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Supt. Steve Quick’s contract not renewed... so far

THIS IS JUST A DRILL

BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – After an evaluation that lasted through several executive sessions, including at extended school board meetings, Oroville School Superintendent Steve Quick still hasn’t had his contract renewed. The board first went into executive, closed-door session, at their Monday, Feb. 23 meeting. After conferring on the matter they decided to continue the meeting on Thursday, Feb. 26 and again on Monday, March 2. At the March 2 meeting Rocky DeVon, chairman of the school board, stuck his head out of Quick’s office at least five times to announce they needed more time. After about two hours the board reconvened. DeVon called for a motion on approval or disapproval of the contract - board member Amy Wise moved that the matter be tabled until June. The motion received a second and passed, with Wise and board member Travis Loudon approving and board members Todd Hill and Michael

Tonasket School District, law enforcement, emergency responders and North Valley Hospital, participated in an accident drill, emphasizing the dangers of drinking and driving. The staged accident took place last Tuesday morning in the school district parking lot and featured student volunteers serving as accident victims. EMTs gave first aid to the wounded at the scene and readied them for transportation to the hospital. See next week’s issue of the G-T for the full story.

Egerton abstaining. The chairman cast the deciding vote and the matter will be tabled until the June meeting. Supt. Quick has been on a three year contract – at one point when a past board discussed only approving his contract on a yearly basis, the administrator said he would like to be released to look for another job. At the regular meeting of the board they swore in Dakota Haney as the newest student representative to the board. “Student representatives don’t get to vote on the actual agenda items, but get to give their input,” said Quick. Director Egerton, who also serves as chairman of the Okanogan County Fair Board, gave a report on last year’s fair. He also discussed how the fair board is trying to encourage more school participation from all the school districts in the county. Tori Kindred, a freshmen at Oroville High School, gave a presentation on the recent FBLA conference held in

SEE SCHOOL | PG A3

County Infrastructure Fund may release money again BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - City Planner Kurt Danison announced at the Tonasket City Council meeting Feb. 24 that Okanogan County Commissioners may be ready to release money from the County Infrastructure Fund this year. Seven agencies county-wide have applied for grants from the fund. The Infrastructure Fund takes in money each year through a .09 retail tax rebate set up in 2001 by the state to help economically distressed counties. “When the legislature passed this, they were pretty specific about the money being spent on public facilities necessary for economic development,” Danison said, adding that about 10 years ago it was decided 40 percent of the funds would go for the county to spend on whatever it wanted, the cities would all compete for 40 percent, and the remaining 20 percent would go to emerging opportunities. Danison said the retail tax fund now generates about $500,000 annually, with $100,000 going to the Economic Alliance every year.

Brent Baker/ submitted photos

“There’s always money going out of the fund, but it’s been awhile since any money has been allocated to specific projects,” Danison said. Money going out each month includes a bond payment on three million dollars the county borrowed to build sidewalks, restrooms and post signs around the county. Another payment being made each month is on a loan the county took out to build the sewer out to Veranda Beach. “The initial idea was that as people connected to the sewer would generate revenue to pay the loan back,” Danison said, “but the city is not enforcing properties to connect. Over time the county will get some policies in place and have revenue coming in from the sewer, but for now the loans are paid out of the county infrastructure fund.” Additionally, money goes out of the fund each month to support the Economic Alliance. According to Danison, the agency has been in place for 35 or 40 years, but has always struggled to survive, taking in a small amount of money from the state and some

SEE FUND | PG A2

NV Hospital has $1 million in bank Hospital Administrator Linda Michel placed on paid leave BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital Administrator Linda Michel has been put on paid administrative leave through April 3, 2015. Her last day with the hospital was Thursday, Feb. 26. Michel, whose salary is $176,966 per year, planned to retire in October 2015, before moving that date up to April 3, 2015. Neither Helen Linda Michel Casey, chairwoman of the board of commissioners nor Chief Financial Officer

Helen Verhasselt had any comment as to was important to bring in an outside why Michel was placed on administra- resource as interim until a permanent tive leave. administrator has been selected.” Jim O’Halloran, Meanwhile, retired CEO of Ferry Verhasselt will be the County Hospital, will acting administraserve as the interim “Having someone cme tor. The search for a Administrator startnew administrator is in to lead us through ing April 1 and lastbeing carried out by the way will be the ing until the position a Long Range Focus is filled. O’Halloran Committee made best thing for the will receive a monthly up of board memdistrict. He is highly fixed salary of $10,250, bers Clarice Nelson working on a month qualified and has great and Teresa Hughes; by month contract. Human Resources experience in leader- Director Jan Gonzales; “Having someone come in to lead ship and healthcare.” Verhasselt; Director of us through the way Business Development Helen Casey Chairwoman will be the best thing Terri Orford; Long North Valley Hospital Board for the district,” said Term Care Director Casey. “He is highly Linda Holden; and qualified, and has great community members experience in leadership and healthcare. Don Atchison, Steve Quick, Montie The Board felt that to continue forward Smith and Karen Schimpf. Twenty-nine progress, considering that the Senior applications have been received so far. Leaders have a lot of responsibilities, it The committee will meet March 26

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 09

to discuss the applications, with Skype interviews set for March 30 and 31. Three to five applicants will be selected and brought to the hospital campus the week of April 20th for a “meet and greet” and interviews with the Board of Commissioners, followed by final interviews with the Long Range Focus Committee. The advertised position calls for five to ten years of experience in healthcare administration. The new administrator’s salary is to be determined based on experience. “With naming Jim O’Halloran as our Interim, we will be able to take our time finding a versatile candidate that meets all the qualifications that the community, Medical Staff and Board have established,” said Casey. Director Nelson reported at the Feb. 26 board meeting an interview matrix was complete and available for committee members to review.

FINANCES LOOKING UP Cash on hand for the hospital was

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$807,067 as of Feb. 26. On March 2, Orford reported the hospital having $1 million in the bank. “We have paid off our warrants, and now have $1 million in cash reserves,” Orford stated. “We will be handing out root beer floats tomorrow to our staff and community thanking them for being a part of our success.” Jana Symonds, Director of Patient Financial Services, reported reaching an average daily revenue of $90,165 in the most recent 90-day period. “This is a happy day for me,” said Symonds. “Our departments are doing a good job.” Holden presented survey results from Medicare.gov comparing nursing homes within a 200 mile radius of Tonasket. Of the six nursing homes compared, NVH was the only facility to rate with five of five stars under headings of: Overall, Health Inspections, and Quality Measures. NVH received four of five

Valley Life Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

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Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports Outdoors Obituaries

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2015

Council hears everything from appointments to zoning

“We could qualify for a lot of for almost a year on significant directly under the commission- Customers could choose to go cially with the swath of people changes to the zoning code and ers. Emergency Manager Scott paperless or continue to receive trying to pay their bills on the last grants with a parks and recreation district designation, and hope to have the final document J. Miller’s last day of service was their bills in the mail. day,” said Plumb. The system would cost the city “It’s way more than just a bill this town really needs a pool,” TONASKET - The deadline ready for their March 17 meeting. January 16, 2015. The Emergency “Then a public hearing would Manager will receive $55,000 per a one-time software fee of $2,500, pay system,” said city staff mem- said Jeffko. “I understand the for completion of the US 97 Pedestrian Improvements project take place and a 60 day review year and be responsible for pro- an annual software assurance fee ber Joël Pilkinton. “A customer resistance of the county commishas been extended from March process, so the earliest we would viding emergency management of $375 and a monthly access can log onto Invoice Cloud and sioners when we approach them, see any amendments to the zon- services countywide. Individual fee of $50. Customers would be view their usage over the year, but we want to approach them 30 to Dec. 31, 2015. The project consists of the ing code would be June,” said cities pay into the emergen- charged $2.95 for each electron- they can pay part of their bill at anyway. We have a dedicated sidewalk in Tonasket being Danison, adding that most of the cy management budget, with ic payment they make. The city the beginning of the month and group of people with a wide array extended south past Whistler’s changes involved reformatting Tonasket’s share being $3400 for would also be charged 40 cents for the rest at the end of the month, of talent working on this.” Jeffko said the feasibility study each monthly electronic invoice and they don’t have to trust the and Shannon’s restaurants to the and updating and not necessar- 2015. Mayor Patrick Plumb, who met presentment to each customer. mail to get it there on time. Plus, group chose the municipal corbridge near Legacy Park and the ily changes to the content. “The Veterens’ Memorial; along with zoning code has not had a major with county commissioners last The city currently outsources the they can have reminders emailed poration model, one of three difinstallation of a pedestrian bridge rewrite since it was first adopted week, thanked them for “recog- billing at a cost of about 60 cents right to their phone a week or a ferent models of parks and recrenizing the value of the cities being per invoice. Councilman Olson day ahead of time, so they don’t ation districts set up by the state. to Legacy Park. The delay is due in the early 1960s.” “This model is one where you Changes include the addi- a part of this.” spoke out against purchasing the have to remember to mail in their in part to an environmental classoftware, saying that as someone payments, which would save staff would have very little interacsification summary which origi- tion of an airport zone for the Mayoral Appointments Plumb appointed council who did not intend to use the time in setting up late fees or tion with the state,” said Jeffko. nally required a cultural resource Tonasket Airport. “A lot of county “Most importantly, we would be residents aren’t in favor of any members Jill Vugteveen and service, he would still be charged sending out shut-off notices.” study. Council members decided a able to establish the boundaries Tonasket City Planner Kurt more land use regulations, but in Claire Jeffko as alternates to a portion of the cost. “Maybe if there was a way to more detailed presentation of the of the park and recreation disDanison said the Colville Tribe the case of the airport we need to attend emergency management agreed to have a staff member make sure there are no non-com- meetings in the event he needed put all the expense on the peo- system would be beneficial before trict, a power we would only have from their history department patible uses around the airport. to be absent, in order for Tonasket ple who want the convenience, I making a decision to purchase with this model. This is the most productive model with the least would agree with it,” said Olson. the software. on-site for monitoring during This is a long term approach, to have a vote. amount of paperwork.” Plumb said he values the idea Parks & Rec Study Group The council approved Plumb’s excavation, which would negate looking out for the future of the The park and recreation disregular committee appoint- that money does not have to Council member Jeffko reportthe need for the cultural resource airport,” Danison said. Other changes were recogniz- ments, which remain the same change hands, it would lessen the ed a new Parks and Recreation trict would include the school study. The project is funded in part ing land that is publicly owned as last year, with Scott Olson and possibility of having customers’ Feasibility Study group has district, and would need approxithrough two federal grants; a and used, such as the hospital and Vugteveen on Finance and Capital banking information at city hall, only met twice but have already mately 350 signatures to get put the ballot. district. The hospital the load of city staff. culture Improvements, Vugteveencitizenship and and lighten Transportation Alternative Grant school Our Values: Putting people first •had Outstanding corporate • High performance • Rigorous financial accomplished a lot toward pro- ondiscipline “I wouldn’t be onboard with “I think it would be interesting posing a parks and recreation disand a Surface Transportation previously been zoned business Jeffko on Street/Water/Sewer/ Cemetary/Airport, Olson and to go into city hall and see how trict for the next general election. this if I didn’t think we could win Grant, which requires a $27,000 and the school, private housing. it,” Jeffko said. “We made that change in the Jeffko on Park/Pool/Housing/ much they have to process, espematch from the city. Center/Recreation, “The Legacy Park group has Comprehensive Plan, so we need Youth committed to providing $10,000 to follow through with that in the Dennis Brown and Lois Rice on According to the Mine is the number zoning code,” Danison said. “We Personnel and Rice and Brown on theSafety project, and we applied to one will be adding a use chart that on Public Safety. thepriority County Infrastructure Safety and Health Adminisof Kinross Fund Kettle – stars under staffing. ing unit for the south side of the NVH performs 230-250 endosBill Payments in the Cloud for the remaining $17,000,” said lists potential land uses.” River Buckhorn. In Februtration (MSHA), “Compared to other facilities in clinic to replace one installed in copy proceduresduring per year.the City Clerk Alice Attwood preDanison, who is hoping the proj- Emergency Manager the area, we are doing very well 1979 was approved at a cost of The next NVH Board of time frame of 2011-2013 ary 2015, yet another safeCounty Commissioners have sented information on Invoice ect will be complete in time for and I am very proud of my staff,” $8,286.11. Commissioners meeting is schedreceived three applications for the Cloud Electronic Bill Payment Labor Day Weekend. Engineering there uled were approximately ty milestone was reached A monitor for the Endoscopy for Thursday, March 12 at of the project is contracted position of Emergency Manager. and Presentment to be considered said Holden. Purchase of an air condition- Suite at $9,987.08 was approved. p.m. by our mill site employees, 6,0137 underground mining through Varela & Associates, Inc., The position used to report to for use at City Hall. Purchase of Sheriff Frank Rogers, but that the system would allow customwith a maximum amount payable lost time injuries (year-towhich includes Mill Opresponsibility will be moved ers to pay their bills online with of $40,782.19. date information is not availerations, Mill Maintenance, out the sheriff ’s office with the credit or debit cards, e-checks Zoning Code Changes county creating an emergency or Electronic Check Processing Danison the and Planning able to include in this total). Supply said Chain AdminCommission has been working management department to work (ACH) from customers’ banks. We are extremely proud of istration. Our employees dues from participating busi- Omak’s new Stampede arena. “We need to show there are our employees anddevelopment their achieved the safety milenesses. Five years ago the state “In Okanogan County, about some economic changed the stature regarding 80 percent of the retail sales tax projects around the county dedication to the safety ofthat stone of nine years withuse of the County Infrastructure is generated in the cities, with would benefit,” said Danison. themselves andhastheir coout a Lost Time Incident Funds to include funding local about 50 percent of that comTonasket two applicaeconomic development organi- ing from Omak,” said Danison. tions This submitted; one for a workers. is no small (LTI), meaning that there BY KATIE TEACHOUT was referring to is expected to it was written prior to the BLM zations, with Okanogan County “After the bond payments, loan $17,000 match grant on a sidefeat. walk Please make project sure to has not been an injury that reveal whether or not Okanogan being formed. KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Commissioners agreeing to use payments and other commitimprovement in the County Public Utility District “We need to value the terms $100,000 of the fund annually for ments, the money basically congratulate goes works, and theKettle other forRiva Plug our has resulted in days away WENATCHEE - Linda Coates- #1 is responsible for removing and conditions of the original that purpose. into a saving account and accrues Northwest charging station for er – In Buckhorn employees from Field work in more Enloe A Dam in commemorating the event it is document,” Coates-Markel Markel, Manager of the than big help because nowmill we and overBuckhorn time. There’sMine enough money electric cars. coin the exemplary safety said records“It’s atathe Kettle River decommissioned. on Feb. 9. “The document from can get more work done instead accumulated now that hopeBLM Wenatchee on their “We dedication to safety. 3,000 days. Field ForOffice perspecare a premier area in the was designed Buckhorn’s Principal Mine Engineer, Schneider. “It will take some timeby to find 1918 should be somewhere; we of justJason reported receiving a box of docutrying to stay alive,” said fully the county commissioners country for electric vehicles, and In recognition of achievtive, there were 1,326,183 ments from the Spokane office it—everything in a government need to find it and read it.” Danison, who serves as Chairman will release some of it for the the nearest charging station is in office takes time, we think we Whether or not document Wednesday morning, Feb. 25 that this hours worked during period of but time, which safety milestones, employees Mine met, andthehave now ofexceeded, notable a 17-memberthe board set up to ing seventhese applications county-wide. ” Pateros, ” Danison said. were might have it,” Coates-Markel is in the box remains a mys- oversee the agency. might relate to Enloe Dam. Danison said the last time he The law sunsets in 2021, after would take a single individual about 638 years to tery. achievement going years without a lost each awarded a specially-minted, quarter-ounce Coates-Markelofwas out ofthreeAdditionally, “We think the document might said. a portion of the checked there was about $700,000 which there will be no money Coates-Markel mentioned the the office Tuesday, March 3, money from the county infra- gold commemorating this outstanding acbe achieve. in here,” said Coates-Markel. time incident. in the coin 40 percent portion of the coming into the infrastructure document at the Feb. 9 PUD and is not expected back in until structure fund is set aside for fund the cities compete for. TheInmissing document she fund. complishment. October 2014, employees at the Buckhorn Commissioners meeting, stating Monday, March 9. BY KATIE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Perfection in safety: nine years and counting

NVH | FROM A1

FUND | FROM A1

Dam document still afloat

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Perfection in safety: nine years and counting Safety is the number one According to the Mine Safety and Health Adminispriority of Kinross Kettle – River Buckhorn. In Februtration (MSHA), during the ary 2015, yet another safetime frame of 2011-2013 ty milestone was reached there were approximately by our mill site employees, 6,013 underground mining which includes Mill Oplost time injuries (year-toerations, Mill Maintenance, date information is not availSupply Chain and Adminable to include in this total). istration. Our employees We are extremely proud of achieved the safety mileour employees and their stone of nine years withdedication to the safety of out a Lost Time Incident themselves and their co(LTI), meaning that there workers. This is no small has not been an injury that feat. Please make sure to has resulted in days away congratulate our Kettle Rivfrom work in more than er – Buckhorn employees A coin commemorating the exemplary safety records at the Kettle River mill and Buckhorn Mine 3,000 days. For perspec- was designed by Buckhorn’s Principal Mine Engineer, Jason Schneider. on their dedication to safety. tive, there were 1,326,183 In recognition of achievhours worked during this period of time, which Mine met, and have now exceeded, the notable ing these safety milestones, employees were would take a single individual about 638 years to achievement of going three years without a lost each awarded a specially-minted, quarter-ounce achieve. gold coin commemorating this outstanding actime incident. In October 2014, employees at the Buckhorn complishment.


PAGE A3

MARCH 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Pool fund receives $5000 donation

for this area to have a pool for youth,” said Wilbur-Ellis’s Brock Sutton, who learned to swim at the Tonasket Pool, as did his own children. “It’s important for youth and the community as a whole.” Wilbur-Ellis employees are encouraged to request funds from the company’s Impact Funds, a collection set up to benefit communities Wilbur-Ellis serves. “Sometimes the funds are

divided up, but with this request we got the entire $5,000,” said Sutton. The gift makes a big splash in an account that has grown to $470,000. The cost estimate for an outdoor pool and new bathhouse is between $1 million and $1.5 million. “We have a few families in the area who are pretty serious about this pool being rebuilt, and have made some big donations,” said TSPA Treasurer Karen Stangland. “We are taking pledges if someone is thinking of making a larger donation.” But Stangland is quick to acknowledge the value of even the smallest of donations. “It all adds up,” Stangland said, adding “If someone sees a person who struggles with making their finances stretch making a contribution to the pool, maybe they will think about pitching in also.” Donation jars are placed at both grocery stores as well as II Sisters Video. “If you can afford to drop a dollar in every week, those dollars will really add up,” Stangland said. Donations can also be made in a person’s memory, or as gifts to the person. Stangland said for people to keep their eyes and ears open, as TSPA is planning some fun fundraising functions for this spring and summer.

wssda.org/. The workshop takes place from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Omak School District Board Room, 619 W. Bartlett Ave. Omak , WA 98841 The agenda includes: How to run for office • Navigate the

process of filing • Public disclosure procedures • Campaign limitations • Responsibilities of a school board member • Time requirements • Role and responsibilities • Open Public Meeting• Working as a team.

submitted photo

The Tonasket Swimming Pool Association (TSPA) got a jump on warm weather and spring flowers leading people to thoughts of rebuilding the swimming pool when local agriculture business supplier Wilbur-Ellis made a gift of $5,000. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket Swimming Pool Association (TSPA) got a jump on warm weather and spring flowers leading people to thoughts of rebuilding the swimming pool when local agriculture business supplier Wilbur-Ellis made a gift of $5,000. “There is definitely a need

MCT’S THE PRINCESS AND THE PEA

Katie Teachout/staff photo

Above, Riverdom Princess Noni Alley confers with Pea Stella Crutcher in last Saturday’s Missoula Children’s Theatre production of the Princess and the Pea. Thirty-five Tonasket K-12 students took part in the play, along with assistant directors Allison Glanzer and Gabriel Roach. Left, Riverdom King Dean Keane gets an autograph from Missoula Children’s Theatre Director Andrew Ross between performances Saturday at Tonasket High School. Ross and co-worker Kalin Honaker put the musical production on after just four afternoons of rehearsals with young actors and actresses.

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OROVILLE - The Oroville Gun Club held it’s annual Club Shoot on Sunday, March 1st. Great weather and a good turn out, abundant food and lots of winners. WINNERS OF THE SINGLES: AA Robert McDaniel A Craig Jordon B Randy Cline C Bob Kirkham D George Miklos Veteran Joe Portlance Ladies Linda Field HANDICP WINNERS Craig Jordon shot 45 out of 50 at 21 yards, Robert McDaniels shot 44 out of 50 at 21 yards and Roy Wadkins shot 44 out of 50 at 23 yards. DOUBLES (two clay birds come out at the same time and both need to be shot to score.) A. Noah Olmstead shot 41 out of 50, B. Dick Lamont shot 32 out of 50 and C. Craig Jordon shot 33 out of 50. Next Sunday, March 8, is the Tonasket Club Shoot. On March 22 is the County Shoot held at Oroville Gun Club. Grab your gun and come shoot. See an Oroville member and get some raffle tickets for the Henry Golden Boy .22 rifle. Drawing will be March 22 at the County Shoot.

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Wenatchee (see last week’s G-T). She is running for state president of the organization. “Ir’s really fun to get out of town and meet kids from different states and schools,” she said about the conferences the group has around the state. Her father and club advisor, Tony Kindred, is regional director for the group. “It is because of the support of the district and the principal that FBLA is growing,” he said. “The junior high group is really growing.” School Director Workshop On a school board related note, he Washington State School Directors Association (WSSDA) workshop is coming to Omak on March 18. It is one of 14 workshops that are being offered by WSSDA throughout the state to encourage participation in school board elections. For more information you can visit http://www.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Benito Rojas Reyes, 34, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Nov. 18, 2014 to two counts of first-degree child molestation and two counts of second-degree incest. The court dismissed additional charges of firstdegree rape of a child, first-degree child molestation, intimidating a witness, first-degree incest and second-degree incest. Reyes was sentenced Feb. 24 to 78 months to life in prison and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred between December 2013 and March 2014. Joseph Nathaniel Bowers, 23, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Feb. 18 to third-degree assault, disorderly conduct and obstruction. The court dismissed three additional charges of third-degree assault and one charge of harassment. Bowers was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $600 for the Aug. 24 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Jesse James Ytarte, 32, Okanogan, with two counts of harassment (threats to kill) and one count of second-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 12. The court found probable cause to charge Stephan Dale Moses, 54, Omak, with two counts of POCS: one each for methamphetamine and heroin. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 10, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Daniel August Buckley, 44, Omak, with residential burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 19. The court found probable cause to charge Gloria Marie Mathyer, 51, Twisp, with vehicular homicide, vehicular assault and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred June 7, 2014. Civil The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed Plaza Los Reyes, Tonasket, $4,270.67 in unpaid wages, interest and penalties. The state Department of Revenue assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes, interest and penalties: Martin Contracting, Tonasket, $1,455.25; and M.A. Smith Construction, Oroville, $1,342.52. The state Employment Security Division assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment benefits, interest and penalties: Katie-Lynn Wiseman, Riverside, $212.24; Justin L. Demmitt, Omak, $1,751; Bernice M. Dudonsky, Wauconda, $762.20.

DISTRICT COURT Nicholas Gilbert Andrews, 29, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault and third-degree malicious mischief. Andrews was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,283. Timothy Thom Bailey, 60, Oroville, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Joseph Nathanael Bowers, 23, Tonasket, had a resisting arrest charge dismissed. Lucy Lynn Broken Rope, 51, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Ricky Lewis Bronson II, 34, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Bronson received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Robert Daniel Burris, 29, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS and hit-and-run (unattended property). The court dismissed an additional charge of third-degree DWLS. Burris was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined a total of $858. Darci Lynn Carden, 40, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Carden received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $568. Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 23, Oroville, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Carpenter was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 275 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Derrick James Charley, 21, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Charley was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $508. Joseph William Cook, 28, Okan-

ogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Emmanuel Cortes Gomez, 27, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Feb. 23, 2015 Computer crime on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Automobile theft on Index St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on N. Esther Ave. in Conconcully. Drugs on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Pine Chee Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Crowder Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on S. Main St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Ash St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Apple Lane in Omak. Fraud on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Locust St. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Bicycle reported missing. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Robert Ellis Allen, 31, booked for third-degree DWLS and five FTA warrants: trafficking in stolen property, seconddegree possession of stolen property, third-degree DWLS, obstruction and refusing to comply with an officer’s instruction. Joshua William Combs, 21, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015 Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Trespassing on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Pine Chee Rd. near Oroville. Injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Injuries reported. False report on Temby Rd. near Tonasket. Found property on Hwy. 20 in Okanogan. Bicycle recovered. Domestic dispute on River Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on N. Ash St. in Omak. Game console reported missing. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Columbia St. in Omak. Assault on Temby Rd. near Tonasket. Zaphett Akien Spears, 36, booked on three bench warrants, all for FTP child support. Christopher Scott Milka, 45, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Robert Noel Johnson, 53, booked for violation of an

anti-harassment order. Daniel Dewey Thompson, 38, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Yvonne Delene McMillan, 48, booked for third-degree theft and a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree theft.

Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015 Malicious mischief on N. Country Vue Rd. near Omak. Tires reported flattened. Trespassing on John Peterson Rd. near Omak. Theft on Holder Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Road rage on Riverside Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Injuries reported. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville. Warren William Louie, 49, booked on a warrant for thirddegree malicious mischief (DV). Jose Luis Morenos Ceneros, 45, booked for making false statements. Laura Ann Iukes-McCraigie, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Kevin Michael Clark, 34, DOC detainer. Angelo Ricardo Coy, 29, booked on two counts of violation of a no-contact order. Craig William Wolff, 53, court commitment for DUI. Byron Dean Iukes Jr., 23, DOC detainer.

Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015 Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Threats on S. Main St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Sex offense on Barker Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Copple Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Dry Valley Lane near Tonasket. Trespassing on Ruby Two Moons Rd. near Tonasket. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on S. Birch St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Littering on Deep Bay Rd. near Oroville. Theft on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. DWLS on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Seth Adam Stough, 37, booked for disorderly conduct. Robert O’Dell Peterson, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Theodore Kurtis Storm, 27, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Brandy M. Summers, 38, booked on an FTA warrant for defrauding a public utility.

Friday, Feb. 27, 2015 Warrant arrest on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Viewmont Dr. in Okanogan.

Warrant arrest on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Treats on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Harassment on Barker Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Ferry St. in Omak. Radio reported missing. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Harassment on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Structure fire on Kay St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, booked on an FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Rodrigo Villafana Sanchez, 29, booked on a Tribal FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. Cara Ann Campbell, 28, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for third-degree theft. Miguel Angel Hernandez Cruz, 18, booked on an FTC warrant for theft of a motor vehicle. Mark Anthony Yingling, 31, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for theft of a motor vehicle. Chad David Buckmiller, 34, booked for felony harassment and second-degree criminal trespassing.

Saturday, Feb. 28, 2015 Assault on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Broser Way near Tonasket. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Public intoxication on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Oak St. in Omak. Fence boards reported missing. Custodial interference on Jasmine St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on E. Seventh Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Grainger Ave. in Omak. William Keaton Jr., no middle name listed, 66, booked for second-degree assault (DV). Jacob Weller, no middle name listed, booked for fourthdegree assault and seconddegree negligent driving. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 21, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Tyler Lee Shelton, 24, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for POCS.

Sunday, March 1, 2015 Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near

Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Stampede Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Stepfanie Danielle Ytuarte 25, booked on three FTA warrants: two for third-degree DWLS and one for defrauding a public utility. Stacy Lea Rodriguez, 49, booked on six counts of forgery and one count of third-degree theft.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Washington State Patrol hosts Kiwanis Youth Law Enforcement Career Camp SUBMITTED BY CAPTAIN ROB HUSS WSPGOVERNMENT AND MEDIA RELATIONS

OLYMPIA - Washington State high school juniors and seniors with an interest in law enforcement as a career will have an opportunity to spend a week this summer learning about the roles and job opportunities within law enforcement. Applications are currently being accepted for the 38th Annual Washington State - Kiwanis Youth Law Enforcement Camp to be held at the Washington State Patrol Academy in Shelton from July 19 through July 25, 2015. Applications can be downloaded from the State Patrol’s Home Page, wsp.wa.gov, under “Outreach.” The application deadline is May 9, 2015 The purpose of the camp is to provide selected high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to explore various job opportunities in the law enforcement field. Students are given a hands-on experience on the WSP drive-course and tactical firing range and will get to work with forensics, SWAT, communications, K-9 and many police functions. Additionally, students will have exposure to law enforcement problems and challenges officers encounter on a daily basis and to show how to successfully handle situations in a professional manner. Police departments from around the state provide officers as staff members to instruct and serve as counselors. Guest speakers from various agencies provide first-hand information to the students. This gives the students a variety of experiences and exposure to federal, state, county and local law enforcement as a possible career path. Many students who attend this week-long camp go on to have careers in the criminal justice field. This camp is sponsored and paid for by Washington Kiwanis clubs statewide in addition to corporate and private sponsors.

Out on the Town...

D&E

Dining &

Entertainment

Eva‛s Diner & Bakery

NOW SERVING DINNER!

OPEN: 7 days a week!

Tues. - Sat., 4 to 8 p.m.

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

7-8:30pm Contact Gloria Flora at: glora@s-o-solutions.org To learn more about Biochar visit: www.biochar-us.org or simply scan the QR code

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Ph. (509) 476-3266

712 14th Ave., Oroville

Bonaparte Lake Resort & Restaurant

Prime Rib every Sat.

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050


MARCH 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Net Neutrality, why we should all care

The FCC recently voted to preserve Net Neutrality, taking away the ability of the big internet providers to monopolize the information highway – selling the fast lanes to the biggest bidders and blocking traffic for those who won’t pay their tolls. Why should we care? Perhaps the biggest reason is that these big providers could decide what you can and can’t do on the internet. Let say that you, like a lot of people, have cut the cord, at least when it comes to cable (or satellite) television. Instead you get streaming content off the net – say through Netflix or one of a tiny few other similar services. Without Net Neutrality the new rules, according to the New York Times, would “allow companies like Disney, Google or Netflix to pay Internet service providers like Comcast and Verizon for special, faster lanes to send video Out of and other content to their customers.” That My Mind might sound good, but it stifles innovation and Gary A. DeVon competitors to these already established services – start-ups that don’t have the bank accounts of a Disney, Google or Netflix, will be priced out of the market and we could find ourselves back where we were before things like Netflix, at the mercy of content providers who could in turn demand higher and higher fees - kind of where we were before. That’s just one example, the Internet was designed to be a level playing field for all users, consumers, innovators, activists, artists, businesses and everyone between. But the new rules that were proposed amounted to a playing field that was permanently tilted in favor of a handful of gigantic corporations, according to DemandProgress.org which ran a grassroots campaign to stop the big ISPs Internet grab. The FCC voted 3-2 in favor of Chairman Tom Wheeler’s proposal to regulate ISPs as utilities. Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson said the proposal adopted includes new rules prohibiting ISPs from blocking content or charging content providers for preferential treatment such as speedier service and thereby creating unequal access to digital fast lanes. “This is a critical decision for consumers, businesses and the future of the Internet,” said the AG. “Net neutrality is essential to a healthy economy. It promotes fair market competition by promoting consumer choice and creating a level playing field for businesses. I commend the Commission’s determination to maintain the Internet as an open and equal space for creativity, commerce and expression for all.” Comcast and other ISPs who objected to Net Neutrality on a purely greedy basis didn’t just sit back on their millions though. Comcast shoveled almost $3 million into Congress in 2014—and they tried to get back what they paid for. Within days of FCC Chairman Wheeler coming out strongly for Net Neutrality and Title II reclassification (giving the FCC the clear authority to protect Net Neutrality) Comcast’s allies in Congress started trying to cut off the FCC at the knees. Congressmen Fred Upton and Greg Walden introduced legislation to block Net Neutrality. Guess who Fred Upton’s biggest campaign contributor was in 2014? Comcast. And the second biggest donor to Greg Walden’s campaign? Also Comcast. Cable industry lobbyists will do whatever it takes to stop Net Neutrality – because if they can, it will mean massive profits. The cable industries first strategy is to get the FCC to create gaping Net Neutrality loopholes allowing them to prioritize big corporations and dump the rest of us onto an Internet slow lane. If that fails, they’ll try to get their friends in Congress to overrule any strong FCC rule. So, we consumers have to keep an eye on Congress and any attempt to pay back their big donors by making legislation that guts Net Neutrality and favors the big ISPs over consumers, businesses, innovators, creative people and all those who demand a fair playing field.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Funding for DHS Threatened by terrorists outside as well as within

Dear Editor, Last week’s newspaper cartoon about the longshoreman slow down and the loss to fruit growers and the letter to the editor by Marcus Alden about the urgent need to fund the Department of Homeland Security are a perfect comparative example of how the taxpayers are held hostage by growing government. The DHS didn’t exist until 2001 and now, since its birth by Bush it has bought under the DHS “umbrella” who knows how many other departments that used to function on their own. The ongoing story line of these departments that “urgently need money now” has been worn out for decades. This has become the game of who can get the most attention by threatening the peace and safety of those who pay for, or at least try to pay for these services. Bending the taxpayer over the “barrel of the next urgent need,” or else a shopping mall may get blown up, or your produce won’t get to market on time, is our government‘s version of Jeopardy. We are stuck trying to feed the” beast” that gives us the idea that it is there to serve and protect us while threatening to eat us is the “political chess” game. Our solution has been to throw money at the problem, which brings up the question; does anyone know how much money is requested by DHS for this year’s budget?

If DHS can spend $431 million on a radio system that one out of 400 employees knows how to use and $200 million on screening technology to scan ships at cargo terminals that didn’t work, what is needed this year? Does our peace and safety come from our presumed ability to fund an agency that can paddle through money faster than we can fathom? Psalm 127: 1-2 gives us a homeland security warning that used to be in effect in this nation, but due to the growing cultural hostility to anything “God” and the arrogant attitude of “we got this” it seems we are threatened by terrorism from outside the country as well as from within. So my suggestion is, let’s make sure that Barney Fife has the one bullet for his gun, and leave the rest up to God. Steve Lorz Tonasket

Enloe Dam Commissioners take the reins of the PUD

Dear Editor, On Monday, Feb. 9, the run-away stagecoach of PUD spending felt new firm hands on the reins, slowing the team’s rush to electrify old Enloe Dam. It was thoughtful open-eyed consideration of the facts on the table. It was new leadership. Ratepayers throughout the county have been paying steadily increasing electric rates

to support the borrowing necessary to fund large capital projects like hydro-electrification at Enloe Dam. We simply cannot afford it. Commissioners Houston and Vejraska delivered on their promises to the ratepayers. They recognized the numbers spelled double danger for the utility. The “No on Enloe“ Campaign couldn’t agree more. Commissioners Houston and Vejraska have acted in the public interest by voting 2 to 1 against electrification. Applying for a time extension from FERC allows other options to come forward. Some ratepayers believe an outside utility or large contractor exists, willing to take on electric generation at Enloe Dam in pursuit of profit. Those utilities will look very closely at the low yield and high cost of this hydroelectric energy production. A more everlasting and valuable outcome would be the restoration of the Similkameen to a wild scenic river. Once the PUD makes the wise decision to abandon electrification we can roll up our sleeves and get to work. We can write the grants to save the old powerhouse as a Historic Learning and Visitor Center. We could share the story of the salmon, the steelhead and the life and culture of indigenous people living on the Similkameen. We could teach the local history, the powerhouse, the mining and the railroad days All these subjects are of great public interest. A new suspended cable footbridge, connecting powerhouse to the new camping areas, would be amazing to walk on again. Let’s make it happen. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

Taxation vexation “A democracy... can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves money from the public treasure. From that moment on the majority always votes for the candidates promising [the voter] the most [unearned] money from the public treasury.” - Alexander Tyler 1750 OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER SOCIOPOLITICAL COMMENTATOR

Let’s hope Alex was wrong – we are technically a republic, not a democracy – but comforting evidence with which to refute Alex is hard to come by these days, especially since US makers got outvoted by US takers in 2012. The ‘free stuff’ party ‘triumphed’ again. Granted, the makers kicked fanny in the 2014 mid-terms, but it’s proved token. No leadership exists even in a Republican led Bill Slusher House and Senate to stop workers from being taxrobbed by a powerful presidency intent on bribing taker votes with ever more free stuff, including indiscriminate free citizenship. America got by without income taxation until 1862 when such taxation became necessary to ensure the South’s great agriculture riches remained in the Union. Slavery is often confused as being the ‘cause’ of the Civil War but had not the ag riches been the dominant factor even Lincoln would never have written the Emancipation Proclamation. Yet no one reasonably pretends we can get along without taxation, for life in any nation has costs. Still, taxation in America soon became Frankentax. It morphed from a correct means of funding defense, public protection (from crime and fire), and infrastructure (roads, bridges, hospitals, schools, etc.) to one giant

legislative cattle-prod for politicians to engineer public behavior to suit politicians. Now we sure seem to have reached Alex’s tipping point where liberal American government promises ever more free stuff (and unearned citizenship) in exchange for the free stuff votes to keep it in power. All the while it cleverly shifts the annoying burden of actually paying the free stuff bills to conservative government to soak up voter wrath and invective for. America’s liberals have discounted all the legitimate reasons for taxation. They’ve demeaned defense, cut its funding, and they serve the all volunteer military at a rate of 1 to every 23 non-liberals. They have mounted nationwide smear campaigns to demean police and alienate them with manufactured racial animus. They talk about infrastructure but it rings louder as purchasing votes from their public sector, education and manufacturing unions with money taken from defense. (Without security, international and domestic, all else surely is moot.) They even hide with vicious, contrived, anti-corporate propaganda the fact that unions purchase more political power than corporations, Citizens United notwithstanding. What’s a nice country to do? Well, I must first state the obvious. No administration since before Eisenhower has ever called me wanting advice. Roosevelt (Franklin, not Teddy!) was on his death bed when I was born. If Truman called, I was too young to share my brilliance. Different factions will offer creative explanations of this amazing oversight. Regardless, it seems to me that the place to start is to put taxation back where it belongs, that is to a means of funding minimal government. Defense, public safety and infrastructure. We must denude taxation of its obscene abuse by rulers to cattle-prod free citizens into doing government’s will, usually enriching and entrenching... rulers.

Then we must make... everyone... pay. No one rides for free, for it is this ‘inequality’ of contribution, far more than economic or racial disparity, that stirs unrest in America. There will of nature always be conflict between they (of any group) who have the finite fruits of their labor hijacked to bribe votes from they (of any group) who ride for free. Legitimate support as minimally necessary to protect the poor is one thing. Cultivating an ever more comfy parasite voter plantation in blatant pretext of helping the poor is far yet another. A flat tax is key here. With a flat tax everyone pays a small uniform percentage added to whatever they buy. This way, everyone pays their ‘fair share.’ Anyone - working citizens, loafers, illegal aliens, rich, poor, corporations, politicians, churches, universities, ‘non-profits’ (like the immensely profitable NAACP and ACLU), drug cartels (and all other criminals), foreigners in America, foreign corporations, foreign criminals in America - anyone who buys ... anything ... in America (except exempted food, education, medical care and housing) pays the same fixed sales tax percentage. But... no other tax... of any description. Flat tax is often slurred as regressive - harder on the poor than the rich - but it is no less wrong than income secure politicians levying ever higher taxes on ever dwindling, already tax-robbed workers. Moreover, flat tax is progressive as the poor pay less because they buy less, and the rich pay more because they buy more. Corporations pay most. One thing seems sure. More of the Obamaand-company drift toward unearned, ‘income redistribution’ communism is doomed to fail as all same before it has. William Slusher’s latest bipartisan political comedy, is CASCADE CHAOS or, How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. He may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2015

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Buttercups and Daylight Savings coming up Into March, Daylight Savings time will end on the 8th and spring will be welcomed on the 20th and buttercups have been found. This time reported to me by Joan Thorndike. Usually Betty Roberts gets that honor, and I suspect she also has found some, but just didn’t call. Anyway, the little waxy petaled beauties are so welcomed. Little bouquets of forsythia and pussy willows remind us that we are so much luckier than folks on the East coast. Also Joan reported that her pet? moose, Bullwinkle, had been found in a nearby orchard, apparently shot. Now who would do that and why? Marco Louback, who is like a son to us, from Brazil, whom we had as an exchange student, for nine years, a lot of years ago, moved back to the Boston area, right in the middle of the worst winter on record. From warm sunshine

New legislation has potential to increase nursing home costs THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

to seven feet of snow...wow! We have the sunshine, but not so much warmth, yet. I love the sunshine, but Oh! the dirty windows that show up. What a big lot of friends, and relatives were on hand last week at the Catholic Church for the memorial/funeral service of Jean Harden Jacobs. It was mentioned, by family, that a huge adjustment surely had to be made when Jean moved from the East Coast (Philadelphia) to little ‘ole Oroville, but she always seemed very content. Or, just maybe she was so busy taking care of her family, she didn’t have time to get “homesick.” This, we do know, she will be greatly missed by many. Hazel (Lenton) Dezellem, has joined the list of folks taking a fall. At this time she is in Brewster where a son and his family are looking after her needs. She is a very independent lady, so it will be

NURSING HOME NEWS

There is legislation currently under discussion in the State House Health Care Committee that will not be helpful to our Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF or Nursing Home). It is House Bill 1784 (HB1784), a bill that will establish staffing standards, which in turn will increase costs. The costs will impact Medicaid funds that are already not covering our costs for care. Medicaid payment rates in Washington State are ranked in the bottom 5 states in the nation. Even with this low rate most Washington SNFs have quality, direct care staffing which exceed the national average. Our Administrative Team decided we can control our direct care staff ratio up to 3.75 hours per day (HRPD) for each resident. We try hard to keep enough staff available to provide the care our seniors deserve. This is one of the reasons we are recognized as a “5 Star” facility*.” Those hours are calculated in staffing schedules for Nursing Assistants

(NAC) and Licensed Nurses. Each NAC cares for eight to 10 residents during the day and evening, with fewer staff working through the night. The new legislation reads that each nursing home must have 3.6 hours by 2019, so we are ahead of that curve. This ratio contributes to the cost and our current Medicaid shortfall. It is felt it would not be safe to use less staff with the high acuity of our residents. Another portion of the bill reads that a Registered Nurse (RN) must be present around the clock. While that may be for perceived improved safety, there is a statewide nursing shortage that is well known. Our nursing home has Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) coverage for the night shift. Switching to an RN will be more costly and further increase our losses. We have confidence in our experienced LPNs with additional backup from the Hospital. Unfortunately the legislation outlines a plan to fine

Help out the Hilstads on March 7 and 21

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

There is going to be a Benefit Dinner and Auction on Saturday, March 7 at 5 p.m. at the Eagles in Oroville. This will be a a Ranch-style Chili Feed at $5 per person, $20 per family 5+. Ted and Renee Hilstad need your help. Ted and Renee have spent most of their lives in the Molson Chesaw area. They have been an integral part of our community, always quick to help others in need. Now they need your help. Ted was recently diagnosed with can-

Benefit Dinner/ Auction for Montanye SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

It won’t be long before some spring clothes come out of drawers and winter things are put away. The FFA dinner was outstanding 200 Steaks were served. (Way to go). A reminder for the Benefit Dinner/Auction on Saturday, March 7 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. All proceeds will go to Jordan Montanye that will help with medical expenses. Karaoke to follow with Linda Wood. On Saturday, March 14 is the Annual Crab Feed from 5:pm – 7:pm. Clams and ham are also

cer. He will be facing surgeries as well as chemotherapy and radiation. The medical bills will be huge and this family urgently needs your help. Please come to support this family in need by attending the Chili Feed and Auction. Auction items and donations will be gladly accepted. For information contact Kathy Noel at 509-476-2300, Denise Edwards at 509-560-3301 or Angela Larson at Angela@724Group.com. You may drop off auction items at Java Junkie. The next BINGO night at the Grange Hall in Molson will be on Friday, March 6 at 7 p.m. Bring

interesting to see how long he keeps her Gerald and John when they celebrated out of her home in Oroville. She spent a their 80th birthdays. I am not a fan of Abacrombe & Fitch lot of years teaching school in Brewster stores, but they should be so maybe she’ll be able to able to hire who they want see some of the friends she’s for their sales clerks and also been out of touch with, but have some say so about the meanwhile we’ll be missing attire they wear to work, just her on this end. like other business people At a later date I have should. learned Hazel broke her And, how about the scare ankle and will have to have a tactic’s, (I hope they are just cast on for a few weeks. scares) being reported about Friends and classmates the large shopping malls will be sad to learn of the being threatened with attack. death of Charlie Pickle. That That is getting too close for word comes from Laura Jean THIS & THAT Joyce Emry comfort. Worthington. Do you ever find yourself What a nice article by the laying out way more things new reporter, Katie Teachout, covering Tonasket, did on the Atwoods. to do, than is possible for you to do, Of course it would be difficult not to do since you move so much slower than so, as they have had so many interesting in yonder years? But, I got the cookthings in their life. Now, there is one ies done. Of course, it would probably thing that will be new to them and that help if I’d say no to a game of cards (or is being the Royalty for Founders Day maybe get up earlier). Another thing that “bugs” me, about parade. An honor indeed! Another death reported is that of me, is that at a gathering, such as Jean Gerald Oakes, Tonasket. Not as happy as Jacobs funeral, and seeing folks that what I just recently reported of the twins, I’ve known for years, but can’t think of

facilities that are found to be non-compliant. The Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS, which is also the department that oversees Medicaid) will be the agency responsible for reviewing data collected on staffing, turnover rates, injuries, resident falls and pressure sores, medication errors, payroll records and other quality indicators. DSHS will cite SNFs for deficiencies, and penalize them with fines ranging from $10,000 a month or more depending on the findings. We urge you to write your legislators and oppose House Bill 1274 (HB1274). Washington State cannot have the unrealistic expectation of maintaining one of the highest staffing ratios in the nation while remaining among the bottom 5 states in the nation for Medicaid reimbursement. There is a more positive bill we will discuss in future news. Thanks for reading and please plan to attend one of our forums; March 18, at 7 PM at the Tonasket Community Church or March 25, at 7 PM at the Oroville United Methodist Church *Nursing Home Compare http://www.medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare your friends and families. The more that attend will make the pay back bigger. Don’t forget to help Ray Visser celebrate his 90th Birthday on Saturday, March 14 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Please come to the Immanuel Lutheran Church Parish Hall in Havillah. Please no gifts, but cards are welcome. Light snacks and birthday cake will be served. For more information call Rae at 509-485 2347. There will be a second Benefit for Ted and Renee Hilstad on Saturday, March 21 at the Molson Grange at 5 p.m. for $15 per person. The Menu will include a ham and scalloped potatoes dinner with all the trimmings and apple crisp and ice cream for dessert. There will also be a silent auction and live music provided by the Wilder Band. Be sure to bring your dancing shoes to finish off the evening.

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

The big, luscious strawberry drips with melted chocolate. Its firm flesh gives way to your teeth and juice rushes into your mouth as you bite into it, overwhelming your senses with the sweet tart flavor of strawberry mellowed with chocolate. As the strawberry slides down your throat and you lick the last remnants of chocolate from your fingers you look around the room. At one end of the room is a table laden with meats, their tantalizing aromas tickling your nostrils. Another table holds crisp, colorful and fresh vegetables. In the center of the room stands a table heaped with breads and salads. Tucked into a corner is a table with chips and other crispy tidbits. Another is piled with fruits. On each table rest several pots brimming with sauces. Savory, sweet, spicy, some with ethnic flavors borrowed from around

Celebrating St. Patrick’s Day with card party SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

We will be celebrating St. Patrick’s day with Pinochle and Bridge, followed by a late “desert.” That’s Tuesday, March 17, at 2 p.m. Bingo will be cancelled that day. On Saturday, March 14th, we will be serving breakfast between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Mark your calendar. March 14. Tillie Porter will be starting computer classes in March. We will keep you posted. At the County Senior Citizens Association, the Delegates are having another meeting on Friday, March 20, at the Okanogan

THE LEARNING TREE the world and all of them awaiting your choice of morsels for dipping. If this sounds delicious, NVCS has just the treat for you! Save the date. Coming up on Sunday, March 22 is the NVCS annual Fondue Dinner. The Fondue Dinner is a complete meal so be sure to bring your appetite! This event will be graciously hosted by Esther Bricques Winery, 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. Tickets are available at the door for $10 per person, $5 for children under 12. This is a fundraiser for North Valley Community School, further donations are welcome. In the upcoming week NVCS would like to offer the following classes:

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Senior Center at 10 a.m. Roberta Cole is at home now. So I hear. She had a steel pin installed to put her broken femur back together, and also a new knee joint. Pray for her speedy recovery. Our thoughts and prayers are requested for Hazel, who broke her ankle. Also for Beverly, that her head injury heal speedily. Nominations are open for Senior Citizen of the Year for Oroville. This is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. If you have someone you want to nominate, contact Betty Steg or Raleigh Chinn, our nominations

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

TONASKET EAGLES available. Crab and Clams, $32., Crab only $22., Clams only $10. and Ham $10. Our bartenders will be more than happy to sell you tickets. Get them early as they will go fast. All proceeds will go towards Scholarships for the Tonasket High School. This event is open to the public. The Joker Poker is not far from being won, so come in Saturday and get your tickets $1 each, must be present to win drawing at 7 p.m. You could win half of $3043. Don’t forget Breakfast on Sundays

from 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. a great meal for little money. If anyone is interested there is a Spring Conference in Toppenish, Wash. Aerie #2229 on Saturday, March 21 starting at 10 a.m. for more information call 509-865-2229. Pinochle scores are as follows: first place Ted Zachman, second place Dave Russell, Low Score to Joann Michels and Last Pinochle went to Jerilyn Green & Gladys Fifer. We are saddened by the passing of Gerald Oaks he was a long time member of the Aerie. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

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Fondue fundraiser for Community Schools March 22

their name. But at midnight it sometimes comes to me. Last week I couldn’t go to sleep thinking about a name and it was way past midnight, and I finally got up and looked until I found it in the phone book. Well, the time has come that our good friend, Bob Hirst has made the move into Tonasket Care Center. He and Margaret have discussed this at length, and it seems the decision, difficult as it was, was necessary. So, folks, stop in and see him. He likes to visit and he has has more “tall tales” to share with you, than you can ever imagine. He has three good buddies, that are going to be devastated, when Bob is no longer at home, because it will be impossible to make them understand, as they are three of man’s best friends, his dog companions. One, absolutely doesn’t leave his side. A call from Darleen (Kidwell) Owyen in Idaho, to notify of the death of one of her classmates, Charles Pickle. It was so good to chat with her. How about those Lady Hornets basketball standings? They finished, in a blaze of glory, and let’s hope they do well as they travel to the playoffs.

Call this Newspaper for Details

for the holidays, callforor today. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible a statevisit tax deduction or credit in certain states for those residents. Omak, WA 98841 plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, 509-826-1638 Sandra Rasmussen family members and theSandra child.* Rasmussen

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Play Around with the Crickut on Saturday March 7 at 10 a.m.. This class will cover the basics of using a crickut machine. Bring your crickut, cartridges, and scrapbook paper! Beginning Drop Spindle on Monday, March 9 at 6 p.m. Turn wool into yarn! This class will show you how to prepare raw wool using hand carders and a drum carder to prepare the wool, then turn it into yarn using a drop spindle. Many people in our area raise sheep. Come learn how to make use of the wool! Family Tree on Tuesday, March 10 at 6:30 p.m.. My family tree grows nothing but nuts, and I’m pretty sure this one is cracked. How about yours? Not sure? Come learn how to find out! Physical Wellness on Thursday March 12 at 6 p.m.. Forget magic pills! Avoid the side effects and learn how to take simple steps to be healthier and meet your physical wellness goals, naturally. To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or visit our website at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. committee. Has anyone noticed how the women outnumber the men on the executive board? (6 to 2) I’ve noticed that this is also the case during our business meetings, and also during our fund raisers, and work parties. Let this be my challenge to all those senior men out there, be brave, step up to the plate and join in. (Senior men, the new minority. Hear us roar!) Pinochle report: Door Prize, Jim Fry; Most Pinochles, Barb Cline; Men’s High, Jim Fry; Women’s High, Judy Ripley.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

wIld ThUrs-Fri marCh 5-6.

shOwTimes On Fri. aT 7:00 & 9:15pm

FIFty SHadES OF grEy saT. - TUes. marCh 7-10. saT. 7:00pm-9:30pm

takEn 3 ThUrs.-Fri. marCh 12-13. shOwTimes On Fri. aT 7:00 & 9:100pm

SpOngEBOB: SpOngE

OUt OF watEr saT.-sUn.-mOn.-TUes., ThUrs-Fri. marCh 14-15-16-17,19-20

OMAK THEATER Omak and mirage TheaTers are nOw digiTal

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

MCFarland USa

pg

129 min drama/spOrT sTarring kevin COsTner, maria bellOw, ramirO rOdrigUez. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT.*3:00,6:00, 9:00. sUn. *3:00, 6:00. mOn-ThUrs. 6:30

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

UnFInISHEd BUSInESS

91min

COmedY sTarring vinCe vaUghn, dave FranCO, TOm wilkinsOn. Fri. 6:45, 9:45. saT. 3:45, 6:45, 9:45. sUn. 3:45, 6:45. mOn-ThUrs. 6:45

FOCUS

104 min

r

r

COmedY / Crime / drama . sTarring will smiTh, margOn rObbie, rOdrigO sanTOrO. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT. *3:30, 6:30, 9:30, sUn. *3:30, 6:30. mOn - ThUrs. 6:30

BIrdMan COmedY / drama

r

119 min sTarring miChael keaTOn, edward nOrTOn, emma sTOne. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT. * 3:30, 6:30, 9:30.

tHE IMItatIOn gaME

113 min

pg13 biOgraphY / drama / Thriller sTarring benediCT CUmberbaTCh, keira knighTleY, maTThew gOOde sUn. *3:45,6:45. mOn.-ThUrs. 6:45

Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


MARCH 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR Oroville Chamber of Commerce OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce will have a general meeting on Thursday, March 5 at America’s Family Grill at 1 p.m. The meeting is open to all, but the organization will be conducting official Chamber business in the presentation of by-law changes, budget and voting on directors.

Weed Control Recertification OKANOGAN The Okanogan County Noxious Weed Control Board will be holding a Recertification Class on Thursday, March 5 in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room, 123 Fifth Ave. North, Okanogan. Class size is limited to 75 people so pre-register. The class will be from 8 a.m. to 11:50 a.m., topics are: Herbicide Control Options for Pasture and Rangeland Weeds; WSDA Licenses & Endorsements; Weedy Grasses Who’s Who and Conventional Orchard Weed Control There will be a $5 charge for the class, and 4 pesticide license credits will be available. For more information call the Noxious Weed Office at 509422-7165 or stop by Room 102 in the County Courthouse or see www.okanogancounty.org/nw/.

TIRE RECYCLING & DISPOSAL EVENT OROVILLE - There will be a free Tire Recycling and Disposal event on Saturday and Sunday, March 14 and 15. Drop off of personal regular and passenger truck tires off the rims (no oversized tractor or heavy equipment tires) between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. at the north parking lot of Oroville High School. This is a Senior Project of Steven Maupin and Trevor Shearer and is being done in cooperation with Okanogan County Public Health District, Washington State Department of Ecology, Tire Disposal and Recycling, Inc. and Oak Harbor Freight Admission. Snacks and drinks $1 each. Proceeds benefit Oroville Public Library.

Space Blues Band at Tonasket CCC TONASKET - The Outer Space Blues Band is coming to the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, on Saturday, March 7 at 7 p.m. This is a Rockin’ Blues, danceable, high energy group consisting of local musician members: Steve Sher, Christina Del Rosario, Larry Hutchison, Tim Alley, and Quill Hyde. Cost of this event is $7 for members, $8 for the general public with children under 10, free. Call 509-486-1328 for more information.

Nuance to Perform at Winery Honor Flight OROVILLE – “Nuance,” a Nacho Feed newer instrumental trio, will open the month of March performances at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday evening, March 5. Walt Gilbert, Sam Howell, and Scott Teagarden will perform primarily on guitar, clarinet, and percussion. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Okanogan County Genealogical Society OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Genealogical Society will have their monthly meeting on March 5, at 2 p.m. at the Wilson Research Center, 1410 N. 2nd Ave., Okanogan. Phil Brown will share information about “Midwifery Health Care in our County in the Early 1900s.” Visitors welcome.

Stream Ecology Presentation TONASKET - The Okanogan Highlands Association is presenting another in their Highlands Wonders series on Friday, March 6 at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket (CCC), 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, WA, 98855. Freshwater ecologist and emeritus professor, Dr. Mark Oswood, will cover the basics of stream ecology, with perspective on the inner workings of streams, including functional feeding groups, sources of energy, and riparian ecology. “No bugs, no fish!” Presentation at 6:30 pm is free; dinner at 5:15 pm is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. More info at http://www.okanoganhighlands. org/education/hw.

Hilstad Benefit Dinner OROVILLE - There will be a dinner and auction to benefit Ted and Renee Hilstad on Saturday, March 7 at 5 p.m. at the Oroville Eagles Hall. The menu will be Ranch-style Chili and fixings and the auctioneer will be Ken Neal. The public is encouraged to come on in and support their neighbors.

It’s Showtime 2015 OROVILLE - It’s Showtime 2015! at Vickie’s Backdoor is Saturday, March 7. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Live music this week by Slippery Slope. Free

CHEWELAH - The 6th Annual Inland Northwest Honor Flight Nacho Feed will be held on Saturday, March 7 at the Chewelah American Legion from 5 p.m. until it’s gone. The dinner is by donation and hosted by 14-year-old Justin Peterson (grandparents are from Oroville) who is still raising money for the organization. He asks to please honor our Inland Northwest WWII, Korean War and terminally ill Veterans by helping to send them to Washington D.C. to see the memorials built in their honor. Generous donations have helped him to raise over $86,000 for our Heroes. Call 509-6702322 with any questions. Visit www.jp4vets.com or Jp4vets/ Facebook for more info.

OCTA Monthly Meeting OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) will hold their Public Board Meetings the second Monday of every month. The next Board Meeting will be held at our office, 307 S. Main #4, Omak, WA 98841 at 6 p.m. on March 9, 2015. Please visit our website at www.okanogantransit. com

Blues, Jazz and Show tunes. The event takes place at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 5800 1115th Street in Osoyoos. Tickets available at Imperial Office Supply in Osoyoos or at the door. For more information see www. osoyoosarts.

SOAP Presents ‘Melville Boys’ OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 pm. For ticket information, please check out http://www.soplayers.ca/melville-boys.html

Applications for Habitat Home OMAK - A new Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity home is going to be built in Omak, There will be a public meeting on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, March 28th, at 2 p.m. at the Cornerstone Christian Fellowship Church at Riverside and Locust Street in Omak for those interested in qualifying for this home. You must attend one of the two public meetings to get an application. The selection criteria are: (1) need for adequate shelter, (2) lived in the area for at least one year, (3) able to make monthly house payments of approximately $500 to $600 a month, which includes taxes and insurance and (4) willingness to partner during building process.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Chief Joseph Rock Oroville Food Bank & Mineral Club OKANOGAN - 2015 marks 50 years of the Chief Joseph Rock & Mineral Club. First 2015 meeting and no-host dinner will be Wednesday, March 11 at the Okanogan Eagles. Dinner at 5:30 p.m., meeting at 6:30 p.m. Guests welcome. Club purpose.1 Promote the education of mineralogy and geology 2. Encourage the collecting of rocks and minerals 3. Provide field excursions to mineral collecting areas 4. promote interest in lapidary work.

NCW RC&D Meeting CHELAN - The North Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council (NCW RC&D) will hold a public meeting on Wednesday, March 11, from 11 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. in Chelan City Hall, 135 E. Johnson, Chelan WA. Questions, contact Chris Branch chrisb.oroville@nvinet.com or call 509421-0475.

Dock Side Drive OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Dock Side Drive a music event on Thursday, March 12 at 7:30 p.m. This popular swing and show band features Swing,

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

St. Patrick’s Day Dinner, March 14

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

support our neighbors in their time of need. Our ladies of the Auxiliary will do a St. Patrick’s Day dinner on Saturday, March 14, at 5 p.m. They will serve a full-menu pulled pork dinner with proceeds going toward the Easter Egg Hunt. We now have lunch available every week day from 12 noon to

There will be a dinner and auction on March 7th at 5 p.m. to benefit Ted and Renee Hilstad. The menu will be ranch-style chili and fixin’s and our auctioneer will be Ken Neal. We are expecting a big turn-out, so you might want to get there early. Come on in and

2 p.m. and the banquet room is open to the public. Come on in and give our Soup-n-Sandwiches a try. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Wednesday is Pool League and Burgers. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050 Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 5, 2015

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

Announcements

Help Wanted

CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475 month. Call 509-223-3433

Public Notice Substantial development court ordered hijack of Hwy 20E. Dangerous driveway is now a road no permits needed. Site will not pass sight distance requirements or floodplain issues. It’s been 10 years since the courts cut the chain on the gate and tried to bring in 60+ homes. I removed the red tagged bridge. I’m in debt $75,000. I no longer own my home and have a permanent protection order by the driving public not to interfere. The courts proclaimed that no permits are needed. Permit #4078 is now a trailhead for anyone to use. The D.O.T. fears the courts and you should also. Their permit system is dysfunctional by design-court ordered. Public involvement needed to save your life or the lives of others. I will be in jail for 1 year because I told you the truth and interfered. rrylander.info rylpublic.info for comments coming soon

FREE NAC Class

For Rent

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

2 BR, 2 BA, 2nd FlOOR apt in Oroville. Nice walk-in closet, washer and dryer hookups. Quiet area and great location. Over looks a nice shade tree and green lawn from covered back patio. Accepting applications. No smoking. No pets. $550 / month + $400 deposit. Call 509-223-3064 or 509-560-9043.

Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

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3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Abby at

Sudoku

Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 10 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

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SUN LAKES REALTY

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4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; Furnished Cabin $625; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

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WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

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with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

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ANSWERS

Announcements

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Sponsored by

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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Spring Variety Show & Auction Help Thurs, March 12, 6:30 pm. Come see the entertainers Wanted while supporting our college COOK bound scholars! Live and siOCTN is accepting applicalent auction. Door donation: tions for a relief cook for the $3 ea. $10 family. senior meal programs in Oroville and Tonasket. Experi5. Caribbean, e.g. 25. Person who lives apart from ence cooking for large groups society 6. Fill is preferred but we will train 27. Abstinence from alcohol 7. Blue hue the right individual. Must be or drugs 8. Ann ___, Mich. able to pass a pre-employ32. Live wire, so to speak 9. Moved with lightness and ment background check and 33. A pint, maybe buoyancy obtain food handlers permit. 34. Sit on or hatch eggs 10. “Malcolm X� director Applications can picked up at 36. A great deal 11. Aggressive (3 wds) 431 5th Avenue W. in 39. Air freshener option 12. Parenting challenges Omak, (800) 635-4391 41. Morgue, for one or online at 13. Taste, e.g. 42. Bring up the rear www.octn.org 18. All alternative OCTN is an EOE 43. Aussie “bear� 22. Cloudless 24. Heart protector

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509-476-3602

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North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning April 6, 2015. This class will be completed in May. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www.nvhospital.org This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative and technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after March 20, 2015. for information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185. North Valley Hospital has a Full time opening for a

Billing Clerk in the Financial Services Department Previous insurance billing experience preferred. CAH experience preferred. Detail orientated a must. North Valley Extended Care has 3 Full Time and 4 Per Diem opening’s for

NAC Washington State certified NAC license required. Current CPR and HIV certification required You may apply online by visiting our website at www.nvhospital.org. or pick up an application at North Valley Hospital Human Resources Department. For more information please call 509-486-3185.

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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OFFICE HELP WANTED Accounting Clerk/ Bookkeeping The ideal candidate can keep the highest level of confidentiality with all information obtained, has exceptional analytical and problem solving abilities, can complete all tasks within specified deadlines, is well organized, possess time management skills and can manage multiple priorities. Strong knowledge of computers and proficiency with Microsoft Office and can quickly learn new computer applications and systems. E-mail resume to Gold Digger Apples at payroll@golddiggerapples.com or drop off at 1220 Ironwood, Oroville.

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: Behavioral Health Spec. 1 Full time position Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket Medical Patient Registration 1 Full time position English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Garage & Yard Sale BIG SALE Sat only 3/7, 9 - 4 Furniture, household Items and much more. See you here! 305 West 4th Street, Old River View Market, Tonasket, 98855.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF MARCH 2, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a

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MARCH 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE March 5, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Statewides Legals Continued From Previous Page particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good”, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices Arbuckle SP 2015-3 Application and SEPA Exemption An application for a short subdivision has been submitted in order to divide approx. 5.6 acres into 2 lots. Potable water will be supplied by 1 private well. Irrigation is provided by Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. Access will come from Highway 7 (CR 9437). The property is north of Tonasket, WA approx. ½ mile south of River Loop Road and spans from Highway 7 to the Okanogan River. Physical address: 910 Highway 7. Tax parcel number: 3827270092. The Okanogan County SEPA Responsible Official issued a final SEPA determination identifying this project is exempt from SEPA review in accordance with WAC 197-11. The comment period for this project ends April 3, 2015 at 5pm. Comments must be submitted in writing. Direct questions and comments to: Ben Rough, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7122 or by e-mail at brough@co.okanogan.wa.us. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 5, 2015. #OVG618300

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Big Time Beach SP 2015-3 Notice of Application An application was submitted in order to subdivide a 1.18 acre property into 2 lots. The current zone designation is Suburban Residential. The property is approximately 1 mile north of Oroville, WA and is within the plat of Okanogan Smith Irrigation Tracts. Physical address: 35 Big Time Drive. Tax parcel: 6400330012. The comment period for this project ends April 3, 2015 at 5pm. In accordance with OCC 16.24.060(B) the public may request a public hearing no later than March 18, 2015. Hearing requests must be received in writing. Also, in accordance with WAC 197-11-600, the Okanogan County SEPA Responsible Official determined SEPA review is satisfied by reliance on the final SEPA determination (DNS) issued September 3, 2014. Additional SEPA review is not required. Information is available upon request. Direct questions and comments to: Ben Rough, Senior Planner, Okanogan County Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, or by e-mail at brough@co.okanogan.wa.us. Phone: (509) 422-7122. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 5, 2015. #OVG618301

Public Notice Posted Proclamation of Reclamation Abandoned State Hwy. 4 (now S.R. 2OE) circa 1932-2015 Feb. 1, 2015 To be recorded on Parcel nos. 3727260002-37272600053727260006 all in Okanogan Co. WA. From Feb. 1, 2015 is unified non-abandonment linked to parcel 3727264005 Homestead-Farmstead Roger Rylander. I Roger Rylander have maintained, improved and paid delinquent property taxes on said parcels. I am the first person to have property identified as segregated and recorded nonabandonment of such property. I am the First person in recorded history to do so. I will improve the premises and relocate my driveway from mile marker 264.28 to a point that is the safest to all people of the State of Washington. State property is 100% free of encumbrances and when abandoned is 100% free of encumbrances. Now and Forever to be entered into county taxed land. I do so willingly. Records of said Abandoned 1932 roadway are kept int he maproom basement at the Wenatchee D.O.T. P.U.D. welcome Phone welcome. Posted on Property. WAC458-61-550 Excise tax exempt South of Creek Abandoned roadbed. W.A.C. 197-11-960 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 /s/Roger Rylander Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 2015. #OVG611291

northwest of the Upper Portal entrance to the underground mine near the Buckhorn Mountain. This area contains an approximate 0.7 -acre depression (small swale) with topographic outlet to the west that drains into South Fork Bolster Creek basin. All discharges to be in compliance with the Department of Ecology’s Water Quality Standards for a permit to be issued. Ecology has further modified the permit to streamline the numerical limits of certain monitoring locations that were established based on preBuckhorn mining conditions. Additionally, the proposed changes, highlighted in yellow, would bring more clarity to the permit. Therefore, public review and comment period is being extended for an additional 2 weeks beginning March 5 through March 20, 2015. A tentative determination has been made to issue a proposed permit based on the effluent limitations and special permit conditions that will prevent and control pollution. A final determination will not be made until all timely comments received in response to this notice have been evaluated. PUBLIC COMMENT AND INFORMATION The modified permit and fact sheet addendum may be viewed at: https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/ wqreports/public/ f?p=110:302:3939967066958930::N O:RP:P302_PERMIT_NUMBER:WA 0052434 . The application and other related documents are available at Ecology’s Central Regional Office for inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., weekdays. To obtain a copy or to arrange to view copies at the Central Regional Office, please call 509/575-2027 or write to the address below. Interested persons are invited to submit written comments regarding the proposed permit. All comments must be submitted by March 20, 2015 to be considered for the final determination. E-mail comments should be sent to cynthia.huwe@ecy.wa.gov . Written comments should be sent to: Cynthia Huwe, Department of Ecology, Central Regional Office, 15 West Yakima Avenue, Suite 200, Yakima, WA 98902. Any interested party may request a public hearing on the proposed permit within 10 days of the publication date of this notice. The request for a hearing shall state the interest of the party and the reasons why a hearing is necessary. The request should be sent to the above address. Ecology

will hold a hearing if it determines that there is significant public interest. If a hearing is to be held, public notice will be published at least 30 days in advance of the hearing date. Any party responding to this notice with comments will be mailed a copy of a hearing public notice. If you require special accommodations or need this document in a format for the visually impaired, call Cindy Huwe at 509-457-7105. Persons with hearing loss can call 711 for Washington Relay Service. Persons with a speech disability can call 877-833-6341. Publication date of this Notice is March 5, 2015. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 5, 2015. #OVG618676

Spokane, WA 99201 /s/Greg M. Devlin Greg M. Devlin, WSBA #7228 Attorney for Personal Representative Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 19, 26 and March 5, 2015. #OVG615711

March 3, 2015 Summary of Ordinance #754 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, annexing certain territory to the City of Tonasket, Washington, incorporating the same within the corporate limits thereof; requiring the assumption of existing indebtedness, and assigning zoning classifications, specifying conditions and an effective date. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 5, 2015. #OVG618780 PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 3/9/2015 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1992 Toyota Camry Lic# 397WCD Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 5, 2015. #OVG617335

NOTICE: ANNOUNCEMENT OF AVAILABILITY OF DRAFT MODIFIED PERMIT PERMIT NO.: WA0052434 APPLICANT: CROWN RESOURCES CORPORATION FACILITY: BUCKHORN MOUNTAIN MINE Crown Resources Corporation Buckhorn Mountain Mine has requested a modification of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit No. WA0052434 in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW), Chapter 173-220 Washington Administrative Code (WAC), and the Federal Clean Water Act. Following evaluation of the SEPA Addendum and other available information, a draft modified permit has been developed which would allow the addition of Outfall 006 through infiltration. This outfall will be located on private property about 400 feet

SUPERIOR COURT, STATE OF WASHINGTON, COUNTY OF SPOKANE In the Matter of the Estate of SUZETTE M. TUCKER, Deceased. No. 15400209-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 1.40.020(1)(c); or (4) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non probate assets. Date of First Publication: February 19, 2015 Personal Representative: Rogene E. Wood Address: 1520 S. David Spokane Valley, WA 99212. Attorney for the Personal Representative: Greg M. Devlin Address: 601 W. Riverside Ave., Suite 1900

Did you know? We use...  Soy Ink  Recycled Paper  Excess paper recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

Think Green!

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

REAL ESTATE GUIDE #1 Top Producer Office in North County!

SUN LAKES REALTY

1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121

Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

Impeccably cared for 3 bed 2 bath 1998 Fleetwood on manicured lot in John’s Landing. Large rear deck for Entertainment. John’s Landing is on the Okanogan River in Tonasket. Monthly fee includes water & Sewer. $41,500

www.windermere.com

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

Great location and Lake Osoyoos view from this Peterborough cottage, close to the Village center, diner, general store, pool and beach. Lots of green space. White picket fencing, flower boxes gives the cottage a 50’s feeling! NWML#745121 $429,000

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2015

SPORTS

Hornets trounced by Colfax to end season Oroville makes furthest advances in team’s history

Hornets wrap up their season at 15-10. “Lily battled to the end,” Bourn said. “She’s been huge to the program. Having her out

there was having a coach on the floor. Her leadership on the floor, leadership off the floor, leadership during the summer, were a big reason we got to the Sweet 16

two years in a row.” Those two appearances have been the first such times Oroville girls basketball has advanced to the round of 16 in school history.

BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

CHENEY - Feb. 28, 2015 Too much experience, too much depth, too much talent. In the end, there wasn’t much the Oroville girls basketball team could do to handle defending state champion Colfax, which is on a mission to repeat regardless of having a team like Okanogan to contend with this year. The Bulldogs - definitely at Okanogan’s level, as an overtime loss to that squad back in December would attest - had their way with the Hornets on Saturday in a loser-out Class 2B state regional game, to the tune of 61-19. “They’re fundamentally sound, and very deep,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “I was a little surprised by their verticality (leaping ability) but otherwise they were what we expected.” The Hornets held their own defensively for awhile, but could never get on track offensively at all as they trailed 12-4 after one quarter. Colfax made no secret of its intent to bottle up Lily Hilderbrand and forced the Hornets out of their comfort zone from the opening tip. “(Colfax coach Corey Baerlocher) said before the game he’d rarely had an athlete like her,” Bourn said. “He told me straight up before the game they were just going to double and triple team her all day. First play down we ran a play to get her the ball, and they ran the double team over and stole it from her. We were going to try to isolate her and get her one and one, and they were all over it.” Baerlocher wasn’t happy with his team’s offensive execution after the first quarter and let his team know it. The suffocating defense turned into offense for Colfax in the second quarter as the Bulldogs pulled away to a 36-12 halftime lead. Bourn, frustrated with Colfax’s physical play on one end, picked up a technical after protesting a call against Hilderbrand at the other. “It was just too physical a game for us,” he said. “Lily had the crap beat out of her in the paint, then reaches in to tie the ball up and gets called for a foul. I got the ‘T’ for slapping the floor with both hands; I didn’t say anything. “But they were just very good, period. They were quick enough to recover when they doubleteamed Lily and she’d pass it out. You’d throw a skip pass over and they’d be right there.” The second half was a learning experience for a lot of Oroville’s younger players, as well as the final minutes of Hilderbrand’s celebrated high school career, as well as the careers of Rachelle Nutt and Kali Peters. Eleven Colfax players scored, led by Taylor Garcia with 11 points, six-foot freshmen Carmen Gfeller with nine and two others with eight. Hilderbrand finished her career with 11 points but no other Hornet had more than two. Colfax (22-3) will take on White Swan on Thursday in the state 2B quarterfinals while the

Brent Baker/submitted photos

Clockwise from above,, Kali Peters fires off a jumper during her final game as a Hornet. The Hornets’ Rachelle Nutt drives past a Colfax defender during Saturday’s game. Faith Martin and the Hornets weren’t given any room to operate by defending state champion Colfax in Saturday’s season-ending loss. Lily Hilderbrand was honored with the WIAA’s state tournament sportsmanship award after Saturday’s contest.

SPRING SPORTS Our Spring Sports Section will be coming in March!

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MARCH 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

OUTDOORS

OHA presents: Stream Ecology with Dr. Oswood SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OHA CONSERVATION COORDINATOR

TONASKET - On Friday, March 6, OHAs Highland Wonders series welcomes back a knowledgeable and enthusiastic speaker from last summers outdoor events. Freshwater ecologist and emeritus professor, Dr. Mark Oswood, will cover the basics of stream ecology, with perspective on the inner workings of streams, including functional feeding groups, sources of energy, and riparian ecology. This event aims to increase our community’s understanding of stream ecology, and how riparian zones and streams interact to support and affect populations of aquatic insects. Mark will explain how freshwater macroinvertebrates can be part of a person’s natural history tool kit, with high quality field guides for community members to peruse and a list of recommended resources. “Many of you are bird watchers,” he said at last summer’s event. “But these small things are the nuts and bolts, and the cogs in the machinery, that make life on earth happen... You could do this as a hobby, as an avocation, just like bird watching.” Oswood lives in the Wenatchee area, retired from the department of Biology and Wildlife and the

Institute of Arctic Biology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, with a research specialty in freshwater ecology. He focused mainly on running waters (streams and rivers), with an emphasis on aquatic entomology (the scientific study of insects) and trophic structure of stream ecosystems. He has taught limnology (freshwater science), ecology of streams and rivers, aquatic entomology, as well as introductory biology. Most of his research was on ecology of stream insects, especially biogeography and decomposition of organic matter. Oswood has applied experience studying the effects of heavy metals from mining on streams, and has a side specialty in statistical analysis. Throughout his career, Oswood has taught a wide variety of “introduction to stream ecology” events in classrooms, Elder Hostels, and for government agencies, fly-fishing groups, and conservation organizations. “Seeing the diversity of invertebrates that live in streams can be analogous to a first experience looking at tide pool organisms,” he said. “Plus, aquatic insects are a stream’s way of turning green algae and brown leaves into fish food. No bugs, no fish!” OHA’s educational events take place at the Community Cultural Center (CCC) of Tonasket, beginning at 6:30 p.m., with a din-

Julie Ashmore/submitted photo

Dr. Mark Oswood takes a group out to study stream ecology last summer. Oswood will return on Friday, March 6 to speak at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on the inner workings of streams and the basics of stream ecology. ner benefiting the CCC at 5:15 pm. The dinner will be $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members (no charge for the presentation).

OHA is a non-profit organization that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The Highland Wonders educational series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands

and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources by helping

increase awareness of local natural history. Donations are always welcome. Details are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw.

New legislation pending that could alter state’s wolf management efforts BY COOPER INVEEN, REPORTER WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

As Washington’s gray wolf population continues to grow, so do concerns from those living in the areas of the state most affected by their return. “There’s two sides to this issue, and it kind of boils down to either you like them or you don’t,” said Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, who co-sponsored several wolf-related bills this legis- Rep. Joel Kretz lative session. Seven bills relating to Washington’s gray wolves have been introduced to the 2015 Legislature, with four surviving for continuing consideration in their respective chamber this week. Together they could have a dramatic affect on Washington’s wolf-recovery policy. Much of the wolf debate stems from an uneven distribution of wolves across the state. Ten of Washington’s 14 wolf packs reside in the state’s northeast corner, and the two largest recent attacks on livestock have both occurred there in Stevens County. While Washington is on track to meet the state’s total wolf population objectives, there’s a long way to go before geographic distribution goals are met. Although wolves are considered endangered at both the fed-

eral and state levels, the abundance of wolves in northeastern Washington has prompted a demand that the Department of Fish and Wildlife alter its classification of “endangered” to reflect an animal’s presence in a region rather than in the state as a whole. If wolves were reclassified this way, they would only be considered legally endangered in twothirds of the state. Sen. Brian Dansel, R-Republic, is sponsoring Senate Bill 5583, which would give the Department of Fish and Wildlife the power to declassify an endangered species on a regional level. It would also require the department to respond to any petition to declassify with a full investigation and a written response explaining why it chose or chose not to declassify the species. If the department does decide to declassify an endangered species, the bill would require it to construct an entirely new management system for the species based on populations in that particular region. The new system would have to consider “customs and culture of local communities over statewide goals for any species” undergoing a status change. The bill declares that the impact on local cultures and communities is “the paramount priority.” Dave Dashiell of the Cattle Producers of Washington advocated for the bill at a committee hearing on Feb. 5, saying he doubted cattle ranchers in Stevens County could “survive another five or six years wait-

ing for [wolves] to be dispersed across the state.” His sheep flock, he reported, was the target of an attack last year that resulted in the deaths of 30 sheep and many more that were never located. Nate Pamplin, assistant director for the department’s wildlife program, strongly opposed the bill. “The agency’s authority to list a species as endangered comes from that species of wildlife being seriously threatened with extinction in the state of Washington,” he said. “So if we were to set aside the regional contribution of a species, we are essentially setting aside that contribution to delisting that same species elsewhere in the state.” As for the ranchers, Pamplin said the department already has a program in place to compensate those who have lost livestock to wolf attacks, and open-range ranchers can earn up to twice market-value on reimbursements for individual animals whose carcasses are never located. He said the department is currently processing Dashiell’s claim in a similar manner. SB 5583 passed out of the Senate Ways and Means Committee and is on the Rules Committee calendar for advancement. An identical bill in the House, co-sponsored by Kretz, died in committee after one public hearing. Kretz has been concerned about wolf distribution since the beginning of the legislative session. During a presentation Dave

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Ware, the DFW’s wolf policy lead, gave to a joint House and Senate committee last month, Kretz suggested using helicopters to relocate wolf packs to Western Washington’s more populated areas, in an effort to take some of the burden off of his wolf-heavy district. “There are those people who think wolves should be everywhere and should run the state,” Kretz said. “I would support them in Seattle particularly.” Ware called the suggestion logistically and politically impossible. Despite their disagreements, Ware supported one of Kretz’s bills during a public hearing in the House Appropriations Committee on Feb. 26. HB 2107 would require the department to amend the 2011 wolf conservation and management plan to better address the uneven distribution. Among other things, the new plan would have to consider reducing or consolidating recovery zones, outline new attack-

prevention methods for ranchers, and re-evaluate when lethal force can be used against individual wolves. It now awaits full House consideration. “This is probably the best vehicle to address some of the concerns we’re getting from folks in northeastern Washington,” Ware said, seeing the bill as an appropriate compromise. Dansel’s companion bill in the Senate, SB 5960, passed out of the Senate Ways and Means Committee on Feb. 26 and could earn full Senate consideration this week. One thing ranchers and conservationists consistently agree on is that they need to better understand the predatory effects wolves have on the wild animals around them. No official data exist on how elk and deer populations in the northeastern part of the state have been affected by the rising number of wolves there. The lack of data has sparked considerable debate between conservationists and hunters who worry that an

increased wolf presence could harm game populations. House Bill 1676 would shine light on that issue. The bill would require the University of Washington’s Predator Ecology Lab to assesses and report on the health of hooved animal populations in places with high wolfrecovery rates. It’s also the only piece of wolf legislation to gain the approval of Conservation Northwest, which advocates for the protection of the region’s old growth forests and other wild places. It awaits assignment for full House consideration by the House Rules Committee. The bill has received approval from many sides of the wolf debate and passed out of the House Committee on General Government & Information Technology on Feb. 26. UW researchers will have until Oct. 31, 2016 to deliver their report, although the bill would not take effect unless the Legislature allocates the necessary funding by June 30.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 5, 2015

Lions Club assists Carlton Complex Fire victims BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

A $15,000 check was given to the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club (T/OVLC) by the Lions Club International for the Carton Complex Fire & Flood Recovery Fund Feb. 18. The award was presented by

District 2 Governor Frank Karas and Grant Committee Chair Lion Scott Carver, both of Moses Lake, to T/OVLC President Kris Bailey at Whistler’s Family Restaurant in Tonasket. Other Lions Club members present were Deb Rimstad-Bevier, Cindy Stout and Connie Maden. Members of the local Lions

Club applied for the Lions Club International Foundation Emergency Grant earlier this winter, after the Carlton Complex Fire and flood. The Carlton Complex Fire & Recovery Fund was set up by the T/OVLC and they have already raised and distributed over $15,000 to victims of the Carlton

Tonaske/Okanogan Valley Lions Club President Kris Bailey (center) holds up a $15,000 award, presented to him by District 2 Governor Frank Karas (left) and Grant Committee Chair Lion Scott Carver (right)

The Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club receives a check for $15,000 to assist Carlton Complex Fire and Flood Victims. Pictured (L-R) are Debbie Rimstad-Bevier, Cindy Stout, District 2 Governor Frank Caras, President Kris Bailey, Connie Maden and Lion Scott Carver

OBITUARIES

Gerald Eugene Oakes

GERALD EUGENE OAKES Gerald Oakes age 80 of Tonasket met his Lord and Savior on February 24, 2015 where he passed away peacefully at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. Gerald was born January 7, 1935 in Tonasket on North Pine Creek along with his identical twin brother, John Oakes. Gerald was born to Bill and Lena Oakes and was raised on the old Oakes Homestead, along with his brother and three sisters and attended Tonasket Schools. Gerald was very involved in

farm life and sports; and was always extremely proud of the fact that his high school basketball team went to the State Playoffs for the first time in school history. After graduating high school he went on to further his education at Eastern Washington College in Cheney, Wash. Gerald married Gwen Holt in 1953 and together they raised four children; Hollie, Bill, Jerry and Valli. In 1955, he started what went on to be a 34-year career with the Washington State Department of Transportation working out of the Tonasket Shop retiring in 1985. Also, during this time period he owned orchards and operated a Duty Free Store at the U.S./Canadian Border north of Oroville. Gerald was married to Peg Michels in 1983 and helped raise two step children, Troy and Michelle Michels. After his retirement from the D.O.T., Gerald and Peg started a car sales business at Crumbacher Estates. Together they later moved to North Pine Creek raising some cattle and enjoying the scenery. In 1999 they sold the ranch and moved closer to town on North Pine Creek across from Aeneas Lake. Gerald was a long time member of the Tonasket Eagles (No. 3002) and was an avid outdoorsman, hunter and fisherman

throughout his lifetime. He was an active member of the Tonasket Community Church; serving on the board and other aspects of the church. His children and grandchildren were the love of his life. Gerald was preceded in death by his parents Bill and Lena Oakes, one sister Betty and her husband Ken Clarkson and brother in law Elmer Freeman. Gerald is survived by his wife Peg Oakes, two sisters Irene Freeman and Leona (Carman) Bliss, twin brother John (Adaline) Oakes, four children Hollie (Mike) Darbyson, Bill Oakes, Jerry (Colleen) Oakes and Valli (Gordon) Schroeter, two step children Troy (Missy) Michels and Michelle Michels, ten grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. A Graveside service will be held on Saturday, March 7, 2015 at 10 a.m. at the Tonasket Cemetery with a Memorial service at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Community Church with Pastor Leon Alden, officiating. Following the Memorial Service family and friends are invited to the Tonasket Eagles for a luncheon. Memorials may be made to Tonasket Community Church or the American Cancer Society. Bergh Funeral Service Oroville/ Tonasket in care of arrangements.

CHARLES NORMAN PICKLE

He then worked at Boeings for a few years before going into the construction business, building fisheries, the Okanogan school, Omache Mall, the new Zosels Dam, the retaining wall at Lake Osoyoos Veterans Memorial State Park and Arizona rooms in and around Quartzsite, Ariz. After a severe electrical accident he retired, living in Arizona, Seattle, the Okanogan Valley and Wenatchee. He was preceded in death by his parents, one sister and four brothers. He is survived by two daughters, three sons and one step son. At his request there will be no service.

no insurance or other means to recover their losses. Each request for assistance from the Carlton Complex Fire & Recovery Fund must go through chair Bailey, The Fire Relief Fund committee, and membership to determine priority and final approval. “The Okanogan Community Action Council and its case workers have helped us distribute these local funds and will continue to help us identify survivors who could benefit from the grant monies,” said Bailey, adding that OCCAC has been helping connect T/OVLC members to fire

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

Charles Norman Pickle

JUANITA GERINGER WAGGY

Juanita Geringer Waggy

In memory of Juanita Geringer Waggy, born August 23, to Ollie and Harry Hudnell in Milan, Missouri. She later moved to Yakima, Wash. where she was a nurse at a local hospital. She then married and moved to the Seattle area. Juanita moved to Maple Valley and there she built a new house on Lake Lacerne. Her husband worked at Pac Car in Renton and there he retired. It as here she started a study with Jehovah Witnesses Bible Study. After studying the Bible, she became a Jehovah Witness. She spent many hours telling people about Jehovah and his Kingdom.

She did not know a stranger and would greet everyone she met. She had many friends and would hug everyone she knew. She will be missed by her family and many friends. She is survived by: her husband, Glen Waggy; sister, Winona; children, Barbara Dover, Richard Geringer, Anita Geringer-Choate, Donna Geringer-Stone. She had seven grandchildren and four great grandchildren. She will be loved and missed. She will be with us in our fondest thoughts and memories, but not forgotten. Rest in peace. A memorial will be held, Saturday, March 7 at 2 p.m. This will be at the Kingdom Hall on Highway 97, six miles south of Oroville.

HEALTH CARE

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Charles Norman Pickle, age 88, died February 13, 2015 in Wenatchee following a lengthy illness. He was born in the Oroville General Hospital on May 22, 1927, the youngest child of Tom and Mary Pickle. He attended the Oroville schools and at age 17 enlisted in the Navy. After serving two years he returned and graduated from high school with the class of 1947.

survivors since they began relief efforts in July. All the funds donated to the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club for the Carlton Complex Fire Relief Fund goes to the victims. The T/OVLC just had their club charter approved in January 2013. “Since that time we have attempted to live up to the Lions International motto “We serve,” Bailey said. “We currently have 18 members and are always looking for people interested in serving their community.”

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Complex Fire. “We began collecting funds funds locally and raised about $15,000 from Tonasket and Okanogan County residents, and Lions Clubs and businesses around Washington State in addition to this grant,” said Tonasket resident and Fire Relief Chair Cathy Bailey. The Lions Club works in conjunction with the Okanogan County Sheriffs office as well as case workers with the Okanogan County Community Action Council (OCCAC) to ensure funds go to fire victims who have

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 05, 2015  

March 05, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 05, 2015  

March 05, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune