Page 1

Charley Long & The

SENIOR BREAKFAST

Okanogan Kid, Part II

Oroville Senior Center Pancake Breakfast, Saturday, April 11

See Pages A3, A12

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Katie Teachout & Gary DeVon/staff photos

There were Easter Egg Hunts and visits from the Easter Bunny at both Tonasket and Oroville last Saturday morning. As usual a wave of happy children vacuumed up colorful eggs and hoped for one of the prize eggs. Above, Parents and kids alike took off at the start of the race to grab colorful eggs Saturday, April 4 at Tonasket. Left, One-year-old Kendyl Leslie scoops up one of 3600 Easter Eggs at the hunt at Oroville’s Lake Osoyoos Veterans Memorial Park Saturday. Right, The Easter Bunny, AKA Dan Haven, is seen here with Grand Prize Winner Heriberto Bejar (front, right), along with his brother Esteban Bejar (left), sister Mayra Bejar (center) and mother Janet Bejar.

Biochar presentation spurs conversation More hands on demonstrations planned in future BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Biochar – Capturing value from waste biomass by turning it into fine charcoal that can be used for other purposes, was the subject

of a presentation made by Gloria Flora in Oroville last week, one of many she is making around the state. Flora, who owns her own farm, is getting the word out about biochar as a way to use agricultural and other waste products generated on farms, ranches and forests and saving money while doing so. She explained how biochar can be used to enhance soil to retain water for better plant growth, especially when mixed with compost. The biochar can

trap things that are bad for the environment, like heavy metals and carbon dioxide, CO2. By trapping the CO2 in the soil it is not released into the atmosphere, she said, reducing pollution. Flora, from Montana, runs the U.S. Biochar Initiative. She spoke about how ancient civilizations in the Amazon were able to produce enough food to feed large cities, despite having less than perfect soil by turning the waste biomass into biochar to enhance the

soil. There are many processes for turning the waste into biochar, both highly technical and home built. The process, called pyrolysis, can be used to generate electricity and provide heat for homes, industries and whole cities, according to Flora. It can also be used to make biofuels like syngas and bio oil. Flora emphasized that the process can be done on a small scale and can help farmers and others who find they have biomass they

need to get rid of without having to pay fees to haul it off or put in landfills. She showed several examples of converting the biomass into biochar, many of them simple, that can be used on farms and ranches. Rather than putting the waste in landfills, the biochar produced can be used on the farm to increase crop yields, protect water quality and protect air quality by avoiding burning. It can also be sold to others as a soil amend-

ment. It can also be used to clean up forest lands and reduce wildfies, according to Flora. While only about 10 people attended the Oroville meeting, a few were somewhat familiar with the process and wanted to learn more about how to do it. Flora said that future meetings will take place outside where some of these technics for making and using biochar can be demonstrated. More information can be found at www.biochar-us-org.

Oroville enrollment drops, but in line with last year Senior project collects 5000+ tires for recycling BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville School Board heard that enrollment had dropped by 11 FTEs between the semesters within the district. “We are starting budget work for the 2015-16 school year. We usually see a drop off between the semesters and we lost 11 students between February and March,” said Business Manager Shay Shaw in her financial report. The state pays the district basic education funds based on student population – FTEs, Full Time Equivalents. In the

past the board has taken a conservative Steve Quick was out of town to visit view and set the yearly budget based his first grandchild, a baby girl. Board on numbers that are lower than the Member Amy Wise reported that the expected FTEs for the Oroville Scholarship next school year. Foundation’s talent “Looks like we will show was well attend“There are 10 billion be budgeting at the ed. same level as last year, scrap tires generated or at a little more,” TIRE COLLECTION EVENT each year globally...” Shaw said. Teacher Tam The Monday, March Tam Hutchinson, teacher Hutchinson gave a Oroville High School 30 meeting began report on the recent with “Good News tire recycling event and Announcements.” organized by two Among the good news shared by High senior students, Steven Maupin and School Principal Kristin Sarmiento Trevor Shear, for their senior project. He was that the board would be signing first showed a PowerPoint slideshow, crea diploma for a student who had been ated by student Hunter DeVon, on how a few credits short of the graduation many used tires are generated each year requirements and had made them up. It in the state. was also announced that Superintendent “There are 10 billion scrap tires gen-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 15

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Just a few of the more than 5000 used scrap tires were collected in a tire recycling event held by two Oroville senior students working on their senior project. erated globally. Each person generates about one scrap tire per year, there are 7 million generated in Washington alone,” said Hutchinson. “They are waste and health and fire

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INSIDE THIS EDITION

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hazard. Each tire can harbor mosquitos, snakes and other vermin,” he said. “Every tire is a potential breeding ground for up

News History Cops & Courts

A2 A3 A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Sports Schools Obituaries

A10 A11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 9 2015

Hitchhiker robbed at gunpoint on Hwy. 20

ROYAL VISIT

Fleeing suspect dies after being tasered BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Above, Oroville May Festival Queen Ellamae Burnell and Princesses Faith Martin and Mikayla Scott join Oroville Chamber of Commerce members at their regular membership meeting held Thursday, April 2. In addition to hearing about the upcoming May Festival activities, the membership voted to approve changes to the bylaws.

North Cascades Hwy. reopened April 3 Crews opened in time for Easter

SUBMITTED BY JEFF ADAMSON WSDOT COMMUNICATIONS

WINTHROP – In one of the fastest reopening efforts in the North Cascades Highway’s 42-year history, state Department of Transportation crews swung open the winter closure gates to

traffic at 10 a.m. Friday, April 3. Crews began the clearing process on State Route 20, the North Cascades Highway, just over three weeks ago on March 16. Last year it took crews nearly six weeks to clear the highway, opening it May 8. In 2013, with a lighter snow pack, it opened April 16. There was only one year, 1977, when the highway never closed due to a drought. The earliest opening was March 10, 2005,

Thank You So Much...

Dr. Dicroce & Staff for your help and support. Also, thank you to the doctors and staff at North Valley Hospital, Wenatchee Hospital, Bergh Funeral Home and Pastor Rod Brown for the service. A special Thank you to Buddy & Helen Fritz for their support. Thank you to the ambulance drivers, pallbearers and Eagles for their tea...thank you again for your support in the loss of my mother Audene Farmer.

~ Wanda & Beacon

but two weeks later snow closed the highway for another 10 days, reopening again on April 4. “We all live up here and know it’s important for local businesses to have the highway open for Easter, the lowland fishing season and ‘49er Days Festival in Winthrop,” said Don Becker, WSDOT Maintenance Supervisor. The mid-morning reopening allows the crew time to sweep the entire 37-mile winter closure zone for sand, rocks and debris, clear any snow from below avalanche chutes, and apply sand or deicer as needed. During the past few days, crews saw a foot of snow fall at some locations and they performed avalanche control to clear the chutes so the highway can be safely opened. For more information, including a history of opening and closing dates, maps, photos and progress reports on the 2015 opening, visit the North Cascades web page: www.wsdot.wa.gov/traffic/ passes/northcascades.

TONASKET – An Idaho man who was hitching on Highway 20 outside of Tonasket said he was picked up and later robbed at gunpoint. One of the suspects in the robbery died after being tasered by a law enforcement. On April 4, at around 9:50 a.m. a U.S Forest Service Officer was contacted on Hwy 20 out of Tonasket. The 47-year-old from Sagle Idaho said he was hitchhiking on Hwy 20 when he was picked up by three people in a van, a female and two male subjects. “The victim stated that during the ride the male subjects were using drugs and then started acting crazy. He said the male subject in the back seat pulled out a .22 caliber handgun and pointed it at his head. The victim stated that they stole $150.00 cash from him and his fly rod,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers. The suspects then

let the victim out of the van who contacted the USFS Officer to report the incident.” Deputies arrived at the scene and contacted the victim to get a statement, while other officers in the area continued to search for the suspect vehicle. At around 11 a.m. the same USFS Officer located the suspect vehicle and the three occupants on the Lyman Lake Road at the campground. As the USFS Officer drove by the suspect vehicle pulled out and he followed, calling for additional units, according to Sheriff Rogers. A WSP Trooper arrived on scene and when they attempted to stop the vehicle, the driver of the vehicle accelerated. The pursuit turned onto BIA 66 Road and went approximately five miles when the van wrecked hitting a tree in the road. The two male occupants bailed out of the vehicle and took off running through the woods, the female remained in the van. “As the Trooper and USFS Officer caught up to one of the suspects he was ordered to stop several times and then a taser was deployed. The suspect was secured and put into custody. The

suspect then stopped breathing. CPR was begun and emergency personal were called to the scene but they were not able to revive the subject,” said Rogers. The subject who was arrested and died at the scene was identified as William J. Dick III, 28, of Coulee Dam. The second male subject, who had run from the van, eventually walked out to a road and turned himself in to the Washington State Patrol. Arrested at the scene was Kyle S. Cate, 23 of Okanogan. Cate was later taken to the hospital to be checked out, cleared and then booked into the Okanogan County jail on armed robbery in the first degree, felony eluding, DWS third and an arrest warrant out of Lincoln County. “Both Dick and Cate were identified by the victim as the two male suspects that had robbed him,” said the sheriff. A search of the area was done and drugs were located in the vehicle and the area. No weapon was found at the time. The 33-year-old female in the vehicle was not booked. Family was notified of Dick’s death. An autopsy will be performed on Dick.

In addition to the two seniors, there were several students who volunteered to help with the collection. The event was set up by the Okanogan County Health District, with funding from the state Department of Ecology. Oak Harbor Trucking, which transported the tires, had allocated four trailers to the event, but since it was such a success they increased it to 10 trailers, according to Hutchinson.

$2000 for State FBLA registration fes and $1049 for a tennis ball machine. The board also approved John Ragsdale as the director for Sixth Grade Camp, with assistance from Ila Hall and Mary Willey. Two overnight trips were approved for this month, one for FBLA to Spokane and one for Upward Bound to Seattle. The following were approved as coaches or volunteers: Even Miranda, high school assistant boys soccer coach; Noah Burnell as high school assistant tennis coach; Justin McGarvin as junior varsity track volunteer; Daniel McKinney as high school baseball volunteer and Jose Quenzada as boys soccer volunteer.

TIRES | FROM A1 to 100,000 mosquitos.” The Oroville tire collection event collected over 5000 tires in two days and filled eleven 28-foot trailers, with each trailer holding about 550 tires, according to Hutchinson. The tires will be transported to Portland, Ore where they will be used as fuel to make cement. “They burn really hot and the plant uses modern technics to clean up the emissions to EPA standards,” said Hutchinson. “But first, each tire’s sidewall is inspected to see if it can be reused for a retread.” Manufacturing a new tire takes 22 gallons of oil, while making a retread reduces that number to seven gallons, according to Hutchinson.

CONSENT AGENDA After approving changes to district policies, the board moved on to new business. They approved a consent agenda of several items, including accepting donations from the Oroville Booster Club - $652 for wrestling singlets,

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APRIL 9, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

HISTORY

A desperate fight at Palmer Lake

Editor’s Note: This is the second installment of Karen Beaudette’s research into the Charley Long killing near Loomis in 1894. The third and final chapter will follow in two weeks. G.A.D. BY KAREN BEAUDETTE LOCAL HISTORIAN

If you have read this far, you may recognize the preceding as a photocopy of the original 1894 newspaper article printed by the Loomiston Journal in the January 4th issue, saved for all these years in Mrs. Alan Palmer’s scrapbook. At this point, the local press’s report of Smith’s confession to killing Charley Long is almost mysterious as the tombstone epitaph “killed by the Okanogan Kid.” This writer’s condensed version below will be an effort to sort out second-hand, even thirdhand, hearsay and confusion in a coherent sequence. Editing out a lot of “he said” of the original article, the basic statements are as they were told to us by the Journal. Lou Burrell told the hastily organized coroner’s jury on January 4th the story that Smith told to him: Smith said he was in the house alone, the dog barked, and he saw Charlie Long coming to the house. He asked Long to come in and sit down but Long refused and asked for Smith’s father and for [Michael] Kelly. He was told they were “up to Phillip’s ranch.” Long then said, “I came to kill you;” Smith replied “You have, have you” and he fired at Long. Smith’s revolver went off twice but the chambers stuck and would not work. Long fired one shot, which did not hit Smith. The desperate fight of the

newspaper headline followed the alleged gunplay as Smith continued his story: Smith grappled with Long after “he could not shoot anymore” and the two men got outside, Smith “striking and fighting” Long. As they struggled, Smith noticed a bullet wound in Long. After getting outside, Long said “Let me go home” and then fell down. Smith was afraid Long would “rally and shoot him” so he hit Long on the head with a double-bit ax. Seeing that Long was dead, Smith went to get a horse from the pasture and rode away. Smith said he took the gun that was Long’s to Conconully. [Later in the article we learn that Smith gave himself up to the Sheriff and was in custody on the day of the hearing, probably in Conconully.] Witnesses testifying before the coroner’s jury are skeptical about this version of what happened. Long’s friends said that they believed he had no gun with him when he went to Smith’s.

Yakima cattle buyers in the Okanogan, late 1890’s. out the common George Smiths— turns out to be an elusive fellow. His father, up at Phillips’ ranch at the time, has been found to be George F. Smith, a cattle buyer out of Kittitas (Ellensburg). The same source also mentions meeting Junior Smith, a cook at the War Eagle mine, maybe a common confusion of George H. as a George F., Jr. The 1880 Federal census records the George F. Smith household in Kittitas Precinct [Yakima County] which includes one George, son, age 17, born in Maine [about 1863]. The same census lists T. Jefferson Smith with son Horris [Horace], age 8 and daughter Emily, age 11. 1850 Maine census records indicate Thomas Jefferson Smith is George F. Smith’s brother, in the same household as Coffin Smith, father. Significant to the Where? of Long’s demise, two Bills of Sale filed in 1889 at the Okanogan County courthouse, reveal that George F. Smith bought two ranches, one described only as “grantor’s [John Y. Phillips] ranch on the east side of Sinlahekin Creek” and one “commonly known as the John S. Palmer ranch situated at the foot of Palmers Lake lying between Hambletons and Bill Clauseys ranch and adjoining James Palmers ranch”. By the descriptions, it is impossible to

friends...men who know the ways of gun fighters say that Charley’s visit to the cabin and finding Smith alone would almost inevitably lead to a fight. Smith says it did and poor Charley is a corpse.” A week after coroner’s hearing, the case of the State vs. George A. [sic] Smith for the killing of Charles Long at Palmer Lake came up for a hearing before Justice of the Peace Fifield a week later. Sheriff Rush and Deputy Sheriff Wallace told Smith’s story “as Smith told it to them.” A dozen witnesses were sworn in but only five had testified when the Judge granted the defendant’s motion to dismiss the case and rendered a verdict of justifiable homicide. The Journal points out that “Smith was practically discharged on his own evidence although he was not put upon the stand.” The news report then goes on: “As no one claimed the revolver which Smith said was Long’s, Sheriff Rush gave it to Smith and he now has it in his possession.” THE OKANOGAN KID: aka GEORGE H. SMITH?

A name but not an identity-who might this confessed killer be? The long-gone tracks of historical documents that identify Smith are the reason you are reading this in 2015. George H. Smith--initial and all, to separate

determine which portion of the land contained the Smith residence, but the 1896 survey maps indicate the northwest corner of Palmer Lake [more about that later; it could later turn out to be “a clue”]. These sales took place seven years before the official U.S. Geological surveys, when land descriptions tended to include prominent rocks and trees but no map coordinates as they did not yet exist. Therefore, there was no legally binding “sale”, only a holding of place until the surveys were confirmed and the holder could file for homestead rights. Smith had a tenuous claim on this ranch land; worse, it required the continuous occupancy of a traveling man to legally hold it. The Smith Brothers’ Cattle Company—George F. and Thomas Jefferson—are well known throughout eastern Washington, buying cattle in that cow empire around Walla Walla and Umatilla, Oregon. Any cowboy today would agree that if one buys a cow, one must move a cow to market, often a long trip and, if a large herd, with a large crew of skilled drovers. Leta May [Olmstead] Smith of Ellensburg (no relation) wrote that “Jeff Smith and his brother George were probably the best known and the best trail men in Kittitas. The Smiths were famous in the 1870’s and into the 1880’s on both sides of the Cascades for a cattle trail they had pioneered over Stampede Pass from the Kittitas Valley to the markets of Seattle (some of which they owned with wealthy partners). The winter of 1879-80 wiped out their extensive cattle herd, along with those of other big cattle ranchers of eastern Washington, and their Kittitas Valley holdings. Alas, they came to Palmer Lake just in time to see it happen again in the cow-killing winter of 1889-90 which took a heavy toll on Okanogan ranches; Smith lost 400 head in that winter.

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Photo of Loomiston Journal article of January 4, 1894.

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Other witnesses said there was not much evidence of a scuffle to be seen, except some blood in the house. Witness Ballou further asserted that the ax was used near the woodpile where the body had been dragged as there was a considerable amount of blood at that spot. Dr. F. S. Reynolds was called to testify about the “wounds upon the person of Long,” as the press put it: Two bullet wounds were found, “in each case where the bullet went in and where it came out.” The doctor said the shot to the lower part of the neck was almost certainly fatal. The other bullet entered about “two inches above the right nipple and passed out the right side and below,” not necessarily fatal but very severe. “The head and face were battered and cut, the skull pierced, both with a sharp, blunt instrument,” also pronounced “not necessarily fatal.” The good doctor added that during the autopsy he had found a ball protruding under the deceased’s skin, below the line of the shoulders. After much speculation, the jury decided this foreign object had been lodged there for quite some time. Just in case, Coroner Nathan Reed preserved the ball. Later, while dressing the body for burial, another ball was found in Long. The full account from the Journal is here quoted in full: “A ball had been fired directly at the head. The pistol had raised on being discharged and the ball had struck the skull about an inch above the base and glanced down the spine to where it was found by the doctor. The ball had been battered by coming in contact with the bones and it still carries two short pieces of hair...The ball is a .41-caliber. The pistol that Smith said was Long’s and which he carried to Conconully with him is smaller than a .41 or .45 cal. But the size was not determined here. The coroner has preserved this bullet.” Everyone in Loomis probably had an opinion about what happened. The jury of six Loomis men decrees that Yep, George H. Smith killed Charley Long. The reporter offers his own take: “Smith’s story as told to Burrell admits all the ghastly details, but he claims it was a desperate fight...It was...as far as Smith is concerned, for he probably kept it up as long as there was motion in the body. [Smith] claims Long would kill him, as he did not know Long had no gun.” The editor goes on: Long’s friends told the jury that they believe he was killed as the door opened— that Smith commenced to shoot... even if Long had a pistol, he was in a dying condition immediately. They think Long fell in the house where there was blood found on the floor, but all the witnesses at the inquest stated there was no evidence of a scuffle. There was, instead, evidences of the body having been dragged the entire distance from the house to the woodpile. The story you have read is fourth-hand, after all—Smith to Burrell to a reporter to the writer. All the same, this is the place in any good mystery tale where the suspects are assembled, all the clues are exposed and the truth comes out. Accusations of motive are made. In our case—reader and writer, the killer confessed, the fear of Charley Long was undoubtedly real; perhaps not for the suspicious stated intent of Long but more for his reputation as a gunslinger. Panic ensued all right; but the details appear to be an attempt to conceal prior intent to murder. Well, New Age Sherlocks, what do you think? The dog did bark, remember? The editor of the Journal concludes his story with some background for the Loomis readers: “...there had been for some time legal troubles between Long and his friends and Smith and his

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

try Forestry, LLC, Omak, $3,385.43 for unpaid taxes, penalties and fees.

COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

DISTRICT COURT Gustavo Camacho Salazar, 44, Tonasket, guilty of fourthdegree assault. Camacho Salazar was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 324 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Matthew Russell Carden Jr., 28, Omak, guilty of four counts of third-degree theft. The court dismissed a third-degree DWLS charge. Carden was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 165 days suspended, and fined a total of $758. Brandon William Cate, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. The court dismissed an additional charge of third-degree theft. Cate was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $808. Sandra Louise Cheer, 56, Omak, guilty of DUI. Cheer was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Amanda Corlene Childers, 22, Oroville, had an MIP/C charge dismissed. Childers was fined $200. Cory Stephen Lee Counts, 20, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Robert Leo Curtis, 55, Omak, guilty of DUI. Curtis was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $1,936. James Michael Eriksen, 32, Riverside, guilty of DUI. Ericksen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 330 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Robert Erik Lee Foster, 34, Riverside, guilty of fourth-degree assault. The court dismissed a third-degree malicious mischief charge. Foster was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Irwing David Gaytan Balderrama, 21, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of fourth-degree assault and one count of second-degree DWLS. The court dismissed two additional charges: second-degree vehicle prowl and third-degree theft. Gaytan Balderrama was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,241. Richelle L. Geddes, 43, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed.

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Christine Marie Mix, 48, Okanogan, pleaded guilty March 31 to POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. Mix was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $1,110 for the Feb. 11 crimes. Joshua Carl Jacobs, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty March 31 to fourth-degree assault (DV) (amended from third-degree assault of a child). Jacobs was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 94 days suspended with credit for time served, and fined $1,110.50 for the March 21, 2014 crime. Brandon Scott Thomas, 23, Omak, pleaded guilty March 31 to unlawful imprisonment (DV). The court dismissed a fourth-degree assault (DV) charge. Thomas was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the June 6, 2014 crime. Martin Thomas Stanley, 45, Omak, pleaded guilty April 2 to first-degree criminal trespassing (amended from residential burglary). Stanley was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended and credit for time served, and fined $1,010.50. The crime occurred Feb. 1 in the Sinlahekin. Emily Ann Wisdom, 23, Tonasket, pleaded guilty April 43 to POCS (heroin). Wisdom was sentenced to 15 days in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the Aug. 8, 2014 crime. The court found probable cause to charge Alicia Lynn Flores, 36, Omak, with residential burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred March 25. The court found probable cause to charge Justin Rogers, no middle name listed, 25, Okanogan, with residential burglary, third-degree theft and giving a false or misleading statement. The crimes allegedly occurred March 25. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Dwayne Stead, 28, Nespelem, with second-degree TMVWOP. The crime allegedly occurred on March 25 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Noel Johnson, 53, Omak, with violation of a no-contact order. The crime allegedly occurred March 28. The court found probable cause to charge Dawn Maria Torrence, 40, Omak, with residential burglary, thirddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred March 30. The court found probable cause to charge Shannon Cersten Strader, 23, Okanogan, with two counts of tampering with a witness. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 7. JUVENILE A 15-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty April 1 to third-degree theft. The girl was sentenced to two days in detention with credit for one day served, and fined $100 for the Dec. 5, 2014 crime. A 15-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty April 1 to fourth-degree assault. The girl was sentenced to 16 hours community service and fined $100 for the Dec. 18, 2014 crime. CIVIL The state Department of Revenue assessed Backcoun-

