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Water and sewer rates going up in Oroville area

VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY

Need a name for proposed new park BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Friends join Churchill Clark in carrying his latest carve, a dugout canoe called Crazy Mary, for a first launch at Chief Tonasket Park Sunday, March 22.

SHAKEDOWN CRUISE Churchill Clark, descendent of the famous explorer, takes his dugout ‘Crazy Mary’ on it’s maiden voyage

SEE RATES | PG A2

Property owners worry about future flooding

BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Crazy Mary entered the waters of the Okanogan River for her christening voyage Sunday, March 22, at Chief Tonasket Park. Steering her was her creator, William Clark’s great great great great grandson Churchill. Clark found the tree a couple years ago after a windstorm in Republic took her down. She may have thought her life was over, but it was just about to get good. A Ponderosa Pine, Mary was hauled to the Okananogan Highlands by Dave Konz. “We slabbed it in two, loaded her into a dump truck and dropped her off at the Barter Faire site,” said Clark. Her emergence from the trunk began in October, 2013 on Artist Row at the Barter Faire, with Clark as the featured artist and hundreds of volunteers chipping in with an adze over the four-day event. Named after a Pearl Jam cover of a song by Victoria Williams, Clark said the canoe’s name came to him “very late” in the process, just this past December. The making of the canoe can be viewed in a video called “The Unveiling of Mary the Dugout Canoe” on Clark’s website, Dugout Canoe Love.com. Her true transformation, however, happened with Clark paddling her upriver for a short spin on the Okanogan before returning to friends and spectators gathered onshore. “It’s official. Crazy Mary is now a canoe,” announced Clark jubilantly. “I love it. I am so ready for this.” Clark himself seems transformed, with a wide smile shooting across his face now that he’s on the water with a beloved boat. He’s headed to the Columbia River in her, but not before stopping in Omak, where he said he’s looking forward to a visit from Paschal Sherman Indian

OROVILLE – It’s been the topic for the last few council meetings, but the city council is on the verge of increasing the base water and sewer rates in order to try and meet future repairs and improvements. At their Tuesday, March 17 meeting the council reviewed a draft ordinance that would increase the base rate by one dollar for water and by two dollars for sewer, according to City Clerk JoAnn Denney. That would mean the rate would go from $21.50 a month inside the city limits to $22.50 outside and sewer would go up from $26 a month to $28. While the increase only affects the base rate, outside the city limits the monthly charge would be higher because their base rate is already higher. “There hasn’t been a rate increase since 2012,” said Denney. “The increase will be approved at the April 7 meeting to be effective April 1.” AMBULANCE DISCUSSION Oroville still doesn’t know what to do for ambulance service – continue with

the current crew or contract with a private company. Mayor Chuck Spieth asked city attorney Mick Howe about the legality of using levy funds to pay to contract services. Howe said the city would have to show good faith in finding the funds were used appropriately and not a “gift of public funds.” He discussed transferring service to a private company if Oroville were to dissolve the current volunteer service. He said most communities were moving toward services like those provided by private ambulance companies. Amy Morris, a commissioner with the Rural EMS District, asked how such a transfer would apply to the Rural EMS. Howe said while he represents the city, he felt it would apply the same way. While the city studies whether to contract with a private company, members of the current volunteer ambulance crew approached the city at the last council meeting with a proposal to contract for services. The council indicated they would study this option as well in making their final decision. ZONING TEXT CHANGES The council meeting was also advertised as a public hearing to discuss a zoning text amendment. Oroville Reman and Reload has requested the Zoning

Want to do work in Tonasket Creek bed to lessen property damage Clark spins Crazy Mary to head downstream after taking her out for a quick test ride upriver. Below, Clark rests for a moment at Janis Bridge. School students. “She’s about the people. These trees bring people together and put a smile on their face,” Clark said. “The canoe brings people out of the woodwork,” said Ephraim Brown, enlisted to drive Clark’s truck from the launch site. “His journey is magical.” Descended seven generations away from Clark’s firstborn son William Meriwether Lewis Clark, Clark was privy to reading his relative’s journals during preparation for a two-anda-half-year-long bicentennial reenactment of Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery trip. Asked what stood out the most for him from the journals, Churchill shrugs. Perhaps the inkings were simple log notes, devoid of the musings of the descendant to follow. “People are capable of amazing things. This is truth. We are not helpless,” Clark says on a video posted on his website. “We do not need to be saved. We don’t need someone to take care of us. We need to live, and live strongly with our hearts. Roll with it. Learn to do it.” Clark can certainly lay claim to “learning to roll with it.” An accident left him blinded for three years before surgery restored his sight. Rather than laying

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 13

down his life and waiting patiently to take it back up again, he took on a Cottonwood and started digging her out. Knotty the Dugout Canoe was born, and Clark paddled her, still blind, following the Platte River across Nebraska. “I tell you...from my experience...that your life will change forever and so will so many of the lives around you,” Clark states. Brown recalled first meeting Clark after his sight was partially restored. “He’s blind in one eye, he’s got metal in his legs, and still he’s carving on a canoe. To see someone that dedicated, it’s pretty hard not to get inspired,” said Brown. “You see this magical thing come into your life, and to be able to help...how can you not?” Clark called to say he was approaching Omak at 7:40 a.m. Tuesday, March 24. “I got out before sunrise—I still haven’t seen the sun because it’s raining—but I’m coming into Omak.” He pulled Crazy Mary up to shore around 9 a.m. at the Omak Stampede grounds, just across the river from the Suicide Race. “I had a great float today,” he announced happily. “I just broke my tent down when the rain started. I wasn’t waiting for the sun to come up, because I wanted to get out. I don’t usually paddle in the dark unless there’s a full moon— especially on a river I don’t know, but I wanted to be sure and be here in time for the kids.” He was expecting the students to arrive around 12:45 p.m.

SEE VOYAGE | PG A2

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – After last month’s flooding of Tonasket Creek, several area property owners are trying to find out just what they can do to prevent future damage to their orchards and businesses. Jeff Bunnell, who owns Oroville Mini Storage, got together with like-minded people, as well as agency representatives to discuss the matter. They met on East Oroville Road, near where a small bridge crosses over the creek. Those who suffered property damage wanted to know if they could deepen and widen the creek bed, as well as building higher berms along the sides to try and contain any future flooding events. “If you dig down about three feet you are down to the glacial till. When you get an event like we had it just washes all the top soil away and exposes the glacial till,” said Bunnell. On the west side of East Lake Road the group could see the Bunnell property where much of that topsoil was laid out where his wife’s garden used to be. He said he had already dug down more than a foot before he hit where the garden was. It took, he said more than an hour, just to expose even a small portion of his lot that borders the creek. Rod Noel, Oroville’s superintendent of public works said, “The start of where the creek actually left its banks is above the second (Molson) grade. This is a bad spot down here, the actual streamline is way above this area. “With the velocity of the water, no matter what, it’s going to eat away at the bank.” Bunnell pointed out that the bridges, the one where the group was gathered, and another on Sawtell Road, act as choke points as they fill with debris

SEE FLOODING | PG A2

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underneath. “We have a lot of trouble with bridge debris as it stops the flow and the water goes over the sides,” agreed Noel. Although the vast majority of the damage occurred outside of the city limits, Oroville’s Bud Clark Ballfields along the Chesaw Road were covered with material washed up in the flood. “It took out fences, my wife’s garden... we were just lucky we have the berm which protected the storage units,” said Bunnell, who adds he experienced similar property damage two years ago and five years ago. “You get a huge amount of water at times, but most of the time it is bone dry,” said Noel. Chris Fisher, a fisheries biologist with the Colville Fish and Wildlife Department, took measurements in the creek bed below the bridge. He said while the creek had water year around further up the creek, the stretch in question, only had water in the spring. The water was important, however to allow adult fish to reach spawning grounds and juvenile fish to leave them. He indicated that his agency would not be adverse to work being done during the dry period to improve the habitat and help prevent or lessen future flooding events. “Down here it not a much of a fish issue, further up yes – we have some tagged fish that show they leave the stream this way,” Fisher said. “For this reach it is for access in and out in the spring.” Fisher called it access to some limited, but quality habitat, but said there were no plans to return it to historic levels where water flowed year around. He added that it would be the land owners responsibility to try and get the permits required from the state Department of Ecology to work in the stream bed. “Do we all agree that something needs to be done?,” Bunnell asked his fellow property owners. “If not it is just going to happen again.”

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PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 26 2015

LOCAL NEWS

JOURNEY | FROM A1

RATES | FROM A1 Code allow alternatives to the maximum lot coverage requirement in the commercial district. Lot coverage deals with storm water drainage issues, according to Denney. At the hearing Councilman Ed Naillon asked if changing the text would still allow for 100 percent coverage of the storm water. Chris Branch, director of community development, said it would, explaining that storm water would be contained on site. Naillon made a motion to adopt the changes, based on the Planning Commissions findings and it was approved.

Katherine Teachout/staff photos

Clark bowline anchor-13: Clark pulls ashore in Omak Tuesday morning, March 24. Below, a metal eyebolt found embedded in the tree made a natural bowline anchor. The wolf’s head is a tribute to George Lagergren, the Chinook elder who carved a canoe for the bicentennial reenactment of the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery’s journey to the Pacific. It was the first dugout Churchill Clark laid eyes on, and he’s been hooked ever since. “I swamped her coming into Riverside,” he said. “At the big falls way up river, she was a rock star. I pulled over on an island and saw the falls; I couldn’t tell where I was hitting it. We got good washers or rollers or whatever; whitewater. But the worse one was coming into Riverside. No one told me about it. Had I gone to the left I would have been okay. But I just came up on it and it was a bit of a surprise. I heard a lot of noise, and saw some big rocks. I shot them, and took some water on at the bottom and had to pull over and bail her out.” “But she can’t flip; you can lean hard to either side and she won’t flip,” he said. Clark spent Sunday night, March 22, “between the rapids and falls on an island,” and was offered a place in Riverside Monday evening where he was able to park his canoe at the host’s boat ramp. He said he guessed the float down to Omak took three or four hours. “She is quirky,” Clark said. “One thing with my canoes is, if you

want something symmetrical and predictable, you don’t want one of my canoes. But if you want to get to know her and feel how to ride her, then these are the canoes for you. I leave the natural curves in place, so she responds different to either side.” Clark said part of the fun for him is that every canoe is different. “I don’t know where the tree is going to come from, I don’t know who is going to end up working on it with me, and I don’t know where she’ll end up.” Clark said Crazy Mary is the first canoe he was considering selling, with an asking price of $15,000. He may never be convinced to sell the canoe he dug out while

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fires and countless other wood products, and WHEREAS, trees in our city increase property values, enhance the economic vitality of business areas, and beautify our community, and WHEREAS, trees, wherever they are planted, are a source of joy and spiritual renewal. NOW, THEREFORE, I, C. F. Spieth, Mayor of the City of Oroville, Washington, do hereby proclaim as the last Thursday of April (April 30, 2015) as Arbor Day in the City of Oroville, and I urge all citizens to celebrate Arbor Day and to support efforts to protect our trees and woodlands, and FURTHER, I urge all citizens to plant trees to gladden the heart and promote the well-being of this and future generations.”

FLOODING | FROM A1

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Jeff Bunnell, Chris Fisher and Rod Noel speak with area property owners about the reoccurrence of Tonasket Creek overflowing its banks and causing property damage. Fisher, a biologist with the Colville Tribal Fish and Wildlife Agency, said he wouldn’t be opposed to work being done to deepen and widen the creek bed. After getting agreement all around, he asked, “What if we got a consortium permit that would allow all the landowners to work in the stream?” Fisher replied, “We wouldn’t be opposed to making a conveince.” The fish biologist said the landowners should begin by starting

the HPA process with state Fish and Wildlife. Bunnell said he would work on organizing a meeting between the landowners and the various

agencies from the Colville Tribes, county and state – like Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Ecology.

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blind. In a video called ‘Knotty Gets Delivered’, Clark returns to Livingston, Mont., where the canoe had been stored at the Yellowstone Gateway Museum. As a crew of firemen carry her down the stairs, Clark says on camera, “I’m finally seeing her for the first time. The canoe that I made and paddled across Nebraska two years ago. And let me tell you, it rocked my world. It’s kinda like smelling rain for the first time.” He recalled the event as he stood onshore Tuesday. “I was in tears. I couldn’t believe it. I just thought, she looks great. I’ve never seen her before, and now I could see her grain and everything.” Future carves include doing canoes for the Dakota Sioux in Poplar, Montana; and another for MHA Nation comprised of the Manden, Hidatsa and Arikara Tribes in New Town, North Dakota. “The elders tell me, “We don’t have any carvers anymore,” Clark said.

ARBOR DAY DECLARATION Mayor Spieth declared that the last Thursday in April, April 30, would be Arbor Day. “WHEREAS, in 1872, J. Sterling Morton proposed to the

Nebraska Board of Agriculture that a special day be set aside for the planting of trees, and; WHEREAS, this holiday, called Arbor Day, was first observed with the planting of more than a million trees in Nebraska, and WHEREAS, Arbor Day is now observed annually in Washington State on the last Wednesday in April, nationally on the last Friday in April, and at various times throughout the states of our nation, and around the world, and WHEREAS, trees can reduce the erosion of our precious topsoil by wind and water, cut heating and cooling costs, moderate the temperature, clean the air, produce life-giving oxygen, and provide habitat for wildlife, and WHEREAS, trees are a renewable resource giving us paper, wood for our homes, fuel for our

We would like to thank everyone for the love and support you gave us during the loss of our mother/grandmother. Your cards, flowers and gifts of food were greatly appreciated. With much gratitude we thank Jack & Mary Hughes, the employees of Hughes Dept. Store, Jim & Marilyn Prince, Akins Harvest Foods, their employees and Gold Digger Apples for the wonderful luncheon they provided after the service. Thank you to the Altar Society for their help with the luncheon and the many desserts they brought. Also, a thank you to Dr. Doug Wilson and his staff for the years of great care they gave to Mom. A special thank you to Scott Miller for his caring, compassion and guidance though such a difficult time. Zeke & Judy Miller, “thank you” doesn’t seem enough for everything you did for Mom. She loved you both. Mom was the heart of our family and loved beyond measure. We will miss her everyday and treasure the memories she has left us with.

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MARCH 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

HISTORY

Part I

A tombstone for Charley, a local mystery solved

BY KAREN BEAUDETTE LOCAL HISTORIAN

LOOMIS - The tombstone arrived at the gravesite in Loomis 110 years after the occupant made the trip. There may have been a time when the small society of the old mining camp knew well just who and what Charles E. Long was in 1894. In 2004, the chiseled name was only a mystery. His eternal resting place in the Mountain View Cemetery had been long-ago forgotten, the original marker destroyed in an earlier wildfire. No record of this internment existed. Maybe there had been some kind of mistake. Even more puzzling than where, exactly, to put the rectangular slab of granite was the epitaph. Regular visiting mourners might suppose that the stone missed its intended destination by many miles or many misunderstandings: “OREGON PIONEER” implies a wellknown early settler of respectability and a tendency to roam. “SHOT BY THE OKANOGAN KID,” on the other hand, contains a contradictory hint that the deceased was perhaps someone who could have been, should have been shot. Perhaps Charles E. Long most likely belonged in a Boot Hill, a common name in frontier towns for burial grounds of those who died violently – with their boots on. The stone tells a life story that fits none of the then-known facts of Loomis in 1894. Outsiders, yes; plenty of them around, looking to strike it rich. Shootings not exceptional– at least one took place outside the saloon, if old-timers’ stories had it right. Long was mentioned decades afterward in fuzzy reminiscence of the shooting; however, there exists not a single mention in local lore of The Okanogan Kid or anyone who could have been The Kid: Not a lawman, gunslinger, outlaw, cowboy, rancher, or drifter. Still, the tombstone wasn’t lost, it wasn’t even unexpected. Charley Long’s foster family in Oregon had tracked down his grave through old family records and the help of the cemetery caretakers in Loomis. A fourth-generation descendent of that family, David McNett, wanted to recognize one of theirs who, at exactly the same

age, grew up in the same household as his great-great grandfather. Following his death, McNett’s widow forwarded the marker in a plain, brown wrapper—an ordinary cardboard box with peanut packing— along with the marvelous story of Charley’s past. “OREGON PIONEER” is a true description; but his life seems to have earned Charley Long the reputation of “OREGON DESPERADO.”

Charley Long Charley Long was fondly remembered in the Howard family as the small boy who had been orphaned on the Oregon Trail and rescued by a famous frontier scout named Benjamin Allen. Allen took Charley and his brother, William Henry, to his in-laws in Eugene, Oregon. The date was sometime prior to the filing of guardianship papers in 1855 in Eugene, giving custody of the boys and their inheritance, one cow, to James Howard. Five years later, Charley Long, age nine, is registered on the 1860 U.S. Federal Census as being part of the Howard household (William Henry was apparently taken in by a different family as he is not listed on this census with the Howards). It is known that James Howard discovered gold near Prineville, Ore. in 1871 which became the famous Scissors Mine. Charley seems to have left the Howards and set off on his own. Of Long’s whereabouts after the family relocated, McNett claims that Charley Long was a hired gun for the notorious McCarty clan—the family of Billy the Kid aka William Bonney also known by his real name of Patrick Henry McCarty--in Oregon Territory. He also mentions as documented fact that Long was known as an accomplice of Butch Cassidy, Harry Longabaugh (The Sundance Kid) and the Wild Bunch while they robbed trains and banks, creating havoc throughout Wyoming Territory.

This seems a more romantic legend than probable reality since Charley was long dead by the heyday of the Bunch from 1894 to, say, 1908. Nonetheless, Charley was supposedly never captured or arrested for any of these outlaw activities attributed to him (others observed later that Long was something of a braggart). According to McNett’s long-postponed family eulogy, “Charley’s personal life was chaotic. Always on the run, he lived in many different places. Curiously, something in his careful upbringing remained with him all of his life and he returned periodically to [attend church services] with the family…despite his notorious reputation, he was loved by the family to the very end.” Charley is also remembered in the Oregon history books, perhaps not so fondly, but certainly with a keenness for the often-repeated Old West tale of the shoot-out in the Prineville saloon in late 1893. Jon Skovlin [1996] wrote of consolidating at least “eight accounts of the [December 1881 shoot-out] as reported in newspapers or by eyewitnesses…” which took place in The Silver Dollar Saloon. Russell Blankenship’s account in his 1942 book And There Were Men centers around Hank Vaughan, the most colorful outlaw of Umatilla County. In fact, Vaughn is the focal point of almost all the published recollections of the event. Blankenship wrote that “Vaughan heard that a fellow named Charley Long had established himself as the champion bad man of the lower Deschutes regions of Central Oregon…” and he headed for Prineville to “make a personal investigation…,” finding his quarry at the Longhorn Saloon. Gale Ontko, author of the Thunder Over The Ochoco series on Central Oregon history, claims that Hank Vaughan “…challenged Charley Long to a shoot-out in the Bucket of Blood Saloon [in Prineville].” Further on, Ontko says the two men met at the Silver Dollar where “Vaughan was leaning on the bar sipping a beer when Charley Long—a reckless 37-year-old gunslinger—walked in” [this time in January 1882]. Long apparently fired without provocation and “calmly walked out and disappeared down the street.” There may have been two encounters involving gunfire, in fact. Details, like the exact saloon location, from one episode seem to have drifted to the final outcome, including approximate dates, as the story is passed from ear to ear. Let’s stick with this version, taken from Ontko in And The Juniper

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He was described by Kathleen Grant Prince as a “tall, slender, quietspoken Virginian… with a soft Southern drawl.” Kathleen Grant Prince, daughter of Susie Fruit Grant

Prineville. By January of 1883, the Vigilance Committee was better organized and Charley was back on his feet. However, because he had not fulfilled his contract with the livestock association—which was to carry out committee instructions to rid the county of unwanted predators of the two-legged kind—Charley Long was replaced as a bounty hunter and wasn’t paid for his services. Rumor added that he lit out for Washington Territory. The old-timers in the Oregon cow camps say that Hank Vaughan and Charley Long met one last time in Pendleton in 1893. When he heard Vaughan had been seriously shot up in another dispute, Long visited him on his deathbed, bringing flowers. Some even insist that he even joined Hank on the bed to offer condolences, possibly good-byes. During the intervening nine years, there is no mention of Charley Long until he arrives in Loomis, Washington Territory

around 1891 or so. Kathleen Grant Prince has described him as being “tall, slender, quietspoken Virginian…with a soft Southern drawl,” according to her mother Susie Fruit Grant. Charley’s accent was more probably a Missouri drawl, learned in the Howard family as a toddler of age two or three. Readers who remember the actor Alan Ladd may notice that Charley does appear to closely resemble the hero of “Shane” movie fame. Prince goes on to state that family lore claims Long was feeling lonely while his hosts, the Guy Fruits, were away and decided to become acquainted with another bachelor in the area for company. She also hints that Charley’s reputation preceded him, causing a great deal of gossip in the sparsely-settled community. Charley’s tombstone marks an unknown occupant’s gravesite in the Mountain View Cemetery, where the oldest identified graves date to 1894. The marker recognizes the storied past of the Boot Hill of the Old West and an Oregon desperado. We do know the circumstances of this violent death through the astonishing preservation of a 125-year-old Victorian-era scrapbook compiled by Mrs. Alan Palmer from the newspaper clippings she carefully pasted in an old government publication [now safely at the Okanogan County Historical Society]. From the original account from the shortlived Loomiston Journal of 1894, we even know the killer’s real name. Is he the Okanogan Kid? Look for Beaudette’s next installment in two weeks in the April 9 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune. © COPYRIGHT 2015 KAREN BEAUDETTE

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four men—men of unquestioned courage and discretion—and told them of my plans. These men [included] Charley Long.” The vigilantes’ presumed guilty parties managed to escape in the darkness of night. Armed with shotguns, Thompson and Long managed to round up their ten accomplices without a shot and haul them back to

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The mysterious tombstone at the Loomis Mountain View Cemetery.

Trees Bore Fruit where he relates the eyewitness account of James Blakely as printed in the Ochoco Review of 1882: At the saloon showdown, Vaughan was reported to say, ‘Charley, let’s settle things right now.’ Then both men walked to the middle of the saloon and commenced shooting, Vaughan with a .44 Bulldog Colt and Long with a .38 five-shot Smith & Wesson. Ten shots were fired from close range. Perhaps faster on the draw, Long was reported to have fired first, the bullet hitting Vaughan in the forehead. Long’s second shot got Vaughan in the left breast over the heart but he still didn’t go down. Vaughan then fired five shots, hitting Long three times in the left shoulder. By the time the smoke had cleared, Long was laid out on a poker table to die. Vaughan stumbled out to the street and asked to be taken to the Longhorn Saloon where the doctor removed the bullet from above Hank’s heart. A later testimony by a Dr. Belknap reported that he couldn’t remove one of the bullets from Charley which lodged deep in his body. Neither man was expected to live that night. Despite being reported as dead, both recovered to live another day. Charley’s wounds in the shoulder ruined his left arm. Now packing a .41 caliber Remington derringer in a shoulder sling, his injury was apparently no handicap to his next role: Hired gun. Nor did it keep Charley out of the Bucket of Blood. Reports at the time noted Long in conversation there with Col. William “Bud” Thompson, organizer of the Vigilante Committee to eliminate the criminals—mostly rustlers--of Wasco County. In Thompson’s own words, events of March 1882 prompted him to action: “I did not…tell the Deputy of my plans. I went to

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 26, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal David Leslie Louis, 34, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 25 to firstdegree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes occurred Dec. 4, 2014. In a separate case, Louis pleaded guilty Feb. 25 to intimidating a witness and fourth-degree assault. Those crimes occurred Oct. 2, 2014. Louis was sentenced March 18 to a total of 15 months in prison and fined a total of $1,200. James Edward Grant, 33, Omak, pleaded guilty March 18 to three counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crimes occurred in July and August of 2014. In a separate case, Grant pleaded guilty March 18 to POCS (methamphetamine). That crime occurred March 21, 2014. Grant was sentenced to a total of 27 months in prison and fined a total of $2,361. Madison Leigh Louie, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty March 17 to POCS (methamphetamine), second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Louie was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $850 for the Oct. 29, 2014 crimes. In a separate case, the court dismissed March 17 two additional charges against Louie: second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The charges were dismissed with prejudice. Lyle Zachary Long, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty March 17 to six counts of violation of a no-contact order. The crimes occurred between October 2014 and January 2015. In a separate case, Long pleaded guilty March 17 to residential burglary and bail jumping. Those crimes occurred Oct. 28 and 29, 2014. In another separate case, Long pleaded guilty March 17 to two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (oxycodone). The court dismissed an additional charge of distribution of a controlled substance (oxycodone). Long was sentenced to a total of 45 months in prison and fined a total of $3,610.50 Daniel August Buckley, 44, with addresses in Omak and Wenatchee, pleaded guilty March 17 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Buckley was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the Feb. 19 crimes. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty March

19 to POCS (methamphetamine). Munsey was sentenced to 90 days in jail and fined $600 for the Feb. 28 crime. Billy Dale Anderson, 47, Okanogan, pleaded guilty March 20 to POCS (hydrocodone). Anderson was sentenced to 60 days in jail and fined $700 for the May 31, 2014 crime. The court dismissed March 23 two charges against James Clair Chevalier, 68, Tonasket: both for first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. The charges were dismissed with prejudice. The court dismissed March 23 a second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) charge against Melissa Anne Francis, 41, Omak. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. The court found probable cause to charge Martin Antonio Aguilar, 26, Riverside, with three counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin). The crimes allegedly occurred in February and March. The court found probable cause to charge Christopher W. Nicholson, 28, Riverside, with two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin). The crimes allegedly occurred March 4. The court found probable cause to charge Benjamin Aaron Paul Zimmer, 25, Omak, with two counts of POCS (one each of methamphetamine and heroin). The crimes allegedly occurred March 12. The court found probable cause to charge Jessica Marie Bagley, 32, Riverside, with distribution of a controlled substance (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred March 4. The court found probable cause to charge Joseph Alexander Felix, 19, Omak, with POCS (heroin) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred March 12. The court found probable cause to charge Aaron Michael Bauman, 28, Omak, with three counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, POCS (with intent) (heroin), two counts of POCS (one each for heroin and methamphetamine) and one count of use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred March 12. The court found probable cause to charge Elizabeth Patricia Bauman, 26, Omak, with three counts of POCS (two for heroin, one for methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred March 12. The court found probable cause to charge DeeDee Louise Tompkins, 28, Okanogan, with two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin), two counts of POCS (with intent) (one each of her-

oin and cocaine). The crimes allegedly occurred March 12. The court found probable cause to charge Clifton Robert Scroggins, 41, Omak, with two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 26 and March 3. The court found probable cause to charge Kammie Elizabeth Stanger, 34, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The charges allegedly occurred March 11. The court found probable cause to charge Steven Kenneth Hoffpauir, 19, Omak, with unlawful issuance of a bank check. The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 25. Juvenile A 14-year-old Oroville girl pleaded March 18 to fourth-degree assault. The girl was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for three days served, and fined $100. The crime occurred Feb. 22.

Civil The state Department of Revenue assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes, penalties and fees: NCW Yellow Cab, Okanogan, $658.29; Camary Motels Inc., Surrey, BC, $6,299.66. The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following individual for overpayment of disability benefits, penalties and fees: Michael Dean Menendez, Omak, $3,798.46. The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following business for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and fees: Stidman Contracting and Repair, Omak, $196.72.

DISTRICT COURT Sabrina Kay Scholla, 26, Omak, had a charge dismissed: furnishing liquor to minors. Scholla was fined $400. Joseph Kenneth Shawl, 44, Okanogan, guilty of fourthdegree assault. Shawl was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Shannon Tawny Simpson, 30, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree theft and guilty (revoked) of fourth-degree assault. The court dismissed an additional third-degree theft charge. Simpson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 350 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,826. George Scott Smith, 42, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Smith was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended, and fined

$1,058. Lue’cinda R. Soriano Churape, 26, Okanogan, had a thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Daniel George Taylor, 50, Okanogan, guilty of DUI. Taylor was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,636. Catherine Pearl Wadkins, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wadkins received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. April Katherine Webb, 44, Omak, had two charges dismissed: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Webb was fined $1,425. Julie Aspen Wise, 22, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft. Wise was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 358 days suspended, and fined $587.92. Clayton Joseph Young, 24, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, March 16, 2015 Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Dog reported missing. Drugs on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on Oak St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Stampede Dr. in Omak. Burglary on S. Granite St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. First Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Two-vehicle crash on N. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Quince St. in Omak. Graffiti reported. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Jackson St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Brian Wayne Goff, 28, DOC detainer. Travis Lee James, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Monica Gaye Joseph, 54, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: first-degree DWLS and second-degree DWLS. Wayne Dale Rieb, 28, booked for first-degree DWLS. Steven Kenneth Hoffpauir, 19, booked for unlawful issuance of a bank check.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015 Disorderly conduct on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.

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Fraud on Pine Crest Rd. near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Bicycle recovered. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Illegal burning on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Two reports of assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Weapons offense on Dayton St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Skyview Dr. in Omak. Fraud on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Fig Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Vehicle prowl on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Ryan Wade Marchand, 32, booked on six Superior Court probable cause warrants: firstdegree robbery, first-degree burglary, second-degree theft, two for second-degree assault and one for unlawful possession of a firearm. James Corwin Hoben, 39, booked on an OCSO warrant for POCS. Alysha K.M. George, 25, booked on two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants, both for fourth-degree assault (DV); and an OCSO FTA warrant for obstruction. Billy Joe Rosenkilde, 36, DOC detainer. Manuel Hernandez Gabriel, 28, booked on a USBP hold. Kallie Louann Thomas, 25, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI and a DOC detainer.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Two reports of violation of a nocontact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Pine St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Lost property on Omak Ave. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St.in Omak. Warrant arrest on Benton St. in Omak. Theft on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Drugs on Main St. in Oroville. Steven Gonzalez, no middle name listed, 24, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Stormy Rae Brenard, 26, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Marcos Florention Rosas, 30, DOC detainer. Chad Winston Vanatta, 28, DOC detainer. Warren Eugene McCrea Jr., 27, booked for failure to register as a sex offender. Fawn Marie Palmer, 36, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI and second-degree DWLS; and a Tribal hold.

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Threats on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Copple Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. TV set reported missing. Trespassing on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Joseph Best-Timentwa, 18, booked for attempting to elude. Jennifer Valdes, no middle name listed, 21, booked for seconddegree assault. Timothy Richard O’Brien, 42, booked on a DOC violation. Jacob Adam Alexander, 42, booked for interfering with reporting (DV).

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Fatality crash on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda.

Two reports of violation of a nocontact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Omak Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Omak Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Locust St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Forgery on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Shumway Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Engh Rd. near Omak. Littering on Deep Bay Rd. near Oroville. Assault on E. Hwy 20 near Tonasket. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, DOC detainer. Billy Dale Anderson, 46, booked for POCS. Eva Lily McKinney, 25, booked for a drug court violation. Deena Jean Lazard, 26, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree theft and possession of a legend drug. Robert Wendell George, 45, DOC detainer. Louis Mark Clark, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Lacey Ann Picard, 25, booked on three FTA warrants, all for third-degree theft. Ashley Lynnette Picard, 32, booked on three State Patrol FTA warrants: second-degree DWLS, DUI and reckless driving.

Saturday, March 21, 2015 Robbery on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Assault on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Phone reported missing. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Automobile theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Fig Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Canyon Court Dr. in Omak. Monte Louis Nicholson, 48, booked for first-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Kyle Lloyd Campbell, 26, DOC detainer.

Sunday, March 22, 2015 Assault on Sunrise Heights Rd. in Okanogan. Threats on Burton Ave. in Okanogan. Littering on N. Country Vue Rd. near Omak. Assault on Jaquish Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Littering on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Hanford St. in Omak. Lost property on Kay St. in Oroville. Firearm reported missing. Noah Matthew Balauro, 25, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). David Thomas Kay, 33, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for POCS and a DOC detainer. Darryle Gua, no middle name listed, 30, booked for theft on a motor vehicle.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement.


MARCH 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

The Petri Dish

Transportation bill nears finish BY JERRY CORNFIELD HERALD WRITER

The wait is nearly over. Senate Republicans, after two years of avoidance, are putting the final touches on a multibillion-dollar transportation package and could make it public as early as Thursday. It’s what Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee has politely, pointedly and persistently demanded of GOP lawmakers. His public pressure — remember how he called them out in last year’s State of the State address — coupled with the private lobbying of business leaders, certainly motivated Republicans to reach this point this early in the session. But the governor is likely to be sparing in his praise of their handiwork. This package — crafted in part through negotiations with Democrats — delivers a bipartisan rejection of his signature climatechange initiatives. Its major funding source would be a gas tax hike of somewhere between 11.5 cents and 14 cents, not revenue from the cap-and-trade program for carbon emissions he’s pushed. And Republicans apparently are ready to pump more dollars into public transit in exchange for Democrats agreeing to delay — maybe even halt — action on a new carbon fuel standard that Inslee’s administration has begun writing. The deal also calls for GOP senators to allow Sound Transit to ask voters to fund expansions into Everett and Tacoma. Inslee’s not going to wave the white flag on his initiatives. Instead, he can focus on making sure the counterproposal that will be drawn up in the Democrat-controlled House keeps one or both of them alive in some fashion. The governor’s next move may become clearer when he talks to reporters Thursday. Meanwhile, don’t look for House Speaker Frank Chopp, D-Seattle, to applaud the accomplishment of Senate Republicans too loudly either. By this time next week, that bundle of transportation joy could be outside his door and he’ll be fielding questions about what he wants to do and when he wants to do it. Some around the Capitol think Chopp should press for swift action by the House, rapidly consummate a deal with the Senate and get it signed by the governor. This would give everyone a chance to collectively relish an accomplishment on what’s been a divisive issue. Acting soon, they argue, also would give Democrats a little breathing space before they start seriously talking about taxes they want to raise to pay for education and government services. That’s going to be a difficult conversation that will last until the end of session in late April and maybe beyond. Leaving a decision on a gas tax hike until then can only make it harder. On the other hand, Chopp may find more value in waiting and using the transportation package as leverage for securing votes for those taxes. There are those who contend there will be lawmakers in both parties willing to pledge support for a new or higher tax for the budget if their pet transportation project is funded. But, they contend, acting too soon on transportation could allow those lawmakers to change their minds later. Back in the Senate, after two years of being the ones watched, Republicans surely can’t wait to be the ones watching.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Decide to make good use of the old casino Dear Gary, I have asked many times, written some letters to the Board of Directors and to some of the Tribal Leaders, and no response was

given. I would like to let you, the People, know my idea. The soon to abandoned “old” casino needs a reason to remain standing. I feel very strongly that the Colville Tribes take the following initiative and make this happen. Turn the existing building into a learning center. A place to study, educate, research and

teach. The University of Washington, Central Washington University, Eastern Washington University and Wenatchee Valley CollegeNorth would all participate at different levels to make this educational facility work. We could then “tell” the Smithsonian Institute that we have a facility to house the more than 8000 pieces from our area and the many more from the surrounding tribes. That the surrounding tribes would work with us to house the artifacts for research and the return to their respective tribes. We could “tell” the Burke Museum that the 4000 baskets and hundred and hundreds of our Tribal artifacts are returned so that our People may see and honor the custom, culture and tradition of our People. This is not a new idea; the Tribal Planning Department where I worked suggested this decades ago and it fell on deaf ears then too. It is time to take back what is ours and allow Graduate Students from those universities study their own Peoples’ artifacts instead of what they do now. It is time that we increase the need to learn our language and sustain that which makes us a People. We must protect our rich heritage, artifacts, language, custom culture and tradition. This is what makes us a People, this is what makes working for the Seventh Generation worth doing. This is your opportunity to take a step forward and do it with purpose. Wai, Lim Limpt Arnie Marchand an Okanagan Indian and member of the Colville Tribes

fourth period of Grade 9; Fern McPherson, Betty Rhodes and Marian Thompson; Grade 8, Robert Hirst, Donald Stansbury and Dollie Mae Engle; Grade 7, Lola Mooney and Mary Alice Strickler. Grocery Prices: Fautless Kraut, 21/2 size can, 2 for $.25; Carnation milk, 3 cans, $.31; Grade “A” eggs, 2 doz. $.31; 1 qt salad dressing, $.25.

hams, $.29 per lb.; Lettuce, 2 heads for $.25. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, official observer: March 10, 66 degrees maximum and 36, minimum; March 11, 64 and 29; March 12, 60 and 35; March 13, 59 and 20; March 14, 64 and 22; March 15, 61 and 21 and March 16, 5 and 32. No precipitation for the period.

The Oroville Gazette

The Gazette-Tribune

50 Years Ago:

25 Years Ago:

March 18 - 25, 1965: Officials of the Oroville Lion’s Club stated Monday that the ice on Lake Osoyoos had broken up. The exact time was clocked as Sunday, at 1:45 p.m. and 55 seconds. Those having the nearest time were Jack Banker, of Oroville, at a time of 2:00 p.m. and Las Hendrickson, of Wenatchee, with 2:05 p.m. and 30 seconds. Proceeds from this project go to support youth project in the community. Mike Lynch and his brother Dan, were the happy recipients of a prepaid polar bear hunt at Point Hope, 300 miles above the Arctic Circle off the coast of Siberia. Under the guidance of Carol Meyers, the two hunters were gone for about two weeks and lived with Eskimos at Point Hope, population 100 Eskimos and 1000 Husky dogs. The Sitzmark Ski Club will hold a no-host meeting banquet at the Kozy Kitchen Kafe on March 19, 7 p.m. Skiing is still good at the ski run, reports Earl Freels. Lifts at the site will begin operation this Saturday and Sunday at 1 p.m. Students at Oroville High School, Wednesday, chose five finalists for Queen of the May Day Festival which will be held on May 7 and 8. Those chosen were: Lynn Dwyer, Janice McDougal, Kathy Kuntz, Janice Pickering and Deanna Jennings. The final selection will be made on March 29 with the girl with the most votes will be queen and the next two for her princesses. Oroville’s businesses will be grow in number when Fred Hardenburgh will open his Oroville Realty office in the newly remodeled Moran Building. Hardenburgh was formerly in the real estate business in Oroville, then moved to Moses Lake and Wenatchee before returning here. Grocery Prices: 8 - 10 oz. tins of Campbell’s soup, $1.00; Fresh Red Snapper, $.29 per lb.; Chunk Tuna, 4 tins $1.00; Cove Oysters,8 oz size, $.39; 6 ‚Äì 8 lb Picnic

March 22 - 29, 1990: Oroville Police Chief, Alfred Rise, was fired from his job by Mayor Ed King following a short predetermination hearing held Tuesday, March 13. Rise is expected to appeal. Although the allegations were not made public, an earlier letter to Rise accused the chief of “dereliction of duty, and misfeasance and malfeasance of office” and violations of he Oroville Police Operating Procedures. Rise had no comment other than to say that he has turned the matter over to his attorney. In a following story covering many different items to the council, Ethel Lindauer ended by stating that‚“If any valid reason for the Chief’s resignation exists, I am not aware of it.” Going from talk to action is a neat trick. Two North County people that are pulling it off with gusto are Janet Allen and Harrell Rounds, our own recycling wizards. They started with cars. In the past two years, Harrell and Janet have pulled 500 wrecked and rusted cars out of banks, rivers and ravines here, crushed them in a compactor and trucked them to buyers on the coast, like General Steel in Seattle. They have pulled 32 cars out of the Similkameen River alone. Floyd Thornton is pictured showing off a couple of large Steelhead trout that he caught in the Similkameen River last week. The larger of the two weighed 16 pounds and the smaller one, 11 pounds. Real Estate for sale; Lot on Eastside of Lake Osoyoos, $45,000 and large building site with 480 feet of lake front, $38,000; Overlooking Lake Osoyoos, tip top condition - 3 bdrm 1 1/2 bath home with great view of the lake --large living room with fireplace, full basement with large storage area, FAE Furnace & Central Air, double garage, $78,500.

Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www. heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623; jcornfield@heraldnet. com and on Twitter at @dospueblos

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago Friday, March 22 - 29, 1940: All persons interested in playing baseball are invited to turn out for a town baseball team meeting March 22. The Oroville team is planning on a league with Canadian teams only this year. We are looking for talent and anyone who wants to play ball or knows of anyone, please attend this meeting. Choice of a new set of officers for a celebration this summer in place of the fall fair took up most of the time of the Business Club meeting. Those chosen for this work were John Hancock, president; Fred Hart, vice president; Bert Wagner, treasurer and Russell Atherton, secretary. A report on plans for the new public park at the fairgrounds was made by N. G. Barlos. In order that orchardists will have water available for the dormant spray, water will be turned into the canals of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District for a period of ten days beginning Monday, March 25. The water will be turned off long enough to complete the repair work now being done on the flumes before it is turned on for the summer season. Ed Worksoky, cashier of the First National Bank in Tonasket, was in the Gazette office and stated that the bank had received word from the Seattle First National Bank, that the Canadian exchange rate would take a sharp increase on April 1, 1940 for at least 20 percent or more. The Washington Water Power Co. is building a new rural extension line down the east side of the Okanogan River to the G. R Byrn ranch to the Harold Lansing ranch. The new extension will serve about 20 new customers. The first six weeks of the second semester Honor Roll for the


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 26, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Spring is blooming with blossoms Another month is mostly gone. Lots of green showing both on the ground and in the willow trees and of course the beautiful yellow forsythia bushes are in their prime, loaded with blossoms. So many more orchards have been cut down. Some orchards are being replanted and some not. When I arrived here in 1943 it seemed there was not room for another apple tree and the valley was pastel pink in all directions. A beautiful, fragrant sight, to say the least. That is until the lime and sulfur sprays were put on and then it didn’t smell so good. And it surely is easy to locate the pear orchards as they look as if they have been painted gray, but of course that is a spray cover.

Bills introduced in legislature could help nursing homes SUBMITTED BY KIM BLACK THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

In an earlier post we mentioned the new legislation that had positive news for nursing homes. The House Bill 1274 was introduced by State Representative Cody in January, with State Senator Parlette bringing the companion bill, Senate Bill 5152 to the Senate in February. These bills read identically and therefore both recognize that the Washington State Medicaid reimbursement system is too complex, being one of the most complicated in the nation. The system currently calls for “rebasing” payment (adjusting for real costs) every two years. Nursing homes haven’t been assessed for this adjustment since 2007. Adjusting costs now based on the broken

NURSING HOME NEWS system will have a devastating effect on the majority of nursing homes that care for Medicaid residents. Thankfully our legislators have heard us! The intention of these two bills is to have a new payment system in place by July 1, 2017. It will take into account geographic location, resident acuity and value. Acuity refers to the residents’ ability to perform self-care, do they need a lift to move them, assistance eating or toileting, or help with other daily activities. Value-based systems look at quality. This means facilities in similar geographic locations that deliver similar quality care to residents of similar acuity, will be reimbursed with similar payment. This should be a huge plus for us! The Washington State

St. Patrick’s Day card party well attended SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

We had 24 Pinochle players, plus others in attendance, at our St. Patrick’s day card party. All were served a dessert of chocolate mint (green) ice cream and assorted cookies. Great fun. Betty Steg organized the affair. Our County Association meeting went well. We are sending Amended By Laws to the six Senior Center’s members for ratification, hopefully, without a hitch. Our goal is to give to the members their place as our proper authority. I’ve been reading the Older Americans Act of 2006. Enjoyable reading, if you like legalize. Example: “(d) EVALUATION.—

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of the Older Americans Act Amendments of 2000, and annually thereafter, the Assistant Secretary shall conduct a comprehensive evaluation of practices for cost sharing to determine its impact on participation rates spacer image(with particular attention to lowincome older individuals, including low-income minority older individuals, older individuals with limited English proficiency, and older individuals residing in rural areas).spacer image” Wasn’t that fun? Or, did you get a headache, too? I hear that computer classes have progressed. I think Tillie has her hands full. Lets give her

Where’s your grandchild?

NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLENBECK NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

It is a time to remember the children of our local Service Men and Women. These children carry part of the burden for our nation’s freedoms and April is the National Month of the Military Child. Military children hold a very special place in a Blue Star Mother’s heart. It is often the mother of the soldier who steps in to help with the care of a child and with running the military family while the parent(s) is away on an exercise or deployment. It is often the Blue Star Mom they call when help is needed adjusting to the absence of a parent or spouse away at war.

Now, we have to hope that the frost doesn’t get too severe for the fruits. REMINDER: The Nursing Home Success Team will be holding the second Public Forum, on March 25 at 7 p.m. That is Wednesday evening, at the Oroville United Methodist Church. Please attend in order to learn and ask questions you may have. The first meeting was held at the Tonasket Community Church. Refreshments will be served afterward. I have been told that the white bus I mentioned in last weeks article was from the Job Corps and they were doing soil sampling and looking for crystals. Of course, sometimes I am told things and they aren’t always accurate. More later

Most of today’s military children have only known war as our nation enters its 14th year. It’s time to reflect on and acknowledge the burden these children have carried. As a token of our communities’ appreciation of their service, our chapter will be sending a Thank You gift to every child of our Hometown Soldiers! If you know of any child whose parent hails from North Central Washington and is in the Armed Forces, send us their names, age, and address so that they, too, can be included in the mailing this month. All information is kept confidential. We don’t want any area children left out! We offer our personal thanks

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but she isn’t a quitter and hopefully she about that, perhaps. That brings the subject of the elk will find better days, ahead. I saw by the paper that Tonasket has (overpopulation). One lady says the a new school superintendent notion that they are being and there is a possibility of brought in is nonsense, and a change in Oroville. Also that the increase is just plain saw where our grandson, old “doing what comes natuDakota Haney was chosen rally.” Maybe I opened up a as high school delegate to can of worms? Comments the school board. When he are welcome. graduates, soon, that will be I’ve mentioned the empty our last family member in business buildings on Main high school, other than the Street and now I have anothHilderbrand kids. er which I sadly add to the Can you believe it was still list, that being “Sandra’s on THIS & THAT snowing in Boston and surMain.” Due to health issues rounding area, on the first Sandra has been told by her Joyce Emry day of spring? doctors to close her shop Those folks fear floodwhere she has beautified the nails of many during her years in ing when the snow melts, while in Oroville, as well as make comfortable the Californaia they are drying up, and there is talk of rationing showers and lawn feet of the clients she had. As Sandra told me, “I look healthy, but watering, and the prices of the vegetables problems with lungs and bone deteriora- grown there will be even more expensive tion don’t show.” As of now she doesn’t and in short supply. Have you noted the fads in foods that know just what will be in store for her,

Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) is charged with cooperating with nursing facility provider associations, consumer groups and nursing home employees to come up with the system. It must “match payment to patient care needs, reward efficiency, incentivize controlling costs and promote quality of care.” The legislature expects to hear from DSHS regarding benefit and costs of the new system by Jan. 2, 2016. Seven of the complicated rules (RCWs) that now govern payment will be repealed. This is great news for nursing homes throughout the state. However, we still need to be active; write in support of these bills, give input to the committee that will be designing the new bill and do not lose sight of the fact we have to keep our heads above water for two years until this change takes place. Thank you for reading and a huge thank you to those who are taking action and spreading the word.

a round of applause. By the way. Did you know that there are funds allotted in the Older Americans Act for computer training for Seniors, at Senior Centers? Huh? I am really impressed with our pool players dedication. They meet every Monday, and every Tuesday, Thursday and Friday after lunch. I’m talking about the same people day after day. What dedication, what determination, and hard to beat. Imagine what we could accomplish with a little bit of re-direction, like, maybe a tournament? We’ve decided to move forward with new floor covering installation in the dining room. We’ll try to keep any interruptions to a minimum. (I spent Sunday afternoon under the building again, shimming up floor joist to strengthen the soft spots in the floor. Someone has to do it.) Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Betty Hall; Pinochle, Kate; High Man, L. Paulsen and Jim Fry; High Woman, Boots Emry.

and heart to each Hometown Military Child. www.facebook. com/ncw.blue.star.mothers or ncw.bluestars@yahoo.com.

Great turnout for Hilstad Benefit SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Benefit Dinner for Ted and Renee Hilstad last Saturday at the Grange Hall in Molson was well attended. There were over 200 Dinner Tickets sold at the door. The Dinner was very good and many compliments were given to the chief cooks, and all those who helped in the preparation, serving, and cleanup. The Wilder Band did a good job with the music as several danced to the beat, including some little ones along with seniors. It was quite entertaining. The auction was a big part of the evening as the hall had many tables filled with items to be auctioned. As always some items are more popular than others and buyers were watching their favorites. One of those favorites was a homemade huckleberry pie. Throughout the evening the price was increasing. It was being watched very carefully. I heard the final bid was $105. Thank you, thank you, thank you. Another higher priced item was a Lopi wood stove that went for $225. Of course many items were less and the buyers went home happy with their new

John Figenshow memorial March 28 SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER

HILLTOP COMMENTS found treasures. Thank you all for making the benefit a success. Remember that pinochle will be winding up for the season with only two more weeks -- March 23rd and 30th. Last week’s winners were – High’s George Penner and Birdie Nelson and the Low’s – Willie Penner and Clayton Emry. See you in the fall. Mark your calendars for the Bingo dates on April 3rd and 17th and May 1st and 15th. Mark and Ann Alden have made a nice donation to the Grange and it will be put into the Bingo prizes on those dates. Thank you very much. Start thinking about the big Chesaw/Molson Garage Sale over the Memorial Day weekend for all to enjoy. Details will be coming soon. We have lost yet another one of our long time Hill Toppers. Judy Coffelt passed on to be with her maker. Thoughts and prayers go out to the families. The next Pancake Breakfast at the Grange Hall will be on March 29, don’t forget to purchase your tickets for the basket drawings. The ladies auxiliary has put together some nice prizes. There has been a lot of activity

TONASKET EAGLES

TONASKET EAGLES #3002

It’s time to start mowing your lawn if you already haven’t and think about putting out your humming bird feeders. On Saturday, March 28 we will be having a Memorial for John Figenshon starting a 12 p.m. John was a long time member of the

Eagles. He will be missed. On April 4, 2015 we will be having a Benefit dinner and auction for Boe McDonald to help with medical expenses. Dinner will start at 5:30 p.m. and we will be serving pulled pork sandwiches with scallop potatoes and cole-

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

You might not think that 70 ½ represents any particular milestone. But when you do reach this age, you will have to make some decisions that affect an important aspect of your life — your retirement income. Here’s the background: Once you turn 70 ½, you will need to start taking withdrawals from your 401(k) or similar employersponsored retirement plan and from your traditional IRA (but not your Roth IRA). Actually, you will need to begin these withdrawals — known as “required minimum distributions” (RMDs) — by April 1 of the following year and continue taking them by December 31 each year after that. These RMDs are calculated by dividing your account balance at the end of the previous year by your life expectancy, as determined by IRS mortality tables. If your spouse is your sole beneficiary and is

in beautiful downtown Chesaw these past few weeks. I have heard folks ask each other “have you seen the Rodeo Hall?” or ask, “what is going on in the Rodeo Hall?” I haven’t heard a lot of answers, so I decided to check it out for myself. There were several trucks parked around the building with pieces of wood or tools in the back of some. Other left over pieces of stuff lying around. A lot of hammering was going on inside. I entered carefully. What did I find inside? Power tools, plywood, 2x4s and the guys who were making all the noise. To my surprise I found, Walter, Bill, Jake, and Steve, all working hard at giving the Hall a big time face lift. Thank you for your hard work. Not to give away their surprise, all I am going to say is “what an improvement.” Thank you. I need to also thank Leroy. Our old Springer Spaniel, Cocoa, went to her final rest Wednesday, March 11. For 12 years she was everyone’s friend. She appointed herself the official ambassador for Chesaw, coming out to greet everyone who came to church, the store or the tavern. Almost no one could resist stopping to pet her or give her a treat. We say she was our dog (Leslie and Larry Smith), but the reality was she was Chesaw’s dog. R.I.P. Cocoa

slaw for $10. The auction starts at 7 p.m., all donations welcome. For more information call Dee at 509-429-6094 or Bev at 509486-2398. Pinochle scores are as follows: first place, Carol Ross, second place, Jo Porter low score went to Neil Fifer and last pinochle to Carol Ross and Lyle Anderson. We wish all those that may be ill A speedy recovery to good health, God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

MOVIES

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000

Be Prepared For Those RMD’s FINANCIAL FOCUS

come and go through the years? Some years ago we’d never heard of salted caramel and now it’s in a multitude of things... and most of them are good. Another Gonzaga game was played Sunday evening getting them higher up “the totem pole” as they very handily won and I searched in the audience, for Terry Mills because surely if she went to La Vegas to watch the team in the beginning of the play offs, she’d surely go to Seattle. They keep winning and now the next game will be in Texas. Will Terry be there taking pictures ‘ya ‘spose? Bright sunshine has been great to look at, but wind has kept it very cool. And then some more rain came. When we went to Havillah, recently, for the Visser get together I had thought I’d see Emma (Kuhlman) only to learn that she had recently fallen and broken her hip and then the inevitable pneumonia had stricken her. She was one of the avid pinochle players at Molson and we truly miss her, as she now resides in Wenatchee closer to family. ‘Til next week.

your retirement accounts. Your withdrawal rate will depend on a variety of factors, such as your other sources of income — Social Security, earnings from employment, savings, etc.— your lifestyle choices, your estimated longevity, and so on. In any case, What you should concern yourself with, once you have arrived at an appropriate however, are the first two words of RMD: withdrawal rate, you’ll need to stick to that “required” and “minimum.” These words rate unless your circumstances change. mean what they say. If you don’t take withdrawals, or if you withdraw less than If you have multiple IRAs, you’ll also face you should, you could face a 50 percent another decision, because, once you’ve penalty tax on the difference between what calculated your total RMDs for the year, you withdrew and what you should have from all your IRAs, you can take that amount withdrawn — and then you’ll still have to take from one or more of them. Depending on the out the required amount and pay taxes on investment mix of these individual IRAs, you the taxable portions of those withdrawals. So may find it beneficial to take the money from it’s a very good idea to take your withdrawals one account and leave the others intact, to on time — and without “shortchanging” potentially grow further. (If you have multiple 401(k)s, though, you will likely need to yourself. calculate and withdraw the separate RMDs Of course, you can certainly take more than for each plan.) the required minimum amount — but should you? The answer depends on whether you Other issues are also involved with RMDs, need the money. But even if you have to so, when the time approaches, consult with take larger-than-minimum withdrawals, you’ll your tax and financial advisors. By studying want to be careful not to take out more than all your options before you begin taking you need — because if you “over-withdraw” these withdrawals, you should be able to year after year, you run the risk of outliving maximize their benefits. your resources. That’s why it’s so important, during the early years of your retirement, to This article was written by Edward Jones for use establish a sustainable withdrawal rate for by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. more than 10 years younger than you, you’d use a separate table. Don’t worry too much about the number crunching, though — your financial advisor generally can do the calculations for you.

Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

KINgSMAN tHE SECREt SERVICE

Thurs.-fri. march 26-27.

INSuRgENt

saT.-sun.-mOn.-Tues., Thurs.fri. march 28-29-30-31, aPril 2-3. shOwTimes On fri. & saT. aT 7&9:20Pm

CINDERELLA saT.–sun.–mOn.– Tues.,Thurs.–fri. aPril 4-5-6-7-9. maTinee saT. 2Pm -

OMAK THEATER Omak and mirage TheaTers are nOw digiTal

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

INSuRgENt

119min Pg13

adv./sci-fi/Thriller sTarring shailene wOOdley, ansel zelgaOrT, TheO james. fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT. *3:00,6:00, 9:00. sun.*3:00, 6:00. mOn-Thurs. 6:30 The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

HOME animaTiOn

94min

CINDERELLA

112 min

Pg

/ advenTure / cOmedy sTarring jim ParsOns, sTeve marTin,jennifer lOPez. fri.6:45., 9:45 saT. *3:15,6:15, 9:15. sun*3:15, 6:15. mOn - Thurs. 6:45 Pg

advenTure/drama/family sTarring lily james, hayley aTwell, richard madden. fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. sun. *3:00, 6:00, 9:00. mOn-Thurs. 6:30

gEt HARD

100 min

r

cOmedy sTarring will ferrell, kevin harT, alisOn Brie. fri. 6:45, 9:30. saT. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30. sun. *3:30, 6:30. mOn-Thurs 6:45 Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


MARCH 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Oroville Chamber holds officer installation and awards banquet

Okanogan Valley Gary DeVon/staff photos

The Oroville Chamber of Commerce held their Officer Installation and Awards Banquet last Thursday and recognized several businesses as well as naming Business of the Year, Most Improved Business, Citizen of the Year and Senior Citizen of the Year. Above, left, Pat and Jodie Davidson receive “Business of the Year” honors for their store Frontier Foods; above, right, Clyde and Sandy Andrews, manager of the Camaray Motel received “Most Improved Business; upper left, Doris Hughes received “Senior Citizen of the Year” to a rousing standing ovation from those gathered and upper right, Lynn Chapman was “Citizen of the Year.” Both were honored for their tireless dedication to the community and all the volunteer work they do. This year’s officers - Clyde Andrews returns as president; Leah Palmer, vice-president; Sandy Andrews, secretary; Peggy Shaw, treasurer. Board members are Gary DeVon, Dan Lepley (the night’s emcee), Mary Lou Kriner and new board member, Diane Acord.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR DONKEY BASKETBALL, MARCH 28 OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club is bringing Donkey Basketball back to town on Saturday, March 28 at 6 p.m. at Oroville High School. The event features local teams including the Oroville Fire and Molson-Chesaw Fire departments. Advance tickets at Hometown Pizza & Bakery or Hughes Dept. Store customer service are $8 (adults), $6 (Student, 7th-12th Grade), $4 (Children, K-6) or at the door $9 (adults), $7 (Student, 7th-12th Grade), $5 (Children, K-6).

MAY POLE DANCERS NEEDED

OROVILLE - May Pole Practices have begun and anybody interested in the third, fourth or fifth grade is welcome to join the dancers on Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Oroville Elementary School Gym. They meet by the locker room. If someone knows where the May Poles that are used at the elementary school gym are located should call A. Martin at 509-322-0495

DONATIONS FOR EGG HUNT

OROVILLE - Members of the Oroville Eagles will be going around town collecting cash or egg donations during the week of March 23 to March 27 for the annual Easter Egg Hunt which is Saturday, April 4 at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park, starting at 10 a.m. sharp.

STORY TIME AT LIBRARY

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, March 25 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fund for young children.

NURSING HOME FORUM, OROVILLE

NORTH COUNTY - The Nursing Home Success Team will be holding the the second of its Public Forums on Wednesday, March 25 at 7 p.m at the Oroville United Methodist Church. Please attend in order to learn and ask the questions you may have.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP

OROVILLE - A Stroke Support Group meets on Thursday, March 26 at 10:30 a.m.at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments.

COMMUNITY ACTION MEETING

26 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, March 28, at 2 p.m. at the Cornerstone Christian Fellowship Church at Riverside and Locust Street in Omak for those interested in qualifying for this home. You must attend one of the two public meetings to get an application. The selection criteria are: (1) need for adequate shelter, (2) lived in the area for at least one year, (3) able to make monthly house payments of approximately $500 to $600 a month, which includes taxes and insurance and (4) willingness to partner during building process.

OROVILLE KITE DAY

OROVILLE The 8th annual Oroville Annual Kite Day will be held on Saturday, March 28 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Bud Clark Field on Chesaw Rd. Free kites to the first 100 kids. “Kids of all ages” are encourage to come and bring kites for all to enjoy.

TONASKET ABC DESSERT AUCTION

TONASKET - Tonasket Athletic Booster Club will be having their annual Benefit Dessert Auction on Saturday, March 28 at the Kuhler. Spirit hour and silent auction start at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. and live auction at 7 p.m. Dinner is $25, with tickets available at U.S. Bank, ask for Marilee or Maricela. (dinner not required, bidder packets available at the door for those only interested in the auction.) Come join the Tonasket ABC at their biggest annual fundraiser.

MOLSON PANCAKE FEED

MOLSON - There will be a Molson Pancake Feed at the Molson Grange on Sunday, March 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

SCHOOL RETIREES ASSOCIATION

OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will meet at 11 a.m.,Tuesday, March 31, for a nohost luncheon meeting at the Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. Dr. Jim Bone will discuss the Master Gardener program. Information: Jennie Hedington: 509-422-2954.

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, March 25, 2015, at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. If you have questions or need additional information contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041.

NATURALIST TO SPEAK

BASEBALL SIGN UP

RUTH MOODY BAND AT CCC

OROVILLE - Baseball season is here, kids ages four-years to 15-years-old can sign up in Oroville Elementary School Cafeteria on Thursday, March 26 from 5 to 7 p.m.

NORTH COUNTRY CAR CLUB

TONASKET - The North Country Car Club monthly meeting is Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. at Whistlers in Tonasket for interest in all types of vehicles for restoration, cruising, shows, etc. Come early for dinner before meeting. $15 annual dues. Teenagers welcome.

APPLICATIONS FOR HABITAT HOME

OMAK - A new Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity home is going to be built in Omak, There will be a public meeting on Thursday, March

TONASKET - Okanogan Highlands Alliance Presents Dragonflies: Rainbows on the Wing, with Dennis Paulson on Friday, April 3. Presentation at 6:30 p.m. is free; dinner at 5:15 p.m. is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. The presentation is at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, 411 Western Ave. More info: julie@okanoganhighlands.org or 509-476-2432. TONASKET - Community Cultural Center of Tonasket is presenting Ruth Moody band on stage Saturday, April 4 at 7 p.m. Dinner available

312 S. Whitcomb

with ticket for $25; concert only is $20. Pre-concert tickets available at Oroville Pharmacy, Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op, and Main Street Markett in Omak. A sell-out crowd is expected, so get your tickets now.

REP. NEWHOUSE MOBILE OFFICE

OMAK - U.S. Congressman Dan Newhouse’s staff members will be available to meet with anyone who needs help with a federal agency or has questions or comments on federal issues during monthly mobile office hours in Central Washington. Members of the public are invited to meet with Congressman Newhouse’s staff with no appointment necessary on Tuesday, April 7 at the Omak City Hall, 2 N. Ash St., 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

BLOSSOM SPRING BAZAAR

OROVILLE - The 9th Annual Blossom Spring Bazaar is Saturday, April 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Oroville High School Commons Admission Free (please bring a Food Drive Donation)/ Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day! Sponsored by Blossom Ministries. Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at 509-733-1941 or 509-476-2246

SOAP TO PERFORM MELVILLE BOYS

OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 p.m. For ticket information, please check out http://www. soplayers.ca/melville-boys.html

TONASKET FOOD BANK

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386. LISTING YOUR ITEM Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Be Queen for a Day!

Rhinestone Tiaras Because you deserve it!

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 26, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 26, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

SUN LAKES REALTY

9

5

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We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: Behavioral Health Spec. 1 Full time position Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical: Patient Registration Rep. Full time See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Business Opportunities

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 4

1

3

6

2

9

8

5

7

2

7

8

5

1

3

6

9

4

Puzzle 22 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

2

7

2

7

9

5

3

2

7

9

8

2

5

6

3

7 8 5

9

9

1

4

5 3

6 9

3 9 4 8 6 2 7 1

9

3

4 5

7 8 9

6 1 4 2 5

2 5

1

7

8 2

6 3 4

3

5

6

4

2

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3

1

6 8 3 1

9 7 5

4 2

7

2 5

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9

4

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9

1

6 4 8 1

9 3

1 5 2

3 7 8 6

Puzzle 19 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

8 7 4

5

2

8

9

3

3

5

1

6 9 5

9

2 5 3 8 1 7 6 4

8

6

7 5 9 1

6 2 3 4 8

7

8 1

Medium, difficulty rating 0.51

1 4 3 5

9 7 2

2 4 3 9

7

6 7 8 5

5 6

4 8 1 6

4

1

1

9

2 3

8

5

9

7 2 3

1

3 2 6 9

4 5 8 7

Puzzle 16 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

7 1 3

Sponsored by

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Subscribe to the...

2 8 6 5

509-476-3602

4 9

2 5 6 4 9 3

8 7 1

8 9 4 7 5 1 6 2 3

6 2 7

5 4 9 3 1 8

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6 4 7 8

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2 8

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6 8 1 4

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Puzzle 23 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

4 7

6

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8 4

3

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9 6

9

2

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6 9 2

3 5 8

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5 4 6

9

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8 4 9 2

9 4 8

3 1 2 7 6 5

4 7 2

1 3 5

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3 6 9 8 2 4

1 5 7

3

1 6

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5 8 1 6

7 9 4

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9 7 8 4

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6 7 2 3 4

Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

1 2

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3 8 5

1 3

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4 5

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7 8 5 1

3 6 9 4

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Puzzle 14 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.39)

5

8 4

1

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6 9

1 3

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8 4

3 2 5

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6 1

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1 2 7 5

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3 6 9

Puzzle 21 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

Puzzle 17 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

1

2

Puzzle 24 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

Puzzle 20 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.35)

ANSWERS

8 2

2

1

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7

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5

54. Cambridge sch.

52. Accident

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1

3

6

49. Checker, perhaps

2

5

48. Can of worms?

5

8

45. Prepare, as tea

1

6

2

44. Bright circle?

9

1

9 4

5

3

7

9

2 8 7 3

9 1 6

4

7 9 6 5

2 1 3 8

5

1

6

3

8 6

1 5

9

1

4 2

2 4

3 8

5

7

4

2 7

8

6 9

2

9

3 1

8 6

5 7 4

6

8 7

4 5

9 1 3

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1

2 9

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6 8 4

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9 3 5

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2 1

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5 2 1

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6 9 8

Puzzle 18 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

2 3

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5 9

8 1

1. Baseball batters who lightly tap the ball

42. Indicates

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8

38. Fidelity

37. Annul

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9

36. Bookbinding leather

7

4

7

35. Injure by treading heavily

40. Perfect, e.g.

6 5

1

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7 8

1

7 6

5 9

3

8

7 2

2 5

3 6

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4

2 3

9 8

3 6

2 1

4 5 7

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2

8 7

3 6

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5 1

3 4

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9

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2

Puzzle 15 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.72)

5. Accessory

5

34. Sisterly

58. Concise

4. ___ tide

4

33. Quality of having been recently obtained

39. Kind of drive (acronym)

3. His “4� was retired

2

31. Elephant’s weight, maybe

57. Small coins of ancient Greece

2. Bawdy

6

8

56. Men with chauvinistic beliefs

Down

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26. Before the due date

24. Erode (2 wds)

3

22. Vocalizing songs

1

19. Pinocchio, at times

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4

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9 7 2 5

6

3 4 1

23. Come to mind

14. Erasable programmable readonly memory (acronym)

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2

21. Orders to plow horses

1

20. “To ___ is human ...�

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18. Nutty confection

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17. Abbr. after a comma

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16. Rose plant fruit

7

15. Place in office

9

13. Exclamation of excitement

5

11. Underlying theme

4

6. Chronic nag

13. Slap target, sometimes

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

30. Sylvester, to Tweety

53. Unit of distance used in navigation (2 wds) 55. Listlessness

3

1. Daniel ___, Am. frontiersman

51. “Father Murphy� extras

6

ANSWERS

Across

50. Boy

48. Tony ___, Am. singer

12. Restaurant serving light meals

Sudoku

28. Any port in a storm

44. Stands for

47. CD follower

2

36. Extension of library book due date

46. It has its ups and downs

3

34. Artificial leg?

43. Downer

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33. ___ Scotia

41. Bigwig

5

32. Fat unit

40. Haul

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11. Surrounding and blockading a fortress

31. Golden Horde member

39. Mawkishly sentimental

10. Stranger

1

29. Daniel Webster, e.g.

9. Desert shrub with scalelike leaves

9

28. Sheik’s bevy

8. ___ v. Wade

6

27. ___ grass

7. Cheat, slangily

3

25. Cab driver in “It’s a Wonderful Life�

6. Excelled

8

Crosswords

24. Taro plant’s edible root

www.gazette-tribune.com 1

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

40 hrs per week April/October Job description and application available online: www.oroville.wednet.edu

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www.gazette-tribune.com

5

Groundskeeper/Assistant Maintenance

1

Oroville School District has

Okanogan County Department of Public Works is accepting applications until April 3, 2015 at 4:30 pm for Temporary M-2 Truck Drivers Wages will be $15.55/hour. Applicants must possess a Commercial Driver’s License, current updated health card, and flagging card. Okanogan County is also excepting applications for Flagger and General Labor Positions at $12.65/hour. Positions are available in various maintenance areas. Applications, supplemental and job descriptions may be obtained by contacting the Dept. of Public Works, 1234-A 2nd Ave. S, Okanogan, WA 98840 or go online to www.okanogan county.org/HR/ Telephone (509) 422-7300. E.O.E.

4

www.gazette-tribune.com

Subscribe to the... $550; 2 BR, 2 BA with walk-in closet. Quiet area. Nice view of green lawn from covered back patio. Great location. 2nd floor apartment in 4 plex. $400 dep. Oroville 509-2233064 509-560-9043.

Telecommunications Technician 1 Okanogan County PUD is looking for a Telecommunications Technician 1 to install, test, maintain and repair various types of broadband communication equipment, associated connections over fiber optic/copper/wireless mediums, analog/ digital telephony circuits and associated protective equipment. Assist in troubleshooting, locating and correct faults or anomalies on fiber optic, copper and wireless circuits. High school diploma or equivalent required. One to three years of experience in placement, splicing, testing and maintenance of fiber optic and copper cable and the installation and maintenance of network hardware and radio communication equipment. Washington State Class A CDL preferred. Valid flagger card (or ability to obtain one), First Aid / CPR Card (or ability to obtain one) and climbing certification preferred. Applications and resumes will be accepted through Friday, March 27, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, PO Box 912, Okanogan, WA 98840-0912, by email to donc@okpud.org or by fax (509)422-8418. Applications and job descriptions are available at PUD offices and at www.okanoganpud.org. Okanogan County PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer

NORTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

9

3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

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Help Wanted

NCWEDD seeks a self-motivated Executive Director (ED) professional to lead the nonprofit regional economic development organization serving Chelan, Douglas, Okanogan Counties and the Colville Confederated Tribes. The goals of NCWEDD are to communicate, advocate, and www.gazette-tribune.com collaborate. NCWEDD brings together the private and pubTONASKET lic sectors, promoting diver2 bedroom apartment with sification to enhance the fuyard. Close to town. $525.00 ture of the NCW region. month. Call 509-322-0347 or Three years of business 509-476-2234. and/or non-profit experience preferred. BA required. This job entails travel, good comWA Misc. Rentals munication skills, and openness to new ideas. The salaParking/RV Spaces ry is DOE. Position is a .75 FTE. To apply, please provide a cover letter and resume to RV SPACE admin@ncwedd.com. with full hook-ups. Full job description at Long-Term Leases. www.ncwedd.com Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Okanogan County Department of Public Works is accepting applications until Friday, April 3, 2015 for the positions of Summer Temporary Solid Waste Recycle/Transfer Station/Equipment Operator. For more information go to www.okanogan county.org/HR or call 509-422-7300. E.O.E.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

8

For Rent

www.gazette-tribune.com

2

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

You may apply online by visiting our website at www.nvhospital.org. or pick up an application at North Valley Hospital Human Resources Department. For more information please call 509-486-3185.

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4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; Furnished Cabin $625; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

Health General

NAC

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted

Washington State certified NAC license required.

7

www.gazette-tribune.com

North Valley Extended Care has 3 Full Time and 4 Per Diem opening’s for

5

Subscribe to the...

3 BR Starting at $450/mo + security deposit. Includes: Water, sewer, garbage; washer & dryer; air conditioning; play area; storage space. For more info contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

2

Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

Similkameen Park Apts Oroville, WA.

Help Wanted

4

COMMERCIAL LOT, 1 ACRE in Prescott AZ. New development close by. Possible trade for similar lot in Oroville area. (928)713-6741.

RIVER VALLEY OUTLOOK. Sunny one bedroom home with living room French doors welcoming to a relaxing patio, perfect for indoor - outdoor living. Features a beautiful kitchen, large walk-in closet, full bath & laundry room. $650. 509-429-7823.

Announcements

6

Lots & Acreage

For Rent

3

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com


MARCH 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE March 26, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF MARCH 23, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train at home to process Medical Billing & Insurance Claims! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at Bryan University! HS Diploma/GED & Computer/Internet needed. 1-877-259-3880 HELP WANTED RN’s up to $45/hr; LPN’s up to $37.50/hr; CNA’s up to $22.50/hr; Free gas/ weekly pay, $2,000 bonus, AACO Nursing Agency 800-6564414 $Wanted$

PAGE A9 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR COUNTY OF KING Estate of RICHARD DEAN ANDERSON, Deceased PROBATE NO. 15-4-01636-6SEA PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 26, 2015 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Richard J. Anderson ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Elizabeth A. Stephan WSBA #30479 ADDRESS FOR MAILING OR SERVICE: Oak Street Law Group, PLLC 10900 NE 4th Street, Suite 2230 Bellevue, WA 98004 COURT OF PROBATE PROCEEDINGS/CAUSE NUMBER: 15-4-01636-6SEA Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26, April 2, 9, 2015. #OVG621841

PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 841 An ordinance of the City of Oroville, Washington, revising Chapter 17.60 Spatial Requirements of the Oroville Municipal Code to provide allowance for the exceeding lot coverage where an alternative approved method of addressing storm-water dispersal is provided and setting an effective date. The above summary is of an ordinance adopted by the Oroville City Council during the March 17, 2015 regular meeting. Entire copies of the ordinance may be obtained at the Oroville City Hall, 1308 Ironwood, during normal working hours (Monday - Friday, 8:00 - 4:00). ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26, 2015. #OVG622554

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. Document: NOS Printed: 12/22/2014 8:44:12 AM Page Count: 5 IDS Automation: D eliver signed document(s) to Scan Clerk TS No.: WA-13-541519-TC APN No.: 1580020000 Title Order No.: 130018868-WA-GSO Grantor(s): ELAINE F. HUNTSINGER, STEVE E. HUNTSINGER Grantee(s): TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 864366 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 4/24/2015 , at 10:00 AM At the front entrance of the Okanogan County Courthouse, 149 Third North in the City of Okanogan, WA 98840 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of OKANOGAN, State of Washington, to-wit: Lot 2 of the Gerard Short Plat as recorded April 9, 1984 in Book A-1 of Short Plats, page 3, under Auditor’s File Number 708314, records of the Auditor of Okanogan County, Washington. Situate in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington. More commonly known as: 107 E JOHNATHON AVE, OMAK, WA 98841-0009 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/26/1998, recorded 4/15/1998, under 864366 in Book 167 Page 2562 and re-recorded on 9/12/2013 as Instrument Number 3185573 records of OKANOGAN County, Washington , from STEVE E. HUNTSINGER AND ELAINE F. HUNTSINGER, HUSBAND AND WIFE , as Grantor(s), to WASHINGTON ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, INC. , as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE , as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by TMS MORTGAGE INC., DBA THE MONEY STORE (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. . II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $24,986.52 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $49,937.59 , together with interest as provided in the Note from the 5/1/2012 , and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 4/24/2015 . The defaults

referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 4/13/2015 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 4/13/2015 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 4/13/2015 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME STEVE E. HUNTSINGER AND ELAINE F. HUNTSINGER, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 107 E JOHNATHON AVE, OMAK, WA 98841-0009 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 11/18/2014 . VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20 th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20 th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CON-

TACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm . The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate= WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear . If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBTAND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 12/22/2014 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 411 Ivy Street, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 108 1 st Ave South, Suite 202 Seattle, WA 98104 (866) 925-0241 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-13-541519-TC IDSPub #0075089 3/26/2015 4/16/2015 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26 and April 16, 2015. #OVG610204

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PUBLIC AUCTION There will be a Public Auction at Budget Towing, 32156 Hwy. 97, Tonasket, WA 98855, Phone 509-5601056, on Thursday, April 2nd, 2015. Viewing Time will start at 11:00 a.m. with the auction at 12:00 p.m. Up for auction will be: 1) 2002 Nissan AMZ-4248 2)1999 Mazda 824-ULO 3)1995 Chev B80808L 4) 1995 Buick 093-ZWB Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 26th, 2015 #621818

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www.gazette-tribune.com SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of MICHAEL KEEGAN WRIGHT, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00024-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Gerald L. Beffa as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: March 12, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Gerald L. Beffa, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 12, 19, 26, 2015. #OVG620006

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 26, 2015

SCHOOLS LEADERSHIP DAY IS APRIL 15 AT OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SUBMITTED BY JOAN HOEHN

PRINCIPAL, OROVILLE ELEMENTARY:

Submitted photos

Volunteers help paint murals at Oroville Elemetary School as part of the Leader in Me program. The school will be holding a Leadership Day onWednesday, April 15.

The Leader in Me SUBMITTED BY STEVE QUICK

SUPERINTENDENT, OROVILLE SCHOOL DIST.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Elementary School received a multi-year grant to implement a new leadership program for students: The Leader in Me. Staff members and students alike have formed committees that have the ultimate aim of helping every student become a leader in their own unique way. The program itself is centered on Stephen Covey’s Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. One committee that has formed is the environmental committee that has focused their energy on the physical appearances of the building that not only make our school more friendly and warm, but also things that remind everyone of the Seven Habits. Several volunteers have come into the school to help paint trees, caricatures and other items around the hallways. The building is really coming alive.

On April 15 the elementary school is hosting a LIM Leadership day when community members and visitors from other schools will come visit our school for the day and our stu-

dents and staff will be showcasing our transformation this year. Anyone wishing to come participate in this program should call the Elementary School office and reserve a spot. 509-476-3332.

OROVILLE - Are you wondering what will happen on The Oroville Elementary Leadership Day? Well, you will be in for a big surprise. Everyone is invited, but people that preregister at 509476-3332 will be scheduled to tour our building and some classrooms. There will be a general program in the gym for adults that are unable to preregister. During the school year, students have selected areas of interest and joined one of five committees that have been synergizing, working together, to make our Leadership Day a success for all involved. In preparation for our big leadership event, some students have contacted local stores and organizations to borrow large items for the event. Hailey Helm, a third grade Lighthouse Member, contacted Jack Hughes of Hughes, Inc. to ask about using 150 chairs for the event. The Okanogan Historical Society, is allowing the committee to use some of their tables for the event. Students on the Student Lighthouse Committee, Michael Oaks, Emily Grunert, Hadley Blasey, Cici Cervantes, Rebekah Martin, Kylie Acord, Amara Hayworth, Elijah Godinez, Hailey Helm, Micheal Fulmer, David Corrales, Ramon Steele, Ivan Burgarin, Baylee Taber, Anny Martin, Coby Bosler, Hazel Fogg, Conchita Garcia, Venus Sanchez, and Truitt Salazar, have been super busy planning the program of events, sending invitations, reserving items, practicing introductions, and a completing a plethora of other duties. Groups of students, individual students, and others will wow you with their leadership skills at both the assemblies and on the tours. Oroville Elementary school will be hosting our first annual Leadership Day on Wednesday, April 15 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. This is a training day. Some students will be talking in front of a large audience for the first time in their young lives. We will make mistakes, but we are learning to be leaders. Part of our growing process is to learn to greet and welcome people to our school. Other learning processes include how to start over if you stumble on words, how to look at our audience, how to refer to note cards, and how to share our learning experience. We welcome parents, grandparents, community leaders, and all to join us in this learning adventure. Hope to see you there.

Tennis team sees two loses on the court

A WINNING TEAM

Tiger Boys and Girls Team struggle in first outings BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Katlenia Vejraskas/submitted photo

The Tonasket FFA team took first place for the fifth year in a row when Sunny Okanogan Angus Ranch hosted a Judging Competition sponsored by the Cattle Producers of Washington. Chelan placed second, followed by Colville, Okanogan, Omak, Bridgeport, Pateros and AlmiraCoulee Hartline. The competition was held at the livestock auction in Okanogan March 11. Right, Morgan O’Brian, a senior at Tonasket High School, took second place among 152 individuals. He is shown here receiving an individual plaque and a souvenir sweatshirt and ball cap from Cattle Producers of Washington Directors Jim Wentland (left) and Scott Vejraska. This is the fifth year Sunny Okanogan Angus Ranch, in the business of breeding Angus cattle the past 54 years, has hosted the Judging Competition.

Tonasket hosted Cascade on the tennis courts Thursday (March 19) and Chelan Saturday (March 23). The girls lost their match against Cascade 0-5, and the boys lost 1-4, with the only win coming in on a second doubles forfeit. In the home match against Chelan, the boys lost 0-5, and the girls lost 1-4. “The only girls’ win was in the first singles, where Bailey Hirst battled back from dropping the first set to win it 3-6, 6-4, 6-2,” reported Coach Mark Milner. Hirst is a senior this year. Tonasket will travel to Cascade Tuesday (March 31) after hosting Omak Saturday (March 28). The home match begins at 11:00 a.m.

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Tonasket eighth-grader Joseph Schell prepares to return a serve during a doubles match with classmate Seth Smith against Cascade’s Chase Burtis and Klev Peckham. Smith and Schell lost the first set 1-6.

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MARCH 19, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SPORTS Tonasket loses close match to Liberty Bell

Katie Teachout/staff photos

Carlos Abrego takes control of the ball from Liberty Bell while teammates Jesus Gonzales, Hugo Sanchez and Hamit Aktas look on, ready to assist, at last Thursday’s (March 19) home match against the Mountain Lions.

Police called to investigate referee’s actions BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket lost a varsity home match to Liberty Bell 2-3 Thursday (March 19), after playing what Coach Darren Collins called “the better game.” The JV match was called mid-play by Tonasket Athletic

Director Kevin Terris when a referee was accused of shoving an athlete after the varsity game. “We felt that because of some things that took place between the games, we didn’t want to have any more games going on that night,” said Terris. “When a 30-year-old ref shoves a 16-year-old kid to the ground, that’s just wrong,” said Coach Darren Collins. The alleged incident took place right after the varsity game, as the athletes and coaches were going down the line shaking hands. “I guess I hit the ref too hard,

and right when I was going to fist-pump the other ref, the first ref shoved me out of the way,” said the student involved. “I was standing right behind him in the line, and he had to catch himself from hitting the ground with his other hand,” stated Collins. Superintendent Paul Turner was called to the field, along with Tonasket Police Officer Darren Curtis. Turner asked Collins to have a report on his desk the next morning. When Officer Curtis was questioned Monday, March 23, he said the incident was under

investigation and he couldn’t comment. Liberty Bell scored the first goal at the beginning of the game, then senior Elias Abrego scored a goal for Tonasket. The Lions put another one in, and Hugo Sanchez, a junior, scored the next goal for Tonasket. Sanchez said it “was awesome to make the goal,” giving credit to freshman Carlos Abregos for the pass. Liberty Bell attempted to put another in on a penalty kick early in the second half of the game, but goal keep Cristian Garcia made a good save, keeping it out. “We passed the ball great, and outplayed the other team the entire time. We had the majority of the shots and the majority of possession of the ball the whole game,” said Collins. “We played the better game. We had some unlucky bounces and some unlucky calls against us.” Victor Flores had to come out of the game during the second half, after an injury to the ankle. “I was getting pushed around, and (one of the other players) was talking trash to me the whole time. Then I got hit in the ankle with a cleat and they rolled over it,” Flores said. “It’ll be sore, but I’m hoping to be ready for the next game.” Sophomore Hamit Aktas echoed Coach Collins words. “The highlight of this game was the ref. He was really unfair. I think we were the better team,” said Aktas. “I think we can go to State for sure. We are not in shape—me personally, so I think once we get in shape we will be ready to go to State.” A foreign exchange student

from Germany, Aktas had the opportunity to practice with the Sounders this fall. “They have applications on their website, so I filled one out for fun,” said Aktas. Two hours later I got a message from them, saying, ‘Can you come for a trial?’ I drove over to Seattle with my host brother Riley Morris, and practiced with them all day October 14.” Aktas said that was his “second chance to be a pro,” recalling a time when he was at a tournament in Frankfurt at the age of eight, on a First League Team, when an agent came around. Aktas played soccer for 13 or 14 years in Germany, where

there are no school sports, just club sports, and he started in the Youth League. “So this is my first year playing in the normal man league— for people over 18,” said Aktas. “I played in the man league last year in Germany, playing inside over winter break.” Aktas came to Tonasket September 9, and stayed with the Steve Roebecks before moving in with Gail and Chris Morris. The Tigers were scheduled to host Manson Tuesday, March 24, and travel to Okanogan Thursday, March 26. They host Omak Saturday, March 28, at 11 a.m.

Tonasket Police Officer Darren Curtis meets with Coach Darren Collins and Superintendent Paul Turner after Thursday’s (March 19) match with Liberty Bell to discuss the possibility of charges being filed against a referee.

Tiger and Hornet track compete in first event of season BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

The Tonasket Track and Field team had it’s first meet of the season Tuesday, March 17, joining seven other 1B and 2B schools at the Bridgeport Jamboree. “For seventeen of the athletes, it was their first-ever high school meet,” said Coach Bob Thornton. “Everyone competed well and though the season is just starting, the future looks good for Tonasket Track and Field as they all get more experience at competing.” Competing hard was junior Ryan Rylie, taking first place in 400 Meters with a time of 54.41. Classmate Shyane Lewis also came away with a first-place finish in the 800 Meters at 3:08:00. Tonasket took the top spots in the Long Jump, with sophomore Hunter Swanson coming in first place at 16-10.00, and senior Ethan Bensing and sophomore Loyd Temby tying for second place, along with sophomore Kirston Tran of Entiat, all at 16.06.00. Also tying for third among the girls in the Long Jump was freshman Alina Vlahovich, who jumped 13.06.00, as did Ashley Watson, a senior at Liberty Bell. Tying for third place in the 400 Meters was freshman Katie Henneman, who kept up with junior Cierra Kohlman of Entiat to come in at 1:08.00. Following close behind to finish in fifth place at 1:09.08 was Jaden Vugteveen.

Also grabbing third place finishes were sophomore Hunter Swanson in the 1600 Meters at 4:56.00 and senior Alissa Young with a javelin throw of 78-04. Results for all Tonasket athletes at the Bridgeport Jamboree are as follows: 100 6. Smith Condon, 12.5; 10. Justin McDonald, 12.75; 14. Dallas Tyus, 13.77; 17. Lloyd Temby, 13.84; 21. Keeton Hoines, 15.06. 5. Katie Henneman, 14.05; 8. Alina Vlahovich, 14.38; 27. Morgan Tyus, 16.84; 28. Alycia Tibbs, 17.0; 30. Meri Hirst, 17.16; 31. Madyson Clark,17.20. 200 5. Smith Condon, 25.92; 6. David Curtis, 26.63. 12. Camille Wilson, 32.21; Madyson Clark, 36.01. 400 1. Ryan Rylie, 54.41; 9. Justin McDonald, 1:02; 13. Zach Clark, 1:07. 3. Katie Henneman, 1:08; 5. Jaden Vugteveen, 1:09. 800 14. Vance Frazier, 2:35; Abe Podkranic, 2:35. 1. Shyane Lewis, 3:08; 4. Mary Naylor, 3:25. 1600 3. Hunter Swanson, 4:56; 10. Vance Frazier, 5:27; 12. Matis Sitar, 5:45; Abe Podkranic, 5:52; 16. Riley Morris, 6:04. Shot Put 5. Chad Edwards, 34-9.5; 10. Ethan Bensing, 31-1; 20. Johnathan Tellez 24-11; 24. Colt Hatch, 19-1.

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6. Allison Glanzer, 24-5; 7. Kasey Nelson, 23-9. Discus 11. Chad Edwards, 73-3; 18. Zach Clark, 54-3; 19. Zeke Sliverthorn, 48-8. 8. Alissa Young, 79-11; 12. Jaden Vugteveen, 62-0; 14. Allison Glanzer, 58-8; 19. Nicole Juarez, 45-7. Javelin 16. David Curtis, 70-10; 17. Colt Hatch, 69-11; 19. Zeke Silverthorn, 48-11. 3. Alissa Young, 78-4; 9. Nicole Juarez, 55-11; 12. Kasey Nelson, 46-2. Long Jump 1. Hunter Swanson, 16-10; 2. Ethan Bensing, 16-6; 2. Lloyd Temby, 16-6; 6. Dallas Tyus, 15-11; 9. Johnathan Tellez, 13-9; 10. Matis Sitar, 12-10; 11. Keeton Hoines, 12-9; 12. Riley Morris, 11-6. 3. Alina Vlahovich, 13-6; 6. Camille Wilson, 12-7; 9. Morgan Tyus, 11-4; 11. Mary Naylor, 10-9.

Both Tonasket and Oroville joined 31 other teams for the Ray Cross Invitational at Ephrata High School Saturday, March 21. Highlights of the event for the Oroville girls was Tori Kindred placing third in the shot put, and Katie Egerton finishing seventh in the pole vault, followed by Tylynne Watkins in eighth place. “This was one of the most competitive meets I’ve seen for a track opener in Ephrata for years,” said Coach Harold Jensen. “Our young team did very well in both the boys and girls in establishing marks and times to improve upon. They were very impressive, despite battling a few injuries, soreness and flus that have been going around.” Team scores for local Varsity Men are: 12. Okanogan, 19; 18. Liberty Bell, 7; 20. Omak and Republic, 5; 23. Tonasket, 4. Local teams of Varsity Women scored as follows: 5. Okanogan, 35; 13. Republic, 18; 15. Omak

and Bridgeport, 14; 20. Oroville and Liberty Bell, 8.5 and 22. Tonasket, 5. Individual results for Oroville and Tonasket athletes are: 100 Meters 29. Smith Condon, TON, 12.93; 33. Caleb Mills, ORO, 12.99; 45. Colt Hatch, TON, 14.30. 14, Alina Vlahovich, TON, 14.53; 21. Katie Henneman, TON, 14.88; 40. Havannah Worrell, ORO, 16.80. 200 Meters 21. Smith Condon, TON, 25.80; 27. Justin McDonald, 26.98. 400 Meters 4. Katie Henneman, TON, 1:06.94; 12. Jaden Vugteveen, TON, 1:10.82 800 Meters 25. Abe Podkranic, TON, 2:28.67. 18. Mary Naylor, TON, 3:26.79. 1600 Meters 27. Vance Frazier, TON, 5:41.04; 32. Riley Morris, TON, 5:57.88. 14. Camille Wilson, TON, 6:21.44. 3200 Meters 8. Hunter Swanson, TON, 10:39.05; 12. Matis Sitar, TON, 11:08.98. 100 m Hurdles-39” 15. Brandon Baugher, ORO, 22.33. 100 m Hurdles-33” 26. Madyson Clark, TON, 22.75; 30. Mikaela McCoy, ORO, 28.36. 4x100 Relay 12. ORO Seth Miller, Caleb Mills, Brandon Baugher, Jetta Youker, 50.54. 16. TON Smith Condon, Dallus Tyus, Justin McDonald, Johnathan Tellez, 51.95. 12. TON Madyson Clark, Katie Henneman, Camille Wilson, Alina Vlahovich, 58.85. 17. ORO Yessica Nemecio, Bailey Griffin, Emili Divine, Mikaela McCoy, 1:07.34 4x400 Relay

DONKEY BASKETBALL Sat., March 28, 2015

15. TON Smith Condon, Hunter Swanson, Johnathan Tellez, Matis Sitar, 4:33.84. 12. TON Madyson Clark, Alycia Tibbs, Camille Wilson, Morgan Tyus, 2:13.35. Shot Put-12 lb 30. Dakota Haney, ORO, 31-07.50; 39. Johnathan Tellez, TON, 28-00. Shot Put-4kg 24. Kasey Nelson, TON, 23-10.50; 35. Nicole JaurezZelaya, TON, 19-10.50. Discus-1.6 kg 36. David Iniquez, ORO, 72-09. Discus-1kg 15. Alissa Young, TON, 78-08; 35. Kasey Nelson, TON, 55-03. Javelin-800g 20. David Curtis, TON, 105-09 Javelin-600g 10. Alissa Young, TON, 87-07; 30. Tori Kindred, ORO, 64-09. High Jump 14. Katie Egerton, ORO, 4-04.00; 17. Morgan Tyus, TON,

4-00.00. Pole Vault 10. Jaden Vugteveen, TON, 7-00.00. Long Jump 22. Lloyd Temby, TON, 16-00.50; 27. Jetta Youker, ORO, 15-02.25. 25. Alina Vlahovich, TON, 12-06.50; 33. Emili Divine, ORO, 11-02.25; 35. Morgan Tyus, TON, 10-08.50. Triple Jump 6. Dallas Tyus, TON, 37-02.50; 14. Lloyd Temby, TON, 32-05.75. 9. Alina Vlahovich, TON, 31-01.00; 16. Jaden Vugteveen, TON, 27-11.00. Oroville and Tonasket travel to Colville High School this Saturday, March 28, for the Ezra Gordon Invitational that begins at 10:30 a.m. The following weekend, March 31, Tonasket hosts Omak, Lake Roosevelt and Waterville; time to be announced.

Tiger baseball faced tough Brewster games Bears play rough at Tonasket BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket hosted Brewster on the ball diamond for their opening games Saturday, March 21. The Tigers came away feeling victorious, despite losing the first game 10-1 and the second game 16-4. “The games went better than in the past. The first game was our best game against Brewster in probably ten years,” said Coach Dan Vassar. “Adrian McCarthy pitched a gem in the first game, giving up only five runs in six innings.” Vassar said a couple of his good pitchers were ineligible to play, so he didn’t have “a real

reliever.” “I had to save Jimmy Coleman for the second game, in which he pitched the whole game,” said Vassar. A senior, Coleman brings a lot of experience to the mound. Adrian McCarthy, a junior with experience pitching, pitched the first game, with Chad Hockett relieving him in the last inning. In the first game, sophomore Zion Butler was 1-3 with a double and McCarthy was 1-3 with a run scored. Eighth-grader Riley Haug was 1-1 with a walk and two runs scored in the second game, and Coleman was 1-3 with a double and two RBIs. Tonasket hosts Omak Wednesday, March 25, and travels to Republic Saturday, March 28. The Tigers travel to Omak Tuesday, March 31, and host Liberty Bell Thursday, April 2.

Time: Place:

6:00 p.m. Oroville High School Sponsor: Oroville Booster Club Teams: Oroville Fire Dept. Molson/Chesaw Fire Dept. & More

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 26, 2015

OBITUARIES

Patrick Liley

PATRICK R. LILEY Patrick R. Liley, age 61 of Oroville, passed away in Omak on March 17, 2015. He was born in Olympia, Washington to James and Jean (Lehman) Liley.

Lydia Erma Wallace

LYDIA ERMA WALLACE Lydia Erma Matilda Feddersen - Helm – Wallace was born Feb 13, 1920 to Martin Feddersen

Marian Jackson

MARIAN JACKSON Marian Gladys Jackson, 87, died Wednesday, March 4, in Republic, Washington. Previously she had lived in Curlew for about 10 years, and in Montana near her daughter Susan for about 5 years. In December, she came

JOHN FIGENSHOW John Figenshow’s service will be Saturday, March 28, 2015 at

Patrick grew up in Boston Harbor north of Olympia where he roamed and explored the woods with his siblings or friends, creating a memorable young life. After high school he spent time in Tonasket, Wash. visiting his mother, where he met the love of his life, Peggy Williams. He joined the Army as a medic and was stationed at Fort Lewis, following their wedding in 1975. Upon his discharge, he attended college and worked as a Driver’s License Examiner. In 1988 he earned a teaching degree and worked as a substitute teacher and librarian for school districts in the greater Wenatchee area, Soap Lake, and Prosser. One winter was spent in Tynda, Russia teaching English and American Culture. As a teacher he had ample time to spend with his children and attending their games, concerts, and travel-

ing with his family on summer breaks. Upon his retirement he and his wife moved to the family ranch at Wannacut Lake near Oroville where they could spend more time with family and their donkeys. Patrick is survived by his spouse Peggy (Williams) Liley; children Craig (Susanne) Liley and Fiona (Colin) Pitman, brothers Jim Liley, Curt Liley, Dave (Pam) Liley, brother-in-law John Bell, sister Cheryl (Wayne) Fournier. He was preceded in death by: parents and sister Karen Bell. A memorial service was held Saturday, March 21, 2015 at 11 a.m. at Community Cultural Center in Tonasket and was officiated by Jim Yaussy-Albright. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Tonasket Food Bank in recognition of his generosity and compassion for others. Bergh Funeral Service & Crematory in care of arrangements.

and Katherine WildermuthFeddersen. She died at age 95 on March 22, 2015. Lydia had six children, several grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren. She has one living brother Ted Feddersen that resides in Omak Wash., and one older sister Clara Sovitski living in California. She was baptized and confirmed at Immanuel Lutheran church and was involved in many of the church activities. Living in Tonasket, her later years she attended and held her membership at Hope Lutheran Church. Her interests as farm wife and mother were mainly outdoor activities. She enjoyed gardening, hunting, fishing (prided herself in taking grandchildren gopher hunting and creek fishing). She was indeed loved so much and appreciated for her great help, nurturing, loving spirit, for her family, and for her life here on

this earth. Lydia joined her husband Ben Helm as Farmer of the Year and also was given the honor, with her husband Ray Wallace, the Cattlemen Association Award and Weed Control Award (Weed Lady) for Okanogan Valley. Her many activities brought her much happiness and many rewards. After moving to Spokane she lived at Broadway Court Estates, always enjoyed her family and friends there and her great joy in life was serving and knowing Jesus as her Savior. She was fond of saying, “I’ll see you all in Heaven.” The funeral service will be held at Immanuel Lutheran Church in Havillah Wash. on Saturday, March 28 at 1 p.m. with burial services and a reception following at the church. Arrangements by Bergh Funeral Service Oroville and Tonasket.

“home” to Republic, where she was living at MJ’s Adult Family Home. The family is so grateful for the exceptionally loving care she received while in Mari Jo’s care. Marian was born to Nelson Rhe and Lucy Candace Rowland on April 23, 1927, in Aumsville, Oregon. She married William Harvey in 1944, and they had a son, Greg. Later, Marian married Walt Jackson, and they had a daughter, Susan. Marian was an extraordinary woman who excelled at many things. She helped her grandma run the telephone switchboard in Aumsville when she was a young girl. Later, she worked in an upholstery shop. She was an excellent seamstress and cook. She worked alongside her husband, Walt, building houses for 20 years, doing virtually every phase of construction. She raised cattle and loved her garden. She also loved hunting, fishing, berry picking, and digging clams. Marian enjoyed every phase of meat processing. After her husband Walt died, she went to

massage school and became a licensed massage therapist, which she practiced for several years. Marian was always ready to lend a hand when anyone needed help. She loved to travel and visited many countries, but her favorite travels were to visit her friends and family. Marian found her greatest joy in her faith and fellowship in her church. She loved reading her Bible and meeting together with others who served the Lord as she did. Marian is survived by her son Greg (Christy) Harvey of Curlew, WA, her daughter Susan (Howard) Eoff of Bozeman, MT, and brother, Jim (Patti) Casteel of Aurora,OR, as well as 7 grandchildren, 13 great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and many, many friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, both of her husbands, and her brother Walter. Services were held Saturday, March 21 in Oroville, Washington, at the Free Methodist Church.

noon at the Eagle’s in Tonasket. Contributions in his name are welcome to the Tonasket U. S. Armed Forces Legacy Project http://www.veteranlegacyproject. org/. There is an online “guest

book” at www.berghfuneralservice.com His obituary can be read online at www.gazette-tribune.com/ obituaries/.

Arbor Day Celebration will focus on clean-up THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – In addition, to the Arbor Day Ceremony at Welcome Gate Park on Wednesday, April 29 at 1 p.m., this year’s Oroville Arbor Day celebration will be titled, “Arbor Day Clean-up Program.” Organizers, such as the Oroville Tree Board, plan to have community volunteers clean up areas of downtown, especially along Main Street from 10 a.m. until 12 p.m. A list of areas that need to be cleaned up will be made by the Oroville Tree Board, and volunteer groups and the high school classes will choose from these designated areas on which to work. The city will pick up bags of debris that are accumulated. The Oroville Chapter of

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OROVILLE – THE OROVILLE AMBULANCE IS IN NEED OF VOLUNTEERS TO BECOME EMTS. “OUR STAFFING IS LIMITED SO WE NEED YOUR HELP,” SAID JACKIE DANIELS, AN EMT WITH THE OROVILLE CREW. “COME AND JOIN THE

(pre-school, grade 1, grades 2-4, and grades 5-6). Entry forms have been given to Oroville Elementary School, the SeventhDay Adventist School, and to the Head-Start school. Additional entry forms are going to be made available at Atkins Harvest Foods. All entry forms will be turned in to Harvest Foods in Oroville, and they will display the entry forms and judge them on April 29. The winners will be announced at the tree planting ceremony, which will be held at 1 p.m. on the sidewalk across from the library at Welcome Gate Park. A memorial tree for Bill LaFrance is being planted in the sidewalk in front of Welcome Gate Park with a new iron tree grate. “We hope to have the flag presented by scouts or veterans, the Arbor Day Proclamation read by the mayor, and a few remarks from Ruth LaFrance regarding her husband’s memorial tree,” said Lynn Chapman, Chairwoman of the Tree Board.

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

AMBULANCE CREW AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN PEOPLE’S LIVES.” APPLICANTS MUST BE 18 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER AND BE A HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE OR HAVE THEIR GED. PICK UP APPLICATIONS FROM CITY HALL OR CALL 509-476-4320 IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS. “CLASSES WILL START IN EARLY MAY. IF YOU KNOW OF ANYONE WHO IS INTERESTED PLEASE PASS THIS INFORMATION ON TO THEM,” SAID DANIELS.

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DENTISTRY

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Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

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(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

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Columbia River

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Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

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OPTICAL

MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Healthcare Services

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

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A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

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(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities Psychiatric Services

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Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

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OMAK

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Tree Drawing Contest An Arbor Day Tree Drawing Contest will also be held for pre-school age through grade 6, with a $25 gift certificate from Akins Harvest Foods going to the winner of each age category

OROVILLE AMBULANCE NEEDS VOLUNTEERS ON CREW

 Behavioral

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The Royal Neighbors has offered to provide lemonade and cookies.

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Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

PAGE A12

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 26, 2015  

March 26, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 26, 2015  

March 26, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune