Page 1

EASTER EGG HUNTS

AREA SCHOOLS IN THE NEWS

Eagles to hold Easter Egg Hunts in Oroville & Tonasket, Saturday, April 4

See Pages A3, A11

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Tonasket looks at forming Rec District for pool

GOOD GRIEF CHARLIE BROWN

Proposal would have 15 mile radius around town BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Representatives from the Tonasket Swimming Pool Committee appeared before the city council Tuesday, March 24, to seek input regarding a proposed Tonasket Parks and Recreation District to help with the cost of maintenance of a new city swimming pool. The committee chose the county type of Parks and Recreation District from three different model types; a model that requires seeking advice and consent from the city council and county commissioners, but does not give the Parks and Recreation District

power of eminent domain. This model includes levy cycles every six years requiring 60 percent voter approval. The planning committee is currently working on mapping out the district boundaries, which will be smaller than the Tonasket School District. “We are looking at a 15 mile radius from the Tonasket City Center, as the bordering districts probably won’t be using the pool,” said committee member Michele Giovia, Tonasket High School Gear Up Director. The planning committee needs to collect signatures from 15 percent of registered voters in the proposed district, which they estimate to be less than 300, and submit the petition to the county auditor’s office by May 4 in order to get it on the November ballot. Working with an estimated budget of $81,200 per year to maintain the swimming pool, they are expecting the levy

SEE POOL | PG A12

Chief Rob Burks retires to pursue tattoo dream Taking on ‘Big Pink Ink’ full time BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket Police Chief Rob Burks announced his resignation Thursday, March 26. April 30, 2015 will be his last day with the police force. But Burks isn’t going anywhere— he’s staying here and moving into full time work as a tattoo artist with his business, Big Pink Ink. “I have a childhood friend, and he Chief Burks was one of my first ‘fixer’ tattoos—where I touch up what they already have—and he jokingly called me Big Pink Ink because I’m a

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Oroville held their annual Kite Day last Saturday at Bud Clark Ballfields, unfortunately someone forgot to tell the wind. No sooner would a tiny puff of breeze come along to lift the kites skyward and it would go calm just as suddenly and the colorful kites, many of them provided by the Oroville Chapter of the Royal Neighbors, would come floating back to earth. It didn’t matter as everyone seemed to be enjoying the blue skies and warm temperatures as they ran the length of the park, strings held firmly in hand. One kite was reminiscent of Charlie Brown’s and spent the day in a tree. It was breezier on Sunday and would have made for much better kite flying. Oh well, there’s always next year.

cop,” said Burks, adding that once his friend sent him a logo of a bodybuilding warthog with tatoos in a police uniform, the name stuck. Burks has been the Tonasket Police Chief for the past eight years. He grew up in Oroville, graduating in 1985 and going to college in Wisconsin before returning home and starting in law enforcement as a jailer and dispatcher in Oroville. “I got my first cop job with Wilbur, Washington,” Burks said. He became a patrolman with Tonasket in October 1995 before being promoted to Chief in 2007. “This was a good place for me to end my career,” said Burks. “I love Tonasket and I’m not leaving. As a result of working here, I’ve gotten to meet a lot of interesting people and make several new friends and hear a lot of good stories.” Burks has been doing tattoos on

SEE BURKS | PG A3

Nursing Home forum attracts many New legislation may offer help by 2017; group asks for letters of support BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Nearly 70 people gathered at the Oroville United Methodist Church to attend a Nursing Home Forum last Thursday. The forum was led by Dixie Brown, Linda Holden, Kim Black and Montie Smith from the Nursing Home Success Team. Using charts and financial figures the team members explained that it was important to remember that in order for the Nursing Home to exist, North Valley Hospital has to remain financially viable. There are 40 residents currently in the long term care facility, one of only six connected to hospitals remaining in the state, according to the team. “We have the second lowest cost per resident... and despite budget cuts we

have maintained our five star rating,” she said. said Holden, who credits the district’s Those in attendance were told that training program for nurses and CNAs there is state legislation that may more as a big factor in those realistically reimburse numbers. for the cost of resident The nursing home is “For those 40 people it’s care by 2017. Current operating at a deficit reimbursement rates vital for their families and the county treaare frozen at 2007 levsurer has urged the at $149 a day per to be close by and for els district to not get back resident. That leaves those who may need it about a $50 for day into trouble with warrants. Currently the which resultin the future it is vital” shortfall, district has paid back ed in over a $700,000 Kim Black, NVH Long Term Care the $3 million in wardeficit in 2014. Nursing Home Success Team rants it owed and is Kim Black spoke looking at $1 million in about how important the bank. However, the the nursing home is district can not go on supplementing the to the area’s economy – that there are 70 nursing home, which does not get back employees and that if those jobs were what it costs to care for each resident – gone the local economy would take a mostly because the majority of residents, big hit. 95 percent, are not private pay and the She also spoke about the importance state does not reimburse for actual costs. to the local people, as well as the resiSmith said the Nursing Home Success dents. Team meets weekly and applauded the “For those 40 people it’s vital for their hospital commissioners for extending families to be close by and for those who the discussion beyond the original dead- may need it in the future, it is vital” said line to Dec. 31 of this year. Black. “That gives us some breathing room,” The group also talked about asking for

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 14

a levy to help support the nursing home as the district has the ability to increase the tax rate. They also asked for support

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Linda Holden, DNS, uses a chart to illustrates how the North Valley Long Term Care part of the hospital district could benefit by how the facility is used.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

through letters to the state legislators asking them to better reimburse for nursing home care.

News A2-3 Schools A3, A11 Cops & Courts A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate Sports Obituaries

A9 A10-11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2, 2015

BURKS | FROM A1

tattoo artist in July of 2014, and has done about 360 tattoos so far. He said depending on size and complexity, tattoos can take him

anywhere from five to twenty minutes for a small one, or up to seven and a half hours for a larger one.

Burks, age 48, originally planned to hold off on full time tattoo work until retirement. Asked what changed his mind, Burks replied, “A combination of things. It’s taken off more than I thought it would. Right now with what little time I have I do one tattoo a night; from four to five a week, and I am booked clear into May. For the last six to eight months, I’ve had to schedule tattoos two months out. But once I’m full time, I’ll be able to do two or three a day.” He said the other reason for the earlier retirement was wanting to spend more time with family, friends and church activities. “I’m losing friends to things like cancer, and it makes me realize....I want to enjoy life. Rather than working until I’m 65 and then dying, now if I die in a month or two, at least I would die doing something I enjoy.” His tattoo shop is located behind his house. Burks and his wife Wendy have two daughters still at home, ages 17 and 14, as well as three sons ages 19, 21 and 23 years old. A fan of tattoos since 1989, Burks has 26 on his own body. His work can be viewed at his Facebook page, Big Pink Tatoo.

Attwood said it has always been this way, and suggested continuing with it. Plumb said he felt it was unfair to treat two city employees differently than everyone else, and said when he suggested paying all city employees overtime after 35 hours, he was told there was no money for that. Making the positions 40 hours per week was discussed, but Attwood said at this point she was not ready budget-wise to change. She said overtime hours are rarely put in; usually only if she is out of town or the planning commission meetings run until 5 p.m. “I don’t know if it is more feasible to pay a few hours overtime or pay the extra five hours per week,” said Rice. “This is not about pennies and dimes, this is about equality under the law,” said Plumb, stating there was no state or federal law saying a person had to be paid overtime before they reached 40 hours per week.

Council member Scott Olson moved to keep the pay the same, with clerical staff getting paid time and a half after 35 hours. The motion was seconded by Council member Claire Jeffko. Brown said he felt it was a budget issue that should be discussed later, and Olson agreed with him. Keeping city hall open until five p.m. was also discussed. “I get approached by multiple people asking why city hall is not open ‘til five p.m. and I am told by the employees that would just be too hard,” said Plumb. “I told them they could stagger their hours. I think the hours should be from 8 to 5 p.m., and they can figure out what to do for lunch. With three employees, we should be able to cover that. The police have to provide coverage 24/7, and there are only three of them. We get calls after hours from people saying they missed getting into the office. This is simply an issue of service to the

community.” Council members agreed to keep city hall hours at 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. GARBAGE CANS Rice reported being approached by community members to have mandatory garbage cans for people within the city limits. Attwood said it was mandatory to have a plan for garbage pickup, but not a can. Rice said in Seattle, garbage cans were added to the water bill. Attwood said the city would have to contract with a collector for that, and Plumb said he did not want to get in the garbage business. Plumb said anyone having concerns about garbage left lying around by city residents could be addressed by calling city hall at (509) 486-3132, and the complaint would be forwarded to Building Inspector Christian Johnson. ENGINEERS, PROJECTS The council selected Varela

Brent Baker/file photo

Above, Rob Burks prepares to do a tattoo on Melody Webb. The photo is from an article the G-T did last October. Burk’s logo, “Big Pink Ink” is also a tattoo. This is just one example of the retiring Tonasket Police Chief’s work. himself, family and friends for about four years after buying himself a tattoo kit for Christmas in 2011. He became licensed as a

POOL | FROM A1 to be 14 to 16 cents per $1000 of property value. The planning committee is currently gathering input from the community through a Tonasket Parks and Recreation Needs Survey. Council members directed staff to prepare a resolution with the assistance of attorney Mick Howe for the next city council meeting stating the city will join a Parks and Recreation District upon formation. OFFICE HOURS, OVERTIME Council member Lois Rice, on the Personnel Committee along with Council member Dennis Brown, reported meeting with City Clerk-Treasurer Alice Attwood to discuss the budget of employees working in city hall. Clerical staff receive overtime compensation of time and a half for hours worked over 35 per week. Attwood called the issue a “point of contention” between herself and Mayor Patrick Plumb.

and Associates to continue as the official engineering firm for city projects. Current projects include the US 97 pedestrian bridge and a sewer rehab project funded by a Community Development Block Grant. “The law requires us to advertise for an official city engineer for city projects, as does the CDBG funds, so it served a double purpose,” said Attwood. “We had a rating system for the different companies that applied.” Varela and Associates have been the official engineering firm for Tonasket for over 20 years. Attwood announced the Infrastructure Assistance Co-ordinating Council (IACC) will be holding its annual conference Oct. 20-22 at the Wenatchee Convention Center. Attwood said the conference is attended by city and county representatives to meet with various funding agencies, engineers and WSDOT officials.