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2015 Fraud on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Bentham Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Crofoot Lane near Riverside. Public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. Littering on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Lost property on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Theodore Kurtis Storm, 27, booked for POCS (heroin). Davis Henderson Tatshama, 30, booked for first-degree DWLS. William Michael Bozman, 57, booked for violation of a nocontact order. Jason David Harder, 43, booked on an FTA bench warrant for third-degree theft. TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2015 Vehicle fire on Okoma Dr. in

Omak. Trespassing on Reevas Basin Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Pine St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Injuries reported. Public intoxication on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Fraud on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Harassment on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Tricia Lynn Dezellem, 31, booked on two FTA warrants: third-degree theft and violation of no-contact order (DV). Joshua Allen, no middle name listed, 33, booked on two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: second-degree criminal trespassing and second-degree vehicle prowl; and on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Dawn Maria Torrence, 40, booked for residential burglary, third-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Lauren Michelle Rist, 20, booked for making a false statement and a Chelan County FTA warrant for DUI. Jeffery Alan Bob, 28, DOC detainer. Gloria Marie Mathyer, 51, booked on three OCSO PC warrants: vehicular homicide, vehicular assault and thirddegree DWLS. Kyle McLain Plankers, 28, booked for third-degree malicious mischief and a State Patrol FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 2015 DWLS on Hendrick Loop Rd. near Omak. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Backpack reported missing. Sex offender registration on Juniper St. in Omak. Assault on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on S. Columbia St. in Omak. Assault on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Seventh Ave. in Omak. Theft on Juniper St. in Oroville. Clinton John Nicholson, 51, booked on two FTC warrants: both for third-degree DWLS. Brandon Matthew Herz, 28, booked on possession of drug paraphernalia and POCS. Robert Leo Curtis, 55, court commitment for DUI. Garrett Thomas Peterson, 21, booked for POCS (heroin) (with intent), possession of drug paraphernalia and thirddegree DWLS. Reynaldo Cardenas Chapa, 56, court commitment for reckless endangerment. THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 2015 Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Assault on Pine Chee Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Violation of a no-contact order

on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Lode Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Pine St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second St. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. One-vehicle crash on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Drugs on Index St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Cherry St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on W. 4th St. in Tonasket. Graffiti reported. Joshua David Moore, 27, court commitments for fourthdegree assault, third-degree theft and two counts of violation of a no-contact order. Jeremy John Wright, 39, booked for first-degree DWLS. Chance Alexander Taber, 20, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Theodore Kurtis Storm, 27, DOC detainer. Michael Tyler Singleton, 41, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for vehicular homicide. James Corwin Hoben, 39, DOC detainer. Jovany Figueroa Godinez, 20, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Sandina Marie Nelson, 20, booked on an Oroville Police Department warrant for disorderly conduct.

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2015 DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Fraud on Rogers Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on E. Dry Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. Injuries reported. Burglary on Ruthless Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Mary Ann Creek Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Illegal fireworks on Seventh St. in Tonasket. Anthony Robert Jolly, 37, booked for third-degree theft and third-degree possession of stolen property. Jeffrey Duke Clark, 59, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree possession of stolen property. Monica Gaye Joseph, 54, court commitments for two counts of first-degree DWLS. Beau Brandon True, 30, court commitments for reckless driving, disorderly conduct and DUI. Stephen Lee Swezey, 40, DOC detainer. Lisa Marie Ness, 47, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Robert Joseph Parisien, 20, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants, all for seconddegree vehicle prowl. SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 2015 Robbery on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak.

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Theft on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Bicycles reported missing. Found property on N. Ash St. in Omak. Keys recovered. Drugs on Grainger Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on E. Third Ave. in Tonasket. Sebastian Joseph Martinez, 23, booked on four OCSO warrants: third-degree malicious mischief, minor intoxicated in a public place, MIP/C and obstruction. Lynn Marie Arnhold, 38, DOC detainer. Kyle Steven Scott Cate, 24, booked for first-degree robbery, third-degree DWLS, attempting to elude and a Lincoln County warrant for third-degree DWLS.

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015 Trespassing on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Trespassing on Pine St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on 19th Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jeffrey Parra Duarte, 27, booked

on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and hit-and-run (unattended). Raymond Lee John, 22, booked for failure to stop for an officer, refusing to cooperate with an officer, seconddegree DWLS, obstruction; a PC warrant for hit-and-run (attended); an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS; Tribal warrants for battery (DV) and malicious mischief (DV); and Lincoln County warrants for criminal trespassing and resisting arrest.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Stolen gold dredge leads to two arrests Charges filed for possession of stolen property, meth BY GARY A. DEVON GDEVON@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - The theft of a gold dredge and sluice led to the arrest of two men on Friday, April 3 after they were found to be in possession of the items at a Balmes Road residence. In addition, one of the men was charged for possession of methamphetamine. Jeffrey D. Clark, 59, of Oroville and Anthony R. Jolly, 37, of To n a s k e t , were both arrested and transported to the Okanogan County Jail and were booked for possession of Jeffrey D. Clark stolen property in the third degree. Clark was also booked on possession of methamphetamine, since it was his residence, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. On March 26 Okanogan Anthony R. Jolly C o u n t y S h e r i f f ’s Deputies received a report that someone had entered a residence

and a trailer on Broser Way in the Mt. Hull area, where several items were stolen, including a gold dredge and gold sluice, along with tools, according to Sheriff Rogers. “Prior to the report of the theft, deputies received a complaint on March 17 that Anthony R. Jolly had been trying to sell a gold dredge and sluice. They contacted Jolly at Jeffrey D. Clark’s residence at 15 Balmes Rd. They looked at the items and photographed them because it was suspicious but there had been no theft report at the time,” said the sheriff. According to the incident report, the theft victims had not discovered the items were missing until March 26. When they made the discovery they filed a report and the deputies showed the victims photos of the items at the Balmes Road residence and they said that the dredge and sluice were in fact the ones stolen from their residence on Broser Way. “Good job on the deputies checking out the complaint and photographing the items at the time,” said Rogers. A search warrant was obtained and on April 3 deputies executed the warrant at 15 Balmes Road. “Once in the residence they located the stolen gold dredge and sluice upstairs. They also found drugs at the residence which they believed to be methamphetamine,” said Rogers, who added, the investigation is still on going at this time.

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APRIL 9, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

The Petri Dish

Smaller class sizes? OPINION BY JERRY CORNFIELD

THE EVERETT HERALD

Five months ago voters said they wanted smaller classes in Washington public schools. Seven months from now lawmakers want to ask them ‘Did you really mean it?’ In November, the electorate passed Initiative 1351 requiring fewer students in classes at every grade level in every school in every district in the state. The measure contained no “ifs”, “buts” or “maybes,” just a directive to get it done in four years. It also contained no means of paying for the additional teachers and staff and classrooms needed to meet the demands created by the mandate. The price tag, for those who read the voter’s pamphlet, is roughly $4.7 billion over the next four years. This week House and Senate budget writers said the state can’t afford I-1351 and want a reprieve from the bulk of its requirements. They said taxpayer dollars should be spent on shrinking class sizes in kindergarten through third grade, where research shows students benefit the most, and is required of the state under a mandate from the Supreme Court. House Democrats and Senate Republicans follow that blueprint in their respective budgets issued this week and want voters to endorse their approach this November. Leaders in the chambers are now tasked with figuring out exactly how to accomplish that. Senate Republicans want to ask voters to support amending the original initiative to cover those four grades. House Democrats are toying with something a little more complex, linking a revised initiative with other education-related costs. With the intention of lawmakers now clear, the question is will the Washington Education Association and its 84,000 members – mostly public school teachers – fight them. Initiative 1351 is their handiwork. The WEA wrote it and the statewide teachers’ union, along with its locals and the National Education Association spent $5 million getting it on the ballot and passed. However, the final result – 51 percent to 49 percent – and the margin of victory – 40,000 votes out of nearly 2.1 million cast – indicates voters were split on the measure. Lawmakers in both parties think voters will understand the cost of the initiative this November. They also want to avoid an expensive ballot battle with teachers. Neither political party is in the mood to spend millions of dollars in a campaign — especially not the Democratic Party with whom the union is traditionally aligned. Lawmakers hope putting billions of additional dollars into schools, including the first state-funded pay hikes for teachers in years, will help avoid a clash. It would help if Senate Republicans stop pursuing a bill detested by teachers that would require student test scores be used to evaluate their performance. These steps won’t buy the union’s silence or acquiescence in the legislative endeavor but it might keep its campaign coffers closed this fall. Going back to the ballot is not without its risks – even if there’s no opposition. If voters stick by their original decision, lawmakers would need to regroup and come up with the billions of dollars through spending cuts, higher taxes or both. It’s a vexing challenge now and will be no less vexing later. That’s why they want to ask voters if they really meant what they said. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www. heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623;jcornfield@heraldnet. com and on Twitter at @dospueblos

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Why are they messing with medical cannabis?

Dear Gary, Why does the Washington State Legislature (WSL) want to undermine medical cannabis? Initiative 502 clearly stated that if passed, it would have no effect on medical cannabis laws. Senate Bill SB 5052 is an effort by the Washington State Legislature (WSL) that could doom our medical cannabis patient rights. This bill could bring harm and even death to many medical cannabis patients. Why would the WSL do this? Immediately, three reasons grab my attention: knowledge deficit, power, and greed. Let’s examine this. Knowledge deficit: The WSL is way behind the leading edge of Medical Cannabis Study. Amazing anecdotal stories of healing are coming to the public’s attention daily. Legislative bills presented in this session don’t recognize the unique organism of each individual human nor our specific medical condition. New and promising cannabis plant varieties and delivery systems are being developed as we speak. (Recent bills would limit the term “concentrates,” constrict study, experimentation and the patients right to choose the best treatment.) They would limit the number of plants a patient could grow to less than half the current amount-severely limiting the patient’s right and ability to find out if a high CBD plant serves them better than a THC plant (not to mention CBG, CBN or a variety of terpines...) Greed: I- 502 created a huge lobby of 502

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, April 5-12, 1940: Ranger Burge, of Winthrop, called from a cabin in the EightMile country that the snow depth at the pass was 85 inches and the moisture content was 26 inches as measured on April 1. This snow course is thirty miles northwest of Winthrop. Monte McDaniels has in his possession, two original patents to homestead land issued by the United States government to Moses Massey over 100 yeas ago. They were both signed by President J. Q. Adams (John Quincy Adams) and were issued from The Chillicothe, Ohio Land Office. One was made in 1825 and the other in 1827. They were made out on genuine leather parchment and are still in a good state of condition. Postmaster W. A. Grube reported that postal patrons should not be too impatient if the window is not opened promptly for a short time as for the next couple of weeks it is necessary to weigh all incoming and outgoing Canadian mail. There are only three post offices the State of Washington which handle Canadian mail, Seattle, Spokane and Oroville. While on his way to Republic Tuesday morning about seven o’clock, Paul Roberts, who is driving the local Shell Oil Plant truck in Oroville for Joe Hardenburgh Jr., was forced into ditch and turned the truck upside down in the creek along side the road. He escaped without any injuries. There will be a poultry meeting at the Ellisforde Schoolhouse on Wednesday evening, April 17 sponsored by the Washington Co-op local of Oroville and Tonasket and all poultymen interested in getting a better price for their eggs and chickens are urged to attend. According to A. C. Irwin, hatchery man of Tonasket, these eggs are bringing, on the average, two cents above the

growers, processors and retail storeowners in Olympia. Many members know nothing about the exciting miracle of medical cannabis. They want to sell recreational pot. SB 5052 would force patients to purchase their medicine from recreational stores under the guidance of the Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB). Growers following the guidelines of the WSLCB can produce cannabis heavily laden with non-organic chemicals (248 pesticides are approved for use). Medical patients lose again, being forced to smoke, ingest or topically use medicine grown with chemicals known to exacerbate their conditions. This lobby and the WSLCB have held secret meetings. One purpose of these meetings was to end medical cannabis. Power: Campaign contributions put and keep our Legislators in office. Public records show that the prime sponsor of SB 5052, Senator Ann Rivers-(R) 18th District, has received substantial contributions from large pharmaceutical corporations. Pfizer, Abbott and Eli Lilly have all contributed heavily to her last campaign. Big Pharma has always been opposed to medical cannabis because this natural remedy will cut deeply into their billion $ profits. It is up to the public to hold the Legislature accountable. SB 5052 has not passed the House. Please call your representative today and tell them SB 5052 is not acceptable. The legislature needs to work with cannabis patients groups to work out an acceptable way to provide safe access to quality medicine. If these efforts fail to convince the legislature that we need medical cannabis, the public

must once again take the initiative. Citizens Initiative-1372 will strengthen and protect medical use of cannabis. You can find a copy at: www.cppwa.org Please download a copy, sign it, get your friends to sign it and send it to the address on the website by June 27, 2015. This may be the only way to bring common sense, regarding medical cannabis, to the Washington Legislature. Michael “Buffalo” Mazzetti Tonasket

State Fish & Wildlife didn’t bring in the elk

Dear Gary, Hi folks... It’s me again, this time much different subject.... I Spoke with Dale Swedburg concerning the elk problem on “the hill.” He flatly guarantees no elk were ever “trucked in” to our area. As I have lived and hunted this area all my life, I know for a fact there were elk on Mount Hull in the early 1950’s. And, they have multiplied. Any time you have a critter that is not hunted and has no predation, that animal such as the elk is going to multiply. Elk are a different creature to hunt than deer and many hunters originally didn’t know of their existence. The elk have done what comes naturally. I don’t always side with Fish and Game.... BUT, I am positive this population of elk is not their fault. Again, in God we trust, Betty Roberts Oroville

local market. Beginning Tuesday, April 16, all dogs kept within the city limits or found at large on the streets without a license, as provided for by town ordinance, will be taken up and destroyed.

$1.89; Bread, 4 loaves for $1.00; 2lb. bananas, $.29; Ground beef, 3lb., $1.17; Skinless Franks, $.49 per lb.; Ice Cream, ½ gal. $.49; MJB Coffee, 3 lb. tin, $1.37 and 16 oz. frozen, breaded shrimp,$.99.

The Oroville Gazette

The Gazette-Tribune

50 Years Ago:

25 Years Ago:

April 1-8, 1965: The Oroville JuniorSenior High School last Friday, March 26, chose their May Festival Queen and two attendants. Five finalists were chosen earlier in the month; they were, Lynn Dwyer, Deanna Jennings, Janice Pickering, Janice McDougal and Kathy Kuntz. Elected to reign as the thirty-first May Festival Queen on May 7 and 8 was Miss Lynn Dwyer, daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Robert Dwyer. Her attendants are Deanna Jennings, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Jennings and Janice McDougall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy McDougall. An additional $500,000 federal allocation has been secured to speed construction of the North Cross State Highway in Washington. This sum, from the Federal Public Lands Fund, will be sufficient to program work on 3.9 miles of the route, designated Washington State Highway 16. Skiing was excellent Sunday at the Ski Tow as there was five inches of new powder snow for some of the best powder skiing of the season. There is a total snow depth on the hill of 28 inches. North Central Washington will have a vital role in the Communications Satellite Program. A tracking station, to be built in the region, will become a part of the program that was launched on August 31, 1962. This legislation authorized the creation of a Communication Satellite Corporation which plans to begin the world’s first commercial communications satellite service sometime this year and will be located just North of Brewster, Wash. The James Hotel, a scar on the main street of Oroville, will soon be torn down. The hotel was sold last month for back taxes by the county. The removal of this building will be a great improvement to the looks of south main. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: March 31, 63 degrees maximum and 36 degrees minimum; April 1, 59 and 26; April 2, 61 and 43; April 3, 64 and 28; April 4, 65 and 23; April 5, 65 and 33 and April 6, 59 and 41. A total precipitation of .01” for the period. Grocery Prices: Flour, 25# bag,

April 5 - 12, 1990: Over 350 acres of orchards in Okanogan County are slated to be “pushed out” by the Farmer’s Home Administration and the number has the potential to go higher. The reasons behind that are varied. Many of the orchards are planted in varieties that are just not marketable while other have old trees that are not good producers. Some of the orchardists are not just good managers according to the FHA. Corina Jean Young was chosen to reign supreme as this year’s Oroville May Day Queen with her Princesses, Jennifer Cari Gee and Dawn Nicole Rounds. As part of the judging the girls were asked to give speeches on the subject of “My home town, May Day and what do they mean to me.” The resourcebased economy of Eastern Washington is under attack by environmental extremism, according to Steve Fuhrman, Representative of the 7th District. Logging restrictions, Wetland bills, growth management planning and Department of Ecology regulations result in one thing, government control of private property. Crown Resources Corporation has announced that a Houston company, Battle Mountain Cold Company, has taken a $10 million option on its Crown Jewel gold deposit on Buckhorn Mountain near Chesaw. The James Askew Associates Engineering firm has estimated a total uncut geologic are approximately 8.3 million tons, grading .102 ounces per ton, or about 840,000 ounces of gold. The Tonasket Tigers suffered a close loss against Penticton B.C. in baseball action on Saturday. The final score was 5 to 4. “We came so close,” Coach Olsufka said of his Hornet baseball team, “but we never seem to get the win.” Real Estate: 40 acres with pond and trees near Molson, $29,500; 40 acres on Whiskey Mountain with well, $42,000; Brick home, great location, lovely 3 bdrm home has 2 ½ baths, large living room-dining room with great view-family room downstairs, wet bar, storage and furnace room, all appliances included, immaculate condition, $65,000.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 9, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Hope that everyone’s Easter a happy one Hoping all had a Happy Easter. Our family is sorta scattered so the big family dinners sometimes dwindle to just a few. We had eight with our daughter bringing the food. It tasted especially good since I didn’t do the cooking, but did provide the traditional eggnog pies. When he asked where all the grocery money was going the wife told him to stand sideways and look in the full view mirror. I thought everyone knew how to make green, edible, Easter grass, (for cupcakes and other decorations) but when I saw a lady trying to, unsuccessfully, buy some green coconut, I told her to take a few drops of green food coloring, dilute it with a few drops of water, put it in a jar and shake it, then spread it on a cookie sheet, let it dry, and there she’d made

green coconut grass. Oh! Boy! Did we see a BUNCH of turkeys on the way to Molson on the last Monday night of pinochle. Can you believe that the “Sound of Music” movie is 50-years-old? I can remember the first time I saw it and I’ve watched it many times throughout the years. It is a beautiful sad story, unlike the “junk stuff” these days... will they last fifty years? And did you know Jeopardy is 51-years-old? It was a good day for Merv Griffin when he came up with the idea for that. Made him very rich. Can you remember it started at $10 per question where it is now, $1,000,00? There are some positive sounds being talked of, for a breakthrough in cancer. It seems that more and more people are

being afflicted with some form of it, so it miles, with never an accident, we can’t would be wonderful if something can be say that anymore. We are so thankful discovered to cure or prevent the awful that we, nor the fellow we hit, were injured. It is a different story malady. for our car. Seat belts do I recently saw an article help. Wear yours. Yes, we entitled, “Raising Kind will have to replace the car. Kids,” which caught my eye. It was totaled! First you have to have kind We were on our way to parents. When I see folks in, Wenatchee, for doctors perhaps the grocery, yelling, appointments. It is said most screaming and slapping at accidents happen within 20 small children, creating more miles of home, and that was of a scene than the child was, the case with both parties I feel like interfering, and involved. then my common sense kicks He tried to make his car in, and I move quickly away, THIS & THAT payment with a smile, but thinking, “poor children.’’ It Joyce Emry they demanded cash! is said you have to be smarter Most who know me, know than a dog to train one, and of my serious dislike of raisins. In a the same rule applies to little kids. Children reared with meticulous care book of old fashioned home remedies, by over-protecting parents often turn out it is said to split a raisin in half, sprinkle as well as those who are permitted to it with black pepper and place over the aching tooth and it will relieve the pain. grow up naturally. For some, April Fool’s day is filled If that works, finally a good use for one with pranks, jokes etc. Not so for us this of those disgusting little items. We just learned of the death of Gene year. After having driven more than 70 years and thousands and thousands of Harnasch, Sr. When a long time friend

leaves our community it definitely leaves a big void. Gene was on hand at Prince’s retail store for a lot of years and he and his wife would sometimes be called on to babysit the little Prince girls when they needed trustworthy folks to stay with the children. It was a sad day when Gene had to have his leg amputated, due to a blood disorder, keeping him from his beloved golf game, but he adjusted. His sense of humor was the best. To the family, we send sincere condolences. Gordon and Nancy Roberts have returned from the warmer climates of Arizona, enjoying visiting family and friends and soaking up sunshine. On Main street it appears that one store just moved across the street, next door to the Gazette-Tribune, from the corner of Central and Main. If you like colorful country side drives, go toward Wannacut Lake and view the golden hillside, and down the valley is beautiful sights with the many fruit trees is full bloom. Just hope they aren’t rushing the season and get nipped in the bud. ‘Til Next Week.

Spring Quarter begins April 15 SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

THE LEARNING TREE

Spring quarter has arrived at North Valley Community School and it’s time to enrich your life by learning something new! Coming up in the next week NVCS would like to offer the following classes: Need to Learn English? Wednesday, April 15 at 6:00 p.m. This class is designed to teach non-English speaking people basic communication in English. It will be taught primarily in English, translation to Spanish will be used only when absolutely necessary. The following is a class description in Spanish

translated by Mr. Steve Quick. Clase de Inglés Descripción: La mayoría de la clase estará en inglés para enseñar los participantes cómo comunicarse en inglés. Traducción a inglés pasará solamente en ocasiones absolutamente necesarios. Habrá carteles con fotos para proveer ayudas visuales y ayudar a los estudiantes aprender los esenciales para hablar inglés. Habrá tarea cada semana para aplicar lo que es

Raffle goes to THS Scholarship Drive

TONASKET EAGLES

enseñado en las clases. Material Necesario: Cuaderno, papél, lapis Decorative Journals – Thursday, April 16 at 6:00 p.m. Does keeping a journal sound like a great idea, but a plain book sound a little boring? Bring an old book to transform and spice up your journal to make your journaling experience fun and interesting! Amateur Radio and Emergency Communications Thursday April 16 at 7:00 p.m. Amateur radio is a worldwide hobby that many enjoy. Ham radio is great for meeting and communicating with people, and is extremely valuable in an emergency situation. Getting an amateur radio license is as easy as getting a driver’s license. Come learn how to get started! To sign up for these classes and more call Ellen Barttels at 509476-2011 or visit.

Submitted photo

Bud McSpadden holds up the Everyday Hero Award and pin he received from the Tonasket Kiwanis Club

Bud McSpadden scores record setting donation amount for Salvation Army SUBMITTED BY BERTHA WANDLER TONASKET KIWANIS

Each year the Tonasket Kiwanis Club members take

Getting prepared for summertime activities SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Molson Museum Committee will be hosting their Spring Meeting on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 at 1 p.m. in the Big Hall at Eden Valley Guest Ranch. Everyone is welcome. The next Bingo night over in Molson at the Grange Hall will be on Friday, April 17 starting at 7 p.m. There has been a sizable donation made to the Prize Fund so the Pay Back Prizes are good ones. Come and join in the fun. These big prizes will go for three more times. On Thursday, April 23 in Molson at the Grange Hall there will be a potluck starting at 6:30

TONASKET KIWANIS turns ringing the Salvation Army Bell for two Saturdays prior to Christmas. However, this last December community member Bud McSpadden asked if he could help us by ringing the bell on Christmas Eve. Which he did for six and a half hours. His efforts

HILLTOP COMMENTS p.m. After dinner high school students from Oroville will make a presentation on their Class Assignments. The next Pancake Breakfast will be on Sunday, April 26 from 11a.m. to 2 p.m. in Molson. The big yard sale for Chesaw and Molson will be held in Molson on Memorial Weekend. Other things to look forward to this summer will be the Summer Fest in Molson in June. Plans are already being made for the Hot August Nights in Chesaw in August and the 4th of July Rodeo in Chesaw. Come and enjoy the Summer on our Hilltop. I will make an attempt to fix last week’s news (April 2). There was a combination of errors, however, like I said, I am going

300 dozen eggs at Easter Egg Hunt

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE EAGLES AUXILIARY #3865

The Easter Bunny came and then hopped away until next year. There was a good turn out for the annual Community Easter Egg Hunt at Lake Osoyoos Veterans Memorial Park as usual. Special thanks to Akins Harvest Foods, Frontier Foods, Gold Digger Apples, Oroville Reman and Reload, Zosel

to try. It is important that the Pinochle winners get posted as the season for the games has come to an end until the fall. So, all of you want to be players, here is your chance to learn or practice all summer. If you need help just give Willie or George Penner a call at 509-485-1922 and they can help you. The winners for two weeks ago were: (March 23) Highs Leonard Paulson and Dolly Engelbretson. The Low’s – Larry Smith and Jan Harper and the Traveling went to G. Penner. The Winners for the last week were: High’s – Carl Cole and Judy Ripley with the Low’s going to Lenord Paulsen and Lani Thompson. With 35 in attendance, Ina Visser took Traveling Award and Birdie Nelson got the Five Week Prize. See you all in the fall Until next week.

Lumber, Appleway Video and so many others who donated to help make our community egg hunt a success. A big thank you to the City of Oroville for donating the use of Veterans Memorial Park and to all the Eagle girls who spent hours boiling and dying around 3600 eggs. Thanks to all again.

SUBMITTED BY SUSIE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Spring is here, warmer weather to come. It’s time to check for ticks on your dogs and other pets. The Aerie has started their annual Scholarship drive for the Tonasket High School. You could win a MS170 Stihl Chainsaw. Tickets on sale at the bar one

Senior meals: Support a great program SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT - OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

The Older Americans Act of 2006 Section 315, In part, says: “....contributions shall be encouraged for individuals whose self-declared income is at or above 185 percent of the poverty line, at contribution levels based on the actual cost of services.” OAA 315 (b)(1). The income level they are talking about is $21,775 for a single person and $29,471 for a couple, annually. The cost of services is $8 per meal. I am bound to comply with the law, and pose the question. It’s up to you all to do what you think is right. Stop, think, and give as you are moved, and able. Be encouraged. Let’s

ticket for $3., two tickets for $5 and five for $10. Joker Poker is growing again come in and get your tickets for the drawing on Sat. at 7 p.m. Friday is Bingo at 7 p.m. and this Friday the kitchen will be having burgers and a special of pulled pork sandwiches for only $5. Don’t forget our Sunday breakfast

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

Pinochle Report: Most Pinochles, Jim Fry; Ladies High, Nellie Paulsen; Men’s High, Jim Fry; Door Prize, Arden Penner.

support a great program. Our Pancake Breakfast for this month is scheduled for this coming Saturday. That’s April 11, at 8 to 10 a.m. Mark your calendar for a scrumptious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, tea, orange juice, milk, and a smile, all for only $8. Tillie Porter’s Computer Classes are on-going. I highly recommend them. Sign up sheets, and times, for the next classes are in the lunch room. The new floor covering is in the process of shipping. It’s scheduled for arrival on April 13th. Expenses are accruing, and we are thankful for any contributions received towards that project.

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rewarded us with a record setting donation amount for the Salvation Army. On March 24th the Tonasket Kiwanis Club awarded Bud with the Everyday Hero Award. The award consists of a certificate signed by the Pacific Northwest Kiwanis Governor and also signed by our president Aaron Kester. Bud also received an Everyday Hero pin.

from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Pinochle scores are as follows: first and second place there was a tie with Lee Bennett and Jo Porter low score went to Dave Russell and last pinochle to Dave Russell. We are saddened by the loss of sister Gerry Beeman. There will be a Memorial Luncheon for her on Saturday, April 11 at 11:30 a.m. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State

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APRIL 9, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

Seeking input on County Extension director position

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OKANOGAN CONSERVATION DISTRICT NATIVE PLANT SALE OKANOGAN - The Okanogan Conservation District Native Plant Sale will be held on Saturday, April 11 in downtown Okanogan at the corner of Rose St. and 2nd Ave (next to Rawson’s) from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Purchase bareroot native plants including ponderosa pine, serviceberry, mock orange, and many other species. A species list is available on the District website at www.okanogancd.org/plant-sale. Quantities are limited, so come early for best selection; in 2014 the sale sold out in less than one hour. Cash, checks, and MasterCard/ VISA will be accepted. Okanogan County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer questions about plants and planting. Information on noxious weeds will also be available. For more information, please contact the Okanogan Conservation District at 509-422-0855. Nuance to Perform at Winery

OROVILLE - Nuance, an instrumental/vocal trio consisting of Sam Howell on bass clarinet, Walt Gilbert on bass, and Scott Teagarden on acoustic guitar, return to Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, April 9, with their blend of soft jazz and a variety of pop music. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509476-2861. Oroville Senior Center Pancake Breakfast

the lookout for fresh ideas. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 to let us know. FD 16 Meeting & Location Change

Fire District 16 has permanently moved the monthly Commissioners work session to their new fire station at 20 Bench Creek Road in Aeneas Valley. The Commissioners meet the second Monday of every month and their next meeting is Monday, April 13. The public is invited to attend. Call Mike Woelke at 509486-1386 for any questions. OCTA Monthly Meeting

OROVILLE - The Oroville Senior Center will have their Our Pancake Breakfast on Saturday, April 11 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Mark your calendar for a scrumptious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, tea, orange juice, milk, and a smile, all for only $8. The Senior Center is located at 1521 Golden Street.

OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) will hold their Public Board Meetings the second Monday of every month. The next Board Meeting will be held at our office, 307 S. Main #4, Omak, WA 98841 at 6 p.m. on Monday, April 13. Please visit our website at www.okanogantransit.com.

Habitat for Humanity Yard Sale

OES Leadership Day

OROVILLE - Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity Yard Sale on Saturday, April 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Gold Digger Warehouse on Main Street in Oroville located between the Okanogan Winery Gift Shop and the railroad tracks. Public donations accepted – no clothing. Call Lynn Chapman, 509-476-4626.

OROVILLE Oroville Elementary School invites people to join them for Leadership Day on Wednesday, April 15 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Come see student presentations from grades K-6. Students will share what they are learning about The 7 Habits of Happy Kids (based on Stephan Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People). Call 509-4763332 for more information.

CCC Rummage Sale

TONASKET - There will be a huge Rummage Sale at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave. in Tonasket, starting Thursday, April 9 until Saturday April 11 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. each day. Donations are welcome on Thursday and Friday. Saturday will be $1.00 a bag day. We fill the entire concert/dance hall with a variety of treasures, so don’t miss this event. Proceeds will go to the Front of the building remodel fund. NVCS Class Start

NORTH COUNTY - Spring quarter for North Valley Community Schools is just around the corner! Watch for the green class catalogs coming soon! North Valley Community Schools classes will begin April 13. Also, NVCS website and Facebook pages will be updated with the upcoming classes. Meanwhile, are there subjects you wish NVCS would offer classes in? Do you have a skill or hobby you would like to pass on to other people? North Valley Community School is always on

Story Time at Library

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, April 15 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children. Rural Pathways to Prosperity Conference

OROVILLE - The Rural Pathways to Prosperity Conference will be held Friday, April 17 at the Pastime Bar & Grill from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This includes breakfast and lunch! For more information contact Debra Hansen, WSU Extension 509-684-2588 or debra.hansen@wsu.edu. Locally sponsored by Oroville Chamber of Commerce. in partnership with the City of Oroville Community Development Office. Oroville Grange Potluck

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange Potluck and meeting Wednesday, April 18 at 6 p.m. at the Grange Hall 622 Fir St. Oroville. The potluck supper

begins at 6 p.m. followed by the meeting at 7 p.m. This month we will be planning for May Day and other community events, including a series of live music and dance events for this year. The Grange welcomes all interested people to this long standing community organization. Join the fun and come together with other community minded people to make some good things happen here in Oroville. Blossom Spring Bazaar

OROVILLE - The 9th Annual Blossom Spring Bazaar is Saturday, April 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Oroville High School Commons Admission Free (please bring a Food Drive Donation)/ Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day! Sponsored by Blossom Ministries. Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at 509-733-1941 or 509-476-2246. TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be hosting its first Art Gala Fundraiser on Saturday, April 18. Thirty one artists will display their artwork for judging based on a pre-determined theme. The public will judge “My favorite artists interpretation of the theme”. There will be prizes for the top three artists. Come judge and enjoy h’ordeurves and music by Steve Kinzie from 3 to 6 p.m. Dinner is at 6 p.m. and is $10. There will be a silent auction from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. while enjoying the riveting music provided by Reed Engel. The live art auction will begin at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at Tonasket Interiors and the CCC or at the door. Come get some culture, some fantastic art, enjoy a wonderful dinner and the best music in the valley! The Community Cultural Center is located at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket. For more info call: 509-486-0365 or 509-476-3121 SOAP to Perform Melville Boys

OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 p.m. For ticket information, please check out http://www.soplayers.ca/melville-boys.html Spring Barter Faire

TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire announces, “Spring Barter Faire.” The event is May 1, 2, and 3 at the Family Faire Grounds located at 72 West Cayuse Mountain Road (off Hwy. 20), Tonasket. Information available at: okanoganfamilyfaire.net; offaire2015@gmail.com; or 509486-2173. Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival

OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org

FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

For the past few years, the stock market has moved up fairly steadily, with no major “corrections.” But thus far in 2015, we’ve already seen periods of volatility — enough, in fact, to make some investors jittery. Nervous investors may be more prone to make decisions based on short-term market movements — so how can you stay calm? First of all, when evaluating your investment decisions, stay focused on those factors that have historically driven stock prices. The U.S. economy is growing at a reasonably good pace, and corporate earnings remain fairly strong. Plus, stocks may not be as undervalued as they were a few years ago — as measured by the price-to-earnings ratio (P/E) — but they still aren’t overly expensive, either. Things can change, of course, but when market volatility seems to be primarily caused by short-term events,

What else can you do to help ensure that you don’t let feelings of anxiety influence your investment moves? For one thing, evaluate your investment mix. If you own too many stocks and stock-based vehicles, you could take a big hit if stock prices fall sharply during periods of volatility. Historically, however, bond prices have typically increased when stock prices fell — although, of course, there are no guarantees. So, if your portfolio consists of stocks and bonds, you are better positioned to weather the harshest effects of market turbulence.

always looking for quality. Typically, higher quality investments fare better during market declines and recover more quickly when the markets rebound. How can you judge whether a particular investment is of good “quality“? A long-term track record is useful to study. It’s certainly true that, as you have no doubt heard, “past performance is no guarantee of future results,” but it’s nonetheless valuable to know how a particular stock, for example, has performed in various economic environments. If it seems to have done well relative to others in its industry and over long periods of time, that may give you a good idea of its quality. It’s never easy to take all the emotions out of investing, especially during periods of market volatility. After all, you count on your investments to help provide you with the type of future you’ve envisioned. But by focusing on the fundamentals, putting together an appropriate investment mix and constantly looking for quality, you can help “de-stress” yourself — and, as the American poet, novelist and historian J.G. Holland once said, “Calmness is the cradle of power.”

To further prepare yourself for downturns, you may also want to diversify your fixed-income holdings to include investments such as U.S. Treasury bills, certificates of deposit (CDs) and municipal bonds. The percentages of each type of investment within your portfolio should be based on your goals, risk tolerance This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial and time horizon. Advisor. Finally, you can help yourself maintain an even-keeled approach to investing by

Public meeting Tuesday, April 14

Our calendar generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. Our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info contact. Place an event on online by going to our website and clicking the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. List your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

SUBMITTED BY SHERRY BODKINS WSU OKANOGAN COUNTY EXTENSION

OKANOGAN - The WSU Okanogan County Extension Director’s position is currently vacant. To insure this position addresses the needs of Okanogan County residents, there will be a public meeting on Tuesday, April 14 starting at 6 p.m. The purpose of this meeting is to gather input on what the focus of the WSU Okanogan County Extension Director position should be. As the gateway to the university system, Extension serves the

diverse population of Okanogan County. The major program areas currently serving the community include Master Gardeners, SNAPEd, Food Preservation, and 4-H Youth Development. Comments and concerns are important in addressing the needs of the community and filling the WSU Okanogan County Extension Director’s vacant position. Randy Baldree and Jim Kropf, WSU Extension program directors will be leading the meeting. Written comments may be sent to the Extension office at PO Box 391 Okanogan, WA 98840 or emailed to Okanogan. county@wsu.edu or call 509-4227245 for more information. The County Commissioner’s Hearing Room is located at 123 5th Ave N #150 in Okanogan.

Okanogan Valley

Art Gala at CCC

Control Your Emotions in Volatile Markets such as plunging oil prices, it’s important to look beyond the headlines to these less glamorous, but probably more important, fundamentals of good investing. By doing so, you can help avoid making fear-driven investment choices.

Listing Your Item

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville 10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Healing Service: 1st Sunday Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Warden • 476-2022 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 9, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 9, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 1 BR Starting at $365/mo + security deposit. 3 BR Starting at $450/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

SUN LAKES REALTY Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Lots & Acreage COMMERCIAL LOT, 1 ACRE in Prescott AZ. New development close by. Possible trade for similar lot in Oroville area. (928)713-6741.

www.gazette-tribune.com Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

For Rent

$550; 2 BR, 2 BA with walk-in closet. Quiet area. Nice view of green lawn from covered back patio. Great location. 2nd floor apartment in 4 plex. $400 dep. Oroville 509-2233064 509-560-9043. $650. 3 BR, 2 BA MOBILE HOME IN LOOMIS AREA Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433 OROVILLE LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom apartment. Upstairs. No pets or smoking. $435 per month. 509-476-3145

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

BUS DRIVER

Career Opportunity

Okanogan County Transit Authority

ENTRY LEVEL AND LATERAL POLICE OFFICER

seeks full and part time Drivers to provide safe, reliable and courteous transportation services to the public, including populations with special transportation needs. Positions report to the Omak office. Positions from 24-40 hours/week. $16.90-$17.93 per hour and benefit eligible. Class B CDL with Passenger endorsement required. See www.okanogantransit.com for instructions on submitting applications. Okanogan County Transit Authority is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

3 BR to 4 BR House $795-$895. Furnished Cabin $625. Lakefront Apt $795. Beautiful downtown Apt $495-$600. Call 509-476-2121

Job Fair April 9, 2015

www.gazette-tribune.com

Veranda Beach invites you to our annual job fair

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces

April 9th - 9am to 1pm. Positions in the following departments will be offered RESORT STAFF Front Desk Services Housekeeping Housemen Store Clerk THE DINER Line Cooks Servers Baristas Front of House Manager General Laborer Landscape/Vineyard crew Veranda Beach Resort, 299 Eastlake Road, Oroville, WA 98844. Phone 509-476-4000

RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Carrier Wanted:

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Crosswords

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The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune is seeking an independent contract delivery driver to deliver one day per week. A reliable, insured vehicle and a current WA drivers license is required. This is an independent contract delivery route. Please call 509-476-3602, ext 5050 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

26. Common solvent

6. Rebounds

28. Bas-relief medium

7. Way, way off

31. Cocktail accessory

8. Severe recurring headache

33. Syria’s largest city

9. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

35. “___ moment�

10. Inferior

36. Annoy

11. 3! and 4!, e.g.

39. Anita Brookner’s “Hotel du ___�

12. “Encore!�

40. Poor health 43. C.S.A. state 44. Soon, to a bard 46. Carbonium, e.g.

6. Beast of burden 11. Marvelous, in slang 14. Gasket (2 wds) 15. All excited 16. “Give it ___!� (2 wds) 17. Deprives of hope

25. Arizona Indian 27. Colgate rival 28. Apple variety

52. Tears down

30. Red ribbon winner (2 wds)

53. Gloom

32. 1,000 kilograms

55. “Beowulf,� e.g.

34. Hodgepodges

57. Fire remnant

37. Beat it

58. Doing nothing

38. Minnesota ___, pool hustler

65. Player’s twisting to help desired ball direction (2 wds)

1. Musical show

23. Any thing

49. Someone who has no chance of success (hyphenated)

64. Directly

ANSWERS

18. Adaptable truck, for short

47. Gelcap alternative

60. Barbra’s “A Star Is Born� co-star

Across

13. Carried

68. Balaam’s mount 69. About 70. Bridal path 71. After expenses 72. Veins of mineral ore 73. Charger

29. Brio

41. Not straight 42. Traditional dress of women in India 45. ___ of the above 48. Illuminated from behind 50. Kind of tea 51. Rents to a new tenant 53. Alternative to a convertible 54. Charm 56. Ballpoint, e.g.

Down

59. Fraction of a newton 61. Acclivity

1. Engine parts

62. “Cast Away� setting

2. Ashtabula’s lake

63. Abandon

3. MasterCard alternative

66. Beatle spouse

22. ‘60s protest (hyphenated)

4. Become unfastened

67. Neon, e.g.

24. “Beg pardon ...�

5. “I� problem

19. “Wheels� 20. Close, as an envelope 21. Unit of pressure

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications and will conduct a Civil Service Exam to establish an eligibility list for Entry Level Police Officer and for Lateral Officer; please specify which application you are requesting. Applications may be secured from the Oroville Civil Service Commission, Secretary-Chief Examiner Lindsey J Acord, PO Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844, Phone (509) 476-2926 ext. 14. A $10.00 non-refundable fee is required before an application may be given to the applicant. Applications may also be secured from the City’s web-site: oroville-wa.com The $10.00 non-refundable fee must be submitted with the completed application to be accepted. Requirements for applicants: Minimum age of 21, high school diploma or GED, able to meet physical and medical minimum requirements, have a valid Washington State driver’s license, pass a competitive Civil Service Exam. Hiring is provisional based on outcome of background investigation, psychological and polygraph evaluations. Lateral applicants must also have successfully graduated from the Washington State Law Enforcement Academy and hold current certification and have a minimum of 24 months of continuous law enforcement experience. Wages currently range from $2,946.60 per month for Entry Level to $3,799.40 per month after 36th month following certification; benefits include 80% health package. A physical dexterity test will be included with the written and oral exams for Entry-Level applicants, dress accordingly. Applications are due Friday, May 15th, 2015 by 4:00 PM. Test date will be Saturday, May 30th, 2015 at 8:00 AM. E.O.E. The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) is seeking an OPERATIONS MANAGER. This position is responsible for the daily operations of all transit services, ensuring high quality public transportation availability to the residents of Okanogan County. CORE FUNCTIONS include oversight of dispatch, fixed route, demand response and vanpool programs, supervision and training of staff, participating in strategic planning, policy development and transit related reporting. Must live no more than 60 minutes from Okanogan County. For a complete job description, please visit our website at okanogantransit.com OCTA is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Dental Operations Manager Okanogan and Oroville Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Dental: Dental Operations Manager, Brewster, Bridgeport and Twisp Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

DINER FOR LEASE Lease this fully equipped and established 1950’s themed Diner at Veranda Beach Resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington. This is an exciting business opportunity for an experienced and successful food and beverage operator with catering capabilities. The Veranda Beach Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Jim Hammond for details jim@legendresorts.com Check out our website www. verandabeach.com

Wanted WANTED TO BUY: Paying Cash for Silver, Gold, Coins, Jewelry, Sterling Flatware. Spence: 509-429-4722.

Garage & Yard Sale Oroville

YARD SALE April 11th & 12th, 9am-1pm. Miller’s Lane (turn right off Airport Rd.). Some furniture, scrapbooking items, craft books and much more. TONASKET Saturday, April 11th, 9-4. 328 Hwy 7 S, Two miles south from 4th Street Bridge. Queen bed, treadmill, antique mirror oak TV stand. Good stuff! NICE clothes. Guy things. (509)486-2066 for directions

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Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

RETIREMENT AUCTION - DAN SMITH - 95 White Rock Rd - OKANOGAN, WA. Go up Hwy 20 toward Twisp approx 7-8 miles. Turn Right on Buzzard Lake Rd. Follow Signs to White Rock Rd and turn Left to Sale Site.

SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2015 – 10:00 a.m.

******************************* NOTE: Dan’s health is forcing his retirement. Excellent offering of Equipment in Very Good Condition, and some items Like New. Large Selection of Mechanic and Shop Tools PARTIAL LISTING BELOW :

* Ford 4500 Tractor w/Backhoe, Front Bucket, Gas, Good * Ford 2110 Tractor w/ Front Loader * Inter 766 Farmall Tractor w/Loader, Gas, 71 HP, w/Ripper Pipe Layer * AC Cat w/Angle Blade, Hydr, Good Tracks & Rails * D-4-R Cat w/Blade (bad clutches) * JD M Tractor * 1994 Dodge Ram 2500 Pickup, 2 WD, Diesel, 4-speed, Canopy * 1962 Inter 1600 Loadstar Truck w/18-ft Bed * Tandem Axle Trailer, 12 ft x 5 ft * 1997 Polaris Xplorer 500 4-wheeler, 4x4 * 24-ft Cargo Van * Hydr Hay Grapple ÂżWV,+7UDFWRU  \G'XPS%R[ .LD)RUWHGRRU&DU -D\FR7UDYHO Trailer, 31-ft, 2 tip-outs * Miller Welder, Trail Blazer 250G, Gas, Like New * Honda 2000 Generator, Like New * Honda ES 4500 Generator * Honda Pressure Washer * Grand Rapids Drill Press * 1000-gal Fiberglass Tank * Ryobi 10-in and Delta Chop Saws * 12-in Table Top Saw * Stihl & Poulan Chainsaws * Bench Griner * MANY MORE SHOP & HAND TOOLS * Toro Lawnmower * JD Riding Lawnmower * .308 Winchester * 410 Shotgun * 41 Magnum .22 Pistol * Collectible Homemade Pistol * MUCH MORE CALL & WE WILL MAIL, E-MAIL, OR FAX YOU A HANDBILL

NO SALES TAX * NO BUYERS PREMIUM

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 DAL DAGNON 486-2570

Business Opportunities

Licensed & Bonded

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF APRIL 6, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. HELP WANTED Drivers-No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! No matter what stage in your career, it’s time, call Central Refrigerated Home. (888) 793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com


APRIL 9 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 9, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR COUNTY OF KING Estate of RICHARD DEAN ANDERSON, Deceased PROBATE NO. 15-4-01636-6SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 26, 2015 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Richard J. Anderson ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Elizabeth A. Stephan WSBA #30479 ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: Oak Street Law Group, PLLC 10900 NE 4th Street, Suite 2230 Bellevue, WA 98004 COURT OF PROBATE PROCEEDINGS/CAUSE NUMBER: 15-4-01636-6SEA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26, April 2, 9, 2015. #OVG621841

NEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 3138268 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/17/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 Third North in the City of Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: That part of the Northeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of Section 9, Township 32 North, Range 25 East W.M., Okanogan County, Washington described as follows: Commencing at the center of Section 9, Township 32 North, Range 25, East W.M., and running thence West on the East and West center line of Section 9, a distance of 634.35 feet and turning an angle of 90 deg. to the left and running a distance of 400 feet to the Point of Beginning; Thence from said Point of Beginning run East on a line parallel to the East and West center line of Section 9, a distance of 301.38 feet; Thence turning an angle of 90 deg. to the right and running a distance of 75 feet; Thence turning an angle of 90 deg. to the right and running a distance of 301.38 feet; Thence turning an angle of 90 deg. to the right and running a distance of 75 feet to the Point of Beginning. EXCEPT the East 118.0 feet of said premises. More commonly known as: 41 OKANOGAN STREET, MALOTT, WA 98829 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/10/2008, recorded 10/20/2008, under 3138268 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from WILLIAM E. CONLEY and HEIDI J. CONLEY, Husband and Wife , as Grantor(s), to Baines Title Company, Inc. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR EAGLE HOME MORTGAGE, LLC (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $28,828.52 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $174,480.64 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2013 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/17/2015 . The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/6/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/6/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/6/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME WILLIAM E. CONLEY and HEIDI J. CONLEY, Husband and Wife AD-

DRESS 41 OKANOGAN STREET, MALOTT, WA 98829 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 1/16/2014 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 12/15/2014 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Wash-

ington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-602786-TC IDSPub #0074909 3/19/2015 4/9/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 19 and April 9, 2015. #OVG610186

27, 2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustees’ fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers’ or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the April 27, 2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the current Beneficiary, Planet Home Lending, LLC or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): ADDRESS UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERNEST D DAHLGREN 308 SOUTH TONASKET AVE, TONASKET, WA 98855 ERNEST D DAHLGREN 308 SOUTH TONASKET AVE, TONASKET, WA 98855 by both first class and certified mail on November 12, 2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees’ Sale. X. If the Borrower received a letter under RCW 61.24.031: THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer

you to mediation if you might eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (877) 894-4663 or (800) 606-4819 Website: www.wshfc.org The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (800) 606-4819 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; Dated: December 30, 2014 MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, as Duly Appointed Successor Trustee By: Jean Greagor, Authorized Signatory MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps 1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100 Seattle WA 98101 Phone: (800) 409-7530 For Reinstatement/Pay Off Quotes, contact MTC Financial Inc. DBA Trustee Corps TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.insourcelogic.com. Order No. WA14-000455-2, Pub Dates 04/09/2015, 04/30/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 9, 30, 2015. #OVG625107

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Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 12/13/2014 8:43:03 AM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-13-602786-TC APN No.: 3225090079 Title Order No.: 130240994-WA-MSO Grantor(s): HEIDI J. CONLEY, WILLIAM E. CONLEY Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMI-

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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Nickel Cove Sudivision & Rezone LPA 2015-1 Application & Threshold SEPA Determination An application proposes rezoning a 1.03 acre property to Suburban Residential. The current zone designation is Rural 1. Also, a concurrent subdivision application proposes development of two lots. Water and septic shall be provided by the City of Oroville municipal utility lines. Access is provided by Eastlake Road. The property is within the plat of Okanogan Smith Irrigation Tracts and fronts the east shoreline of Lake Osoyoos and Eastlake Road. The physical address is 117A Eastlake Road, approximately 1 mile north of Oroville, WA. Tax parcel: 6400030002. Project comments must be submitted in writing or attend the public hearing. The public hearing for this project is not yet scheduled. Project comments and SEPA comments will be reviewed separately. SEPA Comments must be submitted in writing no later than 5:00 pm April 22, 2015. According to Washington State Environmental Policy Act regulations, Okanogan County Planning and Development issued an environmental determination of non-significance (DNS). Failure to comment by this date denies a party standing to appeal the final SEPA determination. Information is available at the Office of Planning and Development. Direct questions and comments to: Ben Rough, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7122. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 9, 2015. #OVG625134

TS No WA06000164-14-1 APN 2420112000 TO No 8476431 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on May 8, 2015, 10:00 AM, at the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 3rd North, Okanogan, WA 98840, MTC Financial Inc. dba Trustee Corps, the undersigned Trustee, will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 1 AND THE NORTHWESTERLY 15 FEET OF LOT 20, BLOCK 11, MAP OF TONASKET, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN BOOK “B” OF PLATS, PAGE 37, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN, STATE OF WASHINGTON. APN: 2420112000 More commonly known as 308 SOUTH TONASKET AVE, TONASKET, WA 98855 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of January 22, 2011, executed by ERNEST D DAHLGREN, UNMARRIED MAN as Trustor(s), to secure obligations in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. (“MERS”), as designated nominee for MORTGAGE INVESTORS CORPORATION, Beneficiary of the security instrument, its successors and assigns, recorded February 17, 2011 as Instrument No. 3161845 and the beneficial interest was assigned to Planet Home Lending, LLC and recorded October 1, 2014 as Instrument Number 3194718 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Okanogan County, Washington. II. No action commenced by Planet Home Lending, LLC, the current Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantors’ default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. Current Beneficiary: Planet Home Lending, LLC Contact Phone No: (866) 882-8187 Address: 321 Research Parkway, Ste. 303, Meriden, CT 06450 III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY WHEN DUE THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WHICH ARE NOW IN ARREARS: DELINQUENT PAYMENT INFORMATION From April 1, 2014 To December 30, 2014 Number of Payments 1 Monthly Payment $418.63 1 $397.71 7 $357.47 Total $3,318.63 LATE CHARGE INFORMATION April 1, 2014 December 30, 2014 $66.08 PROMISSORY NOTE INFORMATION Note Dated: January 22, 2011 Note Amount: $47,927.00 Interest Paid To: March 1, 2014 Next Due Date: April 1, 2014 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $44,515.91, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on May 8, 2015. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by April 27, 2015, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before April


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 9, 2015

SPORTS Tonasket Tigers keep fighting the good fight BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Head Coach Emily Rimestad urges Vanessa Pershing to keep rounding bases. Pershing was batted in by Alexa Sutton.

Tonasket’s Lady Tigers faced tough opponents in Liberty Bell Thursday, April 2, dropping the game to the Mountain Lions 1-13. A lot of hits were made with the Tigers being tagged out before reaching first base. The only run to keep the game from being a shut-out was scored by Vanessa Pershing, the Tigers’ pitcher. Pershing had a base hit before being sent home by Alexa Sutton in the fourth inning. “We’ve been practicing since the first of March, so the team is starting to come together,” said Liberty Bell Coach Lee Pilkington, now in his twelfth year of coaching the softball team. “I’m really proud of them. Tonasket has a good team, too.” Liberty Bell is currently ranked third among nine teams in the North division of the Central Washington B Leagu, with three league wins and zero league losses. Tonasket next had to face Okanogan, the team currently

ranked in first place, with seven league wins and zero league losses. Traveling to Okanogan Saturday (April 4) for a tough doubleheader, the Tigers lost to the Bulldogs 5-18 and 3-13. Tonasket currently has zero league wins and five league losses, with two wins overall and six losses overall. “Perfect effort is essentially what makes a good team, whether

you win or lose,” said Tonasket’s head coach Emily Rimestad at the beginning of the season. “To me, that makes the team a winning team.” Rimestad is assisted this year by first-time coach Breanna Hanson. The softball team travels to Liberty Bell Tuesday, April 14, and hosts Manson Saturday, April 18 with games at 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.

First baseman Alexa Sutton tags out a Liberty Bell runner.

Tonasket takes down Pioneers on their own field BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Jesse Manring catches a pop fly for Liberty Bell’s third out in the first inning.

The Tonasket Tigers traveled to Omak to beat the Pioneers 12-9 Tuesday, March 31. Jesse Manring went 2-4 with one walk and two runs scored; Jimmy Coleman went 2-2 with two walks and three runs scored; Cade Hockett went 2-4 with one walk and two runs scored; and Quincy Vassar went 1-2 with a double and one walk. Hockett pitched three innings and Adrian McCarthy pitched four innings. Hosting the Liberty Bell Lions Thursday, April 2, the Tigers took a 2-4 defeat. Coleman pitched all seven innings, throwing only 87 pitches for Tonasket. He had five strikeouts and no walks. On the offense, Coleman went 2-3, Manring went 1-3 with a double and a run, and Chad Bretz walked and scored a run. “Before the big bang that got Derek Alumbaugh ejected (nicest kid on the team), he was pitching a one-hit, ten-strikeout five innings. Cruising, to say the least,” reported Liberty Bell Coach Don Calvert. “About ten feet from home plate, Derek ran Adrian (McCarthy) over. Adrian held onto the ball for the out. Derek was ejected for lowering his shoulder rath-

er than sliding,” said Tonasket Coach Dan Vassar Friday, April 3. “Adrian was pretty sore today.” “That was a tough game, and obviously one we were glad to walk away with a win from,” said Calvert, who reported eight hits with doubles by Jacob McMillan and Alumbaugh; and RBI singles by Riley Calvert and Gavin Wengerd.

Tonasket hosted Okanogan for a double header Saturday, April, 4. The Tigers lost both games, 1-9 and 1-13. McCarthy pitched four innings in the first game and Hockett pitched four in the second game. “Jimmy Coleman broke up Jim Townsend’s no-hitter with a double, and Cade Hockett hit him in

with a single, scoring the game’s only run for us,” reported Coach Vassar. “In the second game Adrian McCarthy had a double. Not much going for us Saturday.” Following spring break, the Tigers travel to Liberty Bell Tuesday, April 14, and host Manson Saturday, April 18 for games at 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.

Jesse Manring rushes to second base with ball in hand, but not before Liberty Bell’s Riley Calvert slides in safely.

Tonasket ranked third in league for soccer BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket hosted the Central Washington B League’s toughest soccer opponent Tuesday, March 31, holding the Bears to just two goals to the Tigers’ one. The Bears are currently ranked first place in the league, with four league wins and zero losses. The Tigers aren’t too far behind, sit-

ting in third place among the seven league teams, with three league wins and one league loss. Tonasket is just about neck and neck with Liberty Bell, currently at second place with three league wins and one league loss; Liberty Bell has five overall wins with two losses and Tonasket has five overall wins with three losses. Goal-wise, the Bears have 31 scored and eight conceded; the

Mountain Lions have 22 scored and 15 conceded; and the Tigers have 23 scored and 10 conceded. The Okanogan Bulldogs are currently in fourth place with one league win and two league losses, followed by the Manson Trojans ranked in fifth, also with one league win and two league losses. Ranked sixth and seventh in the league are the Bridgeport Mustangs and Oroville Hornets,

Free Community Movie Night - 7PM at the

Tonasket Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave.

The Lost Fish

both with zero league wins so far. The Mustangs have lost four league games but won one overall, whereas the Hornets have three league losses and four over-

Dining

For more info on our habitat restoration projects or educational events go to our website at ccfeg.org or call us at 509.888.7268

&

Entertainment Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

Prime Rib every Sat.

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* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB The Cascade Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group is a non-profit working in Chelan and Okanogan counties facilitating habitat restoration projects and educational opportunities to help foster healthy fish populations for future generations. If you own riverfront or floodplain property and are interested in helping fish please contact us.

a close loss of 1-2. The Tigers host Cashmere, currently ranked first in the Caribou Trail 1A League, Tuesday, April 14 at 4 p.m.

Out on the Town...

Thursday April 23rd

Come learn about the oldest fish in the Columbia River! They have been returning to spawn for over 450 million years, but now Lamprey are on the brink of extinction. This short film covers the cultural significance of this historic fish, and will be paired with presentations on lamprey biology and regional research.

all losses with no wins. Tonasket traveled to Bridgeport Thursday, April 2, beating the Mustangs 2-1. A trip to Chelan Saturday, April 4, cost the Tigers

starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

EVERY WEEK


APRIL 9, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SCHOOLS OES PAINTING PARTY

TONASKET ELEMENTARY GRABS EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION AWARDS BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Recipients of this year’s Excellence in Education Awards are Tonasket Elementary School’s Jamie Portwood, a Remedial Reading Specialist; and Special Education Paraprofessional Elizabeth Norblad. “This is the third year in a row the classified staff award is coming from the elementary school,” said principal Jeremy Clark. “We are proud to have Jamie and Elizabeth on staff; they couldn’t be more deserving of the award. Anyone among the school staff can nominate a recipient for either the Certified Staff Award, or the Classified Staff Award, which includes other staff members such as paraprofessionals, bus drivers or kitchen staff. After the nominations come in, a committee decides who the recipients will be. Jamie Portwood, left, and Elizabeth Norblad are this year’s Excellence in Education award winners. said Norblad. “I call the students ‘Little Angels Among Us.’”

Norblad has been working as a special education parapro for 25 years; the last ten at Tonasket Elementary. “It’s my passion. I love it,”

Portwood serves as the Cheerleading Coach and Middle School Track and Field Coach, along with her duties as a reading specialist. An Awards Banquet will be held May 8 at Tonasket High School, with school districts countywide recognizing their winners. This year a short video will be shown demonstrating the winners at work with the students they serve.

Submitted photos

Sarah Marlow, the counselor at the Oroville Elementary School held a paint party so students could come and help paint some boxes that will be used to showcase student art for the schools leadership event on Wednesday, April 15. “The event was a success with over 40 students, staff members, and parents volunteering their time after school to synergize and get around 20 cardboard boxes painted!,” said OES Principal Joan Hoehn. “Everyone had a great time and some even got a little messy. Good thing they wore their painting clothes.”

THS Future Business Leaders head to State BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) class attended the North Central Regional Competition in Wenatchee February 18, with seven students heading to State competition in Spokane April 15-17.

Abe Podkranic, in his senior year, took second place in Agribusiness. Freshman Morgyne Hjaltason took third in Public Speaking 1, and freshman Nicole Juarez took fifth in Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure. Senior Colt Hatch made it to the finals in Impromptu Speaking, but did not place in the top five.

The seven students headed to State will be competing in various events. Podkranic will compete in Agribusiness and Business Calculations. FBLA President and senior Smith Condon will compete in Client Services and Business Communications. Condon and Podkranic will work as a team for a Marketing competition.

Hjaltason will compete in Public Speaking 1; Juarez in Introduction to Parliamentary Procedure, Intro to Business and Creed; freshman Justin McDonald in Business Math and Accounting 1; Hatch in Impromptu Speaking; and freshman Brooklyn Ward in Introduction to Business Communication and Business

Law. “The students are excited to attend State in Spokane this year,” said the club’s advisor, Business and Marketing Instructor Kerry Delfino. “They are looking forward to the College and Career Fair that will have over 20 exhibitors, where they will learn about internships, discover new colleges, and even find employment

opportunities.” Keynote speakers at the conference include a former Starbucks president, the creator of the Xbox and a nonprofit CEO. “The students will also have the opportunity to network with other WAFBLA members from around the state,” said Delfino.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2 2015

OBITUARIES

DESPERATE | FROM A3

Geraldine Beeman

Two typical Okanogan cowboys of late 19th Century The search for the Okanogan Kid, however, stalled right about here. Old Washington Territory census records taken in anticipation of statehood seem to indicate that Smith Junior lived on the coast between 1880 and 1900 in Seattle, alternately identified as “bookkeeper” or “clerk.” The atypical census information “born in Maine, [about] 1863” strongly suggest that these references are our boy. Even so, this is not information that would appear to support a theory about George H. being The Okanogan Kid. Even his father testified two years later that his son managed his nine meat markets in Seattle. Still, it’s difficult to imagine a cattleman’s son of that era as anything but a cowboy. In January, 2015 the evidence turned up--in a Seattle PostIntelligencer article of November 14, 1892, titled “Life on the Okanogan Range: A Cowboy Describes Interesting Sights and Scenes Among the Bunchgrass.” George H. Smith (the horses’ mouth, so to speak) describes eastern Washington climate and land as well as explaining that he spent the summer near Whitestone Lake with 5,000 head of cows on surrounding grazing land. [Aside: Quite a comeback in two years, from few cows after a bad winter to a huge herd]. He goes on to describe the cowboys “so romantic for their mysterious names” who are known only by their nicknames, such as Sorrel Horse Woods, Come Quick Kense, Henry the Kid. Smith makes it clear, without mentioning his own nickname, that he was most likely known in the cow

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camps of the territory as “The Okanogan Kid.” The news of Charley’s Long’s killing got to Oregon in less than three weeks. The McNett family provided the obituary from the East Oregon Herald issue of January 31, 1894 of Harney County (location of Marcus

“The cowboys ‘so romantic for their mysterious names’ who are known only by their nicknames, such as Sorrel Horse Woods, Come Quick Kense, Henry the Kid.... ” George H. Smith, (aka The Okanogan Kid?) in an interview in the Seattle Post Intelligencer, November 14, 1892

Howard’s ranch). The obituary suggests that Charley Long, often in trouble during his early days, “...came out a pretty good man... at no time using a gun... he was quarrelsome when drinking but later years, at the advice of friends, stopped carrying a pistol and became a very quiet citizen.” Also mentioned was that Charley had left for Washington around 1892 and expecting trouble over a ranch. While the Herald obituary clearly names George H. Smith as Long’s killer, that identity may have been typically better known as “The Okanogan Kid” in the cow camps of Oregon. It’s not

too hard to imagine the news: “Who killed Charley Long (gasp of astonishment)?” “Don’t know his rightful name, only that he’s known around camp as The Okanogan Kid.” Later retelling of Charley’s death in the remote Okanogan country, picked up by Gale Onko and other writers eighty years later, may have had only the nickname to go by. Certainly “George H. Smith” is neither sufficiently romantic nor mysterious for chiseled granite through the ages.

Geraldine Beeman passed away at home with her family by her side on Friday, April 3, 2015. She was born October 29, 1939 in Tonasket to parents James and Rosie (Siegrist) Rider. Rosie married Duward Scott in 1945 and Gerry became the daughter of Duward’s heart. Gerry was raised up in the Bonaparte Lake area. She went to Wauconda School through the

BILLY RUSSELL GIDEON

Billy Russell Gideon, 53, of Omak, Wash. passed away March 30, 2015. Billy was born October 29, 1961 in Omak. He will be dearly missed by his mother, Judy Miller; stepfather, Zeke Miller; sisters, Connie Gideon and Susie Mann, all of Oroville, Wash. At his request, there will be no memorial service. PrechtHarrison-Nearents Chapel and the Okanogan County Crematory are caring for the arrangements.

BACK ON THE RANCH:

Those keeping track of the Smiths have now counted up at least four. The newspaper has two Longs, Jack and Charley. The coroner’s jury has at least two names that figure in the events leading up to the confrontation at Palmer Lake, which will bring the tally up to eight. One of those events has George H. Smith’s name on it. Our last installment will bring more facts to the table to unravel the tangled web presented so far. There’s a chance that readers will find a plausible motive, tucked in between the facts, that explains the stakes and the circumstances. For now, we have the classical moral of so many old Western movies: No matter what one becomes in life, a reputation as a gunslinger will surely take you to an early grave. And there remains the nagging mystery left behind in 1894: How many guns? Whose guns? Smith’s, Long’s? Self-defense? A shooting? Was this really a gunfight?

Billy Russell Gideon

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Gerry is survived by her husband Bert, her three daughters, one brother Mike (Glenda) Scott, one sister Pat (Yeg) Wandler, grandchildren Chereẻ and Jason Utecht, Josh and Zack Kuhlmann, David (Kellie) Burton, two great grandchildren Kady and Karder Burton and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, Rosie and Duward Scott and James Rider and grandson, Willie Burton and nephew, Brian Wandler. Services will be held Saturday, April 11, 2015 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Free Methodist Church with a luncheon to follow at the Tonasket Eagles. In lieu of flowers the family request memorials are made to Relay for Life/Angels Among Us, 131 N. Tonasket Ave., Tonasket, WA 98855 or the Willie Burton Memorial Scholarship Fund at US Bank, Tonasket. The family wishes to express their sincere gratitude to Frontier Hospice. Death Leaves A Heartache No One Can Heal. Love Leaves A Memory No One Can Steal. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

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GERALDINE BEEMAN

eighth grade. She attended high school in Tonasket, graduating in 1957. During her high school years she was Princess Wauconda, Tonasket Rodeo Princess and in 1957 was Tonasket Rodeo Queen. On January 25, 1958, Gerry married Bert Beeman and they lived in the Loomis and Tonasket area. In 1972, they built a home on Aeneas Lake and raised three girls, Sally Jo (Allen) Utecht, Rosalie (Terry) Kuhlmann and Peggy (Dwight) Burton. Gerry worked in the apple industry for many years, working as a checker and dispatcher for Regal Fruit and Bluebird until 2009. Gerry was a member for many, many years of the Tonasket Eagles and Tonasket American Legion Auxiliary. During this time, Gerry was involved with the Tonasket Comancheros. Gerry and Bert organized the Pony Express from 1991 to 2000. Gerry tended the Rodeo grounds making it the park that it is today. If you couldn’t reach her at home, you could find her down there working. Bert and Gerry were chosen Grand Marshalls for the Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo in 2001. Gerry’s life was her family and her happiest times were at the family gatherings.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 09, 2015  

April 09, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 09, 2015  

April 09, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune