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Pathways to Prosperity

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Rural Pathways to Prosperity Conference, April 17 at Pastime

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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O’Halloran on board as temporary NVH Administrator

TIME TO HIT THE TRAIL

Retired CEO plans to ‘stay the course’ BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Ron O’Halloran has stepped in as interim hospital administrator for North Valley Hospital while the search for a new CEO to replace Linda Michel continues. As this article went to press, three candidates had been interviewed. Michel originally tendered her resignation for October, 2015, then moved the date up to April 1 before being placed on paid leave with the hospital Feb. 26. Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt served as acting administrator from that time until April 1. Katie Teachout/staff photo O’Halloran started with NVH April 1 on a month-to-month contract, and Ron O’Halloran of Curlew is filling in at will remain at the helm until the hospital NVH until a new administrator can be finds a suitable replacement. found, and said he has been enjoying meet“I have no idea how long it will take; ing hospital staff and community members. I’m sure it will be less than three years but I really have no idea how long,” O’Halloran said, adding “Someone needs hospital; just stay the course. Things hapto be found who will fit the community pen, and people need to keep their vision for a long time.” alive,” O’Halloran said. “Knowing that Administrator at the Ferry County vision, I can help prod them to do so.” Public Hospital District #1 for eleven He said the CEO years before retiring search could be a in 2011, O’Halloran lengthy process, as not spoke lightly about only do resumes come “We’re just looking for a his decision to come in needing reviewed, out of retirement early person who can grasp but applicants begin to before voicing his real a hold of where the get serious about the motivation. job search and inves“I was working too district is at and the tigate the areas they’ve hard being retired; to; sometimes direction it wants to applied trimming trees, mowtaking themselves out ing lawns, fixing fenchead to and can put all of the running. So far, es and chasing grandcandidates applythe pieces together to two kids,” O’Halloran said, ing at NVH have adding, “I was keepmake it happen.” found other jobs. ing up with what was Some of the qualiRon O’Halloran, Temporary CEO going on in Eastern fications sought in a North Valley Hospital Washington healthnew CEO include care, and when I saw the ability to underhappening I let them stand the business of know I would be willing to help out. healthcare, which “has a lot of moving With my background and experience, I parts,” according to O’Halloran. The new knew some of the board members and administrator will need to understand they felt it could be a comfortable fit for different licenses and certification, the me to fill in.” different avenues of finances and reimO’Halloran said he intended to add- bursements, and the ability to be able to ing just “stay the course,” and not try to deal with uncompensated care and bad change things; leaving any changes up to debt. the new administrator. “When it comes to paying the bills, a “My job is a bridge; I’d like to help lot of people have a hard time with that, them achieve what goals they have out- and it’s not like going to the service bay lined for themselves so they don’t fall to get your car fixed, and you don’t get behind and get discouraged. It may be your keys back until the bill is paid,” awhile, and I would like to help the person who comes in get on course with the SEE O’HALLORAN | PG A3

Above, the Similkameen Trail to Enloe Dam is bursting with sunflowers over Easter weekend. Right, even before springtime fully greens the land, the Whistler Canyon Trail is packed full of breathtaking views. Below left, the remains of the Enloe Dam powerhouse hold stories of hard labors that fulfilled big dreams while the Similkameen flows on. Below right, the late-winter view from Whistler Canyon Trail peaks into Canada while looking out over fields anxious for spring. The Oroville Chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association will be honoring both these sites on National Trails Day. For more information, see page A10.

Katie Teachout/ staff photos

‘Princes Heritage’ name of new Oroville park No decisions yet on what kind of park BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – While there has been a big push to make a soccer field out of the new Princes’ Heritage Park, no decision on what kind of park the former bin storage lot will become has been made. The park, both the name and what kind, were discussed at the Tuesday, April 7 Oroville City Council meeting. “I would like to suggest something that incorporates the Prince family for all they have done for the town over the years,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth. After talking about the name, Councilman Ed Naillon suggested Princes Heritage, to honor the community involvement of the Prince family

over the years, and their leasing of the property to the city for $1 for five years, with an option for a second five years. Naillon, who serves on the park committee, along with Councilman Tony Koepke, suggested the city gather public input before making any decision about what kind of park it would be. “If we are going to have public events, we have got to do some planning on traffic patterns, especially if we have large vehicles like busses turning around,” he said. Rod Noel, head of the parks department asked for some guidance on irrigation. He said at the very least he’d like to get permanent sprinklers installed and grass growing so as not to have a dust problem with the now vacant and leveled off lot. He presented the council with some very preliminary drawings of the park, including his proposal for parking and what it would look like if a soccer field was developed on the south

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 16

end. Noel said such a field would take up more than half the park and that a group of proponents for a soccer field had approached him. “I think we’d be safe to design parking lots for the most intensive use possible,” said Naillon. Noel said with his working cost estimates he wasn’t sure the city could afford to fence off the entire park this year. “Chain link is expensive. And of course another issue is rest rooms. If we look at permanent rest rooms they are expensive as well. You are looking at about $50,000 and that’s pretty spendy. Since we do not own the property I’m assuming we are looking at sani cans,” he said. Noel was given the go ahead to proceed with the irrigation and getting some grass growing. He said that he felt there could be as many as 150 parking spots. “We’re going to need parking regardless of the use of the park,” said Naillon. Other suggestions besides a soccer

field have included a walking track around the perimeter, swings and other playground equipment, as well as a skate park. No matter what is constructed the council agreed that since the park land is only being leased, anything of a permanent nature would be hard to justify at this juncture. The council would like additional input on what kind of park the public would like to see. The Gazette-Tribune will have a new opinion poll online at www.gazette-tribune.com for people to vote on what they would like. Representatives for the Run for the Border charity motorcycle ride and the Rally at the Border Blues Festival were on hand to discuss the upcoming events, slated for Armed Services Day, Saturday, May 16. Vicki Hinze, spoke about the progress being made to prepare for the blues festival which takes place at Deep Bay Park in and coincides with the annual charity ride from Wenatchee to

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Oroville. “Everything seems to be moving in an upward direction. We’ve sold more tickets online at this point than we did last year. She added that the event would start at noon, rather than 2 p.m., as it had in 2014, its inaugural year. Jeff Bunnell said the city should expect more riders this year, as several had turned around last year due road construction on the highway between Wenatchee and Oroville. He said the group already expects many more Canadian riders to participate and feels the event will continue to expand. Tina Janowitz, representing the Harley Owners Group, asked the council to approve a parking plan along Main, Golden and Appleway that was similar to last year. However, the Rally at the Border group asked that even more of Main be set aside for motorcycle parking. The council voiced their approval for both events.

Business News Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

A2 A4 A5

Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports & Rec. Schools Obituaries

A10 A11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 16, 2015

BUSINESS

25 YEARS OF SERVICE

Sully’s serving Mediterranean Cuisine Cooking is in his blood. You can tell that he cooks his food with his soul and from his heart.” Ali and Shannon were both LOOMIS - Ali and Shannon Nakkour bring big-city cuisine to born and raised in Seattle. Shannon grew up vacationing the little town of Loomis. The Nakkours purchased on family land in the Sinlahekin Sully’s from Chris Elder, reopen- Valley. The Nakkour faming the town’s only restaurant ily moved to Loomis in October 2014. and bar last “We both October. love Loomis The restaurant fea“These recipes are pre- and just decided we were tures gourmet pared using traditional tired of city Labanese dishand never es consisting of ingredient and family life wanted to leave lamb kabobs, recipes that have been Loomis,” said lemon and “We garlic chicken handed down to Ali by Shannon. knew that our kabobs, sausage his grandmother and daughter Lilly rolls (Kafta), and son Joseph lamb or chickfather.” would get a en Shawarma, Shannon Nikkour, Co-owner good qualvegetarian Sully’s Restaurant ity education falafel, cabbage in the Tonasket rolls and vegSchool District etarian grape leaves. They also serve steaks, and that they would be safe. We burgers and fish and chips; along love the fact that our kids and the other kids in town can play with prime rib on Saturdays. “Our Mediterranean cuisine together and really be kids--is second to none. Many of the something that wasn’t an option items cannot be found anywhere in the city of Seattle.” Ali was previously an attorney else in the county. All of our sauces and dressings are homemade. in Western Washington. “Unfortunately, his health sufOur desserts and soups are from scratch,” said Shannon. “These fered from the continual stress of dishes are prepared using tradi- being an attorney,” Shannon said. tional ingredients and family rec- “As a result we decided as a famipes that have been handed down ily that it would be better if Ali to Ali by his grandmother and transitioned out of the legal field father. His whole life, Ali’s parents and spent more time with our owned restaurants throughout respective families.” A Grand Opening celebraSeattle and the surrounding area. tion is planned for Mother’s Day, BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Jennifer Bergh Photography/submitted photo

Lisa Pickering of Wells Fargo Bank is celebrating working at the Oroville location for 25 years. Her co-workers are asking people to stop by this week and congratulate her. There will also be a celebration on April 23, all day long, with cookies and coffee.

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Elia and Jeff Bunnell have opened a new store offering new and used items, the Four Seasons, at 1420 Main Street in the historic Colbert Building in Oroville. “We own Oroville Mini Storage and at our new store we will sell new or used clothing, jewelry, household goods, collectibles, books, DVDs, furniture, etc.,” said the Bunnells. Opening day is Thursday, April 16 and business hours will be Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. In the future, the couple says, “We hope to outgrow our current location. We are looking at pre-

paid cell phones and other items of interest for our local community, as well as our seasonal workers.” One of the reasons they opened their new shop is because they heard the Cornerstone Thrift was closing, so they bought the inventory. “We would like to see our Main Street in Oroville grow,” they said. What makes the Four Seasons different, according to the Bunnells, is the number of “sensible, usable” new and used items they offer at an “affordable price.” The couple are residents of Oroville and have been together in the community for six years. He is from the Tacoma area, a retired firefighter and she is from Oaxaca, Mexico. Prior to opening the Four Seasons, Elia had been in business with her “Treasures from Mexico” for five years, selling mostly at Saturday markets and invitation events.

May 10, with a brunch complete with traditional favorites including quiche and eggs benedict. Check out Sully’s Restaurant on Facebook to see what other goodies will be offered on Mother’s Day. But let the viewer be forewarned: checking out these photographs of picture-perfect, delectable dishes is going to stir up quite an appetite. Future plans include possibly purchasing a food truck to share food on the Powwow Trail, and food booths at different fairs and events throughout Central Washington. The restaurant, located at 22 Palmer Ave, is currently open Wednesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.

to 8 p.m. and Sunday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Beginning May 1, summer hours will be 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday, and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday. The Bighorn Bar is open seven days a week, from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. or later if the bar is busy. Karaoke is held the second and fourth Friday of every month, and pool tournaments are held every first and third Saturday of the month. “We currently are looking for local bands that would like to come and play at our Bighorn Bar,” said Shannon. “We believe that having fun is the secret to any successful business.”

EVERGREEN HOME LOANS HIRES MIKE THORNTON FOR OMAK OFFICE

Couple opens store on Main in Oroville Offering new and used items at affordable prices

Submitted photo

Fine dining can now be found in Loomis. A menu of Mediterranean cuisine features multi-generational family favorites, along with American traditional favorites like burgers and fries and fish and chips.

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Jeff and Elia Bunnell have opened up their new store, the Four Seasons, at 1420 Main Street, in the historic Colbert building (next to the GazetteTribune). The couple will be offering new and used items at “affordable prices.”

OMAK - Evergreen Home Loans says that it is pleased to announce that Mike Thornton has joined the Omak branch as Branch Manager/Loan Officer. Thornton will provide a range of local home loan solutions for customers in the area. He has more than 16 years in the industry and is an NMLS certified loan officer. Recently, the company expanded its loan servicing as part of its business offerings. Evergreen is building a customer service portfolio by retaining the servicing rights of the Conventional, FHA, VA, and USDA loans they originate. Focusing exclusively on home financing with a variety of lowdown loan programs that can help reduce Mike Thornton out-of-pocket costs as well as the down payment, loan officers work with buyers to streamline the process. “I couldn’t be more excited about joining a company that believes so passionately in giving customers ultimate control and confidence and very often, providing a local one-stop shopping experience right here in Omak,” said Thornton. For a personalized home loan solution, call Thornton, NMLS ID 160217, at 509-826-1965 or email him at mthornton@evergreenhomeloans.com. The Omak branch is located at 715 B Okoma Drive In Omak, WA 98841,Visit Evergreen’s website at www.evergreenhomeloans.com.

Excavation and septic service Naylor’s Appliance now serving North Okanogan sales and repairs closing its doors

Morgan & Son expands business, covers from Oroville to Brewster

After over four decades in business BY GARY A. DE VON

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Morgan & Son Excavation and Septic Service has expanded their business to now serve Okanogan County from the Canadian border to Brewster.

“...I feel we offer a needed business for people with rural septic systems that need pumped and serviced” A.C. Morgan, Morgan & Son Excavation and Septic

With the recent purchase of Oroville’s Eisen’s Pumping Service, and the enlistment of new trainee Tonya Blunk, Morgan & Son of Okanogan is ready to meet the needs of North Okanogan County residents.

Charlene Helm/staff photo

Morgan & Son Excavation and Septic Service is now serving the North Okanogan County, with their latest expansion stretching their reach from the Canadian Border to Brewster. A.C. And Laurie Morgan, lifetime residents of Okanogan, have owned their business for 18 years. They offer complete excavation service, site work, gravel hauling, septic tank pumping, portable toilet rental and install new septic systems as well as repair old ones. “Okanogan County has so

many people that are on rural systems and need a septic pumping business that services their septic tanks. So I feel we offer a needed business for people with rural septic systems that need pumped out and serviced,” said A.C. “We also recognize the growing

need for portable toilets and hand wash units,” added Laurie. The Morgans have three children, Angie Chilmmak, Andrea Morgan and Aaron Morgan; and three grandchildren, Hunter, Hayden and Hallee. They can be reached at 509422-3621.

OROVILLE – Naylor’s Appliance, Sales and Repair has close its doors and Cliff and Alice Naylor are retiring from the business after 43 years serving the north county. “We have closed the business, but we just want to say we appreciate all the customers we’ve had over the years,” said Cliff Naylor, who opened up shop in 1972. “We are both in our late seventies and we are both at that ‘ouch’ point in our lives,” added Alice Naylor. The couple says they still have a “plethora of appliances left” if someone wants them. However, they can’t guarantee any appliances being sold by someone else using their business name. An issue they didn’t want to discuss further. “If you buy any appliances from someone else saying they’re

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Cliff Naylor the same as ‘Cliff ’s’ we can’t stand behind them,” he adds. They both repeated how much they had enjoyed serving their customers over the years and that they will miss meeting the people they have worked for. To get in touch with them about any appliance they might have “left over” contact them at 509-486-2009.


APRIL 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Nashville Country Star fundraiser in Oroville THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Washington Nashville Country Star will be holding a fundraiser show Friday, April 24, featuring some of the top finalists from the 2015 season. Now in it’s 11th season, the singing competition was started by Ed Lisenby of Okanogan, who wanted to give students the chance to sing and perform in front of people. Originally called Okanogan Valley Nashville Star, the program expanded in 2010 to include students from high schools all over Washington State, as well as home-schooled students in grades nine through 12. Making it all the way to this year’s Championship Finals held March 28 at the Omak Performing Art Center were Melanie Christensen of Tonasket, and Jaimie Keenan and Taleigh Bockmann of Curlew. These three will appear at the fundraiser, along with 2015 semi-finalist and featured guest singer Pie Todd of Oroville High School. This year’s Championship Title, along with $1500 cash, was given to Dakota Neuman of Monroe after he sang ‘God Bless the USA’ and ‘Sherry.’ Coming in at fifth place was Curlew’s Keenan.

PAGE A3

Several local offices up for in the fall Positions on city council, hospital and school boards

large). Position 1 and 5 are for four year terms, while Positions 2 and 4 are for two year unexpired terms. Tonasket School Director positions that will be on the ballot and those that currently hold them are: Catherine Stangland,

BY GARY A. DE VON

Position 2, Ty James Olson, Position 3 and Jerry Asmussen, Position 5 – all are four year terms. Hospital District #4, North Valley Hospital, which includes voters from the Oroville and Tonasket School Districts, has only one position up for election, that of Herb Wandler, in Commissioner Position 3, a six year term. There also several positions up for election on local fire, water and cemetery boards.

Candidates can file two ways: • ·Candidates can submit their Declaration of Candidacy by mail between April 27 and May 15, 2015. • ·Candidates can file on line during filing week. “Filing online has become a very popular way to file for office both for the candidate and for our office, said Mila Jury, Chief Duputy and an elections officer with the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office. “We want to encourage as many candidates as possible to file online during filing week.” To file on line candidates can go to the county auditor’s website, vote.wa.gov/okanogan, follow the links to Elections and Filing for office. They can also come into the auditor’s office in the county courthouse in Okanogan and file online or with the paper Declaration of Candidacy. The auditor’s office hours are from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. Filing online will begin on Monday, May 11 at 9 a.m. and will close on Friday, May 15 at 4 p.m. If a candidate files online and there is a filing fee, the filing fee must be paid before the filing will become valid. All filing fees must be paid in the auditor’s office by 4:30 p.m. on Friday, May 15.

at closely and corrected. We should have stayed on the track we were on with audits being done for extra expenses and over billings.” He also spoke of concerns regarding cost and care of elders in nursing homes. “I haven’t checked the numbers in a while, but I know it used to be that our criminals were being treated better than our elders in nursing homes,” he said. “Not that people in prisons don’t deserve to be treated correctly, but we have these people who have worked hard and been honest all their

lives, and they are in a facility that doesn’t have the finances to care for them they way they deserve.” O’Halloran next spoke of the importance of keeping local economics local. “Rural people step out and help each other, and we as an organization need to be supporting the local vendors,” O’Halloran said. “We need to take the money we are getting serving the community and spend it in the community as much as possible. I think if you lose your hospital here, you would have a dried-up community in a number of years.”

MANAGING EDITOR

Gary DeVon/file photo

Pie Todd, a student at Oroville High School will be a guest performer at the Washington Nashville Country Star fundraiser. Here she performs at the May Festival Royalty Selection Night in February Contestants who remain eligible (still in high school) are encouraged to come back the following year; and in the meantime, attend as many fundraisers as they can to further hone their skills and get to know one

another. Tickets are $8, available at the American Legion or from Louie Wilson, phone (509) 476-3438. The show is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. at the American Legion, 314 14th Ave in Oroville.

“Filing online has become a very popular way to file for office.... We want to encourage as many candidates as possible to file online during filing week.”

OKANOGAN – It’s time again to think about fall elections and May 11 through 15 is filing week and those looking to have a say in local government have a chance to serve on their city council, school and hospital boards. In Tonasket, there are three city council positions up for election, including those held by Scott Olson, Position 2; Lois Rice, Position 4 and Claire Jeffko, Position 5. The Position 2 and 5 offices are for four year terms and Position 4 is for a short term and four year term. In Oroville, offices held by Ed Nailon, Position 3; Walt Hart III, Position 4 and Neysa Roley, Position 5, all four year terms, are up for election. Nearly everyone on the Oroville School Board could face challenges this go around. The offices up for grab and their current office holders are Todd Hill, Position 1; Amy Wise, Position 2; Mike Egerton, Position 4 and Rock DeVon, Position 5 (at-

Mila Jury, Chief Deputy Elections Administrator Okanogan County Auditor’s Office

O’HOLLORAN | FROM A1 O’Halloran said. The new CEO will need to understand the economic benefit of healthcare to the local community. O’Halloran spoke of the domino effect that would happen if Tonasket lost NVH. “It would probably be worth $25 million per year in lost economics,” O’Halloran said, adding that losing the long term care facility alone would probably cost the community eight or nine million dollars per year. “Nursing home care costs have risen 4 percent every year over the last several years, so they can get behind pretty quickly. We need to keep the state aware of the great service this provides to

the community,” O’Halloran said. The new CEO will need to understand the role major hospitals, in this case in Wenatchee and Spokane, have with smaller hospitals. “Thank God we have a facility here to service someone who has been in an accident or had a heart attack. It’s nice to know you are minutes away from a facility. Even if you have to be moved on, if you don’t get packaged right you are not going to get there,” said O’Halloran. The new administrator will also need to have a feel for recruitment of medical professionals, including nurses, physicians and specialists such as lab techs.

“At a minimum, they should have a baccalaureate degree in healthcare management, but most hospitals look for a masters degree or above,” he said, who started out as a pediatric and emergency room nurse before going on to get a business degree in marketing, then an MBA with an emphasis in healthcare management. O’Halloran said a new CEO should have several years of some sort of line experience in business or office management, adding that he knew of several excellent administrators in healthcare who came from industry or other areas. “One was a teacher for several years before making the

jump into the healthcare field,” O’Halloran said, “so we’re just looking for a person who can grasp a hold of where the district is at and the direction it wants to head to and can put all the pieces together to make it happen.” One area of concern for him is the cost of healthcare. “Healthcare in this country is incredibly expensive. I don’t think we are on the right track with the Affordable Healthcare Act,” O’Halloran said. “I think we were on track with starting to get the system corrected; starting in 1985 things were getting looked

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 16, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Dacia L. Mackarness, 42, Oroville, pleaded guilty Jan. 6 to residential burglary and two counts of violation of a no-contact order. The crimes occurred Nov. 22, 2013. In a separate case, Mackarness pleaded guilty Jan. 6 to second-degree burglary and first-degree theft. Those crimes occurred June 16, 2014. Mackarness was sentenced April 7 to12 months in community custody and fined a total of $2,221. Terry Lee Zoller, 64, Riverside, pleaded guilty April 7 to POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. Zoller was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $2,360.50 for the Feb. 7 crimes. The court dismissed April 8 three charges against Christopher David Brockmiller, 34, Okanogan: intimidating a witness (DV), harassment (threats to kill) (DV) and violation of a no-contact order (DV). The charges were dismissed with prejudice. Larry Leroy Pauley, 58, Tonasket, pleaded guilty April 10 to first-degree assault. The court dismissed a fourth-degree assault charge. Pauley was sentenced to 93 months (7.75 years) in prison and fined $640 for the Aug. 2, 2014 crime. Joseph Alexander Felix, 19, Omak, pleaded guilty April 10 to POCS (heroin) and use of drug paraphernalia. Felix was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 62 days suspended and credit for 28 days served, and fined $1,610.50 for the March 12 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Garrett Thomas Peterson, 21, Omak, with POCS (heroin), use of drug paraphernalia and thirddegree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred April 1. The court found probable cause to charge Jeffrey Duke Clark, 59, Oroville, with POCS (methamphetamine) and thirddegree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred April 2. The court found probable cause to charge Mark Alan Altman, 40, Tonasket, with two counts of harassment (threats to kill) (DV) and two counts of fourth-degree assault (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred April 4. The court found probable cause to charge Kyle Steven Scott Cate, 23, Omak, with firstdegree robbery, attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred April 4. The court issued an arrest warrant for Conchita Delphine Perez Velasquez, 34, Okanogan, for 10 counts of forgery and 10 counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred throughout January. DISTRICT COURT Mistin Blaze Grace, 27, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Grace was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $818. Anthony Abraham Grand Louis, 45, Omak, had a fourthdegree assault charge dismissed. Laura May Griffith, 51, Tonasket, had a second-degree criminal trespassing charge dismissed. Darryle Clint Gua, 30, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and disorderly conduct. Gua was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined a total of $536. Leslie Iniguez, no middle name listed, 19, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Aaron Cesslie Jacobs, 24, Omak, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Robert Noel Johnson, 53, Omak, guilty of violation of a nocontact order and violation of a civil anti-harassment order. Johnson received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined a total of $1,241. Kyle Louis King, 22, Omak, guilty on four counts of violation of a no-contact order. The court dismissed an additional charge: violation of a temporary order of protection. King was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,944. Alberto Lara Figueroa, 24, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Lara Figueroa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days

suspended, and fined $1,641. Ardith Elaine Law, 83, Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: hit-and-run (unattended vehicle) and third-degree DWLS.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, April 6, 2015 One-vehicle crash on Highland Dr. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on Sunset Lakes Rd. near Riverside. DWLS on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Fraud on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Box Spring Dr. near Tonasket. Wicker chairs reported missing. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Mailbox reported damaged. Burglary on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Ridge Place in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Kyle Anthony Nicholson, 29, booked for first-degree DWLS. Alan Forbes Price, 41, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tuesday, April 7, 2015 Structure fire on Reevas Basin Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Sex offense on Lime St. in Omak. Drugs on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Angelique Michelle Parker, 42, court commitment for DUI. Remigio Flores Rivera, 51, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS. David Wayne Waddell, 54, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Cedar Chantrelle St. Onge, 22, booked on two bench warrants: trafficking in stolen property and third-degree theft. Carlo Perez, no middle name listed, 30, DOC detainer. Byron Dean Lukes Jr., 23, DOC detainer. Rebecca Lynn Cabrera, 54, DOC detainer. Robert Erik Lee Foster, 34, court commitments for fourthdegree assault (DV) and malicious mischief. Gary Austin Vaughn, 46, booked for third-degree DWLS and obstruction. Wednesday, April 8, 2015 Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Drugs on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on N. Lemansky Rd. near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville.

DUI on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Threats on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Assault on Edmonds St. in Omak. Theft on Shumway Rd. in Omak. Robert Wendell George, 45, booked on two FTA bench warrants: POCS and thirddegree assault. Amanda A. Sanabia-Hammons, 33, booked for POCS (heroin), third-degree possession of stolen property and obstruction. Rachelle Marie Stanley, 42, DOC detainer. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, DOC detainer. Kevin Michael Clark, 34, DOC detainer. John James Herrera, 25, DOC detainer. James Everett Davis, 58, DOC detainer. Arnold John Shaw, 59, court commitments for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Laurie Ann Marchand, 62, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

Thursday, April 9, 2015 Threats on W. Chief Joseph Spur near Riverside. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Main St. in Riverside. Harassment on Barker Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on N. Fir St. in Omak. DWLS on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Index St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Harassment on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Aaron Christopher Meyer, 33, booked for DUI. Kammie Elizabeth Stanger, 34, DOC detainer. Mark Anthony Yingling, 31, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Richard Wayne Verbeck, 53, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and POCS (methamphetamine). Michaella Jean Flores, 30, DOC detainer. Jason Paul Martins, 45, DOC detainer. Katlyn Diane Hammons, 27, booked on four FTA warrants: two each for second-degree theft and unlawful issuance of a bank check. Friday, April 10, 2015 Drugs on Epley Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Speakers reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on Dayton St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on N. Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache

Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Threats on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Tiffeney Marie Olson, 34, booked on FTA warrants for POCS, use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. Jon Wade Batten Jr., 37, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Paul Jason Myrick, 22, booked for DUI.

Saturday, April 11, 2015 Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Burglary on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Threats on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Crofoot Lane near Riverside. Warrant arrest on E. Stampede Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication at East Side Park in Omak. Illegal burning on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Disorderly conduct on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Adrienna Louise PalmenteerYellowwolf, 48, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Jason Dawayne Greene, 42, booked on an OCSO probable cause warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Anthony Abraham Grand Louis, 45, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for obstruction. Lukas Timothy Mieirs, 19, booked for residential burglary, MIP/C and third-degree malicious mischief. Raymunda Arciniega Ortega Jr., 20, booked for residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. Riley Dean Buzzard, 23, booked for residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. David Sanchez Hernandez, 22, booked for residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. Irwing David Gaytan, 21, booked for hit-and-run (attended), reckless driving and second-degree DWLS. Crispin Emanuel Ramirez, 24, booked for residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. Dustin Ollie Mathews, 33, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jeremy John Lavender, 29, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for violation of a nocontact order. Sunday, April 12, 2015 Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Structure fire on Third St. in Riverside. Structure fire on Bass Alley near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Burglary on S. Ash St. in Omak. Illegal burning on E. Grape St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Skyview Dr. in Omak. Found property on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Bag recovered. Assault on W. Third Ave. in

Omak. Domestic dispute on Omache Dr. in Omak. Burglary on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Park Dr. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Found property at Chief Tonasket Park in Tonasket. Bicycle recovered. Nicholas Alan Baker, 21, booked for DUI. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 31, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: third-degree theft and possession of marijuana; and a Tribal FTA warrant for thirddegree malicious mischief.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Influence

Under

the

DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Senate proposes $10 million for forest wildfire reduction Significant investment in local forest health collaboratives, cross boundary treatments and actions to increase public safety

knows no boundaries and neither should our restoration. That’s why we’ve worked so closely with PROGRAM ASSISTANT UPPER COLUMBIA state, federal and local landownSALMON RECOVERY BOARD ers through collaboratives to OLYMPIA - The State Senate maximize our impact with limunveiled their proposed capital ited dollars” “The North Central budget, including $10 million for forest health treatments to Washington Forest Health Collaborative reduce the risk CWFHC) of catastrophic “What makes this ask (isN focused on wildfires to unique is the recogni- restoring the Wa s h i n g t o n communities. tion and the priority health and of the The money that the DNR placed resiliency Forest Servicewould be proon collaborative, cross managed lands vided through boundary restoration. that make up the Department of Natural Fire knows no bound- 70 percent of the land base Resources for aries and neither in Chelan and thinning and should our restoration.” O k a n o g a n controlled counties,” said burns on local, James Schroeder The Nature Conservancy Lloyd McGee, state and fedCo-Chair of eral lands most the NCWFHC. at risk of cata“A l t h o u g h strophic fires, and support of local communities to take action NCWFHC supports an appropriation of $20 million, we are satto increase public safety The State House proposed $5 isfied that the WA State Senate million in their budget last week, a appropriation has enough flexquarter of the initial request from ibility to effect forest health hazDNR and a coalition of advocates. ard reduction on all lands, and The original $20M capital bud- we appreciate the Senate’s efforts get request was developed from during this period of tight overall an October 2014 report to the budget concerns.” “Investments now that support state legislature titled “Eastern Washington Forest Health: community wildfire preparedness Hazards, Accomplishments and will reduce the risks to homes, Restoration Strategy.” The report businesses and firefighters and drew heavily on a joint study by increase our ability to live in a the US Forest Service and The fire-adapted landscape,” added Nature Conservancy of priority Annie Schmidt, Chumstick forest restoration needs in eastern Wildfire Stewardship Coalition Director. Washington and Oregon. Now that both the House and “What makes this ask unique is the recognition and the priority Senate budget proposals have that DNR has placed on collab- been released, they must agree orative, cross-boundary restora- and vote on a final capital budtion,” said James Schroeder with get that will be submitted to the The Nature Conservancy. “Fire Governor for his signature. SUBMITTED BY BARBARA CARRILLO

Omak Stampede Arena Truck Races Saturday, April 25 • Noon Tickets: Adults $12 each 7-12 years $6 each 6 and under FREE

Dance Saturday night, 8 p.m. Dance with DJ Camping available Contact Kevin Fletcher 509-322-7017 or Eric Brown 509-322-2052


APRIL16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

What do we want, need, for a park?

It’s time for a new poll, our city leaders are looking for some direction in what to do with the newly christened Princes Heritage Park. There’s a big movement to make it a soccer field for the high school, and Rod Noel, stated at the last council meeting that if soccer is what is wanted then one could be fit in the old bin storage lot, but it would leave less than half for all other uses. We say a big movement because proponents have jumped right in with both feet and started a rallying cry for a new soccer field. However, not everyone has spoken and we, like the city, would like to hear what the public has in mind for the property that was so generously leased to the city for $1 a year for the next five years, with an option to renew the lease in five years. A couple things must be kept in mind – first, this isn’t a permanent lease and one day the Prince family may decide to do something Out of else with it so anything put there will probably My Mind have to be of a less than permanent nature. Gary A. DeVon Second, there isn’t a lot of extra money for parks, Oroville has several great parks, but only one really creates direct revenue, Veterans Memorial, where camping spaces and a couple of vacation cottages are rented. The rest, bring in money through indirect means. This means things like skate parks might be out of reach – a recreation center and pool as someone recently suggested, are way beyond the city’s budget (and pretty much rely on a lease in perpetuity). So, what should it be – soccer field, play ground, walking trail, dog park, or some combination of all four? Baseball that close to the highway would certainly be out and we already have Bud Clark Ball Fields. Personally, we wonder why the city should provide a soccer field for the school, but still carry a grudge from when the non-high school baseball, like Little League, Babe Ruth and Pony, were played at the high school and then no longer allowed. That’s why the city came up with a plan to build Bud Clark park for the kids baseball and adult softball leagues. (As an aside, it’s too bad not enough kids are turning out this year so the minors and majors have been cancelled). The high school already uses “City Park” off Main Street for soccer, although we understand the park isn’t the best place to play. Remember when there were swings, a slide and a merry go ‘round there? So as Noel suggested, maybe if a soccer field was built at Princes Heritage, with some help from the school district, then City Park could go back to being a kids, multi-purpose park and the rest of the new park could be used for other things. When soccer season was over, then the whole park could be used for events – art, music, play, maybe an expanded farmers market, who knows? Anyway, we want to run another online poll, but would like some guidance as to what we should ask before we ask for the public’s vote. Why not send us your thoughts to editor@gazette-tribune or drop them by the office and we might include them as one of our poll questions. Editor’s Note: Our most recent online poll asked what Okanogan County PUD should do about Enloe Dam, refurbish, leave it as it is and address the issue at a later date, pull the dam, or something else. The majority of voters say to pull the dam if it is at no cost to the ratepayers, while leaving it as it is came in a close second. Surprisingly, the third most votes went to “remove the dam and return the Similkameen to pre-dam status even if the ratepayers have to pay for it.” Fourth went to leave the dam and powerhouse as historic sites on the river and the least votes went to pursue power generation and build a new powerhouse. G.A.D.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO EDITOR Who will fill her shoes? Volunteers needed

Dear Gary, I would like to thank the Kiwanis Club for the recognition I received for the Christmas bell ringing for the Salvation Army. I would also like to thank all the folks that donated! I would also like to use this time to put out a call for help! So many of the clubs and organization’s are in dire need of help and new

volunteers. If you are new to the area or just looking for a way to fit in, here is your chance. If I may use the Rodeo Club as an example, some meetings we don’t have enough members present to even hold a meeting? With our entertainment season fast approaching, it is of great concern how we are going to pull off all the events with the few members available to help? Think of what this area would be missing if the Rodeo Club closed its doors! One of the most active members of our club Gerry

Beeman just passed away. At her funeral the song (who’s going to fill her shoes) by George Jones was played. My concern is, who will fill her shoes? Again I am honored for the recognition that a few hours of my time made a difference. Imagine how much difference could be made if more people stepped up to the plate once in awhile. Thank you, Bud McSpadden Tonasket

The Petri Dish: Let the negotiations begin There will be no pomp or ceremony today when Gov. Jay Inslee plans to sit down with the Democrat and Republican leaders of the House and Senate to talk budget. Rather, the state’s chief executive and four caucus honchos will try to figure out what routes to take — and which to avoid — to reach agreement in the 18 days left before the Legislature is scheduled to adjourn. What should be apparent, though maybe not admitted in this particular gathering, is neither majority party enjoys much bargaining advantage at the outset of this year’s negotiations because the balance of power in each chamber is, well, pretty balanced. In the House, Democrats only outnumber Republicans 51-47. That doesn’t give Speaker Frank Chopp, D-Seattle, much extra muscle with which to try to impose his will on the process. In the Senate, Republicans operate with a 26-23 edge on Democrats. (The Republican Caucus has 25 adherents of the Grand Old Party and one centrist Democrat). That doesn’t provide Senate Majority Leader Mark Schoesler, R-Ritzville, much extra strength to force matters his way either. Such numeric equality fuels optimism among Olympia’s political class — sort of like what Chicago Cub fans feel this time of the season — in the ability of the House and Senate to reach the hundreds of little compromises on spending that are the guts of the 500-page spending tome. These are the $1 million, $5 million and $10 million decisions for budgets of state agencies

and the provisos for studies, task forces and reports to the Legislature. These same insiders aren’t quite so effervescent about lawmakers easily resolving conflicts between the chambers on modifying the initiative for smaller class sizes, increasing state worker pay and hiking taxes. This is where they hope House Democrats and Senate Republicans are cognizant of the thin ice on which they’ve set their bargaining stakes. Consider the House’s position. Democrats pushed through their two-year $38.8 billion spending plan on a party line vote but have not yet passed the $1.5 billion package of tax increases needed to pay for it all. Democrat leaders insist the votes are there and brush off repeated challenges by Republican counterparts to prove it. Democrats contend if they did pass it and sent it to the Senate for consideration it would be ignored so why go through the exercise. Senate budget negotiators will no doubt point out this shortcoming as they look to whittle down the size of the House Democrats plan. In the meantime, Senate negotiators are operating on weaker ground in some areas themselves, after what happened in a marathon session that began the afternoon April 2 and finished the next morning. Senate Republicans made it harder to amend their proposed $37.8 billion budget with a rule change requiring a supermajority vote of 60 percent to pass any amendment offered on the floor. This meant passage

required votes of at least 30 of the 49 senators. This blunted the Democrats, while at the same time allowed moderate GOP members to vote for a Democrat-sponsored amendment on a controversial subject without fear it would pass or be used against them in a future campaign. There were 32 roll call votes on Democratsponsored amendments. Of those 10 received 25 or more votes, which is a majority in the chamber. A key one dealt with pay hikes for state workers. The Senate budget contained raises of $1,000 per employee per year. The amendment called for approving new contracts negotiated between the state employee unions and the governor’s office, putting it in line with the House budget. Six Republicans joined the 23 minority Democrats to support the revision but, because of the rule, it failed 29-20. You can bet House Democrats will remind their Senate counterparts of this philosophical majority on this critical matter. Not to be forgotten in the coming days is the importance the minority parties in each caucus will play. Their members will be engaged in the shuttle diplomacy required to reach a bipartisan deal. Let the journey of negotiations begin. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri  Dish, is at  www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at  360-352-8623;jcornfield@heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos

Home is where the hell isn’t OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIOPOLITICAL COMMENTATOR

Sometimes, rarely, I wonder why I ever came to Okanogan County. But then, every couple of years I take a trip back east. Why would I ever do such a crazy thing? Well, one has kids and grandkids and old friends to visit not all of whom can fly across the US to visit me more than once every few years. So, it’s airline time again. I have to go first class, see, because I’m big, old and a crank. That Bill Slusher means I can’t tolerate being crammed in a coach seat between two 360 lb prison guards on their way to a seminar on transgender pathological murderers. It also means I have to be able to move around some. Casket-like immobility for seven hours is slow suicide for me even if our co-pilot is not intent on driving into a mountainside because his girlfriend ditched him. Lastly, young mothers get aggravated when you beat their spoiled, seat-kicking, screaming brats with a rolled-up airline magazine. Go figure. Besides... there’s free booze in first class which - along with a psychologically balanced co-pilot -always makes the flight go smoother. Then you must find a flight to Washington Dulles that does not necessitate an 11 hour layover in Los Angeles and does not arrive at 2:59 a.m. In today’s airline climate, this isn’t as simple as it may sound, especially when you check the non-suicidal co-pilot option online.

When you step off the airplane at Washington Dulles you instantly remember one of those reasons you moved to Okanogan County. The air feels like someone took a blanket from a tub of hot water and threw it around your body. That humidity only gets worse after you ride a train to baggage claim, wait forever for the carousel to start turning, then board a bus driven by some foreigner of indeterminate designation, whom you pray is not a terrorist, for a cross-country ride to the rental car lot. You rent a roofed roller skate from yet another foreigner, show your papers to a third foreigner at a ground-spiked gate that warns of grim death if you back up, then the fun begins. Four lane traffic, bumper to bumper, doorhandle to door-handle, the slower of whom are doing 75 mph in a 60 mph zone. Thousands of these drivers are drunk, doped, toked, can’t read the signs and/or bought their driver’s licenses from a guy you don’t ask questions of. If just one of these NASCAR champions slips up, or just one of those cars breaks, traffic backs up from Richmond to Baltimore. Then the friends you’re visiting live in northwest Washington DC so they must find a parking place a block away so you can crowd your rented Nissan Versa (Japanese for ‘little deathtrap’) tightly up against their four-floor townhouse. Thank God the latter has an elevator. Magnanimously, you spring for lunch then look for the defibrillator when it turns out four sandwiches and drinks costs $68, but you ain’t seen nothing yet. You desperately struggle to think how you can retract your earlier stupid offer to take the extended family to dinner that night. (That turns out to be $830 for dinner for eight!! Can we all say ‘bankruptcy’, boys and girls?)

You’ve only been back east about six hours and already you’re wondering if you can move your return reservations up to, say, yesterday. That night you’re asleep when you spring up and grope for your gun before realizing all those screaming sirens going by have nothing to do with you. The North Koreans haven’t come ashore after all. But you’re groping in horror again at dawn before you understand that that beastly roar is not a grizzly at your door but a loud lion at the nearby National Zoo. Lord love a duck. The cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin by the Jefferson Memorial are stunning but they don’t make up for the previous night’s terror. Then there is the delightful fun tour of the Holocaust Museum. Some folks really know how to have fun in their nation’s capital. Which building, incidentally, is shrouded in scaffolding for construction. Then some guy blasts himself on the capital grounds, perhaps because that scaffolding is so ugly, which shooting results in lockdown of the whole area, barricades, fleets of cop cars, frozen traffic, etc. Okanogan County where art thou? Of course it’s all worth it to see our greater family and friends, but deliver me back to dusty, barren, sparsely populated, isolated Okanogan County where you have to outrun cougars on your way to the outhouse at night. At least you know that if you run fast and don’t carry a cheeseburger you’ll probably see another sunrise. Yea I say unto thee, I’ve enjoyed about as much of the east as I can stand. William Slusher’s latest novel is CASCADE CHAOS, Or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (Amazon). He may be insulted or complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 16, 2015

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Did you remember it was tax day? Did you get your income taxes paid yesterday or did you ask for an extension? Just a reminder that the 15th of April is here. So, basketball games are finished until next season and baseball is in full swing. The Seattle Mariner’s, so far are like other seasons, win a few, lose a few. It was good to hear that the main pitcher, Felix Hernandez, who makes a tremendous amount of money, is a big supporter of the “Make a Wish Foundation” and donated $30,000 of his awards money to help the less fortunate kids last year, to have a wish fulfilled. One of the faithful pinochle players at the Senior Center, Ed Craig, had to go home before the games had even started last week, due to a severe cough, which landed him in the hospital with pneumonia. His stay in the hospital was short and after recuperating, at home during

Now is the time to write your legislator SUBMITTED BY THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

Over the past few weeks there has been considerable legislative activity which continues to look favorable for not only Skilled Nursing Facilities like ours, but Assisted Living Facilities as well. Senate Bill 5152 introduced by Senator Linda Parlette, has made it through the Senate and now the budget discussion on funding is underway. This is the bill that calls for simplification of the Medicaid payment system for Nursing Homes. Safe staffing levels were added into the bill as a quality measure. The SB6010 which mandated a staffing level did not pass through to be voted on, however the staffing issue was recognized as being significant and therefore needed to be included in SB5152. Initially the timing was for a new plan to be submitted for legislative review in January 2016

PTSD: Courage AFTER Fire SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Our military children will often return home from deployment with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), injuries, and/or depression, both great and small, short term or long term. As a parent we are suddenly thrown into a world unknown to us before their joining the mili-

Molson Grange meets tonight SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Molson Grange Meeting will be held on Thursday, April 16 at the Grange Hall in Molson at 6:30 p.m. This will be a potluck event. Dinner will be followed by a program put on by the Oroville High School students.

the week, he was back on hand to get the coffee brewing for the next session of players. George Thornton brought in dozens of beautiful, yellow daffodils to share with those who wanted a bouquet. There are some compensations of becoming a senior citizen! How very thoughtful of him. Glenna Hauenstein has had another death in her family, as her older son, Roger, passed away last week. He had been a Seattle City bus driver, a lot of years, and his health started declining and the cause of death was an inoperable brain tumor. She recently lost her husband and has had other family member deaths this year. Condolences are indeed sent her way. The Oroville Senior Center chose Hank and Darlene Allen as representatives to the May Day Festival. They are

NURSING HOME NEWS and the plan to be implemented by January 2017. It was recognized that many of us felt something had to happen more urgently. The dates for review are now moved forward to July of this year, with implementation scheduled earlier, in July of 2016. The workgroup headed by the state Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) must consult with consumers (residents and families) as well as Nursing Home employees. Washington State still needs to get a budget passed for this new system. Any letters now can simply say that you support SB 5152 for simplifying Medicaid reimbursement for nursing homes. There will be no change to our payment system until July 2016, but we anticipate a payment system that will be much more fair and likely to cover our costs more adequately. In Washington State there are 215

BLUE STAR MOTHERS tary! We suddenly find ourselves providing emotional support and care for those who have served our country. You may feel in over your head. You know that good support at the right time, in the right way can make all the difference for them and you. This month, the Blue Star Mothers are making the book “Courage After Fire for Parents of Service Members – Strategies for

HILLTOP COMMENTS Come and hear what is going on in school these days. On the Friday, April 17 there will be another BINGO Night at the Grange Hall. The pay back will again be larger for the last game, due to that nice donation made last month. Come and enjoy the fun. The Rodeo Club will have their

beginning to see light at the end of the proud to have the honor, a second time. Kathy Sawtell was honored recently as tunnel. After having a procedure done in she retired from Cheney College (Eastern Harbor View Hospital, Seattle, the severe headaches she had endured, Washington University), since the initial fall, went after 44 years, as being almost magically, away. She comptroller for the school. is now in the new Regency She will do some traveling rehab building, Omak, havand play more golf, now that ing therapy and other helpful she has more time on her treatments, to help her regain hands. Congratulations for a lost strength due to not eating job well done. She graduated for the past few weeks. She from there and went to work can have visitors, but on a in the office and continued short term basis. on ever since. In 1912 a gift of the I notice a very pleasing THIS & THAT cherry trees that adorn the paint job on what used to U.S. Capitol building in be the Blossom and Briar Joyce Emry Washington D.C and provide flower shop and I was told the beauty, annually, at this that the shop had changed ownership and was moving back into the time of the year, are a blaze of pink blossoms, bringing people from great building. We’ll see. We have a little Robin in our family. distances to view them. The First Lady She weighs 8 pounds. 11 ounces and is at that time was Mrs. Taft. The year 1965 was (I think) the largour eighth great grandchild and I’m so anxious to see her, but since she lives in est ever, graduating class from Oroville Seattle, it won’t be real soon. Her mom High School. If you do the math you is Tristan and her grand-mom is Jeril, our will find that to be 50 years ago. And I have a daughter in that class. (no wonder youngest daughter. I am so pleased to tell friends of my knees hurt and my shoulders hurt Beverly (Lemaster) Curtis that she is and many places in between... I’m old)

Nursing homes. As the second lowest reimbursed nursing home our shortfall is $50.00 daily for each Medicaid bed. The statewide average projected Medicaid shortfall per resident per day, for 2014, has increased to $31.48. You can see why we are not the only ones working hard for a system change. The State Budget this year also plans to address Assisted Living rates. As you know, the Medicaid rates paid to our facility were not enough to keep our doors open and this has also been recognized as a statewide shortfall. As the baby boomer population comes of age, the needs of elder care in homes, private or public, is expected to increase by 30 percent in the next ten years and another 30 percent ten years after that. There is consideration of long term care insurance provisions through the workforce that has been given to a committee to evaluate as a way to fund the care many of us may need. Let’s all look forward to a future where our elders feel safe in their homes, wherever those homes may be.

Allens are Senior May Royalty

Coping When Your Son/Daughter Returns from Deployment” by Paula Dominici available to our members and to those military families in the North Valley who feel they could benefit from this book. This book has meant so much to many of us and we want to share it with you. It acknowledges the contribution and sacrifices you must make as a parent and provides strategies and practical tips to guide you as you face postdeployment challenges while taking care of yourself, too. Contact us at ncw.bluestars@ yahoo.com.

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C.

appreciation dinner on Sunday, April 18 with Happy Hour starting at 6 p.m. and the potluck at 7 p.m. at the Rodeo Club in Chesaw. The Knob Hill Club will be having their monthly Pot Luck Meeting on Wednesday, April 22 in the Chesaw Community Building at noon. Plans will be made for the yard sale for Molson and Chesaw on the Saturday of Memorial Weekend. Tables are free so if you need one call Penny at 509-425-2343. Until next week.

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT

Anyhow, those kids are preparing to have a fiftieth class reunion, this year the weekend of May Day, May 9th and 10th. Since Walt Hart is one of the classmates it only made sense, part of the festivities will be held at “Vicki’s Back Door” since he and his wife, Vicki own the place. There will be follow-up notices in the paper. Right now my Vicki (Haney 509-476-2269) is busy trying to find the addresses and e-mails of the class so they can be notified. If you need information call her at the above number. I remember the year the class started first grade (no kindergarten yet), a third class was added as there were 90 (give or take a few) and there were three girls named Vicki so they put one in each class, to avoid confusion. Duane Ward will undergo back surgery this week, so keep him in your thoughts and prayers for good results and quick recovery.’ No more Wednesday night hamburgers at the Legion Hall, for this year. As for next year, we’ll find out later. The “M &M’s” do a good job and provide good food and fun for a goodly number. Unfortunately, we missed several nights this past season.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

“Profoundly penetrated with this idea, I shall carry it with me to my grave, as a strong incitement to unceasing vows that Heaven may continue to you the choicest tokens of its beneficence; that your union and brotherly affection may be perpetual; that the free constitution, which is the work of your hands, may be sacredly maintained; that its administration in every department may be stamped with wisdom and virtue; than, in fine, the happiness of the people of these States, under the auspices of liberty, may be made complete, by so careful a preservation and so prudent a use of this bless-

Spring classes at Community Schools NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Spring has sprung! For the next few weeks Ellen may have to dig me out of my garden to get me to do my homework. Here are our North Valley Community School spring classes for the upcoming week: Heartsaver First Aid Tuesday, April 21 at 6 p.m. Everyone should know first aid and CPR. The more people with this knowledge, the safer all people are. You may someday be called upon to save the life of your child, your spouse, your friends or other family members or even a stranger. Will you be prepared? Get prepared now by taking this class! Upon completion of

ing, as will acquire to them the glory of recommending it to the applause, the affection, and adoption of every nation, which is yet a stranger to it.” Part of George Washington’s farewell address. Sentences used to be longer. Our leaders thoughts were larger, in the old days, before this present mind numbing era of mass media, and six second sound bites. Something to think about. Hank and Darlene Allen were elected to represent the Seniors as May Day Royalty. A Salute to them. Becky, of Hometown fame, has graciously volunteered her Toyota Convertible, again, for our Royalty parade procession.

THE LEARNING TREE this class students will receive a First Aid/CPR card valid for two years. This class will be held in Tonasket. Need Help With Your Golf Swing? Tuesday, April 21 at 5:30 p.m. Get your swing in shape for spring! Whether you are a beginner or looking to improve your game, if you like to play golf this is the class for you. Make Homemade Pizza From Scratch Tuesday, April 21 at 5:30 p.m. Do you get cravings for pizza on Sundays, and there is no pizza anywhere in town? Do you have ideas for wild and crazy

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

FOCUS ThUrs.-Fri. aPril 16-17 FURIOUS 7 saT.–sUn.–mOn.–

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Rites of Spring

TUes.,ThUrs.–Fri. aPril 18 - 19 - 20-21,23-24. 1 shOw nighTly @ 7:30

GET HARD

– In The Breeze –

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

Our Ladies Auxiliary will present a Baked Potato Bar tomorrow night at 6 p.m. and Jeanie Riggs will join us for her karaoke show at 8:pm. Meat draw and Joker Poker will also be on deck. Sounds like a dandy Friday to

EAGLEDOM AT WORK me. Come on down and join your Eagle family. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 pm to 7 pm every day. We have free

pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

saT.-sUn.-mOn.-TUes. aPril25-26-27-28

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pizza toppings you’ve been wanting to try? Are you looking for something your kids can help you make in the kitchen? Mr. Ground has been teaching 5thand 6th graders (and others!) to make pizza for 20 years and we finally talked him in to teaching it here! Making pizza at home is a great activity for kids and adults alike so show up hungry and bring the kids! Make Your Own Laundry Soap Wednesday, April 22 at 6:30 p.m. Making your own laundry soap can help you save money and avoid exposure to commercial chemicals. It’s quick, easy and fun! To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or visit our website at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Oliver Theatre

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

We had our Pancake Breakfast Saturday, and it was most enjoyable. Thanks to all who helped. A special thanks to Donny Steg, who tirelessly washed an endless amount of dishes. Our Computer classes have generated about 30 students, so far. Go Tillie. Our new floor covering for the Dining Room is scheduled to arrive this week. Installation should follow shortly. We are planning a “school days picture contest,” so dig up a picture of yourself while you were in the grades so we can post it and try to guess who it is. This was Betty Steg’s idea, so give your picture to her. Pinochle report: Door Prize, Leonard Paulson; Pinochle, Clayton Emry and Ken Ripley; High Man, Ken Ripley and Clayton Emry; High Woman, Darlene Firpo. 21 people were in attendance. Be always encouraged.

Request a free information kit — today: Whidbey Island Vintners Association

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Did you know? We use... Soy Ink  Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

FURIOUS 7

137min Pg13

acTiOn / crime / Thriller sTarring PaUl walker, Vin diesel, dwayne JOhnsOn Fri. 6:15, 9:30. saT. *3:00,6:15, 9:30. sUn.*3:00, 6:15.mOn-ThUrs.6:30. The

MIRAGE THEATER

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THE LONGEST RIDE 139 min

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drama/rOmance sTarring scOTT easTwOOd, briTT rOberTsOn, alan alda. Fri. 6:15, 9:30. saT. *3:00, 6:15, 9:30. sUn. *3:00, 6:15. mOn-ThUrs. 6:15.

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1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844  509-476-3602

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

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Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50


APRIL 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR RURAL PATHWAYS TO PROSPERTITY CONFERANCE OROVILLE - The Rural Pathways to Prosperity Conference will be held Friday, April 17 at the Pastime Bar & Grill from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This includes breakfast and lunch. For more information contact Debra Hansen, WSU Extension 509-684-2588 or debra.hansen@wsu.edu. Locally sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce in partnership with the City of Oroville Community Development Office.

people you can get out and hike with. For Information contact: 509-476-4072.

Blossom Spring Bazaar OROVILLE - The 9th Annual Blossom Spring Bazaar is Saturday, April 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Oroville High School Commons Admission Free (please bring a Food Drive Donation)/ Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day! Sponsored by Blossom Ministries. Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at 509-733-1941 or 509-476-2246.

Spiritual Movie Night OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, April 18 at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200.

Art Gala at CCC TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be hosting its first Art Gala Fundraiser on Saturday, April 18. Thirty one artists will display their artwork for judging based on a pre-determined theme. The public will judge “My favorite artists interpretation of the theme”. There will be prizes for the top three artists. Come judge and enjoy h’ordeurves and music by Steve Kinzie from 3 to 6 p.m. Dinner is at 6 p.m. and is $10. There will be a silent auction from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. while enjoying the riveting music provided by Reed Engel. The live art auction will begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at Tonasket Interiors and the CCC or at the door. Come get some culture, some fantastic art, enjoy a wonderful dinner and the best music in the valley! The Community Cultural Center is located at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket. For more info call: 509-486-0365 or 509-476-3121.

Story Time at Library OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, April 22 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children.

Pacific Northwest Trail Club

Students at Grange Potluck MOLSON - The Grange Potluck in Molson will be Thursday, April 23 at 6:30 p.m. Come and listen to Oroville High School students tell about their projects around the neighborhood.

Nashville Country Star Fundraiser OROVILLE - Washington Nashville Country Star will have a fundraiser show at the Oroville American Legion on Friday, April 24, starting at 6 p.m. See some of the top finalists from the 2015 season and their favorite guest performers. The American Legion is located at 314 14th Ave., Oroville.

OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 p.m. For ticket information, please check out http://www.soplayers.ca/melville-boys.html

Spring Barter Faire TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire announces, “Spring Barter Faire.” The event is May 1, 2, and 3 at the Family Faire Grounds located at 72 West Cayuse Mountain Road (off Hwy. 20), Tonasket. Information available at: okanoganfamilyfaire.net; offaire2015@gmail.com; or 509486-2173.

OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org

Conconully Trout Derby The Conconully Trout Derby will be Saturday and Sunday, April 25 and 26 the opening weekend of fishing at Conconully Reservoir and Conconully Lake Registration at Conconully General Store, Prizes awarded at General Store Weigh-in hours: Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more Calendar of Events, check out our website at www. conconully.com

Orchards in Bloom Race OMAK - The Fit 4 Life Coalition will host the second annual Omak Orchards in Bloom Half Marathon and 10K Race at Rockwall Cellars on April 25 beginning at 8 a.m., as a fundraiser to support all of the free community wellness activities that the group offers throughout the year. With participants from all over the Pacific Northwest, this walk/run through the beautiful orchard-filled countryside of Omak also promotes agri-tourism encouraging more people to visit our community and enjoy our lovely landscape and hospitality. Registration for this fun event is available online at www.active. com until Friday, April 24th. See you “when the orchards are in bloom!” Also on April 24 the Omak Fit 4 Life Coalition will host 10 time Ironman Champion, Dr. France Cokan, M.D. at the Best Western Hotel in Omak at 6 p.m. as its keynote speaker for the pre-race festivities. Free event.

OROVILLE - The monthly meeting of the Pacific Northwest Trail Club will be Wednesday, April 22 at the Oroville Grange, 622 Fir St., Oroville, Washington. The regular fourth Wednesday meeting of the club will begin with a potluck dinner at 6 p.m., followed by the business meeting at 7 p.m. We are planning a National Trail Day Event for Saturday, June 6 and a Summer Trail Festival in Oroville on the weekend of Aug. 8 and 9. New members, interested locals and families are all welcome WhyCome not start new new holiday tradition?www.edwardjones.com Make this the to attend. and ameet

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Run Out. SOAP to Perform Give Holiday Gift Melville Boys That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. time of year that you help save for a child’s college education. www.edwardjones.com

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville 10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Healing Service: 1st Sunday Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Warden • 476-2022 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

goala–parent, or other savings goals can youpolicy stay onistrack. *Contributions a 529that plan may be eligible for ahelp state deduction oracredit in As having ahelp life–insurance critical time of to year you save fortax a child’s college certain states for those residents.

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CHURCH GUIDE

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, Is an Essential Part of To make your savings gift in timefor a this the time of college year that you help save Developing a strategy for achieving your education savings family members and the child.* Caring Family Why not startfor a newYour holiday tradition? Make this the

is in memory of Bill LaFrance, who was an active member of Streetscape before his death. We encourage the public to attend this short ceremony. Drawing Contest “Tree Drawing Contest” – The Arbor Day Tree Drawing Contest entry forms are available at Harvest Foods in Oroville. A gift certificate from Akins Harvest Foods will be given to each of the following age categories: Pre K-Grade 1; Grades 2-4; and Grades 5-6. Entry forms must be delivered to Akins Harvest Foods by April 28th for judging. The winner of each category will be announced at the Arbor Day Tree Planting Ceremony on April 30th at 1 p.m.

Okanogan Valley

Think Green!

*Contributions to a 529 plan mayseason be eligible for a state deduction or credit in For parents, back-to-school means it’stax time to stock certainJones states forcan thosework residents. Edward with you to develop a strategy up on school supplies. But it can also be a good time to think to save for college. One option is a 529 college savings about how save for child’s future education. Why nottostart ayour new holiday tradition? Make

Omak, WA 98841 plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, family’s unique needs. 509-826-1638 family members and theSandra child.* Rasmussen

OROVILLE Oroville’s Arbor Day will be celebrated on Thursday, April 30 and the Oroville Tree Board has designated downtown blocks for cleaning. Clean-up The designated Arbor Day clean-up time is Thursday, April 30, from 10 a.m. until noon, but clean-up can also occur any time before Arbor Day. Groups will receive their assigned area by contacting Lynn Chapman, chairwoman of the Oroville Tree Board and leave their bagged debris on the nearest sidewalk area to be picked up by the city

Oroville Free Methodist

Add an ImportantGift Item to Give a Holiday Your Back-to-school List. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out. Life Insurance

for thefind holidays, callforor today. help the lifebe insurance best suits *Contributions to a 529 plan may eligible a statevisit taxpolicy deduction orthat credit in certain states for thoseyour residents.

CHAIRWOMAN, OROVILLE TREE BOARD

 Soy Ink  Recycled Paper  Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings where giftsave can for have tax benefits for you, timeplan, of year thattoday’s you help a child’s college family members and the child.* education.

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crew. Plastic garbage bags will be provided, if needed. Oroville High School has volunteered to help with this project, but we need more community members involved to get the work done. If you have a group, or you individually would like to be part of our clean -up effort, contact Chapman at lchapman@ncidata. com, 509-4764626. Refreshments will be provided by members of Royal Neighbors at Welcome Gate Park, across from the Oroville Public Library, during the clean up hours from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. that Thursday. Tree Planting A memorial tree planting will take place at Welcome Gate Park at 1:00 PM. The tree to be planted

SUBMITTED BY LYNN CHAPMAN

Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival

Tonasket Food Arena Truck Races Bank OMAK - Outlaw Motorsports presents Omak Stampede Arena Truck Races on Saturday, April 25 at noon. There will be a dance on Saturday Night 8 p.m. with Dance with DJ Dan. Camping available Contact Kevin Fletcher 509-322-7017 or Eric Brown 509-322-2052.

‘Clean-up Oroville’ for Arbor Day, April 30

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 16,, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 16, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275 Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

For Rent

$550; 2 BR, 2 BA with walk-in closet. Quiet area. Nice view of green lawn from covered back patio. Great location. 2nd floor apartment in 4 plex. $400 dep. Oroville 509-2233064 509-560-9043. Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 1 BR Starting at $365/mo + security deposit. 3 BR Starting at $450/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Help Wanted

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces

Career Opportunity ENTRY LEVEL AND LATERAL POLICE OFFICER

RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications and will conduct a Civil Service Exam to establish an eligibility list for Entry Level Police Officer and for Lateral Officer; please specify which application you are requesting. Applications may be secured from the Oroville Civil Service Commission, Secretary-Chief Examiner Lindsey J Acord, PO Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844, Phone (509) 476-2926 ext. 14. A $10.00 non-refundable fee is required before an application may be given to the applicant. Applications may also be secured from the City’s web-site: oroville-wa.com The $10.00 non-refundable fee must be submitted with the completed application to be accepted. Requirements for applicants: Minimum age of 21, high school diploma or GED, able to meet physical and medical minimum requirements, have a valid Washington State driver’s license, pass a competitive Civil Service Exam. Hiring is provisional based on outcome of background investigation, psychological and polygraph evaluations. Lateral applicants must also have successfully graduated from the Washington State Law Enforcement Academy and hold current certification and have a minimum of 24 months of continuous law enforcement experience. Wages currently range from $2,946.60 per month for Entry Level to $3,799.40 per month after 36th month following certification; benefits include 80% health package. A physical dexterity test will be included with the written and oral exams for Entry-Level applicants, dress accordingly. Applications are due Friday, May 15th, 2015 by 4:00 PM. Test date will be Saturday, May 30th, 2015 at 8:00 AM. E.O.E.

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SUN LAKES REALTY 3 BR to 4 BR House $795-$895. Furnished Cabin $625. Lakefront Apt $795. Beautiful downtown Apt $495-$600. Call 509-476-2121

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Crosswords

23. Authoritative statement

8. Bride-to-be

25. “Fudge!�

9. Ceremonial burner

26. Experienced

10. Spectacles with nose clip (hyphenated)

27. Victorian, for one 28. “___ quam videri� (North Carolina’s motto)

11. Ancient Greek theater

29. Seed coat

13. “___ Smile� (1976 hit)

33. Has a traditional meal (2 wds)

18. Gushes out (var. spelling)

36. Sorcerer

22. Cremona artisan

37. Pretentious sort 38. Legal prefix

23. Orange crablike Pokemon character

41. Formerly known as

24. Baking appliance

42. Made invalid

25. Abstruse

44. Julie ___, “Big Brother� host

30. Supreme judicial council of ancient Jerusalem

45. Cocktail sauce ingredient (pl.) 48. Religious order probationer 49. A hand 50. ___ probandi 51. Marine decapod (2 wds) 55. Mouselike animal 56. Alter, in a way 57. Baba ghanouj ingredient 58. “Iliad� warrior

ANSWERS

Across

59. Absorbed, as a cost 60. Printed, glazed cotton fabric

1. Floodgate 7. Forner aerosol propellant (abbrev.)

Down

14. Inhabitant of 34th U.S. state

1. Schuss, e.g.

15. Deception

2. PC linkup (acronym)

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3. Review unfairly

17. Inhabitant of the Maylay Archipelago

4. Equiangular polygon

20. “I� problem 21. Seaport in NW Florida

5. Religious law 6. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 7. Business needs

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Dental Operations Manager Okanogan and Oroville Brewster Dental: Dental Operations Manager Brewster, Bridgeport and Twisp Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time

31. Ashes, e.g. 32. Gulf of ___, off the coast of Yemen 34. First light of day (pl.) 35. That is, in Latin (2 wds) 36. Dry riverbed 38. Protective wall 39. Simultaneously (3 wds) 40. Counseled 43. Japanese ___ girl 44. Affected 46. Fertilization site 47. Fergie, formally 48. ___ Scotia 52. Abbr. after a comma 53. Amazon, e.g. (insect) 54. Show ___

DINER FOR LEASE Lease this fully equipped and established 1950’s themed Diner at Veranda Beach Resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington. This is an exciting business opportunity for an experienced and successful food and beverage operator with catering capabilities. The Veranda Beach Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Jim Hammond for details jim@legendresorts.com Check out our website www. verandabeach.com

Wanted BOAT WANTED: 10 ft aluminum V-bottom boat wanted. Must have lip around edge. Have 12 ft V-bottom to trade or reasonable offer. Call (509)476-2804 WANTED TO BUY: Paying Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. Spence: 509-429-4722.

Public Notices PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 04/21/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1992 Ford Explorer Lic# 015RIH Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 2015. #OVG626439

Twisp Dental: Dental Assistant Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job.

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 04/21/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1991 Cadillac Deville Lic#AMB8347 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 2015. #OVG626438

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 04/21/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1997 Chevrolet K1PU Lic# B02053U Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 2015. #OVG625529

Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time

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12. Gave out

45. Accept

10. Miniature sci-fi vehicles

19. Warm, so to speak

Business Opportunities

Health General

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 04/21/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1983 Ford F-150 Lic# C75207C Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 2015. #OVG625534

RETIREMENT AUCTION - DAN SMITH - 95 White Rock Rd - OKANOGAN, WA. Go up Hwy 20 toward Twisp approx 7-8 miles. Turn Right on Buzzard Lake Rd. Follow Signs to White Rock Rd and turn Left to Sale Site.

SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2015 – 10:00 a.m.

******************************* NOTE: Dan’s health is forcing his retirement. Excellent offering of Equipment in Very Good Condition, and some items Like New. Large Selection of Mechanic and Shop Tools PARTIAL LISTING BELOW :

* Ford 4500 Tractor w/Backhoe, Front Bucket, Gas, Good * Ford 2110 Tractor w/ Front Loader * Inter 766 Farmall Tractor w/Loader, Gas, 71 HP, w/Ripper Pipe Layer * AC Cat w/Angle Blade, Hydr, Good Tracks & Rails * D-4-R Cat w/Blade (bad clutches) * JD M Tractor * 1994 Dodge Ram 2500 Pickup, 2 WD, Diesel, 4-speed, Canopy * 1962 Inter 1600 Loadstar Truck w/18-ft Bed * Tandem Axle Trailer, 12 ft x 5 ft * 1997 Polaris Xplorer 500 4-wheeler, 4x4 * 24-ft Cargo Van * Hydr Hay Grapple ÂżWV,+7UDFWRU  \G'XPS%R[ -D\FR7UDYHO7UDLOHUIWWLSRXWV  Miller Welder, Trail Blazer 250G, Gas, Like New * Honda 2000 Generator, Like New * Honda ES 4500 Generator * Honda Pressure Washer * Grand Rapids Drill Press * 1000-gal Fiberglass Tank * Ryobi 10-in and Delta Chop Saws * 12-in Table Top Saw * Stihl & Poulan Chainsaws * Bench Griner * MANY MORE SHOP & HAND TOOLS 7RUR/DZQPRZHU -'5LGLQJ/DZQPRZHU :LQFKHVWHU 6KRWJXQ  Magnum .22 Pistol * Collectible Homemade Pistol * MUCH MORE CALL & WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL, OR FAX YOU A HANDBILL

NO SALES TAX * NO BUYERS PREMIUM

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF WHATCOM In Re the Estate of EDGAR FUSCH, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00134-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 JUDGE: IRA UHRIG The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: April 16, 2015 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: JOAQUIN MONDRAGON ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: PO BOX 736 Bouse, AZ 85325 Attorney for Personal Representative: Olivia Burkland, WSBA #41771 Barron Smith Daugert, PLLC 300 North Commercial St. Bellingham, WA 98225 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Whatcom County Superior Court, Cause No. 15-4-00134-9 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 23, 30, 2015. #OVG626712 PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 842 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington, amending rates for water service. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the April 7, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 843 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington, amending rates for sewer service. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the April 7, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 16, 2015. #OVG626563 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 12/22/2014 8:44:12 AM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-13-541519-TC APN No.: 1580020000 Title Order No.: 130018868-WA-GSO Grantor(s): ELAINE F. HUNTSINGER, STEVE E. HUNTSINGER Grantee(s): TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 864366 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/24/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 Third North in the City of Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 2 of the Gerard Short Plat as recorded April 9, 1984 in Book A-1 of Short Plats, page 3, under Auditor’s File Number 708314, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. More commonly known as: 107 E JOHNATHON AVE, OMAK, WA 98841-0009 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/26/1998, recorded 4/15/1998, under 864366 in Book 167 Page 2562 and re-recorded on 9/12/2013 as Instrument Number 3185573 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from STEVE E. HUNTSINGER AND ELAINE F. HUNTSINGER, HUSBAND AND WIFE , as Grantor(s), to WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE , as

Legals Continued On Next Page


APRIL 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 16, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

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Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $24,986.52 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $49,937.59 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2012 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/24/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/13/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/13/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/13/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

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1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 12/22/2014 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-541519-TC IDSPub #0075089 3/26/2015 4/16/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26 and April 16, 2015. #OVG610204

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ing an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate= WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone:

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encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME STEVE E. HUNTSINGER AND ELAINE F. HUNTSINGER, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 107 E JOHNATHON AVE, OMAK, WA 98841-0009 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 11/18/2014 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone hav-

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 16, 2015

SPORTS & RECREATION

OkanoganOutdoors.org offers a wealth of information for visitors and residents BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OkanoganOutdoors.org is a highly informative and constantly evolving website launched to keep visitors to Okanogan County as well as natives to the area current on information regarding outdoor activities to engage in during any season of the year. With the wide expanse of recreational opportunities available in Okanogan County, the website is fat with photos, maps (including topographical), reviews, fees and permits required, how-to’s and who-should’s, and continually-updated reports on conditions of rivers, snow and trails. “A lot of sites out there say, ‘Come to Okanogan County, we’ve got great outdoor activities,’ and suggest places in real broad stroke ways,” said Content Editor Andy Dappen. “Then people have to do a lot of searching online, going to different sites; whereas here you bring up guidebooks, and it will give you the site and lots of information about it, including hazards, best time of year, maps and how to get there.”

coming challenges. “We want this to be a growing library of information,” Dappen said, adding that people who know the area are welcome to post information, as well as visitors wanting to include stories and photos of their adventures in the Okanogan’s great outdoors. Running off a fairly sophistiWith just a few clicks, people can cated blogging engine, new posts get all the information they would come on and older items scroll find in a store-bought guidebook. down but are always able to be But unlike store-bought guide- found, with an index on the site books, OkanoganOutdoors.org as well as good search engines. Dappen said gear reviews were keeps information up-to-date specific to this area. with new posts and reports con“Not all equipment is suited tinually being added on. to each environment, so we do For exama lot of filterple, in a secing of which tion titled is ‘Choice of “It doesn’t matter who equipment better here,” the day,’ a you are, if you are think- said Dappen. post called given ‘North Star ing about coming to “We’ve careful thought Bike Loop— the area, you are going as to why it is The Fury of appropriFire Ride’ to be curious about most ate for Central describes a Wa s h i n gton these things.” thirty-mile and Okanogan bike loop with Andy Dappen County. Content Editor a 2,000-foot Okanogan OkanoganOutdoors.org gain in elevaO utd o ors . org tion through gets it’s majority country ravof sponsorship aged by last from Confluence Health, who summer’s Carlton Complex Fire, supports the program not only the largest wildfire in Washington for it’s benefits on people’s health State’s recorded history. by encouraging them to get active Other posts range from favoroutdoors and the benefits to the ite routes for hiking, biking and environment by fostering a love skiing to gear reviews, and even include personal stories of over- for and interest in conservation of

Photo submitted by OkanoganOutdoors.org

The Chopaka Mountain Quad is a challenging 12.5 mile day hike with a 4,350 vertical feet elevation gain topping Disappointment (pictured in the foreground), Joe Mills, Hurley and Chopaka (pictured in the distance) mountains. the outdoors; but for the value the site has in influencing medical professionals to move to a rural setting like Okanogan County. Content on the site focuses on all things outdoors, including people and events of the area, resources, what people do and favorite places to go. The site is not geared to hardcore sports enthusiasts only, but also helpful to people wanting to try new activities.

“It doesn’t matter who you are, if you are thinking about coming to the area, you are going to be curious about these things,” said Dappen. Dappen pointed out that area businesses and resources including hotels, sports equipment stores and conservation organizations are encouraged to post a link with their information, including adding events to the outdoor calendar.

“We want to be as complete as we can, and if people continue to contribute it will become a pretty valuable resource for all things outdoors,” said Dappen. Dappen can be reached at adappen@charter.net, or phone (509) 663-7027. OkanonganOutdoors. org is a sister website to WenatcheeOutdoors.org, both part of the nonprofit The Outdoor Discovery Network.

Celebration planned for National Trails Day Trail maintenance and bike ride planned BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachou/staff photo

The Girder Bridge, part of the Similkameen Trail, is 375 feet long and sits 86 feet above the Similkameen River. Bicyclists will be crossing the bridge June 6 as part of the National Trail Day Celebration with the Oroville chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association. New members are always welcome.

Save the date—June 6 is National Trails Day, and the Oroville chapter of the Pacific Northwest Trail Association has a couple different events planned. Volunteers will meet at 9 a.m. at the Whistler Canyon Trailhead to perform trail maintenance. The trailhead is located three miles south of Oroville, on the east side of Highway 97. Traversing

the west face of Mt. Hull, the trail quickly climbs to breathtaking views of the Cascade Mountains and the Okanogan Valley. Workers should bring water, gloves and pack a lunch. But the day is not all about work and no play. At 4 p.m. bicyclists will meet at the Similkameen Trailhead in Oroville for a tenmile bike ride on the trail, a former railroad route with gentle inclines leading into Enloe Dam. Participants are asked to bring their bicycles, helmets and water, and to RSVP ahead of time to coachtobey@gmail.com. All participants will be invited to a special drawing for National Trails Day prizes at 6 p.m., at a

location to be determined. The group meets once each month at the Oroville Grange, with the next meeting scheduled for April 22. New members are always welcome. A meet, greet and eat (bring something easy to share) will take place at 6 p.m., followed by a business meeting at 7 p.m. Jon Knechtel, PNT Director, and the PNT Marketing person will be attending. The PNT is part of the 1200mile Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail running from the Continental Divide to the Pacific Ocean, with Oroville marking the halfway point. The trail crosses three National Parks and seven National Forests.

Gage grabs first place finish in Richland BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Crystal Gage/submitted photo

Dyllan Gage takes a pit stop about 42 miles into the March 29 Hare Scramble. His father, Stacy Gage is pictured filling his gas tank while close family friend Steve Slack looks on. Gage will be out of racing for a couple weeks as he recovers from a separated AC joint, but hopes to race in Utah May 2.

RICHLAND - Dyllan Gage is back on the dirt track, taking first, second and third place finishes in races held during February and March. His first race this year was a Southwestern Idaho Desert Racing Association (SIDRA) event called the Desert Raiders Oreana 100 Race held February 28 near Boise, Idaho. Gage took second place riding his KTM 250 XC in the Light B Class for 250 or lower motorbikes. “I raced in a class lower than I usually do, because I hadn’t raced since the middle of last year due to injuries from riding,” Gage said. According to SIDRA rules, class is determined through an assessment of an individual contestant’s relative ability in terms of A, B and C classification. Categories riders compete in are based on age, sex, kind of machine (two, three or four-wheeled) and engine size. “That’s a hard race to compete in,” said SIDRA’s Phil White. “There are a lot of new, younger riders in it who are aggressive and competitive and like to go fast out in the desert. For him to take second place, he did really well.” Gage finished 34th overall out of 233 racers. The Oreana 100 is comprised of two separate 40-mile loops of varying terrain. This is the only SIDRA race Gage competes in. The next day, March 1, Gage headed to Richland to race in the Eastern Washington Dirt Riders Association (EWRA) Spring Hare Scrambles held at the Horn Rapids Motorsports Complex, where he took first place

in the Sportsman Light Class out of approximately 20 competitors. The Light class does less laps than the Full class, with this race made up of three ten-mile loops out in the sagebrush and sand. “This year I was not sure about racing, so I went to the first couple, and it was kind of a reality check that I am capable of doing better than how I showed because I just wasn’t in shape,” said Gage. His next competition consisted of two back to back races in the Northwest Motorcycle Association (NMA) series held in Odessa March 28-29. Gage competed with about 20 other riders in the Open A Class of the Stumpjumpers Frostbite Hare Scramble Saturday, March 28. “I was leading into the first part of the race, then I wrecked and went from first to last place,” said Gage. “But that happened in the beginning, and I ended up finishing third.” A Long Course with a thirteenmile loop, it runs about two and a half hours. Riders from four different classes (A Pros, Open A, Vet A and 200 CC) start all at once. “Everyone is at the line all at once, with between 60-70 people at that start,” said Gage. “Throughout the whole race, there are other waves starting behind you at different times, so there were probably 150-200 people on the race course at the same time.” Gage placed seventh overall out of 100-150 Stumpjumper racers. The next day, racers completed as many loops as they could within three hours over a different, 14-mile loop course. “I ended up taking the whole shot

at the beginning, leading out and keeping the lead for the first two miles, then I got passed by three of the pros within five or six miles,” said Gage. “I was still fourth overall after the first loop; fourteen seconds behind the leader. Then I dropped back because my endurance was not as good as it should have been.” Still, Gage finished third in the Open A class and tenth overall. A 2014 Tonasket High School graduate, Gage works for Ty Olson Construction while he completes pre-requisites at Wenatchee Valley College North in Omak for a radiology program. Not yet able to earn enough prize money to finance his racing, Gage is grateful for sponsorship from local businesses. Race entry fees range from $40-$60. Jack and Mary Hughes of Hughes Department Store and Discount Fireworks, Beyers Market and Subway and Rancho Chico in Tonasket all support him. “The big ones would be my parents, Stacy and Crystal Gage. Also, Johnny’s Autobody painted my trailer for me,” Gage said, adding that he was hoping to be able to keep racing for at least the next couple years. His next race is the Desert 100, a race course of two fifty-miles loops held in Odessa April 12; one he described as his all-time favorite. “When they start us, there are 700800 racers at the starting line, all of us standing. They fire a cannon, and you have to run to your bike, jump on it and go for 100 miles,” Gage said. He started racing at the age of nine. “My dad bought me a dirt bike when I was five years old, and I’ve ridden dirt bikes ever since,” said Gage.


APRIL 16, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SCHOOLS

Tonasket School Garden gearing up for future BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tonasket School Garden is a learning lab, and not just for students interested in how things grow. The garden has also been used by middle school math and engineering teachers to demonstrate how things are measured and surveyed. “The school needs to adopt the garden as a learning lab, just like a chemistry lab,” said School Garden President Joseph Willging. “It should be used and funded like a lab.” The School Garden could also be a considered a learning lab in how volunteers pulling together can get a lot of work accomplished. According to Willging, over 700 volunteer hours have already been clocked. A volunteer himself, Willging fits in a widely varying number of hours helping the garden grow, outside of his full-time duties as a farmer, landscaper and owner of a permaculture design and education business, Druid’s Grove

Permaculture. The garden has provided, to date, 760 students with hands-on learning opportunities. The elementary school uses it the most, with students giving back to the garden through a composting program that recycles cafeteria waste into compost. “The elementary school formed a Green Team to run the composting program at lunch, and by the end of the 2013/14 school year, more than 2700 pounds had gone up to the garden to be composted,” said Willging, adding that construction of compost bins was almost complete, which would make running the program a lot easier. A large fruit tree planting was done last April, and this spring the garden team plans to put in nut trees, wind breaks and hedge rows. Plans are in place for a strawberry patch to go in, as well as wishes for more funds for berry patches. “The general thrust of what we are planting is for stuff that

will produce before students leave school in the spring or when they return in the fall. We try and avoid stuff that produces when the students aren’t there as much,” said Willging. “We’re trying to develop plans for summer garden camps, but we are very much still on the book, trying to figure out who is going to work it and fund it.” Sometimes funding comes around with a lot less toil than digging up the soil. Willging was presenting a report of garden needs at the March 23 Tonasket School Board meeting, when volunteers stepped right up with time, talents and cold, hard cash. “How many acres are you irrigating up there?” asked Rob Enloe when the discussion of irrigating the garden on city water came up. “Just around an acre,” replied Willging; at which point Enloe handed him $100 and said, “Here. It’s a good project.” Irrigation of the garden has been averaging $40 a month. School Board member Ty

Olson of Olson Construction volunteered to finish grading the road to the garden when the discussion came up of making the garden handicap accessible. “We also need to have pathways made that a student who has some sort of a disability can negotiate, whether they are on crutches or in a wheelchair,” said Willging. “All students need equal access to being involved in this learning opportunity.” Willging requested at the March 23 School Board meeting that the school district fund and hire a garden educator in a 30 hour per week papraproffesional position. Willging himself does not want the job; preferring to stay behind the scenes and work as a volunteer as time away from his own business allows. Other plans in store for the garden include building an outdoor classroom. “We’ve started building an amphitheater-style terraced area, and would like to see benches, an awning for shelter, an outdoor lectern and a white board an instructor could use,” said Willging, adding that a grant had been applied for, with a site visit from possible grantors scheduled for April 22.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Newly constructed compost bins are nearing completion

Oroville School District honors Classified staff SUBMITTED BY STEVE QUICK OSD SUPERINTENDENT

Oroville School District recognizes Classified Employees Last month Oroville School District celebrated Classified Employee Week, taking time out of their busy schedules to pose for some group photos. Classified

employees are all the district employees who do not hold a teaching certificate, including secretaries, bus drivers, custodians, cooks, librarians, maintenance workers and paraeducators. “We often take for granted the many support staff who work quietly, efficiently, and behind

the scenes to help each and every day at school run smoothly, which supports the learning of our students,” said Oroville Superintendent Steve Quick. “We are grateful to have a dedicated group of employees here in Oroville, as they make a huge difference in the education of our students.”

a a Submitted photos

Picturd are, with comments by Supt. Steve Quick, left, High school staff Steve Thompson, Nathan Shirley, Joann Loudon, Erin McKinney, Brigette Acord, Shay Shaw, Dawn Miller, Denise Jewitt, Daphne Booker, Kay Sawyer, Cori Hilderbrand, and Kathy Hughes assist students transitioning into young adults; above, Elementary staff Sharon Scott, Laura Curdie, Marlene Barker, Kathy Hughes, Olivia Santana, Dennis Curdie, Bobbie Stirek, Susan Smith, Glenda Harvey, Chris Jensen, Crystal Milholland, Shannon Smith, Jessie Rise, Steffi Fuchs, Laara Peters, Tina Koepke nurture young minds and hearts; below, left; Bus Drivers Richard Hairston, Jaime Santana, Jim Bretz, Jessie Rise, Mark Fast, and Novelita Beitz transport students safely and soundly and below, Custodians Martha Buckmiller, Miguel Carrera, and Julie Sylvester keep the buildings clean and in good working order, Not pictured - Camera Shy: Kristi McKinney, Betty Clough.

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Thank You

There are not words enough to express the extraordinary gratitude we feel at the outpouring of love, support, prayers and offers of help we have received during the loss of Jeff. We will take every offering and use them to fill the hole his passing caused. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts to every Trucker who participated in the procession. The honor touched us very deeply. We continue to urge all who read this to take the lesson that Jeff applied daily and tell your family you love them.

Thank you, The Family of Jeff Sackman

Thanks for John Figenshow Tribute

Our whole family, the Figenshows, Woodwards, and Stansburys with to extend our deep appreciation to everyone who came to offer their support and condolences at the service for John Figenshow. We especially want to offer the following acknowledgements: The Tonasket American Legion, under the direction of Jeff Bergh, conducted a beautiful graveside service for the family at the Tonasket Cemetery. The Legion ceremony with statements, prayers, color guard gun salute, and the exquisite playing of Taps, all made for a very moving tribute to this wonderful father, husband, brother, and uncle who served his family, his community, and his country so well. The respect and honor was palpable, and we are all so grateful. We are grateful also for the generosity of the Tonasket Eagles and Auxiliary for providing the facility for his services, and for providing and serving the great luncheon to the overflow crowd. Thanks to John Newton for officiating, and speakers Todd Woodard, Daryl Asmussen, Dottie Skelton, Dennis Stansbury, and Mike Stansbury, who also sang. John was well remembered.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 16, 2015

OBITUARIES

Roger Gene Hauenstein

ROGER GENE HAUENSTEIN Roger Gene Hauenstein, age 61, passed away in Seattle on April 6, 2015 after a lengthy battle with health issues. Roger arrived in this world on August 3, 1953, the oldest of four children born to Glenn and Glenna Hauenstein. McMinnville, Ore. was his home for the first three years, where he spent many fun times

with the Jacob relatives. Later homes were in Hermiston, Ore. and on the family farm between Mount Vernon and SedroWoolley, Wash. In sixth grade he was very proud to be allowed to start driving tractor for his Grandpa Hauenstein, cleaning cow barns and helping in the fields. In 1966 the family moved to Oroville. Roger loved music and enjoyed playing piano, guitar and baritone horn. In high school he was a member of the Band, Key Club, Science Club and Honor Society. After graduation in 1971, Roger attended college at Western Washington University for several quarters, and then he enlisted in the Navy. He was stationed in Japan and was a weatherman on the ship Oklahoma City. One of the most exciting events was when the ship was involved with evacuating people from Saigon. His Navy experience was cut short when he became ill with Hodgkin’s disease in 1975. After recovering from two surgeries and radiation treatments, he attended Seattle Pacific University.

In 1979, Roger began a 30 year career driving Seattle Metro buses. He had a long-time friend and companion and helped her raise her three children. Later, he also enjoyed being “Grandpa Roger” to the two granddaughters. He always loved driving. Many of his happiest times were getting away from city traffic to drive his car into the hills on back roads, admiring the scenery and especially the buildings on the old homesteads. From a very young age Roger was interested in gardening. He spent several years with help from friends, landscaping his property in Seattle. People would admire the beautiful results and inquire what company he had hired to do it, which pleased him. Roger is survived by his mother, Glenna, in Oroville; sister Marjory (Bob) Brandon of Spokane; brother, Philip, of Oroville; sister, Susan (Robert) Hauenstein-Kelley of Stanwood and four nephews and two nieces. His father, Glenn, passed away on October 30, 2014. A memorial service will be held at a later date.

Thelma R. Harris

THELMA R. HARRIS Thelma R. Harris, age 68 of

TONASKET - Kindergarten Information Nights are coming up for young Tonasket Tigers and their parents. Tuesday, April 21, an informational meeting will be held for English-speaking parents in the Elementary Library at 6:30 p.m. Topics will include Meet and Greet School Staff and Question and Answer time with the

Kindergarten Staff. Registration paperwork will be handed out, and the chance to sign up for registration times. Childcare will be provided. Registration Day is at the Tonasket School District Office Wednesday, April 22, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Spanish Parent Night informational meeting is scheduled for April 22 at 6:30 p.m. in the Tonasket Elementary School

Library. Registration paperwork will be handed out, to be turned in to the Tonasket School District Office the following day. If you miss these dates, please come in to the office during regular hours to register your child. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Phone (509) 486-4933 with any questions. Your child must be five years of age on or before Aug. 31, 2015.

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Historically, April 1 is the peak snowpack. This year, the peak came earlier. The April 1 statewide SNOTEL readings were 22 percent of normal shattering the previous record low of thirtythree set in 2005. “The only holdout is in the Methow River Basin, which is reporting 79 percent of normal,” said Pattee. “Look at the data and you’ll see that almost everywhere else is at 50 percent or less of normal readings.” A consequence of the early snowmelt is that Western states will have reduced streamflow later this spring and summer. In Western states where snowmelt accounts for the majority of seasonal water supply, informa-

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friends from near and far. She was known as “Mountain Ma Ma” as she cared for others as if she was their mother. Nita worked the Garage Sales, Pancake Breakfasts, and if there was phone calling to be done she was there to help. She was always ready with a fresh pot of applesauce. A couple of her favorite sayings were, “The good Lord is not finished with me yet” and “Mothers are hard to raise these days.” Death comes for us all. We will miss you our dear Mountain Ma Ma. Celebration of Life for Nita Myrick will be on May 16, 2015 at the Molson Grange at 1 p.m. Dessert will be served.

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SPOKANE (April 13, 2015) – Washington State snowpack is melting earlier than usual, according to data from the fourth 2015 forecast by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). “Seventy-four percent of our long-term monitoring sites have set new record low snowpack,” NRCS Water Supply Specialist Scott Pattee said. “March was warm and dry in most of the West; as a result, snow is melting earlier than usual.”

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JUANITA ‘NITA’ MYRICK

State snowpack melting early, experts say SUBMITTED BY SCOTT PATTEE

DENTISTRY

Chapter 21 D.A.V., a state certified service officer and District 2 D.A.V. Commander for all of Western Washington. She was D.A.V. Van service for Pacific and Grays Harbor counties and was “A First” two time Commander of Post 896, Amvets of Raymond, WA. Thelma is survived by her loving husband, Curtis A. Kelly. She was preceded in death by her parents and brothers and sister. Graveside Services will be held Monday, April 13, 2015 at 1 p.m. at the Chesaw Cemetery with David Ray, officiating and Military Honors by Tonasket American Legion, Post #82. Memorials may be made to Disabled American Veterans, 3725 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076 or the Legacy Veterans Memorial in Tonasket.

On Saturday, April 4, 2015 our dear friend Juanita Myrick, 91, joined her beloved husband, John, in Heaven with a smile on her face. She and John had been married for 73 years and five months. They raised five boys, of which four preceded her in death; Paul, Michael, Richard and Patrick. Kevin (the caboose) is now the sole survivor of the family. Nita was very active on our Hill Top at the Molson Grange and Auxiliary. She worked one day a week at the Molson School House Museum and made many new

TES Kindergarten 2015-2016 round- up set for next week SUBMITTED BY TONASKET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Oroville, died on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at home. She was born May 24, 1946 in Gainesville, Missouri to parents Charlie and Celia May (Casey) Harris. During difficult times the family moved from Missouri to the west coast and worked as fruit tramps to make a living. Even though Thelma was a child, she worked side by side with her family. Later she worked as a dental assistant and technician. Thelma joined the U.S. Army in April of 1975 and was honorably discharged in November of 1988 as Sgt. First Class. She was a D.A.V. lifetime member, Amvets lifetime member, Blinded Vets lifetime member and also a Paralyzed Vets lifetime member. Thelma was commander of

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tion about snowpack serves as an indicator of future water availability. Streamflow in the West consists largely of accumulated mountain snow that melts and flows into streams as temperatures warm in spring and summer. National Water and Climate Center scientists analyze the snowpack, precipitation, air temperature and other measurements taken from remote sites to develop the water supply forecasts. NRCS monitors conditions year-round and will continue to issue monthly forecasts until June. The water supply forecast is part of several USDA efforts to improve public awareness and manage the impacts of climate change, including drought and other extreme weather events. Through the creation of the National Drought Resilience Partnership, launched as part of the President’s Climate Action Plan, federal agencies are working closely with states, tribes and local governments to develop a coordinated response to drought. Since 1939, USDA has conducted snow surveys and issued regular water supply forecasts. Other resources on drought include the U.S. Drought Monitor. For information on USDA’s drought efforts, visit USDA Disaster and Drought Information. And to learn more about how NRCS is helping private landowners deal with drought, visit the NRCS’ drought resources.

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A P P R A I S A L S

City of Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth has declared the week of April 20th – April 24th as the annual Spring Clean-up. Residents may schedule pick-ups by contacting City Hall at 476-2926. Pickup date is Wednesday, April 22nd, if needed additional pickup on Thursday April 23rd. For collection information contact City Hall at 476-2926. The Mayor and City Council are encouraging all residents and property owners to take pride in our community by participating in the Spring Clean-up. Take advantage of this opportunity to cleanup your neighborhood.

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 509-476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 16, 2015  

April 16, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 16, 2015  

April 16, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune