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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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rrow! o m o t s nitie u t r o p p For o w o d 2015 n n s l o l y i e k B s ool & Build h c S h g i H WHAT'S INSIDE West Sound Education Consortium

Consortium Defined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 The Five Ps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Tech Prep. Did You Know? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Tech Prep. Saving Parents Money Tech Prep Students Congratulated . . . . . . 20-23

Bainbridge School District

Family & Consumer Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Bremerton School District

First Robotic Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Lights, Camera, Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Energy Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 New Computer Sciences Career Pathway . 16

Central Kitsap School District

Skills USA WA State Conference . . . . . . . . Aviation in the Classroom Experience (ACE) . . . . . . . . . . Klahowya Secondary Yearbook Awards . . . First Robotics – Olympic High . . . . . . . . . .

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North Kitsap School District

Mechanical Drafting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Career & Technical Ed Classes . . . . . . . . . . . 9

South Kitsap School District

S.K. DECA Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Woodworking at S.K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 STEM Skills – Hands-On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Port Angeles

Donation to Machine Program . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

West Sound Tech

Biomedical Research & Global Health . . . . Advanced Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Travel & Hotel Management . . . . . . . . . . . . STEM Engineering Programs . . . . . . . . . . .

Olympic College

EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS

The “What's Next Tour” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New Degree Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Air Washington – Aerospace Training . . . . . . Teacher Certification Program . . . . . . . . . . . .

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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West Sound Education Consortium: A regional partnership of education and business The West Sound Education Consortium’s professionaltechnical education initiative is an approach to learning that acknowledges that students learn best when they learn by doing. Whether students are planning to attend college, get post-secondary training or enter the workplace after high school, professional-technical education teaches strate-

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent 8489 Madison Ave. NE, Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 Phone: 206-842-4714 CTE Director 9330 NE High School Rd., Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 206-780-1263 FAX: 206-780-1260 www.bainbridge.wednet.edu BREMERTON SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent 134 Marion Avenue N, Bremerton, WA 98312 360-473-1000 CTE Director 1500 13th St., Bremerton, WA 98337 360-473-0906 www.bremerton.wednet.edu CENTRAL KITSAP SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent Jenne-Wright Building 9210 Silverdale Way NW P. O. Box 8, Silverdale, WA 98383 360-662-1610 CTE Director Jenne-Wright Building 9210 Silverdale Way NW P. O. Box 8, Silverdale, WA 98383 360-662-1800 www.cksd.wednet.edu

gies and activities that promote high academic performance and practical learning. Through various district level programs, the West Sound Education Consortium exposes students to a wide range of academic and career areas. At the core of professional-technical education are rigorous academics, career awareness and exploration,

work-based learning and post-secondary education options. Students are exposed to real-world situations, while building strong reading, writing, math and problem solving skills. We prepare students in the West Sound region for the future by providing them with the tools, skills and education they need to succeed.

NORTH KITSAP SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent 18360 Caldart Ave NE, Poulsbo, WA 98370 360-779-8702 CTE Director 18360 Caldart Ave NE, Poulsbo, WA 98370 360-779-8859 www.nkschools.org

SHELTON SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent 700 S. First St., Shelton, WA 98584 360-426-1687 CTE Director 3737 N. Shelton Springs Rd., Shelton, WA 98584 Phone: 360-426-4471 www.sheltonschools.org

NORTH MASON SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent 71 E Campus Dr., Belfair WA, 98528 Phone: 360-277-2300 CTE Director 200 E. Campus Dr., Belfair, WA 98528 360-277-2299 www.nmsd.wednet.edu

SOUTH KITSAP SCHOOL DISTRICT Office of the Superintendent 2689 Hoover Ave. SE, Pt. Orchard, WA 98366 360-874-7000 CTE Director 2689 Hoover Ave. SE, Pt. Orchard, WA 98366 360-874-7053 www.skitsap.wednet.edu

OLYMPIC COLLEGE Office of the President Mailing Address for all campuses is: 1600 Chester Ave., Bremerton, WA 98337 360-792-6050 www.olympic.edu

WEST SOUND TECHNICAL SKILLS CENTER Office of the Director 101 National Ave. N, Bremerton, WA 98312 360-473-0552 FAX: 360-478-5090 www.westsoundtech.com

WSEC Options is published annually by Sound Publishing Inc.

Art Director - John Rodriguez

High School & Beyond Planning H

igh school students in the State of Washington have a unique opportunity to plan for their high school career and beyond. High schools in our state will be expected to engage students more in their learning, to connect learning to the real world, and require that each student have a plan for after graduation. This plan may include many options: four-year college, community college, technical college, specialty schools, apprenticeship programs, the military, or on-the-job training. To assist students to be responsible and engaged in their education, the 4 P’s have been established as a framework for addressing high school graduation requirements. This framework includes: a Plan, a Pathway/Program of Study, a Portfolio, and a Project/Presentation. This is designed to help students understand the “why” of their learning and how it will be

applied in the future.

Plan

All students will have an individualized “high school and beyond” plan. Students must outline how they plan to meet their high school Arts & graduation Communication requirements and how they Business & will spend Marketing their first year out of Engineering & high school. Technology Creating a plan will help Health & Human Services students start thinking about Science & Natural their futures Resources and focus on the courses

they need, to best prepare them for their career interests, no matter what direction they plan to take. The plan should be flexible with the goal being to help students understand what they are learning, why they are learning it, and how they can use this learning in their future.

Pathway

A pathway is an organized sequence of classes, experiences, and communitybased activities, supporting students in career exploration and educational preparation. This is flexible and may change as the student progresses through their high school experience. (Note the symbol associated with each Pathway title)

Study help ensure that integration occurs between academic and occupational learning. •T  ransitions are established between secondary schools and post-secondary institutions • S tudents are prepared for employment in a broad career cluster • S tudents receive a skill credential

Course:

An instructional unit that includes a set of defined competencies, a syllabus or course outline and a measure of accountability, evaluation, or assessment. A course may be academic, exploratory, or preparatory.

Program of Study

A model sequence of courses that prepares a student for a career. Programs of

Continued on next page


High School and Beyond Continued from page 2

Knowledge & Skills:

Specific work tasks performed on the job. They are related to the Industry Standards and/or the Essential Academic Learning Requirements.

Portfolio

A portfolio is a collection of student work documenting knowledge, skills, and experiences in and out of school. It documents pathway progress. The portfolio will enable a student to keep a record of their progress in these areas: • student as planner • student as learner • student as individual • s tudent as worker (career development) Students who participate in a presentation of their portfolio will demonstrate how they have applied their skills and knowledge during their high school experience. They will also demonstrate self-advocacy skills and a connection between themselves and their community.

Project/Presentation

Students must design and complete a culminating project on a topic of their choice, and present their project to other students, teachers, parents, and/or community members. This requirement offers students an opportunity to apply their learning in a “real world” way. School districts can set parameters for how students accomplish these projects. For more information regarding Washington State High School graduation requirements: www.k12.wa.us/Graduation Requirements

February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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Career and Technical Education Teacher Certification Program Now Offered at Olympic College Professionals in business/ industry and currently certified teachers who want to add a Career and Technical Education (CTE) teaching endorsement to an existing certificate can now enroll in the Olympic College CTE Teacher Preparation Certification Program through Olympic College’s Continuing Education Department. The program was approved by the Professional Education Standards Board (PESB) in May 2013, making OC the sixth state approved provider. Kari Morgan, a current teacher candidate says, “I chose the Olympic College CTE Teacher Preparation Certification program because not only is the program affordable, but Olympic College offers a flexible class schedule and convenient location that easily accommodates

my work schedule. The instructors are local, experienced CTE professionals and I feel that they truly care about my individual success. I am very glad that I chose OC to complete my certification!” Kari has worked in the financial industry for over ten years and is currently the registrar at West Sound Technical Skills Center. She is excited to start her new career as a CTE teacher. Since the program started, 31 teacher candidates have enrolled in the program. The first program completer is expected in Spring/ Summer 2015. If you would like more information about the program, contact (360) 475-7786 or continuinged@ olympic.edu. Kari Morgan, Olympic College CTE Teacher Certification program participant

Air Washington Expands Opportunities for Students Olympic College’s $2.3 million Air Washington grant project to expand aerospace training opportunities was scheduled to finish in September, however the Department of Labor has allowed for a one year extension to enable this statewide consortium effort to continue its momentum. As we enter into the fourth and final year of Air Washington funding, the focus will continue to be on student support with regards to individualized advising, retention, and assistance with job search for participants enrolled in the Composites Manufacturing, ManufacturingPrecision Machining, and Electronics programs. The consortium of 11 colleges that make up Air Washington also agreed that although all students will continue to receive exemplary levels of student support, additional emphasis will be placed on serving the needs of

our veteran students.

Science in Engineering Technology.

Through successful participation in this grant, Olympic College has experienced expansion with regards to their training programs. Specifically, the Composites Manufacturing Technology program has, under advisement from industry, expanded their program offerings from a two quarter Certificate of Completion and has now added a longer Certificate of Specialization (approximately one year). This extended certificate offers more advanced skills in Composites Manufacturing and incorporates the industry’s pressing need for non-destructive inspection/ testing and repair. Additionally, the Manufacturing-Precision Machining and the Composites Manufacturing Technology programs have established a pathway for their short-term certificates to lead to an Associates of Applied

Air Washington and Tech Prep hosted the Career and Technical Education Directors from the West Sound Education Consortium in the Fall of 2014. While here, they toured the Composites shop and engaged in discussion with faculty related to the Electronics and Composites programs. There has been significant growing interest in teaching the Composites Manufacturing Program at the high school level and several interested high school faculty were also in attendance. Air Washington also hosted the high school Career Educators at the Electronics shop to hear about opportunities in our region for student training and employment in this industry. A major deliverable of the Air Washington grant included vetting cur-

riculum in the Electronics program through industry, and sharing the revised curriculum through Washington State’s Open Course Library. Our Electronics faculty worked diligently to ensure that high quality curriculum was provided and as a result, they were able to submit and share the entire Electronics technical course curriculum for the Electronics Certificate of Proficiency through the Open Course Library in Washington State. If you are interested in learning more about any of the Air Washington programs (Manufacturing-Precision Machining, Composites Manufacturing Technology, or Electronics), please contact Deborah Welsh for more information at dwelsh@olympic.edu or visit our website at http://www.olympic.edu/ Students/WFDBS/WFD/AirWA.


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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High School Seniors Discover “What’s Next” at Olympic College On February 24th, Olympic College opened its Bremerton campus to approximately 200 high school seniors, career counselors, and staff members from 15 local high schools throughout Kitsap, Mason, and Pierce counties. The event, called the “What’s Next Tour”, allowed high school seniors to experience life as a college student, explore potential programs of interest, and gain valuable employment information from local employers. While on campus, students had the opportunity to visit two professional-technical programs of interest. They met in small groups with the program faculty and listened in on a class or engaged in a classroom activity. The students also had a chance to meet with local employers to hear tips on writing resumes, interviewing, acquiring the required skills for employment, and to learn how to prepare themselves for entering the workforce. Additionally, they learned how to navigate many of the student services that exist on campus including Advising, Counseling, Career Center, Registration and Records, Cashiering, Financial Aid, and Admissions. While at OC, students also

Do You Know About Tech Prep? Tech Prep is an opportunity for students to earn FREE college credit while enrolled in their Career and Technical Education (CTE) classes. When CTE courses at the high school are aligned with similar college courses, and faculty agree that the core competencies match, an articulation agreement is signed. Students who take these articulated CTE courses can choose to register for Tech Prep credit. As they complete the class and earn a “B” or better, they will receive credits for the equivalent college course. This

received a tour of the campus from current OC students, experienced lunch in the Bremer Student Center, and heard from the Associated Students of Olympic College (ASOC) President and Educational Opportunity Center Director, Sam Morgan, regarding topics including life on campus and ways to finance their education. Following the “What’s Next Tour”, OC representatives asked for feedback from the high school visitors. Kris Howell, Career Counselor at Olympic High School, said, “My students’ evaluations were extremely positive. They all had a great time. Thank you for making the event such a huge success!” In addition, Jim Funaro, Olympic College’s Tech Prep Director, reports that he has been amazed at the level of enthusiasm from the local high school Career Educators, OC faculty and staff, and employers wanting to participate in this event. He said, “I think everyone knows that this event will have a positive impact on these students and they are truly excited to be a part of it.” All in all, the event was a great success and OC’s Tech Prep department looks forward to planning the event for many years to come.

offers multiple benefits to the student. Tech Prep is beneficial to all students, including the students that may not be planning on college, and/or might even be in danger of dropping out. Tech Prep CTE specifically has the advantage of offering a “hands-on” educational approach in lieu of more traditional methods of teaching and learning. By connecting the working world with the learning experience, students can better visualize the value of the course content for future use. Individual interests and abilities are used to help identify appropriate career pathways. This, in turn, increases career and occupational awareness and readiness, prior to the student leaving the K-12 system. Aside from gaining occupational skills and related work experience, students may be able to earn industry

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certifications and choose to enter the workforce directly after school. Prior college credit can equate to higher pay for competitive employment or a promotion if a career pathway includes the military. Or, students may decide to continue their education. The college credits they earn through Tech Prep can be applied to future certificates or degrees, either at the community college or university settings, enabling the student to enter more smoothly into post-secondary education. Because they earn the credits, students are less likely to participate in duplicative (and more costly!) coursework. Interested in Tech Prep for yourself or your student? Check out the Washington State Tech Prep website at Continued on next page


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

Do You Know... Continued from page 4 secure.techprepwa.org and search for your school’s Tech Prep class offerings. Tech Prep Saves Parents’ Money Higher education is needed for success in the workplace, but costs for higher education are on the rise. In light of the current economic recession, families need to consider opportunities for savings. Students participating in Tech Prep have an opportunity to save significant amounts of time and money on their post-secondary education. On average, students enrolled in Tech Prep will earn six college credits. Based on 2013-2014

tuition rates, this equates with a total savings of over $600 to the average student and there is no limit to the amount of Tech Prep credits a student can earn. The State of Washington also enjoys the cost-cutting benefits of Tech Prep. Based on 2007-2008 figures, the state invested nearly $2 million, but earned savings of nearly $29 million. Employers are further benefitted by the development of independent and productive workers, thus strengthening the workforce as a whole. Check with your CTE instructor, Career Counselor, or school counselor to see if your class is a Tech Prep class and start earning free college credit today. Or, visit the Olympic College Tech Prep website at olympic.edu.

School Board Thanks Local Doctor for his Donation to Machine Program Port Angeles, Wash. – Port Angeles High School career technology students and machine technology instructor Mike Frick joined Port Angeles School District Board of Directors and Superintendent Jane Pryne at the May 8, 2014 board meeting to thank Dr. Sam Baker and his wife Martha for their donation to the machine Dr. Baker with a fracture distractor tool while talking shop program. about the device and its use at the May 8, 2014 Board The donation was accompameeting. Left to right, with Dr. Baker are students who help build the tool - Quade Beck, Zak Alderson, Baker, nied by a note from Dr. Baker; Casey Bailey – and instructor Mike Frick. Superintendent “Here is a donation for the Jane Pryne can be seen in the background. PAHS machine shop because of the excellent work the students Dr. Baker, a local retired orthopedic surand you have done in making the fracture geon, and other orthopedic surgeons, use distractors. You all have helped many the distractors in their work in third world injured patients in third world countries. countries, train doctors on how to use the Hope this helps.” bone distractor, and then provide the tool Students have built the special tools for future use to the doctors. - bone distractors used by orthopedic Students built each distractor for $100; surgeons – for use during surgery. The commercially, one costs $5,000. distractor holds the broken bone in place For more information, contact instrucwhile the surgeon sets and or plates the tor Mike Frick at 360.565.1575 or email broken bone. him at mfrick@portangelesschools.org.

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Get a jump start on your college career today! TECH PREP DUAL CREDIT Tech Prep Dual Credit is a federally funded program that allows high school students to earn college credits in approved courses on their high school campus.  Start preparing for a career while you are still in high school  Tech Prep credits are accepted at all Community and Technical Colleges in WA state  Stand out! Add college credits to your resume / job applications  Military bound? Earn promotion & pay raises with your credits  University bound? Check with the admissions office for information regarding credit transfer

Last year over 2100 students earned 10,438 Tech Prep Credits at Olympic College for a savings of over $1.3 million in tuition and fees! Registration open until the last day of school Go to sers.techprepwa.org for a list of eligible Tech Prep dual credit classes at your high school. Register online and earn a “B” or better in the course to receive your FREE Olympic College credits.

REGISTER NOW!

Contact your teacher or guidance counselor for program details or contact the Olympic College Tech Prep Office: Phone: 360-475-7353 Email: bhale@olympic.edu. You can also visit us online at www.olympic.edu The contents of this publication were partially developed with funds from the Carl D. Perkins Act. Olympic College and the West Sound Education Consortium does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, sexual orientation or age in its programs and activities.

www.olympic.edu

New Degree Opportunities at Olympic College Olympic College began offering three exciting new degree programs fall quarter, 2014. Engineering Technology If you enjoy tinkering with gadgets and being creative, this may be an excellent career area to consider. The Engineering Technology Associate in Applied Science degree is a two-year degree that provides a degree opportunity for the first time for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Technology, Composites Manufacturing Technology and Manufacturing Technology students. In addition, the degree also provides a second associate degree opportunity for Technical Design students. Engineering Technicians use modern technology to help design and manufacture a product and bring that product to market. Depending on the specialty area chosen, someone completing this degree may work in the manufacturing industry, the construction industry, the design industry, or work for cities, counties and utility companies. There are five special pathways provided within this degree: • Manufacturing/Machining • Manufacturing Composites • Technical Design Architectural/Civil • Technical Design GIS • Technical Design Mechanical The total credits for the degree vary, depending on the specialty area. A five-credit Capstone Project in either Manufacturing or Design is included in this program. This project will allow students to integrate knowledge from previous courses and demonstrate that knowledge in a collaborative, team-based, multi-disciplinary project, in which the student designs and documents a product and tests that design through manufacturing when appropriate. The Technical DesignArchitectural/Civil, Technical Design-GIS and Technical Design-Mechanical career pathways each have a two-credit Cooperative Education Seminar and a two-credit Cooperative Education Work Experience in the core course requirements. We are excited to be able to offer this new Engineering Technology opportunity in our Kitsap and Mason county region. For more information, please contact Ron Raty at (360) 4757389 or rraty@olympic.edu. Homeland Security Emergency Management Have you ever wanted to make a real difference in your community? The Homeland Security Emergency Management Associate in Applied Science - Transfer degree is a 98-credit degree program designed to provide great flexibility to students and to prepare students to become emergency management

policy leaders in their communities. We know now, after experiencing the Oso landslide, how crucial it is to have well-trained and experienced Emergency Managers available to handle disasters. These experts help with preparedness, mitigation, continuity of operations, response and short or long term recovery from emergencies or disasters. Emergency Managers are needed in local, state, tribal, regional and federal agencies, as well as in business, industry, medical and emergency services, non-profit organizations and many other fields. Students working toward the degree can take required courses such as English, math, social science, humanities, natural sciences and communications at one of the Olympic College campuses or online, selecting the best fit for their learning styles and schedules. Most of the core technical Homeland Security Emergency Management curriculum is available through the Washington Online System. Courses include topics such as Basic Incident Command, All Hazards Emergency Planning, Public Information Officer, Emergency Operations Center, Emergency Response to Terrorism, Training/Exercise Design & Evaluation, Homeland Security Law and Ethics, Disaster Response and Recovery, Public Administration, Technology in Emergency Management and Developing and Managing Volunteer Resources. The degree includes supervised practical experience of a minimum of 150 hours in a professional emergency management setting that is designed to integrate the student’s academic and technical skills into a work environment. These are hands-on, locally offered experiences. For more information about this degree, contact Professional-Technical Advisor Stephen Quinn at 360-475-7345 or squinn@ olympic.edu. Applied Science in Information Systems Olympic College (OC) now offers a Bachelor of Applied Science in Information Systems. This degree is designed for placebound, self-motivated students and provides a broad foundation, work-based learning and a very direct pathway from OC’s Associate of Applied Science-Transfer degree. Business processes, software development, web, networking, information assurance, project management, analytics, communication, teamwork and leadership are core topics in the degree. Quarterly information sessions are provided throughout the year. The program is a full-time cohort model, with 15 credits per quarter. Continued on next page


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

New Degree Opportunities at Olympic College Continued from page 6 Entry requirements include an Information Technology (IT) related associate degree or higher, or 90 credits from a regionally or nationally accredited institution, a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0, 25 general education credits with a 2.0 GPA or higher and 35 credits of foundational IT courses with a 2.5 GPA or higher. Students will develop electronic portfolios that will be used to evaluate student success and skills learned and applied. Students will have the opportunity to work in industry placements, pursue advanced certifications and strengthen skills applications. Course work includes workbased team projects, as well as individual projects to complete. There are currently 15 students working toward the degree; most students are also working full-time. The program offers them the option to attend the classes during the day or online and attend a weekly lab for individual and project work. It is recommended that applicants with prior coursework, previously earned degrees, industry certifications and/or extensive work experience should meet with the program director to discuss and identify options. If you are interested in this new degree program, please contact Rich Becker at (575) 496-1557 or rbecker@olympic.edu. What’s Next? Olympic College is in the midst of the review and approval process for a proposed applied bachelor’s degree in Organizational Leadership and Technical Management. Formal approval is still needed from the State Board of Community and Technical Colleges and the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. The focus of the new degree will be people who hold a broad variety of technical associate degrees. Businesses in the Kitsap/ Mason county region (Olympic College’s service area) are expecting a wave of retirements among managers and executives. At the same time, residents of this region lack

access to bachelor’s level education. This degree would create a degree pathway for current professional technical students as well as for current workers wanting to gain educational credentials and new skills. The Organizational Leadership and Technical Management Bachelor of Applied Science degree would prepare individuals for management, leadership, and supervisory roles in the private and public sectors. The degree would include subjects such as leadership theory, conflict resolution, supervisory communications, change and diversity management, business ethics, occupational safety and project management. Olympic College (OC) surveyed local employers, hosted two industry roundtables and surveyed advisory committee members from a variety of professional technical programs to confirm the support and demand for the degree. The Organizational Leadership Resource Management advisory committee will assist in curriculum/program review and provide recommendations. OC students were also surveyed as to their interest in the degree program. The proposed program will be a full-time cohort model with an estimated 17 students the first year. The degree has a hybrid format, which means there will be some online coursework as well as face-to-face instruction. Students will be required to complete 90 credits of junior and senior-level coursework in the Bachelor of Applied Science Organizational Leadership and Technical Management degree. A total of 180 credits will be needed to graduate, which will include 90 credits transferred from a professional-technical associate degree. Portfolios will be used throughout the two years of the program to assess essential knowledge, skills and abilities, individual student strengths and progress. Admission to the program will be selective, and applicants will need to meet the minimum qualifications and complete all application processes. Please contact Norma Whitacre, Dean of Business and Technology Division, at 360-475-7361 or nwhitacre@ olympic.edu for more information as to the status of this proposed degree program.

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Family and Consumer Sciences: An Adventure in Meaningful Fun and Success It is time to put aside any notion you may hold about your grandmother’s Home Ec. class, or your parents’ Home and Family Life course. Today’s students are enrolling in Family and Consumer Sciences Education (FACSE), a dynamic and multi-faceted curriculum which addresses 21st Century Skills. Students have the opportunity to apply math, science and engineering concepts to real world situations. They utilize computer literacy skills in exploring career pathways, as they learn to think broadly about their roles as family member, as well as local and world citizens. The boy-to-girl ratio has been equitable for 17 years. In addition, the differentiation within the course makes it a welcome place for both college bound students, as well as students with unique special learning needs. Sprinting beyond an outmoded stereotype of sewing and preparing the perfect fluffy muffin, Woodward Middle School has taken this evolution farther by earning recognition as one of the best, all-encompassing FACSE programs in our state. In 2010, the Woodward Middle

School’s FACSE department became one of a very few accredited Science, Math, Engineering and Technology (STEM) programs within the State of Washington, in alignment with specific STEM concepts, as well as all other required academic disciplines. A Leadership component, consisting of 21st Century Skills was also submitted and accepted through OSPI. By presenting lessons within the Common Core State Standards, we have been granted accreditation through September 2017. This criterion comes with both strong expectations, as well as substantially more funding for the Bainbridge Island School District.

Each day the students in Family and Consumer Sciences find success through challenging, lifelong learning experiences, as they learn though supportive hands-on lab situations. Each lesson is fully aligned with specific STEM concepts, without compromising the heartfelt nature of learning about families and friends. Two separate courses of FACSE are offered at Woodward Middle School: 1) Consumer Sciences: Developed for mixed

Woodward Middle School students fabricate individual parachutes to test engineering principles.

classes of 7th and 8th grade students. 2) Food, Family and Careers: Developed for 8th grade students transitioning into an experience of future high school level expectations. Family and Consumer Sciences units you will find at Woodward Middle School: • Cooking for Your Family and within the Food Service Industry • Nutrition and Wellness • Financial Literacy and Career Exploration

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

Mechanical Drafting at Kingston High School

In Dianna Palermo’s Mechanical Drafting class at Kingston High School, students combine computer-aided design, mechanical engineering and computer programming to create robotic assemblies. Working with engineers at the Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station (NUWES) Keyport, students design an underwater vehicle as a culminating project. From design to electronics, construction and testing using standardized techniques, students work with adult mentors to see the scope of engineering and technical careers and the sequence of new manufacturing.

9

Career and Technical Education Classes at Kingston High School Personal Finance:

Financial literacy is an important element of education for all our graduating students. In Personal Finance students learn lifetime skills for budgeting, banking, credit, housing, investing and risk protection. Coursework is a combination of financial concepts, real-world math and activities that emphasize the core curriculum in a way that is underKingston HS students working with K-1 students to solve math problems found in a variety of careers. standable and relevant to high school juniors and seniors. Students are able to participate in a variety of activities that connect personal finance to economic systems. Digital Photography: Digital photography students learn the basics of photography and photo manipulation. Coursework combines elements and principles of design, learning to grow picture taking skills from snapshots to photographs, and the ability to use manipulation software to enhance photographs. Second and third semester students have the opportunity to increase their

Kingston High School students Hunter Parini and Anthony Stieh soldering switches for underwater vehicles. Relinquished Feelings by Kindra Smith, Frame in a Frame Photo Challenge standout.

Continued on next page

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Career and Technical Education Classes at Kingston High School Continued from page 9 skills behind the lens and produce AP 2-D art portfolios. All levels of students enjoy the opportunity to enter photo challenges and exhibits. Digital Graphics Studio: First semester Digital Graphic students learn the elements and principles of design and use this knowledge to produce a variety of original and creative graphics. Second semester students use their original artwork to create animation projects for different audiences. Students are able to share their Choose Your Own Adventure animations with elementary age children. Third semester students learn to write ActionScript commands to create complex animation projects.

Sneaker by 1st semester graphic design student Gary Gormanson.

Mermaid by 1st semester graphic design student Sara Neal.

Biomedical Research & (360) 779-4567 Globallibertybaybank.com Health Medicine that Makes a Difference Do you want to be on the cutting edge of not only the health care industry but research industry? Have you ever wondered if you can make an impact that will stop the spread of disease around the world and save lives? Do you want to perform hands-on scientific procedures and explore life from the microscopic level? Then look no farther. This is the perfect class for you.

will be explained in depth and explored. The importance of both post-secondary training and communication of scientific results is emphasized, including a research presentation at the end of the course as part of a scientific conference. The capstone project for this course is student designed – which means you can plan, develop and execute a microbiology based project.

West Sound Tech’s new Biomedical Research and Global Health program is designed for 11th and 12th grade students who have an interest in exploring scientific concepts and learning through use of the scientific method. Students will engage in a series of handson laboratory and computer lessons about molecular biology, immunology, pathobiology, bioinformatics and related college and career preparation. Students learn about and will be able to perform with precision a variety of biomedical skills (e.g., pipetting, microscopy, ELISA assays, blood hematology, DNA gene amplification and DNA gel electrophoresis), a spectrum of infectious diseases and a concentration on the molecular and bioinformatics tools used in creating vaccines for infectious diseases such as malaria. Ethical issues in biotechnology and genetic research

Global health is an expansive, growing field containing many different career opportunities. Educational requirements for a global health career will depend heavily on the specialty and necessary skills for a particular position. Almost every job in global health will rely on a foundation of research, communication and management skills with a strong understanding of working across diverse cultures, environments and political contexts. In general, global health careers will fall into one of four categories: health care provision, research and policy, program management and advising, and program development. Students want to know if they can get a job in this industry after they graduate from college – the answer is yes! The Department of Commerce for Washington Continued on next page


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

11

STEM Engineering Programs at West Sound Technical Skills Center Engineering & Design Technology

Have you ever wanted to learn how to create your own video game? Have you ever wanted to build a remote operated vehicle? Here’s your chance. West Sound Technical Skills Center has two unique programs that may interest you. While both start with the fundamentals of Engineering & Design they each have their own separate skill sets, creative environments and employment opportunities. If you are into hands-on learning, consider yourself creative and technically minded, these may be the classes for you! Advanced Video Game Design In this class you will learn to model and design 3D video game characters, objects and 3D video game environments using industry software. Once you have your character/object designed you will learn to rig and animate them. This is almost like putting a skeleton into a character so they can Screen shot of a video game character in progress. move with more life-like motions. This is the proSuccessful unit assignment and testing allow you to “level cess that makes them seem so real. After you create and up” as you work toward an excellent grade in the class. design all the characters and background features you Career Opportunities include: Video Game Design, will work with teams on programming techniques and Animation Design, 3D-Modeling for Video Games, create an actual video game. The class is structured like a Rigging and Animation for Video Games, Programming video game. Each assignment earns you “achievements” for Video Games. and “badges” as you work your way through the year.

Biomedical Research & Global Health Medicine that Makes a Difference Continued from page 10 State reported that “the biomedical, life science/global health sector is responsible for 11.1 billion of the state’s gross domestic product (GDP). Employment tops 34,000 direct jobs and another 57,000 indirect jobs making it the 5th largest employment sector in the state. If that’s not enough, this class will also give you the opportunity to get a head start on your college degree. Students, who successfully complete this course

with an average grade of “B” or better, will qualify for community college Tech Prep credits through the Washington State SERS system. Bates Technical College alone is offering more than 20 college credits for this program.

We offer 2 scholarships each year to a South Kitsap High School student and a Mature Woman who is continuing their education!

Contact info at www.bpwportorchard.org

West Sound Technical Skill Center programs are open to all high school juniors and seniors. If you are intrested in joining one of our STEM based hands on programs please contact Nora Zollweg at 360-473-0559 or check out our web page at www.westsoundtech.com. Enrollment for Fall 2015 starts in January. Space is limited due to the number of computer stations available. Don’t wait - enroll early.

We can do more UNITED than we ever can alone.

Enrollment starts for new students at the end of January 2015. Don’t wait; this amazing new program will fill quickly. For enrollment information contact Nora Zollweg at 360-473-0559 or check out our web page at www.westsoundtech.com. Step on the path to a bright and fulfilling future. Strive to make a difference.

North Coast Natives Port Orchard Business & Professional Women proudly support the young women & men of Kitsap County.

Across the hall, in the Engineering & Design program, students are engaged in building remote operated vehicles from the ground up. Students in this program use industry software to learn technical design and drafting. Once those skills are mastered, they move into designing and building robots and remote operated vehicles (ROV). After their ROV is designed, fabricated and assembled, they learn programming and troubleshooting techniques to move their ROV through unique underwater environments. The ultimate goal is to successfully compete in an ROV underwater competition. Career opportunities include: Mechanical Drafting and Design, Technical Design, Robotic Design and Programming, Electronics and Programming, 3D Printing Design and 3D Printer Operation.

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Bring a friend, a co-worker, or a family member and help build a better community. Over 40 projects from all over Kitsap County. Projects available May 1st.

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

12

Workforce Development Workforce Development Your Your Career Can Start Career Can Start Here! Here!

Olympic College offers degrees and certificates in these exciting Professional - Technical Programs:

Olympic College offers degrees and certificates in these exciting Professional – Technical Programs:

Accounting Technology Homeland Security/Emergency Management New! Advanced Composites Manufacturing Technology Human Services & Chemical Dependency Business Management Industrial Trades Technician Business Technology Manufacturing Technology Accounting Technology Services & Chemical Dependency Computer Information Systems MedicalHuman Assisting Cosmetology Advanced Composites Manufacturing TechnologyNursing/Health IndustrialCare Trades Technician Culinary Arts Institute Organizational Leadership/Resource Management Business Management Manufacturing Technology Early Childhood Education Physical Therapist Assistant Business Technology Medical Assisting Electronics Polysomnographic Technology Engineering Technology New!Systems Technical Design Computer Information Nursing/Health Care Fashion Marketing New! Welding Technology

Cosmetology Organizational Leadership/Resource 360-475-7530 Culinary Arts Institute Worker Retraining Assistance! Management Access to Worker Retraining financial assistance is based on availability of funding. To be considered for Early Childhood Education Physical Therapist Assistant Worker Retraining assistance, you must have met one of the following criteria and plan to enroll in a Electronics Polysomnographic Technology Professional-Technical program: Engineering CollectedTechnology WashingtonNew! State Unemployment Insurance (UI) in the past 24 months, or Technical Design  Been determined eligible to collect WA state UI, or Marketing Welding Technology Fashion Received a lay-offNew! notice, or Homeland A Displaced Homemaker, or Management New! Security/Emergency  

Been Displaced Self-Employed, or Honorably Discharged Veteran within the last 24 months or Active Duty Military who has received an official separation notice.

Worker Retraining Assistance! 360-475-7230 Olympic College 1-800-259-6718

Access to Worker Retraining financial assistance is based on OC Shelton 360-432-5432 www.olympic.edu/WorkforceDevelopment availability of funding. To be considered for Worker Retraining does not discriminate on the basis of races, color, national origin, sex, disability, assistance,Olympic youCollegemust have met one of the following criteria sexual orientation, or age in its programs and activities. and plan The tocontents enroll in a Professional-Technical of this publication were developed with funds from the Carlprogram: D. Perkins Act. • Collected Washington State Unemployment Insurance (UI) in the past 24 months, or • Been determined eligible to collect WA state UI, or • Received a lay-off notice, or • A Displaced Homemaker, or • Been Displaced Self-Employed, or • Honorably Discharged Veteran within the last 24 months or Active Duty Military who has received an official separation notice.

Olympic College 1-800-259-6718 OC Shelton 360-432-5432 www.olympic.edu Olympic College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, sexual orientation, or age in its program and activities. The contents of this publication were developed with funds from the Carl D. Perkins Act.

West Sound Technical Skills Center Travel & Hotel Management Did you know that 1.8 million people are employed in the hotel industry and 13 million are working in restaurants? This collaboration between the travel and hospitality industries accounts for over 9 percent of the U.S. workforce plus being the fourth largest industry in Washington State and third largest on the Kitsap Peninsula. West Sound Technical Skills Center’s Travel & Hotel Management program offers highly motivated high school students a chance to experience industry standard academic instruction and paid industry related work experience. Do you need a job? This is the program that can help you accomplish that goal! Students of the Travel & Hotel Management program will learn front desk procedures, sales and reservations, customer service and telephone skills, leadership and teamwork, professional dress code and behaviors, security and emergency response, travel related geography, and Sabre Reservations (Airline training). Job shadows, employment portfolio development, barista training and field trips to unique industry related job locations are all part of this rewarding program. Students may also earn the following certifications: • Certified Rooms Division Specialist

(CRDS) from the American Hotel Lodging Association

• Travel and Career Development certificate by ICTA (Institute of Certified Travel agents) • Travel Agent Proficiency (TAP) upon passing test of the American Society of Travel Agents (ASTA) Career opportunities include Travel Agents, Ticket Agents, Hotel Management, Flight Attendants, Cruise Lines, Front Desk Agent, Sales and Marketing, Catering and Events Manager, Reservation Agent, Accounting, Human Resources Staff, Hotel Food Service Staff, Security Staff, Maintenance Staff and Housekeeping Management. There are so many things to learn here at West Sound Tech. The possibilities are endless and the environment demands success! So, if you are personable, ambitious and want to have a future in this dynamic industry, we have the perfect program for you. Enroll now and start preparing for a future filled with exciting travel and new experiences. For enrollment information contact Nora Zollweg at 360-473-0559 or check out our web page at www.westsoundtech.com. Get started on your future today!

What’s all this Talk About Advanced Manufacturing? Representatives in the Manufacturing industry are very concerned about a shortage of qualified people to fill positions in manufacturing as their skilled workforce looks toward retirement.

According to the National Association of Manufacturers, “in 2013, manufacturers contributed $2.08 trillion to the economy, up from $2.03 trillion in 2012. Manufacturing supports an estimated 17.4 million jobs in the United States, in fact, 9% of the workforce is employed in manufacturing. So how does that compare to our workforce right here in Washington State? In 2012, Washington State generated $46.5 billion in the Manufacturing industry, which made up 9.6% of the jobs. What’s even better is that the average manufactur-

ing worker in Washington State can earn anywhere from $13.00 per hr. (entry level/ no experience) up to $28.00 depending upon the area of expertise. Furthermore, the Kitsap Peninsula is immersed in the maritime industry and we have the aerospace industry across the water. Recognizing these high demands of our local and regional workforce, West Sound Technical Skills Center, has decided to expand manufacturing opportunities by offering a new Advanced Manufacturing program for the 2015-2016 school year. Advanced Manufacturing will provide students with experience in Electronics, Precision Machining, Welding and Composites. (http://www.nam.org/Newsroom/FactsAbout-Manufacturing)


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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CKSD Students Compete in the SkillsUSA Washington State Conference The 2014 SkillsUSA Washington State conference was held in April 2014 and the Central Kitsap School District students did very well. In fact, all 28 participants from Central Kitsap High School earned medals. Fifteen students from Olympic High School placed in the top ten of their contests and one student earned a gold medal. SkillsUSA advisors are Jim Adamson, Paul Stensen, and Brandon Brown. GOLD MEDALISTS Nick Birkenfeld_______________________Internetworking Chris Bryan___________________________ 3D Animation Joy Clark___________ Precision Automated Manufacturing Maggie Cordray__________ Engineering Technology Design Richard Davey ______________________Technical Drafting Jessie Hernandez_______________________ 3D Animation Rachel Kagan____________ Engineering Technology Design Madison Largey__________ Engineering Technology Design Eric Ma____________ Precision Automated Manufacturing Ginelle Ramos_______________________Web Page Design Joshua Udell_________ Precision Automated Manufacturing Caleb Wylie____Web Page Design & Related Technical Math

SILVER MEDALISTS Jeremy Carlson ________________ Broadcast News Production Alfred Hanson______________ Engineering Technology Design John Harvey____________________________Internetworking Curtis Holden_____________________ Related Technical Math Stella Kim____________________ Broadcast News Production Tanner Lambert _______________ Broadcast News Production Ginelle Ramos______________ Engineering Technology Design Jarrod Sweet___________________ Broadcast News Production Joshua Udell_______________ Engineering Technology Design

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Studies show—kids who study music excel in school

BRONZE MEDALISTS Mairead Andersson___________Broadcast News Production Jordan Blake__________________________ 3D Animation Cooper Campbell______________________Mobil Robotics Greg Hablutzel________________________ Internetworking Rachel Kominek_____________Broadcast News Production Jenna McKenzie_____________Broadcast News Production Annette Misuriak____________Broadcast News Production Jacob Smith___________________________Mobil Robotics Nathan Smith_________________________ 3D Animation Josh Witek_________________Computer Repair Technician

Klahowya Secondary Students Earn Yearbook Award Gordon Little’s Yearbook students received a “Featured” award from Balfour Publishing this year. A representative presented students with the award which included a banner to hang in the classroom. The following is from the Balfour Publishing press release. “The Klahowya Secondary School yearbook staff has been honored for its accomplishments in yearbook design and coverage and recognized

by Balfour Yearbooks. The Klahowya Secondary School yearbook is featured in the 28th edition of Yearbook Yearbooks. The yearbook advisor is Gordon Little.” Mr. Little noted this represents the top estimated 5% of all of the yearbooks that Balfour publishes, and his students have worked very hard trying to earn more than the honorable mention they have received for a few years now.

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

FIRST Robotics Reign at Olympic High School

Back row: Tony Arnold, Ellery Newcomer, Bruce Richards, Dahlton Jamrock, Patrick Graham, Morgan DeSoto, and Richard Davey Middle row (kneeling): Mike Ward, Brandon Brown, Jeff Yenko, Tom Yenko, and David Tewksbury Front row (laying): Ariel Johns and Chantelle Lamb

Olympic High School is intent on producing valid STEM experiences for students. One such experience is the creation of a FIRST Robotics team which is an international high school robotics competition. Participation in this program gives students real-world engineering experience as well as designing accessible, innovative programs that build not only science and technology skills and interests, but also self-confidence, leadership, and life skills. Olympic High School teacher, Brandon Brown, leads and supervises the team of about 20-30 students along with some adult volunteers. The team, named Binary Robotics, began their first competition of the season at Glacier Peak High School where they competed in a game called Ariel Assist. Teams of three robotic alliances competed against each other to score giant exercise balls. Teams scored more points for passing to other teammates before the balls were scored at the opposing end of the arena. Binary Robotics did very well, winning first place at the event. The students then travelled to Ellensburg for the second district match. The team needed to earn enough aggregate

points in order to place high enough in the Pacific Northwest to qualify for a trip to Portland for the Regional Championships. The team came just a few points short in the final match of the final round of the elimination tournament at the Ellensburg event. They took 2nd place, and they earned more than enough points to qualify for a trip to Portland to participate in the championships. Binary Robotics finished 25th in the northwest out of approximately 200 teams.

Once in Portland they competed well, but did not make it to the finals. Although not World Champions, the experiences the students gained through teamwork and competing will last well beyond their high school years. In fact, many of the students post-secondary choices were based on experiences they had through robotics participation, and some have received scholarships for being a part of a FIRST robotics team.

15

Aviation in the Classroom Experience (ACE) By Terry Vanderhoef-Donison Aviation in the Classroom Experience (ACE) is a STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Math) semester class that is offered to seventh and eighth grade students in the Central Kitsap School District. This is a truly premier classroom overflowing with technology and student energy. Each classroom is constructed as the ready-room of an aircraft carrier which was the result of a grant provided by the DODEA (Department of Defense Education Activity). Students learn the basics of flight fundamentals and apply them to complete a variety of tasks. They learn about the forces of flight and how they apply to flying an airplane, as well as understanding the structure of the plane itself. Besides classwork and other activities, the joy of flight is experienced through flight simulation and actual flight simulators. Practical application of aviation knowledge helps students’ successfully complete missions. Through the use of science, technology,

engineering and math, they learn to meet challenges of the 21st century. By using the aviation/aeronautical theme, students develop critical thinking skills and teamwork to meet challenges with real-world application. When students were asked about this class, the resounding answer was “Challenging, but fun, and it offers new career choices I never knew existed.” Comments made by students really define the success of the program. • It takes every class and puts it together as one. • It makes me work harder in my other classes, too. • It made me more organized. • It taught me to accept a challenge and never give up. • It teaches you responsibility, organization and things about yourself. • It gives me some new career options. • I am now considering joining the Air Force. Lastly, according to one student, “You can’t always play it safe. Take a challenge!”

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Bremerton School District Partners with Code.org to Deliver New Computer Science Career Pathway By Blake Greisinger

Bremerton High School is working with Code.org to deliver the nationwide rollout of the Exploring Computer Science (ECS) course. ECS delivers computer science content though a mix of computer programming and robotics integrated with “computer science unplugged” which uses offline activities to develop student understanding of topics such as hardware, algorithms, and problem solving. Currently, students at BHS are learning how to use the programing language Scratch, which has been developed at MIT to make the programming and design of simple games easy and accessible to anyone. By combining “hard” computer science topics

such as mathematics and logic with “soft” topics such as art, character design, and setting development, students are producing interactive environments and games.

Students will conclude the year with a study of robotics where the logical and mathematical commands they have mastered in the computer will come to life in the real world as their robots interact with the physical world. Using their newfound knowledge, students will work on the LEGO Space Challenge as they develop “rovers” like those currently under operation on Mars. The LEGO rovers will have to overcome many of the same challenges that real rovers encounter as they attempt to navigate their environment and perform tasks.

Mr. Blake Greisinger with some Bremerton High School students learning a variety of introductory programming methods during the “Hour of Code”.

Energy Week: Students Gain Real-World Business Experience While Learning About Future Sustainability By Emily Wise Energy Week is a specific Washington Business Week model that Bremerton High School runs as a three-day pull out program for 170+ students enrolled in our Engineering, AP Environmental

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future, build a wind turbine to generate the maximum amount of electricity possible and then sell their home and its sustainable features to 40+ community judges. Each student company also has an adult Company Advisor, all of whom are volunteers from the Bremerton community. It is an intense three days where the deadlines are real and the competition is fierce. Students must market their company by creating slogans and designing logos, and they make business cards and brochures to entice investors. Students complete a cost benefit analysis and must estimate the total cost of the home that they design. The engineering cohort helps to blueprint the home of the future, including the sustainable building materials, interior design, and landscaping. Everyone in the company helps to build the wind turbine as well as a scale

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model of their home design. During the week, Students hear from guest speakers who are experts in various sustainable energies (wind, solar, geothermal) as well as environmental architects and planners. All of the ideas and concepts students gather during the week become integrated into their home designs and business proposals. On the final day of the event, the company student CEOs and team leaders deliver a formal presentation to a board of community investors and then everyone competes for investment dollars at a home show. It is a difficult week that forces students out of their comfort zones and into a truly collaborative scenario that is as close to a true business model as we can provide them. The program would not be possible without our community partners including Puget Sound Energy, Kitsap Credit Union, and the Washington Business Week support staff.


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

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Lights…Cameras…and Digital Media! By Kyle Meagher

It doesn’t seem that long ago when I first stepped into that unconventional, thrilling classroom full of lights, cameras, computers and many other fascinating technological devices I had never seen before. I remember my mixed feelings of confusion and excitement when my eyes explored a studio that looked much different than what my imagination had somehow created while watching Bremerton High School’s daily live broadcast of the morning bulletin with the rest of my classmates. The idea of working with video cameras, creating movies and operating a live television studio was not just a fun elective that gave me a break between core subjects; it was an opportunity that kick-started my pursuit of a Communications Degree and a career in digital media production. It’s been nearly twelve years since that first day of TV Production class at Bremerton High School and generally speaking, that isn’t very much time. In the digital world we live in today however, it’s ages. Any person with a cell phone can be his or her own producer, videographer, and editor. Websites like YouTube and Vimeo give anyone the opportu-

nity to become a worldwide celebrity. The cost of production equipment and software has gone down, allowing more people to create high quality productions and further mainstream the concept of bringing digital media creation into the lives of the average person. These changes have created what I believe to be new challenges in the classroom for teachers but new opportunities in the digital workforce for graduating seniors.

Today we live in a world where the terms media, video, online and digital are synonymous. The experience I gained from 180 days of TV Productions at Bremerton High School was not just the beginning of a career in television. With the experience I gained from that class along with my college training, I was able to work in numerous facets of media production. I’ve worked at a number of video production companies, but I’ve also worked for a website, a recording studio and a video game company. I’ve even worked in the digital creative department at Starbucks. This was all because I learned that our world is blending digital media together and video is needed everywhere. There has never been more of an opportunity to find work in Digital Media. If a company has a website, a

Bremerton High School’s TV Production teacher Kyle Meagher in the television studio with some TV Production students.

Facebook page, or a Twitter account, there’s an opportunity for someone to produce a video for them (and many companies have all three). As a teacher, I want my students to realize the same thing. I want them to see that the digital world is not something to take for granted but a source of inspiration for job opportunities that didn’t exist when I first stepped into that TV Productions classroom twelve years ago.

South Kitsap High School Gets Hands-on STEM Skills Mr. Mike Sheppard added Veterinary Medicine; the class focuses on medical terminology, diseases, medical tools and basic medical care of livestock and pets. This class prepares students for a variety of post high school plans, including attending technical college to become a Vet. Tech. or becoming a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at a university. Students entering the medical field may find the vocabulary and tools translate well from animals to people. Students work hands-on with local vets and animals to experience the science of keeping animals healthy. Sheppard also has a new addition of a Plasma Cam in his Integrated Agriculture Mechanics classes. This equipment allows

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during the plant sale in May. At the sale students practice sales, marketing, and advising customers using their science. Working in the greenhouse pushes students to know their science at a deeper level and engineer solutions to problems that arise during the cultivation process.

Mrs. Katie Atkinson advises the FFANutrients for Life team. This team placed in the top 20 at the State competition in May of 2014 and brought home a check. The Nutrients for Life team teaches the community about soil science and soil health through a variety of programs. Students not only research and conduct their own experiments but they practice communication skills as they pass their knowledge on to the South Kitsap community. They intend to compete at the State level again in May.

New equipment, classes, and contests are

Mr. Jordan Lybeck teaches Horticulture and Landscaping. They cover topics from biology to gardening, propagation, and genetics. These skills help students pursue degrees in Plant Science. Students are asked to put these skills to the test

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pushing students to become ready for life after high school. The Agriculture Department is encouraging students to look at science careers for their future and to start gaining skills now that will allow them to be successful whether they go straight into the workforce, attend technical college, or attend a 4-year university.

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Hands-on science has always been a focus for the Agriculture Department at South Kitsap High School, but new classes and new technology have made teaching up-to-date industry standards possible and give students a broader look at how science can become a potential career after high school.

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Beginning October 2014, Nick Matheson and Talia Fazio of South Kitsap High School’s DECA program launched a personalized Nike product campaign that is quickly spreading throughout the school. Nick and Talia plan to use this experience in creating and managing a marketing campaign. This campaign will be the content of a 30-page written project submitted to Washington DECA for competition. At the State Career Development conference Talia and Nick will present their project to a panel of judges and be scored on a rubric. A trip to the DECA International Development Conference is on the line. “I like to see all of our hard work finally paying off ” said Nick Matheson. “I think we have a legitimate shot at qualifying for Internationals. And once you make it, you never know what might happen.” Conferences and travel are an integral part of DECA Inc. and South Kitsap’s DECA experience. Students recently had 4-day trip to the Western Leadership Conference in Anaheim. “We had a great time, got some advice on how to make our written 30-page project better, and of course, saw Mickey Mouse!” said Talia Fazio. “It’s amazing to see thousands of DECA members all in one place wearing

suits and formal business attire. It really gets you motivated,” said Talia about the DECA leadership conference experience as a whole. South Kitsap already has one automatic qualifier for the International Career Development Conference in Orlando, Florida. Payton Swinford, South Kitsap DECA President, has punched his ticket to the national finals in the “Virtual Restaurant Challenge”. Payton finished 2nd in the entire Western Region out of a field of over 600 competitors. “I worked really hard at learning the intricacies of the restaurant industry and continually managed to grow my profits” said Payton. “This is my second year competing in the DECA Virtual Business Challenge, so I think my experience from last year really paid off.” In April, Payton will be one of 16 finalists from across the nation, who will battle head to head in a time-limited virtual restaurant challenge. The winner receives $1000 cash and of course a large trophy with the words “National Champion” on it. “I am a little bit nervous, but I am going to be prepared and I will give it my best shot. It would be great to bring home a national championship trophy for South Kitsap DECA”.

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

SKHS Taking on a Finer Type of Woodworking

South Kitsap High School’s Career and Technical Education (CTE) students are taking on a finer type of woodworking. Some students in a furniture-making class are interested in making tenor ukuleles as an after-school activity. Instructor Tim Shaffer and a handful of interested students will be making the instruments with lumber that was donated last year. “This is a great way to see how the life cycle of a tree applies to woodworkers,” says Shaffer. Last year the school was given a donation of a western maple log. The log was taken to a local sawyer who cut up the tree into 1” slab planks that totaled approximately 450 board feet of usable lumber. After season-

19

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ing it, students are ready to put it to good use. Students machined and re-sawed select pieces that will be used in the construction of the small instrument. Aside from the lumber used, specific parts of the instrument will be purchased and the goal is to keep costs down to a reasonable estimate of $50.00. Not only is this a great way to teach students good forest stewardship, but it also shows them how a tree/log gets processed into usable material. In the future it is the hope of the instructor to replant young saplings to replenish the forest from which the tree was harvested.

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February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

20

2013-2014 Tech Prep Students Congratulated Student Name

Credits Student Name

Bainbridge High School

ALLEN, NATALIE......................... 5 AMORE, AERIN......................... 5 ANDERSON, LEANNE............... 5 BAKER, AUDREY........................ 5 BARKER, KATHRYN................... 5 BEATIE, NATALIE...................... 10 BENTZEN, BLAKE....................... 8 BERDAN, HARRISON................ 4 BODLOVICH, SOPHIE................ 5 BREDY, VICTORIA.................... 10 BRELSFORD, HARRY.................. 4 BRUNDIGE, COLE...................... 4 BUCY, ANA............................. 10 BURNS, ELIJAH.......................... 4 BYER, JACKSON........................ 4 CALLAHAM, SHAWN................ 4 COSTELLO, ALYSSA................... 5 CRAMER, NORA........................ 5 DANIELS, CAMERON................ 4 DEVLIN, CAROLINE................... 5 DUTT, HANNAH........................ 5 EATON, RYAN........................... 4 ECKERT, KATHLEEN.................... 5 ELZIG, HANNAH....................... 5 ESTES, ALYSSA.......................... 5 FAY, BRIAN................................ 8 FIEDLER-KAWAGUCHI, CODIE... 5 FLING, ALEXANDER.................. 5 FLYNN, MARIA.......................... 5 FORST, ASHLEY......................... 5 FRADKIN, JULIA........................ 5 FURNER, CHARLOTTE................ 5 GLAZE, ETHAN.......................... 4 GOIDEL, SYDNEY.................... 10 GORDON, SAVANA................ 10 HALLINAN, SKYLER................... 8 HANSEN, COLLIN...................... 5 HARRIS, ELLA............................. 8 HILDERMAN, ROBIN................. 5 HOBBS, ROBERT........................ 4 HOBERG, MARGARET............... 5 JAMES, ALYSSA......................... 4 JIANG, SAMANTHA.................. 5 JOHNSON, NATHAN................ 5 KARREMAN, ANNEKE............... 5 KIRSCHER, MICAH..................... 5 KNIGHT, JEREMY....................... 4 KULFAN, RILEY.......................... 5 LAUKAITIS, CARINA.................. 5 LEIGH, ABIGAIL......................... 5 LEUNG, ABIGAIL....................... 5 LIEBLING, PHOEBE..................... 5 LINDSAY, EMMA........................ 5 LUNZER, CLAIRE...................... 10 MAASEN, CIANA...................... 9 MALONE, MICHAEL................. 10 MARSHALL, LUKE...................... 4 MERILLAT, MORGAN................. 5 MILLERD, AMALIE...................... 5 NATHAN, MAYA........................ 5 NIGASH, ELIZABETH.................. 5 NIGASH, RONALD.................. 10 NIMB, ERIK................................ 4 O’KEEFE, COLIN........................ 8 PEARL-SACKS, CAROLINE......... 5 PHILIP, MOLLY............................ 5 ROGERS, ELIJAH........................ 5 ROUSER, CAMERON................. 5 SAFFORD, ELAN........................ 8 SANDLER, OLIVIA...................... 5 SCHARDEIN, COLE.................... 5 SELTZER, GEORGIA................. 10

Credits Student Name

SPICKARD, EMMA................... 10 SULLIVAN, ISAIAH..................... 4 TATRO, KENNEDY..................... 5 TSAO, KAITLYN......................... 5 VIERITZ, ISA............................... 5 VITALE, OLIVIA.......................... 4 WILLIAMS, NICHOLAS............... 5 WILSON, EDWARD.................... 4 WING-KOVARIK, CHRISTIAN.... 5 WINKER, EMMA........................ 5 YOUNG, MITCHELL.................... 4 YOUNG, RUTH.......................... 4 Total........................... 473

Bremerton High School

ABIGANIA, RHAL DAVE............. 2 BEACH, ALYSSA........................ 2 BEARDSLEY, KENDALL............... 3 BELL, NORAH............................ 3 BENTON, HUNTER.................... 5 BIRKETT, KYLE............................ 3 BRAMBILA, ORLANDO.............. 2 BROWN, GEEANA.................... 2 BURR, DONALD......................... 5 BUTLER, HARLEY........................ 5 BUTLER, KATIE........................... 7 CARSON, FAITH........................ 5 CORNWELL, VICTORIA.............. 2 COWDERY, MAXWELL............... 4 COX, JONATHAN..................... 5 DALSKY, MANIKANDAN........... 5 DEJESUS, RODDRICK................. 5 DERDA, MICHEALA.................... 2 DOAN, MY................................ 3 EASTIN, BRITTANY..................... 2 EDWARDS, KELLI....................... 5 ELLISON, DAWNEISHA.............. 5 ELTON, ANTHONY.................... 3 ENRIQUEZ, JOVANA................. 5 ERICKSON, CARTER................... 5 ERYKAH, ERYKAH..................... 3 FARMAN, ZACHARY................. 5 FARMER, KALEB......................... 2 FLEMISTER, RONALD................. 5 GOFORTH, MEGAN.................. 3 GRAHAM, MEGAN................... 3 GRAN, ALYSSA......................... 3 GRAVES, BRIANA...................... 8 HAJI, SHAMA............................ 4 HARRIS, EMMA......................... 2 HEMMINGSON, AUBREY.......... 5 HENSLEY, BAILEY....................... 3 HOLLKAMP, LAUREN................. 3 HOLLOWAY, JOSEPHINE........... 9 HUNTWORK, SERENITY............ 5 KILE, HAILE................................ 5 KING, CEINNA.......................... 2 MALDONADO, KATHERYN....... 7 MATRO, JOHN.......................... 5 MATRO, KRISTA......................... 3 MCCORMICK, MARISSA............ 5 MCKINNEY, ELISE...................... 2 MIRANDA-CORONA, ULISES.... 5 NAVARRO, BAILEY..................... 2 NGUYEN, KEVIN....................... 4 NOLTING, LEAH........................ 3 PAYTON, FORREST.................... 5 PENDER, TERESA-LYNN............. 2 PENNER, SHYIANN................... 3 QUINTANA, SELENA................. 3 RIVERS, KAYLENE...................... 5 ROWE, CHEYENNE................... 5 SANDERS, BLAKELY................... 5

Credits Student Name

SANDNESS, EMILY.................... 7 SHELBY, KIARA........................ 10 SKIADOPOULOU, ZOE.............. 3 SMITH, MEGAN......................... 4 STYRLUND, KELSIE..................... 9 TIMMERMAN, AVA.................... 5 TODD, TARYN........................... 3 VARGAS, MARINELLE................ 3 WATSON, SOMIYA.................... 3 WINBORN, ALANA................... 5 WINKLEY, ILENE........................ 5 WRIGHT, CONNOR................... 4 YOSHIKAWA, AYANE................ 2 Total........................... 292

Central Kitsap High School

ABAD, CIDNEY.......................... 5 ABSHER, DAKOTA..................... 5 ACKERMAN, TAYLOR.............. 15 ADAMSON, TIMOTHY............... 4 ALLISON, SABRINA................... 5 AMANTE, KRISTAJAE................. 5 ANDERSON, AUSTIN................ 5 ANDERSON, CHASE................ 10 ANDERSON, KADON ............... 5 ANDERSON, MADISON............ 5 ANDUZE, BRION....................... 5 ANGKICO, CHRISTOPHER......... 8 ANTOINE, WYATT..................... 5 ANTONIO, KALO...................... 5 APPLETON, ADAM.................... 5 ARNDT, CAILYN......................... 5 ARNOLD, BERTHOLD............... 10 ASHBURN, MIKAYLA................. 5 BAKER, CORY............................ 5 BALDRIDGE, JACOB.................. 5 BALDWIN, DARRIEL................. 10 BALDWIN, MALIK...................... 5 BARBERO, NICKOLAS............. 10 BAREFIELD, SEAN...................... 5 BARRICK, BAILEE....................... 4 BARROS, MICHAEL.................... 5 BAUGHMAN, GRANT............... 5 BECK, ALEXANDRIA.................. 5 BEEBE, VAUGHN....................... 5 BERG, TAYLOR........................... 5 BEVAN, SHYANNE.................... 5 BIRKENFELD, NICHOLAS........... 4 BLACK, JORDAN....................... 1 BLACK, NIKITTA......................... 5 BLANTON, CHRISTOPHER......... 5 BONILLA, CARLOS..................... 5 BORSON, BENJAMIN................ 4 BRATCHER, ELISHA.................. 10 BRAUN, HALEY......................... 5 BROMLEY, AMY....................... 10 BROOKS, BREONNA................. 5 BROOKS, BRITTANY.................. 5 BRUNDIGE, AVERY.................. 10 BRYAN, CHRISTOPHER.............. 5 BRYAN, CODIE........................ 10 BUCKSON, AKIYOSHI............... 4 BULLMAN, KENDRA.................. 5 BURAYAG, JANE MARIE AIMEE....................... 15 BURK, ZOE................................ 5 BURLESON, TESS....................... 5 BURNETT, JACOB..................... 10 BURNETTE, SARAH.................. 10 BURNS, KALANI...................... 10 BUSSARD, SAVANNAH............. 5 BYRON, KAYLAH....................... 5 CALDERON, HALEY................. 10

Credits Student Name

CAMPANA, KENDALL................ 5 CAMPOS, NADINE ANGELA..... 5 CANNY, JUON........................ 10 CANTU, ALEXANDER................ 5 CARLSON, CONNOR................ 5 CARR, MORGAN....................... 5 CARROLL, SOPHIE................... 15 CARTER, ALYSSA....................... 5 CASSEL, ALICE........................... 5 CHAPARRO, NICHOLAS............ 5 CHAPMAN, LUKE...................... 5 CHRISTEN, KEITH....................... 5 CHRISTEN, ROSE..................... 10 CHRISTENSEN, JARED............. 10 CIPOLLO, ASHLEY...................... 5 CLARK, JOY............................... 4 CLAWSON, DOLAN.................. 4 CLOSAS, HEATHER.................... 5 COBB, CASEY.......................... 10 COLOMBO, MEGAN................. 5 COLON, ANTHONY.................. 5 CORDRAY, EMMA...................... 5 CORDRAY, MARGARET.............. 4 CORPUZ, HANNAH.................. 5 COSLETT, MARIA....................... 5 CRABTREE, DAULTON................ 4 CRIOLLOS, JOSHUA.................. 5 CROW, BLAINE.......................... 4 DAHL, KODY............................. 5 DAMPMAN, DUSTIN................. 5 DAVIS, JUSTIN........................... 5 DAVIS, KALISSA....................... 10 DAWSON, ALEXANDRIA........... 5 DEAN, CHAD.......................... 10 DEGUZMAN, JONROSS.......... 15 DELAHAY, CHANEL.................... 5 DELEON, CHRISTIAN................. 5 DELGADO, NOAH..................... 4 DJORDJEVIC, JENNIFER............. 5 DUNBAR, DESTINY.................. 10 ECKLEY, MADISON.................... 5 EDWARDS, LIONEL.................... 4 ENCARNADO, JEANINE............ 5 ESCOBAR MORENO, YASMIN... 5 EVERMAN, HANNAH.............. 10 EWING, CHRISTIAN.................. 5 FAJARDO, ZACHARY................ 5 FELICIANO, JORDAN.............. 20 FERNANDEZ, PAOLA NICOLE.... 5 FERRELL, TIFFANI........................ 5 FIELDS, KENDRA........................ 6 FINNEY, TAYLOR........................ 5 FIRKINS, DAREK........................ 5 FISCHER, CALVIN....................... 4 FORD, JASMINE...................... 10 FORTNEY, COLLIN..................... 5 FOUTZ, KIMBERLY..................... 1 FUENTES, ROWINN REY........... 5 FULTON, ISAIAH........................ 5 GARGUILE, KAYTIE.................... 1 GATLIFF, HEIDI............................ 5 GAULDEN, KEYERA................. 10 GERARD, KOLBY..................... 10 GIBSON, DARRELL..................... 5 GILHAM, ALEXANDER............... 5 GILMORE, MADISON................ 5 GOETHALS, MICHAEL.............. 14 GOTTFRED, NOLAN.................. 5 GREEN, MADISON.................... 5 GUERRERO, ALEXIS................... 5 GULLETTE, KI’SHA...................... 5 GUTIERREZ, JUAN..................... 5 GUZMAN, CHARISSE FAYE........ 5 HABLUTZEL, GREGORY............. 8 HALL, ISAIAH............................. 5

Credits Student Name

HALLORAN, SHAYNNA........... 10 HALVORSON, ERIC................... 5 HAMILTON, CYNTHIA............... 5 HAMILTON, RACHAEL............... 5 HAMMOCK, CORISSA............... 5 HARPER, BRIANNA................... 5 HART, ARIANNA....................... 5 HARVEY, JOHN....................... 12 HEBERT, CHRISTIAN................... 5 HENDLEY-RUSH, SEMAJ............ 5 HIBBS, JAKOB......................... 10 HILLERS, KJERSTEN.................. 10 HIZER, DELANCY....................... 5 HOARE, CHRISTOPHER.............. 5 HOFF, JORDAN....................... 15 HOLDREN, KARLI....................... 5 HOOGSTRA, NATHANIEL.......... 5 HOOVER, KELSEY...................... 5 HORNSEY, ELIZABETH............... 1 HORTON, ROBERT.................... 4 HUDSON, BRANNON............... 5 HUFFMASTER, KAITLYN............. 5 JACOBS, CHRISTIAN............... 20 JACOBSON, SPENCER.............. 5 JENSEN, DANA....................... 10 JOHNSON, GWENDOLYN........ 5 JUN, JONG............................... 5 JUNT, TAYLOR............................ 5 KAGAN, RACHEL...................... 5 KANKOVSKY, KATHERINE......... 5 KEFFER, SIERRA....................... 10 KELLY, DANIEL........................... 5 KENDRICK, LEAH..................... 15 KIRBY, MILENA.......................... 5 KLAHR, KARISSA....................... 5 KNAPP, LEE................................ 1 KOLLARS, ERIN.......................... 5 KOMINEK, ANDREW................ 5 KOMINEK, RACHEL................... 4 KOVACS, JASMINE................... 5 KRAMER, BAILEE....................... 5 KROUSE, TAYLOR.................... 10 KRUEGER, JARRAD.................... 5 KURRUS, KENDRA..................... 5 LABERGE, KIMBERLY.................. 5 LAMERE, MACKENZIE............... 5 LANE, SAVANNAH.................... 5 LANOUE, JASON...................... 5 LARGEY, MADISON................... 4 LAVOIE, STEPHEN...................... 4 LEA, JEREMY.............................. 8 LEDESMA, ERIC........................ 10 LEON GUERRERO, ASHLEY...... 10 LEON GUERRERO, JORDON..... 5 LEVEILLE, JACOB...................... 16 LINDQUIST, TRISTAN.................. 5 LINGAT, CHARLES.................... 10 LUCAS, KIM ERICKA.................. 5 LUND, EVAN........................... 10 LUONG, ANA........................... 5 LYNCH, ANGEL PRECIOUS...... 10 MA, ERIC................................... 4 MA, KEVIN.............................. 16 MAC, JARRED............................ 5 MACKENZIE, MADISON............ 5 MANALAC, NIKKIE.................... 5 MANGAOANG, WILJOE........... 5 MANZANO, DANNY................ 5 MARSHALL, CATHERINE............ 5 MATCHELL, AMY..................... 10 MCCORMICK, GRIFFIN.............. 5 MCGREW, KARLEE................... 15 MCINNES, DREY........................ 5 MCINTYRE, RYAN...................... 1 MCKENZIE, JENNA................... 6

Credits

MCLAUGHLIN, GABRIEL............ 5 MEDINA, MARIA PRECIOUS...... 5 MEJOS, TERENCE...................... 5 MENARD, DANIELLE.................. 5 MESSERLY, JOSELYN................ 15 MILLER, ISAIAH........................ 16 MISTRY, MISBAH....................... 5 MOIMOI, NIA............................ 5 MONSERRAT, MICHAEL............. 5 MONTES, LACEY....................... 5 MOORE, ALEXANDRA............... 5 MOORE, ERIN........................... 5 MOORE, PATRICK...................... 5 MUNRO, MADISON.................. 1 MURRELL, SUMMER................... 5 NAJAR, SAVANNAH................. 5 NELSON, RYAN....................... 10 NESSER, JORDAN................... 10 NIDOY, ARABELLA-PRINCESS.... 5 NOYER, COLIN........................ 14 OBYMAKO, JESSE..................... 5 OLMSTEAD, ZACKERY............... 5 ORDEN-SCOTT, AYANA............. 5 ORDONEZ, IVANIA................... 5 ORR, CHLOE.............................. 5 OTANEZ, ENRIQUE.................... 5 OWENS, MARTISHA............... 15 PALOMARES, TERRY.................. 8 PARKER, AUSTIN....................... 5 PARR, SHAWN.......................... 5 PARRISH, TRAVIS....................... 5 PARSELS, NICOLE...................... 5 PARSONS, CHLOE................... 10 PARTSCH, BO............................ 5 PASCHAL, RILEY......................... 5 PASCUAL, RYAN........................ 5 PATTON, PATRICK...................... 5 PAULSEN, CHELLEESE................ 5 PEARSON, MADALYN............... 5 PERRY, ALEXANDER................... 5 PETERSON, NICOLENA............. 5 PETTUS, HARLEY...................... 10 PLUMB, JUSTIN........................ 10 POISSON, GARRETT.................. 5 PRIDDIS, MICAH........................ 5 RAMOS, GINELLE...................... 5 RANDLE, A’LYIA......................... 5 REBULADO, RAZEL DENISE........ 5 REGYNSKI, RYAN.................... 16 ROBERTS, JADIN....................... 5 ROBERTS, NICOLAS................... 5 ROBINSON, TORSTEN............... 5 ROHLFING, TESS..................... 10 RUTH, HALEY............................. 5 SADAYA, RYAN....................... 10 SAMUELS, ELAINE................... 10 SANDOVAL, ROSS.................... 5 SAUSEN, DANIEL...................... 5 SCHULZ, ELEANOR.................... 5 SEELEY, MASON...................... 10 SERNA, CARISSA....................... 5 SHIM, ABRAHAM...................... 5 SHORTER, MADISON................ 5 SILVA, SHAYE-LANI.................. 10 SIMONS, KYLE.......................... 5 SISEMORE, KATELYN............... 15 SKIFSTAD, JAEGER.................... 5 SKINNER, LINSEA.................... 10 SLATE, EMILY............................. 5 SLATE, WESLEY.......................... 5 SMITH, ALEX.............................. 5 SMITH, JACOB.......................... 5 SMITH, MICHAEL....................... 5 SMITH, TAYLOR.......................... 5 SOTH, EMILY........................... 10


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

21

2013-2014 Tech Prep Students Congratulated Student Name

Credits Student Name

STACHURA, MATTHEW.............. 5 STACK, BRIANNA.................... 10 STADLER, EMILY....................... 15 STAHL, TAYLOR........................ 20 STEPHENS, HANNAH................ 5 STEPHENS, PARKER................... 5 STONHILL, LAURENCE............... 5 STOTTS, MATTHEW................... 5 STOUDERMIRE, VICTOR........... 10 STOVER, JOSHUA..................... 5 STRANGE, MICHAYLA............... 5 STREFF, BRET.............................. 5 STROBLE, KYLE........................ 10 SUNDERLIN, LACHLAN-SUYLIA................... 5 SVARTHUMLE, JASON............... 5 SWANBERG, SPENCER............ 10 SYMINGTON, EMILY................. 5 TANKSLEY, ISAIAH..................... 6 TANKSLEY, MELODIE................. 5 TANNER, KAYCI....................... 10 THORESEN, ANDREW............... 5 TIBBS, JUSTIN............................ 5 TORRES, BRANDON.................. 5 TORRES-HERNANDEZ, ESPERANZA........................... 5 TRAIL, TYANNA......................... 5 TRANILLA, MAKAYLA................ 5 TREI, CARIN............................. 15 TRUJILLO, CHRISTOPHER........... 5 TVEIT, RACHEL........................... 5 UNGREN, AMANDA............... 10 VALENZUELA, HOSEA............... 5 VARGAS, NOEMI...................... 5 VELGARA, CIARRA.................... 5 VESSELLS, CODY....................... 5 VICKERY, KONNER.................... 5 WALLACE, ZOEY....................... 5 WALLITNER, DALTON................ 5 WALSH, SAMANTHA................ 5 WARNER, ARIANNA............... 10 WARNOCK, JOSEPH................. 5 WATSON, KARL....................... 10 WATSON, LEWIS....................... 5 WETHERBY, ETHAN................... 5 WHITE, DANIEL....................... 10 WHITE, KEVIN........................... 5 WILER, NOLAN......................... 5 WILLIAMS, SAMANTHA............ 5 WILSON, BREYDON.................. 5 WINKLER, RYLEE........................ 5 WINSLOW, TYLER...................... 5 WIREN, MADISON.................. 20 WITEK, JOSH............................. 4 WRIGHT, MADELEINE................ 5 WRIGHT, SADIE MAY............... 10 WYLLIE, CALEB........................ 16 YAEGLE, KENDAL...................... 5 ZAPATA, MAXWELL................... 5 ZETTY, HANNAH....................... 5 ZUSAG, EMMA......................... 5 Total........................ 2,213

Central Kitsap Junior High

BALASA, SABRINA.................... 7 CHAPMAN, JADE...................... 7 COLES, ALEXEA......................... 7 DAVISON, KATHERINE.............. 7 DELUNA, JESSICA...................... 7 DUNN, MEGHAN...................... 7 ENGER, RACHEL........................ 7 GARRETT, ALEXANDRA............. 7 HENRY, RHIANNON................. 7

Credits Student Name

HUIZAR, MATTHEW................... 7 KUSS, CHRISTIAN...................... 7 LABOW, LAUREN...................... 7 LAING, BRITTON....................... 7 LEWIS, CLARISSA...................... 7 LOETHEN, EVAN........................ 7 MASSEY, KENDALL.................... 7 MCCARTY, EMMA...................... 7 RE, BAILEY................................. 7 REIDER, DAELYNN..................... 7 SANTOS, DANAMAE................ 7 SCARR, STEPHANIE................... 7 SCHONAUER, JACOB............... 7 SEABROOK, GRACE.................. 7 SHERWOOD, KATHRYN............ 7 STONE, HAILEY......................... 7 TRAIL, TIERRA............................ 7 ZAPATA, PARKER....................... 7 Total........................... 189

Fairview Junior High

AJTUN VICENTE, GRACIELA...... 7 BARRIENTOS, PRINCESS JOY.... 7 BIAS, CYRAH............................. 7 BIRKENFELD, SHELBY................. 7 BORJA, SIERRA.......................... 7 CASTILLO, FELIX......................... 7 CLARK, TAELA............................ 7 COLVIN, OAKLEY...................... 7 COXEN, STEPHANIE.................. 7 EBERHART, JASON.................... 7 FASSNACHT, HANNAH............. 7 FOSTER, TIFFANY....................... 7 FRECKLETON, PEARL................. 7 GARDNER, AMBER.................... 7 HARPER, ADDALIE..................... 7 HICKS, MEGHAN...................... 7 HOWARD, JESSICA................... 7 JACQUES, IYAUNNA................. 7 JOSE, ARIEL............................... 7 KELLEY, KIRSTYN....................... 7 KELLY, AUSTIN........................... 7 LUTES-OTTERBECK, QUINN....... 7 MCCROSSAN, MADISON......... 7 MCINNIS, KAYDRA................... 7 MONZON, DANIELLE ROSE...... 7 NELSON, TAYLOR...................... 7 PANGELINAN, ARMANI............ 7 PARKER, JORDAN..................... 7 PAYNE, MYA.............................. 7 PORTER, CHARLENE.................. 7 PRUSAITIS, SARAH.................... 7 RIOS, JESSICA........................... 7 SCHASER, CELINA..................... 7 STANGER, BRITTNEY.................. 7 STEPHENS, ARIEL....................... 7 STUART, CARSON..................... 7 TANUYAN, NIA......................... 7 THEBEAU, SAMANTHA............. 7 VARGAS, JOLINA...................... 7 VELEZ, LAUREN......................... 7 WILLIAMS, ARIANNA................ 7 WILSON, ROSE......................... 7 YARBOROUGH, LAURAN.......... 7 Total........................... 301

Kingston High School

ANDERSEN, KATHERINE............ 4 BAEHR, CHRISTOPHER.............. 4 BENJAMIN, ALEXA.................... 5 BROOKS, KALANI..................... 5 CHARGUALAF, KALI................... 6

Credits Student Name

CHERNICK, YAKOV................... 4 CLEMENTZ, THEA...................... 4 CRAWFORD, ELIZABETH............ 5 CRIBBS, DARREN....................... 4 DANG, MEGAN........................ 4 DAY, MADISON......................... 5 DEASCENTIIS, SARAH............... 6 FORTIER, AARON...................... 5 HARRIES, MARK........................ 6 HAYWOOD, JOSHUA............... 4 HEALY, ALICE............................. 5 HEWITT, CALVIN........................ 4 HILSE, ALLISON......................... 6 HOFFER, BRENT......................... 4 HOUCK, TOVA.......................... 4 JORGENSEN, CHEYENNE.......... 9 KNAUFF, ALLISON..................... 6 LACOURTE, MORGAN............... 6 LJUNGGREN, AUSTIN............... 4 MARTIN, JESSE.......................... 5 NASH, KELLY............................. 6 NORBUT, ZAC........................... 4 OBRIEN, ASHLI.......................... 5 PREGARTNER, ANDER............... 4 RAY, NANIKA............................ 5 REYNOLDS, ZACHARY.............. 4 RODRIGUEZ, AUGUST............... 4 SHAW, MATTHEW..................... 4 SLUYS, AUNDRONIQUE............ 6 SMITH, CARMEN....................... 5 SPENCER, PAIGE........................ 5 STEBBING, REBECCA................. 6 STOKES, HAILEY........................ 5 STRAND, HEATHER.................... 4 SWEEPE, ALYSSA...................... 4 THOMA, APRIL.......................... 4 TWETEN, WILL........................... 4 WILLIAMS, KAELIN.................... 4 WILLIAMS, TROIAHNA.............. 4 WOODSON, MASON............... 4 WORLAND, MADISON............. 6 WRIGHT, JULIE-ANNE.............. 11 Total........................... 232

Klahowya Secondary School

ACKERMAN, DELANEY............. 5 ARCENEAUX, JUSTIN.............. 10 BAILEY, SPENCER....................... 5 BOCKENSTEDT, LONDON....... 10 BOYLE, NATALIE........................ 3 BREWER, DUSTIN...................... 5 BRIGHT, KIRA.......................... 10 BROCKETT, FORREST................. 3 BRONNIMAN, BRANDI LAYNE.. 5 CADY, AMANDA....................... 5 CARAVETTA, CHANCE............... 5 CARLSON, JESSICA................... 5 CARPENTER, DREW................... 5 CARTER, GABRIEL...................... 5 CHURCH, TARAH....................... 5 CLOUGH, MITCHELL................ 10 COLSON, RANDALL................ 10 COMPTON, NICOLE.................. 5 COOK, MCKENZIE.................... 5 COPPINGER, KELLEIGH.............. 5 CYR, JESSICA............................. 5 CYR, MONICA........................... 5 DAMMEYER, CAMERON........... 5 DARKOW, DESSTENEY.............. 5 DAVIS, RYAN........................... 10 DECLERK, TREVOR..................... 5 DEUTSCHER, MAKAYLA............. 5 DOTSON, MEGAN.................... 4

Credits Student Name

ENDSLEY, ANDREW................... 5 ERICKSON, ANJANNETTE......... 5 FAULKNER, MEGAN.................. 5 FERBER, CAILEY......................... 5 FISCHER, CHARLOTTE................ 5 FREDERICK, DANIELLE................ 5 GALLEGOS, KATE.................... 10 GASCOYNE, JORDYN............... 5 GHERNA, JAMES...................... 5 GIBSON, KYLE........................... 5 GORDON, NATHANIEL............. 5 GORLEY, LEANESS..................... 5 GREENE, CHRISTOPHER............ 5 GROZIER, PARRIS.................... 10 HARGROVE, TREVOR................ 5 HARNACK, JAMES.................... 5 HARRIS, JONATHAN............... 10 HARTFORD, MARINA................ 5 HEAMAN, MADISON................ 5 HENCE, MATTHEW.................... 5 HENSON, LUKAS...................... 5 HITT, BRENDYN......................... 5 HNATOVIC, NICHOLAS............. 5 HOLLIDAY, AARON................. 10 HOLLIS, JACOB......................... 5 HOLMSTROM, JONAH.............. 5 HOLMSTROM, LINNEA.............. 5 HOLOS, MILENA....................... 5 HUNT, CAMERON..................... 5 HUNT, RORY............................. 5 JANOWSKI, COLE..................... 3 JOHNSON, BRITTANY............... 5 JOHNSON, ZACHARY.............. 5 KASPER, RAYMOND.................. 5 KELLER, AUSTIN......................... 5 KELLEY, NOAH.......................... 5 KENDALL, SEAN........................ 5 KENDALL, TROY........................ 5 KENNEDY, MONICE.................. 3 KESTERSON, CHINA.................. 5 KETTERLING, TWILA.................. 5 KIECKHAEFER, DYLAN............... 3 KIMBALL, HEATHER................... 5 KING, GENNA.......................... 5 KING, GIAN.............................. 4 KNAPP, DYLAN......................... 5 KRAMER, TYLER....................... 13 LAKES, JENNAMARIE................ 5 LANDERS, ALYSSA.................... 5 LANDRAM, JERRY..................... 5 LANGHOLFF, KEIGEN................ 5 LARSON, TIMOTHY................... 5 LEWIS, ALEXIS........................... 5 LOEHRS, SARAH........................ 5 LUNDEN, BETHANY.................. 5 LUNDEN, KEVIN...................... 10 MATNEY, WILLIAM.................... 5 MAZELLI, TRENT........................ 5 MCGEHEE, BREANNA............... 5 MEFFORD, BRADLEY.................. 5 MENEAR, BAILEY....................... 5 MERCER, DESTINY..................... 5 MEYERS, BRAYDEN................... 5 MICALLEF, MEAGAN................ 10 MIKKELBORG, BRANDON......... 5 MILLER, DAYTON....................... 5 MILLS, ANDRE........................... 5 MILLS, KATELYNN.................... 10 MILLS, NICOLE........................... 5 MONTGOMERY, SAVANNAH.... 5 MOORE, JUSTIN...................... 10 MOSHER, CAITLIN..................... 4 NELSON, TAYLOR...................... 5 NIETUPSKI, EMILY.................... 10 OLSON, CHRISTIAN.................. 5

Credits Student Name

ORTEGA, MARISSA................... 5 PALLIN, CONNOR..................... 3 PECH, ELIZABETH....................... 5 PERRYMAN, MATTHEW............. 5 PETERS, EMILY........................... 5 PETERSON, JENNIFER................ 5 PHILLIPS, BAILEY........................ 5 PIPER, JACKSON....................... 5 POWELL, CAROLINE................ 10 POWELL, ERIKA......................... 5 PRENTISS, MADISON.............. 10 PRIOR, ASHLUND...................... 5 PRUIETT, MICHAEL..................... 5 PRUITT, ELIZABETH..................... 5 RAYMOND, MAYMIE................. 5 REEVES, OWEN......................... 5 REYNOLDS, JACLYN.................. 5 RIBBLE, BRADEN........................ 5 RICKMAR, SAMUEL................... 5 ROBERTS, CHEVELLE.................. 5 ROBERTS, CONNER................... 5 ROSE, SHANIA.......................... 3 SALAZAR, JOI........................... 5 SARGENT, AUSTIN.................... 4 SARGENT, JACOB..................... 5 SCARBOROUGH, MATTHEW..... 5 SCHIFFMAN, KELLIERAE............ 5 SCHUSTER, PAIGE...................... 5 SCOTT, ALEXANDER.................. 5 SCOTT, ERIC............................... 5 SHADDOX, ALEXANDER........... 5 SHANNON, MICHAEL............. 10 SHARP, ASHLEY......................... 5 SHEETS, WYATT......................... 5 SHENEFIELD, THOMAS.............. 5 SHOPSHIRE, SHANNON........... 5 SHORT, SPNECER....................... 5 SHUFFIELD, JACOB.................... 5 SLANEY, DREW......................... 5 SMITH, TIMOTHY....................... 5 SMITH, WILLIAM........................ 5 SNOW, MARIE.......................... 5 SNYDER, ALLYSEN..................... 5 SOLDANI, ALLISHIA................. 10 STONE, NATHAN...................... 5 TERRY, SHANE........................... 5 THOMPSON, MEKENZIE........... 5 TOBIAS, ANTHONY.................. 5 TONE, JESSICA.......................... 5 TORNO, BRENNA..................... 5 TROTTER, MERCEDES................. 5 TUIPALA, FAAMAINI.................. 5 VEACH, PAIGE........................... 5 VOSKUHL, NICOLE.................... 5 WADE, KYLE.............................. 3 WADE-DEVER, RILEY.................. 5 WALKER, JEFFREY...................... 5 WALLS, ZACHARY..................... 5 WEAVER, RIQUELLE................... 3 WHETSEL, BRADY...................... 5 WHITE, IAN............................... 5 WILLIAMS, BRAM...................... 5 WILLIAMS, EVA.......................... 5 WILSON, JONAH...................... 5 WIXSON, RYAN........................ 5 WOOD, KIERSTIN..................... 5 WOODRUM, ALEXA.................. 5 WOODS, DALTON.................... 5 ZIESER, JACOB.......................... 5 Total........................... 941

North Kitsap High School

ANDERBERY, ALYSSA................ 6

Credits

ANDERSON, JAKOB................. 4 ARNOLD, JENAE....................... 6 ARTHURS, KELLSON.................. 4 BANNON, AMANDA.............. 10 BENSON, JE’MARIUS................ 6 BLAIS, CHASE............................ 6 BOWERS, ERIN.......................... 4 BUEL, BRENDEN........................ 5 BUTTS, RYAN............................. 6 CALDER, EMILY.......................... 4 CARLSON, BENJAMIN.............. 6 CASTILLO, JERALD..................... 6 CLAPPER, CAMERON................ 6 CONKLIN, MIKAILA................... 4 CRINER, JUSTIN......................... 6 CROWELL, SEAN....................... 6 DULAY, SOTERO........................ 5 DURYEA, DEVYN....................... 5 ELLIS, AUSTIN............................ 6 FIGUERAS, ROBERTO................ 6 GOODFELLOW, MORGAN........ 6 GRANDBOIS, ABRIELLE.............. 6 GREEN, MEGAN....................... 5 HATTON, RHIANNA.................. 5 HAWORTH, REBECCA................ 5 HERNANDEZ, RAMONA........... 5 HOLT, SARAH............................ 6 JABLON, PAIGE......................... 5 JACHIMOWICZ, EMILY.............. 5 JOHNSON, ZACK..................... 6 KIRTLEY, ADDISON.................... 6 KRETCHMAN, DENNIS.............. 5 LARIOS, CARINA....................... 5 LAUDE, DONNA........................ 1 MARTIN, EVAN.......................... 6 MILLER, SARAH......................... 5 MORALES, JESSICA................. 11 MORIARTY, MARY..................... 6 MYERS, NATALIE........................ 5 PARRIS, SHELDON..................... 5 PATTON, ASHLEY...................... 5 PEREZ, ANTONIO..................... 5 QUINTON, ISABEL..................... 4 RAINS, ELYSE............................ 6 RAMIREZ, JOSE......................... 6 RAPHAEL, ALEXANDRE............. 5 RATCLIFF, JULIA.......................... 4 ROHLINGER, NOAH.................. 4 ROLLINS, HALEY........................ 6 RONNING, JAKOB................... 9 STOWE, MELISSA...................... 7 TALOSIG, JOSHUA.................... 6 THOMAS, JORDAN................... 6 VADSET, TAYLOR........................ 4 VEST, ASHLEY............................ 5 WALKOWSKI, JILLIAN............... 6 WALLWORK, SAVANNAH......... 6 WHITTAKER, ZACHARY............. 4 WOLBAUM, LAUREN.............. 10 WRIGHT, ABIGAIL...................... 4 ZAYAS, AMANDA..................... 6 ZIMMERMAN, SARAH............... 4 Total........................... 348

North Mason Senior High School. ABPLANALP, BAYLEE.................. 5 ACDAL, ALIA............................. 2 AFFONCE, BRENDAN................ 5 ARIAS, LIAM.............................. 5 ARKIN, SAMANTHA.................. 2 ASKREN, MAEGAN................... 5 BLONDELL, KYLEA..................... 5 BOGGS, SAMANTHA................ 5


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

22

2013-2014 Tech Prep Students Congratulated Student Name

Credits Student Name

BOND, MORGAN..................... 5 BOYCE GARRETT, DESTANIE...... 2 BOYD, CHELSI........................... 5 BREDA, ISABELLA...................... 5 BREWER, ALEXIS....................... 5 BRICKWEDEL, HALEY................. 5 BROWNAWELL, ADAM............. 5 BUMBURIDI, DMITRIY................ 5 CAMACHO, OLIVIA................. 10 CANADY, DESTINY.................... 5 CHU, AARON............................ 5 COFFIN, SARAHLEE................... 5 COSTELLO, TAYLOR................... 5 DATUS, NATHAN....................... 5 DAVIS, CHASE........................... 5 DAVISCOURT, TEGAN................ 5 DENEND, NOAH....................... 5 DIMES, RAVEN.......................... 5 DOWLER, MADASEN................ 5 DUKE, PATRICK.......................... 5 FALTER, CONNSTANCE.............. 5 FERGUSON, EMMA................... 5 FILER, CHEYENNE...................... 5 FITZGERALD, JOSEPH................ 5 FLORES, JACQUELEN................. 5 FULLER, APRIL-ROSE.................. 5 GARRETT, SKYLER...................... 5 GARRETT, SYDNEY.................... 5 GASCHEL, MAKENZIE............. 10 GASPAR, MANUELA.................. 5 GEIER, BAYLIE............................ 5 GIBSON-MOORE, ALISSA......... 5 GINNETT, EMMA....................... 5 GONZALES, ALENA.................. 5 GOSSER, MADISON.................. 2 GREWELL, MORGAN................. 5 HAHN-CARTER, BRANDON....... 5 HAKES, JAMIE........................... 5 HANSEN, MACKENZIE.............. 5 HATHAWAY, TRISTAN................ 5 HEINICKE, SAMANTHA............. 5 HENNINGSEN, PATRICK............ 5 HICKSON, KYLIE........................ 5 HOLLAND, KATRINA................. 5 HOLMES, RHYAN...................... 5 HOWARD, ESTELLE.................... 5 HUITULA, EMILIA....................... 5 IRWIN, CHELSEY........................ 5 JACKSON, MEGAN................... 5 JOHNSON, BRYCE.................... 5 JOHNSON, KYLE....................... 5 JOHNSON, SAMANTHA........... 5 JOHNSON, WHITNEY............... 5 JONES, TABITHA....................... 5 KISSLEER, NICKOLAS................. 2 KOCH, FELICIA.......................... 5 LEFAVE, GAVIN........................ 10 MAGARGEE, CHELSEA.............. 5 MAGERA, JESSICA.................... 5 MANN, MORGAN.................... 5 MANN, TODD......................... 10 MARKS, ZACHARY.................... 5 MARTIN, DYLAN....................... 5 MCCALLISTER- MATHEWS, AUSTIN.................................. 5 MCINTOSH, STERLING............ 10 MEDINA-DELACRUZ, MEGAN... 5 MEHELICH, BRITTANY................ 5 MICHAELS, MIKAELA............... 10 MICONE, TY.............................. 5 MIHELICH, MATTHEW................ 5 MOORE, SARA.......................... 5 MORGAN, LUKE....................... 5 MORIN, BROOKE.................... 10 MULLINS, RYLIE......................... 5

Credits Student Name

MULLINS, TRISTIN...................... 5 NESS, JONAH........................... 5 NOLASCO FERNANDO, DOMINGO........................... 10 ORLOB, SAVANNAH................. 5 PADILLA, ERIKA......................... 5 PALMER, EMILY.......................... 7 PANZERA, JASON..................... 5 PEDRO ALONZO, CRUZ............ 5 PEEK, HANNAH........................ 5 PELLOW, RIDGE......................... 5 PHIPPS, KAYLA.......................... 5 PIERCE, ALEXANDER................. 5 POPE, DUSTIN........................... 5 PULLEY, NATALIE........................ 5 RAMIREZ, NICO........................ 5 RASMUSSEN, ANDRIA.............. 5 REUTER, ASHLEY........................ 5 REYNOLDS, MARSON............. 10 ROOD, RACHEL......................... 5 RUSSELL, STEVEN...................... 5 SATRAN, QUINCY................... 10 SAWATPETCH, THITICHAYA........ 5 SAWYER, SARAH...................... 5 SETTLEMIER, NICOLE.................. 5 SHELBY, ANDREW..................... 5 SHIFRIN, ANDREW.................... 5 SOMERDAY, HAILEY.................. 5 SPOONER, ANGELICA.............. 5 STARK, LACEY........................... 5 SWANN, SAMUEL..................... 2 SWANSON, CONNER............... 5 SWANSTROM, CASSANDRA..... 5 TACKES, BRYCE......................... 5 THOMAS, KIARA....................... 5 TIEMEYER, VALERIE.................... 5 TILTON, COLE............................ 5 TRAHAN, BRYANNA................. 5 TYGART, SARINA....................... 5 WARD, SARAH.......................... 5 WILSON, RACHEL..................... 5 WISEMAN, KATHERINE............. 5 WYNN, WINONA..................... 5 Total........................... 654

Olympic High School

ACEDO, JOSIE MARIE DANIELLE.................. 13 ANCERO, JEANETTE.................. 8 ARCE, AUBREY.......................... 6 ARSENIO, JAY-AR...................... 5 ATALIG, MARIANA.................... 9 ATKINSON-SEAL, HARMONEE.. 6 ATOIGUE, JOSAIAH.................. 8 BALETO, ANGELINA.................. 6 BARLOW, DEJA......................... 7 BARNES, SHELBY..................... 17 BAUM, JOSHUA........................ 8 BAUMGARTNER, EMILY........... 19 BAUTISTA, AIRA NICOLE........... 4 BEARD, CIERRA....................... 10 BENSON, MACKENZIE............ 11 BIRD, TAYLOR............................ 1 BLACKBOURN, BRITTNY............ 5 BLOTSKY, DEREK....................... 6 BOICE, CASEY........................... 5 BROWN, BRITTANY................... 5 BROWN, JOHN PATRICK........... 5 BROWN, MICHAEL.................... 6 BUNDOC, RYAN........................ 6 BURROUGHS, HUNTER............. 7 BURROUGHS, JOHN................. 5 BUSHEE, DESHAWN.................. 5

Credits Student Name

CABACUNGAN, KAREN STEPHANIE............................. 7 CABORNAY, MALCOLM............ 5 CAMPANA, ALEXANDER........... 6 CAMPANA, CHRISTOPHER........ 6 CANTRELL, MIKAYLA................. 7 CAPUANO, ALISSA................... 5 CASE, MARISSA........................ 7 CAULFIELD, MIRANDA............. 13 CHARPIA, SAMANTHA............ 13 CHIPLEY, BRYCE......................... 5 CLARK, KASSIDY....................... 6 COLBERT, JASMINE.................... 6 CORCELL, CHRISTINA................ 5 COYLE, LINDSEY........................ 5 CRAWFORD, RAVYN............... 11 CRISOSTOMO, BRYAN.............. 6 CURTIN, JORDAN...................... 5 CURTIN, TAYLOR........................ 7 DANIELS, AALIYAH.................... 7 DAVIS, PAULETTE....................... 5 DEAN, LOGAN.......................... 5 DENIS, SAMANTHA.................. 6 DEVOIR, MAXIM....................... 5 DILLON, ALYSSA....................... 7 DORNBUSH, TYLOR.................. 5 DOTSON, MATTHEW................ 7 DUNHAM, TARESSA.................. 2 DURON, RILEY......................... 12 EARL, CODY.............................. 5 ELAURIA, JOYCE........................ 5 EMERSON, TYLER...................... 5 EPENESA, JONSAIH................ 14 ERICKSON, KATHRYN............... 6 ESCOBAR, NIKKA JOYCE.......... 7 ESTABILLO, RICAH MEI............... 6 ESTORBA, TED JR....................... 5 FIRCHAU, ASHLEY................... 11 FLEMING, WALTER..................... 6 FLORES, AARON....................... 4 FLORES, JASMINE..................... 5 FRIEDRICH, JENNA.................... 5 FROGGE, DEVIN....................... 5 FYNES, RILEY............................. 6 GAINER, ASHLEY....................... 6 GARCIA, LARNIE..................... 16 GARCIA, LIEZEL......................... 7 GARCIA, PHEOBE...................... 9 GENTILE, ANNA........................ 4 GESICKI, JOEL........................... 7 GIORDANO, ZECHARIAH......... 6 GIVENS, MAR’REN.................... 2 GODWIN, RACHAEL............... 10 GOLDIZEN, ETHAN................... 4 GORHAM, SAMANTHA.......... 11 GRAHAM, LAUREN................... 6 GRAHAM, PATRICK................... 4 GRAVES, COURTNEY................. 7 GREGG, ALAYNA...................... 7 GROSE, EMMA.......................... 5 GUERRERO, BRANDON............ 4 GUEVARA, ALYSSA................... 6 GUTIERREZ, GABRIELLA............. 5 GUTIERREZ, KARLEIGH.............. 5 HABENICHT, JESHON................ 5 HALL, TRISTEN........................... 9 HANNUM, DYLAN.................... 6 HANSEN, JORDAN................. 10 HARRIS, MARCUS..................... 7 HAYMANS, E’LORA................... 6 HAZZARD, ELLA SHARISSE........ 6 HEATON, ASHLEY..................... 7 HENLEY, RAY............................. 6 HERNANDEZ, ARREN.............. 17 HERNANDEZ, LENA.................. 7

Credits Student Name

HILLIS, EMILY........................... 15 HORNER, VAN.......................... 4 HUATO, JANESSA................... 11 HUTCHINSON, KIMBERLY......... 6 IBARRA, EVAN......................... 13 ICHIKI, TATE............................... 6 JAI, EMMA................................ 5 JAI, JOHN................................. 6 JAMES, ALLISON....................... 8 JINGCO, JULIA.......................... 6 JOCSON, ALEX......................... 7 JOHNS, ARIEL........................... 4 JOHNSON, BAILEY.................... 6 JOHNSON, CARL.................... 11 JOHNSON, DAMARIUS............. 4 JOHNSON, DEZMOND............. 5 JOHNSON, MELINA.................. 6 KAUR, RAMNEET....................... 1 KEIFERT, LAUREN....................... 6 KELLY, CHASE.......................... 10 KIMBROUGH, KEEGAN............. 5 KLEINFELTER, ALEX.................... 6 KLEINFELTER, BENJAMIN........... 7 KLINGLER, CHRISTIAN............... 4 KNOX, WILLIAM....................... 9 KONO-SANTOS, DAELYN......... 5 KOZINETS, MICHELLE................ 7 KROTZER, ELIZABETH................ 6 KRUGER, CRYSTAL..................... 5 LABABIT, MARIEL..................... 11 LABUMBARD, ZACH.................. 4 LAROCQUE, AMBER................ 11 LARSEN, BAILEY........................ 4 LAWVER, MICHAEL.................... 7 LEACH, MICAH........................ 11 LEANDERSON, MARISA............ 4 LEDONNE, DAKOTA.................. 4 LESLIE, ALEXANDER................. 11 LEYVA, MICHAEL....................... 6 LIGHTY, BRITTNEY...................... 7 LONG, GAGE............................ 5 LOPEZ, ROSA.......................... 15 LOVE, AUSTIN......................... 12 LUTTON, ALISSA........................ 9 MACALUSO, GRACE................. 6 MADL, TYLER............................. 6 MAGBANUA, RAFFY................. 5 MANLEY, CHELCI..................... 15 MANN, KATELYN...................... 5 MARBURGER, RAYMOND......... 7 MARTINEZ, EDGAR................... 5 MARTIR, AIMEE....................... 11 MATHENY, SHANE.................. 10 MAUSBACH, SARAH................. 7 MCINNIS, MAKALEB................. 6 MCKENZIE, SHAELYN................ 6 MCLEAN, DEMETRIUS................ 5 MEDINA-PEREZ, JASMINE......... 6 METZGER, LOGAN.................... 5 MIDDLETON, MARSHEA............ 2 MILLER, AARON........................ 5 MILLER, ISAAC........................... 5 MILLER, KAYLEIGH................... 11 MILLS, KEERIE............................ 6 MITCHELL, CHRISTOPHER.......... 7 MITCHELL, MAIRIN.................... 6 MONDRY, HUNTER................. 12 MONDRY, SHELBYANNE........... 6 MORGAN, KRISTINA................. 6 MORGAN, TAHNEE................... 5 MORHOUS, BRANDON............ 4 MORRELL, KAITLYN................... 6 MORRIS, PATRICK...................... 8 MORTRUD, ALYSSA................... 7 MOSS, SAVANNA..................... 6

Credits Student Name

MOWRY, EMILY......................... 6 MUHLBAIER JR., BARRY............. 2 MULLINER WISEMAN, MICHAEL................................ 5 MYERS, KAITLYN..................... 13 NAGMA, MARIAH.................. 10 NELSON, RAYMOND................ 5 NESS, JACOB.......................... 11 NICHA, JUDY ANN................. 17 NINEMIRE, JAMIE...................... 6 OLEARY, TYLER.......................... 5 OLMO, MOISHA....................... 6 ORESZKO, ERICA...................... 5 OVALLE, CARLOS....................... 5 PABLO, JAYDE........................... 6 PADILLA, ARVIN........................ 5 PARDO, SAVANNA.................... 5 PARIZEK, SPENCER.................... 8 PAUOLE, CHANYN.................... 5 PEREIRA, KAILIAHNA................ 6 PERKINS, JADE.......................... 5 PERRYMAN, BRYCE................... 4 PESCASIO, ROMA ALLAINE..... 12 PETERSON, EMILY...................... 6 PHAKSONG, ANUTTRA............ 6 PHAN, NATANYA.................... 11 PIPER, SAGE.............................. 5 PLUM, MAXXWELL.................. 13 PLUMB, MEGAN........................ 6 POOL, KEVIN............................ 1 POOL, MCKALEB..................... 11 POOLE, EMILY........................... 6 POSIS, CHRISTINE NICOLE........ 5 POTTS, KENNETH.................... 10 PRESLEY, TANNER.................... 10 PROUSE, ERIN........................... 2 RADEBAUGH, JONATHAN........ 5 RAVENTOS-VASQUEZ, TONY.... 5 REYES, WILLIAM........................ 4 RICE, SAVANNAH...................... 5 RIDDLE, ODESSA....................... 2 RILEY, SKYLER............................ 6 RITTENHOUSE, JACKSON......... 6 RIVAS, EVYN........................... 10 RIVERA-HOSKINSON, KAYLA.................................... 5 ROBERTS, ADIA......................... 5 RODRIGUEZ, EDGAR................. 5 RODRIGUEZ, NEIL..................... 6 ROLLINS, JULIET......................... 5 RUFFIN, NATASHA.................... 5 SABANGAN, MARIA............... 10 SAGASTUME, SOPHIA.............. 6 SAMUEL, DENZEL...................... 5 SAMUELU, DALVA..................... 6 SANDERS, BRYCE.................... 11 SANTOS, RYAN ADRIAN........... 6 SAPP, ALEXANDRA.................... 7 SAPP, BRANDON...................... 5 SCAVONE, NICOLE.................... 5 SCHASER, LAURA.................... 12 SCHENKEL, ROENNA................ 6 SCHUTT, ALEX.......................... 11 SCOTT, ALEXANDRIA............... 18 SCRIPTURE, SARAH................... 2 SEAMAN, ALLISYA.................... 7 SECREST, RICHARD.................... 8 SELLARDS, KALEB...................... 5 SELPH, ASHLEY........................ 16 SHAW, KATHERINE.................... 5 SHORT, ALYSSA......................... 2 SIDES, CYNTHIA...................... 11 SINGLETON, MARQUISE........... 5 SITES, JANJIRA........................ 11 SLATER, MEGAN........................ 7

Credits

SMITH, ALIEHS........................... 4 SMITH, COURTNEY.................... 7 SOMMER, SINA....................... 22 SOTO, ALEXANDER................... 6 SPARKS, MADISON................. 15 STARR, LACY............................. 6 STAUNER, MARIA.................... 16 STEARNS, LOGAN..................... 4 STEILING, HUNTER.................... 2 STENZEL, LILLI.......................... 17 STEWART, BRADLEY................... 9 STEWART, TARYN...................... 5 STRAIFF, EMIRY.......................... 6 SWANN, TREVOR................... 14 TAPORCO, RYAN..................... 10 TAYLOR-SERONELLO, JAEDYN.................................. 5 TEWKSBURY, KIM...................... 8 THOMPSON, TRYSTON............. 4 TIBI, ALOURA LHEI..................... 6 TORRES, NICHOLAS.................. 8 TORRES, TALEA.......................... 6 TOWNE, DARREN..................... 3 TROTTMAN, KYILENE................ 7 TUBES, MA.CRISTINA................ 5 TUCKER, CHRISTOPHER............. 8 TUFTS, ETHAN........................... 5 TUPAI, ESETA............................. 6 TURNER, MEGAN...................... 2 TYNER, ISABELLE....................... 5 ULIBARRI, COLE......................... 4 UNGREN, TYLER........................ 5 VALENCIA, ANDY...................... 5 VALENCIA, SHAINA.................. 6 VARGAS, LARRY...................... 10 VARGO, PARIS........................... 6 VEDDER, MILDRED................... 10 VILLARREAL, MICHAEL............. 12 WAGNER, ALEXIS...................... 6 WALLS, DYLAN.......................... 4 WARD, MICHAEL....................... 5 WARNER, KENDRA................... 2 WARNER, MADISON................. 5 WASHBURN, DONALD.............. 5 WATSON, DIMITY...................... 7 WHITE, TYAMBER.................... 12 WHITE-MCCAULEY, HAILE......... 8 WIELAND, GABRIEL................... 6 WILLIAMS, EMILEE................... 11 WOJCEK, JEREMY..................... 7 WOODARD, ELIZABETH............ 2 WRIGHT, HAYDEN..................... 5 WRIGHT, TAYLOR....................... 7 YANAS, STORYM.................... 10 YANAS, TYRA............................ 6 ZAPATA, EBERARDO.................. 5 ZOLMAN, TYLER........................ 4 Total......................... 2114

Shelton High School

ANDREWSKI, NATALIE.............. 4 BOYCE, COLBY........................ 12 BRAGG, MALICIA...................... 5 BRAYTON, KENNEDY................ 4 CATION, GRANT....................... 5 CORE, HUNTER......................... 6 CROSSEN, SHANIAH................ 6 DAVIS, KYLE.............................. 6 DUSHARME, BRIANNE.............. 1 ENCARNACION, JOSE.............. 6 EQUIHUA-TORRES, ADREANNA........................... 6 GARCIA, IRVIN.......................... 6


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

23

2013-2014 Tech Prep Students Congratulated Student Name

Credits Student Name

GASPAR, BRENDA..................... 6 GASPAR, HECTOR..................... 6 GONZALEZ SANDOVAL, SERGIO.................................. 6 GOULD, KAILEY......................... 6 GREEN, DALTON....................... 6 GRIFFIN, ANIKA........................ 4 HERNANDEZ, SERENA.............. 6 HILDEBRANDT, TYLER................. 9 HORNE, TREVANTI.................... 4 JACKSON, DAVID................... 12 JAMES, TIMOTHY...................... 4 JEPPESTOL, PATRICIA................. 4 JOHNSON, BRITTANY............... 5 JOHNSON, JESSICA.................. 5 JOHNSON, MITCHELL............... 6 JONES, BRADY.......................... 4 KEALY, SEAN............................. 6 LASLEY, LANCE.......................... 6 LOZA, KEVIN............................ 6 LOZA, ROSI............................... 6 MACEWEN, ROBERT................. 6 MACKIEWICZ, RUDY................. 6 MALLOY, MATTHEW.................. 6 MARTINEZ, JANINE................... 4 MARTINEZ, THOMAS................ 6 MCNEASE, SHANNON............. 6 MEDINA, ALAN......................... 6 MILLER, WILLIAM..................... 12 MUNSON, HOPE...................... 4 MURDOCK, JESSICA.................. 6 PAGEL, TRISTEN......................... 6 PARKS, DELANEY...................... 6 POE, ZACHARY......................... 6 RIVAS PEREZ, MIGUEL............... 6 SAEGER, CHELSEA..................... 6 SALINAS, DANIELLE................... 4 SALVADOR SOTO, ANGEL IVAN.......................... 5 SIGO, ANDREW........................ 6 SNYDER, KACEE........................ 4 SOBOTKA, MICHAEL................. 4 SOTO-MARES, STEPHANIE........ 4 STANLEY, BAILEY....................... 6 SUSHAK, JOHNATHON............ 6 VALANTE, THOMAS.................. 4 WALDROOP, REGGIE............... 12 WILSON, REX............................ 6 WOODS, KAITLIN..................... 1 YORK, DREW............................ 6 Total........................... 344

South Kitsap High School

ABARE, SHARRA....................... 3 AL-RAIHANI, KAREEM............... 4 ANCHICK, JOHN....................... 4 ANIES, ERVIN............................ 6 ARCHER, KYRON...................... 5 ARNETT, BAILEY......................... 6 AVOCATO, COLLIN.................... 4 BAREFIELD-BLUNT, SHANELL...... 5 BARRIE, HUNTER..................... 10 BAUR, AIGUL........................... 10 BAYNE, KOBE............................ 5 BEDFORD, BRYNLY.................... 3 BELL, SARAH............................. 6 BENAVENTE, DAVID................... 4 BENNETT, ARIEL......................... 7 BENNETT, REBECCA................... 3 BERG-AGUILAR, MICAH............ 5 BINGHAM, FOREST................... 5 BJORKHEIM, KRYSTEN.............. 3 BLOWERS, MAKENZIE............... 3

Credits Student Name

BOEHS, AIRIAN......................... 5 BOLAR, WHITNEY..................... 8 BOYD, BLAIKE........................... 3 BOYER, BRYSON....................... 4 BRAY, MARYBETH...................... 6 BREESE, BREANNA.................... 5 BRICKS, KALI............................. 4 BROWN, EMMA........................ 6 BROWN, KATELYN.................... 3 BRYANT, ASHLEY....................... 5 BUMGARDNER, SEAN............... 4 CAIN, CURRAN......................... 4 CALVERT, JEREMY...................... 4 CARR, ASHLEY.......................... 5 CARRAGHER, KYRA.................. 3 CARROLL, JADON..................... 4 CHAMPEAU, MAKANAAKUA..................... 4 CHANCELLOR, TIMARA............. 5 CIEZADLO, WILLIAM................. 4 CLARDY, KALEE......................... 3 CLARK, BRIAN........................... 8 CLARK, DANIEL......................... 4 CLEGG, ALEX............................. 4 CLINE, KIERA............................. 4 CLOSE, KENNETH...................... 4 COBB, FRANKLIN...................... 4 COCKERILL, KEVIN.................... 8 COLEMAN, ALEXANDER........... 5 COLESCOTT, MATTHEW............. 5 COLLINS, MATTHEW................. 4 CONGER, ZOE.......................... 3 CORBIN, KAITLYN..................... 2 CORPUZ, DANIELLE................... 4 COTTEN, ISIAH.......................... 3 COTTEY, WILLIAM...................... 4 CRAIG, KENNEDY..................... 2 CRANER, COLE.......................... 5 CROSTON, KATELYNN.............. 3 CRYDER, EMILY.......................... 4 CULVER, LOGAN....................... 5 DAMIAN, NOEL........................ 5 DANUBIO, KARISSA.................. 5 DE LA CRUZ, ARIANA............. 17 DELGADO, BRANDON.............. 5 DELGADO, TROY....................... 4 DELMUNDO, ALESCA................ 6 DELOS-SANTOS, ADRIAN......... 5 DETTLOFF, TIARE-LEE.................. 5 DRENNON, NICOLE.................. 3 DRUM, SARA............................. 4 DUE, RACEL............................... 5 DUERRE, MASON...................... 4 DUNBAR, ANNA....................... 3 DYSTE, NICOLE.......................... 5 EADY, HUNTER.......................... 5 EDDINGTON, DARBY................ 5 EDGIN, ALEXANDRIA................ 5 EKSTRUM, DALE........................ 5 ELLINGSON, SARAH................. 3 ELLIS, MICHIRU.......................... 3 ESTERON, JOSEPH.................... 8 EVANS, ANDREW..................... 4 FARNUM, JASON...................... 5 FAZIO, TALIA............................. 5 FESSENDEN, JOHNATHAN....... 5 FISH, PAITEN............................. 3 FISHER, SOREN......................... 4 FLAHERTY, ARIANE.................... 3 FLOWERS, MAHAYLA................ 3 FOSTER, CAMERON.................. 5 FOSTER, CHELSEA...................... 5 FOWLER, MARISA..................... 5 FRIDRIKSSON, ELSA.................. 5 FUJINAGA, LEXI........................ 3

Credits Student Name

GARCIA, DYLAN....................... 5 GARCIA, JEREMY...................... 5 GARCIA, MICHAEL.................... 4 GEHLER, KYLE............................ 6 GERBING, TRISTAN................... 3 GEST, ROBERT............................ 4 GIBSON, TANYA....................... 3 GILSON, BLAKE......................... 5 GOODLIN, NICK....................... 5 GRAHAM, RAYMOND............... 4 GRANNUM, ARIEAHANA......... 5 GREEN, BRANDYN.................... 4 HALADY, TYRELLE...................... 5 HALE, TYLOR............................. 4 HANSEN, BRENNAN................ 5 HARRIS, LYDIA.......................... 3 HARRIS, TAMIKA....................... 3 HARTY, TYLER............................ 5 HELWIG, SARAH....................... 4 HENDERSON, RYAN.................. 4 HERMANN, OLIVIA................... 3 HERNANDEZ, JOHLAN............. 4 HILF, DANIEL.............................. 5 HILL, ANDREW.......................... 4 HITNER, MADISON................... 8 HOLMDAHL, RACHEL................ 3 HUFF, MILES............................... 5 HUFFMAN, CAMERON............. 4 HUGHES, TABITHA.................... 3 HULEN, MICHAEL...................... 5 HULSE, RYLAN........................... 3 HUMES, KYLEIGH...................... 4 HUNT, KAITLIN.......................... 5 HUNT, STEVEN.......................... 8 IHLEN, CHARLIE......................... 5 JABUR, TROY............................ 4 JAMES, ALEXA.......................... 5 JAMES, RICHARD...................... 3 JENSEN, STEVEN....................... 5 JOHNSON, ALEC...................... 5 JOHNSON, PAIGE................... 17 JONES, DELANIE....................... 6 JONES-MORGAN, CASSANDRA.......................... 8 KALISH, ALLYSSA...................... 4 KALISH, KAITLYNN.................... 7 KATHAN, NATALIE..................... 5 KEATING, NIGEL........................ 5 KEGLOVITZ, THERESA............... 3 KLINGBEIL, COURTNEY............. 3 KNIGHT, MATTHEW................... 5 KNOWLES, LUCAS.................... 5 KRININGER, KRISTOPHER......... 5 LANE, DANIEL........................... 5 LANGE, EVAN........................... 4 LANTRIP, KELSEY........................ 3 LENSICO, KIMBERLY.................. 3 LENSICO, RAELINE.................... 3 LEWIS, KARLA........................... 5 LIND, AMANDA........................ 3 LINDLEY, KAITLYN...................... 3 LITTLE, ELIZABETH...................... 3 LIVERS, THOMAS....................... 4 LOVELY, HUNTER....................... 8 LOVITT, DALLAS......................... 6 LUDLOW, TYLER......................... 5 LUTZ, KATHERINE...................... 5 MACARTHUR, ALBERT............... 4 MACAULAY, BRITTNEY............... 4 MACHIN, ALEX.......................... 5 MADISON, DAMARA................ 4 MALLORY, MCKENNA............... 3 MARQUARDT, JAXON.............. 4 MARSHALL, SAMUEL................. 4 MATALA, KYLEE......................... 5

Credits Student Name

MATHESON, NICHOLAS............ 5 MAYFIELD, GLENN.................... 8 MCMORRIS, ERIC...................... 5 MEEK, MARLEE.......................... 8 MELENDEZ, ALYSSA.................. 5 MOE, KYLE................................ 5 MONKHOUSE, IAN................... 4 MOORE, MICHAEL.................... 5 MORGAN ROOK, ANTHONY... 4 MORGAN, ANDEE.................... 6 MORRIS, MATTIE....................... 6 MOYER, ELISHA......................... 4 MYERS, BAYLIE.......................... 3 MYERS, KAINOA....................... 4 NAIL, MAX................................ 4 NELSON, NICOLE.................... 12 NESSETH, AMANDA................. 2 NEWKIRK POWELL, ZABRINA................................ 3 NGUYEN, SAMANTHA............. 3 NIETFIELD, LEVI.......................... 4 NIKOLAC, KAITLYN................... 3 NOLAN, ANDREW.................... 4 NUNLEY, HAELEY...................... 3 O’DELL, HALEY.......................... 5 OGDEN, CALEB......................... 4 OJIMA, SHARYN....................... 5 OLSON, DANIEL........................ 5 OLSON, ISAAC.......................... 4 OSTROWSKI, JOHN.................. 5 OSWOOD, KELLY...................... 5 PANGELINAN, RIANNA............ 3 PARKER, ABIGAIL...................... 5 PARKER, CHRISTIAN.................. 5 PARKER, HAILEY........................ 6 PAULSON, TANNER................... 5 PETERSON, CHANDLER............. 5 PETERSON, DYLAN................... 4 PETERSON, KYRA...................... 8 PETERSON, SPENCER................ 4 PHILLIPS, ZACHARY................... 5 PORTER, NATHAN..................... 4 PRICE, BRADLEY........................ 4 PRITZ, HALEY............................. 5 PUMMELL, ALEXANDER............. 4 RABELOS, ZOE.......................... 3 RAMIREZ, MAKAYLA................. 5 RANDEL, ELISA.......................... 6 RAY, DANIEL.............................. 9 RECKER, JORDAN..................... 4 REITER, TRAVIS........................... 4 RENFRO, VERONICA................. 5 REVILLA, ELIZABETH................... 3 RILEY, HUNTER.......................... 9 ROCHAT, THOMAS.................... 3 ROGERS, ANDIE........................ 3 ROSE, CLAIRE............................ 3 ROSE, TIMOTHY........................ 5 ROSSER, TACHINA.................... 8 RUSCIGNO, ORIANA................ 5 RUTHERFORD, REBECCA.......... 12 RYBARCZYK, AMY.................... 5 SALO, ETHAN............................ 6 SANCHEZ, MAYA-KAY............... 5 SANTOS, JLAWRENCE............... 5 SANTOS, JONAE...................... 5 SANTOS, ROYLAINEE................ 5 SARTOR, JACOB........................ 4 SAUBY, CONNOR..................... 4 SCHMIDT, COURTNEY............... 4 SCHURMAN, CHAD.................. 4 SEATON, TANNER..................... 5 SEVERNS, TYLER........................ 4 SHAFFER, JACK......................... 4 SHERWOOD, ZACHARY............ 5

Credits Student Name

SHOTWELL, KAYLA.................... 3 SHOWS, BREANA..................... 4 SHUPE, KENNETH................... 12 SIDHU, DAVID........................... 4 SILIVERSTOVA, NATALIYA.......... 3 SIMONS, BRYAN....................... 5 SIMPSON, ADAM...................... 4 SKILLMAN, NOAH.................... 5 SLONE, DAVID........................... 4 SMITH, BRADLEY....................... 6 SMITH, CAMRY.......................... 5 SMITH, MACKENZIE.................. 5 SNELL, JOHN............................. 4 SPEER, KYLA.............................. 3 STADSVOLD, ABBIGAIL............. 4 STANLEY, ERIK........................... 4 STEPHENS, NATALIE.................. 3 STEWART, TRISTAN.................... 5 STIFFEY, JASON......................... 4 STIGLER, ROBERT....................... 4 STOKES, MELISSA...................... 5 STRINGER, AIYANA................... 5 SULDAN, SUMMER.................... 5 SULLIVAN, KYLEE....................... 5 SUROWIEC, MEGAN................. 5 SWATEK, AMANDA................... 3 TABACCHI, BASTIAN................. 5 TAILLEUR, DAKOTA.................... 4 TALLEY, TONY............................ 5 TENGEL, ELIZABETH................... 3 THRESHER, MADELINE............... 8 TIMMERMAN, VINCENT............ 4 TOWNSON, JOSEPH................ 4 TREMPER, TESSAH..................... 6 TRUJILLO, ANTONIO................. 5 TUCKER, JARED......................... 5 UBAN, FRANCES..................... 10 VALLEJO, LINDSAY..................... 5 VANSANDT, ERIC....................... 5 VANSANTFORD, JULIA.............. 7 VANVALKENBURG, HEIDI.......... 3 VIGIL, ANGELO......................... 5 VIRATA, MICHAEL...................... 6 WALLACE, DAMON................... 5 WANKE, COLTON..................... 5 WARREN, COREY...................... 4 WARREN, JACOB...................... 4 WATSON, MADISON................ 2 WATSON, RILEE......................... 5 WEAVER, HAILEY....................... 3 WENZLICK, KYLE....................... 5 WESSEL, KAMERYN.................. 3 WHATLEY, AIMEE....................... 2 WHITE, ALEYA........................... 8 WHITTEN, CHARLOTTE.............. 6 WIECHMANN, HANNA............ 3 WILLIAMS, JOSHUA.................. 3 WILLIAMS, OLIVIA..................... 4 WILLIAMS, PRESTON................. 5 WINGE, ERIC............................. 8 WOODCOCK, BRADLEY............ 5 WORLEY, KEENAN.................... 4 WORLEY, KEMYSS..................... 4 WRIGHT, BRITTANY................... 4 WRIGHT, DESIRAE..................... 4 WYANT, ALYSSA....................... 5 YBARRA, ELIJAH........................ 5 ZIMMER, BRYCE........................ 5 ZIMMERMAN, ASHLEE.............. 3 ZIMMERMAN, JAZZMINE......... 3 ZIMMERMAN, MEKALA............ 3 Total......................... 1474

Credits

West Sound Technical Skills Center

ABAD, JACOB......................... 21 ALLAWAY, WESLEY.................... 4 ANDERSON, TREVOR................ 4 BARTKOWSKI, JESSE................. 2 BRAY, ASHLEY......................... 16 BUSHA, RYAN......................... 16 CLAUDON, JESSICA................ 22 COSCA, ALEXANDRA.............. 16 DODD, NICK............................. 4 FILLINGHAM, OLIVIA................. 4 GARCIA, ROBERT.................... 16 GASPAR, MANUELA................ 20 GRAY, DAKOTA....................... 16 GREGORY, AMANDA................ 2 HALL, JEREMY......................... 16 HANSEN, TORREY................... 16 HENDEN, NATHANIEL............. 16 HOCKETT, KAYLEE..................... 2 HOLMSTROM, LINNEA............ 19 HUDSON-CULP, BRENDA........ 26 IOVINELLI, TRISTEN.................. 16 JOHNSON, JEREMIAH............ 16 JORDAN, TERRENCE................. 4 KNIGHT, RICHARD................... 16 LARIOS, MOISES..................... 16 LEEMAN, SKYLER..................... 16 LIND, ANTHONY..................... 16 LOPEZ, ANDREW...................... 4 MCCORMICK, MARISSA.......... 26 MILLER, DEAN......................... 16 MILLSAP, TREVEHNTE................. 2 MOORE, DONALD.................. 16 MORTON, FRANKLIN.............. 16 MUNSON, SAVANNAH........... 16 NEAL, HUNTER.......................... 4 NEDEDOG, CAYLENE................ 2 NIXON, ALANNA................... 16 OATRIDGE, SAMUEL................ 16 O’DELL, JONATHAN.................. 4 OHLIGSCHLAGER, DEVIN.......... 4 OTIS, SERENA......................... 26 PIERSON, ERIKA........................ 6 PONCE, MARIA....................... 16 QUENGA, KEHMYILLE............... 2 QUESADA, ZACHARY............... 4 REYNOLDS, ZACHARY.............. 4 RIDINGS, HEATHER.................. 26 ROBERTS, CHEVELLE................ 23 RYKER, ANTHONY.................. 16 SMITH, AUSTIN....................... 16 SMITH, PATRICK....................... 16 SPANGLER, RENEE................... 19 SPAULDING, BENJAMIN............ 4 SPENCER, SUMMER................. 19 SPROUFFSKE, RACHEL............. 15 THRESHER, PAUL..................... 16 TRAPP, KYLE............................ 16 TSCHIDA, JOSEPH..................... 2 UEBELHARDT, KALLIE............... 16 VELEZ, DEJA............................ 26 WANKE, COLTON................... 16 WILLIAMS, CHRISTINE............. 37 WILLIAMS-FRICKE, ELLA........... 16 WOODS, DALTON.................... 4 YOUNG, ALEXANDER............... 2 Total........................... 863 Grand Total......... 10,438


February 2015 OPTIONS — It’s Your Future

24

CONSTRUCTION CRAFT

LABORER APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM A Construction Craft Laborer takes pride in the fact that they have a hand in every structure built in this country above ground as well as below.

UNION LABORERS ENJOY: • • • •

Excellent wages Medical benefits Negotiated pensions Comprehensive Training

800.554.4457

WORK AS PART OF A TEAM THAT BUILDS: • Airports • Bridges • Factories & stores • Highways • Light rail systems • Treatment plants • Tunnels • Water mains ...and much more

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT US! Northwest Laborers-Employers Training Program 27055 Ohio Avenue, Kingston, WA 98346 e-mail: apprentice@nwlett.org / www.nwlett.org

INSTRUCTED BY POLICE OFFICERS!

Driving School

✓ Teen/Beginners Drivers Education ✓ Approved Location for DOL Knowledge & Skills Test.

Serving Kitsap County with locations in Port Orchard & Silverdale

Experience, Knowledge & Trust 1800 Mile Hill Drive Ste 110, Port Orchard www.911drivingschool.com

(360) 874-9111

Profile for Sound Publishing

West Sound Consortium Options - West Sound Consortium Options 2015  

i20150313083144188.pdf

West Sound Consortium Options - West Sound Consortium Options 2015  

i20150313083144188.pdf