“It’s a great opportunity to meet with people and discover funding or suggestions for city projects,” Attwood said. “It’s very helpful, especially for a small town, as it gets our name out there and lets people know what we need.” Attwood said she and the mayor attended last year, along with Council Member Brown and Superintendent of Public Works Hugh Jensen. Olson reported speaking with Linda Black, who said the Spray Park is on track to open midMay. City Council members and the mayor have been invited to attend the Princeton Rotary Club’s annual parade July 3. “We are being asked as the city to participate in this. They have invited a lot of cities in B.C. to attend, but we are the only Americans being invited,” said Plumb. “They attend our Founder’s Day Parade every single year.”

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APRIL 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

SCHOOL

Tonasket’s FFA team heading to state

Submitted photos

Tonasket’s FFA Team took several first-place finishes at Sub-Districts March 12. The team’s advisors are Matt Deebach and Andie Wommack.

Tonasket’s FFA team cleaned up at Sub-Districts held March 12, in Tonasket. Sub-districts include Pateros and Bridgeport north to Canada. Grabbing first through fourth place finishes in Prepared Speaking were Deisy Alcaeter, Jenna Valentine, Corrina Karrer and Nichol Fletcher. Students give a six to eight minute prepared, persuasive speech on an FFA subject with five minutes of oral questions at the end. The first through fourth place finishes were also all taken by Tonasket in Extemporaneous Speaking with Rade Pilkington, Colt Hatch, Leighann Barnes and Morgan O’Brian. Students draw

OROVILLE ELEMENTARY TO HOLD KINDERGARTEN ROUNDUP SUBMITTED BY PRINCIPAL JOAN HOEHN

the District 7 Finals in Chelan. Districts include Wenatchee, Leavonworth and East Wenatchee north to Canada. First through third placers at Districts will compete at State in Pullman, Washington, May 14-16. Tonasket teams took first and second place in Agricultural Issues at Sub-Districts. Students are required to pick an agricultural issue that has no clear answer, and present both sides of the issue in a speech lasting no longer than 15 minutes, with five minutes of oral questions at the end. Taking first place was a team of Alejandra Avilez, Shelby Gilreath and Serenity Poletti. The team to place second was Colt Hatch, David Curtis, Nicole Fletcher and Hunter Swanson. These teams will compete at State in Pullman in May. Several students earned Proficiency Awards for Supervised Agricultural Experience projects, with two of them forwarded on to Nationals. Headed to Kentucky for the National competition in October 2015 is Charile Sanchez,

NEW FLORAL TEAM MAKES IT TO STATE FFA advisor Andie Wommack, who teaches Floral Design and several other horticulture classes at THS, said her team has been competing since the fall and went to State Competition in Snohomish March 21. “This is the first time Tonasket has ever had a Floral Design Team, and they did very, very well,” said Wommack. The team is made up of Bonnie Siegfried, Dallin Good, Ruben Laurie, Wyatt Pershing and Seth Smith. Events included identifying 50 common plants and tools off a

FFA President Dallas Tyus, who will participate in Parliamentary Procedure at Districts in Chelan April 22, has applied to run for State office. “In the spring there will be an extensive candidacy review with a 50-question test on agricultural topics, a written exam, a group interview and individual interviews. The top ten individuals will make a speech. Six people chosen will travel around Washington State and sometimes into Oregon to promote Agricultural Education and Leadership,” said Tyus. A fourth-generation hay farmer with experience in sheep production and diversified lifestock, Tyus hopes to become an Agricultural teacher. “I think it would be really cool, because you are someone the kids look up to,” Tyus said. “Also, they learn stuff that can apply to their lives, not like trigonometry.”

BEYERS

OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

OROVILLE - Oroville Elementary Kindergarten Round-up will be held at the Elementary School on April 21st and 22nd, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on both days. Any child who has turned fiveyears-old, or will turn five prior to Aug. 31, 2015, will be allowed to register for Kindergarten. If you are unable to attend the Kindergarten Round-up, please come by the Elementary School office at any time/ any day, from 8:00-3:30 to register your child. Registration is now open for children who will be attending Kindergarten in September of 2015.

FFA PRESIDENT LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

Tonasket’s first-ever Floral Design Team competed at State in Snohomish March 21. Pictured left to right are: Dallin Good, Wyatt Pershing, Ruben Laurie and Seth Smith. Not pictured: Bonnie Seigfried.

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three topics and choose one, with thirty minutes to write a four to six minute speech. After presenting, they have five minutes of oral questions to answer. In the Creed competition, Nihole Juarez grabbed first place, Morgan Tyus took third, and Zach Clark got fifth. Students memorize a five-paragraph essay written in the early 1900’s on the FFA, recite it, and are asked three questions afterward. Tonasket teams also took first and second place in Novice Parliamentary/Rituals competition. Students are required to display opening and closing of a meeting, four motions of parliamentary law, and debate three times each on a topic they don’t know the subject ahead of time on, with just one minute to prepare. The Tonasket FFA team also took first place in the Vejraska Livestock Judging competition, with Morgan O’Brien taking second as an individual. Finishers from Sub-Districts will compete again April 22, at

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said. “They are looking forward to putting in some hard work and being even more competitive next year.”

list of 124 plants and 17 tools; a knowledge test of 50 questions from a bank of 500 questions covering plant science topics ranging from fertilizers to stages of development to marketing of materials; and a problem-solving test where one example might be identifying a deformity and naming what kind of disease causes it. Tonasket was one of four teams to take a first place in Team Activities, with the Tigers taking a total of 200 possible points. “The group as a whole is given a scenario they have to solve. For example, they might be told ‘the local Kiwanis needs five floral arrangements and they have a budget of $200,’” said Wommack. “They have twenty minutes to come up with a solution, and ten minutes to present the solution to the judges.” In addition, each team member does an individual practicum of a different topic, covering anything from job interviews, individual sales, customer complaints, making and packaging a corsage, to designing a round arrangement. Seventeen total teams competed at State. “The kids are really excited. They had a lot of fun,” Wommack

with a first-place Gold award in Fruit Production; and John Symonds in Equine Sciences. “John won State last year in Agribusiness, and has a shot to become a National Finalist,” said FFA advisor and Agricultural teacher Matt Deebach. Symonds graduated Tonasket High School last year, but gets to include projects from the summer of his senior year in this year’s competition. Sanchez will be recognized as a District Star onstage at the State Convention held May 14-16 in Pullman, Washington. Other students receiving Proficiency Awards are: Brock Henneman in Beef Production Placement (2 Silver) Colt Hatch in Ag Services (2 Bronze), Darbee Sapp in Agricultural Sales-Placement (3 Bronze), Jesse Manring in Fruit Production (4), Manuel Puente in Fruit Production (5) and Brooke Nelson in Swine Production Entrepreneurship (8). Nine students qualified to earn their State Degrees at this year’s convention: Brock Henneman, Brooke Nelson, Charlie Sanchez, Colt Hatch, Darbee Sapp, David Curtis, Jesse Manring, Manuel Puente and Morgan O’Brien. Deebach estimated only about 25% of FFA students become eligible to receive the State Degree.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2, 2014

COPS & COURTS

A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty March 25 to firstdegree criminal trespassing. The boy was sentenced to 16 hours of community service and fined $100 for the Dec. 26, 2014 crime. A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty March 25 to theft of a firearm and theft of a motor vehicle. The boy was sentenced to a total of 25 days in detention with credit for 14 days served and 90 hours of community service for the Jan. 10 crimes. The boy was fined $100 and ordered to pay $688.29 in restitution.

CIVIL The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed DF Orchards, LLC, Tonasket, for $12,388.56 in wage payment violations, penalties and fees. The state Employment Security Department assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits, penalties and fees: David J. Barton, Tonasket, $710.70; Elizabeth Garza, Riverside, $2,418; Natasha R. West, Oroville, $851.70; Clemente Pacheco, Omak, $403.92; Colin Townsend, Okanogan, $486.72.

DISTRICT COURT

MONDAY, MARCH 23, 2015 Theft on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Trespassing on Koala Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Burglary on S. Fir St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Casey James Brender, 25, court commitments for attempting to elude, unlawful imprisonment, reckless endangerment, possession of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. Esther Leona Vankirk, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Huntz Carlton Leonhardt, 33, booked for obstruction.

TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 2015 Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Sex offender registry on Madd Mountain Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan.

Burglary on Cougar Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Domestic dispute on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Theft on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Mail reported missing. Trespassing on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. MIP/C on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Columbia St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Ross Canyon Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Denny Albert Dare, 53, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: residential burglary, harassment (threats to kill) and fourth-degree assault. Jason Jonathan Boyce, 24, booked for DUI. Alicia Lynn Flores, 36, booked for residential burglary and third-degree theft.

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2015 Warrant arrest on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Howell Canyon Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Mailbox reported missing. Theft on Pine Creek Cemetery Rd. near Tonasket. Trees reported missing. Theft on Omak Mountain Rd. near Omak. Prescription medication reported missing. Recovered vehicle on E. Third Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. Theft on Broser Way near Tonasket. Mining equipment reported missing. Automobile theft on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on E. Park Dr. in Omak.

FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2015 DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Fraud on Cape Labelle Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Illegal burning on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Dalton Rd. near Omak. Found property on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Tools reported missing. Custodial interference on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on S. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Canyon Court Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Illegal burning on W. Delicious St. in Tonasket. Illegal burning on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Delitha Gail Hahn, 37, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for POCS. Stephen J. Whitefoot, 23, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock vio-

lation; and a Yakima County warrant for MIP/C. Steven Gonzalez, no middle name listed, 24, booked for an ignition interlock violation, third-degree DWLS and making a false statement. Kristen Ann Bob, 32, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for firstdegree attempted robbery. Arlen Leroi Long, 58, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: second-degree criminal trespassing and second-degree theft.

SATURDAY, MARCH 28, 2015 Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Hand carts recovered. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Engh Rd. in Omak. Steven James Novotny Jr., 46, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Palmer Elliat Gunshows, 28, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). John Leon Thomas, 63, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Norman Edward Whited, 64, booked on a Tonasket Police

Department FTA warrant for first-degree negligent driving.

SUNDAY, MARCH 29, 2015 Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Trespassing on Sandflat Rd. near Omak. Assault on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Sex offender gets 45 months for failure to register THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – A Nespelem man has been sentenced to 45 months in prison for failure to register as a sex offender, his third conviction. On Nov. 24, 2014, Warren Eugene McCrea, 27 , was taken into custody by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Oliver, British Columbia on an outstanding felony warrant for failure to register as a sex offender. The Oroville Police Department met the RCMP at the Port of Entry and arrested McCrea who was then booked into the Okanogan County Jail on the outstanding felony warrant, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. “McCrea is a level two sex offender and is required to register with the Sheriff ’s Office in the county he resides in,” said the Sheriff. In July 2014 McCrea was found not to be living at the Okanogan County address he had previously registered at. Investigation determined that McCrea had moved out from his registered address three months prior and may have been living in Montana. An Okanogan County felony arrest warrant was OCSO booking photoissued for McCrea on Oct. 16, 2014. On March 11, 2015 the court Eugene McCrea found McCrea was found guilty for failure to register as a sex offender. This is McCrea’s third felony conviction for failure to register as a sex offender. The court sentenced McCrea to 45 months in prison for failure to register as a sex offender. “McCrea will also be on 36 months of community custody supervision by the Department of Corrections once he is released from prison and shall also register as a sex offender with the Sheriff ’s Office in the county he resides,” said Rogers, who added, “I am sending these press releases out, so that everyone knows that if sex offenders are failing to follow the rules, such as registering, they are being dealt with.” The cases are put together by Detective Debbie Behymer and processed through the Okanogan County Prosecutor’s Office.

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JUVENILE

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2015

Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Wildfire on Jasmine St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Justin Rogers, no middle name listed, 25, booked for residential burglary and third-degree theft. Tyson Everybodytalksabout, no middle name listed, 24, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI and a juvenile warrant for truancy. Laura May Griffith, 51, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Christopher Scott Milka, 46, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Michael Dwayne Stead Jr., 28, booked for TMVWOP and a Grant County FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Arthur George Longdo, 61, booked for DUI. Wendy Kay Wiley, 46, booked on a juvenile bench warrant for truancy. David Sanchez Hernandez, 21, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Shane Rich, no middle name listed, 35, DOC detainer. Wendy Joe Martin, 34, booked on a prosecutor’s FTA warrant for POCS. Aaron Cresslie Jacobs, 24, booked on a DFW FTA warrant for first-degree DWLS and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV).

liv

Lance Mario Torres, 42, Republic, pleaded guilty March 24 to POCS (heroin). Torres was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $2,210.50. The crime occurred April 17, 2012 near Tonasket. Brenden Wade Oliver, 23, Spokane, pleaded guilty March 24 to POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed a use of drug paraphernalia charge. Oliver was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $2,110.50. The crimes occurred Feb. 8 in Omak. Wesley Paul Wirth, 38, Tonasket, pleaded guilty March 24 to POCS (methamphetamine). The crime occurred Jan. 29. In a separate case, Wirth pleaded guilty March 24 to seconddegree organized retail theft. That crime occurred between September and October of 2014. Wirth was sentenced to three months in jail and fined a total of $2,221. Kendall Dayton Keith Miner, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty March 30 to attempted third-degree rape (lack of consent) (DV). Miner was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended and credit for three days served, and fined $700 for the May 14, 2013 crime. The court found probable cause to charge Darryle Clint Gua, 30, Omak, with theft of a motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred March 22. The court found probable cause to charge Jennifer Lynn Valdez, 21, Omak, with attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and two counts of second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crimes allegedly occurred March 18. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Noel Johnson, 53, Omak, with 21 counts of violation of a no-contact order.

Found property on Sidley Lake Rd. near Molson. ATM machine recovered. Disorderly conduct on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Two reports of assault on S. Birch St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Yazmin Cervantes Orozco, 20, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Patricio Sanchez Morales, 22, booked for DUI. Kyle Martin Jim, 25, booked on two OCSO warrants: thirddegree DWLS and DUI. Lance Mario Torres, 43, court commitment for POCS. Penny Annette Weekly, 38, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Jessica Lynn Palmer, 35, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

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CRIMINAL

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SUPERIOR COURT

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COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

Eric Mathew Anguiano, 23, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Anguiano was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $858. Kody Charles Ayers, 23, Omak, had a charge dismissed: use or possession of a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle. Anthony Kevin Baker, 27, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Baker was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $687.99. Rodimiro Bejar Alvarez, 33, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree theft. Bejar Alvarez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined $568. Justine Christina Belgarde, 21, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. William Michael Bozman, 57, Okanogan, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Bozman received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $768. Allyson Marie N. Brickman, 18, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Christie Jennifer Burke, 31, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Burke was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,108.

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COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

Phyllis Ann Adolph, 53, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, Oroville, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Anguiano was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $858.

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APRIL 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Volunteers Kaitlin McKenna Schade and Makenna Reed with Elsa at the N.O. Paws Left Behind adoption event Saturday. Two dogs were adopted.

Why not adopt a rescue dog?

When I lost my dog Sophie after 14 years I wasn’t prepared to take on another four-legged companion right away. It just didn’t seem right to try and “replace” her. She certainly couldn’t be replaced, but maybe I could find a dog to fill that need to have a companion that loves you unconditionally. Sophie wasn’t purebred but she was about as easy going, gentle and intelligent as you would want to find. Since just before she passed away, my family has expanded to include a new woman in my life and two children, ages 15 and 11. While Dana, like me, grew up with dogs as part of the family, her children never have, but always wanted one. After several months of saying I’m not ready yet, we saw a unique looking rescue dog at Carol Richard’s N.O. Paws Left Behind animal rescue. We decided to take the plunge last week and paid our $50 to adopt Delilah Louis, Lila Lou for short. She’s a Catahoula Leopard Dog (the Louisiana State Dog) and about two-years-old. This will be the first dog I’ve raised that didn’t start out as a pup, so it is a learning experience. According to her records she wasn’t so much physically abused, but she was neglected by a previous owner. She is skittish around strangers, which makes her worlds apart from Sophie, who never met anyone she didn’t like. She has adapted, or should I say adopted, to our family completely and is quite intelligent. We hope that this leopard will change her spots and become more sociable around strangers – but it is going to take time. If like me, you’re ready for a four-legged companion, then I suggest you give Carol a call at 509-476-2991 or attend an adoption event like she and her volunteers had at Hughes’ Warehouse last Saturday, she has literally dozens of dogs that could use a good home. It gives you a great feeling inside to help out one of these animals and they give back far more than they take from us.

CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

Dear Editor, What a biased article you printed regarding the incident at the Tonasket vs Liberty Bell Varsity soccer match on March 19, 2015. When you print people’s heated opinions of something the real truth is often left out. For instance did you know that the official who was fist bumped by the Tonasket player “a

little hard” had his knuckle split open and was bleeding? The player cocked his arm back to hit the second official in line and that is when the first official intervened. The player was not “shoved to the ground.” Also, the Tonasket coach, Darren Collins, called the police after the officials were told that the police were not being called and everyone was sent home after the JV game had already started. There is no way that the JV coaches would have allowed this official to start the next game if they had really

believed that an assault had just taken place - come on. You will never get the truth from hearing only one person’s side of what happened. Especially from someone who is angry that they just lost a game. A loss that he blamed on the officials. Try doing a little investigative reporting next time. Kristine Marohl Wenatchee Valley Soccer Referee Assoc. East Wenatchee, Washington

the street, and most are unaware of what the fuss is about. For now, Kelley seems resolved to serve a term which runs through the end of 2016. As unlikely as that seems, it could happen if he manages to ignore the noise and nothing comes of the investigation in the next year or so. But Kelley can’t win a second term. Neither political party would embrace him, nor could he raise enough money to conduct an effective statewide campaign. Should Kelley resign, Gov. Jay Inslee, a fellow Democrat, will appoint a successor. While the governor will be under pressure to replace him with another party member, the state constitution doesn’t require the successor to be a Democrat, said Dave Ammons, spokesman for the Secretary of State’s office. Whom the governor might choose could depend on when Kelley departs. If he leaves office before May 11, the first day of candidate filing for the November election, the position of state auditor would be on the ballot this year. Thus Inslee’s appointee would serve until a choice of voters is sworn in this fall. If Kelley were to resign after May 11, Inslee’s appointee would serve the rest of the term through 2016. Under the first scenario, Inslee might be inclined to install a caretaker who won’t run this fall, someone like the last state auditor, Brian Sonntag, or the former secretary of

state, Sam Reed. Both are experienced at guiding state agencies and maneuvering Olympia politics — handy skills if the Legislature is still in session. There are obvious drawbacks to both men, though. Though Sonntag won five terms as auditor as a Democrat, his party credentials literally got revoked when he joined the conservative anti-union Freedom Foundation as a senior fellow. Reed, meanwhile, is a moderate Republican who has been trying to drum up support for a challenger to Inslee in 2016. If the appointee needs to serve through next year, Inslee is more likely to seek a Democrat who could win a statewide election. That could ace out Sen. Mark Miloscia, R-Federal Way, who is said to be interested in the gig if it opens up. He ran unsuccessfully for state auditor in 2012 as a Democrat, then switched parties to win his Senate seat. As of Wednesday [[3/25]]  morning,   the governor’s staff said there had been no conversations with people who might show up on a list of appointees. That’s not to say people who might seek the job aren’t thinking about it. They may not know if Kelley will leave, but they certainly want to be ready if he does.

The Petri Dish BY JERRY CORNFIELD EVERETT HERALD

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Addentures in Elderland

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You only reported one side of incident

No one but Troy Xavier Kelley knows how long he will be the state auditor of Washington. But for those who roam the corridors of power on the Capitol campus in Olympia, the first-term Democrat can’t leave soon enough. Kelley, whose post puts him fourth in line to succeed the governor, has become a pariah in just two weeks. He’s been abandoned by his Democratic Party. None of his former colleagues in the Legislature have offered public support. Some Republican lawmakers think he should take a leave of absence, while state GOP leaders want him to resign immediately. That’s what happens when employees of the federal Department of Justice search your home, subpoena your work records and investigate the intersection of your personal, professional and political lives. The feds aren’t saying a word about their motivations. They aren’t saying Kelley is the target of a probe. But because federal authorities don’t typically search the home of a statewide elected official on a whim, it’s evoked public shunning of Kelley. Kelley faces the choice of trying to ride out the storm or leave on his terms. His salvation, if you can call it that, is that he’s pretty much unknown to the public. While 1.5 million voters elected him in 2012, few would recognize him if he passed them on

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIOPOLITICAL COMMENTATOR

Oh, the joys of aging. Laugh it up, young people, your time is coming. Alright, so we mummies walk goofy, have complexions like Shih-tzus, and dress like aliens from another planet, but mark my words, your day in the old-folk barrel is coming. If you think we dress funny, wait ‘til the first tattooed 70-year-olds show up wearing backwards ballcaps, gauged ear-loops, Che shirts, and basketball shorts hanging Bill Slusher below their underwear... if they’re wearing any. Ponder that vision. You won’t notice aging at first because you think it isn’t going to happen to you or at least if it does you’ll be so medicated you won’t know it. But nay. The bell tolls for thee too, youngster. It’ll happen slowly. One day you’ll scowl at that lying mirror for daring to suggest that, well, no, actually you... aren’t... getting better looking every day after all. In fact, you’re getting faint lumps and sags you swore could never happen to you. It gets worse. You’ll start to notice that doctors and airline captains look like they’re... younger... than ... you. Nawwww. Can’t be. Oh yeah. Wait’ll they start looking like twelve-year-olds to you. Foxy hotties or hunks begin to say ‘sir’ and ‘ma’am’ to you. You turn around to see who they’re talking to and no one’s there. Ooooh. A young beauty holds the door open for... you... and smiles sweetly as though she’s gonna need to dial 911 any second. Mouthto-mouth on you is totally, like, outta the

question, gramps. You mention your favorite movie actor or musician and some college kid goes, “Who?” You’ll look down at your tummy some morning, recoil and exclaim: “What the hell is... that!?” Soon you start having chronic pains in places where you didn’t even know you had places. Speaking of which. You’ll curse cars you used to think were cool rides because they’re so agonizing to get in and out of. Once in them, they’re just rolling computer games that take a degree from MIT to know how to turn the wipers on, let alone that navigation TV thing. They tell you not to text and drive (what’s that say about the prevailing American IQ?) then they put more computer buttons in cars than space shuttle cockpits. And you’re gonna feel like you wet yourself until you figure out that the freaking driver’s seat itself is... heated. You’ll get an envelope in the mail someday and you’ll say, what on earth is... Medicare? You’ll start to buy shoes for their comfort, giving not a happy damn that they look like fudd slippers. You’ll wear cargo pants to haul all your meds. Later, it starts to get ugly. Addentures in elderland. Your dentist drops balefully into a chair and asks, “Bill, how do you feel about... say... having all those uppers and roots cut out for a whole upper denture?” “Ooooh, gee,” you answer, “sorta like I feel about sucking on a chainsaw, Doc... why?” Weeks later, George Clooney sues his dentist because his teeth don’t look as good as yours. Your new upper denture gleams such that when you flash charging rottweilers they flee in panic. Girls ask you for Brad Pitt’s autograph. Jeopardy calls wanting you to replace Vanna White. Of course, at night you look like the loser in a hockey brawl, but one thing you’ll have

Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623;jcornfield@heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos.

learned by now is everything has it’s different perspectives. Now you become a connoisseur of soups, stews, pastas, casseroles, puddings. You can think of eight ways to eat applesauce. You even think about eating Jello for the first time in over half a century. You just think about it. You become astonished at what’s on most menus that’s inedible. Forget that steak unless you run it though a blender. Nuts? Nuts! Corn on the cob? What med are you on now!? Thank heaven king-crab-legs are still on the fossil’s food list. You can still eat most cookies, it’ll just take longer. Much longer. Oh yeah. Bank on it, young folks. They’ll probably have laser teeth you can open beer cans with when you’re my age, but you’re going to have your own addentures in elderland. Your joints won’t be able to handle the transporter when it reassembles you back on Earth. Your eyes, having atrophied from 70 years of playing with your holographic cell phone or whatever, will need to be replaced with new video thingees. You’ll be able to read prescriptions from twenty feet away, but you’ll look like C3PO (ah, Google him!). But... if you’re as lucky and blessed as me (exemplary third spouses and retirement planning go a long way here, children) you’ll be able to say something like I say each birthday: After fighting one war and two divorces and losing all three, I’m just thrilled I’m still... having... birthdays! William Slusher, a patient of Tonasket’s own superb dentist Dr. Robert Nau and staff, out of his Okanogan dental outpost, is also an author. His latest novel is a political comedy available from Amazon, called CASCADE CHAOS or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. Mr. Slusher may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live. com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

No more Gonzaga games until winter And did you have any April Fool’s joke pulled on you yesterday? On a drive to Omak last Friday I saw several bunches of the summer balsam plants in full bloom. It must have been a protected area because it was just in the one setting, but it won’t be long until the hills are alive with the golden plants. And the highways have many “snowbirds” in their big motor homes on their way back into Canada. Last Monday night was the end of pinochle, in Molson, until next fall. It was fun while it lasted through the winter months. No more Gonzaga basketball games until next winter. I’ll really be at “loose ends.” And the team will never be the same because three players are graduating that were so special and played such a big part in the outstanding record that the team made at the close of the season and although winning the final games didn’t turn out as we had hoped, it was a year to be proud of for the team and coach, Mark Few.

Easter Egg hunt at park this Saturday SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

Okay, yesterday was April Fool’s Day but this is no joke! This Saturday is the Eagles Auxiliary’s Annual Easter Egg Hunt at the Veteran’s Memorial Park. The fun begins at 10 a.m. sharp. The ladies have been picking up donations, cooking and coloring eggs and getting prizes together all week. And they aren’t the only ones. Businesses and individuals have made major donations, including Gold Digger, RemanReload, Oroville Building Supply, Hugh’s Ace Hardware, The Brown Jug, Apple Way Video, Harvest Foods, Frontier Foods and too many more to mention here.

one form letter and getting signatures on cially, Georgia (Perry) Thompson, from it. So help do your part as down the line Okanogan. We were classmates, here in you just might need use of facility. Oroville, seventy-one years ago. If we A fund that I am really were to have a class reunion, interested in, is one which it would not take very much Dixie Brown, former adminpreparation, as it was a small istrator of the extended care “girly” class as most of the facility, has spearheaded, boys were in the military, is getting a walk-in bath and death has called some, so tub for the residents. The we’re but a few. Tonasket folks will find jars When I was saying we’d for donations in business be going to Molson, last places and dropping in loose Sunday, someone said, “go change (or bills) help get the one way of the other by total needed. I’m not sure Sidley Lake, and you’ll see if there are jars in Oroville, THIS & THAT many eagles.” We did and yet. Checks can be mailed to Joyce Emry the birds must have heard I North Valley Extended Care, was coming and they all left. and be sure you mark it for Didn’t see one. As a matter “Bathtub fund,” Attn. Brenda Turner, of fact we saw no deer or elk or any wild 203 Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855 life. Just a dead skunk! or you could drop the envelope at the It was so good to see Coralie (Colbert) front desk in the care center. One of Vansant and Joe, as just recently Joe had those items will make bath time easier a lengthy stay in the hospital, but is once for the folks and staff. They surely need again out amongst us. They live in East all the help they can get. Thanking you Wenatchee now. in advance. We are waiting for the birth of yet Another successful event at Molson another great grandchild. Wouldn’t it Grange was held last Sunday morning, be a grand birthday present for greatas breakfast was served to quite a sum grandpa Clayton if she came on the of folks, both young and old and those predicted date? But when do babies ever in between. The best part for me is the arrive when they are supposed to? Also visiting, as I am not a breakfast person. on April 9th, your editor of the G-T will It was such a pleasure, again, to see so be another year older, so happy birthday, many long time friends, and one espe- Gary!

The beautiful sunny weather with just a touch of rain, the past ten days or so, has made the countryside really turn green. Beautiful! As the many flowering, colorful bushes and shrubs come to life, now the early fruit trees are joining in, and soon my good friend will delighted to see his favorite flowers, all over the place, the lowly dandelion. I was shocked to read of the death of Judy Coffelt. Amos, her husband passed away, just a few months ago, and I didn’t know she was ill. Sympathy goes out to the surviving family and friends. At the United Methodist Church, last week, a meeting was held concerning the North Valley Nursing Home and the problems thereof. A terrific turnout of folks were on hand, (over 60) and a good discussion was held. There will be other meetings in the future and interest must be shown by writing to the State Senators and Representatives stating your position, and it is said that personal letters are more effective than writing

EAGLEDOM AT WORK Rod Noel and his city crew have been hard at work in the park cleaning up and moving tables for us. Another whole crew of Eagles and friends will be in the park very early Saturday morning to set up the hunt. All of this effort goes into a controlled bedlam that starts at 10 a.m. on the dot and lasts a very short period of time. Be there a little early to be ready to go. Get your kids or grandkids (or borrow a couple of kids) and be there! This madness is split up into age groups so your little ones won’t get trampled by the big ones. Ages are zero to three; four to seven and eight to 12 years of age. Everyone be sure to watch for the Easter Bunny. It is a sight

to behold! If you’ve been there you know what fun it is. If not, come on down just to watch. It really is a hoot! Our next joint meeting is Tuesday, April 7 at 6 p.m. On Friday, April 17 come in and join your brothers and sisters at 6 p.m. for Meat Draw, Joker Poker and, especially, the Baked Potato Bar for $6. The District Meeting for the month will be Sunday, April 19 in Republic at 1 p.m. for the joint meeting and 2 p.m. for the regular meetings. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

Getting ready for a new floor at Center SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Ana Novalle Prichard, pictured here at 25-hours-old, was born to Robert and Jodi (Batton) Prichard of Oroville Friday, March 27, 2015, at 2:23 p.m. Ana was 9 pounds, 3 ounces, and 20.5 inches long. She joins her parents and brothers Connor and Collin at home in Oroville.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our new floor covering is on track for delivery on Monday, April 13. Brent Daniels will schedule installation after that date. If anyone is so moved to donate funds towards the cost, I promise to, personally, for posterity, write their name on the underside of the linoleum. Some are wondering what the new storage shed is for. Well, it’s for anything we want, as soon as it’s ready. Give me about six months, or sooner if someone will help. The cost of our Senior Center meals, so I have been told, is $8. The Older Americans Act, it appears, requires that those who

Easter Egg Hunt is this Saturday

Newborn babe

A lady from Tonasket told me, “I’m so glad you’re still writing in the paper, otherwise we’d never know anything that was going on.” It struck me funny, because my husband picks up the paper and says, “Tonasket, Tonasket, there’s never anything in here about Oroville.” Isn’t it funny? We see what we want to see. And then there’s the person that says, “Oh, I don’t bother reading it, ‘cause there’s nothing in it,” and when you tell something they didn’t know, they say, “Well, I didn’t see that!” People we’re a funny lot aren’t we? After being affiliated with the newspaper business for a “bunch” of years, I can tell you this. You’re damned if you print it and you’re damned if you don’t. Steve and Laura Wilkerson were in Oroville a few days recently. I was told they came to get a car that was left here after their move to Minnesota. They are missed here by the many friends they had made. The helpers of the Easter Rabbit, at the Eagles have been busy coloring eggs for the egg hunt Saturday. The date of Easter is a bit earlier this year. At this time I sincerely wish each and every one of my readers a very Happy Easter. Spend time with your families, especially the little ones. They grow up much too quickly. ‘Til Next Week.

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3005

Hope the weather turn’s out wonderful for all the kids that go Easter egg hunting and get full baskets. On Friday, April 3 at 11 a.m. there will be a Memorial for Jeff Sackman whom was killed in a logging accident. Our hearts go

can afford to, be encouraged to give more than the $3.50 donation request, up to the $8 amount. (Encouraged, root word “courage.”) Be, therefore, so encouraged. Let’s support a great program. Our Pancake Breakfast for this month is scheduled for the second Saturday. That’s Saturday, April 11. We are in the process of picking our Senior May Day Royalty Nominations are being received by Betty Steg, and Raleigh Chinn, our Nominating Committee. Voting will be during lunch on April 7.

TONASKET EAGLES out to the family and friends. He will be missed. Saturday, April 4 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. we are having a benefit and auction for Boe McDonald. This benefit is to cover some of his medical expenses. Don’t forget Taco Tuesday, this has been doing very well (thank you Lyle and all your help). Bingo

Communications have been opened regarding a Pool Players Tournament. Maybe all that practice and dedication by our pool players will accomplish something worthwhile. Figure? My mind is running wild on this subject. Could we have a pinochle tournament? Or, a Bingo Tournament? Or, a puzzle assembling tournament? Where we would send, or receive, our best players for a showdown with other Senior Centers? On Friday, April 27 I attended Tillie’s Computer Class. It was a hoot. And, informative. I highly recommend it. Sign-up sheets, and times, for the next classes are in the lunch room. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Glen Waggy; Pinochle, Jim Fry; High Man, Ed Craig; High Woman, Dolly Engelbretson; Dolly and Vallerie Scrivner, 1500 Trump and Dolly and Clayton, 1000 Aces.

is going strong and Pick 8 is up over $1500, get your dobbers and come on in Fridays at 7 p.m. that is start time so get here early to get set up. Pinochle scores are as follows: first place Nellie Leonard Paulsen, second place Ted Zachman and Wanda Sutherland, Low score went to Betty Paul and Gib McDougal, last pinochle to Wanda Seim & Jerilyn Green. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

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APRIL 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

HILLTOP COMMENTS

COMMUNITY CALENDAR EASTER EGG HUNTS SATURDAY Oroville OROVILLE - The Oroville Eagles Auxiliary is sponsoring their annual Community Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, April 4 at Oroville’s Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park starting at 10 a.m. sharp. Tonasket TONASKET - The Tonasket Community Easter Egg Hunt will take place on Saturday, April 4 starting at 10 a.m. sharp. Children first grade and under will gather at the high school tennis courts and second grade through fifth behind the school bus garage. This event is sponsored by the American Legion Auxiliary. In addition to colored eggs, there will be several special eggs that can be redeemed for prizes at both events. OROVILLE CHAMBER MEETING OROVILLE - There will be anmeeting of the general membership and board for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, April 2 at 1 p.m. at America’s Family Grill. Unless otherwise noted, our monthly meetings will be a combined Board/General Membership Meeting. First Thursday of every Month. SLIPPERY SLOPE TO PERFORM AT WINERY OROVILLE - The Blues are Back! Chuck Oakes, Ron Champagne, Dave Wheatley and Jim Attwood, performing as Slippery Slope, are bringing their version of blues-themed music back to Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, April 2. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861. NATURALIST TO SPEAK TONASKET - Okanogan Highlands Alliance Presents Dragonflies: Rainbows on the Wing, with Dennis Paulson on Friday, April 3. Presentation at 6:30 p.m. is free; dinner at 5:15 p.m. is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. The presentation is at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, 411 Western Ave. More info: julie@ okanoganhighlands.org or 509476-2432. GOAT DAY OKANOGAN - Goat Day, hosted by the UROK 4-H club, will be Saturday, April 4 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Caso’s Country Foods at 2406 Elmway (Hwy. 215) in Okanogan. There will be discussions goats for weed control, goat races, goat meat recipes, milk goat demonstation, hoof trimming, braiding goat collars, and goat tail tying. Goats provided for demonstrations. Come and enjoy with all the family! Contact Carey Hunter 509-826-9492 for more information. RUTH MOODY AT THE CCC Ruth Moody, of the Wailin’ Jennys, will be on stage at the Community Cultural Center this Saturday, April 4 at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at Oroville Pharmacy, Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, and Main Street Market in Omak. $25 for dinner and concert and $20 for concert only. Dinner begins at 5:30 p.m., seating for the concert will be at 6:30 p.m. Nathaniel Talbot, from Whidbey Island will open the show for Ruth who has just returned from European and Australian tours--and now she will be performing in Tonasket with her band. Tickets are expected to sell out, so don’t delay. SUNRISE EASTER SERVICE LOOMIS Loomis Community Church will host an Easter Sunday Sunrise Service at 7 a.m. on April 5, followed by breakfast at the church at 8 a.m.

The Sunrise Service will be held at the Cross up the Horse Spring Coulee Rd, between Spectacle Lake and Loomis. There will be a sign, turn south and up, up to the service site. Those who do not have a home church are also invited to their 11 a.m. Worship Service. 509-223-3542

REP. NEWHOUSE MOBILE OFFICE OMAK - U.S. Congressman Dan Newhouse’s staff members will be available to meet with anyone who needs help with a federal agency or has questions or comments on federal issues during monthly mobile office hours in Central Washington. Members of the public are invited to meet with Congressman Newhouse’s staff with no appointment necessary on Tuesday, April 7 at the Omak City Hall, 2 N. Ash St., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. STORY TIME AT LIBRARY OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, April 8 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children. NVCS CLASS START NORTH COUNTY - Spring quarter for North Valley Community Schools is just around the corner! Watch for the green class catalogs coming soon! North Valley Community Schools classes will begin April 13. Also, NVCS website and Facebook pages will be updated with the upcoming classes. Meanwhile, are there subjects you wish NVCS would offer classes in? Do you have a skill or hobby you would like to pass on to other people? North Valley Community School is always on the lookout for fresh ideas. Call Ellen Barttels at 509476-2011 to let us know!

TONASKET FOOD BANK TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

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The Pancake Breakfast was enjoyed by 166 hungry folks on Sunday. The winners of the Gift Baskets were Janet Leslie, Pat Rise, Patty Clark, and Rae Morris’.’ The Next Bingo night at the Grange Hall will be on Friday April 3 rd at 7 pm. The Knob Hill Club will be having a pre Easter Bake Sale on Saturday, April 4 starting at 10 am ‘til we sell out of all the

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OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

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HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

goodies. Happy Easter to all. Think about participating in the Molson/Chesaw Garage Sale on Memorial weekend. More information next time. For table information call Penny Cole 509485 -2343.

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT

Trinity Episcopal

The

Stay tuned for more details.

Call this Newspaper for Details

OKANOGAN VALLEY FIBER FESTIVAL OKANOGAN - The Second Annual Okanogan Valley Fiber Festival will be held at the County Fairgrounds Agriplex, 175 Rodeo Trail Road, Okanogan on Saturday, May 30 through Sunday, May 31. Bringing fiber producers and users together to celebrate natural fibers in all forms. Vendors, workshops, live shearing demo and fleece grading, food and more. See www. okfiberfest.org

OCTA MONTHLY MEETING OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) will hold their Public Board Meetings the second Monday of every month. The next Board Meeting will be held at our office, 307 S. Main #4, Omak, WA 98841 at 6 p.m. on Monday, April 13. Please visit our website at www.okanogantransit. com.

Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo & Parade

Includes 96 Newspapers Request a free information kit today: & 24 Shoppers

SPRING BARTER FAIRE TONASKET - The Okanogan Family Faire announces, “Spring Barter Faire.” The event is May 1, 2, and 3 at the Family Faire Grounds located at 72 West Cayuse Mountain Road (off Hwy. 20), Tonasket. Information available at: okanoganfamilyfaire.net; offaire2015@gmail.com; or 509486-2173.

Another successful pancake breakfast, with 166 served

LISTING YOUR ITEM Our Bulletin Board allows listing events up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to that limit. Our online calendar at www. gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for longer periods. Items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information contact. You may place an event on the online by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. For the paper submit to gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

SOAP TO PERFORM MELVILLE BOYS OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 p.m. For ticket information, please check out http://www.soplayers.ca/melvilleboys.html

OROVILLE FOOD BANK OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Celebrate Tonasket at the 80th Annual

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BLOSSOM SPRING BAZAAR OROVILLE - The 9th Annual Blossom Spring Bazaar is Saturday, April 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Oroville High School Commons Admission Free (please bring a Food Drive Donation)/ Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day! Sponsored by Blossom Ministries. Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at 509-733-1941 or 509476-2246

FD 16 MEETING & LOCATION CHANGE AENEAS VALLEY -Fire District 16 has permanently moved the monthly Commissioners work session to their new fire station at 20 Bench Creek Road in Aeneas Valley. The Commissioners meet the second Monday of every month and their next meeting is Monday, April 13. The public is invited to attend. Call Mike Woelke at 509486-1386 for any questions.

SAVE the DATE

Metro:

Conference will be held Friday, April 17 at the Pastime Bar & Grill from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This includes breakfast and lunch! For more information contact Debra Hansen, WSU Extension 509684-2588 or debra.hansen@wsu. edu. Locally sponsored by Oroville Chamber of Commerce. in partnership with the City of Oroville Community Development Office.

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 2, 2015

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Lots & Acreage COMMERCIAL LOT, 1 ACRE in Prescott AZ. New development close by. Possible trade for similar lot in Oroville area. (928)713-6741.

www.gazette-tribune.com Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

For Rent

$550; 2 BR, 2 BA with walk-in closet. Quiet area. Nice view of green lawn from covered back patio. Great location. 2nd floor apartment in 4 plex. $400 dep. Oroville 509-2233064 509-560-9043. $650. 3 BR, 2 BA MOBILE HOME IN LOOMIS AREA Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

SUN LAKES REALTY 3 BR to 4 BR House $795-$895. Furnished Cabin $625. Lakefront Apt $795. Beautiful downtown Apt $495-$600. Call 509-476-2121

For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

BUS DRIVER

North Valley Extended Care has 3 Full Time and 4 Per Diem opening’s for

Okanogan County Transit Authority

seeks full and part time Drivers to provide safe, reliable and courteous transportation services to the public, including populations with special transportation needs. Positions report to the Omak office. Positions from 24-40 hours/week. $16.90-$17.93 per hour and benefit eligible. Class B CDL with Passenger endorsement required. See www.okanogantransit.com for instructions on submitting THANK YOU to everyone for applications. Okanogan their generosity and caring, County Transit Authority is an www.gazette-tribune.com for the donated goods, and Equal Opportunity Employer. financial help for Ted Hilstad Carrier Wanted: OROVILLE and family. A special thanks LARGE, Nice 1 bedroom to Linda and her crew for all The Okanogan Valley Gaapartment. Upstairs. No pets her work in providing a deli- zette-Tribune is seeking an or smoking. $435 per month. cious meal. Also to Kathy independent contract delivery 509-476-3145 Noel and her crew for all the driver to deliver one day per work setting up the silent week. A reliable, insured veauction. Around 200 attended hicle and a current WA drivthe benefit and everything ers license is required. This was most appreciated. is an independent contract Thanks again everyone for delivery route. Please call your care and kindness. 509-476-3602, ext 5050 or email gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Found

RIVER VALLEY OUTLOOK. Sunny one bedroom home with living room French doors welcoming to a relaxing patio, perfect for indoor - outdoor living. Features a beautiful kitchen, large walk-in closet, full bath & laundry room. $650. 509-429-7823. Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA. 1 BR Starting at $365/mo + security deposit. 3 BR Starting at $450/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

Across 1. A lot

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted

Job Fair April 9, 2015

Veranda Beach invites you to our annual job fair April 9th - 9 am to 1 pm. Positions in the following departments will be offered RESORT STAFF Front Desk Services z Store Clerk Housekeeping z Housemen THE DINER Line Cooks z Servers z Baristas Front of House Manager General Laborer Landscape/Vineyard crew Veranda Beach Resort, 299 Eastlake Rd, Oroville, WA 98844 Ph. 509-476-4000

Oroville School District has Groundskeeper/Assistant Maintenance

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Crosswords

ANSWERS

Announcements

40 hrs per week April/October Job description and application available online: www.oroville.wednet.edu

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8. Elders’ teachings

25. Successful runners, for short

9. Bad look

26. Type of beds with curtains and canopy (hyphenated)

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31. Chill

13. Burglar

32. Bean counter, for short

21. “___ bad!�

35. Clash 36. Domestic animal skin disease

22. ___ line (major axis of an elliptical orbit)

38. At liberty

23. Two-door

39. ___ el Amarna, Egypt

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63. “For Your ___ Only,� Bond film

43. Advantages

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6. Hot spot 10. ___ Cooper, Am. actor

11. Fourth month

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Job Fair April 9, 2015 Veranda Beach invites you to our annual job fair April 9th - 9am to 1pm. Positions in the following departments will be offered RESORT STAFF Front Desk Services Housekeeping Housemen Store Clerk THE DINER Line Cooks Servers Baristas Front of House Manager General Laborer Landscape/Vineyard crew Veranda Beach Resort, 299 Eastlake Road, Oroville, WA 98844. Phone 509-476-4000

www.gazette-tribune.com NORTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NCWEDD seeks a self-motivated Executive Director (ED) professional to lead the nonprofit regional economic development organization serving Chelan, Douglas, Okanogan Counties and the Colville Confederated Tribes. The goals of NCWEDD are to communicate, advocate, and collaborate. NCWEDD brings together the private and public sectors, promoting diversification to enhance the future of the NCW region. Three years of business and/or non-profit experience preferred. BA required. This job entails travel, good communication skills, and openness to new ideas. The salary is DOE. Position is a .75 FTE. To apply, please provide a cover letter and resume to admin@ncwedd.com. Full job description at www.ncwedd.com

Health General

NAC Washington State certified NAC license required. You may apply online by visiting our website at www.nvhospital.org. or pick up an application at North Valley Hospital Human Resources Department. For more information please call 509-486-3185.

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

OCCDA 2 temporary positions – BILINGUAL CLASS AIDE – Oroville. Assists teacher in classroom activities and function as part of the teaching team and provide translation services to families and children. Previous experience providing services to pre-school children and families preferred. Fluent Bilingual/Spanish skills required. 30 hrs per wk. COOK/CLASS AIDE – Oroville. Assist with food preparation and classroom. 28 – 30 hrs per wk. High School/GED, WA Drivers license required. Applications at 101 4th Ave. W. Omak. Submit cover letter, application and resume’ to OCCDA – P.O. Box 1844 Omak, WA 98841 EOE.

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: Behavioral Health Spec. 1 Full time position Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time

www.gazette-tribune.com

Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time

The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) is seeking an

Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time

OPERATIONS MANAGER. This position is responsible for the daily operations of all transit services, ensuring high quality public transportation availability to the residents of Okanogan County. CORE FUNCTIONS include oversight of dispatch, fixed route, demand response and vanpool programs, supervision and training of staff, participating in strategic planning, policy development and transit related reporting. Must live no more than 60 minutes from Okanogan County. For a complete job description, please visit our website at okanogantransit.com OCTA is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

RETIREMENT AUCTION

SUNDAY, APRIL 19, 2015 - 10 a.m. - OKANOGAN

A Few Fetured Items - MUCH MORE - See Next Week’s Paper and Look for Handbills

*******************************

** Ford Backhoe ** Inter 766 Tractor w/Loader ** 1962 Inter Flatbed Truck ** 1994 Dodge Ram Pickup, Good. ** 2010 Kia Forte 4-door Car ** 2002 Jayco 31-ft Travel Trailer w/2 Tipouts ** Utility Trailers ** Snowmobile ** Lincoln Welder w/Gas Motor, Like New ** ** LARGE SELECTION of Good Mechanic Tools & Shop Items ** Don’t Forget our Annual Consignment Auction at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds, Saturday, May 2, 2015 - Call Now so We Can Get Your Items Advertised

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Business Opportunities

DINER FOR LEASE Lease this fully equipped and established 1950’s themed Diner at Veranda Beach Resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington. This is an exciting business opportunity for an experienced and successful food and beverage operator with catering capabilities. The Veranda Beach Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Jim Hammond for details jim@legendresorts.com Check out our website www. verandabeach.com

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF MARCH 30, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows

Legals Continued On Next Page


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ANSWERS

Summary of Ordinance #747 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, revising Section 6.04.060 operating a dog kennel or cattery - permit required of the Tonasket Municipal Code specifying a fee for renewal permits. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG623775

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Summary of Ordinance #736 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, amending Section 2.24.080 of the Tonasket Municipal Code and thereby amending provisions of the “Cemetery Perpetual Care Trust Fund”. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG623768

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Summary of Ordinance #733 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, providing clarity to the boundaries of the territory annexed by Ordinance No. 723 and setting an effective date. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG623771

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR COUNTY OF KING Estate of RICHARD DEAN ANDERSON, Deceased PROBATE NO. 15-4-01636-6SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 04/7/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1994 Nissan Stanza Lic# AKD0930

Summary of Ordinance #732 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, comprehensively adopting the updated state building code by reference; repealing all ordinances in conflict with and setting an effective date.. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG623772

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Public Notices

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DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

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LEGAL SERVICES

Summary of Ordinance #730 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington amending Title 17 of the Tonasket Municipal Code as it pertains to the use “Storage, Self-Service” and setting an effective date. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-4862132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG623773

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PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

Summary of Ordinance #729 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, creating an agency fund called the Municipal Court Fund. A complete copy of this ordinance contact City Hall, 509-4862132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG623774

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EVENTS-FESTIVALS

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 04/7/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1996 Ford Crown Victoria Lic# AGR2287 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG621605

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classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

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Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 2, 2015. #OVG622815

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RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 26, 2015 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Richard J. Anderson ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Elizabeth A. Stephan WSBA #30479 ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: Oak Street Law Group, PLLC 10900 NE 4th Street, Suite 2230 Bellevue, WA 98004 COURT OF PROBATE PROCEEDINGS/CAUSE NUMBER: 15-4-01636-6SEA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26, April 2, 9, 2015. #OVG621841

Sudoku

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Public Notices

Statewides

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APRIL 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE April 2, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

Lake and Country

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Lake View Home, within walking distance to town. Lake access just steps away. 2 bd / 2 ba home, approx. 1440 sq ft. Downstairs would be a great mother in law suite as it can be completely independent from the upstairs. MLS#721550 $159,000

SUN LAKES REALTY

#1 Top Producer Office in North County

HILLTOP REALTY

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

HAVE BUYERS FOR

** 1-level Modern 2-3 Bdrm Move-In-Ready Home. Garage. Private. Good Access. 2 to 20 acres. Up to $300,000.00. Ready to Move. ** Okanogan-Malott-Omak area. 2+ Acres with Small Home. Barn. Corrals. Cash Buyer. Up to $160,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Live the good life realize your dream

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

on this shy 20 acres located in Tonasket; 3 bed/2.5 bath w/ tons of room, spacious living room, many large windows, vaulted ceilings. Roomy kitchen. 2 wells on property. $375,000

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2, 2015

SPORTS

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Rycki Cruz kicks in the first goal during Tonasket’s shut-out of the Omak Pioneers Saturday, March 28.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Elias Abrego dribbles the ball out front and away from Omak Pioneers Saturday, March 28

Tonasket Tigers soccer shuts out Omak BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket hosted Omak on the soccer fields Saturday, March 28, shutting them out 5-0. The Tigers controlled the ball most of the game, with Omak getting very few attempts to shoot. Goal keep Cristian Garcia made good saves with any attempt on the Pioneers’ part to score in the first half. Rycki Cruz put in the first goal for the Tigers, off a pass from Carlos Abrego, who put in the second goal off a pass from Elias Abrego. The third goal was made early

in the second half by Victor Flores, and shooting in the fourth goal was Bryden Hires. “Why did you make that goal? Because you hustled and you followed it,” Coach Darren Collins told Hires. The fifth and final goal was scored by Elias Abrego, with a dribble down the field and a straight shot in. Carlos Abregos had three assists in the game, and Flores had one. “I finally got my assist!” said Flores. “It was in the second half, to Elias. I missed the header, but we got it back.”

“We haven’t had any wins on the road, but hopefully we will soon,” said Omak scorekeeper Madison Morgan. “We played a much tighter game than the score showed,” said Omak Coach Chris Werner. “We used a new formation today; one that we just threw at them on the bus on the way here. They played alright. Isaiah Albright torched us in the Jamoboree, but we were able to shut him down today, thanks to efforts by Tim Vincent and Jag Bains.” This is Werner’s third year with the Pioneers. He said this was just his second year with this group, made up of mostly freshmen and sophomores.

“Isaiah definitely has a lot of potential,” said assistant coach Tod Matthews. Andreas Rosenkranz, who played most of the second half, had to leave the game after taking a kick to the foot, which quickly swelled. A foreign exchange student from Austria, Rosenkranz was driven to the hospital by a member of his host family, the Laceys. In earlier games, the Tigers traveled to Okanogan Thursday, March 26, where the varsity team won 2-1 and the JV team won 4-1. Elias Abrego made the first goal in the first half, assisted by Victor Flores. In the second half,

Carlos Abrego made the second goal, assisted by Elias Abrego. “We didn’t let them get too many shots, so our goal keep (Garcia) only had to make two or three saves. One guy got away from our defender and put it in the corner of the net, so they made their one shot,” said Collins. “We’re playing really good, and controlling the ball good. But we’re not having much luck with shots; a few go off the bar and those always hurt.” The Tigers hosted Manson Tuesday, March 24, with the varsity team beating them 2-1 and the JV team losing 3-2. According to Collins, Elias Abrego made the

first goal by dribbling the ball in. The Tigers led 1-0 most of the game, before Manson got a goal on a penalty kick in the last 30 minutes, tying the game, putting the game into forced overtime. Two five-minute golden goal overtimes were played with no goals, so the game then defaulted into penalty kicks, with Tonasket wining 4-3. Tonasket was scheduled to host Brewster Tuesday, March 31. They will travel to Bridgeport Bridgeport Thursday, April 2, and to Chelan Saturday, April 4. Their next home game is Tuesday, April 14 against Cashmere at 4 p.m.

Tonasket Tennis faces tough Tonasket fights court battle with Omak strong teams BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket hosted Omak on the tennis courts Saturday, March 28, winning some matches and losing some. Final team score for boys was a 3-2 win, and a 0-5 loss for the girls. Morgan O’Brien won his second singles match 6-0, 6-1. “It was a good match, and the weather has been awesome,” said O’Brien. “We both played well, and I think in the end my experience was the only moderator. My serve and forehand were really on today. It was a long match.” Playing First Doubles were Tim Frazier and Seth Smith, who lost 0-6, 1-6 to Omak’s Gabe Holz and Devyn Grillo. “We are both first-year players, and we played against a team that will probably go to State this year,” said Frazier. “They are really good, so it was a good experience for us.” “Yes, that team probably will go to State this year,” agreed Tonasket’s Assistant Coach Arcelia Carroll. A sophomore, Omak’s Grillo said this is his first year playing doubles, but he made it to the third round of Districts last year playing singles. In First Singles, Bailey Hirst, a Tonasket junior, lost to Omak’s Rocio Cruz, a senior, 1-6, 0-6. “Omak has a very solid girls’ team, so we can take a lot out

of our loss today and just try to get better everyday,” said Coach Milner. “I was encouraged with the boys’ team today, especially in the singles.” Eighth-grader Eric Owsley won his singles match 6-2, 6-3 against Phillip Law, a sophomore. “It was a good team win for our young boys’ team,” Milner said. Eighth-grader Caleb Hardesty battled a tough match against Omak’s sophomore Craig Conway. The match came down to a tie-breaker that Conway won 8-6. “It was a big comeback for me, because I was down 5-2 in the third set,” said Hardesty. “And at one point you were up by one,” commented teammate Owsley. The matches have to be won by two points. “It was good competition today, and a lot of fun,” said Omak’s Coach Lance O’Dell. “We were worried about the weather for a bit, but it turned out awesome.” The team is assisted by volunteer Brian Hendrick, a Tonasket alum who played tennis for the Tigers four years, and took second at State last year in boys’ doubles. “He comes out every day and helps us. He’s a cannon,” said O’Brien, adding “You have to be a cannon. You have to focus, or you aren’t going to win.”

early in season Varsity loses to Republic, Junior Varsity defeats Bridgeport at home

Vassar went 1-2 with a walk. “We were no hits in the first game against Aaron Fritz,” Tonasket traveled to Republic Vassar said. “I told our boys Saturday, March 28, for a double that we are going through the header against Republic, a team meat of our schedule right now, that had 19 wins to nine losses with Brewster, last season. Republic, The Tigers lost “Republic is a great Okanogan and 12-0, 13-3. hitting team... Errors Liberty Bell “Republic is were the story of the all in the first a great hitting day.” eight games.” team,” said Coach Dan The JV Coach Dan Vasar, Vassar. “Errors Tonasket Tigers Baseball team beat were the story Bridgeport at of the day for home Monday, our team.” March 23; and Adrian McCarthy, a junior, won a close game in Bridgeport pitched three innings in the first Friday, March 27, 19-18. game before being relieved by The Tigers were scheduled to eighth-grader Benny Williams travel to Omak Tuesday, March for two innings. 31. They will host Liberty Bell Senior Jimmy Coleman at home Thursday, April 2 at pitched the entire second game. Offensively, Cade Hockett, a 4:30 p.m.; and host Okanogan junior, went 2-3 with an RBI; for a double header Saturday, Coleman went 1-3 with two April 4, with games at 11:00 RBIs; and eighth-grader Quincy a.m. and 1 p.m. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Bailey Hirst returns a serve to Omak’s Rocio Cruz Saturday, March 28.

Tiger and Hornet track compete at Colville Tonasket girls team places first among 2B schools BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

COLVILLE - Tonasket and Oroville Track and Field teams traveled to Colville Saturday, March 28, to compete among

29 schools in the Ezra Gordon Invitational Track Meet. “Our young team continued to show their competitveness,” said Tonasket Head Coach Bob Thornton. With teams from 1B to 3A at the meet and over 60 athletes in most events, the Tonasket girls’ team placed ninth and the boys placed 14th. “Against schools our size (2B), the girls’ team placed first and

the boys team placed third,” Thornton said. “Impressive performance for a young team. Their winning attitude is contagious.” Rose Walts, a junior at THS, took first place in the 100 Hurdles. Oroville Coach Harold Jensen said his team is establishing marks in many events and also trying new events. “They’re trying to find the events that will best suit their individual talents,” said Jensen.

“Great competition from meets like this will help create high quality and competitive marks for the qualifying meets late in the year.” Among Oroville athletes, Katie Egerton placed sixth in the high jump and sixth in the pole vault. Tori Kindred also placed sixth in the shot put, and the 400 relay with Yessica Nemecio, Havannah Worrell, Emili Divine and Mikaela McCoy placed seventh.

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Tylynne Watkins placed eighth in the pole vault. Tonasket athletes placing in the top ten were Katie Henneman (8th) and Alina Vlahovich (10th) in the 100; Rose Walts (5th) in the 200; Katie Henneman (9th) in the 400; Hunter Swanson (9th) in the 3200; Rose Walts (1st) in the 100 Hurdles; Rose Walts (7th) in the 300 Hurdles; Girls team (7th) in the 4x200 relay; Girls team (9th) in the 4x400 relay;

Alissa Young (5th) in the Javelin; Ethan Bensing (4th) in the Long Jump; Rose Walts (5th) and Alina Vlahovich (10th) in the Tripe Jump; Ethan Bensing (4th) and Dallas Tyus (8th) in the Triple Jump; and Jaden Vugteveen (8th) in the Pole Vault. The Oroville team travels to the Deer Park Invitational Friday, April 3, and the Tonasket team travels to the Brewster Co-Ed Relays in Bridgeport April 14.

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APRIL 2, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SPORTS

SCHOOL THS mathematicians heavy in the top ten

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Front Row Left to Right, Taylor Anderson, Lexi Wahl, Taylon Pilkington, Vanessa Pershing, Daien Carson, Olivia Sutton, Morgan Hjaltason, Ashylnn Willis, Coach Rimestad, Madilynn Larson, Megan Powell, Elizabeth Hylton, Serenity Polieti,Dayzi Keller, Trinity Dejong, Zoe Rodriquez, Samantha Keller, Alex Sutton, Kayla Willis, Coach Hanson.

Tonasket takes double header from Republic Tiger softball goes plays game and has fund doing it BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s softball team won both games in a double header in Republic Saturday, March 28. They took the first game 11-1 before Republic woke up and made Tonasket fight a little harder for their second win, 10-9. Head Coach Emily Rimestad called it “a great game for the girls.” “They played hard,” said Rimestad. “We won the first game 11 to one. Vanessa Pershing was the pitcher, and had a good game. Samantha

Keller hit a home run in the third inning and brought in two play-

They went out there and played the game, and had fun doing it.”

“They played hard. We won the first game 11 to one. Vanessa Pershing was the pitcher and had a good game. Samantha Keller hit a home run... and brought in two players with her.” Coach Emily Rimestad, Tonasket Tigers Softball

ers with her.” Keller also hit a one-run home run in the second game, as did Pershing. Trinity Dejong pitched the second game. “This was her first game to pitch for the year. She did a good job as well,” Rimestad said. “It was a very good feeling for the girls. I am proud of all of them.

The Tigers lost their earlier games, 1-24 to Omak March 24; and 0-23, 0-20 to Brewster March 21. They are scheduled to host Liberty Bell Thursday, April 2 at 4:30 p.m. and travel to Okanogan for games at 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. Saturday, April 4.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

The Math is Cool Fifth Grade Team is made up of (front row, l-r): Carina Avilez, Yadira Orozco, Stella Crutcher, Kaylee Clark, Jessica Heinlen, Logan Sutton and Alex Owsley. Middle row, l-r: Quaid McCormick, Connor Hardesty, Aava Gleason, Sara Alexander, Rebecka Allen, Owen Pershing, Salvador Penaloza and Carter Timm. Back row, l-r: Coach Kerry Alexander, Diana Magdaleno, Hannah Thompson, Carson Sasse, Trace Scott, Cody Stirek and Juan Tafollo. Not pictured: Logan Payne and Coach Scott Olson. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Carter Timm takes first place out of 135 students TONASKET - Tonasket’s Math is Cool Fifth Grade Team took first place overall when they competed in Wenatchee Friday, March 20. “We had high expectations going in, so anything less than first place would have resulted in a bus load of kids crying on the way home,” joked Tonasket

Elementary School Principal Jeremy Clark. Carter Timm took first place

“We had high expectations going in....” Principal Jeremy Clark Tonasket Elementary School

out of 135 kids. Also placing in the top ten were Owen Pershing in third place, Kaylee Clark in fourth, Sara Alexander in seventh and Logan Sutton in ninth. “We had five kids in the top

ten; it’s a good team with some smart kids on it,” said Coach Kerry Alexander. Four of the top ten students will go to Masters Competition in Moses Lake May 15. Alexander and Scott Olson have been coaching the team all three years of its existence so far. “Technically, Scott is the fourth grade coach and I am the fifth grade coach. But we help each other. Scott is better at teaching kids tricks to help them learn and remember, and I am good at getting them to work together as a team,” said Alexander. The fourth graders started practicing last week for their upcoming competition April 17.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Training series equips businesses for future Over the past six months, Kinross Kettle River Videos of all of the trainings are available for 18, 2015, at Ferry County Conservation Fair – Buckhorn has been working with the state and viewing at the Ferry County Business Resource • Ambassador Program: Community Tourism local communities on offering a series of business Center, by contacting the Tri County Economic Development & Branding (TEDD): May 13, and entrepreneur trainings. This has been done Development District (TEDD) at 509-775-0953. 2015 as part of a program to assist Following • Ambassador Program: Guided Workshop the local communities with upeach session, to Market your Business & Region (TEDD): coming change as closure of we asked particiJune 10, 2015, limited seating the Buckhorn Mine approachpants to indicate • Understanding Business Types, Laws & Taxes es in early 2016. The series what additional (WSU): June 24, 2015 of trainings and workshops types of trainings • Business Web Design & Internet Placement was designed specifically for they would like (WSU): Date TBA Ferry and Okanogan county to see in the fu• Social Media & Communications Plans (WSU): residents and businesses, and ture. While many Date TBA was aimed at helping budding of the requested • Grant Workshops (WSU): Fall, Date TBA entrepreneurs to create new topics were cov• Small Business Administration Accounting business ventures, as well as ered throughout 101 Webinar (TEDD): available by appointhelp existing businesses add this Commerce ment at TEDD office value to their current business training series, • Local Business Tourism Assessments (TEDD): model. To implement the sethere are a numcontact TEDD office to participate ries, Kinross partnered with the ber of upcoming • Networking for Better Business Promotion: Washington State Department opportunities Attend monthly Business Development/Tourof Commerce, Republic Chamoffered by our ism Committee meetings, 2nd Tuesday of evbusinesspeople met with agency ber of Commerce, Okanogan Local other partners ery month, 509-775-3372 representatives in a series of training sessions Economic Alliance, Tri County designed to equip Ferry County entrepreneurs for the that community Other opportunities that were highly requested Economic Development Dis- future. Photos Kate Meginley. members may during the series, such as basic accounting, retrict, and Washington State search skills, computer and University Ferry County Extension. want to take advantage of during technology training, busiThe trainings were well attended, averaging the upcoming months. Unless ness writing, social media over 50 participants per session. Guest present- otherwise specified, please conand much more can be acers focused on a variety of topics, such as busi- tact either the TEDD office (509cessed by contacting your ness idea generation, business model canvassing 775-0953) or WSU Extension local community college, in(a different way to think of business planning), (509-775-5225 ext. 1116) for cluding the Spokane Commarketing in the 21st century, financing your more details about these oppormunity College Republic business through both conventional and uncon- tunities, as locations and dates Campus (509-775-3675) ventional means, and more. At the last and final are subject to change. and Wenatchee Valley Colsession of the series, we brought in experts from lege Omak Campus (509• Think Local First Campaign various state and local entities who could provide 422-7800). Local librar(TEDD): beginning in April. more detailed information about topics such as The sessions also gave local ies can also be a great Contact TEDD office to parbusinesspeople the opportunity to business laws and finance, agricultural rules and resource to gain additional ticipate solidify plans for working together in regulations, women and minority-owned busiskills and knowledge. • Rural Pathways to Prosperity the future. ness opportunities, library resources, educational Special thanks to all of (TEDD): April 17, 2015 opportunities through local community colleges, • Instagram Training (Republic Regional Visitor the participants, partners and guest presenters business planning assistance, financing and web & Convention Bureau, 509-775-3372): April throughout this entire training series. design.


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 2 2015

Tonasket School District squeezing pennies until levy funds arrive

Name

JEFF SACKMAN Jeff Sackman died March 25, 2015 doing what he absolutely loved to do, logging. Jeff was always happiest outdoors, hunting fishing or simply looking for shed horns. Doc, he swore he would find a bigger set than yours. He was a good ole country boy with a heart that couldn’t get any bigger; with a love of a good laugh, good food, good whiskey and being sur-

Name

RICHARD ‘TANT’ BOOTHMAN Richard

Anthony

“Tant”

rounded by family and friends. He will for a long time be remembered for his Fourth of July block parties that were known to draw as many as 200 people. Jeff grew up in the Conconully, Riverside and Tonasket areas ranching alongside his family, shaping his lifelong work ethic and “Get R Done” attitude. He entered the United States Army right out of high school where he obtained his CDL and had a driving career that lasted over 30 years. He had an uncanny ability to back a loaded semi into the tightest spots. While in the Army Jeff met and married Tonya Duffy and they had three children. After the Army the family moved to Oroville where they later divorced yet remained good friends. In 1991, he met Jeannie Ramsey, starting a tumultuous yet love packed 24 year life together. Jeff is survived by his devastated family, Jeannie, his parents Anne and Buck (Sue), siblings, sister Wendy Foth ( Michael) and children Tyler and Kellie, brother Todd (Mikey) Sackman and his son Joseph “Opey”. Jeff was responsible in bringing into this world and shaping the lives of eight of the most beautiful children this world has ever seen, blessing him with nine grand-

children; Kristi Denison (Cole) and children Cailee and Keenan, Holly Lane (Russell) and children Jeffery David “JD” and Lukela, Michael Sean Sackman (Tracy), Jason Ramsey (Becky) and children Brennon, Andrew and Tavis, Jared Ramsey (Heather) and children Makala, Payton, Jonathan Ramsey, Jensen Sackman and Jordan Sackman. These brief words fall so short in describing this man who said I Love You every single day and filled those days to the fullest every chance he got. His presence will be with us always. Memorial Services will be held Friday, April 3, 2015 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Eagles with a luncheon to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Tonasket Scholarship Fund. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Boothman passed away at his home near Othello, Wash., Thursday, March 5th, 2015, with his wife and family at his side. Tant was born in Oroville, Wash. to Edward Albert Boothman and Margaret Nancy (Hitchon) Boothman Sept. 25, 1929. The youngest of eight children, he grew up on the family cattle ranch near Loomis. He is survived by his loving wife, Linda, two sons, William Anthony “Tant” Jr. and David Scott Boothman (Darla), daughter, Debra Lynn Boothman Crisp (Gary), one sister-in-law, Lucy Boothman, three brothers in law, Gary, Mike and Tom O’Haver, numerous grandchildren, greatgrandchildren and nieces and nephews. Tant was preceded in death by his parents, five brothers, two sisters and one son, Jeffery Robert Boothman.

After Tant graduated from Oroville High School, in 1949, the Boothman family sold out and purchased a cattle ranch in the Grande Rhonde Valley near La Grande, Ore., which is still operated by some of the family. Tant and Linda owned a ranch at the base of the beautiful Mt. Emily, near La Grande, where they raised their family and cattle until 1969, when they sold out and moved to British Columbia, where he managed a Purebred Charolais Cattle Ranch, in Surrey, B.C. Returning to the States in 1974, they settled near Othello, staying true to his calling, raising cattle, hay and family, until he retired in 1991. They continued to live in their home on a small acreage, working in the garden and often enjoyed fishing trips, until the time of Tant’s death.

A Memorial Service for Tant will be held April 25th by his family, at Tonasket Wash., with burial in the family plot. Contributions to honor his life can be sent to: Cancer Care of North Central Washington, 1708 Castlerock Ave., Wenatchee, WA. 98801 or The Old Hotel Art Gallery, 33 E. Larch, Othello, WA. 99344.

Tonasket Mayor Plumb proclaims April 24 for Arbor Day celebration by Public Works Superintendent Hugh Jensen. City Council Member Dennis Brown is encouraging anyone wanting to volunteer their time to contact City Hall and sign up with the tree board. Tonasket was named a 2014 Tree City USA by the Arbor Day

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - Mayor Patrick Plumb of Tonasket has proclaimed April 24, 2015 as this year’s Arbor Day. Tree plantings will take place at the Little Learners Park, also known as State Street Park. Anyone wanting to purchase a tree to donate for the event is encouraged to buy it at Baker’s Acres in Tonasket. Merchants there can advise the best trees to purchase for the park, and are keeping track of numbers of holes to be dug

Foundation in honor of its commitment to effective urban forest management. Cleaner air, improved storm water management, energy savings and increased property values and commercial activity are among the benefits enjoyed by Tree City USA communities.

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District looking for bus drivers, increases subs pay BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board voted to increase substitute bus drivers’ pay from $12.39 to $14.39 per hour, effective April 1, 2015. A lack of bus drivers (including one resignation coming up) combined with the district’s pay for drivers being lower than other area schools was the reasoning behind the raise. A full-time bus driver for TSD gets $15.95 per hour, plus benefits. A request was made for additional help on the grounds and maintenance staff, with an ongoing list of general maintenance items yet to be addressed for lack of time. External Business Manager Trisha Schock suggested finding short term relief with temporary staff or substitutes so the school district would not have to pay benefits. “When we get the levy funds we can fund some of those things, but for now we are trying to be real conservative until we see where things land in April,” said Schock. “But if we have safety issues, they need to be addressed.” Audience member Rob Enloe suggested having a full-time bus driver who is already getting benefits fill in during the day with grounds and maintenance work. “In general I tell people there’s no money now so they don’t spend it,” Schock said. “Increased levy funds will come in April and May, and we are now trying to balance the needs of everything in all buildings. The levy funds

DENTISTRY

are covering a lot of things, but asked everyone to keep the facilifront-loading those needs has ties bond “in our thought procaused a cash crunch.” cess.” Schock said there was cur“If we look at enrollment rently $304,000 numbers, these in cash, and she issues are not was working “In general I tell people going away. hard with everyThe school is one to keep that there’s no money now, swelling at the from shrinking. said so they don’t spend it.” seams,” “We have Asmussen, Trisha Schock, Business Manager $988,000 per adding it was Tonasket School District month in AP a nice change and payroll, so from several I would feel less years ago when nervous if we had $500,000 cash; it looked like enrollment was especially since there are no large going to be dropping to 750 stutax revenues coming in June,” dents. Enrollment is currently Schock said. at 1,098 compared to 1,069 last Board member Jerry Asmussen year.

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916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

509-826-1800

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

(509) 826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

Su Ianniello

250-495-6144

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Licensed Massage Practitioner

OKANOGAN VALLEY

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

826-7919

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services

Coagulation Clinic

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-8496

 Ophthalmology  Behavioral

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

OMAK

 Anti

Office Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. NEW patients are welcome! Call for an appointment.

HEALTH CARE

Call us . . . Se Habla Español

Healthcare Services

Think Green!

7-8:30 pm

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Welcome Dr. Afshinkia

15th at Vickie’s Backdoor Club

FAMILY PRACTICE

CLINIC

and the Osoyoos Dental Centre are pleased to announce expanded hours and

Oroville: April 1st &

To learn more about Biochar visit: www.biochar-us.org or simply scan the QR code

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Dr. Singleton

April 14th at the Community Cultural Center

Contact Gloria Flora at: glora@s-o-solutions.org

 Radiology

Did you know?

Tonasket: March 31st &

WA Lic#MA21586

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OBITUARIES

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 02, 2015  

April 02, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 02, 2015  

April 02, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune