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CONGRATS TO THE NORTH

OSF VARIETY SHOW

COUNTY TEAMS

Spring Variety Show and Auction. Thursday, March 12 at 6:30 p.m. in the OHS Commons

See Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Superintendent search at TSD in interview stage

THE CAT IN THE HAT, IMAGINE THAT

School board narrows candidate field BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket School Board members have their work cut out for them as they go into executive session this evening (Tuesday, March 10) to select one of two highly qualified candidates to replace Paul Turner as Superintendent of TSD. The district set up agendas from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, March 9 and 10, for candidates to tour the campus and meet district staff, administrators, school staff, high school ASB members, certified staff, community members and board members before topping the long days off with an interview with the Board from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. School Board members were hoping to reach a decision by the end of Tuesday evening, March 10, after the GazetteTribune went to press. Steve McCullough, currently serving as both Superintendent and Principal with the Curlew School District, interviewed on Monday. Desiree Gould, currently the Career Technical Information Director and Assistant Principal with the Pullman School District interviewed on Tuesday. Gould served in the past as Superintendent with the Skykomish

The Cat in the Hat, AKA Katie Abrahmson, Tonasket School Counselor, reads to an enthralled group of students Monday, March 2, in celebration of Dr. Seuss’s birthday. Meanwhile, the Grinch, AKA It Tech and substitute Sarah Prock, high-fives students while the Mayor of Whoville, AKA Principal Jeremy Clark, looks on. School staff, teachers and AmeriCorps volunteers brought well-known Seuss characters to life while students got to spend the day reading, clad in pajamas. The day kicks off a program designed to instill a lifelong love of reading for students K-8. Every student who reads books outside of schoolwork for a total of 10 hours between March 2-20 receives a ticket to Silverwood Theme Park. “It’s very motivating for the students,” said AmeriCorps Volunteer Amy Fry, adding that her 5-year-old son Carter went home and read ‘Hop on Pop’ all by himself at the day’s end.

School District. McCullough served as principal for four years before becoming superintendent for Curlew. “They are both highly qualified and they both can do the job, so now it is just a matter of the Board saying who is a good fit,” said Douglas Asbjornsen with McPherson & Jacobson, the superintendent search firm hired to find suitable candidates for the position. “Both of them bring very good experience and unique strengths. Desiree is very strong in the arts, but also the technical side of it. She speaks Spanish, Italian and French and those are some great gifts. Steve has been there 11 years as superintendent in Curlew and done a great job, and they don’t want to see him go. That’s a great thing and says a lot about his performance. They are both very, very fine individuals.” School Board members gathered input from community and all stakeholder groups on their perceptions of the candidates’ skills, qualities, characteristics, and/or personal attributes. Catherine Stangland, speaking for the school board, thanked community members for coming to the “Meet and Greet” sessions with candidates and turning in the survey forms. “We really value what you wrote. We’ve had six meetings today and we are going to read every word written in every meeting, and take every word into consideration when we make our decision,” said Stangland.

Oroville to participate in Pathways to Prosperity Small Business is Everybody’s Business BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The WSU Extension Office and the City of Oroville are asking people to join them on April 17 for the Rural Pathways to Prosperity Conference an joint effort to try and improve the local economies in rural areas. Participants in sites across rural Washington will watch Erik Pages, on a webinar with the opportunity to ask questions. After his presentation, each site will put his ideas into action through organized activities, turning their atten-

Christy Caton & Amy Fry/ submitted photos

tion to local issues, resources and project ideas. The conference is from 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and the Oroville site will be held at the Pastime Bar and Grill, 1307 Main Street. “For me this is timely. People have expressed their concern about the current state of down- Chris Branch town and the local economy,” said Chris Branch, Oroville’s director of Community Development. “This is a good time to sit down and have a structured conversa-

SEE PATHWAYS | PG A12

Who will provide ambulance service? Ambulance association approaches Oroville with contract proposal BY GARY A. DE VON GARY@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville EMS Association approached the city with a proposal they believe will address the issues with the ambulance service – namely a shortage of staff and the lack of a director. The OEMSA addressed the city council at their Tuesday, March 3 meeting. Michael Greene, the coordinator of the Tonasket Michael Greene EMS showed a PowerPoint presentation to try and help explain what the Oroville Association had in mind – something akin to what takes place in

Tonasket. system,” said Greene. “With this writ“We propose a contract between ten proposal we are asking your help the City and OEMSA where we take and support in order to solve the issues responsibility for the recruitment, train- before it unravels” ing, staffing, supplying and operationGreene said Oroville was not alone al leadership of the and that other comambulance service. munities were looking The City would conat similar solutions, “I can’t overstate that tinue to collect taxes including Grand you are overworking and transport fees and Coulee. Currently maintain ownership of Oroville, your people and over- Tonasket, the ambulance faciliRepublic and Coulee ties and equipment. taxing the system. With Dam run their own The $160,000 cost of ambulance districts. this written proposal this contract would “Ambulance disbe paid with existing we are asking your help tricts are so unique to revenues. This methWashington State,” he and support to solve od works successfully said. around the country,” Janet Allen, a volthe issues before it writes the OEMSA in unteer on the Oroville unravels.” their proposal. EMS said she really Michael Greene, Coordinator The issue of staffing appreciated Greene Tonasket EMS came to a head when putting together and the city began considpresenting the proering the possibility of posal. contract with a private ambulance ser“I know I am on board with it and vice, Lifeline, to provide services in town. that’s what I hear from the rest of the “I can’t overstate that you are over- crew,” she said. working your people and overtaxing the Hearing talk that the city may contract

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 09

with Lifeline, the council chambers were filled to capacity with local EMTs and their supporters, as well as EMTs from Tonasket. There were several questions about how come there seems to be a constant shortage of volunteers. Most of the answers talked about the time it takes away from family and work to serve on the ambulance crew – both in training and on call. Crew members also discussed the cost of becoming certified. “It’s not a fast process and it’s not a cheap process.... I guess you’re looking at about $1000 per person,” said Allen. “It’s not just the classes, it’s all the time in between... this can be a thankless job,” said Councilman Tony Koepke, who serves on the city’s Ambulance Committee. There was a lot of talk about how to solve the shortage of trained crew members and how to defray costs. There was also gratitude shown to the city for helping with costs in the past. “I think if we have a dynamic approach with the people you have, we should be able to attract people,” said Greene. “As your neighbors there are some things we can do to help.”

SEE AMBULANCE | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

He addressed the “thankless job” comment by saying that volunteer ambulance services lose about one-third of their people in class and lose half of those that finish their class after two years of service. “It’s great to hear an offer of help from our neighboring district,” said Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth. Dale Gavin, president of the OEMSA said the association had a lot of work to do before they could take over the ambulance service entirely. “We don’t have our 501C3 and we need to update our SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) and our bylaws are in limbo. We have to get that done before we could write up a contract,” said Gavin. Greene said he’d be glad to donate his time to bring the Oroville association up to speed. “It should take weeks, not months. I will give my time to see that happen,” Greene said. Mayor Spieth said the city will definitely take it into consideration. “No one ever said we don’t want to

News Schools Cops & Courts

A2 A2-3 A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate Sports Obituaries

A9 A10-11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 12, 2015

SCHOOLS Tonasket Knowledge Bowl team off to state

Rachel Silverthorn/submitted photo

Team photo (front, L-R) LeighAnne Barnes, Mandie Wilson, James Silverthorn, Chyan Kincaid, Alyssa Warner and coach Susan McCue (back row) Dalton Smith, Kahlil Butler, Justin McDonald, Kendra Davisson, Thomas Kennedy, Zach Clark, Tawan Murray Allison Glanzer, Alex Mershon

Qualifies for fifth consecutive year BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket High School’s Knowledge Bowl team took first place at Regionals Feb. 23 in Wenatchee qualifying them for state. Competing at the event and headed for state competition March 14 are seniors Kahlil Butler (Team Captain), Dalton Smith and Alex Mershon; sophomores Thomas Kennedy and Tawan Murray, and Freshman Justin McDonald. “The competition was steep and our team conducted themselves with integrity and brilliance,” said Susan McCue, who has been coaching the team the past five years. This is the fifth year in a row they’ve qualified for State. Among 2B teams at Regionals, Tonasket outscored second-place finisher Liberty Bell by six points with 98, but Liberty Bell (92) was

“It is amazing to watch these separated by third-place finisher Soap Lake (91) by just one point. brain athletes answer questions at These top three teams move lightning speeds, sometimes with on to State. Okanogan came in fragmented information,” McCue said. “Rarely do fourth with 74, they allow the followed by to finish Manson (66), “The competition was reader a full question Waterville (47), steep and our team before they and Pateros ring in and (43). conducted themanswer within “We played selves with integrity 15 seconds.” every 2A and McCue said 2B team in and brilliance” she’s learned our region Susan McCue, Coach, over the years at least once. Tonasket Knowledge Bowl Team a lot of the Okanogan has subtleties that a brilliant team result in a great and we were really surprised they didn’t go to team getting the edge over other State,” said McCue, with several great teams. One of the most of the team members agreeing important is bar technique. The Okanogan was one of the hardest students sit with their hands close to electronic bars they tap as soon teams they competed against. When it came to choosing who as they think they can answer a would participate at Regionals, question. The first team to tap McCue said she administered the bar is the first to get a shot at a written exam, and freshman answering the question. “The bars differentiate to the MacDonald “scored higher than anyone I’ve ever tested on a writ- 1/100th of a second, and believe it or not, sometimes there are ties,” ten exam.” Competition at Regionals said McCue. “You always want to ring in and included five oral rounds and one have the opportunity to at least written.

guess,” said Smith. “Half of it is guessing,” Butler said. “But we emphasis educated guesses,” stressed McCue. Points are not deducted for incorrect answers. “With the more complicated math questions, it’s better to ring in late—second or third place— so you have more time to figure it out,” Smith added. McCue praised Smith’s talent as a brilliant mathematician, which was quickly apparent during practice rounds. When one question was asked about a product of 30,000 grown by 640%, Smith immediately rang in and answered, “192,000” without the need for scratch paper or pencil. Smith’s other strong suit is science; Mershon’s is history and science and MacDonald’s is geography, history and warfare. Kennedy, dubbed ‘Mr. Walking Encyclopedia’ by his teammates has an exceptional knowledge of baseball; and Butler claimed geography, airplanes and astronomy as his specialties. “There’s not very many airplane questions, but I get them all,” Butler said. Murray was recognized for talent in Asian geography and “obscure stuff that’s way out there and no-one else knows,” said teammate Zach Clark. “A lot of times, putting a successful team together is finding people with complementary skills,” McCue said. Also competing on the team this year were seniors Allison Glanzer and Alyssa Warner, juniors Kendra Davidson and LeighAnne Barnes, sophomore Cheyan Kinkaid and freshmen Zach Clark, James Silverthorn and Mandi Wilson. Glanzer, Smith and Butler participated on the team all four years of their high school career. “Everyone sitting here is a brilliant person, and it is a great honor to have the pleasure of working with them,” said McCue. She got quiet with a thoughtful look on her face before adding, “It takes a village. None of these kids

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‘If I were a Rich Man’....” “Before the reader could ask more, one of my brilliant team members, Kennedy, rang in and confidently answered, “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” McCue laughed, adding that although the team didn’t get the point, it did break the tension. Questions asked at the State and Regional levels can be requested to be finished, but not repeated. McCue said cues are embedded at the beginning of questions, but sometimes they become tricky by taking a twist at the end. State competition will be held at Arlington High School, beginning at 8 a.m. with a written round of 60 questions that all team members can answer, before continuing with oral rounds until about 4 p.m. “Everyone’s brains are just toast by the time they are done,” said McCue. The team will get a send-off Friday, March 13, with a Tiger Tunnel in front of the high school. And then the fun begins. “I think I’ll pull a Hugh Heffner and walk into State competition wearing silk pajamas,” said Mershon.

OES Our Leader in Me Day, April 15 SUBMITTED BY HAILEY HELM OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENT

OROVILLE - Oroville Elementary School will be having Our Leader In Me Day on Wednesday, April 15 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Come enjoy information on how students are using The Leader In Me Habits, see the wall art and elementary school art. The current plans include school tours for preregistered adults, but space is limited. Please call the elementary office to preregister at 509-476-3332. Activities for registered adults will include student led tours and performances. Adults that are not preregistered will attend presentations in the gym. This is a learning experience for Oroville Elementary students and as such, we will be practicing our leadership skills with an audience. For more information call Joan Hoehn the school principal at 509-476-3332.

AMBULANCE | FROM A1 have an ambulance service,” said have our problem is staff.” the mayor. Naillon said he wanted to thank Lisa Bordwell, also with the the ambulance crew for all they OEMSA, asked what kind of do and that he was excited to see time frame they their proposal were looking at on the table. before the city “ W h a t’s made it’s deci- “We are kind of in limbo unique about sion on what volunteers until we know what way to go. is there is an “We are kind i nte r m itte nt some of our options of in limbo need and you are....” until we know need to have what some of Lisa Bordwell, Volunteer them availOroville Ambulance our options able,” said are... are you Naillon. looking at mak“We put ing a decision our lives on next month or in two months?” hold because we are so dediasked Bordwell, adding, “You are not going to be happy if you go cated to our community,” said Wendy Burks, a volunteer for the the other way.” The mayor explained that the Tonasket ambulance crew. “We are very lucky for what we city would have to meet with the have in the way of health services rural part of the district. “They are a big part of this here,” said Joan Morrison. A tearful Penny Rader added, decision,” he said. Councilman Ed Naillon added, “I was never so glad to see these “Sounds like no matter which people pick my mom off the sideway we go we need to get people walk after she fell. I just want to into service... the only place we say it’s not a thankless job.”

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would be here on the team today without all the fantastic teachers they’ve had over the years.” McCue also acknowledged athletic director Kevin Terris and the Booster Club for all their support in making a winning team. Asked how they’ve accumulated such a mass of knowledge, Mershon responded, “time, life and studying.” Murray said it was due to “all lucky guesses,” and Butler said, “After 9th grade I stopped reading fiction.” Smith said it takes “being able to dedicate yourself or care about something a whole lot.” Asked about her dedication to the team, Coach McCue said, “I just really value education, learning and knowledge. By applying our knowledge is how we improve society,” adding, “And this is such a fantastic group, and really fun to work with.” The team does appear to have fun together, even when the competition is stiff among themselves and against other teams. McCue shared a funny story about a question at Regionals regarding music, which isn’t one of the teams strongest suits. The reader began to ask, “What musical contains the songs ‘Sunrise, Sunset,’

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MARCH 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

SCHOOLS Digital Media Class focuses on individual’s interests Class structure calls for independence BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Thirty middle school students in Tonasket are excited to be taking a Digital Media Class that produces two newscasts per week, shown throughout the middle school. Nathan White, a new teacher in the Tonasket School District this year, said this semester’s class looks a lot different than last semester, when it was offered for the very first time. “We took a completely new approach this semester, doing news broadcasts twice a week, with really strict deadlines,” he said. “The students do a lot of independent work, with not a lot of structure.” The class uses a product called I-Movie, which White described as a great tool for editing. “All the students are learning on the job, and it’s great to see them experimenting and figuring it out,” White said. “We have a great product, so now the question is, how do we make it really amazing?” The students are learning about different digital art projects online, such as Garage Band, which is used to put music in the weekly broadcasts. White said one challenge of the class was realizing that some of the students don’t want to be on camera, preferring to work on the digital art. “We are trying to get to individual students’ interests,” White said. “Everyone in this class is going to have a com-

pletely different experience.” news casts by adding music to Students can choose from some photos taken during Spirit a variety of projects to work Week by herself and some of the on, including yearbook, news teachers. analysis, semester news stories, “The beginning showcases learning new design and music stories to be run, and the end software, or the is credits. I get weekly broadmusic from “Everyone in this class Garage Band, casts. “With ten edit it and put it is going to have a things going together,” said completely different Stirek. on, the students really have to “We all experience.” do some selfhave our difNathan White, Teacher tutoring,” said ferent jobs, Digital Media Class White. “It’s but if somestill a learning one needs to process. It’s stressful and fun, step up and help out they can,” every week seeing what we can said Elizabeth Hylton. “All Mr. do better.” White does is guide us, and Broadcasts on Mondays make sure we behave.” gives students a preview of the “The biggest challenge is week to come, and broadcasts making sure they are all on task, on Fridays recap the highlights even if they are all working on of the week. The broadcasts 30 different things,” said White. get uploaded to U-Tube on an “The students come up with unlisted link that only White ideas, and I tell them, ‘Let’s has access to, in order to pro- try it.’ If it doesn’t work after tect students’ privacy. White a week, we’ll try something sends the broadcasts to teachers different. So I am here for their throughout the middle school, support, not to direct everything and it is shown during the sixth they do.” period homeroom block, where Ethan Calus worked on newsit doesn’t take time away from casting sports while Hector class instruction. White said the Guebara and Juan Puente first broadcast was just 53 sec- worked in Garage Band, cusonds long and a third broadcast tomizing songs and organizing lasted four minutes. them. “Our goal is three to five “Working with the music is minutes, once we get going. We our favorite part of this class,” want to produce a good qual- said Puente. ity product that keeps students’ Derrek Hollister said his attention,” said White. favorite aspect of the class was In class Friday, Feb. 27, Sarah working on illustrations, as he Rhoads worked on writing script created a digital TMS Nation for the newscast as Christopher illustration for the news broadFreese worked on laying out cast. Also working on illustrastudents’ class pictures for the tions was Mitchell Fitzthum. yearbook. Michael Davis said his favorCheyenne Stirek worked on ite task was filming. the “intro and outro” of the “We get to go out and inter-

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Nathan White assists Eyleen Jiminez-Garcia as she imports a Garage Band song from I-Tunes into a news broadcast something that others are going to see, as it motivates them to make a good product,” said White. “These computers have really good sound and pretty good volume,” Whittington said as he and Roach sat at their Apples, choosing different sections from different songs. “Me and Gabe did a music trailer for our first block, and we think we did the best out of all the grades.” “Hopefully in the future we

view people, or film people doing jokes. That’s fun, and watching peoples’ reactions to the newscast is really fun,” said Davis. “It makes people happy, and it’s fun to do.” Gabe Roach said he enjoys getting to interview students and the teacher of the week, along with sports. “It’s a mixed bag,” Roach said. Seth Whittington most enjoys the filming, and getting to show everyone the episode. “It’s nice they are working on

will continue to get bigger and better,” White said. “I want the students to continue to learn it and really master it.” White said he was really excited the class is being offered this year, and he plans to “try and revamp it over the summer” for next year. “It would be cool if sometime in the future we could get the students to do a live broadcast,” said White. “For now we are happy where we’re at.”

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 12, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

under 15), first-degree incest (victim under 14) and fourthdegree assault (with sexual motivation). The crimes allegedly occurred between May and July of 2007.

COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal The court dismissed March 2 a second-degree malicious mischief charge against Patrick Charles Denison, 32, Tonasket. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. Kane McKinsey Searcy, 32, Okanogan, pleaded guilty March 3 to second-degree theft and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Searcy was sentenced to 364 days in jail and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred between November and December 2014. In a separate case, the court dismissed March 3 a possession of a stolen motor vehicle charge against Searcy. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. Sheldon Wesley George, 30, Okanogan, pleaded guilty March 3 for fourth-degree assault (DV). George was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended and credit for one day served; and fined $1,110.50 for the June 17, 2014 crime. Casey James Lawrence Brender, 25, Tonasket, pleaded guilty March 3 to attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle, unlawful imprisonment, reckless endangerment, use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. The court dismissed an additional charge of second-degree TMVWOP. Brender was sentenced to 364 days in jail and fined $1,360.50 for the Aug. 20, 2014 crimes. Robert Charlie Atkins, 23, Oroville, pleaded guilty March 3 to third-degree assault. Atkins was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the Nov. 21, 2014 crime. Jeremy James Monnin, 35, Omak, pleaded guilty March 4 to assault in violation of a no-contact order. The court dismissed additional charges of interfering with reporting (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief. Monnin was sentenced to 364 days in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the Sept. 19, 2014 crime. The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Roberts Munsey, 21, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine). The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 28. The court found probable cause to charge William Keaton Jr., no middle name listed, 65, Tonasket, with second-degree assault (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 28. The court found probable cause to charge Chad David Buckmiller, 33, Oroville, with harassment (threats to kill) and second-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 22. The court found probable cause to charge Tristan Devlyn Rodriguez, 18, Okanogan, with six counts of forgery and one count of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 7-17. The court found probable cause to charge Stacy Lea Rodriguez, 49, Okanogan, with six counts of forgery and one count of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 7-17. The court found probable cause to charge Theodore Kurtis Storm, 27, Omak, with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 26. The court issued an arrest warrant for Jose Luis Martinez Bucio, 40, Tonasket, for second-degree rape (victim

Civil The state Department of License and Industry assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and fees: Mickey’s Chuckwagon Cafe, Omak, a total of $1,152.92 in two assessments; Sarbat Inc., Omak, $759.29; McCuen and Jones Construction LLC, Okanogan; $10,336.44. The state Employment Security Department assessed Tyler D. Anderson, Tonasket, $1,780.17 for overpayment of unemployment security taxes, penalties and fees. DISTRICT COURT Juan Carlos Diaz Figueroa, 26, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. The court dismissed an additional charge: no valid operator’s without an ID. Diaz Figueroa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,936. David Glenn Ferrell, 32, Omak, had a third-degree possession of stolen property charge dismissed. William Dwane Gallas, 49, Oroville, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Gallas was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. Ashley Kirssia C. George, 29, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. George was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $818. Manuel Gonzalez Martinez, 23, Omak, had a charge dismissed: second-degree recreational fishing without a license or a catch card. Mary Frances Harvey, 51, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Harvey received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Reyes Melchor Hinojosa, 49, Oroville, guilty of first-degree DWLS and DUI. Hinojosa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 154 days suspended, and fined a total of $3,286. Raymond Joseph Hobbs, 56, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Hobbs was fined $1,425. Robert Noel Johnson, 53, Omak, had a charge dismissed: violation of a temporary restraining order. Ruben Correa Leon, 52, Oroville, guilty of DUI and obstruction. Correa Leon was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,939. Garrett Jarome Marlatt, 23, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Marlatt was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $568. Luis A. Martinez Gonzalez, 23, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Martinez Gonzalez as sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, March 2, 2015 Warrant arrest on N. Country Vue Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Assault on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on Lemanasky Rd. near Tonasket. Guns and bows reported missing. DWLS on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Main St.in Oroville. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries

reported. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on Oak St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Second Ave. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jory Lewis Vallee, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for third-degree assault. David Lee Fitzgerald, 57, booked for violation of a no-contact order, fourth-degree assault (bond revoked) and resisting arrest (bond revoked). Jennifer Louise Ballesteros, 44, booked for POCS (methamphetamine). Jacob Christopher Weller, 34, booked for second-degree assault (DV).

Tuesday, March 3, 2015 Theft on Main St. in Riverside. Chainsaws reported missing. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Early Sunrise Dr. near Tonasket. Theft on N. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Birch St. in Omak. Harassment on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Jackson St. in Omak. Douglas Lowell Atchison, 35, booked for first-degree DWLS, failure to stop or provide information and a DOC secretary’s warrant. Carlos Morales Garcia, 39, U.S. Marshal’s hold. Cergio Santiago Britt, 28, DOC detainer. Terry Joseph Hubbard, 34, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for third-degree assault. Darryle Leeann George, 23, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Adam Charles Luntsford, 40, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Dustin Hawk Chambers, 23, DOC detainer, a Superior Court FTA bench warrant for third-degree assault, and third-degree theft. Leslie Ann Edwards, 27, booked on four Omak Police Department FTA warrants: one for third-degree malicious mischief and three for third-

degree theft. Pablo Cisneros Lucas, 45, DOC detainer. Manuel Arevalo Hernandez, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for non-emergency use of the 911 system. Miranda Nicole Mann, 24, booked on a Superior Court probable cause warrant for first-degree assault of a child.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015 Weapons offense on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. DWLS on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Littering on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Chukar Lane near Riverside. Threats on Cape Labelle Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Foggy River Loop near Riverside. Public urination on S. Ash St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Columbia St. in Omak. Assault on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Bradley John Lear, 27, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Tina Lounsberry, 53, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order. Joshua Doyle Jones, 39, court commitments for thirddegree theft and obstruction. Robert Noel Johnson, 53, booked for felony violation of a no-contact order. Jessika Quinnelle Twimentwa, 25, booked on five FTC warrants: first-degree DWLS, operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device, DUI and two for seconddegree DWLS. Guy Ray Van Brunt, 65, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jeremy John Lavender, 29, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for violation of a nocontact order. Thursday, March 5, 2015 Domestic dispute on Duffy Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Million St. near Omak. Fraud on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Omak. DUI on S. Second Ave. in Okano-

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Sunday, March 8, 201 Theft on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Carriker Dr. near Okanogan. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Weapons offense on Pharr Rd. near Riverside. Weapons offense on Fletcher Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. MIP/C on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on W. Third St. in Tonasket.

WSP seeks accident witnesses SUBMITED BY WSP TROOPER DARREN WRIGHT PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER

ORONDO -The Washington State Patrol is investigating the March 5, 2015 fatality collision that occurred on US 97 near Orondo. The collision took place at approximately 8:15 a.m. and involved a box truck, passenger car and a loaded school bus. The driver of the car was fatally injured and numerous others to include the car passenger, truck occupants, school bus driver and students were injured. Detectives from the local District 6 State Patrol office and the agency’s Major Accident Investigation Team (MAIT) will be conducting the investigation. The MAIT is a specialty unit in the State Patrol that responds to collisions statewide from their office in Monroe. The detectives from both units are collision reconstructionists that investigate crash events using the human, vehicle, environment (HVE) model to determine causal factors. As part of the investigation, detectives are seeking witnesses that may have seen any events leading up to or the actual crash. If you have any information or know someone who does, please contact Detective Dan Richmond at 509-682-8142 or Sergeant Kurt Adkinson 509765-6175.

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Saturday, March 7, 2015 Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Automobile theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Second Ave. in Oroville. Hannah Lyn Galloway, 27, booked for obstruction. Regina Delores Cook, 53, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Chuck Rodriguez, no middle name listed, 49, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Robert Joe Storm, 34, booked on five counts of distribution

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Friday, March 6, 2015 Domestic dispute on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Weapons offense on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Bicycle reported missing. Assault on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Fraud on N. Main St. in Conconully. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. DWLS on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Illegal burning on Columbia St. in Omak. Andres Lopez Flores, 25, DOC detainer. Shilo Justin Aldag, 38, booked for DUI. Leslie Iniguez Padilla, 19, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Tim Travis Johnson, 53, court commitment for DUI. Travis Lowell Watson, 44, booked for malicious mischief and on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Shaun Anthony Baker, 28, DOC detainer. Timothy Raymond Neal, 64, booked for DUI.

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gan. Two warrant arrests on Riverside Dr. in Omak. DUI on N. Ash St. in Omak. Loitering on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, booked on an FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jacob Donald Smith, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Kevin Michael Clark, 33, DOC detainer. Ned Gail Wheat, 59, booked on an FTA warrant for unlawful display of a weapon. Troy Lee McCollum, 24, booked for DUI. Michelle Ann Hernandez, 25, DOC detainer.

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MARCH 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Oroville should consider OEMSA ambulance offer

The Oroville EMS Association put an interesting proposition before the city last week – rather than contracting with a private ambulance service, contract with the existing crew to respond to emergency calls for medical help. We hope the mayor and city council will give a lot of consideration to this plan. There is a trust of our hardworking volunteers that just might not be there if the city spent our tax money on a private company. While this isn’t meant to disparage private ambulance services like Lifeline, we’ve come to know the crews aboard our ambulances – they tend to be our friends and neighbor even when we aren’t in desperate need of help. These are the people we live and work with. The sticking point, the hard issue the city has to face is that there are not enough people to staff the ambulance as it is. This situation can’t Out of go on, but it is a lot to ask of our friends and neighbors to give up their time and money to My Mind to be an EMT, to ask them to be on call Gary A. DeVon train with little reward other than good karma. We have to find a way to staff the service and to find that ambulance coordinator that can help pull it all together. The situation is not totally unlike the one we found ourselves in several years back – looking to the Okanogan County Sheriff’s office to provide policing under contract to the city. The town leaders made the right decision then and rather than rely on outsiders to do the policing they fixed the problems at home and now the Oroville Police Department is well respected and well run. We believe the same can happen for the ambulance branch of first responders. It was heartening to see all the people who came out to support the current crew and their proposal. Even better to hear that the job isn’t “thankless” even when it might feel like it is. It was also great to see members of the Tonasket ambulance crew ready to give support and lend a hand until the Oroville crew can get back up to what it needs to allow quality 24-hour emergency response. Michael Greene, ambulance coordinator for Tonasket was a good spokesman for the Oroville volunteers and he made some good points. Currently there are only seven responders providing 24-hour service, 365 days a year, according to the OEMSA’s presentation. “With our extended transport times and the high level of care we provide, three people is the minimum needed to provide quality patient care where two provide patient care and the third person drives the ambulance,” they write. They go on to say 24-hour response, 365 days a year, requires 26,280 hours of coverage. With seven responders volunteering 120 hours a week that would still result in a 16,200 hour shortfall. The group says it needs an additional 11 to 12 responders to fully staff the ambulance. They said a contract for $160,000 would cover the costs and could be done by realigning the current budget for ambulance services. That’s the part that will have to be looked into more closely. The mayor and council also made good points – you can’t run an ambulance – either the way it has been ran in the past or under contract, if you don’t have enough people to get the job done. They listened attentively to the offer and we’re sure, after consulting their counterparts in the Rural EMS, make the right decision for the people who call the Oroville area their home.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Oroville’s EMTs need your support

Dear Gary, First I want to thank all of you that turned out for the town council meeting last Tuesday, March 3. There are several things that need to be clarified concerning our volunteer ambulance crew and their job. First off, we are very short handed of trained EMTs. We need a lot of you folks that are able to volunteer, take the training and join up to keep our ambulance operating in the future. It is intensive training and a challenge to all of you that are able. You don’t have to be in town to be on the crew. And though it is expensive, there will be monetary help available. If we get enough volunteers, the class would be held here in Oroville. So come on in to the city hall and see Clerk JoAnn Denney for an application form. A note for all of you who may wish to help financially, checks need be made out specifically for what you want the donation to go for as the ambulance is city/rural business and help for the crew should be specified or training specified. There has been some confusion along this line before. It was told mistakenly that the crew were a 501C3 organization, which they definitely are not. The crew are essentially paid volunteers, originally we didn’t get paid anything but we were given all our training. It was suggested we supplement our short crew by bringing on some of Tonasket EMTs to give our short crew a breathing space before they totally burn out. It isn’t just that simple. There are legalities, financial and personnel

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago March 1, - 8, 1940: County Commissioner Floyd Corporon, accompanied by County Engineer, R. P. Ryker, spent Tuesday in this part of the county investigating various roads. In the morning, they drove to Chesaw and Molson, returning to Oroville at noon. They report considerable snow in the hills to the east as yet, though in some places, the roads are starting to soften up. In the afternoon, accompanied by N. G. Barlas, Chairman of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Board, Ted Kammers, county road foreman for this district, I. J. Doerr and Bert Wagner, they went over a number of places on the Similkameen River road to Nighthawk which are badly in need of repair. Those connected with the operation of the Okanogan County Fair for the many years it has been in operation (in Oroville) gave a brief history of its life. Starting out as a Fall Festival put on by the Knights of Pythias Lodge, it was believed to have begun in 1917. It was later turned over to the business men of the town as it had grown to more than the lodge could maintain. A vote was taken and it was unanimously carried that the fair be given up for this year at least. Brought before Justice of Peace Tom Ray, a charge of reckless driving and destruction of state and private property, was brought against Paul Henry Brumbaugh. He was fined $100 and costs and his driver’s license suspended 30 days. The charge was deliberately knocking down state highway signs and personal mail boxes by crossing the road and

issues to be tended to before we can get get some help from them. We have had a mess up in communications that brought the matter where it is and it has taken quite a long time to develop. Now it is going to just plain take time to straighten out all that has gone bad. We need help and understanding that the volunteer ambulance is a community fact that is unique to our part of the country. There aren’t many like ours still operating. We need public support. Thank you all. In God we trust, Betty Roberts Oroville

Slusher rants and raves, but offers no facts

Dear Editor, The rants of William Slusher are usually filled with half-truths, references to “facts” that are just out and out wrong, bigotry and simplistic thinking that defies logic but he exceeded even himself in “Taxation Vexation.” Beginning with an quote from an anti-democratic philosopher in 1750 who wrote extensively against any government by the people I assume Slusher believes like wise. Such a belief diminishes any credibility for citizens who hold to “government by the people.” “Slavery is often confused as being the cause of the Civil War.” “Confused” - I don’t believe one could find any recognized competent Civil War scholar who would be the least bit “confused.” Without a doubt all would informed Slusher that Slavery was the primary cause knocking the sign posts down by hitting them with the bed of his truck. Seven signs were knocked down, two posts broken and two mail boxes. Grocery Prices: 12 oz. cans of pineapple, $.10; Libby Deviled meat, per can, $.04; 100 lb. sugar, $5.53; Edwards Coffee, 4 lb. can, $.80; Mother’s Oats, large pkg, with cup and saucer, $.29; Walnuts, 2 lb. $.25.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: March 4 - 11, 1965: The Department of Interior has approved the establishment of a field office at Oroville to manage work on the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation project as announced by U.S. Senator Henry M. Jackson and U.S. Representative Thomas E. Foley. A Field Engineer and Construction Inspector will start almost immediately and by fall of this year employment will reach eight persons. The Fiscal Year 1966 budget include $1,000,000 and in 1965, $275,000 was budgeted for the start of construction. The project will be able to furnish water for 916 new acres in addition to the 7,925 acres now provided. The Oroville Hornets downed the Cashmere Bulldogs 53-47 in the District Tournament in Okanogan. This was the first District “A” basketball crown ever to be won by a Hornet team. In the Saturday night game, Cashmere downed the Tonasket Tigers 42-41, to earn a spot in the Class “A” state tournament. The Hornets bowed to 1964 champion, Elma in the first game played in Tacoma with a score of 65-61. Editor Cleland Emry commented on the support of the whole valley for the Hornets and mentioned the sign in Tonasket stating “Well Done Hornets.” We hope this friendly competition will continue. Members of the Lions Club of Oroville stated that the ice on Lake Osoyoos has not broken up as yet and the lake is still completely covered. With recent weather conditions, the break-up is near and it’s time to buy your Break-Up tickets. Oroville’s basketball heroes of the week were welcomed home last Sunday afternoon when about 400 fans gathered at the high school to wait for the Hornets squad to arrive home. They won heir first game with Bainbridge, 62-59 but won with

and reason for the Civil War. I could give him several sources to go to such as the Constitution of the Confederate States to begin with but I doubt if he is actually interested in learning anything not in keeping with his far right wing philosophy. “Free Stuff.” What is “Free Stuff” exactly? Never details just the rants of a man totally at odds with our country and citizens. “Parasite voter plantation, the NAACP (and drug cartels?), foreign criminals, Obama compared to “communism” - racism, hate and delusion. Slusher’s world must be an awful place to live in. There is so much more but last and not least - “liberals have demeaned defense, cut its funding…” Is he aware over one-half of our national budget goes to the military and the U.S. spends more on the military than all other countries in the world put together? Who is cutting the military? I guess he figures we can all pay for even more spending after he gets all of us paying more sales tax (flat tax) on everything we buy. He claims “corporations pay most” (taxes)?!? I would love to see where he pulled that dishonest “fact” from because it is just not true! Why doesn’t Slusher save the GazetteTribune and himself a lot of trouble by just sending a template outlining his columns “Taxes Bad - Foreigners Bad - Poor People Bad - Anyone not White Bad - Corporations Good - Corporate (“Makers”) Welfare Good Regressive Taxes Good - it would make it all so much easier for him wouldn’t it? William F. Johnston Chesaw Foster and lost to Nooksack to come with an eighth place standing in the state. Mike Bourn, Oroville’s 6’ 4” senior, was named to the All State Team. This marks the first time anyone from Oroville has been named to the state team. Weather wise by Marge Frazier official observer: March 3 - 49 degrees high and 20 degrees low, March 4 - 54 and 20; March 5 - 55 and 23; March 6 - 55 and 30; March 7 - 60 and 32, March 8 - 63 and 33 and March 9 - 62 and 37. No precipitation for the period.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: March 1 - 8, 1990: Oroville-rehabilitation of Enloe Dam could provide 3.5 percent of Okanogan County’s power needs without translating into increased costs for the rate payer, according to PUD Commissioner, Jim Martin. The PUD has been taking a good look at what to do with the 60 ft. dam for the past 14 years. Meeting in a continuation of a previous board meeting, the North Valley Hospital Commissioners voted to approve a salary equalization plan that would raise the wages of nearly one-third of those on staff at the hospital. The request came from several staff members who felt that they were not paid in accordance with their fellow colleagues at other county hospitals. Administrator Don James predicted that the raise will mean in the neighborhood of $50,000 in pay increase across the board. The new Oroville Television Association is determined to bring (over the air) TV back to the local area. Members Mike Tibbs, Gary Allen, Bob Kelly and Ed Bjorkman, met recently at Theodore Bruin’s to discuss he association’s plans. Our goal is to bring channels 2, 4 and 6 clearly and to reach more areas around Oroville, they said. Mac McAllister is the polite and friendly man with the raspy voice, who with his wife Dolly, operates the Jackpot Foodmart here. Mac is opening a shelter soon in the old Kidwell house at the south edge of town, for people in trouble with alcohol or drugs. Called the “Open Door”, the shelter has beds and kitchen so that anyone in need of a meal or a place to sleep for the night can be made welcome.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 12, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE A busy February with a trip to Seattle February was one very busy month for us. I’m glad it’s over! Our last hurrah was a beautiful trip to Seattle, with the prime purpose of going to the musical, Carousel. Then, it was determined that since we were there the girls would have a baby shower for granddaughter, Tristan, the one that works at the 5th Ave. Theatre. And, since she and three others had March birthdays, we had a Sunday brunch. That worked fine as we saw all the kids but then we had to ride back to Wenatchee, and shop along the way. And of course we had to go to Trader Joe’s. All the driving was done for us though, so that was a plus. We thank our wonderful family for making all this happen.

Nursing Home has direct and indirect economic impacts

It was like a breath of spring in Seattle with all the many flowering shrubs and trees in full blossom and the colorful pansies, and other early flowers. So, my beloved Gonzaga team lost their game to BYU. Do you think it was because I didn’t watch? But, I couldn’t be two places at the same time, and I was able to see a replay of the game. Congratulations to all of the Oroville Lady Hornets and their coach, Mike Bourn. Good job! And of course, I suppose we could be a bit prejudiced, since Lily Hilderbrand is family, but we are very proud of her being a good point maker but receiving the sportsmanship award is way beyond. It is not for losers, Lily. Good Girl! Saturday, March 14, is the date of the

NURSING HOME NEWS

SUBMITTED BY THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

How important is it to keep our Nursing Home open? For the 40 residents living there it is vital. For the families that want their family members close to them it is vital. To people who grew up here and know no other home it may become vital. There is an even greater need beyond the few who are using the Nursing Home as a residence today. The Nursing Home has 70 employees. That includes nurses, nursing assistants doing direct care, kitchen and laundry workers, activities staff, care managers, a social worker, and the DNS and ADNS. North Valley Hospital District overall has 230 employees. It is the largest year round employer in the north end of Okanogan County. Let’s talk economics. If I go to Hughes’ or Lee Franks and buy a gallon of paint for $20, that is a direct economic impact. The hardware store will use a portion

of the money to pay the clerk. The clerk will spend some of their money for groceries. The grocery store will pay the cashier, the cashier will pay utility bills or buy gas; and so on. After my initial purchase there are four additional rounds of spending that are indirect impacts of the first $20. When facilities close employees and families make critical decisions about their futures. They may have to move. Decisions could result in losses for schools, churches, land values and local businesses. Can you picture what Tonasket would look like if the nursing home or hospital were to close and 70 to 230 employees lost their jobs? Thankfully, when the Oroville Clinic and Assisted Living Facility closed NVHD was able to offer those employees positions elsewhere in the district. There is still another beneficial factor for our community that is

next breakfast buffet at the Oroville soon. senior center. Serving from 8 a.m. to 10 Beverly (Lemaster) Curtis, who had a.m. Come and enjoy a nice variety of the misfortune of falling and receivfood to get your day off to a good start. ing a concussion and internal bleeding, has had further testing and Tuesday, March 17 there is told that she must practice will be a St. Patrick’s Day patience as the healing procelebration, Pinochle and cess for her type of injury is Bridge, at the Senior Center, very slow. starting at 2 p.m. with desI have been privileged to sert following playing. Bingo receive a book of poetry, by will be canceled for that day. Steve Lewis. Who would March 17 also marks 75 of have thought of him writing the beginning romance that poetry? Steve died recently, led to the marriage of friend after having his “ups and husband and I. Good grief! downs” in life and my favorNo wonder we have so many THIS & THAT ite poem is the one he called, aches and pains. We’re OLD. Joyce Emry “Damn the Torpedos.” In it One local orchardist says he wrote, “the most importhe temperatures of 17 and tant things in life that he 18 degrees, at night is dangerous for learned, was at “the University of Mom apple buds. and Dad” and it is dedicated to his parWord comes to us that Virgil Forney, ents, Elsa and Grant Lewis. How very who had a procedure on Feb. 25, for a nice! bladder tumor, wasn’t totally successful Grant is battling some serious health and didn’t eliminate the pain he was havissues and now he has the shingles, to ing. Hopefully we’ll have better news add to the list. Sorry Grant. Shingles

in place because of our Nursing Home, and that is the Nursing Assistant program provided for free by NVHD. The goal is to provide nursing assistants for the district, primarily the nursing home. Look at the NACs employed now in both the hospital and nursing home. Where did they get their start? How many people currently employed all over the state and beyond, used our NAC program as a stepping stone from high school into the medical profession and have become nurses, radiology techs, managers or even physicians? Please respond and keep pressure on our legislators to make sure our Hospital and Nursing Home receives the support needed to stay open. Tonasket and Oroville would not make appealing ghost towns! Remember! The first Public Forums are coming up soon. Please attend one of them: Wednesday, March 18, 2015, at 7 PM at the Tonasket Community Church Wednesday, March 25, 2015 at 7 PM at the Oroville United Methodist Church Thank you for your concern and interest, the Nursing Home Success Team

A few more classes before spring break SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Spring may not have officially started, but the weather hasn’t noticed. Today Ellen had to drag me kicking and screaming from my garden, covered in dirt, and make me do my homework. Winter quarter is winding down at North Valley Community School but we have a few more classes before spring break! Nuts & Bolts for Non-Profit – Wednesday, March 18 at 6:30 p.m. Are you creating a non-profit organization? Are you already part of one and need to brush up on how things work? This class

Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day with card party SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The 90th Birthday party celebration at the Havillah Church for Ray Visser will be on Saturday, March 14 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Cards are welcome. Please, no gifts. Light snacks and cake will be served. There will be another Benefit Dinner on Saturday, March 21 at 5 p.m. at the Molson Grange for Ted and Renee Hilstad. This will be a ham and scalloped potato meal with apple crisp and ice cream for dessert. Test your luck at the silent auction or bring your dancing shoes for live music

Tickets going fast for crab feed TONASKET EAGLES #3002

If the weather stays like this much longer, it will be time to start mowing. Once you start there’s no stopping. Come in and get your Crab tickets for this Saturday, March 14, they are going fast. You can also buy them at the door the evening of the event. Coming on Saturday, March 21 the Comancheros will be having a Benefit Dinner and Auction from 5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. Serving Steak with all the fixings. Karaoke will follow auction. District meeting is Sunday, March 15 starting at 1 p.m. at the

Tonasket Eagles. We would like to see a good turn out (so mark your calendar). Every Sunday the ladies have breakfast from 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Name Game and Shake A shift are getting up there. Come in and shake and sign. Tuesday’s are Free Pool day, also on Tuesdays we have Tacos from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bingo is every Friday, starting at 7 p.m. come early to get set up. Pinochle scores are as follows: first place Leonard Paulsen, second place Marc Phillips, low score to Wanda Sutherland and last pinochle went to Wanda Sutherland and Jerry Cooksey. We wish all those that may be ill s speedy recovery to good

We’ve Got You Covered

2.7 Million Readers

health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER

Reach

and after dinner dancing to the Wilder Band. The cost of this dinner will be $15 per person. The next Pancake Breakfast will be on the Sunday, March 29 at the Grange in Molson. The donation to the Grange will be $8 per person. Gather your wool (SheepAlpaca-Llama-Yak-Buffalo) and bring it to Havillah Pines Carding Mill located at the Mercantile in Chesaw. Services available include skirting, picking, washing, carding to batts (for spinning/felting) and spinning (limited quantities to yarn). The first three to four pounds processed free. Call Sandee at 509-485-2268

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or Bonnie at 509-429-5465. I will take these next few lines to catch up on the Pinochle winners for the last couple of weeks as my helper has been down with that nasty cold and or flu. Willie and I or Dug, just did not seem to be able to call each other and pass the info on. For the week of Feb. 23 – the High scores went to Loretta Hickman and Larry Smith with the Lows going to Willie Penner and Trevor Rise. The Traveling went to Myrtle Wood. This was the end of the fourth session with Ray Vissor being the winner. On March 2 it started the fifth and final of the five sessions for this year. The Highs went to Marvin Miller and Birdie Nelson with the Low’s going to Carl Cole and Mary Lou Barnette and Bev Holden taking the Traveling Award with 34 in attendance.

Call this Newspaper for Details

THE LEARNING TREE will provide by-law guidelines, information on tax-exemption and how to apply for grants. How to Launch a Website – Thursday, March 19 at 5:30 p.m. Have you ever wanted your own web site but didn’t want to pay someone to make it for you? Have you paid someone to make you a website and discovered they become incompetent

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

We will be celebrating St. Patrick’s day with Pinochle and Bridge, followed by a late “desert.” That’s Tuesday, March 17, at 2 p.m. Bingo will be cancelled that day. On Saturday, March 14th, we will be serving breakfast between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Mark your calendar. March 14. Tillie Porter will be starting computer classes in March. We will keep you posted.

At the County Senior Citizens Association, the Delegates are having another meeting on Friday, March 20, at the Okanogan Senior Center at 10 a.m. Roberta Cole is at home now. So I hear. She had a steel pin installed to put her broken femur back together, and also a new knee joint. Pray for her speedy recovery. Our thoughts and prayers are requested for Hazel, who broke her ankle. Also for Beverly, that her head injury heal speedily.

Music and Pizza at the CCC

TONASKET CCC

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Celebrate Ray Visser’s 90th this Saturday

aren’t for sissies. Recently, at Jean Jacobs memorial service, it was good to learn that David Hockett is still singing as he did in his high school days. Good job. On Saturday, March 14, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. a birthday bash will be held for Ray Visser, at the Havillah Church, celebrating 90 years. A large gathering of friends and family were on hand at the Eagles for a benefit for the Hilstad family, who are having excessive doctor bills due to the serious health issues of Ted. A second benefit will be held at the Molson Grange. Bob Hirst is getting settled in at the Extended Care Center (Nursing Home) in Tonasket and he invites friends to stop in. The sun has been shining the past few days so brightly and when it starts being warmer we’ll really have it made. How nice to see Clarence Waggy and his wife at the memorial for Juanita Waggy last Saturday. ‘Til next week...

SUBMITTED BY JANET CULP TONASKET COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER

TONASKET - Open Mic Night is this Friday, March 13, from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket. This free event is open to the public to come out and play and/ or listen to music. Anyone wanting to share their talent is invited

to come in and sign up for a time slot. A dinner of vegetarian pizza, salad, dessert and beverage is available for $7, with additional refreshments available throughout the evening by donation to the CCC. Call (509) 486-1328 for more information. The CCC is located

Outlook for Today’s Investors: Less Certainty - But Potential Opportunities FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

The world of today is vastly different from the one that existed in, say, 1974. Innovations such as the Internet, smartphones, tablets, Facebook, Twitter and so on have made our lives more enjoyable, efficient and productive in many ways, and have vastly improved our access to the world’s knowledge. Yet when it comes to one important area of our lives — investing for the future — many of us may actually face more challenges today than we might have in the past.

of private-sector workers covered under a “defined benefit” plan — the traditional pension plan in which retired employees receive a specified monthly benefit, with the amount determined by years of service, earnings history and age.

So unlike your counterparts in the 1950s and 1960s, you may not be able to count on a rise in real wages, and you may not have the promise of a regular pension. What, then, can you do to improve your prospects for eventually achieving a comfortable retirement?

First of all, in the absence of a formal pension, you will need to create your own retirement plan. That means you will need to consider all the opportunities available to you. If your employer offers a 401(k) or similar account, such as a 403(b), contribute as much as you can afford — at the very least, put in enough to earn your employer’s matching contribution, if At least two main factors are responsible for one is offered. And even if you participate in this apparent regression. First, following a your employer’s plan, you may also be eligible quarter century during which U.S. workers’ to open an IRA. If you’re self-employed, you income rose fairly steadily, “real” wages — still have options such as a SEP IRA or a that is, wages after inflation is considered — “solo 401(k).” While these accounts may differ have been flat or declining since about 1974, from each other in terms of eligibility, income according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. restrictions and contribution limits, they both Secondly, during this same time period, offer the same key benefit: the ability to we’ve seen a large drop in the percentage defer taxes on your earnings for many years,

typically until retirement.

As for your next main challenge — the need to compensate for stagnant real wages and the subsequent difficulty of boosting your savings — what can you do? For one thing, you will need a reasonable percentage of your portfolio — both inside and outside your IRA, 401(k) and other retirement plans — devoted to growth-oriented investments. It’s true that the value of growth vehicles, such as stocks and stock-based instruments, will always fluctuate. But you can help control this risk by owning a mix of investments, including stocks, bonds, Treasury bills, certificates of deposit (CDs) and other securities. Keep in mind, though, that while diversification can reduce the impact of volatility on your holdings, it can’t guarantee profit or always protect against loss. As far as attaining rising wages and enjoying guaranteed retirement payments, we don’t have the “certainties” that many people had in the 1950s and 1960s. But you can still help brighten your future — through diligence, discipline and the determination to explore the opportunities available to you. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

once the fee is paid? This class will cover the basics of making your own! Basic terms, costs, templates, blog sites and online stores will be discussed. Don’t Forget to Save the Date! Coming up on Sunday, March 22 is the fantastically fabulous Fondue Dinner! At only $10 per person it is oh so worth it! To sign up for these classes and more, or just to tell Ellen Barttels to be nice to me, call 509-4762011 or visit our website at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com! Still Coming Up! We will be having classes soon on the following: rock painting just for kids, pressure canning, gardening with seed tape, and grant writing. Check out the Learning Tree next week for more in-depth descriptions! If Ellen can catch me....

Nominations are open for Senior Citizen of the Year for Oroville. This is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. If you have someone you want to nominate, contact Betty Steg or Raleigh Chinn, our nominations committee. Has anyone noticed how the women outnumber the men on the executive board? (6 to 2) I’ve noticed that this is also the case during our business meetings, and also during our fund raisers, and work parties. Let this be my challenge to all those senior men out there, be brave, step up to the plate and join in. (Senior men, the new minority. Hear us roar!) Pinochle report: Door Prize, Jim Fry; Most Pinochles, Barb Cline; Men’s High, Jim Fry; Women’s High, Judy Ripley.

between Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op and Wells Fargo Bank, at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket.

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MARCH 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Walking bridge should happen this year SUBMITTED BY MICHAEL STEWART US ARMED FORCES LEGACY

As a new springtime has begun in the valley, we of the Legacy would like to make our policy known concerning mementos placed and left to honor your veteran’s plaque. Please affix the Veterans name to your memento and place it on the cement sidewalk below the appropriate wall and corresponding row! Please do not hang or affix anything on the plaque itself. All mementos may be left in place for one month; at such time we shall remove them for either storage or disposal. Should

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE USAF LEGACY someone desire to retrieve these items, please stop by the office and speak with a member. As all can now see at the Legacy; the front side of the walls are full and we are now discussing how to manage the beautiful murals on the back of the walls along with the need for space for future plaques. We will have lots of room for additional plaques, one-way or another. The “walking bridge” to be installed next to the vehicle bridge south of town, connecting our site to the new sidewalk extension, is supposed to be happening this year! We will install smaller basalt columns along the pathway from the footbridge along side our site ending at the

parking lot. These columns are to be used as a fundraiser for the operation of the Legacy. A donation of $500 is being requested to have your family name/business affixed to these on a suitable brass plaque. The Legacy is always looking for more members and meets on the third Wednesday of each month at the Legacy building. The County Service Officer’s office is still located on site in our building. We have a new service officer beginning his training on Monday, March 16. Please give him a couple weeks to acclimate, then come by to say hello and meet the veteran that wishes to serve you. The members of the USAF Legacy take notice of the excellent respect shown via the city of Tonasket and our flag flying establishments! Thank you all for replacing the torn, dirty or just plain weathered flags.

St. Patrick’s Dinner this Saturday

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

OROVILLE - The annual Oroville Scholarship Foundation Variety Show and Auction is on Thursday, March 12 at the Oroville High School. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. This popular fundraiser showcases local entertainment from volunteers who share their talents to raise money for scholarships for Oroville students. Baseball Sign Up

OROVILLE - Baseball season is here, kids ages four-years to 15-years-old can sign up in Oroville Elementary School Cafeteria on Thursday, March 12 and Thursday, March 26 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Phillips and Pollard to Perform

OROVILLE – John Phillips and Steve Pollard bring a blend of folk melodies and ballads to Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday evening, March 12. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Dock Side Drive

OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Dock Side Drive a music event on Thursday, March 12 at 7:30 p.m. This popular swing and show band features Swing, Blues, Jazz and Show tunes. The event takes place at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 5800 1115th Street in Osoyoos. Tickets available at Imperial Office Supply in Osoyoos or at the door. For more information see www.osoyoosarts.

Open Mic Night at CCC

TONASKET - Friday, March 13 is the next Open Mic Night at the CCC. Time is 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. for this free event. The public is welcome to come and play and/or listen. Vegetarian Pizza, salad, dessert and beverage will be available for $7. Refreshments will be available throughout the evening by donation to the CCC. Outstanding musicians will be sharing their time with us that night. If you would like to come to share your talent--come on in and sign up for a time. More info 509-486-1328.

Masonic Dinner/Auction

OROVILLE - The Aurora Masonic Lodge #201 will be holding their annual dinner and auction at the Oroville American Legion Hall on Saturday, March 14. Dinner and silent auction start at 5 p.m., live auction to follow. The dinner will feature corn beef and cabbage. Come out and have fun while supporting worthwhile causes like the Mason’s scholarship, Christmas baskets and bikes for books. For more in o 509560-0572.

St. Patrick’s Day Dinner

OROVILLE - The Oroville Eagles will be hosting a St. Patrick’s Day dinner on Saturday, March 14 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Proceeds go to the Oroville Eagles Easter Egg Hunt.

Spiritual Movie Night

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, March 14, at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200.

Fire District 12 Meeting

OROVILLE - Okanogan County Fire Protection District #12 has delayed it’s March commissioner’s meeting until Tuesday, March 17. It will be held at 7 p.m. in the fire hall at 474 Swanson Mill Road. For more information call 509-556-2911.

Story Time at Library

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library will be having Story Time at the Library “The Ladybug Club” on Wednesday, March 18 at 10 a.m. This free event will take place each Wednesday and there will be stories, songs, crafts and fun for young children.

Nursing Home Forum, Tonasket

NORTH COUNTY - The Nursing Home Success Team will be holding the first Public Forums on Wednesday, March 18 at 7 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Church and on Wednesday, March 25 at 7 p.m at the Oroville United Methodist Church. Please attend in order to learn, and ask the questions you may have.

Relay For Life Rally

TONASKET - There will be a Relay For Life Kick-Off Rally on Wednesday, March 18 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Church, 24 E. 4th St. (behind US Bank). For more information, contact Roger or Cheral at 509-826-5383.

Oroville C of C Banquet

OROVILLE - Oroville’s Chamber of Commerce is putting on its annual banquet. There will be a social hour starting at 6 p.m., prime rib and chicken dinner served at 7 p.m., door prizes, business and citizen awards, a silent auction and induction of this year’s officers. Jenn Tate is guest speaker. This is a business and community minded event. This is an invitation only and BYOB event being held at the Pastime. More info www.orovillewashington.com.

Fundraiser for Ted Hilstad

MOLSON - There will be a second fundraiser for the Ted and Renee Hilstad Family to help defray medical expenses. The fundraiser will be on Saturday, March 21 at the Molson Grange Hall with dinner starting at 5 p.m. sharp. There will also be a silent auction and an old fashioned barn dance with the Wilder Band performing the music which is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is $15 at the door. For more information call Dal Wilder at 509-476-2284.

NVCS Fondue Dinner

OROVILLE-North Valley Community Schools is putting on a benefit Fondue dinner at Esther Bricques Winery on Sunday, March 22 beginning at 4 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children under 12. Included is a complete meal through the style of the fondue pot, along with back ground music provided by Steve Pollard. In addition, the drawing for the beautiful maple bowl created by Dr. Cynthia Ground will take place. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861 or NVCS at 509-476-2011.

Donations for Egg Hunt

OROVILLE - Members of the Oroville Eagles will be going around town collecting cash or egg donations during the week of March 23 to March 27 for the annual Easter Egg Hunt which is Saturday, April 4 at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park, starting at 10 a.m. sharp.

Nursing Home Forum, Oroville

NORTH COUNTY - The Nursing Home Success Team will be holding the second of its Public Forums on

dinner with the works for $8. All proceeds go toward the Easter Egg Hunt. Yep, it’s that time of year again. The Easter Egg Hunt is Saturday, April 4 at Veterans Memorial Park, starting at 10 a.m. sharp. Eagles members will be going around town collecting cash or egg donations during the week of March 23 to March 27 we will be in the kitchen boiling and coloring eggs the next week. We will have lunch available every week day from noon to 2 p.m. and the banquet room is open to the public until March 27. Come on in and give our Soup-n-Sandwiches a try.

What a great community we live in! The Hilstad Benefit Auction was huge. Big kudos to the organizers for a job well done and to all the friends of Ted and Renee who turned out in their support. The kitchen crew served 400 chili dinners and it was great. The only complaint we heard was from people who got there late and had to park two blocks away. Good job Oroville! You really came together on this one. The Ladies Auxiliary will do a St. Patrick’s Day dinner on Saturday, March 14, at 5 p.m. They will serve a Pulled Pork

Friday the 27th will be our last Steak Night for the season. Then we can all go fishin’. Joker Poker and Meat Draw will continue. Don’t forget District 10 Meeting in Tonasket on Sunday the 15th. Jeannie Riggs will be with us for Karaoke on Friday the 20th after dinner. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Wednesday is Pool League and Burgers. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

Okanogan Valley

COMMUNITY CALENDAR OSF VARIETY SHOW ON SATURDAY

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

Wednesday, March 25 at 7 p.m at the Oroville United Methodist Church. Please attend in order to learn, and ask the questions you may have.

Baseball Sign Up

OROVILLE - Baseball season is here, kids ages four-years to 15-years-old can sign up in Oroville Elementary School Cafeteria on Thursday, March 26 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Applications for Habitat Home

OMAK - A new Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity home is going to be built in Omak, There will be a public meeting on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, March 28, at 2 p.m. at the Cornerstone Christian Fellowship Church at Riverside and Locust Street in Omak for those interested in qualifying for this home.

Oroville Kite Day

OROVILLE The 8th annual Oroville Annual Kite Day will be held on Saturday, March 28 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Bud Clark Field on Chesaw Rd. Free kites to the first 100 kids. “Kids of all ages” are encourage to come and bring kites for all to enjoy.

Tonasket ABC Dessert Auction

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

TONASKET - Tonasket Athletic Booster Club will be having their annual Benefit Dessert Auction on Saturday, March 28 at the Kuhler. Spirit hour and silent auction start at 5:30 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. and live auction at 7 p.m. Dinner is $25, with tickets available at U.S. Bank, ask for Marilee or Maricela. (dinner not required, bidder packets available at the door for those only interested in the auction.) Come join the Tonasket ABC at their biggest annual fundraiser.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Donkey Basketball

Oroville United Methodist

OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club is bringing Donkey Basketball back to town on Saturday, March 28 at 6 p.m. at Oroville High School. The event features local teams including the Oroville Fire and Molson-Chesaw Fire departments. Advance tickets at Hometown Pizza & Bakery or Hughes Dept. Store customer service are $8 (adults), $6 (Student, 7th-12th Grade), $4 (Children, K-6) or at the door $9 (adults), $7 (Student, 7th-12th Grade), $5 (Children, K-6).

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Calendar items must include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Estate Case BARGAIN! 10K Diamond Tennis Bracelet, 2-tone, like new!

$750.00

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE 8 A8

OKANOGAN 12,2015 2015 OKANOGANVALLEY VALLEYGAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE| •MARCH March 12,

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Lots & Acreage Commercial Lot, 1 acre in Prescott AZ. New development close by. Possible trade for similar lot in Oroville area. (928)713-674 Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

RIVER VALLEY OUTLOOK. Sunny one bedroom home with living room French doors welcoming to a relaxing patio, perfect for indoor - outdoor living. Features a beautiful kitchen, large walk-in closet, full bath & laundry room. $650. 509-429-7823. SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

For Rent 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

American Legion Housing 1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.

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z Great Oroville Location z Spacious Floor Plans z Park-like setting

z Picnic area z On-site laundry

Call for information and application

509-476-2808 TTY 425-562-4002

SUN LAKES REALTY $550; 2 BR, 2 BA with walk-in closet. Quiet area. Nice view of green lawn from covered back patio. Great location. 2nd oor apartment in 4 plex. $400 dep. Oroville 509-2233064 509-560-9043. CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475 month. Call 509-223-3433

Announcements

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Public Notice Substantial development court ordered hijack of Hwy 20E. Dangerous driveway is now a road no permits needed. Site will not pass sight distance requirements or oodplain issues. It’s been 10 years since the courts cut the chain on the gate and tried to bring in 60+ homes. I removed the red tagged bridge. I’m in debt $75,000. I no longer own my home and have a permanent protection order by the driving public not to interfere. The courts proclaimed that no permits are needed. Permit #4078 is now a trailhead for anyone to use. The D.O.T. fears the courts and you should also. Their permit system is dysfunctional by design-court ordered. Public involvement needed to save your life or the lives of others. I will be in jail for 1 year because I told you the truth and interfered. rrylander.info rylpublic.info for comments coming soon

FREE NAC Class

NORTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DISTRICT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

North Valley Hospital has a Full time opening for a

For Rent

4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; Furnished Cabin $625; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Crosswords

NCWEDD seeks a self-motivated Executive Director (ED) professional to lead the nonprofit regional economic development organization serving Chelan, Douglas, Okanogan Counties and the Colville Confederated Tribes. The goals of NCWEDD are to communicate, advocate, and collaborate. NCWEDD brings together the private and public sectors, promoting diversification to enhance the future of the NCW region. Three years of business and/or non-profit experience preferred. BA required. This job entails travel, good communication skills, and openness to new ideas. The salary is DOE. Position is a .75 FTE. To apply, please provide a cover letter and resume to Human Resource admin@ncwedd.com. Manager Full job description at www.ncwedd.com Okanogan County PUD is looking for a Human ReSay it in the classifieds! source Manager to adminis*Special deal* ter the District’s employee *HAPPY BIRTHDAY benefits and training pro*HAPPY ANNIVERSARY grams, recruitment and se*CONGRATULATIONS!! lection of employees, admin*WILL YOU MARRY ME? istration of wage and salary MUST BE PREPAID programs, assist with labor $6.00 for the first 15 words contract negotiations, readditional words $1.00 spond to personnel related iseach. Bold words, special sues, communicate with emWSU Student Services font or borders extra. ployees, maintain personnel Professional Add a picture files, serve as the District Prifor only $1.50 more. (Academic Coordinator) vacy Officer and develop/ Call to place ad maintain employee related Okanogan Valley Be creative, make a differpolicies and procedures. Gazette-Tribune ence, develop skills that forBachelor Degree in business ward your career and earn a 509-476-3602 or human resources required. good salary with excellent Successful applicant needs benefits working for a prestigto have experience relating to ious University—while living human resources, labor rela- in rural Okanogan County. tions and benefits administra- This Full Time position will tion. A valid Washington assist in the development DID YOU FIND AN ITEM State Driver’s License is re- and implementation of the AND WANT TO FIND quired. Upward Bound college-acTHE OWNER? Found items can be placed Applications and resumes will cess program in Omak and Okanogan high schools. The in the newspaper for one be accepted through Friday, Coordinator mentors students week for FREE. Limit 15 March 27, 2015 at on their path to higher educawords, or prepay for words Okanogan County PUD, tion. Work with community over the 15 word limit. Call Attn: Human Resources, partners and a supportive UB 509-476-3602 before noon PO Box 912, Okanogan, WA program team to create, coon Tuesdays. 98840-0912, by email to ordinate and provide dynamic donc@okpud.org. educational workshops, seror by fax (509)422-8418. Help Applications and job descrip- vice opportunities and cultural enrichment activities. Wanted tions are available at Salary $2,734/month, DOE. PUD offices and at Position open until filled. For Seeking a Camp Host www.okanoganpud.org. for the Lost Lake Kiwanis Okanogan County PUD is an full description of position recamp for May through Sep- Equal Opportunity Employer. quirements and to apply, visit tember. Applicant must prowww.wsujobs.com. vide their own housing. An WSU is an EO/AA RV hookup is available for Educator and Employer. the host. Call (509) 322-2473 Post your comments on recent to receive an application articles and let your voice be heard. packet. Applications close www.gazette-tribune.com March 28th.

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Subscribe to the...

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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ANSWERS

North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning April 6, 2015. This class will be completed in May. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www.nvhospital.org This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after March 20, 2015. for information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185.

44. Loss of muscle coordination 46. Removed frozen water, as from a plane’s wing 48. Deceptions 51. Close 52. Groove that holds a bowstring 53. Actor Green of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer� 55. A sib 57. “For shame!�

www.gazette-tribune.com

Billing Clerk in the Financial Services Department Previous insurance billing experience preferred. CAH experience preferred. Detail orientated a must. North Valley Extended Care has 3 Full Time and 4 Per Diem opening’s for

NAC Washington State certified NAC license required. Current CPR and HIV certification required You may apply online by visiting our website at www.nvhospital.org. or pick up an application at North Valley Hospital Human Resources Department. For more information please call 509-486-3185.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: Behavioral Health Spec. 1 Full time position Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical Patient Registration 1 Full time position English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.


MARCH 12, 2015 2015 |• O OKANOGAN VALLEY March 12, KANOGAN V ALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide.

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Puzzle 12 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

This cozy 2 bedroom/1bath home is situated on a dead end street has a fenced backyard and an attached carport with enclosed storage area. MLS#750992 $79,000

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Cute, well-kept home in Tonasket!

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

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Lake and Country

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in established & well cared for Tonasket neighborhood, brand new kitchen, new vinyl windows, heat pump, full basement, lovely mature landscaping. $172,900

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Charming Cape Cod Home

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

Enjoy the amazing views of Lake Osoyoos and Mt. Baldy from the deck of this custom built home. Kitchen features oak cabinets, corian counter tops and an island with power. 3 bdrms on main level. Master bdrm features a Jacuzzi tub & access to the deck. Oversized garage is well insulated & heated. 50X36 shop has water/power/phone and is well insulated. Greenhouse, woodsheds and a chicken coop. This property borders National Forest. NWML#752714 $390,000

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509-476-3602

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509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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Sponsored by

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#1 Top Producer Office in North County

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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Hard, difficulty rating 0.62

ANSWERS

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

SUN LAKES REALTY

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LEGAL SERVICES

Section 8 Wait List Opens March 23, 2015 March 10, 2015 The Housing Authority of Okanogan County will reopen the Waiting Lists for HUD’s Section 8 Housing Choice and 5 Year Mainstream Voucher Programs at 9 am on Monday, March 23, 2015. Applications will be accepted by email, fax, US Mail or at the agency office. Applications mailed will be accepted with a postmark of March 20th or later and will be marked as received on March 23 for purposes of the wait list. Applications sent via email or FAX will only

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HOUSING AUTHORITY OF OKANOGAN COUNTY P.O. Box 1306 Okanogan, WA 98840 (509) 422-3721 FAX (509) 422-1713

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 11 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.62)

5

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of MICHAEL KEEGAN WRIGHT, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00024-1 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Gerald L. Beffa as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: March 12, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Gerald L. Beffa, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 12, 19, 26, 2015. #OVG620006

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PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

8

Housing Authority based on the Fair Market Rents for Okanogan County and set by HUD. An assisted family can expect to pay 30 to 40 percent of their income toward rent and utilities. Information on the programs is available at the Housing Authority Office. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 12, 2015. #OVG620263

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be accepted if sent after 9am on Monday, March 23rd. In person applications will only be accepted Monday through Wednesday from 9am to 3pm. Applications will not be accepted at the office outside of these hours. Completed applications submitted before these dates will be returned and not registered on the Wait List. Applications must be complete with documentation to be recorded onto the Waiting List. All questions must be answered and all forms must be signed by household members 18 years of age and older. Incomplete applications will not be recorded onto the Waiting List. Notice of incomplete applications will be given via email or phone and applicant must respond within 7 days of notification or application will be destroyed. Applications for the Waiting List will be available immediately. Send application requests to: houseapp@communitynet.org or phone 509-422-3721 or TTY 771. Applications may also be picked up at the Housing Authority Office or mailed to households on request. The agency office may be inaccessible to some disabled individuals. Disabled applicants who cannot access the office may email or phone the office to request assistance with completing the application in their homes, on the phone or other accessible location and their completed applications will be accepted by mail. The Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program is a federal rental assistance program and the TBRA Program is a state rental assistance program, both administered by the Housing Authority for families throughout Okanogan County. The purpose of these programs is to provide rental assistance for decent, safe, sanitary, and affordable housing to low-income families, including seniors and disabled persons. To qualify for these programs, a family’s annual income may not exceed 50% of the median income for Okanogan County, as established by HUD and listed by family size below: 1 Person $20,300 2 Person $23,200 3 Person $26,100 4 Person $28,950 5 Person $31,300 6 Person $33,600 Both programs offer tenant based rental assistance to families in privately owned housing of their choice. The rental subsidy amount is based on a payment standard set by the

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Public Notice Posted Proclamation of Reclamation Abandoned State Hwy. 4 (now S.R. 2OE) circa 1932-2015 Feb. 1, 2015 To be recorded on Parcel nos. 3727260002-37272600053727260006 all in Okanogan Co. WA. From Feb. 1, 2015 is unified non-abandonment linked to parcel 3727264005 Homestead-Farmstead Roger Rylander. I Roger Rylander have maintained, improved and paid delinquent property taxes on said parcels. I am the first person to have property identified as segregated and recorded nonabandonment of such property. I am the First person in recorded history to do so. I will improve the premises and relocate my driveway from mile marker 264.28 to a point that is the safest to all people of the State of Washington. State property is 100% free of encumbrances and when abandoned is 100% free of encumbrances. Now and Forever to be entered into county taxed land. I do so willingly. Records of said Abandoned 1932 roadway are kept int he maproom basement at the Wenatchee D.O.T. P.U.D. welcome Phone welcome. Posted on Property. WAC458-61-550 Excise tax exempt South of Creek Abandoned roadbed. W.A.C. 197-11-960 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 /s/Roger Rylander Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 2015. #OVG611291

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Public Notices

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Public Notices

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EVENTS-FESTIVALS

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Public Notices

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF MARCH 9, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

PAGE A9 9

Puzzle 6 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory 1

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To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory


PAGE A10

Congratulations

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 12, 2014

Oroville Hornet Athletes 2014 - 2015

Oroville Girls Basketball State Regionals Qualifier

We’re Proud of You... Good Job!

Photos by Brent Baker / okvalleysports.com

Mikayla Scott - All-League Lily Hilderbrand - All-League

Bryce Glover - All-League

Hannah Hilderbrand - All-League

Andrew Mieirs - All-League

These fine business wish to say Congratulations! DISCOUNT FIREWORKS

Good Luck To all The Athletes!

PAUL’S SERVICE Your one stop for complete auto repairs!

Ph. 476-2241

Sheila’s Shoppe 83 B Eastlake Rd., Oroville

476-2051

Hwy. 97, S., Oroville Wash & Wax Your Car...

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1 Block off Main St. (next to the Eagles)

JA V A JUNKIE 476-3893

 Coffee Drinks  Lunch Specials  Much More!

476-2907 P.O. Box 2207 Oroville, WA.

Oroville

BOOSTER CLUB

Supporting Hornet Athletes!

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Tel: 509-826-1930

Oroville Tire Center 476-3902

Oroville Auto Parts Center 476-3679 Hwy. 97, Oroville

2306 N. Hwy 97, Oroville

DOUBLE “A” LOGGING

Oroville Dental Center

Oroville GOLF CLUB

A family warehouse for our growers! Appleway & Ironwood Oroville, WA. 98844 OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. ce:476-3646 Whitcomb, 486-2917 General Offi OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156

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1416 Main St., Oroville


PAGE A11

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 12, 2014

Congratulations Tonasket Tiger Athletes

2014 - 2015

Tonasket Wrestling Team - 3rd place at State Finals

Jorge Juarez - State Champion, 152 lbs. Trevor Peterson - State Champion, 132 lbs.

Frank Holfeltz - State Qualifier, 195 lbs.

Chad Edwards - State Runner-up, 285 lbs. Austin Knowlton - State Qualifier, 170 lbs.

Zach Lofthus State Qualifier, 160 lbs.

We’re Proud of You... Good Job!

Ethan Bensing - All-League

Photos by Brent Baker / okvalleysports.com

Colton Leep - All-League

Jenna Valentine - All - League

Tonasket Boys Basketball - District Tournament Qualifier

These fine business wish to say Congratulations!

Lee Frank Mercantile SCHOLZ

Sporting Goods

509-486-2105

316 South Whitcomb, Tonasket

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183 7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.

Smith & Nelson, Inc. Tonasket, Washington

"CHECKED FOR QUALITY" By applying the most up-to-date technology, our experienced, dedicated and hard working crew continues to provide the best possible service to both growers and consumers.

302 S. Western, Tonasket • 486-2104

P.T. WORKS

INC.

PHYSICAL THERAPY Diane MacFarland, P.T. 39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

509-486-1616

ALLEN’S Good Luck Tiger Athletes! 308 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2921

509.486.8201

Hair Cutting, Coloring, Perming, Styling, Waxing, Gifts and More!

Shannon * Cheree * Johnna * Lisa

9 W. 4th St., Tonasket

for all your prescription needs!

Roy’s Pharmacy

RX Billing for Numerous Insurances 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

(509) 486-2149 Fax: 486-2196

Pizza, Subs, Salad Bar, Calzones, Lasagna, Wraps & More!

TONASKET PIZZA COMPANY 15 West 4th St., Tonasket 509-486-4808 Tonasket

Athletic Booster Club Supporting Tiger Athletes!

• Friendly Service • One Stop Grocery Shopping • Cold Pop & Beer • Chips & Snacks OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 • Groceries, Meats & Produce TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2015

PATHWAYS | FROM A1

Miss Omak Stampede 2015 Queen Menze Pickering, from Oroville, invites everyone to join her at the Old Flour Mill in Okanogan on Friday, March 27, for an auction featuring Al Parsons as the Auctioneer. Dinner is catered by the Breadline and starts at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $12 and can be purchased at the Oroville Pharmacy, Tonasket Feed Store, the Stampede office, Studio Off Main, and the Breadline Cafe in Omak. There will be Silent, Live and Dessert Auctions. All proceeds fund Menze as she travels to promote the Omak Stampede and our beautiful surrounding areas. If you would like more information, you can “like” her Facebook page. Miss Omak Stampede Menze would also like to give a personal Thank You to all of her supporters and to everyone that donated to her auction.

Two alert system for Oroville Schools SUBMITTED BY STEVE QUICK

SUPERINTENDENT, OROVILLE SCHOOL DIST

OROVILLE-The Oroville School District has implemented the use of two alert systems to better communicate with parents, according to Superintendent Steve Quick. K12 Alerts is a communication system that allows the district to not only send routine notices to parents, staff and community members in minutes, but to also send emergency notifications. K12 Alerts notifies parents any-

time and anywhere through multiple modes of communication, including by telephone, email and text messaging to cell phones. “We don’t just use the K12 system to make emergency announcements. We also use it to make automated daily attendance calls for students who are late and/or absent, send newsletters, send notices for school closures; and advise of late buses. Keeping parents and staff members current with school news and positive messages in addition to instant emergency alerts

is important,” said Supt. Quick. The second system the district uses is SafeSchools Alert, which provides students, teachers, and others the ability to report safety concerns such as bullying, intimidation, harassment, weapons, drugs, or other safety items that need to be addressed. There are four easy ways of reporting an issue: Website: http://1181.alert1.us Email: 1181@alert1.us Phone: 509-560-4048 Text: 509-560-4048

Oroville Junior High students on Honor Roll THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Several Oroville seventh and eighth graders have been named to the honor roll for the second quarter. 7th Grade: Charles Egerton, 4.00; Taralynn Fox, 4.00; Alli Harris, 4.00; Chris Worrell, 4.00. Superintendent: Edwin Garcia, 3.95; Christina Herrick, 3.95; Kaytie Miller, 3.95; Seth Baugher, 3.94; Sheridan Blasey, 3.85; Hanna Curdie, 3.83; Mariya

Mathis, 3.83; Gwen Hankins, 3.81; Jose Nemecio, 3.78. Principal: Colby Guzman, 3.73; America Calderon, 3.71; Hunter Rounds, 3.66; Jeidi Avelino, 3.63; Julissa Alvarez-Viveros, 3.56; Austin Bernard, 3.52; Rose Cook, 3.52; Darian Range, 3.51. Merit: Crespin Banks, 3.23; Olivia Mathews, 3.21; Brayden Thompson, 3.11; Payton Sanchez, 3.01. 8th Grade: Jennifer CisnerosMedina, 4.00. Superintendent:

Madison Whiteaker, 3.94; Wendy Ortega, 3.90; Lindsay Koepke, 3.89; Hunter DeVon, 3.80; Spencer Martin, 3.80; Katherine Rawley, 3.77. Principals: Sugeysi Layata, 3.67; Alexis Allenby, 3.63; Jamen Griffin, 3.60; Angela Viveros, 3.51; Gilberto Hernandez-Delgado, 3.50. Merit: Jessie Deaquino,3.31; Elijah Burnell, 3.17; Megan West, 3.08; Nicole Minarcin, 3.04; Andrew Del Rosario, 3.01; Jingy Sykes 3.00.

OBITUARIES

Ruby Faught

RUBY SCHERTENLEIB MAYCUMBER FAUGHT Ruby Schertenleib Maycumber Faught, 84, passed away March 2, 2015 at Washington Odd Fellows Home in Walla Walla,

Washington. A viewing will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Celebration of Life will be at 7 p.m., on Friday, March 6, 2015 at Mountain View-Colonial DeWitt, 1551 The Dalles Military Road, Walla Walla, Washington 99362. Calvin Ransom will be officiating. Graveside service will be at 20 p.m. on Saturday, March 7, 2015 at Wauconda Cemetery, Wauconda, Washington. Ruby was born October 14, 1930 to Robert & Lillian Thomason Schertenleib in Wauconda. She married Donald Maycumber, who passed away in 1968 and later married Jim Faught, who passed away in 1992. She worked as a nurse’s aide at Providence St. Mary Medical Center in the Recovery Room. Ruby loved her children and adored her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Spending time with her brothers and sisters at Bonaparte Lake family reunions were the happiest of times. She spent many years with Jim, wintering in Palm Springs,

Calif. and attending roping events. She enjoyed traveling to Switzerland to see family, playing golf, skiing and loved being a nurse’s aide at Providence St. Mary Medical Center. Ruby is survived by two daughters, Donna Maiden of Walla Walla, Denise (Calvin) Ransom of Richland, Ore.; two sons, Tim (Angelina) Maycumber, Tom (Jane) Maycumber, both of Walla Walla; one brother, Calvin Schertenleib of Fairbanks, Alaska; nine grandchildren and 17 greatgrandchildren. Ruby is preceded in death by her parents; infant son, Danny; husbands, Donald Maycumber and Jim Faught; three brothers and two sisters. Memorial contributions may be made to Wauconda Community Hall or Wauconda Cemetery through Mountain View-Colonial DeWitt, 1551 The Dalles Military Road, Walla Walla, Washington 99362. Friends and family may share memories and sign the online guestbook at www.mountainview-colonialdewitt.com.

tion.” Branch feels the conference is a good opportunity for businesspeople, especially those in the downtown area of Oroville and potential downtown business owners, to get together with other area residents to discuss concerns. “Certainly the conference is for people who are concerned for Oroville’s future,” he said, emphasizing the hope for increased partnerships between the city and business. The 2015 Rural Pathways to Prosperity Conference is sponsored by WSU Extension, Washington State Department of Commerce, Association of Washington Cities, USDA-Rural Development, Avista Corporation and the state Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board.

The registration fee, which includes dinner, is $30 ... with a $25 early bird special between March 5 and April 10. For more

“Certainly the conference is for people who are concerned for Oroville’s future.” Chris Branch, director Oroville Community Development

information, visit waruralprosperity.wsu.edu or call Chris Branch, 509-560-3535. This con-

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Dining &

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Entertainment

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4 N. Main St.

1-509-476-2279

Omak, WA

Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

FAMILY PRACTICE

DENTISTRY

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome.

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Care Credit

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

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(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Healthcare Services  Anti

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

Out on the Town...

ference is sponsored by WSU Extension, the City of Oroville, and the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. “Join us on April 17 for a day of inspiration, learning and regional networking to create jobs, improve your economy, add value to your existing rural businesses, encourage new entrepreneurs and engage with a national expert... without leaving your community,” say the hosts. Persons with a disability requiring special accommodations while participating in this program may call WSU Stevens County Extension at 509-6842588.

Columbia River

 Behavioral

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

10

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Growing Healthcare Close to Home

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NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

YOUR AD HERE

OPTICAL

Advertise In The

Greeted with a smile!

485-2174

St. Patrick’s SPECIAL Sat., March 14  4 to 8 p.m.

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

Corned beef & Cabbage, red potatoes, carrots & dessert

* Wednesday *

~ Come Enjoy Karaoke with Jeanie ~

Eva‛s Diner & Bakery

NOW SERVING DINNER!

OPEN: 7 days a week!

Tues. - Sat., 4 to 8 p.m.

Ph. (509) 476-3266

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

712 14th Ave., Oroville

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Call Charlene Helm

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

Prime Rib every Sat.

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

826-7919

Ph. 509-486-2828

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

509-476-3602 Ext 3050

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 12, 2015  

March 12, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 12, 2015  

March 12, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune