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Missoula Children’s Theatre

STATE WRESTLING

The Princess and the Pea Saturday, Feb. 28 at Tonasket High School Stage

See Sports Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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Superintendent search is on

BUTTERCUPS BRING HOPE FOR SPRING

Public invited to speak up BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - A special meeting of the Tonasket School Board scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday, March 2, will take a look at applications received for the superintendent position. The position opened up with the resignation of Paul Turner. “We’re quite excited about our pool; we have a wide group ranging from the very limited in experience to those who come with a lot of experience; some local and some statewide,” said board member Jerry Asmussen. “A lot of the top candidates in our pool are also top candidates in other pools, so we should be nimble about getting out in front of the others.” The board expects to make a short-list of qualified appli-

cants, with interviews expected to begin March 9 and 10.

BUS REQUEST A request from Transportation Supervisor Jeff Yeckel to purchase two new propane-powered buses at a cost of $229,528 was approved. The buses will be delivered by the beginning of next school year. Yeckel said he checked into quotes from both International and Bryson, and they were the same except for International’s model not having as big a fuel tank. “The one from Bryson is the same model we have now, and we haven’t had any trouble with the propane buses, but two of the diesel buses have broken down in the last year,” reported Yeckel, who said there was enough money in the transportation fund to purchase both of the buses with “some change left over for the next time around.”

SEE SEARCH | PG A12

PUD still treading water on Similkameen BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Last Monday’s meeting of the the Okanogan County Public Utility District Commissioners saw options still being weighed regarding the fate of Enloe Dam. Commissioner Steve Houston reported being in contact with a Washington, DC law firm to have a letter drafted requesting an extension on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license to begin construction on the Enloe Dam Hydroelectric Project. The current deadline for the PUD to begin is July 1, 2015. Meanwhile, a meeting between Derek Sandison of the DOE’s Office of Columbia River, Rich Bowers of HydroReform, Lisa Pelly with Trout Unlimited’s Washington Water Project, Thomas O’Keefe of American

Photos by Don Curtis and Gary DeVon

Little yellow buttercups are a sure sign that spring can’t be that far away. Each year people seem to compete to bring in the first buttercup and this year was no exception. Mary, Don and Corrine Curtis, from Oroville (top) were out riding near Enloe Dam when they spotted a buttercup (above). Five -year-old Elizabeth Hart, also from Oroville, was walking “in her secret spot” when she found this buttercup. She wouldn’t give up the secret location, but was willing to share a smile and pose for a photo. She is the daughter of Tom and Stephanie Hart.

Whitewater, Michael Garrity with American Rivers, Chris Fisher with the Colville Tribes Department of Fish and Wildlife, the PUD’s General Manager John Grubich and PUD Commissioners Scott Vejraska and Steve Houston is being scheduled for early March. The meeting was originally set for 11 AM on March 9, but that date conflicts with the schedules of several of the interested parties, with the PUD Commissioners’ regular meeting scheduled for 2:30 PM March 9. “We’ve got to start somewhere, so we’re starting somewhere,” said Becky Zahler, Sandison’s Administrative Assistant in charge of setting up the meeting. “There’s only so much time, and they need to meet sooner than later, so we are going ahead with

SEE DAM | PG A3

Oroville gives $1000 toward new K-9 Deputy discusses NCW Narcotics Task Force BY GARY A. DE VON GDEVON@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Seeing value in having a police dog available in the North County, the City of Oroville presented a check for $1000 to purchase a trained K-9 for the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office. The check was presented to Sheriff Frank Rogers by Oroville Police Chief Todd Hill at the city council’s Tuesday, Feb. 17 meeting. Deputy Terry Schrable, who is training to work with the dog, updated the council on the county’s K-9 program. The new K-9, a Belgian Malinois will be partnered with Schrable and is being purchased through donations from the various municipalities and from local business who see the value in such a dog. Deputy Kevin Newport discussed the North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force, of which Oroville is a member. He explained that the task force covers Okanogan and Ferry counties and

explained the fees that each community is assessed. He also discussed the organizations budget and funds received from the communities and the Byrnes Grant. The Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Grant Program or the Byrne Formula Grant Program is a federal grant provided to states from the U.S. Department of Justice Department. This grant aims to help law enforcement agencies enforce and strengthen local and state laws designed for serious offenders or violent criminals. Councilman Tony Koepke asked about seized assets and the deputy discussed the difficulties in the collection process where seized assets are concerned.

SOCIAL MEDIA HAS SPOKEN Daryln Hollenbeck attended the council meeting to discuss changing the colors of the poinsettia Christmas Decorations, which are currently lit with all white bulbs. There has been an ongoing discussion on FaceBook about changing the colors of the bulbs so that the poinsettias are more defined, with red pedals, green stems and white leaves. If the lights were changed the council preferred changing

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 09

to LEDs because they last longer and draw less power. The cost to change the bulbs to LED colored lights would be around $3000, said Hollenbeck. “The council was supportive of changing the colors if the community can come up with the funding and the manpower to change the bulbs,” said JoAnn Denney, Oroville City Clerk.

Naillon also made a motion, with a second by Koepke, for a resolution to proclaim February as General Aviation Month. The motion was approved.

Airport Services Manager Steve Johnston commented on the resolution saying he appreciates the support the council and city gives to the airport.

CIRCUS COMING TO TOWN The council approved a park use permit for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce which has requested City Park for the Culpepper and Merriweather Circus on June 10. GENERAL AVIATION MONTH After discussing the Airport Request for Qualifications update given by Denney, the council called for a roster of Engineering services be updated. A consultants list is also needed for the airport improvement project, she said, adding that the RFQs needed to be completed by March 13. Airport Committee members Councilwoman Neysa Roley and Councilman Ed Naillon will be involved in the interview process.

Submitted photo

Deputies Shane Jones and Terry Schrable, Sheriff Frank Rogers, Chief Todd Hill and Mayor Chuck Spieth at the presentation of a check for $1000 toward the purchase of a canine.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Valley Life Local News Cops & Courts

A2-3 A3 A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate A9 Sports, Schools A10-11 Obituaries A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 26, 2015

Ray and Victoria Attwood are 2015 Founders Day Grand Marshals

Ray and Victoria Attwood have enjoyed a lifetime together in the Tonasket area. They say they feel honored to have been chosen as this year’s Founders Day Grand Marshals. BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Ray and Victoria Attwood of Ellisforde are this year’s Founders Day Grand Marshals. The nomination, announced at the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Banquet, came as a surprise to both of them. Victoria said they were invited to go to the banquet and weren’t expecting anything out of the ordinary. “But I knew something was going on when they started talking about all kinds of things we had done in our younger days,” said Ray. “It took a little longer for it to sink in with me,” Victoria added.

“And when they asked us.... well it wasn’t something we would have campaigned for, but we couldn’t say no,” said Ray, jokingly adding “I guess they are running out of people who have been around here forever.” The two have lived in the Tonasket area almost their entire lives. They met in high school, and Victoria invited Ray out to see a movie in Oroville when her girlfriend Loretta Wilhite, who invited Dean Stansbury, had access to her father’s car. They’ve been together ever since. Victoria is the daughter of Victor and Golden Lasamiz, and Ray is the son of Mertin Attwood and Pearl Cooksey Dobbins. Ray and Victoria married in

1947, living in Seattle’s Woodland Park area while Ray worked as a detective with the Burns Detective Agency. Returning to the Tonasket area in 1948, they worked on Victoria’s family’s ranch and began raising their children Craig, Janie, Andrea and Jim. Victoria’s father, Victor Lesamiz, Sr., was a Basque sheepherder. “He came over from Spain, and didn’t speak English,” said Victoria. “He came up into this area from Oregon, driving a herd of sheep the whole way.” Victoria said her 18-year-old mother was working as a bookkeeper in Riverside when she met

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the 26-year-old Victor, Sr. bottles and turned them in for down” two times for bad weather. “There they were, with my cash. While in Alaska, he worked “That was a good trip. I learned father speaking hardly any in the mining camp, helping to a lot the hard way,” he said. English. My mother said she took feed the gold miners. All through An avid trap shooter, Ray one look at his hands and knew his youth, Ray worked with his served as a past president of the he was the man for her.” mom and grandma delivering Tonasket Gun Club. He was Ray and Victoria began raising laundry. At the age of 16, he went also a member of the Mason’s, cattle in 1965 on their own Rafter to the Wilbur area and harvested American Legion, Eagles, 12 Ranch, located six miles east wheat with his lifelong friend Shriners and Oroville Gun Club. of Tonasket on Highway 20 and Kenny Clarkson. Victoria was active in Eastern on Highway “We took Star, along with her moth7 near the Kenny’s car, er and sister. She was also an old Ellisforde but he left me active member of the Okanogan “...I knew something Grange. After there on foot,” Cattlewoman’s Association for was going on when selling their Ray recalled. many years, the Tonasket Garden ranch in 1979, “Around the Club, and the Oroville Golf Club, they started talking the Attwoods second day of where she shot a hole-in-one about all kinds of went into the work, I went while playing with Barb Forrester. orchard busifor Ray said he had four hole-inthings we had done in looking ness, raising Kenny and was ones in his lifetime. our younger days” apples until told he had quit “That’s when you’re lucky. It about 1992. and gone home. doesn’t take skill, it’s just luck,” Ray Attwood, Tonasket Ray was I finished out said Ray. “You might get one every Founders Day Grand Marshal instrumental the two or three ten years, and maybe never.” in the start-up weeks, and got An avid Bridge player, a great of Mid Valley Bank, and served as a check for $400. The biggest cook and wonderful seamstress, a board member. He served in the check I ever got.” Ray’s eyes grew Victoria still has a green thumb. Navy from 1943 to 1947. wide, his face glowing at the recOver the years, the two have Victoria attended Holy Names ollection. greatly enjoyed attending the in Spokane her junior year “I went to go home, but found many sports activities at Tonasket before graduating from Tonasket out the buses didn’t run on High School. High School and attending the Sunday. So I went to the train Finally retired, Ray and Victoria University of Washington, where station. I went Hobo style. I love to garden and spend time she took classes in costume asked which train was going to with their family. They enjoy takdesign. She made her own wed- Wenatchee, and I found a car that ing lunch at the Tonasket senior center, the ding dress and created the first was carrying same building Tiger costume for the THS Tiger lumber. And Ray attended Mascot. there was a lit“We have been as a Boy Scout. Favorite memories include tle spot I could Their chilperforming a challenging dance fit into.” phenomenally blessed dren, grandat the Tonasket Theater, on top Ray said it in our life. We feel so children and of a stage in roller skates. “You was nighttime re at-g randhad to know how to put on the when the train fortunate to have spent gchildren are a brakes!” Victoria laughed. “It was stopped in a long way to fall,” added Ray. Wenatchee. so many years together t r e m e n d o u s in their She also enjoyed cooking for “It was fall as a married couple” joy lives. the Basque sheepherders who and it was Victoria Attwood, Tonasket Their son worked for her folks. cold. But there Founders Day Grand Marshal Jim serves as Victoria always loved to dance, were a lot of the Okanogan and she and Ray were members of Hobos riding City Clerk, and the local Dinner Dance Club for the trains; they many years, where they gained a were picking apples. So I asked his wife Alice is Tonasket City reputation for “cutting a rug.” one which train went up to the Clerk. “We have been phenomenally Ray treasures memories of rid- Okanogan and he pointed it out, ing a dog sled to school with saying he would be there in the blessed in our life,” Victoria said, his little brother Richard when morning to help me get on board. adding, “We feel so fortunate to they lived for a short while in And he was. So I got on, and we have spent so many years together as a married couple.” Chicken, Alaska. “We went up started heading north. Founders Day is held the first for the summer, but I stayed on “But we came to a tunnel, and a year and graduated the eighth I got scared, because I was riding weekend after Memorial Day, feagrade,” said Ray. “It was a remote on the top of the rail car, and I turing a parade down Whitcomb area, and you could only get to wasn’t sure how much clearance Avenue, the Founders Day Rodeo, Chicken back then by plane or there was. I climbed down the an old-fashioned BBQ with kids’ foot.” ladder some, and rode on the games, a 5K Tonasket Freedom Fond memories of growing up side. But it was just a scare. I sure Run, a 3.1 Community Fun Run in Tonasket include caddying on didn’t want to be taken off the top and a crafts fair. “The most exciting thing about the weekends at the Tonasket 4 of that train!” Hole Golf Course, located where Ray later moved up to planes, Founders Day I am looking forthe Free Methodist Church now and Victoria tells the story of him ward to is getting to ride in one of Ken McLean’s Model A Fords,” sits, going west and south towards buying his first one. Hwy 20. This is where he learned “It was back east, and he flew said Victor. his love for the game. it home as a brand new pilot!” “I golfed 40 or 50 years, and Victoria recalls. still play by myself when I can,” “The plane was in Pennsylvania, said Ray, recalling at times carry- and I was a flyer of three hours,” ing three golf bags at once. said Ray. “I about got run over We use... “But there were only four or going through Chicago. I had a five clubs in a bag in those days radio, but I didn’t have it turned l Soy Ink instead of 17, so I could pack on.” l Recycled Paper three bags if I had too.” Ray said the trip took three l Excess paper As a youngster, Ray collected days because he had to “lay it recycled for gardens, fire starter & more!

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PAGE A3

Tonasket’s got Terri

Local singer goes from New Orleans to Facebook to America’s Got Talent BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Terri Orford was on vacation in New Orleans, sitting in a jazz club with her husband Andy when he informed the band his wife had talent. The next thing she knew, she was onstage in the jazz capital of the world, wooing the audience with a rendition of ‘Crazy’ by Patsy Cline. Orford hadn’t previously met the musicians, let alone rehearsed with them. “It was totally impromptu, but that’s what jazz is about---being inspired and in the moment,” Orford said. The moment was captured on video, and when it went on Facebook, Orford was approached by a stranger and told she should audition for ‘America’s Got Talent.’ The NBC summer series, now in it’s 10th season, held auditions for the first time in six years in the Seattle/ Tacoma area Feb. 9, so Orford and her husband hit the road. The Greater Tacoma Convention and Trade Center was their target, where acts began lining up at 6 a.m. “We got there as soon as the doors opened,” Orford said. She was given a number and told to wait in a holding/rehearsal room with about 150 of the 1,000 acts signed up to audition. “I thought I had it all together, but you sit in the holding room and wait for them to call your number, walking around practicing out loud and trying to tune out all the other singers rehearsing,” said Orford, who called the experience a performance of its own, which “helped work out the nerves” for the next step. The actual audition also takes place in front of other performers, all of whom have only 90 seconds to impress the producers of the show. Orford watched a

Traveling jail cells stop north of Oliver, BC New Provincial Correction Centre constructed of 378 pre-fab cells BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune readers have inquired about large trucks observed heading north, hauling extrawide loads of large cement structures. The cement structures are prison cells, destined for a highsecurity Provincial Correction Center located on a 36-acre site in the Osoyoos Indian Band’s (OIB) Senkulmen Business Park, seven kilometers north of Oliver on Highway 97. “They’re not very nice inside. They’re smaller than you think,” said photographer Mark Brett of the Penticton Western News, one of the G-T’s

sister newspapers. Brett photographed construction activities Tuesday, Feb. 24, at the request of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune. Okanogan Correctional Centre (OCC) will have 378 cells and 11 living units, more than doubling the corrections capacity already in the region. Construction of the facility began in spring 2014, with completion expected in fall 2016. The closest Provincial Correctional Centre already in operation is located in Kamloops. Provincial Corrections Centres handle pre-trial cases and criminals with sentences of less than two years, with more severe crimes handled by Corrections Canada and the federal penitentiary system. The contract to build the facility on OIB land is the first time a partnership like this has been formed between the Province of BC and a First

Nation. The land will be leased by the Province from OIB for a period of 60 years, with an option to secure an additional 20 years. Once OCC is fully up and running, correctional services will be provided by BC Corrections, with ongoing funding provided by the Province. Plenary Justice, a private partner with BC Corrections, has been contracted to design, build and deliver the OCC at a cost of $192.9 million. Construction of the facility was expected to generate over 1,000 direct and indirect jobs, and operation of the OCC will provide over 240 full-time positions for correctional officers. Anyone interested in pursuing work as a correctional officer in the facility is invited to attend one of several free information sessions held in Kelowna and Oliver throughout March. For more information go to to http://ow.ly/JgXWR.

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“You’re famous!” laughs NVH Dripline Cafe employee Cheyenne Keen as she asks Terri Orford (left) for an autograph.

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DAM | FROM A1 with the March 9 date, even though four of the people won’t be able to make it due to busy schedules.” Zahler said the meeting would take place in either Okanogan or Wenatchee. “Unless something changes between now and then, it will be held on the 9th. They did want a starting point, and that’s the best we can do. Those who can will make it, and if they need to meet again in the future they can.” Fisher said he expected the meeting to be an information exchange to keep PUD Commissioners appraised of alternative opportunities and funding sources that exist regarding Enloe Dam, one example being the DOE potentially purchasing non-consumptive water rights. Commissioners Houston and Ernest Bolz agreed with the recommendations of Grubich to discontinue the portion of the Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) program which gives consumers interested in supporting the program the opportunity to donate to alternative energy producers. The program was scheduled to end April 1, and it was decided the estimated annual cost to administer the program outweighed the benefits. SNAP began back in 2004 with one producer generating 2171 kilowatt-hour, and has grown over the last 10 years to about 30 alternate energy providers producing 180,000 kilowatt hours. Seventeen county custom-

Mark Brett/Penticton Western News

Construction of the 378 bed Okanagan Correctional Centre in Oliver, BC is expected to be complete by the fall of 2016. The cells that make up the new facility are pre-fabricated in the U.S. and shipped to Canada, crossing at the Oroville/Osoyoos Port of Entry.

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Terri Orford glows with anticipation as she waits to hear back from America’s Got Talent.

Phone:

Katie Teachout/staff photo

comedy stand-up act followed by recording studio and record a a woman playing guitar and sing- few tracks. I could give them ing a Bonnie Raitt song before it to my grandmother who is 101, was her turn. lives in Post Falls, Idaho, and “That was the most nerve- has never heard me sing,” Orford wracking moment,” Orford said. said. “Lonnie Good has a studio “I’m not a seasoned enough per- in Okanogan open to the public former---when a kid does stand to rent. It takes initiative to rent a up right before you, it’s kind of studio and go and actually do it, hard to get inspired to sing.” but with all this happening, it has Singers are asked to perform a motivated me.” cappella (withHer backout a backup ground in track, which music includes can overpower “It was totally impromp- playing drums vocals) and for two years in tu, but that’s what choose a porher high school tion of the song pep band and jazz is about -- being that best shows for a Methow inspired and in the off their voice. Valley jazz Orford again band led by moment.” chose to sing Terry Hunt. Terri Orford, Tonasket ‘Crazy.’ “Singing Contestant on America’s Got Talent Describing in the New the setting as Orleans jazz being “kinda club was the dry,” Orford said it had none of highlight of my life,” Orford the ambiance of the jazz club said, giving credit to her husband with lighting and action, where Andy. “He has definitely fosit’s easier to get into the flow. tered my hobby of singing and “It was more like a job inter- really supports me in that. He’s view, and I felt like I should a quiet and reserved person who have to sit down for a business doesn’t hand out compliments meeting afterward,” said Orford, very often, so when he did that the New Business Development in New Orleans it was a huge Director at Tonasket’s North compliment.” Valley Hospital. Orford said part of the joy in Nationwide, 17,000 people performing and singing is seeing have already auditioned for the other people’s reactions. show that takes all ages, any A 2004 graduate of Liberty Bell talent. A small number will be High School in Winthrop, Orford called up for the next level of acquired her business degree competition, performing in front from Whatcom Community of this year’s celebrity judges College in Bellingham before Howard Stern, Howie Mandel, moving to Tonasket in 2010, takHeidi Klum and Melanie Brown. ing a job in the billing department Acts chosen will then compete at NVH. live on TV, with the winner tak“I love it here; it’s a great ing home $1 million. place to work,” said Orford, who Orford said her mother Leslie moved into her current position Olson, along with her partner of director of business developLaurie Thorp, both of Kettle ment just a couple of months Falls, and her father Brian later. “I’m a very social person, Henderson, also of Kettle Falls and after building relationships are all planning to come if she with people in the valley through gets called up for the next step. work, I feel like it has come full “I had to keep them at bay with circle. People have reciprocated this initial audition, telling them and I feel so much support from ‘it’s just preliminary—don’t co-workers, family, friends and come,’ said Orford, adding that fellow Kiwanians. I think the best she wouldn’t know until April if part of this experience is to realshe’s chosen. And if she’s not? ize how many people love and “I would love to go to a support me.”

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 26, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal Samantha Ann Harding, 44, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Feb. 10 to two counts of attempted second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The court dismissed additional charges of second-degree malicious mischief and reckless driving. Harding was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the Aug. 10, 2014 crimes. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 31, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 12 to POCS (heroin). The court dismissed a third-degree DWLS charge. McCraigie was sentenced to 60 days in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the Jan. 25 crime. Daniel Keith Parker, 49, Yakima, pleaded guilty Feb. 17 to possession of a stolen motor vehicle. Parker was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $600. The crime occurred Jan. 29 at the Oroville Port of Entry. Sean Lee Dahlquist, 24, Oroville, pleaded guilty Feb. 18 to second-degree burglary, residential burglary, first-degree theft, second-degree theft, first-degree possession of stolen property, two counts of possession of a stolen motor vehicle, theft of a firearm, second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, possession of a stolen firearm, POCS (Vicodin), two counts of third-degree malicious mischief and one count of first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes occurred Dec. 1-2, 2014. In a separate case, Dahlquist pleaded guilty Feb. 18 to two counts of second-degree burglary and one count each of second-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Those crimes occurred Nov. 16, 2014. Dahlquist was sentenced to a total of 44.75 months (3.73 years) in prison and fined a total of $4,221. Rosea Mae Perez, 31, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 19 to attempted second-degree assault. Perez was sentenced to 6.75 months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the July 1, 2014 crime. The court found probable cause to charge Jorge Antonio Gonzalez, 32, Omak, with first-degree burglary, second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 7. The court found probable cause to charge Juan Aragon Torres, 47, Omak, with first-degree burglary, second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 7. The court found probable cause to charge Jorge A. Perez Duran, 50, Omak, with first-degree burglary, second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 7. The court found probable cause to charge Alfonso Cardenas Jr., 57, Omak, with violation of a nocontact order. The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 6. The court found probable cause to charge Jennifer Mary Cheney, 36, Oroville, with third-degree assault (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 6. The court found probable cause to charge Dennis Lee Glover, 47, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine), DUI and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 6. The court found probable cause to charge Terry Lee Zoller, 63, Riverside, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 7. The court found probable cause to charge Brendan Wade Overall, 23, Spokane Valley, with POCS (methamphetamine), second-degree DWLS and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 8 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Paul Joseph Fontaine,

47, Riverside, with six counts of first-degree possession of depictions of minors engaged in sexually explicit conduct and one count of the same offense in the second-degree. The court found probable cause to charge Delitha Gail Hahn, 37, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine) and second-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 12. The court found probable cause to charge Ricardo Gaspar Martinez, 42, Omak, with seconddegree theft, second-degree theft (access device) and tampering with physical evidence. The crimes allegedly occurred between September 2014 and February 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Marvella Pioquinto Basa, 39, Oroville, with seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 17.

Juvenile A 12-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Feb.11 to fourthdegree assault. The boy was sentenced to six days in detention with credit for six days served, and fined $100 for the Dec. 26, 2014 crime. A 14-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Feb. 18 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The boy was sentenced to 16 hours of community service and fined $75 for the Oct. 5, 2014 crime. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Feb. 18 to minor in a public place exhibiting the effects of liquor. The boy was sentenced to 16 hours of community service and fined $75 for the Dec. 6, 2014 crime. Civil The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed Cardenas Brothers Auto and Truck Repair, Omak, $2,707.48 in unpaid wages, penalties and fines. The state Department of Labor and Industries assessed Home Services Northwest LLC, Tonasket, $3,702.24 in unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and fines. DISTRICT COURT Anthony Todd Rhodes, 30, Omak, had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. Rhodes was fined $200. Deborah Sue Rodriguez, 42, Oroville, guilty of no valid operator’s license without ID. Rodriguez received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $608. David John Smith Jr., 42, Tonasket, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Smith was fined $500. Kenneth Ray Squetimkin, 23, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Squetimkin was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. Lynn Michelle Stanley, 44, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Stanley was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined $608. Karen Marie Taylor, 48, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Taylor was fined $1,175. John Leon Thomas, 62, Okanogan, guilty on three counts of third-degree DWLS. Thomas was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,824. Bernard J. Valdez, Jr., 39, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Valdez was fined $1,475. Chad Vanatta, no middle name listed, 28, Tonasket, had a thirddegree DWLS charge dismissed. Rowena Leialoha P. Watts, 48, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Watts was fined $200. Ronald Harry Wolf, 59, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Wolff was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $1,283. Jesse James Ytuarte, 32, Okanogan, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Ytuarte was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $808. Jaime Alexis Zavala Galindo, 29, Tonasket, guilty of interfering

with reporting (DV) and disorderly conduct. Zavala Galindo was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,058.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Feb. 16, 2015 Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Tools reported missing. Malicious mischief on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Mailbox reported damaged. False report on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Burglary on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Miller Rd. near Omak. Mailboxes reported damaged. Threats on Limebelt Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Theft on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Phone reported missing. Domestic dispute on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Threats on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Weapons offense on Kay St. in Oroville. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Littering on Main St. in Oroville. Merton Bazil Soloman, 47, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants, both for third-degree theft. Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015 Fraud on Talbert Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Mailbox reported damaged. Threats on Box Spring Dr. near Tonasket. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Senna St. in Omak. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Elm St. in Omak. Harassment on Jasmine St. in Omak. Burglary on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Trespassing on Golden St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Found property on Main St. in Oroville. Bicycle recovered. Assault on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Jory L. Vallee, 26, DOC detainer. Jack O’Bryan, no middle name listed, 25, court commitment for DUI. Sean Thomas, no middle name listed, 48, DOC detainer. Marvella Pioquinto Basa, 39, booked for second-degree assault (DV) and a USBP hold. Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015

Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Fraud on Warren Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Aeneas Valley Rd. near Tonasket. Firearm reported missing. Fraud on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Trespassing on Talkire Lake Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Engh Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Oak St. in Omak. Mailbox reported damaged. Weapons offense on N. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. Eric Edward Hough, 43, booked for DUI.

Thursday, Feb. 19, 2015 Trespassing on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Theft on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Littering on Okanogan Airport Rd. near Okanogan. Drugs on Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Custodial interference on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Threats on Temby Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Oak St. in Omak. Graffiti reported. Malicious mischief on Pine St. in Omak. Tires reported slashed. Malicious mischief on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Graffiti reported. Fraud on Columbia St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on Pine St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Birch St. in Omak. Fire on Hanford St. in Omak. Burglary on S. Birch St. in Omak. Drugs on N. Ash St. in Omak.. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Trespassing on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Stormy Renee Picard, 30, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Heather Dee Anne Day, 51, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Darryle Clint Gua, 30, booked for disorderly conduct. Dustin Hayes, no middle name listed, DOC detainer. Mark Anthony Landa, 49, booked on three counts of firstdegree child molestation and one count of second-degree

child molestation. Daniel August Buckley, 44, booked for residential burglary and third-degree theft. Stephanie Marie Michael, 27, DOC detainer.

Friday, Feb. 20, 2015 Drugs on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Traffic cones reported missing. Harassment on Dun Horse Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on Two Horse Rd. near Wauconda. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Chesaw Rd. near Chesaw. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. DUI on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Birch St. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy.97 near Tonasket. Kevin Anthony Baker, 48, booked on three State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI, seconddegree DWLS and hit-and-run (attended). Kyle Lloyd Campbell, 26, DOC detainer. Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015 Assault on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Automobile theft on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Search and rescue at LoomisOroville Rd. near Loomis. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. DWLS on N. Van Duyn St. in Okanogan. DUI on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Benton Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Harassment on N. Main St. in Omak. Structure fire on E. Fig Ave. in

Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Cedar St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Jackson St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on E. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. Pornography on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Alisha Ann Russell, 22, booked for DUI. Eric Matthew Anguiano, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tristan Devlyn Rodriguez, 18, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for unlawful display of a weapon. Rusty Jochua Nimmo, 25, booked for carrying a loaded pistol without a license and third-degree DWLS. Cecil William Grant, 43, booked for DUI. Anthony Grand Louis, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault. Robert Noel Johnson, 53, booked for violation of a nocontact order.

Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015 DWLS on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Assault on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Harassment on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Assault on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Miller Rd. near Omak. Cell phone reported missing. Illegal burning on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Miller Rd. near Omak. Assault on Palmer Ave. in Loomis. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Theft on Juniper Place in Omak. Fuel reported siphoned. Theft on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Fuel reported siphoned. Warrant arrest on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on Juniper St. in Oroville. Stetson Ladoux McMillan, 25, booked for DUI. Alyssa Kay Lynne Bray, 18, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Larry Gene Visger, 67, booked on five OCSO FTA warrants: two for violation of a no-contact order (DV) and one each for third-degree DWLS, violation of an anti-harassment order (DV), and fourth-degree assault (DV). Juan Orozco Martinez, 38, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and a USBP hold.

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FEBRUARY 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

The Petri Dish

The wait is nearly over BY JERRY CORNFIELD EVERETT HERALD WRITER

Senate Republicans, after two years of avoidance, are putting the final touches on a multibillion-dollar transportation package and could make it public as early as Thursday. It’s what Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee has politely, pointedly and persistently demanded of GOP lawmakers. His public pressure — remember how he called them out in last year’s State of the State address — coupled with the private lobbying of business leaders, certainly motivated Republicans to reach this point this early in the session. But the governor is likely to be sparing in his praise of their handiwork. This package — crafted in part through negotiations with Democrats — delivers a bipartisan rejection of his signature climatechange initiatives. Its major funding source would be a gas tax hike of somewhere between 11.5 cents and 14 cents, not revenue from the cap-and-trade program for carbon emissions he’s pushed. And Republicans apparently are ready to pump more dollars into public transit in exchange for Democrats agreeing to delay — maybe even halt — action on a new carbon fuel standard that Inslee’s administration has begun writing. The deal also calls for GOP senators to allow Sound Transit to ask voters to fund expansions into Everett and Tacoma. Inslee’s not going to wave the white flag on his initiatives. Instead, he can focus on making sure the counterproposal that will be drawn up in the Democrat-controlled House keeps one or both of them alive in some fashion. The governor’s next move may become clearer when he talks to reporters Thursday. Meanwhile, don’t look for House Speaker Frank Chopp, D-Seattle, to applaud the accomplishment of Senate Republicans too loudly either. By this time next week, that bundle of transportation joy could be outside his door and he’ll be fielding questions about what he wants to do and when he wants to do it. Some around the Capitol think Chopp should press for swift action by the House, rapidly consummate a deal with the Senate and get it signed by the governor. This would give everyone a chance to collectively relish an accomplishment on what’s been a divisive issue. Acting soon, they argue, also would give Democrats a little breathing space before they start seriously talking about taxes they want to raise to pay for education and government services. That’s going to be a difficult conversation that will last until the end of session in late April and maybe beyond. Leaving a decision on a gas tax hike until then can only make it harder. On the other hand, Chopp may find more value in waiting and using the transportation package as leverage for securing votes for those taxes. There are those who contend there will be lawmakers in both parties willing to pledge support for a new or higher tax for the budget if their pet transportation project is funded. But, they contend, acting too soon on transportation could allow those lawmakers to change their minds later. Back in the Senate, after two years of being the ones watched, Republicans surely can’t wait to be the ones watching.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Need to tell Congress to pass the DHS budget

ability and efficiency of DHS to perform its mission, which is to keep us safe. By Congress’ and the Senate’s inaction, they are aiding terrorism in its desire to succeed. It’s that simple. Have you contacted your political representative today? The U.S. Coast Guard is the largest agency under DHS. They protect our shores from all types of threats but more importantly terrorist threats hoping to make it to the U.S. undetected. How effective do you think they will be when they are worried about paychecks, operational costs, and financial obligations? “The hardworking servicemen and women of the U.S. Coast Guard have received their

last paycheck for the year, unless Congress acts now. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has been funded under a continuing resolution since October, and its current funding runs out Feb. 27. These dedicated public servants will continue working without pay past the shutdown to ensure our safety on the sea and in our ports, our protection from threats delivered by the sea and to protect the sea itself. Asking the Coast Guard to protect us while remaining unpaid is no way to show the gratitude of the American people. The potential shut down, or even another continuing resolution, would have devastating impacts for the Coast Guard — in addition to bringing down morale, the cost of work on USCG recapitalization efforts would rise as contracts are delayed, and retirees will not receive their retirement pay. Tell Congress and the Senate to give DHS a real appropriations bill now.” (U.S. Navy League) To all, we need your help with getting the word out about the shutting down of DHS and how many families it’s going to harm. We never left someone to die because politicians couldn’t lead or make decisions. Using DHS as a whipping tool or political ploy is ridiculous. The faithful members of this organization didn’t sign up to serve our country just so their health, financial responsibilities, and the family members they support could all be put on hold or suffer due to politicians trying to make a point. How many politicians are losing pay over this political chess? How many political members are having their credit ratings go down or interest rates on loans go up because of this issue. Please contact your elected officials today and tell them to pass the DHS budget. Marcus Alden Oroville

ITEMS FROM THE PAST

Fancy Tuna, large cans, 2 for $.29; Edwards Coffee, 1 lb. can, $.24, 2lb. can, $.45 or 3 lb. can for $.89; Alaska Red Salmon, 2 cans, $.45.

Grocery prices: Pot Roast, $.37 lb.; Rhubarb, hot house grown, $.25 peer lb.; TV Dinners, 3 for $1.00; 2 lb. loaf Velveeta cheese, $.89; Large, AA eggs, $.39 per doz.; Dry onions, $.05 per lb. and Butterhorns with fruit filling, $.05 ea.

Dear Editor, Our malls inside our borders have been threatened by terrorists. These same terrorist have proven they are competent in these types of attacks. One of the primary agencies that protects U.S. citizens against this type of threat is the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Our government is currently holding budgetary funding up for this organization over political reasons and grandstanding. Our Congress and Senate are affecting the

Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www. heraldnet.com. Contact him at  360-352-8623;  jcornfield@heraldnet. com and on Twitter at @dospueblos

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago February 16 - 23, 1940: Okanogan County will spend somewhat more than $50,000 on road construction during 1940. The portion to be spent in the Oroville District will cover the following; a contract is to be let soon for a pile bridge across the Okanogan River east of town at a cost of $5,000; about six miles of the Oroville-Molson road will be re-surfaced with crushed stone at a cost of about $6,000 and a few other small projects in the area. Joe Wicks, attorney from Okanogan and attorney John Hancock were in Oroville this past weekend. Mr. Hancock contemplates locating in Oroville sometime in the near future, should Roy Green fail to come back. Arthur S. Michel, Okanogan County Sheriff, said Monday that every effort had been made to find a clue which will lead to the settle the mystery of the missing Roy Green. His car had been found in Walla Walla but had collected so much dust that it was impossible to get any fingerprints which might indicate that he had driven it to that point. It is reported that the Standard Oil Company has purchased the former Murphy’s Service Station on the corner of Central and Main streets. (The present location of 76 Quickstop station.) The old buildings will be removed and that part of the lots not up to street level will be filled in. The building will be new and modern in every respect with all driveways hard surfaced with either asphalt or cement. Grocery Prices: Hooker Lye, 3 cans, $.23; Grape Nut Flakes, $.09 per pkg.; Walnut Meats, $.43 per lb.;

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: February 18 -25, 1965: The $92,000 annual residential rate reduction announced last week by the Okanogan County PUD will result in customer savings ranging from a few cents to several dollars per month. On a monthly basis, the first 25 kilowatt (kwh) will cost a minimum of $1.00; the next 25 kwh will cost $.02; the next 200 kwh will cost $.01; the next 400 kwh will be at nine mills and all over 650 kwh per month will be at the rate of 8 mills. Charles Spieth was hired as police deputy at the last City Council meeting. He began work on the night of Feb. 15 and will work the night shift. His starting pay will be $4,500 per year. The new police car scheduled to arrive last month has been lost in shipment. George’s Chevrolet has put a tracer on it in an attempt to locate it. The powerhouse of the Caribou Trail League, the Oroville Hornets will tangle with Omak this Friday night to end the season. The Hornets, now with a 16-3 winning streak. At Tuesday’s Chamber of Commerce meeting, the budget for the year 1965 was presented and approved for publication. The major items of expense are: Real Estate contract for the tourist booth lot $400; Sunny Okanogan Float, $300; advertising sign north of town for lighting and painting, $318 and all other items totaling $1,858. Estimated Income, Sign rental, $350, membership dues, $1,278 and miscellanious. items $350 for a total of $1,858. The Gazette learned Wednesday that Gib Moser has been appointed the Standard Oil of California distributor for this area. Moser is well known in this area as he graduated from Oroville High School. He will take over the new position on March 1. Weather Wise by Marge Frazier, official observer: Feb. 17, 40 degrees maximum and 31 degrees minimum; Feb.18, 40 and 29; Feb. 19, 53 and 28; Feb. 20 , 49 and 24; Feb. 21, 45 and 25; Feb. 22, 41 and 30 and Feb. 23, 40 and 25. Total precipitation for the period, 0 with 40 inches of snow.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: February 15 - 22, 1990: The winners of the Valentine Couples in Tonasket and Oroville were chosen recently. Representing Tonasket are Middie and Don Verbeck. The couple celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary on May 30,1987 and have three daughters and one son. Oroville will be represented by Ella and Ernest Quigg. The couple were married in Couer’d Alene, Idaho in 1931 and moved to Oroville in 1932. The Quigg’s have one daughter. Members of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) board have approached the Oroville City Council with a request that the city co-sponsor a loan in order to build a new headquarters for the EMS District. The building would house three ambulances, a service bay, training facilities for the personnel as well as an office for district business. Roger Castelda, Attorney at Law, has opened his office at 216 S. Whitcomb in Tonasket on Dec. 1. He was born in Yakima and graduated from high school in 1959 and from Gonzaga Law School in 1974. Farmers Home Administration gave a go ahead to over 20 units of Senior Housing in Tonasket. The developer, Crest Construction, will demolish the Tonasket Youth Center to provide the space for the new units. The Tonasket Tigers jumped off to a fast start last Thursday as they hosted Cashmere in the first round of Caribou League play, with a final score of 66-49. They suffered a loss in Omak to the Lake Roosevelt team with a score of 55-66. Meanwhile, the Oroville Hornets were bested by Ephrata in the first round by a 37-50 final and went on to overtake Okanogan, in Omak, with a 39-35 win. And finally, the Tonasket Tigers squeezed out the Oroville Hornets to earn the chance to represent the North County in the District play.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 26, 2015

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Sometimes the news isn’t so fun For the most part, writing this column is fun, or I wouldn’t continue to do it. Plus the fact that so many folks, some who don’t even know me, except from my photo at the heading, tell me how much they enjoy reading it. But sometimes I do have to really “think” about things to write, but this week I already know it isn’t gonna be fun because too many of my friends are either ill or death has called them to their eternal home. Where do I begin? Ongoing updates of Bob Hirst find him not gaining strength as I’d like to report. He likes to visit but tires easily so if you go see him, perhaps keep it short. He is still at home, but preparations are in process for a move to Tonasket Care center. Beverly Curtis, who had a head injury from a fall she encountered while doing her usual daily walking, was in hospital in Wenatchee, but is now home. She is still having headaches but a doctor’s visit says she is doing okay, but it may take four to six weeks for the entire healing

Looking back at the history of the Nursing Home SUBMITTED BY KAREN SCHIMPF THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

Every day when I get up, I see my hearth of old bricks. These bricks are from the old convent building. I was lucky enough to take some home when it was torn down. When I first came here in 1974 the convent stood as a testament to the Dominican Sisters who lived there and ran the Hospital and Nursing Home. The Sisters left in 1972 and St. Martin’s became Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4. Both floors of the hospital were full much of the time with surgery on the second floor and medical patients and some long term residents on the first floor. Among those living there was a bald headed nice old man named Mr. Lund. As it turns out he was the banker who helped fund our hospital by encouraging local folks to donate money

Annual FFA barbecue steak dinner Saturday SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

We have had some very cold mornings and nice sunny afternoon, (keep it coming). Just a reminder of the FFA annual Barbequed steak dinner on Saturday February 28th from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Karaoke to follow by Linda Wood. Starting on Tuesday, March 3

NURSING HOME NEWS through the Tonasket Hospital Association in the 1930’s. Across the driveway from the hospital was the old hospital, which became the Nursing Home. Many of our local folks were born in this building and many died there. In front were huge evergreens, two wonderful Gingko trees, and the oldest lilacs I had ever seen. The current tunnel was there in rougher form. Our laundry was located off of it. That tunnel inspired many ghostly fears over the years. I started to work in the Nursing Home in 1975. The hospital DNS made it a requirement to have all hospital nurses orient to the Nursing Home. My long attachment with the Nursing Home began then. I started learning the names of old pioneering families in this area as I took care of their senior members. As I got to know the area I saw so many of these family names on road signs and

TONASKET EAGLES we will be having Taco Night from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Price is $1.50 each and 25 cents extra for orders to go. There will be a Benefit Dinner/ Dessert Auction for Jordan Montanye on Saturday, March 7. Dinner will be chicken fried steak for $10 starting at 5:30 p.m. and going to 7 p.m. Any donations of desserts is very much welcome. Proceeds are for medical expenses. Karaoke will follow the auction. on Saturday, March 14 we will

Breakfasts have been successful Grange fund raisers SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Last Sunday was the first of the Pancake Breakfasts to come on the fourth Sunday of the month. There was a good bunch of folks partaking in this breakfast. They reported 166 adults were served and one child. There were quite a few donations made also. This was a very successful fund raiser for the Grange. The Ladies Auxiliary have put together some baskets again this year to raffle. The winners this time were Darrell and Judy Bunch, Bobbie Jean and Susie Eder. The ladies will be making

process. Roberta Cole fell last Tuesday, broke her femur (large bone above the knee) had a delay in surgery, Omak. I’ve been told she had a rod put into her femur and a knee replacement, a double whammy, indeed! Loni Lutz, site director at the Oroville Senior Center, had issues with her foot and has been wearing a classy shoe on the affected foot and was prohibited from driving. I don’t have an update on our “card sender” at the Center, Marilyn Perry, but hopefully she is doing well, after a short stay in hospital. She’s the one that does the beautiful calligraphy lettering on all the cards that are sent or hand delivered by her, from the center. Geneva Irwin has been moved from her home into Harmony House, Brewster, where Bob is already a resident. Cleta Adams is on oxygen and able to come for lunch, again, sometimes, with the aid of a walker.

HILLTOP COMMENTS more baskets for the rest of the breakfasts so come have your meal and purchase your tickets six for $5 -- you may win a prize. Our next Family Bingo Nights will be on March 6 and March 20, mark your calendar. There is going to be a Birthday Party for Ray Visser on March 14 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., in Havillah at the Immanuel Lutheran Church Parish Hall. No gifts please. Cards are welcome. Help Ray celebrate his 90th Birthday. Light snacks and cake will be served. On Feb. 16 with 32 pinochle players in attendance in Molson the winners were, Highs – went to Judy R and Ray. The Lows went to Ina Visser and Don Field.

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Virgil and Donna (Rainsberry) Forney rageous battle with health issues, (heart have moved into another facility in and lung) but never did give up that she Yakima, due to additional health issues wouldn’t be back at the Center where her with him and the facility specializes in many friends were. Glen was not sure of memory loss, which might the date of a Memorial but be beneficial for her. felt there probably would be Pat Robins is home after one, at a later date. another bout with a malfuncA memorial service was tioning heart. Hopefully she held last weekend for Steve can return to daily routines, Lewis, son of Grant and Elsa, which hopefully include golf, who passed away recently, in and if the weather continues Spokane from multiple health as it has these past recent problems. Condolences were days, that might be sooner offered to the Lewis family than some years. Tulips and and a potluck luncheon was buttercups are sure signs of THIS & THAT held in the United Methodist spring. Church Saturday afternoon. Marge Finley has back Joyce Emry A happy note, for Madge issues which has required her Haney. In fact the birthday to use a walker, but is slowly song is in order for her as she getting better, and will soon be sharing turned 97. She is still able to be in her hugs with folks at the Oroville Senior own home, alone, with help as needed, center. ‘Til then Betty Hall Hall has from daughter Jackie, attends church and been filling in for her, as greeter. I see her frequently at the local breakfast Long time member of the Community, spot on Sunday mornings, after church. Jean (Harden) Jacobs has been called Yeah! for you, Madge. by death, after a recent move to a nursNoted News! An apple that doesn’t ing home in Colville. Jean married Rex turn brown, when cut. How many addiHarden, was from the East Coast, raised tives do you suppose had to be added to their family and after his death, she mar- make that happen. ried Bill Jacobs. We had lots of fun times Would you like to sign up for going to here and away when we were on numer- Mars? They’re taking names, but it’ll be ous bowling teams. Condolences go to a while. I’m for getting things straighther daughters and son and their families. ened out on the local planet, instead of Juanita Waggy fought a long and cou- messing up another one.

realized what a special place I had chosen to live in. People know each other here. By the early 80’s it became apparent that we would need to construct a new building. North Valley Nursing Home opened in 1985 as a 70 bed facility. The community was very proud of their accomplishment. I have more stories and maybe you do too. We are interested in any stories you may want to share and would appreciate it if you would send them to us. I can be reached at 509-486-2144 or you can mail them to me PO Box 865, Tonasket, WA. The Nursing Home Success team has been encouraged by the response to the informational notebook distributions. We, as a community, need to keep focusing on securing the future of our Nursing Home as well as remembering the past. We will be holding our first public forums on March 18 at the Community Church in Tonasket at 7 p.m. and on March 25 at the United Methodist Church in Oroville, at 7 p.m. We hope to see you there.. Thank you for your concern and interest, The Nursing Home Success Team and Karen Schimpf. be having our Crab Feed, more news to come. The Joker Poker is up to $2601. You could win half, so come on in on any Saturday night. Bingo is on Friday nights at 7 p.m., the Pick-8 is up to $15,000. You can’t win if you done play. Pinochle Scores are as follows: first place, Ted Paris and Dave Russell; second place, Leonard and Nellie Paulsen; Low Score went to Jerry Cooksey and Carrol Weber and Last Pinochle to Ward Seim and Jerilyn Green. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. Willie took the Traveling. Until next week.

Everything from acrylic painting to ukuleles SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

This week at North Valley Community School I made a valiant attempt to avoid my homework. Hiding under my desk proved to be insufficient however and Ellen found me anyway, so here are this week’s upcoming classes: The Ukulele for Fun – Monday, March 2 at 6 p.m. Have you ever used a ukulele? You may be amazed at how easy and fun this unique instrument is! No prior knowledge is necessary. Bring your unique ukulele you’ve been wanting to use and join the fun!

Friday is movie night at the Senior Center SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

This Friday is Movie Matinee Friday at 1 p.m. We will be showing the uproariously funny, white knuckle, hold on to your seat “Planes Trains and Automobiles” starring Steve Martin and John Candy. Potluck Sunday is now only on the second Sunday of the month, at 1 p.m. With Pinochle (their own version) afterwards. It has been decided that next month we will be having a St. Patrick’s

There was a smaller attendance at the annual Shrove Tuesday pancake dinner at the Episcopal Church, but the food was just as good and lots of chit-chat. And extra sausage was sold for folks to take home and another meal can be planned without much cooking to be done. Do you realize that two days from the date on this paper, you turn another page on the calendar and you’re looking at March? February was a busy month for us. Our social calendar was really full ending with a trip to Seattle for another musical at the 5th Avenue Theatre. This time the show was Carousel and tickets were complimentary from a grandson, and housing, dinner and a lot of other perks also from family. Good Kids! Lance Haney has been the recipient of the apple wood from his neighbor, Tabers, who cut out parts of their orchard. We came to the conclusion that the trees seemed to look larger laying down flat than they did when standing. One thing for sure is he has enough wood to last a good long while. Have you noticed the several boats out on the lake, already? Another lot of people were served the usual good pancake breakfast last Sunday at the Molson Grange. ‘Til Next Week.

THE LEARNING TREE Mayo is Healthier Made From Scratch – Tuesday, March 3 at 6:30 p.m. Mayonnaise is a staple condiment in the majority of homes in America. But is it good for us? Commercial mayo is made from corn oil and soybean oil, the vast majority of which comes from genetically modified crops. Not worried about GMOs? How about preservatives, additives, pesticide residues and ran-

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS day celebration of Pinochle and Bridge, followed by a late “desert,” on St. Patrick’s day. It’ll start at 2 p.m. and go to whenever. Bingo will be cancelled that day. We will also be providing our unusual Pancake Breakfast, all you can eat, onMarch 14. We had our first computer “workshop” class last Thursday. We spent two hours of setting up computers for classes that will be starting next month, or sooner. If you get computer #5, and it

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

On March 8, we observe International Women’s Day. On this occasion, thousands of events across the world will honor the cultural, political and social achievements of women. Of course, in many countries, women still face significant economic challenges. And even here in the United States, women encounter more obstacles than men in the pursuit of financial security, particularly in seeking a comfortable retirement lifestyle. So if you are a woman — regardless of your marital status — you will need to be aware of these challenges and take steps to overcome them. Let’s consider a few of these challenges and some possible solutions: Challenge: Women spend more time out of the workforce and accumulate less money in 401(k) plans. Women spend an average of 12 years out of the workforce caring for children or elderly parents,

doesn’t work, blame me. Tillie Porter is our illustrious and most appreciated teacher. Bring her an apple. (Apple?) We had three unfortunate falls, with one broken femur. Beverly Curtis, Marylin Perry, and Roberta Cole are all recovering nicely, thank goodness. Life is like driving, while looking only in the rear view mirror. We don’t know the future, just the past. Its only by divine providence that we don’t run into a brick wall, or worse. So, when you pull into that intersectionbe sure to look in all directions. Pinochle Report: Door Prize, Larry Smith; Pinochle, Leonard Paulsen; High Man, Ted Zachman; High Woman, Arden Penner. 16 were in attendance.

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Women May Face Extra Challenges In Seeking Financial Security FINANCIAL FOCUS

cid oils? Make sure your mayo is healthful by making it yourself using fresh, top quality ingredients and health promoting oils. Not only is it better for you, it’s easy and it tastes great too! Advanced Acrylic Painting – Wednesday, March 4 at 6:30 p.m. The previous acrylic painting class covered the basics, and students painted a tree with swells. This class will cover more indepth detail on how to bring out lighting, shapes and personality in your paintings. Financial Wellness – Thursday, March 5 at 2 p.m. This class will teach you the basics of budgeting, paying down debt, and planning your financial future. A workbook will be provided. To sign up for these classes and more, call Taskmaster Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or visit our website at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

compared with less than two years for men, according to the Social Security Administration. This time away from work can translate into less money in retirement plans — in fact, women’s average 401(k) balance is only about two-thirds as large as men’s, according to a study by Fidelity Investments.

Social Security was designed to supplement one’s retirement income, not replace it. Consequently, it’s essential that you make full use of your other sources of income, such as your 401(k), IRA and other investment accounts. To make this money last, you’ll need to create a sustainable withdrawal strategy early in your retirement — and stick to it.

Potential solution: Take full advantage of your 401(k) Challenge: Women are far more likely than men to and IRA. need some type of long-term care. Your care-giving obligations are an issue to be decided by you, your spouse and perhaps other family More than two-thirds of nursing home residents are members. But while you are working, contribute as women, according to the National Center for Health much as you possibly can to your 401(k) or similar Statistics. And the average cost for a private room employer-sponsored plan. Also, try to fully fund your in a nursing home is more than $87,000 per year, according to the 2014 Cost of Care Survey produced IRA each year. by Genworth, a financial services company. Typically, Challenge: Women typically live more years in Medicare covers only a small percentage of these retirement and depend more heavily on Social costs. Security. Potential solution: Prepare in advance for long-term care expenses. Women reaching age 65 are expected to live, on average, an additional 21.6 years, compared with Long-term care costs can be enormous, but you do 19.3 years for men, according to the Social Security have some protection-related options for meeting Administration, which also reports that the average these costs. Check with your financial advisor annual Social Security income received by women to learn which of these choices might be most 65 years and older was about $12,500. Furthermore, appropriate for your situation. Social Security comprises about 50% of the total income for unmarried women age 65 and older, These aren’t the only financial issues facing women, but they do give you a good idea of what you may be compared to just 36% for elderly men. facing. So, be proactive in meeting these challenges Potential solution: To become less dependent on — because there’s actually a lot you can do. Social Security, create a sustainable withdrawal This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your strategy for your investment portfolio. local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Oliver Theatre

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250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

aMErICan SnIpEr ThUrs.-Fri. Feb. 26-27. ThUrs: aT 7:30 & Fri: aT 9:30pm.

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saT. - sUn.- mOn. TUes. Feb 28, marCh 1-2-3. shOwTimes On saT. @ 700 & 9:25 pm

FIFTy SHadES OF grEy saT. - TUes. marCh 7-10. saT. 7:00pm-9:30pm

wIld ThUrs.-Fri. mar 5-6 Fri. @ 7 & 9:15 pm TakEn 3 ThUrs.-Fri. mar 12-13 Fri. @ 7 & 9:10 pm

OMAK THEATER Omak and mirage TheaTers are nOw digiTal

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129 min drama/spOrT sTarring kevin COsTner, maria bellOw, ramirO rOdrigUez. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT.*3:00,6:00, 9:00. sUn. *3:00, 6:00. mOn-ThUrs. 6:30

The

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101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

kIngSMEn: THE SECrET SErVICE 129 min

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SpOngEbOb: SpOngE 93min pg OUT OF waTEr. animaTiOn saT.-sUn. *3:00

FOCUS

COmedY / Crime / drama . 104 min r sTarring will smiTh, margOn rObbie, rOdrigO sanTOrO. Fri. 6:45, 9:45. saT. *3:30, 6:45, 9:45, sUn. *3:30, 6:45. mOn - ThUrs. 7:00 123 min

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pg13 biOgraphY / drama / rOmanCe sTarring eddie redmaYne, FeliCiTY JOnes, TOm priOr. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT. *3:15, 6:30, 9:30.

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No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


FEBRUARY 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR HILSTAD BENEFIT DINNER OROVILLE - OROVILLE - There will be a dinner and auction to benefit Ted and Renee Hilstad on Saturday, March 7 at 5 p.m. at the Oroville Eagles Hall. The menu will be Ranch-style Chili and fixings and the auctioneer will be Ken Neal. The public is encouraged to come on in and support their neighbors.

Stroke Support Group

Weed Control Recertification

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group meets next on Wednesday, Feb. 25 at 10:30 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir Street. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be refreshments.

OKANOGAN The Okanogan County Noxious Weed Control Board will be holding a Recertification Class on Thursday, March 5 in the Commissioners’ Hearing Room, 123 Fifth Ave. North, Okanogan. Class size is limited to 75 people so pre-register. The class will be from 8 a.m. to 11:50 a.m., topics are: Herbicide Control Options for Pasture and Rangeland Weeds; WSDA Licenses & Endorsements; Weedy Grasses Who’s Who and Conventional Orchard Weed Control There will be a $5 charge for the class, and 4 pesticide license credits will be available. For more info the Noxious Weed Office at 509-422-7165 or stop by Room 102 in the County Courthouse or see www.okanogancounty.org/ nw/.

Oroville Trail Club Meeting OROVILLE - The February meeting of the Pacific Northwest National Scenic Trail Club will be held Wednesday, Feb. 25 at 6 p.m. at the Oroville Grange, 622 Fir St., Oroville, Washington. This meeting, our first of 2015, will be an informative meeting, with some events planning for the new hiking season. One new idea will be a Hiking/Walking Switchboard connecting people who wish to walk the trail with others. This meeting is a great time to bring friends and join or renew past membership. Trygve Culp, our Trail Boss, will fill us in on the Skye Program and our Partnerships with Forest service, DNR and other agencies along the trail. Bring something to share with coffee, tea and juice. For more info 509-476-4072.

Bell, Pollard to Perform OROVILLE –Steve Pollard and Steve Bell will be performing together at Esther Bricques Winery this week on Thursday, Feb. 26. Steve and Steve combine the guitar, banjo, conga drum and various other percussions to create a wider range of musical sounds. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Friends of the Similkameen. OROVILLE - Friends of the Similkameen, a local interest group found on Facebook, will have a ground breaking first membership and organizational meeting on Friday, Feb. 27 at 6 p.m. The Meeting and Potluck will take place at the Oroville Grange, 622 Fir St., Oroville.

OSD Presentation MOLSON - Come hear “The State of Our Schools” at Molson Grange on Thursday, Feb. 26, with potluck starting at 6:30 p.m. Steve Quick and the two principals will be our guests and speakers. Come and learn what’s new and what’s needed in the future.

First Aid & CPR Class (Spanish) TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (Spanish) will be held on Saturday, Feb. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 LommisOroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412, leave message.

It’s Showtime for Library OROVILLE - The next It’s Showtime 2015! will be Saturday, Feb. 28 at Vicki’s Backdoor on Main St., Oroville. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Live music this week by Nuance. Free Admission. Snacks and drinks $1 each with proceeds to benefit the Oroville Public Library.

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Stream Ecology Presentation

Promote the education of mineralogy and geology 2. Encourage the collecting of rocks and minerals 3. Provide field excursions to mineral collecting areas 4. promote interest in lapidary work.

Dock Side Drive OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Dock Side Drive a music event on Thursday, March 12 at 7:30 p.m. This popular swing and show band features Swing, Blues, Jazz and Show tunes. The event takes place at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 5800 1115th Street in Osoyoos. Tickets available at Imperial Office Supply in Osoyoos or at the door. For more information see www.osoyoosarts.

South Okanogan Amateur Players OSOYOOS - South Okanagan Amateur Players present Norm Foster’s The Melville Boys Friday and Saturday, April 24 and 25 at Osoyoos Secondary School Theatre and on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2 at Frank Venables Theatre in Oliver. Showtime is 8 pm. For ticket information, please check out http://www.soplayers.ca/melville-boys.html

Practice Sessions

TONASKET - The Okanogan Highlands Association is presenting another in their Highlands Wonders series on Friday, March 6 at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket (CCC), 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, WA, 98855.Freshwater ecologist and emeritus professor, Dr. Mark Oswood, will cover the basics of stream ecology, with perspective on the inner workings of streams, including functional feeding groups, sources of energy, and riparian ecology. “No bugs, no fish!” Presentation at 6:30 pm is free; dinner at 5:15 pm is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. More info at http://www.okanoganhighlands. org/education/hw.

OROVILLE Practice Sessions, the hour long program offered by the Oroville Community Library on Thursday mornings at 10:30 a.m. in the activity room will continue throughout January and February. Allene Halliday shares information about American music from the 1920’s to the 1960’s that has endured and is relevant to the present day. Steve Pollard accompanies her renditions on guitar. The presentations include performances as well as rehearsal techniques plus the history of the style of music that is still used in current entertainment venues, such as popular movies, etc. This ongoing series is free and is for all ages to enjoy. Call 509-4762589 for additional information

Honor Flight Nacho Feed

Tonasket Food Bank

CHEWELAH - The 6th Annual Inland Northwest Honor Flight Nacho Feed will be held on Saturday, March 7 at the Chewelah American Legion from 5 p.m. until it’s gone. The dinner is by donation and hosted by 14-year-old Justin Peterson (grandparents are from Oroville) who is still raising money for the organization. He asks to please honor our Inland Northwest WWII, Korean War and terminally ill Veterans by helping to send them to Washington D.C. to see the memorials built in their honor. Generous donations have helped him to raise over $86,000 for our Heroes. Call 509-6702322 with any questions. Visit www.jp4vets.com or Jp4vets/ Facebook for more info.

OCTA Monthly Meeting OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) will hold their Public Board Meetings the second Monday of every month. The next Board Meeting will be held at our office, 307 S. Main #4, Omak, WA 98841 at 6 p.m. on March 9, 2015. Please visit our website at www.okanogantransit. com

Chief Joseph Rock & Mineral Club OKANOGAN - 2015 marks 50 years of the Chief Joseph Rock & Mineral Club. First 2015 meeting and no-host dinner will be Wednesday, March 11 at the Okanogan Eagles. Dinner at 5:30 p.m., meeting at 6:30 p.m. Guests welcome. Club purpose.1

312 S. Whitcomb

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Hilstad Benefit Dinner this Saturday

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN OROVILLE EAGLES #3865

neighbors in their time of need. We want to thank Shauneen Range for a great CPR class. It was very informative, professionally done and fun too. We now have lunch available every week day from 12 p.m. noon to 2 p.m. and the ban-

There will be a Dinner and Auction on Saturday, March 7 at 5 p.m. to benefit Ted and Renee Hilstad. The menu will be ranch-style chili and fixings and our auctioneer will be Ken Neal. Come on in and support our

quet room is open to the public. Come on in and give our Soup-nSandwiches a try. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Wednesday is Pool League and Burgers. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

MISSION STYLE

CROSSES $24.99 - $34.99

Subscribe to the...

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 26, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • February 26, 2015

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275 Tonasket Warehouse space 45 X 60 with 9ft door $500 per month. Also 8 X 14 storage sheds $65 per month. McDaniel Properties Call 509 322 4732

For Rent

For Rent SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

SUN LAKES REALTY 4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; 2+ BR house $700; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

Subscribe to the... 1 BR $650 Country home, where horses are your “neigh�-bors. Sunny living room with atrium doors. Leads to patio and back yard. Overlooks river valley! Beautifully appointed kitchen. Full bath with storage and laundry room. Spacious walk-in closet. Oroville. 509-429-7823.

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

2 BR, 2 BA, 2nd FlOOR apt in Oroville. Nice walk-in closet, washer and dryer hookups. Quiet area and great location. Over looks a nice shade tree and green lawn from covered back patio. Accepting applications. No smoking. No pets. $550 / month + $400 deposit. Call 509-223-3064 or 509-560-9043.

Announcements

NOTICE TO PUBLIC On February 11, 2015 the Ellisforde Transfer Station was broken into. Among the items taken were personal checks written to the Ellisforde Transfer Station for dumping fees. If you were at the Transfer Station on this date please review your bank account due to those checks being stolen. Public Notice Substantial development court ordered hijack of Hwy 20E. Dangerous driveway is now a road no permits needed. Site will not pass sight distance requirements or floodplain issues. It’s been 10 years since the courts cut the chain on the gate and tried to bring in 60+ homes. I removed the red tagged bridge. I’m in debt $75,000. I no longer own my home and have a permanent protection order by the driving public not to interfere. The courts proclaimed that no permits are needed. Permit #4078 is now a trailhead for anyone to use. The D.O.T. fears the courts and you should also. Their permit system is dysfunctional by design-court ordered. Public involvement needed to save your life or the lives of others. I will be in jail for 1 year because I told you the truth and interfered. rrylander.info rylpublic.info for comments coming soon

Announcements FIRST AID & CPR CLASS (Spanish) will be held on Saturday, February 28th, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm in the Whitestone Church basement 577 Loomis Oroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and a pillow. For information, call Ben Hylton 509-223-3412 leave message.

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Crosswords

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com 26. Blood carrier

8. Sub sandwich

27. 30-day mo.

9. “Miss ___ Regrets�

30. “Cast Away� setting

10. The way we word

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41. Severe mental deficiency

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27. #1 spot

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28. Agenda

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29. Payback

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38. Fill

62. A.T.M. need 66. Balaam’s mount

42. Various plants with an edible root, tuber or underground pod

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69. “Malcolm X� director

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ANSWERS

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14. Malcolm ___, “Under the Volcano� author 15. Full of roots 16. “I� problem 17. Criminal law negotiation (2 wds) 19. Animal house 20. Soap, e.g. 21. Narrow loincloth (hyphenated) 23. Compact

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Subscribe to the...

Health General

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS - WEEK OF FEBRUARY 23, 2015

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 take pride in providing a Oroville, WA 98844 place to work that encourag509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 es growth, teamwork, comgtads@gazette-tribune.com munication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Help Community Health Center Wanted dedicated to providing quality Groundman health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is Okanogan County PUD has an opening for a Ground- welcome. man. A current Washington We have the following State driver’s license with opportunities available: Class A commercial endorseOKANOGAN: ment required. Electrical, Dentist electronic and mechanical 2 Full time experience preferred. Must have good communication Omak Medical: skills and work well with othBehavioral Health Spec. ers. High school diploma or 1 Full time position equivalency required plus pre-apprentice lineman Oroville Dental: school. Must have or obtain Dental Assistant a first aid / CPR card and flagging traffic control card. Part time, on an as needed basis Applications & resumes will Brewster Jay Ave: be accepted through Friday, MA-C or LPN February 27, 2015 at Full time Okanogan County PUD, Clinic Custodian Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Full time, shift is split between Box 912, Okanogan, WA Jay Ave medical & Brewster 98840-0912. Applications Dental clinics may also be faxed or emailed to 509-422-8416, WIC Peer Counselor laurar@okpud.org. 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Okanogan PUD is an Equal Brewster (Indian Ave): Opportunity Employer. MA-R, MA-C or LPN Lineworker Full time Okanogan County PUD is Bridgeport Med/Dental: looking for an IBEW JourneyHygienist man or Hot Apprentice LineFull time. Travel between worker. This position is jourBrewster and Bridgeport. ney level work involving the MA-C or LPN construction, maintenance Full time and repair of electrical overhead and underground distriTonasket Medical bution and transmission sysMA-C or LPN tems. Requires two years in Part time, on an as needed the electrical trades as an apbasis position. English/ prentice working under the diSpanish bilingual rect supervision of an IBEW required due to business journey level electrical trades need. worker. Must have CDL with Class A endorsement, have Roomer or obtain a Washington first Part time/24 hours per week. aid / CPR card. Applications English/Spanish bilingual & resumes will be accepted required. through Friday, February 27, See 2015 at www.myfamilyhealth.org Okanogan County PUD, for job descriptions. Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Submit cover letter and Box 912, Okanogan, WA resume or application to 98840-0912. Applications FHC, c/o Human Resources, may also be faxed or emailed PO Box 1340, Okanogan, to 509-422-8416, WA 98840 or email: laurar@okpud.org. HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. Okanogan PUD is an Equal FHC is an EEO Employer. Opportunity Employer.

www.gazette-tribune.com

Think Green!

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train at home to process Medical Billing & Insurance Claims! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at Bryan University!! HS Diploma/GED & Computer/Internet needed! 1-877-259-3880 HELP WANTED RN’s up to $45/hr; LPN’s up to $37.50/hr; CNA’s up to $22.50/hr; Free gas/weekly pay, $2,000 bonus, AACO Nursing Agency, 800-656-4414 HELP WANTED THE NAVY IS HIRING Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days’ vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HELP WANTED =HIGH-TECH CAREER with U.S. Navy. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (877) 475-6289, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HELP WANTED HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE training with U.S. Navy. Good medical/dental, vacation, great reer. HS grads ages 17-34. Mon-Fri (877) 475 6289, jobs_seattle@navy.mil

NAVY RESERVE Serve part-time. No military exp needed. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HELP WANTED NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. $ for school. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete

Continued on next page

Did you know?

We use... ď Ź Soy Ink

ď Ź Recycled Paper ď Ź Excess paper recycled for

gardens, ďŹ re starter & more!

55. A long time Down 1. “The Sound of Music� backdrop 2. Tree trunk 3. The America’s Cup trophy, e.g. 4. Blue eyes or baldness, e.g. 5. Person devoted to luxury and pleasure 6. “To ___ is human ...� 7. Deck (out)

57. Basic unit of money in Western Samoa 59. Aquatic plant 60. Dock 61. Boat propellers 64. “The Sweetheart of Sigma ___� 65. ___ Solo of “Star Wars�

Paid pay, caCall or

HELP WANTED

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Found

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


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n Civil

Litigation Planning n Probate n Estate

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

RENTAL RENTAL RENTAL

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D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

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MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

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Midway Building Supply

BDK

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Attorney at Law

Quality Supplies Since 1957

Equipment Rental

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Engineering

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Spectacular view property less than 5 minutes to town! Spacious, open concept home with formal living room and second living room. Stamped, stained concrete patio and sidewalks and air to water heat pump. Lawn sprinkler system and irrigated pasture for horses right off property onto approx. 5,000 acres of state land. Ride all the way to Canadian border! Wide views of Mount Chopaka, the Cathedrals to the north and views as far south as the Tiffany Mountains in Conconully! MLS#745984 $279,000

Fantastic views of Lake Osoyoos, the mountains, and the surrounding countryside from this irrigated 4 acre lot on Eastlake Rd. between Oroville and the Canadian border. The lot is mostly fenced and has a city water hookup already in place with power and sewer running down Eastlake Rd. right next to the lot. NWML#741770 $200,000

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www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

Lake and Country

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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Impeccably cared for 3 bed 2 bath 1998 Fleetwood on manicured lot in John’s Landing. Large rear deck for Entertainment. John’s Landing is on the Okanogan River in Tonasket. Monthly fee includes water & Sewer. $41,500

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Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121

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#1 Top Producer Office in North County!

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SUN LAKES REALTY

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you. Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

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509-476-3602

Sponsored by

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 9 (Very hard, difficulty rating 0.81)

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Date of First Publication: February 19, 2015 Personal Representative: Rogene E. Wood Address: 1520 S. David Spokane Valley, WA 99212. Attorney for the Personal Representative: Greg M. Devlin Address: 601 W. Riverside Ave., Suite 1900 Spokane, WA 99201 /s/Greg M. Devlin Greg M. Devlin, WSBA #7228 Attorney for Personal Representative Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 19, 26 and March 5, 2015. #OVG615711

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VENDOR LIST OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT As authorized under RCW 87.03.437 and Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District Resolution No. 2010-03, the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is advertising for vendors who desire to be placed on the vendor list for materials, supplies, or equipment which cost less than $40,000.00. The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District is an equal opportunity employer and seeks participation from women and minority vendors. Vendor list application must be submitted to the manager of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844. Inquiries and requests for applications may be directed to the manager at 509-476-3696. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 19, 26, 2015. #OVG615818

SUPERIOR COURT, STATE OF WASHINGTON, COUNTY OF SPOKANE In the Matter of the Estate of SUZETTE M. TUCKER, Deceased. No. 15400209-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 1.40.020(1)(c); or (4) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non probate assets.

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Public Notices

Public Notice Posted Proclamation of Reclamation Abandoned State Hwy. 4 (now S.R. 2OE) circa 1932-2015 Feb. 1, 2015 To be recorded on Parcel nos. 3727260002-3727260005-37272600 06 all in Okanogan Co. WA. From Feb. 1, 2015 is unified non-abandonment linked to parcel 3727264005 Homestead-Farmstead Roger Rylander. I Roger Rylander have maintained, improved and paid delinquent property taxes on said parcels. I am the first person to have property identified as segregated and recorded nonabandonment of such property. I am the First person in recorded history to do so. I will improve the premises and relocate my driveway from mile marker 264.28 to a point that is the safest to all people of the State of Washington. State property is 100% free of encumbrances and when abandoned is 100% free of encumbrances. Now and Forever to be entered into county taxed land. I do so willingly. Records of said Abandoned 1932 roadway are kept int he maproom basement at the Wenatchee D.O.T. P.U.D. welcome Phone welcome. Posted on Property. WAC458-61-550 Excise tax exempt South of Creek Abandoned roadbed. W.A.C. 197-11-960 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 /s/Roger Rylander Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 2015. #OVG611291

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FEBRUARY 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE February 26, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 26, 2015

SPORTS

Juarez, Peterson win state titles

Tigers third overall at Mat Classic XXVII BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

TACOMA - Feb. 21, 2015Tonasket wrestling coach Dave Mitchell often compares wrestling to a roller coaster ride, where athletes and coaches alike experience the highest of highs and lowest of lows, often within seconds of one another. It’s been a five years since any Tigers have reached the highest point on that ride, particularly without the need to come back down. Trevor Peterson and Jorge Juarez became the first Tonasket wrestlers - or athletes in any sport, for that matter - to win a state championship since Keegan McCormick’s 2010 title as they swept through three matches in the Class B Mat Classic XXVII tournament last weekend. The Tigers as a team earned a third place trophy, tying Liberty Bell for that honor, as each of their six state qualifiers won at least won match, and Chad Edwards earned a state runner-up medal. “It was pretty special making the podium,” Mitchell said. “It’s been awhile.” Warden easily won the team title, with Reardan winning a three-way battle with the Tigers and Liberty Bell for second. The Tigers’ two champs took two very different routes to their state titles. Juarez was making his third trip to State, placing sixth as a freshman at 126 pounds and second last year at 132, both in Class 1A. Peterson, also a junior, was making his first state finals trip. Though expectations for Juarez were high, he also had moved up 20 pounds from last year’s weight. But for the past 12 months there was no doubt that he would consider anything less than a state championship a disappointment. “Definitely,” Juarez said. “I worked all year for this. “Cole (Denison, assistant coach) and me worked together a lot during the off-season. He put a lot of time into me to get better. If I don’t have Cole and Mitchell, there’s no way I would be here. I really appreciate all they did to make me better.” Juarez left nothing to doubt in this year’s tournament, pinning Cruz Plasencia of Davenport in the opening round, then took care of defending champion Kaleb Hafner (who won the B 132 title last year) 13-5 to reach the title match. There awaited Liberty Bell’s Jacob McMillan, whom Juarez had beaten several times this year, including 9-0 in last week’s regional final. But he was taking nothing for granted. “At this point anything can happen,” Juarez said. “I tried to be smart and not force anything. He’s strong, so I didn’t want to do something that got me on my back. Just wanted to stay smart, take my time.” Juarez was leading 5-0 when he ended the match with a pin six seconds before the end of the

second period. “Jorge is such an athletically gifted kid,” Mitchell said. “His being able to wrestle Cole was huge. Cole spent a lot of time with him. He’s a fun kid to wrestle - he’s always moving and has a great feel for things.” Peterson (132), while not dealing with the expectation that the title was his to win, had to put in the work to turn from a solid wrestler into a state title contender. While Juarez turned in a dominant season, Peterson was tested throughout the season with close matches, most of which went his way. “Trevor has had to work hard,” Mitchell said. “He did all the right things, went to summer camps. He’s such a hard worker, and to have it pay off this way is really awesome for him. “He’s a no-nonsense, smart kid who rarely makes the same mistake twice.” Peterson’s first two matches weren’t particularly close - he pinned Shane Kennamer of Darrington in the second round, and Luke Stacey of Wahkiakum 10-2. But the championship match turned into the kind of grueling battle that he’d worked toward all season. Peterson faced Liberty (Spangle)’s Kain Feltwell, who not only was the defending 126 lb. state champion, but had edged Peterson in last week’s regional final, 9-7. Mitchell had hoped Peterson could score a takedown early and wrestle from ahead, but after a scoreless first period, it was apparent that building a big lead wasn’t in the cards. “There wasn’t a takedown in the first round,” Mitchell said, “and we (he, Denison and Trampas Stucker) thought, ‘Crap, that’s not the game plan.’” Peterson finally got his takedown in the second period, with Feltwell scoring an escape. The match stayed at 2-1 through the third. Peterson had the lower position, forcing Feltwell to try to turn him, but Peterson was able to ride out the challenge. With time winding down, Feltwell cut him loose, conceding the escape point in an attempt to get a tying takedown. Instead, it was Peterson who got the takedown to go up 5-1, giving up an escape in the final seconds. “Once he cut me, I was like, heck yeah, I’m good on my feet,” Peterson said. “I thought I could get the takedown, and I was able to get it.” “This was my goal since the beginning of the season. This is what I worked hard all year for. I trained even harder this past week and it paid off. It may take awhile for it to sink in, but it’s awesome.” Edwards may not have won a state title, but easily had the most dramatic tournament of any of the Tigers. The 285-pounder had had almost no luck on his side in previous seasons, with illness and injury short-circuiting his attempts to make the state finals. This year had shaped up to be similar as Edwards was one of several Tigers who struggled at times late in the season with a variety of maladies. “The whole team battled that stupid cold heading into districts,” Mitchell said. “With Chad

Brent Baker/submitted photos

Top, Tonasket’s Jorge Juarez defeated defending state champ Kaleb Hafner in his semifinal match. Above, Juarez wrestled his way to his first state title. Left, Juarez and Tonasket assistant coach Cole Denison celebrate Juarez’s state title on Saturday. Denison spent much of the last year wrestling against Juarez to get him ready for the state tournament.

the huge thing was that he’d never been (to state). So to go into that environment, he handled it all really well, and that was super important. You never know how kids will respond.” Edwards responded by taking to heart one of Mitchell’s most persistent lessons: to never give up on a match. In his quarterfinal, Edwards, who finished fourth in last week’s regionals, upset the West Region’s top seed, defending 195 lb. state champion Lane Monteith. It wasn’t so simple as that. Edwards didn’t lead the match until the final whistle. He tied it at 7-7 with a takedown in the third period, which carried the two wrestlers out of bounds. Edwards conceded an escape point to start in the neutral position and locked up with Monteith, finally getting behind him and establishing control with one second remaining, Mitchell raising his arms in triumph as the referee’s whistle sounded. And if that wasn’t dramatic enough, Edwards topped it off with a stunning 5-4 decision in the semifinal over Waitsburg-

Tonasket’s Zach Lofthus and Trevor Peterson celebrate Peterson’s state title on Saturday following his 5-1 victory over Liberty defending champ Kain Feltwell.

Prescott’s Tristan Newman. Newman, who held a big size and strength advantage, tossed Edwards around like a rag doll for most of the match but in unproductive fashion, eventually tiring. Edwards trailed 4-2 as the clock wound down, scoring an escape and being awarded a point for a stalling call. In the final seconds, Edwards finally worked himself free at the same time as Newman was again called for stalling - picking up both one point for the escape and two points for the additional stalling call. “There’s no doubt that Chad never quit,” Mitchell said. “He only had 14 seconds left and he wasn’t on his feet yet. So to get up, get the escape, and the stalling, that was just not giving up on it.” That set up a championship match with Lake Roosevelt’s Octavio Alejandre, who said he was focused on keeping Edwards’ shots at his legs from happening. They had had a number of meetings this year, with Alejandre holding the advantage, including a 5-1 win over Edwards at regionals and a 3-2 win earlier in

the year in which Edwards was the only Class B or 1A wrestler to score a takedown on Alejandre. He didn’t get one in the final, trailing 1-0 until late when he gave up a takedown while making one last desperate move to try for another last-second win. “For us to win, we had to get away,” Mitchell said. “We needed an escape, but Octavio was able to ride him out.” Still, Edwards brought home the state’s second-place price after taking third at the district tournament and fourth at regionals. The Tigers’ other three wrestlers - Zach Lofthus (160), Austin Knowlton (170) and Frank Holfeltz (195) each won a match but weren’t able to medal. Knowlton came the closest, despite not getting his wrestling season started until late January. Knowlton upset the West Region’s top seed, Shiloh Borden of Raymond, in a back-and-forth 18-13 match. But in the semifinal, another back-and-forth match didn’t end quite so well. Knowlton forced defending state champion Blake Phillips to overtime before losing 12-10. Phillips went on to win the state title in dominant fashion, while Knowlton lost to Davenport’s Nick James to bow out of the tournament. “At first we didn’t think we’d

get Austin at all this year,” Mitchell said. “Then it was ‘maybe,’ then he comes back with only two weeks of competition before districts. It showed, and if he’d had all year he’d have been better prepared. But that was all beyond his control and just getting there at all was a major accomplishment.” Lofthus (160) was pinned by eventual state champion Ben Alford of Northwest Christian (Colbert) in the first round, came back to beat Kody Vik of Wahkiakum with a pin in his next match but suffered a season-ending, 7-4 loss to Havin Heytvelt of Pomeroy. Holfeltz (195) was pinned in his first match, beat Chris Varelas of Brewster by technical fall in his second bout and lost 5-3 to third place finisher Alec Bell of Ilwaco in his final match. Considering that all but Juarez were state finals rookies, Mitchell was more than pleased with the overall outcome of the weekend: the third place tie with Liberty Bell, two state titles, one runnerup and three others who won state finals matches. “That was the great thing that I so happy about,” he said. “Everyone won at least one match, everyone contributed to the team scoring. They were all part of it.

Trevor Peterson had his way in his semifinal match before winning a tight bout in the final.


FEBRUARY 26, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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SPORTS

Hornets qualify for state regionals Oroville faces defending champs on Saturday BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

EAST WENATCHEE - Lily Hilderbrand wanted those rebounds. But after Kittitas dominated the glass through the first half, which played a big factor in the Coyotes’ ability to bounce back from the Hornets’ 12-3 game-opening run, Oroville coach Mike Bourn said a little team rebounding was in order. The Hornets’ ability to box out helped them win a topsy-turvy game 42-37, clinch a state regional playoff berth and keep their season alive. “(Kittitas’ Brianna Shipley) was getting every ball,” Bourn said, referring to a stretch where she pulled down 12 offensive boards on eight Kittitas possessions. “I told her she needed to quit worrying about the ball, box out and let her teammates rebound. “ “We - I mean I - weren’t boxing out,” Hilderbrand said. “I was too busy helping on defense, and after a shot I’d turn around and there she’d be with the ball. We adjusted.” It took a true team effort to pull off the win against a scrappy

Kittitas squad that played all-out defense on every possession. The Hornets’ early lead vaporized by halftime they held a 19-17 lead, and Kittitas opened the second half with a 10-point run to take a 27-19 lead. With three minutes left in the third quarter the Hornets’ season was on life support. Hilderbrand, held scoreless through the first 21 minutes of the game, broke the run with two free throws. By the end of the quarter, the Hornets had answered with a nine point run of their own, capped by Mikayla Scott’s 3-pointer that regained Oroville the lead. Hilderbrand’s four quick points gave Oroville a 33-27 lead, but the Coyotes weren’t done, making two late runs. Rachel Baker pulled Kittitas to within 33-31, but Mikayla Scott scored off an offensive rebound, and Kendal Miller followed with a steal that ended with a Faith Martin layup and a 37-31 lead. Baker again made it close, drilling a 3-pointer with 32 seconds left that made it a 38-37 game. Scott hit 3-of-4 free throws down the stretch, and Hannah Hilderbrand hit another to account for the final margin. Scott and Hannah Hilderbrand’s ability to even play, particularly in crunch time, was a big factor considering that both had suffered severe flu symptoms at various times during the afternoon. Hilderbrand spent much of

Oroville’s cheerleaders perform at last week’s district tournament in East Wenatchee.

the second quarter in the locker room as Kittitas made its first big run of the game. “This is what we’ve been working for all year,” Lily Hilderbrand said. “These last two games we really had to ‘want it’ more, and I’m glad we did. The close games are good; it’s good to get some practice winning games like this.” Scott finished with 17 points, Martin had seven while both Hilderbrands and Miller all had six apiece to account for all the Hornets’ scoring. Baker finished with 19 points and Shipley had 10 for the Coyotes, who finish at 13-10.

White Swan 66, Oroville 35 EAST WENATCHEE - Feb. 21, 2015 - White Swan defeated Oroville for the second time in the District 5/6 girls basketball tournament on Saturday to claim the district’s third seed to next week’s regional game. Emily Botkin and Wiwimu Mills each scored 18 points to key the Cougars’ 66-35 victory. Mills scored 13 points in the third quarter as White Swan pulled away from a 30-17 halftime lead. “We had open shots all through the first half,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “But then we rushed them. We only shot 11-of-51 from the floor, which is the worst we’ve done this season. White Swan definitely got into our heads.” Lily Hilderbrand scored 19 points, pulled down eight rebounds and blocked three shots

to lead Oroville (15-9).

compete better. But some of that

High School.

Brent Baker/submitted photos

Oroville’s Hornets come off the court knowing they’ve qualified for the regional round of the state tournament.

The Hornets weren’t completely out of the game at halftime, but after White Swan opened the third quarter with a flurry of fast break baskets, Bourn benched a number of his regulars. “I felt like some of the girls gave up,” he said. “I put the younger girls in there and told them to just go after it. “I was disappointed we didn’t

Faith Martin stretches to grab a rebound during the Hornets’ victory over Kittitas last Thursday.

is my fault. I’d really emphasized winning the Waterville and Kittitas games, that if we won those we’d be in (to regionals). Unfortunately once we got past those two the girls remembered that, and it kind of came back to bite us. White Swan (18-5) will take on Dayton on in Saturday’s loser out state regional game at Chiawana

Oroville will face defending state champion Colfax, the top seed from District 7/9, on Saturday at noon at Cheney High School. Colfax is 22-3 and has lost three games this season - to undefeated Okanogan; an undefeated Colton team that hasn’t lost in three years; and to Lakeside, which is 23-1 in Class 1A.

Mikayla Scott fought off a pre-game illness to score a game-high 17 points in Oroville’s win over Kittitas.

Oroville FBLA competes at regionals

SUBMITTED BY TONY KINDRED OHS FBLA ADVISOR

WENATCHEE - Oroville Jr/Sr High students traveled to Wenatchee, to the Wenatchee Convention Center on February 18th to the North Central Region Future Business Leader of America Competition. After spending multiple meetings planning and practicing at the high school, Oroville students make it to state. Tori Kindred, State Vice President

representing the North Central Region presided over the conference of over 500 attendees. Kindred spoke to the membership and presented awards and met with regional advisers and judges. Kindred announced her candidacy for Washington State FBLA President, and also introduced Ellamae Burnell as one of the next candidates for Vice President. Both Kindred and Burnell will campaign at the state competition held in Spokane, Washington on April 15-17. Oroville FBLA members spend time

Sunmitted photos

Vice President Tori Kindred Presides over Region Conference. Oroville FBLA members support in front row.

taking practice tests, writing and practicing speeches, building team projects and producing videos. In their efforts together the students from Oroville will all be attending state. Junior High member, Jennifer Cisneros, will also be attending this year making it in the public speaking one competition. A valuable adviser to the Oroville Chapter, Dawn Miller, played an integral part in the competition as a judge and chaperone. The members sincerely appreciate her tireless efforts to the chapter. Oroville FBLA member would like to sincerely thank all of the businesses, family, staff and administration for their support in their competitive efforts and for their assistance in their efforts to become successful leaders. “As North Central Region adviser and local high school chapter adviser it is my privilege to work with such a fine group of young men and women”. Tony Kindred. The following students have qualified for state competition: Vice Pres. Tori Kindred – 1st FBLA Principles and Procedures, 1st, Securities and Investments, 2nd, Public Service Announcement. Bailey Griffin – 1st Public Speaking II, 3rd Personal Finance, 5th Network Design Team 2 Courtnee Kallstrom – 2nd MOS Word, 4th Health Care Administration, 5th Network Design 2

Oroville FBLA members Kali Peters, Jennifer Cisneros, Ellamae Burnell, Mikaela McCoy, Dakota Haney, Hunter DeVon, Tori Kindred, Kaytie Miller, Courtnee Kallstrom, Pie Todd, Lena Fuchs, Yessica Nemecio, Gwen Hankins, Katie Rawley and Lindsay Koepke. Mikaela McCoy – 2nd Public Service Announcement Ellamae Brunell – 2nd Public Service Announcement, 2nd Network Design Team 1 Kali Peters – 2nd Network Design Team 1 Dakota Haney – 2nd Network Design Team 1 Lena Fuchs and Pie Todd – 4th Network Design Team 3 Yessica Nemecio – 4th MOS Word,

1st Creed, 5th Network Design Team 2 Jennifer Cisneros – 5th Public Speaking 1 To find out more about FBLA you can go to: www.wafbla.org If you would like to become a professional member, please contact Tony Kindred at 509-476-3612 To Find out how you can help support the Oroville Business Leaders, please call 509-476-3612 ext. 2404


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 26, 2015

Regina “Jean” Harden Jacobs

REGINA ‘JEAN’ HARDEN JACOBS Jean was born Regina Madelyn Magill on July 15 1922 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was called on February 16 2015 by her lord and savior to be with him in heaven. She was 92 years old. As a child Jean attended Catholic school in Philadelphia. At the age of 17 Jean lost her mother and stepfather. She was on her own at that point and worked odd jobs until 1943 when she enlisted in the Women’s Army Corps (WAC) and became a cryptographic technician. She was extremely proud of her service to our country. While in the Army she met and married the love of her life,

Bruce Edward Notson

BRUCE EDWARD NOTSON Bruce E. Notson, 83, of Anacortes, passed away on Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at Home Place Special Care Center in Burlington. He was born to Mildred and Edward Notson 83 years ago in Thorp ,Wash. Bruce graduated from Tonasket High School in 1950, and continued his education at Washington

Stuart Irwin

STUART IRWIN Stuart Irwin passed away while at home on the morning of February 18, 2015 at the age of 77. Stuart was born September 9, 1937 in Miller, South Dakota to Robert and Frieda (Kruse) Irwin. Stu grew up on the family ranch where he helped his father raise cattle and farm the land. It was there he learned his love of the outdoors, hunting, fishing and all manner of shooting sports all with his little dog Jiggs always at his side. Stu displayed his true cowboy spirit as a bull rider in the State Championship circuit at the age of 16. Stu was an accomplished musician at a young age starting on guitar then playing bass guitar when he formed a band named the Rock Cats at the age of 19 while at college. The Rock Cats played many venues in the MidWest and performed with well known artists such as Jerry Lee Lewis. It was while playing these venues that Stu met fellow musician

Rex Harden. They had their first child, a daughter, and after their discharge from the Army they moved to Oroville, Wash. in 1945 where she remained until her passing. They were blessed with three more daughters and a son. While their family was young Jean worked part time in various jobs such as the fruit industry, as a waitress and bookkeeping, just enough to earn extra money to make her family holidays extra special. After the death of Rex at age 44, she found herself the sole provider for her five children. (A little known fact: Jean never forgot the generosity of Charles Eder Sr. who helped her with a very generous gift of money at this time.) While completely devastated by Rex’s untimely passing, she managed to put on a brave face for her children and find full time employment. She worked at the Post Office for a time and in 1975 went to work for Prince’s Department Store. She worked there for 27 years until she retired at the age of 80. She loved this job and was always grateful to her employers and dear friends Jim and Marilyn Prince for the opportunity. She also had many co-workers that were like family to her, so much so that they called her “Grandma Jean.” The two most important things in Jean’s life were her faith and family. She was a member of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church for 70 years where she was an active member of the Alter Society. She married Billy Jacobs in 1967 and he became a very important part of the family.

She was an amazing mother and grandmother. She taught family values that will be passed on for generations She was the nucleus of her family and everyone gravitated to her. As adults her children would bring their young families to gather at her home to share many of the holidays. Christmas was her favorite and she always made it a very special occasion for everyone. Jean was an avid bowler and enjoyed may trips with her team to State and National tournaments. She loved to read, garden and do ceramics. Her favorite thing was to make hand made greeting cards for birthdays and holidays for all her family. In Mom’s later years she moved in next door to two people who became a very important part of her life. Zeke and Judy Miller were not just neighbors, not just friends, they were part of Mom’s family. They watched over and and treated Mom with special care. Mom loved them dearly and we are forever grateful to them. Jean was preceded in death by her husbands Rex Harden and Billy Jacobs and son-in-law Charles Allie. She is survived by her children Kathleen, Maureen (Darrell), Sharleen (Ed), Theresa (Jack) and Rick (Chris). Also 14 grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren and three great, great grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Monday February 23, 2015. Bergh Funeral Service was in care of arrangements. Memorial donations may be made to the Oroville Ambulance or the charity of your choice.

State University (WSC) graduating with a BS in Business Administration and received his officer’s commission into the United States Air Force. The following week he married the love of his life, Jeanne Porter of Pomeroy, Wash. They began their adventure together in Texas and raised their family all over the United States and in Japan. Bruce was an experienced bomber and fighter pilot with over 10,000 hours and gained his combat experience in the skies above Southeast Asia, totaling 76 combat missions. He loved flying and did so on a recreational basis both while serving in the Air Force and after he retired. After retirement, Bruce and Jeanne moved to Guemes Island in 1980 and settled in to take care of their parents. He was active in the Guemes Church and particularly enjoyed the fellowship of the Men’s Breakfast. He had a soft spot for dogs, especially his last one, Guy the poodle. Bruce had a warm sense of humor and loved to tease his children and grandchildren.

He is survived by Jeanne Notson of Guemes; his daughter Kim Bone of Guemes; Chung-Hwa Nam of San Francisco; son Ed Notson (Jeanne) of Farmington, NM; daughter Barbara Richards (Mark) of Gig Harbor, Wash; and daughter Karen Simpson (Ed) of Bow, Wash. His legacy includes 19 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren. A funeral service will be held at 10 a.m., Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at the Westminster Presbyterian Church in Anacortes with a reception to follow. A graveside service with military honors will be held at 2 p.m., Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at Eden Cemetery on Guemes Island. Memorials to: Moody Aviation (moodyglobal.org) or World Concern (One Village Transform ed - Harako) 19303 Fremont Ave North, Seattle, WA, 98133, or Hospice of the Northwest (www.hospice.org). Arrangements are in the care of Evans Funeral Chapel and Crematory, Inc., Anacortes, WA and the San Juan Islands. To share memories of Bruce, please sign the online guest register at www. evanschapel.com.

and the love of his life, Marian Ratajczak. Stu and Marian were married on June 20, 1961. After their marriage they settled in Pierre, South Dakota where Stu took employment as a police officer. Stu and Marian were inseparable and for 53 years. They played, worked, hunted, fished, camped and raised a family together. In the fall of 1967 they moved to Washington State where they worked at The Peerless and Faos in Oroville, as the house band. Later, as the band, The Midnighters, they travelled over Eastern Washington playing from Oroville to the Tri-Cities. From 1975-1979 they became the owner/operators of the Venture Inn in Omak. After 1979 they returned to music and formed the band Country Roads and continued playing music until January of 1990. Stu worked many jobs in addition to his musical career throughout his life: cowboy, police officer, gas station owner, salesman at Sears, security guard at Omak Wood Products and as a school bus driver for the Omak School District. Stu also served is community as a reserve corrections officer for the Okanogan County Sheriff Office; volunteer fire fighter and EMT with the Omak Fire Department for many years. Though an avid hunter, angler, and archer, he loved animals. He was soft spoken and kind. He was respected for his strong work ethics of reliability, duty, and honesty. He led by example, instilling into his family his character, strength, and values. Stu was a loving father, grandfather and great grandfather. He spoiled his dogs rotten.

He will be deeply missed. He is survived by his wife, Marian of Omak; daughter, Kay (David) Sexton of Omak; sons, David (Trena) Irwin of Bay Springs, Miss., and Dennis (Krista) Irwin of Omak; grandchildren, Brandon Shafer of Douglasville, Ga.; Tiffany Shafer of Wenatchee, Wash.; Brad, Shaelyn, CamdenSamuel, Dane and Kristopher Irwin, all of Omak and two great grandchildren: Christian and Dallas Irwin. Stu was preceded in death by his brother, Lawrence; his father, Robert; his mother, Frieda; and son-in-law, David Shafer. Memorial donations may be given to Animal Foster Care or OK Snip. Viewing for family and friends will be held from 7 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. at the PrechtHarrison-Nearents Chapel on Tuesday, February 24. The service will be held 2 p.m. Wednesday, February 25 at Precht Harrison Nearents Chapel on Elmway. Interment will follow the Chapel service at the Okanogan City Cemetery.

for the next time around.” Yeckel said concerns around storage issues were in the beginning stages of being addressed. TSD sells used buses to other school districts for $2,000-$3,000, with “comeback customers wanting more buses,” according to Yeckel. Recent sales have been made to the Methow Valley, Bridgeport and the Olympic Pennisula. Liz Stucker reported she will be attending a job fair at Central Washington University Thursday, March 5, to recruit to fill new openings in the district. Turner suggested giving district employees the opportunity to shift positions before filling them from outside. Principal Jay Tyus said the middle school was in the process of starting up a Knowledge Bowl. He also reported great interest and progress being shown among students involved in the digital

tently assured community members we want to hear about their concerns, and we deeply value any person’s contributions.” Inlow’s concerns were not listed on the agenda for the Feb. 9 meeting, and when he was granted permission to speak, Stangland, interrupting him, told him to discuss his concerns with the school superintendent. “I apologize. I was tired and there was still a lot to address on the agenda,” Stangland said. “It would be nice if we could address everything. We need to do better to let people know how we can address issues properly.” “Going forward, we will work out our positive procedure to let people know what’s going on,” said Turner. The next regular board meeting, scheduled for March 9, will begin at 7:30 p.m. rather than 7 p.m due to daylight savings time.

Oroville High School second quarter honor roll OROVILLE - OHS recently announced their second quarter honor roll, with students earning Superintendent, Principal and Merit honors. SENIORS SUPERINTENDENT 3.75 -3.99 Kali M. Peters 3.95, Kyle R. Scott 3.83 PRINCIPAL 3.50-3.74 Lily Hilderbrand, 3.60; Leonardo M. Curiel, 3.56 MERIT 3.49- 3.00 Nahum Garfias, 3.40; Andrea Perez, 3.17; Serina M. Finley, 3.11, Jordan S. Smith, 3.05

JUNIORS Ellamae Burnell, 4.0

DENTISTRY

SUPERINTENDENT 3.75-3.99 Bailey Griffin, 3.94; Riley M. Davidson, 3.88 PRINCIPAL 3.50- 3.74 Faith Martin, 3.73; Mikayla L. Scott, 3.52. MERIT 3.49-3.00 Casey Dewitte, 3.28 SOPHOMORES Courtnee Kall Strom, 4.0 SUPERINTENDENT 3.75-3.99 Jon P. Vanderpool, 3.82; Yessica Nemecio MERIT 3.49- 3.00 Sandra Hilstad, 3.217; Ryan Marcolin, 3.0; Taylor J. Minarcin, Jewelr Vanderwaal,

FRESHMAN SUPERINTENDENT 3.75-3.99 Maxwell Turner 3. 95, Alexia Garcia 3.9 PRINCIPAL 3.50-3.74 Katherine E. Egerton, 3.85; Victoria L. Kindred, 3.78, Mikaela Mccoy 3.73, Sydney A. Egerton 3.71, Ryan T. Scott 3.61, Dean A. Davis 3.56 MERIT 3.49- 3.00 Hannah Hilderbrand 3.23, Luis Vazquez 3.2 1, Ha Vannah N. Worrell 3.18, Stephanie Rodriguez 3.16, Esmeralda Rosales-Cortez 3.11, Estifenny Carrillo 3.11, Kambe Ripley 3.06, Tylynne Watkins 3.01, Marissa N. Aubin 3.0, Paz P. Lopez 3.0.

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media class, a recent addition to the school’s class offerings. Upcoming events at the elementary school include a schoolwide read-in on Dr. Seuss Day, Monday, March 2, and a PTO Carnival scheduled for March 13. “This year’s theme is Candyland,” said Principal Jeremy Clark. “Last year’s event brought in $2,500; money that goes to support the kids.” Board member Catherine Stangland made a statement of apology to Rob Inlow of Tonasket, whose Letter to the Editor was published in the Feb. 19 Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune after he attended the Feb. 9 school board meeting to inquire about a proposed project at the bus garage. Inlow was twice told by Stangland that he was “wasting the board’s time.” In her Feb. 23 discussion of the event, Stangland said she “consis-

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 26, 2015  

February 26, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 26, 2015  

February 26, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune