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VALENTINE’S DAY

District Sports Action

Lots of chances to woo your Sweetheart Feb. 14

See Pages A9-10

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Creek overflows banks, covers Oroville area roads

FINE WEATHER FOR DUCKS

Tonasket Creek returned to its channel by the Okanogan County Public Works Department

East Oroville), but most of the debris was in the creek bed where the trees had built up.” Stanley said only minor damage was OROVILLE – Five hours of rain and warmer than normal temperatures in the caused to the roads mostly “shoulder highlands last Friday evening resulted in washing,” with very little damage to the Tonasket Creek overflowing it’s banks asphalt. The event was not unprecedented, and flooding roads just north of Oroville. with Stanley recalling a similar incident “The creek went off course in multiple occurring in March of 2012. However, he spots causing flooding on Sawtell Road said it did not compare between the Chesaw and to the flood 12 years East Oroville Roads,” “We worked with the ago when a woman said Kenny Stanley, her life while trystate Department lost Roadway Manager ing to cross water over of Fish and Wildlife the roadway and was with Okanogan County Public Works. “It also and were able to use washed downstream. flooded the (Bud Clark) crazy is we excavators to remove are“What’s ballfields and some pulling road restricsome of the debris tions this Thursday,” homeowners right next Stanley, referring to the creek reported dams and get the said to how early in the water damage.” water back into the year the restrictions are The creek, which being lifted. channel.” comes down from the Each year the county Chesaw area, following Kenny Stanley, Roadways Manager imposes road restricthe Molson Grade and Okanogan County Public Works tions that limit trucks then cuts south passand heavy loads on cering by the ballfields and tain county roads folunder Sawtell Road and continues until it lowing the winter season. flows into the Okanogan River, south of the well east of the Cherry Street Bridge. On Friday night the rushing water cut a new channel and diverted down the Chesaw Road and formed and cascaded into the Okanogan on the northeast end of the bridge. Officers from the Oroville Police Department were warning drivers of the high water and the county sent out road crews Friday night to try and clear culverts. The floodwaters would slow for awhile, but additional rain over the weekend led to increased flow periods. The county crew finished getting the creek back in its channel on Tuesday afternoon. “We worked with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and were able use excavators to remove some of the debris dams to get the water back into the channel,” said Stanley, “We had some debris build up at both bridges (on Sawtell and BY GARY A. DE VON

MANAGING EDITOR

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Tonasket Creek overflowed its channel in multiple spots starting Friday evening and onward through the weekend. Above, The water not only flooded Oroville’s Bud Clark Ballfields, it covered the intersection of Chesaw and Sawtell roads and was over the road on East Oroville Road as well. Left, Tonasket Creek rose enough cover the bridges on Sawtell and East Oroville roads. Left, Okanogan County Public Works put out “Water over the roadway” signs and worked with the state Department of Fish and Wildlife to return the Creek to its channel by Tuesday afternoon.

Three seek queen’s crown for May Fest OROVILLE – This year sees three candidates who would like to be crowned the Oroville May Festival Queen for 2015. They are Faith Martin, Mikayla Scott and Ellamae Burnell, all juniors at Oroville High School. May Day Selection night is Monday, Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons, where admittance is free. Only people in attendance may vote and each person will be given one ballot when the enter.

Voting by the audience accounts for 35 percent of the score and judges scores account for 65 percent. The totals will determine who will be this year’s May Festival Queen and her court of two princesses. The would-be queens and princesses submitted a little bit about themselves and we have printed their bios below to get an idea of their qualifications to represent the town as May Festival royalty.

Faith Martin Hi, my name is Faith Martin and I am grateful to represent my home town by running for your 2015 May Day Queen. My parents are Brian and Shelly Martin and I have three siblings - Hunter, Spencer and Maddie. I have lived in Oroville my whole life and it is a huge part of me. Running for May Day Queen has always been something I’ve looked forward to. I have participated in many sports and have a 3.5 honor roll GPA. The sports I play now are basketball and softball. I am also the cheerleader captain for the Oroville Hornets during football season. I like to think of myself as enjoyable, outgoing and funny, but also dedicated, respectful, and kind. I love bringing school spirit and helping out in the community. I have volunteered for AAU basketball, youth baseball, and youth softball for many years.

Ellamae Burnell

Faith Martin

Mikayla Scott

I also work at Java Junkie Espresso; I have been working there for about three years and absolutely love it! In the near future I plan to attend a four-year university and major in a science

degree and work towards becoming either a dietitian or a physical therapist, but I am still undecided. Growing up here, May Day has been a big part of my life. I

have loved going to the parades since I was little. I skipped in the Maypole dance in fourth grade. I have helped out with and played in the 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament, and was selected as

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CONTACT US

Volume 111 No. 07

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

class royalty in the past years. May Day is a big celebration in our town and I’d love to be a part of it.

Mikayla Scott Hello, I’m Mikayla Scott and I’m running for 2015 May Festival Queen. I have lived here for four years, but while visiting family I have attended May Festival for 10 years. I am the daughter of Justin and Lisa Scott and the granddaughter of Tom and Louise Scott; I also have a brother Jake. I am a junior at Oroville High School and very active in school activities. Currently I hold the position of ASB Vice President as well as Junior Class President. I am a member of Future Farmers of America and the yearbook committee. I play varsity volleyball and basketball where I hold the position of co-captain. While being involved in sports and many activities I have constantly been an honor roll student. I attend church and youth group regularly. I also help with song service on Sunday. This year I helped with little dribblers and AAU and I plan to

help again next year. While I’m not playing a sport, I hunt and fish with my grandpa and my dad and also go camping with my family. I play summer basketball, work and travel with the school as well as my family. After high school, I plan to attend college at Eastern Oregon University, hopefully with a basketball scholarship. While there I plan to get a degree in business. After my degree, I plan to go to cosmetology school to open my own spa and salon. I would love nothing more than to represent Oroville as May Festival Queen. I adore Oroville and everything about this wonderful town. It would truly be an honor and dream come true to be this year’s May Festival Queen.

Ellamae Burnell I am honored for the opportunity to run for your 2015 May Day Queen. I am a 16-year-old junior attending Oroville High School where I have maintained an Honor Roll since Junior High.

SEE ROYALTY | PG A7

INSIDE THIS EDITION Local News Valley Life Cops & Courts

A2 A3 A4

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate Sports Obituaries

A10 A11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 12, 2015

Fate of Enloe Dam still unknown BY KATHERINE TEACHOUT

KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County PUD Commissioners voted Monday, Feb. 9, to ask a two-week extension with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to decide whether to commission Enloe Dam and build a new powerhouse, or decommission and remove the dam. PUD Commissioners also directed staff members to look for other agencies interested in either rebuilding the powerhouse or removing the dam. Proponents of the electrification of the dam, as well as opponents of the project, a chance to speak to the commissioners before the vote was cast. Tom Berschauer of Omak said he was in favor of making Enloe productive, and voiced concern over what was left in the soil behind the dam from gold-mining activities, and what damage the silt might do to the fisheries. “If you remove the dam it is 100 percent negative cash flow, as opposed to some income,” Berschauer said. “We need to develop the dam and offset it. We are going to be forced to remove the dam someday if we let this license go.” Rocky DeVon of Oroville said he was in support of “putting in this dam,” voicing concern as an Oroville School Board Chairman over how much money the school would already be losing in assessed value with the closing of the Buckhorn Gold Mine. Lee Barker of Omak wanted to know what happened with the proposal from Ted Sorenson, and how much consideration commissioners had given to it. “We could get back some of the money we have spent,” Barker said. “For 20 years we’d get a percentage. And if Sorenson were to run the dam, it would considerably decrease our liability.” Commissioner Ernest Bolz said if the board voted to electrify, “we have a lot more options of people to approach; to more

deeply explore offers of potential buyers like Sorenson.” Commissioner Steve Houston said he’d prefer to have someone else come in and run the dam, and was impressed with Sorenson’s proposal. “I was impressed with Sorenson’s comment, ‘I build Fords, not Cadillacs.’ He does stuff cost effective.” Isabel Spohn of Twisp spoke up, saying she did not support electrification of the dam. “You’re throwing good money after bad,” Spohn said. “The falls surpass the dam as a tourist attraction, and there is no evidence the silt is a barrier or an insurmountable obstacle.” Joseph Enzensperger of Oroville said he has been opposed to the electrification of the dam since first reading about it in 2010. “I have been as active on this as a person not paid to be could be,” Enzensperger said. “I have been trying to bring wisdom to this board that the flow of the Similkameen is too low to support this.” Enzensperger also expressed concern that the dam would only be able to generate 2 percent of the district’s demand for electricity. “The real electricity in this region is down on the Colombia,” Enzensperger said. “Calling it a 9 megawatt powerhouse belies the truth. 4.5 is the monthly average generation, but the requirement is to keep it under 5 megawatt. That’s why we call it that, but for the purpose of selling it to the public, it is called a 9 megawatt powerhouse.” Mike Ward, a Wauconda resident who will be moving to Tonasket also voiced concern about the numbers game. “The project is going to cost more to build and maintain than it is going to generate, and I would like to see the PUD better inform people about those numbers,” Ward said. “I don’t want to be operating under a debt and I don’t want my daughter to grow up with this debt.” Ward said he has worked on hydroelec-

tric power projects in the past, including working with groups on how to manage liabilities, and insisted that “economics is the bottom line.” Jim Miller of Omak said he has been following the project for over a year. “The flyer for ratepayers that is here says the project will lose $1.7 million each year. Who would build a losing business? I have some stock I would like to sell you.” Miller went on to say he “didn’t think we have been given all the facts in a method the ratepayers can understand; in a way they can make a decision about this. It has been framed in a way that is in favor of electrification.” Miller then asked if ratepayers were “on the hook” for removal of the dam, at which point Linda Coates-Markle, Field Manager with the Wenatchee office of the Bureau of Land Management, spoke up, saying it was not known at this time if the dam would need to be removed. “If there is a decision not to power the dam and revoke their right of way, then the BLM would require the PUD to remove any improvements on the property. But we need to find the original document from 1918 and read it.” Coates-Markel said the missing document was written before the Bureau of Land Management was formed. “But I am not confident that the document will address decommission. Back then it was all about moving forward.” Coates-Markle went on to say the BLM would support the PUD “in whatever way the want to go, because that is our role. The BLM is here to serve the public, not get in their way.” Bob Thompson of Tonasket spoke up, saying, “Here we are, to a make or break decision and we don’t have the most crucial piece of information to this decision; the BLM piece.” Chris Fisher, a Fisheries Biologist with the Colville Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department, said testing done on silt samples

taken upstream from the dam for cadmium, copper and arsenic were all below levels known to cause effects. “As of to date, it doesn’t seem like there is anything real detrimental to ecology and human health,” Fisher said, adding that samples were taken from five to eight feet deep. Val Sukovotky of Methow she viewed an educational film at North Cascades Basecamp in Winthrop about the removal of another dam, and “had a hard time getting excited about something that is going to lose money every year.” Rocky DeVon said it would cost more to remove the dam than to generate electricity. “I would rather lose and gain something than just lose,” DeVon said. Ed Poachman of Okanogan said he agreed that “renewable power is in the future and hydropower is great, but to lose money is not great. And what might happen down the road?” Commissioner Steve Houston replied, “We do have responsibilities as a dam owner, including emergency response and dam safety; things you do have to spend money on when you own a dam.” Dan Isaac of Tonasket said he had been following the Enloe project since its inception, and that the issue was not about faith or politics, but finance. “This is a question of fiscal responsibility, sound business judgment and personal integrity,” said Isaac. “The beauty of it is, we are something like $35 million in debt, and we propose to go further in debt. We are told we don’t understand business, but I’m asking you ‘Who pays the interest?’” When he received the answer, “the ratepayers,” Isaac went on to say, “This is not going to impact a small group, but every rancher, every resident of this district. When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging. Now is the time for change. We gave you our trust based on your integrity. It is time

to honor your commitment to do what you said you would do. This is a poor county, by the way. We can’t afford to carry this debt load. We are talking about a 30-year commitment. This is an issue of honor, not just economics.” Alan Fisk of Nighthawk criticized the PUD with having “taken on the personality of a corporation.” Fisk said as a gold dredger, “I like to dredge deep and I know it’s not going to take that much to get the silt out.” He said there had not been enough research done into how much it was going to cost to take

the dam out, but he believed it was not going to cost that much. “We are not a corporation here.” “You are the PUD, we are ratepayers, and you work for us,” he said. Mike Ward said forecasting prices of electricity down the road and counting on them to increase was not fair to the ratepayers, and to consider what would happen when other contingencies arise, such as the Carlton Complex Fire. “It’s hard to put our money into something like that when it is tied up this way,” Ward said. “Please either vote no or defer this until we have some more pieces of important information.”

Extends ESD Contract BY KATIE TEACHOUT KATHERINE@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket School Board members extended a contract with the North Central Educational Service District’s (NCESD) External Fiscal Services Department for provision of external business management through Aug. 31, the end of the school fiscal year. The cost of the extension is $8100 per month. Dave Arp, Fiscal Director with NCESD, said according to the WASA School Information and Research Service’s salary report for 2013/14, an internal business manager’s salary for a school the size of Tonasket would cost an average of $72,000, not including benefits. It was decided to postpone hiring an internal business manager until the end of the fiscal year and after a new school superintendent was hired and brought up to speed on several issues, including budgeting of new funds from the school bond if it passes. “There is a new budget cycle coming up, and that is very time-consuming,” Arp said. “Transitioning a new superintendent is not a good time to also be transitioning a new business manager.” Trisha Schock, who serves as the primary External Business Manager for Tonasket School District with NCESD, reported spending a lot of hours renaming account codes and performing 163 salary adjustments over the past week. “We are getting there, but there is a lot of work to do over the next month or two before we start budget wrap-ups,” Schock said. Tonasket School District Technician Supervisor Jordan Weddle presented information on Google Docs, which he described as “an improved method of collaboration with all your documents.” He said 500 student machines having already been upgraded with the system, which he said includes a new web filter enabled for kids to be safe and better prepared for the future. He said Google Classroom will allow teachers to hand out assignments electronically, with students and teachers able to look at the documents simultaneously. Once students are able to take Chromebooks home, they can access their assignments that way, and it won’t matter if they don’t have internet access at home,” Weddle said.

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FEBRUARY 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Tonasket CCC brimming with Talent

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Tonasket Community Cultural Center had their annual Talent Show last Saturday evening with much music, laughter and even some acrobats. Clockwise from above, The Ruby Scene Band with Ruby Marchand on piano, Casey Stephenson doing vocals and Denny Richardson on guitar. Doni Philips performed some old standards, as well as some of her personal favorites, Quill Hyde and Marchand try their hands at a little blindfolded Boogie Woogie to mixed and often funny results. Sonny Lanigan sings a song written about the Okanogan by a friend of his.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2014

COPS & COURTS

N COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

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SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Joseph Alex Martinez, 36, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 14 to POCS (methamphetamine). Martinez was sentenced to 13 months in prison and fined $2,360.50. Frank Alexander Paul, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 27 to attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle, DUI and unlawful imprisonment. Paul was sentenced to five months in jail and fined $2,151 for the Nov. 2, 2014 crimes. The court ruled Feb. 5 to amend a sentence for Serena Rae Smith, 22, Omak. Smith pleaded guilty Nov. 18 to seconddegree rape of a child and was sentenced Jan. 22 to 12 months in jail. The court amended the sentence to 12-plus months in a state correctional facility. Bjarne Matthew Olson, 44, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 3 to fourth-degree assault (DV). Olson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 317 days suspended and credit for 47 days served. He was fined $1,110.50 for the Dec. 18, 2014 crime. The court found probable cause to charge Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 18, Omak, with POCS (heroin) and seconddegree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Matessa Rose Jorgensen, 20, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine) and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 23. The court found probable cause to charge Brandon William Cate, 28, Okanogan, with second-degree burglary, attempted second-degree theft, first-degree vehicle prowl and second-degree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 24. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Joel Hyde, 44, Tonasket, with seconddegree TMVWOP, obstruction and failure to obey law enforcement. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Carlo Lee Perez, 29, Omak, with second-degree burglary, second-degree malicious mischief and second-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 26. The court found probable cause to charge Lois Elaine Perez, 53, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 31. The court found probable cause to charge Rudy Martin Garcia, 26, Omak, with delivery of a controlled substance (heroin) (within 1,000 feet of a school zone). The crime allegedly occurred March 6, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Thomas Edward Isakson, 41, Okanogan, with two counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) (within 1,000 feet of a school zone). The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 7-8. The court found probable cause to charge Daggon Andrew Deboy Chaska, 22, Okanogan, with possession of marijuana

(with intent to deliver) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 31, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Wesley Paul Wirth, 37, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 29. The court found probable cause to charge Daniel Keith Parker, 49, Yakima, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle. The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 29 at the Oroville Port of Entry.

DISTRICT COURT Michael Patrick Connors, 56, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Connor was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $858. Joseph William Cook, 28, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Cook was sentenced to 364 day in jail with 358 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Cook also had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Mayra L. Covarrubias, 28, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID. Marty Wayne Dobson, 61, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Dobson was sentenced to 364 day in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,473. Jesus Dominguez Martinez, 31, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Dominguez Martinez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 275 days suspended, and fined $1,058. David John Donovan, 58, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Daniel Scott Eisen, 27, Oroville, had a reckless driving charge dismissed. Eisen was fined $200. James Michael Eriksen, 32, Riverside, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Ronald Dean Friedlander Jr., 45, Omak, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI. Friedlander was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,681. David Allen Gorr, 56, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS. Gorr was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Mark Stuart Helberg, 45, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Helberg was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $818. Melissa Hernandez Perez, 20, Omak, had a charge dismissed: possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams). Hernandez Perez was fined $400. Rosalia M. Hernandez, 30, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID. John Andrew Hilderbrand, 21, Omak, had an MIP/C charge dismissed. 911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, FEB. 2, 2015

Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. House reported egged. Theft on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Credit card reported missing. Threats on N. Second Ave. in

Okanogan. Fraud on Kermal Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Red Wing Dr. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Koala Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Threats on S. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Central Ave. in Oroville. House reported egged. Malicious mischief on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Elm St. in Oroville. Found property on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Weed eater recovered. Theft on Juniper St. in Oroville. Rachael Anne Wolff, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for forgery. Kyle Anthony Nicholson, 28, booked for first-degree DWLS. Robert Leo Curtis, 54, booked for DUI. Cody Franklin Webster, 29, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Derrick James Charley, 21, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

TUESDAY, FEB. 3, 2015

Domestic dispute on No Name Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Dickson Hill Rd. near Riverside. Fraud on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Check fraud on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Fraud on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on N. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Benito Perez Soberanis, 25, booked for no valid operator’s license without ID and a USBP hold.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 4, 2015

Theft on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Mail reported missing. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Malicious mischief on John Peterson Rd. near Omak. Mailbox reported damaged. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Miller Rd. near Omak. DWLS on S. Main St. in Omak. Threats on Columbia St. in Omak. Sex offense on N. Ash St. in

Omak. DWLS on Omache Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Shane M. Heisey, 28, DOC detainer. Timothy Thom Bailey, 60, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Shannon Tonnie Simpson, 30, booked for two counts of third-degree theft.

THURSDAY, FEB. 5, 2015

Disorderly conduct on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Koala Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Wanted person on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Jorge Antonio Gonzalez Moreno, 32, booked for second-degree assault and first-degree burglary. Juan Aragon Torres, 48, booked for first-degree residential burglary and second-degree assault with a deadly weapon. Joshua Michael Chapa, 23, DOC detainer. Jorge Perez Duran, 50, booked for first-degree residential burglary and second-degree assault with a deadly weapon. Heather Taizan-Kilgour, 39, booked on two OCSO warrants: third-degree malicious mischief and a juvenile warrant. Richard Bush, no middle name listed, 27, DOC detainer. Roy Contreras, no middle name listed, 40, DOC detainer. Abraham Godinez Cuevas, 29, booked for first-degree rape of a child (DV) and a USBP hold. Ruben Correa Leon, 52, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and obstruction.

FRIDAY, FEB. 6, 2015

Theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Omache Dr. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Theft on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Assault on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Automobile theft on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Assault on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on E. Grape St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order

THE EFFECTS Wenatchee Valley College at Omak Assoc. Student Body

at the Mirage Theater in Downtown Omak Feb 19-21 Boyhood

on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Hanford St. in Omak. Theft on Dayton St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Omak Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Ferry St. in Omak. Fraud on N. Ash St. in Omak. Three-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Fir St. in Omak. No injuries reported. MIP/C on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Cherry St. in Oroville. Theft on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Sixth Ave. in Oroville. Shaun Anthony Baker, 28, DOC detainer. Audrey Ann Huckins, 51, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Aaron Cresslie Jacobs, 24, booked for third-degree malicious mischief. Reese Emerson Clark, 40, booked for first-degree DWLS. Alfonso Cardenas, no middle name listed, 57, booked for violation of a protection order. Daniel George Taylor, 50, court commitment for DUI.

SATURDAY, FEB. 7, 2015 Disorderly conduct on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Central Ave. in Oroville. Threats on Glenwood Ave. in Riverside. DWLS on Dayton St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Threats on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Elvis Aaron Sherman, 48, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jennifer Mary Cheney, 36, booked for second-degree assault (DV). Robert Lynn Stanger, 51, booked for DUI. Bailey Elizabeth Elsberg, 18, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Darryle Leeann George, 23, booked on two State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Brandon Robert Humphreys, 31, USBP hold. Terry Lee Zoller, 63, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia and an OCSO FTC warrant for first-degree negligent driving. Monica Gaye Joseph, 54, booked for first-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTA warrant for seconddegree DWLS. SUNDAY, FEB. 8, 2015

DUI on N. Ash St. in Omak. Drugs on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Mailbox reported damaged. Theft on Mill St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on River Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on Blackbear Dr. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Dry Gulch Rd. near Tonasket.

Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. DWLS on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Threats on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Omak Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Harassment on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Brendan Wade Overall, 23, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, seconddegree DWLS and a Grant County FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Jesse Daniel Ray Lightley, 20, booked for second-degree DWLS. Allen Richard Hertlein, 25, booked for DUI. Blake Adam Wagner, 19, booked for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Larry Gene Visger, 67, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV) and third-degree DWLS. Robert Noel Johnson, 53, booked for violation of a nocontact order (DV).

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Rollover accident

TONASKET – A vehicle rollover accident 5.9 miles east of Tonasket on SR20 last Sunday, resulted in one woman being transported to North Valley Hospital, according to the Washington State Patrol. Abigail S. Pearcy, 30, Tonasket was traveling westbound on SR20 when she left the roadway to the right, overcorrected, then left the roadway to the left and rolled her 2007 Dodge Caliber. The car struck a telephone pole and came to a rest on its wheels, according to WSP Trooper J. Eifert’s incident report. Eifert reports that the cause of the accident was driver inattention and that Pearcy would be charged with Wheels Off the Roadway. The vehicle was impounded by Thompson Bees.

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Gary DeVon/staff photo

For a few days water from Tonasket Creek, really a combination of rainfall and highland snowmelt, created a miniature falls as the newly carved creek channel flowed into the Okanogan near the Cherry Street Bridge.

Going to miss our little falls

I’m just going to start off by saying I know they had to put Tonasket Creek back where it belongs, but for a few days I was able to enjoy the view of a miniature falls cascading into the Okanogan River from my river side cabin. The noisy rush of the water as it flowed out of its channel and through the ditches along Chesaw, Sawtell and East Oroville roads and made it’s way across the river from me was better than having my iPhone set to White Noise at night this weekend. I know that it wasn’t good for the fish, nor for anyone that had to drive through it to get home last Friday night, however, it made for some excitement and of course, lit up Facebook Out of about the unplanned event. The county did My Mind their job and was quick to put the creek back to Gary A. DeVon bed and no one was hurt. Flash floods or water over the road can be dangerous and shouldn’t be taken lightly. If you’re unsure of the road you should find a way to go around or just not drive unless it’s an emergency. Fortunately the water wasn’t that deep or too fast. But it was just 12 years ago we lost Charlotte when she tried to drive through a flash flood and was swept away. Fortunately she was able save her grandchild by pushing her out car window. The Oroville police should be thanked for warning drivers at the start of the flood and the county crews for their quick attention to the problem. It made for some exciting moments and I hope no one suffered too much damage from the flooding.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Photographer Katie Teachout Katherine@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

The Petri Dish

Battling school over test scores BY JERRY CORNFIELD HERALD COLUMNIST

OLYMPIA — Lawmakers, teachers and the state public schools chief are gearing up for another battle over whether student test scores should be used to evaluate teachers and principals. State Sen. Steve Litzow, R-Mercer Island, introduced two bills this week that would require that results from state student assessments be calculated into teacher performance reviews, starting with the 2016-17 school year. Hearings on the bills are expected next week. Federal education leaders are demanding that Washington chisel the requirement into law if the state wants to regain a waiver from the No Child Left Behind law. The state lost the waiver last year, meaning the state and 297 public school districts couldn’t spend about $40 million in federal money the way they wanted. It also meant that 1,916 schools across the state were deemed failing by the U.S. Department of Education, and letters had to be sent to parents explaining why. Through much of the 2014 legislative session, Litzow, Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn and Gov. Jay Inslee tried to get lawmakers onboard. But they collided with the statewide teachers union, the Washington Education Association. Its leaders staunchly oppose the federal dictate and insist that the evaluation process created by state lawmakers is workCOMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER GAZETTE-TRIBUNE PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

75 years Ago February 2-9, 1940: Missing for over a week or since Wednesday morning, January 24, nothing definite as to the whereabouts of Roy H. Green, young Oroville attorney, has been learned at this writing. As to whether he met with foul play, willfully left or is the victim of amnesia, no one has been able to determine. George’s Five and Ten Cent Store, which has been located in the Peerless Hotel building along side of the telephone office for the past year or more, has been moved the First National Bank building on Main Street, and will be open for business in the new location this morning, Friday, February 2. The store will be in the room formerly occupied by the Oroville Commercial Co. Caldwell’s Café, which as been closed since Tuesday of this week while the kitchen was remodeled, will reopen Saturday morning at 6 a.m. According to Wm. Caldwell, proprietor of the restaurant, an almost complete new kitchen has been installed, including a new range, new steam table and re-arrangement in other parts of the room designed to make, as he says, “food service better. The regular meeting, of the Town Council Monday evening, was devoted mostly to discussing the plans for the new city jail and office which it is expected to be built some time this spring. The new building is to of re-enforced concrete and will be so instructed that it may be added to in the future as the funds become available. Grocery prices: Coffee, 2 lb. can, $.53; Albers Corn Flakes, 3 packages, $.25; Crab meat, large can, $.21; Catsup, large bottle, $.10; resh dressed chickens, $.15; 1 lb. George Washington Tobacco, $.59.

ing as intended, weeding out less-talented teachers. The union flexed political muscle to keep most Democratic allies from bending. And in a deliciously dramatic moment in the state Senate last session, a bill originally crafted by a Democratic senator to appease the feds was brought up for a vote by Litzow. It was defeated 28-19, with 20 Democrats — including the original author, Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe of Bothell — and eight Republicans voting against the measure. That didn’t end the scuffle. In the ensuing days, Inslee met with U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to verify what the state needed to do to avoid becoming the first to lose its waiver. Then he and Dorn drafted a new bill and tried to persuade lawmakers to vote on it, which they wouldn’t. “I take my hat off to the WEA,” Dorn said in August of the teachers union. “They did a better job than we did. Maybe this time we can get past the rhetoric and propaganda and do what’s right for kids.” Litzow isn’t predicting how the legislative rematch will turn out. He thought he had enough Democrats in tow last year. He won’t make the same mistake this time. “We’re going out and having conversations right now,” he said. Inslee expended political capital last year trying to get lawmakers to implement a testscores provision for evaluating teachers, and he has nothing to show for it. It’s not clear how hard he’ll push this go-round. Litzow

ITEMS FROM THE PAST The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: February 4-11, 1965: The Oroville Hornets will play one of their most critical games of the year against the Chelan Goats this Friday night in the Coulton Auditorium. The Hornets will be putting their undefeated league record and nine game winning streak on the line. Oroville previously beat Chelan this year by a score of 68 to 49. Chelan will be using Steve Kline, the #3 scorer in the state in an effort to upset the Hornets. “What do you do to entertain our-of-town guests?” That’s what President Pete Valentine asked the Oroville Chamber of Commerce Tuesday. Valentine said one of his most successful outings was when he took visiting city children into the wood where they watched him cut wood with a chainsaw. Charles Speith was hired as Police Deputy Monday of this week by the police committee of the Oroville City Council. Speith, born and raised in Oroville, is married and has two children. He will begin full time duty on Monday, February 15. A new Radio and Record Shop has been opened on Main Street. Jim Howell opened for business next door to Tommy’s Jewelry on Monday of this week. He will have radios, television sets, record players records. He will also be available for service on any of the above units. Grocery Prices: Oranges, 5 for $1.00; Chunk Tuna, 6 cans for $1.00; Cabbage, solid heads, $.06 lb.; Beef liver, $.29 lb. Radishes or Green onions, $.05 per bunch; Ground beef, $.39 lb. Weather wise by Marge Frazier, official observer: January 27th, 34 degrees, maximum and 16 degrees minimum; 28th, 38 and

said he’s not spoken with the governor on the subject. Superintendents of school districts mostly avoided the fray in 2014 but might be engaged this year. At legislative hearings last fall and earlier this session, superintendents expressed frustration at receiving federal money they couldn’t spend due to restrictions related to the loss of the No Child Left Behind waiver. A requirement to ensure student access to private tutors exposed some families to unscrupulous hard-sell tactics, the superintendents said. Oh, and sending letters to parents telling them their child attends a failing school hurt morale, they said. The WEA, meanwhile, is still opposed to using student test scores in evaluating teachers. “It makes no sense to dramatically change our successful teacher evaluation system when Congress appears ready to rewrite the federal law,” said WEA spokesman Rich Wood. “To really help our state’s students, the Legislature should focus on its paramount duty to fully fund K-12 education this session.” Let the battle begin. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623; jcornfield@ heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos. 21; 29th, 41 and 30; 30th, 44 and 33; 31st, 42 and 21; February 1st, 37 and 24 and 2nd, 42 and 21. Total precipitation, .26 and snow, 61 inches.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: February 1-8, 1990: Apparently Crest Construction, the developer who has proposed over 20 units of Senior Housing, has received verbal permission to proceed with the project from the Farmers Home Administration, according to Tonasket City Attorney, Mick Howe. Howe added that Crest would like to close a deal with the town for the Youth Center property by Feb. 15 and to take possession of the site by March 18. Due to the increase in mining activity in Okanogan County, the Committee on Monitoring Mined Minerals (CM3) has been formed. “We do not oppose mineral development,” stated Mark Skatrud. A January article in the Wenatchee Daily World said that the Crown Resources Company of Denver, Colorado, owner of the Buckhorn Reserves, upped its late 1989 estimate of 500,000 ounces of retractable gold near Chesaw Forest Service and U.S. Geological Survey. Tonasket and Oroville have chosen to run two year levies for the 1991 and 1992. Oroville’s levy amount is $295,000.00 for each of the two years at a cost of $373.00 per student for each year while Tonasket is asking for $415,000.00 or a per student cost of $395.00. Both levies passed with Oroville getting a 70.6% yes vote and Tonasket with a 67.7% tally. The Molson Transfer Station will be open for garbage collection every Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., starting Jan. 27. The transfer station is located in downtown Molson and is operated by the Molson Grange. There will be a $4.00 minimum charge for dumping and $4.00 for each additional yard. Charge for dumping appliances is $4.60. They will not take batteries, hazardous waste, hot ashes or paint.


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 12, 2015

PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Remember Valentine’s Day is Saturday In two days Cupid will shoot an arrow into the air and hit your Valentine, or so goes the fable. A quote from somewhere is, “All I really need is love, but a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt,” so remember that Saturday, that is if your wife or girlfriend isn’t on a diet, and then some flowers might be a better choice. If I caused some to go to the Oroville Senior Center last Saturday for breakfast, only to find it locked up, I am truly sorry. I made a mistake. The date is Saturday, Feb. 14 (not Feb. 7) as I indicated. As I say ‘the only person that never makes a mistake is the person

that does nothing”. Please forgive me if I caused undue hardships, for anyone. Here’s a sweet treat recipe that is called “84 Milk-Run Specials.”. Butter a 9x13 inch pan. Combine 1 cup of sugar, 1 cup white syrup. Cook to a boil. Add 1 cup of peanut butter and blend. Pour this over 6 cups of Rice Krispies and 1 cup of unsalted peanuts. Spread in pan. Let stand. Melt and blend 1 cup chocolate chips and 1 cup butterscotch chips. Spread this over Rice Krispies. Let stand until cool before cutting into bars. On Thursday, Feb. 5, at a very early hour we and a couple of friends met

Everyone talking HILLTOP about the weather COMMENTS SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The last week or so the big thing to talk about is the weather. Maybe folks think if we talk about it enough it would go away. Not so. It got worse over last weekend with the big rain storms we had come through. Just when we thought Sitzmark Ski Area was going to be open for all of the ones who like to ski or snow board, and also those who go just to watch and have lunch or just go for the cinnamon rolls. Fred was one of the lucky ones who

Sweet Hearts Dinner on Valentine’s Day

got to have his yearly fix on the cinnamon roll. The big wind, rain, sunshine and warm temperature was not what we wanted at all. There were reports of water over roadway, washed-out roads. It did not matter which direction you went, there was water, gravel and mud. There are lakes in the middle of pastures, rocks and mud everywhere. Please be careful when you are out and about. The next Bingo evening in Molson at the Grange Hall will be on Friday, Feb. 20 at 7 pm.

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY LYLE ANDERSON TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Well, how about this lovely weather. Make sure and have the waterproof shoes out. It is another great week to visit the eagles and enjoy some events. On Friday there will be Bingo at 7 p.m., so make sure and break those daubers out and come enjoy the fun. The kitchen will also be open at 5:30 p.m. and will have burgers and more. The special

Breathing room for Nursing Home SUBMITTED BY THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

Great News! Our efforts have been positively received and acted on by the North Valley Hospital District Board. At the meeting on Thursday, Jan 29, a motion was presented and approved. It

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aMErIcan SnIpEr

saT.-sun.-mOn.-Tues., Thurs.-Fri.. Feb. 2122-23-24, 26-27. shOwTimes On Fri. & saT. @ 7:00 & 9:30Pm. nOminaTed FOr 6 academy awards

JUpITEr aScEnDIng

saT. - sun.- mOn. Tues. Feb 28, march 1-2-3. shOwTimes On saT. @ 700 & 9:25 Pm

will be a delicious jalapeño swiss burger. On Saturday we will be having our annual Sweet Heart’s dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. We will be serving prime rib with all the trimmings for $17.00. So grab your loved one and come enjoy a great evening and dinner. After dinner will be the joker poker drawing at 7 p.m. and the pot is getting up there again and karaoke with Linda to follow. On Sunday there will be breakfast from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and

NURSING HOME NEWS reads: Barring unforeseen circumstances, the Nursing Home Success Team recommends that the Board pass a motion to extend the study period beyond March 27, 2015 and postpone any definitive action regarding the status of North Valley Extended Care until Dec. 31, 2015. This motion was passed unanimously. This gives us the breathing room we need to do a lot of the work necessary to keep our Nursing Home open and to find out what our community would or could support. So once again we are not closing, but the risk remains. There is still work that needs to be done, so please don’t get too comfortable and think that all will be just dandy and put this issue on the back burner. We will continue to have weekly updates in the paper. The fact books are available to read. Please review these booklets and make a list of

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acTiOn/adv./FanTasy sTarring channing TaTum, mila kunis,eddie redmayne. Fri. 6:30, 9:45 saT.-sun.*2:30, 5:45, 9:00. mOn.*2:30-5:45 Tues.-wed. 6:45 93min

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questions and concerns you may have for us. Coming in March or April will be our First Flight Forums. These will be our first public forums and they will be held in Oroville and Tonasket. We hope to be able to find out what you would like to know, how you think the community can come together for the Nursing Home, what you think would be helpful and would work. We are also interested in any testimonials you might have. We have not been able to find much documented history about our Nursing Home; either it’s history or stories about it. We are asking those of you who are interested in sharing to please write down or copy stories or written histories you may have. Local history is precious and it would be great to have it available for community members to read. We are also looking for a copy of “All Roads Lead to Tonasket,” which is now out of print. You can bring any of these to the Nursing Home to Linda Holden or send them to Karen Schimpf at P.O. Box 865, Tonasket, WA 98855.Thank you again for your interest, Nursing Home Success Team.

sTarring TOm kenny, anTOniO banderas, Frankie muniz. Fri. 6:45, 9:30. saT.-sun. *2:45,

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C.

NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

The groundhog has officially predicted six more weeks of winter once again. North Valley Community School is researching groundhog cooking methods in order to offer Groundhog Cooking as a class. Meanwhile, please consider the following classes to keep you busy in the upcoming week. Is Your Dog Training You? Monday Feb. 16 at 5:30 p.m. Does your dog run down the street with you flapping in the wind at the end of his leash? Do guests leave your home covered in slobber and with paw prints on their faces? These issues and many others can be solved with simple training methods. Come

Fundraiser planned for this Saturday SUBMITTED BY TOM CLOUD GREEN OKANOGAN

Green Okanogan has been an all volunteer group working in the north county since 2007. Its mission has been “to create a business model for a community recycling program” and “to inspire others who care about the Okanogan to recycle.” Over the years it has been active in recycling e-waste (computers and televisions), plastic, cardboard, aluminum and other metals and educating area students, residents and visitors in how and why to recycle. GO has been involved in annual Tonasket city spring

Showtime! begins this Valentine’s Day SUBMITTED BY ALLENE HALLIDAY

This year’s Friends of the Oroville Library musical series Showtime! kicks off on Valentine’s Day with guitarist/ accordionist/singer Reed Engels. Music starts at 7 p.m. This popular wintertime entertainment takes place at Vicki’s Backdoor off Main Street in Oroville. These shows are sponsored by a host of communityminded merchants giving their support to our library. Included in that list is Hometown Pizza,

Many activities on Sweetheart Day SUBMITTED BY JANN HANSEN

Sweetheart Day at the Oroville Eagles on Valentine’s Day, Saturday, Feb. 14. We will have a Scotch Doubles Sweet-heart Pool Tournament. Sign up at 1 p.m. and be ready to play at 1:30 p.m. Cost is $10 per couple. Sweet-heart Dinner starts at 6 p.m. We’ll eat Steak and Prawns

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let our puppy whisperer teach you how to get back to top dog status! Meditation for a Peaceful Mind Tuesday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m. Deadlines. Dishes. Paperwork. Repairs. Coworkers. Dinner. Regulations. Bills. Ommmmm... Ahhhh! Come learn and practice meditation and have a peaceful, functional mind and better health. Want to Learn to Knit?

GREEN OKANOGAN cleanup and organized Earth Day educational events each spring. Last summer Green Okanogan received tax exempt status from the IRS and successfully earned its first grant from the Community Foundation of NCW to buy a forklift. After years of searching GO has found the perfect site for a permanent recycling center. They have secured a one year lease with option to buy a two acre parcel next to the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. With help from the community they plan to open their recycling center in May this year. No longer will north county

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY which will be supplying their fabulous pizzas for opening night’s performance, as well as on closing night March 7. The other generous sponsors of Showtime! are: Akins Harvest Foods, America’s Family Grill, the Brown Jug, Frontier Foods, Hughes Department Store, Midway Building Supply, Oroville Pharmacy, Les Schwab, Thompson Bees, Upper Valley Disposal and Esther Bricques

EAGLEDOM AT WORK and the rest of a special dinner. It will be $25 for you and your sweetheart and you can stay and hear and dance to North Half at 8 p.m. See the ad elsewhere in this edition. Come and spend Valentine’s Day with your sweetheart and the Oroville Eagles! We now have lunch available every week day from 12 noon to 2 p.m. and the banquet room is

Tuesday, Feb. 17 at 6:30 p.m. Do you kneed something knew to keep you busy during never ending dark winter days? Knitting may be just the thing for you! Whether you are knew to knitting or need a little help with a project this is the class for you! Decorative Journaling Wednesday Feb. 18, 6:30 p.m. Do you keep a journal? Would you like to spice it up a bit? Bring an old book to transform and join in the fun! To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or check out North Valley Community School online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. The NVCS board members have decided we need an additional board member to help keep Ellen in line. If you feel you are up to this exceptionally difficult task, call Ellen at 509-476-2011.

residents need to haul their recyclables to Okanogan, Twisp or Chelan. As with any business the first year can make or break an organization so the GO board of directors is calling on the community it serves to support and sustain its efforts. A Valentine’s Day “Love Your Community” auction and fundraiser will be held at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Saturday, Feb. 14. A silent auction and live music will run from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. A gourmet dinner will be served at 6pm with a live auction beginning at 7 p.m. Board members ask all local residents who believe it is time for a local recycle center to come, enjoy themselves, join the group and help make recycling a reality in the north county.

Winery. In addition to the music, there will be drawings for gift baskets and other items. Scheduled performers for the Showtime! series are: Feb. 21— Brock Hires; Feb. 28—Nuance (Sam Howell, Walt Gilbert and Scott Teagarden) and March 7— Slippery Slope (Chuck Oates, Jim Attwood, Ron Champagne and Dave Wheatley). Admission is free and refreshments are available. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. with entertainment beginning at 7 p.m. Our sincere thanks to our sponsors and to Rick Braman for his ongoing assistance in recruiting the performers, as well as handling the sound system and working on the advertising. We couldn’t do this without you! open to the public. Come on in and give our Soup-n-Sandwiches a try. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and during Seahawks games. We have free pool every Sunday. Wednesday is Pool League and Burgers. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Fridays are Steak Night, Joker Poker and Meat Draw. We are People Helping People!

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watch the two Gonzaga games. And they won. Our house furnace thermostat had been malfunctioning for quite some time, and we left it in the trusty hands of our grandson. He determined it was more than the thermostat and we arrived home from 80 degree weather to a cold house. Recently, we ran the gamut finding a repair man for the frig so here we go for the furnace. I have recently learned that the Rev. Robert Campbell has returned to Colorado where he lived before coming to Oroville to be at the Episcopal Church and also where he has family. He has health issues pertaining to his heart. He was a quiet gentleman but had many friends throughout the area and will be missed by all. The community wishes the best for him. ‘Til next week.

Any interest in groundhog cooking?

OROVILLE EAGLES

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

the special is waffles with whip cream and strawberries. There will also be pinochle at 1 p.m. On Tuesday, March 3 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. will be a taco night, so get on in here and enjoy a taco. They will be $1.50 per taco, just right after a long day. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows. High Score was snatched up by Nellie Paulsen and in a close second place was Jeannie Jones. Low score was taken by Jerilyn Green and the last pinochle of the day was by Leonard Paulsen We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state.

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Omak and mirage TheaTers are nOw digiTal

The

The next Pancake Breakfast will be Sunday, Feb. 22, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. For $8 you can get an excellent meal of pancakes, ham, hash browns, eggs and applesauce, coffee, tea or hot chocolate. If you are still hungry you can go back for more. The ladies of the Grange have been busy putting together gift baskets for the Raffles. The tickets sell for $5 for six or $1 each. The results of the Pinochle games for Feb. 2 are: the High’s went to (the new guy) Dal Wilder and Boots Emry. The Low’s went to Doug Knight and Mary Lou Barnette, and the Traveling was won by Ruth Wick. There were 31 players present. I do believe that is the most they have had so far this year.

312 S. Whitcomb

OMAK THEATER

drama/rOmance sTarring dakOTa JOhnsOn, Jamie dOrnan, luke grimes. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT-sun.*3:00,6:00,9:00. mOn. *3:00, 6:00. Tues-Thurs. 6:30

at the airport in Spokane with a group they have a difficult time keeping it to of approximately twenty local people, their self. As for me I found a dime on and off we went to Laughlin, Nevada the floor and that was my luck. to experience a few days of wonderSo for those of you on the trip, that ful sunshine, good foods and I threatened with “writing for the most part help out secrets” about, you can relax the economy of the various now. This is it! casinos. I used to walk to the Outlet For some it was a first Mall that is located nearby. time trip, for others it was I used to be younger, also. a repeat. One thing for sure Either they have moved the all had good times visiting, mall or my legs are LOTS sometimes with long time older or perhaps a combinafriends and sometimes maktion of both but it’s much ing new ones. This is not an farther than I remembered. organized group, following THIS & THAT (and it was hot, in the eight“a little flag” like some travies) The shopping had to els, but everyone does “their Joyce Emry be done, and they no longer own thing.” The object is to have shuttles, so I had to have a fun time and possibly resort to taxis. I took a taxi get lucky and bring home more money three times and the fee was different than you left with. I believe everyone each time, going exactly the same dishad a good time. The other I’m not sure tance. of, but usually if someone “gets lucky” I was delighted that I was able to

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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FEBRUARY 12 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE ROYALTY | FROM A1 I am also a Running Start student at Wenatchee Valley College where I have a grade point average that has placed me on the Dean’s list. My parents are Heather and Noah Burnell. I have two younger brothers, Elijah and Jasper. I have lived in Oroville my entire life, and May Day has always been a big part of it. The first time I can remember being in the parade was in preschool. I have been involved in the parade nearly every year since, ranging from Library floats and freshmen royalty to pep band and Maypole. I’m very excited to continue to be a part of May Day this year. I am very involved in both school and the community. I’ve been a class officer since my freshmen year and currently hold the position of vice president. I’m a Future Business Leader’s of

America member, and have been secretary for the past year. Last year I was a State FBLA competitor, and this year I am running for Vice President representing the North Central Region. If elected for that position I will make many business connections while representing Oroville and the North Central Region as a whole. I am also a member of Be the Change Club, Upward Bound, Honor Society, as well as the teen representative for the Oroville Community Library Board. Additionally, I am Editor-inChief for my second year in yearbook, and am a Gear Up Tutor (through Central Washington University) to junior high students. I also play Volleyball every fall. I have been involved in the community since a young age and have helped extensively with Public Library events such

as the Book Sale and Country Celebration. I’ve also helped with the Youth Soccer Association in recent years. The thing that I love most about Oroville is the sense of community. Throughout my high school career especially, I have learned that the people in Oroville are very supportive and welcoming. I feel that this is the best part of Oroville and would love to share that same sense of community with others. After High School I plan to finish my last two years at a four year University, and then move on to Law school. I hope to see each and every one of you at Selection Night on Feb. 16th. I look forward to representing my community in the upcoming year as Royalty. I wish the very best of luck to my friends Mikayla and Faith.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR The Ruby Scene to Perform

OROVILLE –The Ruby Scene will be on stage Thursday, Feb. 12 at Esther Bricques Winery. Denney Richardson on guitar and vocals, Ruby Marchand on keyboard, and Steve Bell on percussion have put together an evening of new sounds. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Darrelle London & Kevin Fox

OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Darrelle London and Kevin Fox on Thursday, Feb. 12 at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 7:30 p.m. This music event features Kevin Fox, a multi-instrumentalist, singersongwriter and composer. Darrell London’s highlights include collaborating with Chantal Kreviazuk The Osoyoos Community Theatre is located at 5800 115th Street, Osoyoos BC. For more information see www.osoyoosarts.

Come see the new CT Scanner

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital will host a CT Scanner Open House on Friday, Feb. 13 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 203 S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Light snacks & Refreshments will be served Come see the newly finished CT Room with 32-Slice CT Scanner.

Senior Valentine’s Breakfast

OROVILLE - The Oroville Seniors will be serving breakfast on Saturday, Feb. 14 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. with a scrumptious meal of pancakes, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, milk, all for the miserly price of $8, cheap. Look for the Valentines theme. Mark your calendar. Bring your own honey. And, don’t forget your sweetheart.

Spiritual Movie Night

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Feb. 14 at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200.

‘Love Letters’ Dinner Theater

OROVILLE – Dramatic Escape along with Esther Bricques Winery will bring Dinner Theater to the North County on Saturday, Feb. 14.“Love Letters, a two-act play, begins with dinner at 6 pm, followed by the play at 7 p.m. Dinner is served at 6 p.m. Call 509-429-8051 or the winery for tickets. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Green Okanogan Fundraiser

TONASKET - Green Okanogan will

be having a fundraiser auction and membership drive at the Community Cultural Center on Saturday, Feb. 14. Silent auction and music from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dinner ($10) and live auction start at 7 p.m. Love your community and the Earth by helping Green Okanogan open a recycling center and restore this spring in Tonasket at 3 Rodeo Dr. (Across from Baker’s Acres). To donate auction items call Janet at 509-486-2061. For more info or to volunteer call Carol at 509-556-2250.

Is Your Dog Training You?

North Valley Community Schools is offering a class, Is Your Dog Training You? This multiple session class starts Monday, Feb. 16 at 5:30 p.m. Does your dog run down the street with you flapping in the wind at the end of his leash? Do guests leave your home covered in slobber and with paw prints on their faces? These issues and many others can be solved with simple training methods. Come let our puppy whisperer teach you how to get back to top dog status. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 to sign up.

Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed

OROVILLE - The Oroville Episcopal Church will be hosting a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed on Tuesday, Feb. 17 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the church hall at 604 Central Ave. The breakfast will be sausage, pancakes, and homemade applesauce. Tickets are available at the Oroville Pharmacy or the door. Adults, $6; seniors, $5 and children 12 and under, $3.

Learn to Knit

North Valley Community Schools asks the question -Want to Learn to Knit? Do you need something new to keep you busy during never ending dark winter days? Knitting may be just the thing for you! Whether you are knew to knitting or kneed a little help with a project this is the class for you! This class is multiple sessions beginning on Tuesday, Feb. 17 at 6:30 p.m. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 to sign up.

Library Preschool Storytime

TONASKET - The next Tonasket Library Preschool Storytime is Friday, Feb. 19 at 10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime is at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket. Any questions please call the library at 509-486-2366.

Tonasket Food Bank Meeting

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank will hold its Annual Meeting on Thursday, Feb 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Tonasket Community Church. All are welcome to attend this yearly meeting to discuss the past year and envision the future.

First Aid & CPR Class (English)

TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (English) will be held on Satur-

day, Feb. 21 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 Lommis-Oroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-2233412, leave message.

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

Your Social Security benefits can be an important part of your retirement income strategy. But when should you start taking these payments? You can begin accepting Social Security as early as 62, but your monthly checks will be much smaller than if you wait until your “full retirement age,” which will likely be between 66 or 67. And these monthly payments will get even bigger if you wait until age 70, at which point they “max out.” So, should you take your Social Security as early as possible and hope that the smaller monthly payments will be justified by the extra years of receiving them, or should you wait until you are older and hope that the bigger checks will be worth the delay? In weighing this decision, consider the acronym LENS, which stands for Life expectancy, Employment, Need and Spouse. Let’s look at each component:

Life expectancy — If your family has a history of longevity, and if you are in excellent health, it may make sense for you to take Social Security later, when your monthly benefits will be higher. You’ll also want to consider your spouse’s life expectancy. Employment — If you want to keep working in your “retirement years,” be aware that your earnings could affect your Social Security payments. Specifically, if you take Social Security early — that is, before your full retirement age — your benefits will be withheld by $1 for every $2 in earned income above a certain amount ($15,720 in 2015). During the year in which you reach your full retirement age, this withholding changes to $1 for every $3 in earnings over the annual limit ($41,880 in 2015). The withheld amounts could also affect spousal benefits. However, beginning the month you attain your full retirement age, benefits will no long longer be withheld based on how much you earn. Also, Social Security will recalculate your benefits at full retirement age to account for the benefits that were withheld. In any case, if you do plan to continue working, and you think you could have significant income, you’ll need to understand the effect that earnings will have on your annual benefits.

Bring your honey to breakfast

TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (Spanish) will be held on Saturday, Feb. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 Lommis-Oroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-2233412, leave message.

Dock Side Drive

OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Dock Side Drive a music event on Thursday, March 12 at 7:30 p.m. This popular swing and show band features Swing, Blues, Jazz and Show tunes. The event takes place at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 5800 1115th Street in Osoyoos. Tickets available at Imperial Office Supply in Osoyoos or at the door. For more information see www. osoyoosarts.

Practice Sessions

OROVILLE - Practice Sessions, the hour long program offered by the Oroville Community Library on Thursday mornings at 10:30 a.m. in the activity room will continue throughout January and February. Allene Halliday shares information about American music from the 1920’s to the 1960’s that has endured and is relevant to the present day. Steve Pollard accompanies her renditions on guitar. The presentations include performances as well as rehearsal techniques plus the history of the style of musc that is still used in current entertainment venues, such as popular movies, etc. This ongoing series is free and is for all ages to enjoy. Call 509-476-2589 for additional information

Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com or at GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

several years with alternative sources of income (such as a pension) and modest withdrawals from your investments, you may be able to delay Social Security, thereby increasing the size of your monthly payments. Be careful, though, because relying too heavily on your investment portfolio can shorten its own “life expectancy.” It’s essential that you maintain a reasonable withdrawal rate for your investments throughout your retirement. Spouse — Your decision of when to take Social Security will affect your spouse’s survivor benefit. Surviving spouses can receive their own benefit or 100% of their deceased spouse’s benefit, whichever is greater. So, if you were to take your Social Security early, when the payments are smaller, your spouse’s survivor benefits will also be permanently reduced. If you are older than your spouse, or otherwise expect your spouse to outlive you, it might be a good idea to delay taking Social Security to maximize the survivor benefits. As you think about when to take Social Security, look at your decision through the LENS described above. It could help clarify your options.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use Need — In deciding when to take Social by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. Security, here’s a key question: Do you need the money? If you can support your lifestyle for

don’t forget your sweetheart. Mark your calendar. Hold the phone. Stop the train! I was just resoundingly informed that Potluck Sunday is the second Sunday of the month, only. Potluck is no longer every Sunday, as some of us thought. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. The meal is served at 1 p.m., with Double Deck(?) Pinochle afterwards. Remember: Don’t forget your dues. Computer classes say, “oui?” Sometime? We’ll see. Pinochle report: Door prize, Nellie Paulson; Pinochle, Bev Holden; High Man, Wayne Naysnorski; High Women, Ruth Barnett.

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

On this Saturday, Feb. 14, Valentines day, we will be serving breakfast between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Mark your calendar for a scrumptious meal of pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, tea, orange juice, milk, and a smile, all for the miserly price of $8. A cheap date. Look for our Valentines theme. Bring your own honey. And,

There were errors in last week’s submitted article about the upcoming Oroville Scholarship Foundation Spring Variety Show which should have listed the date as March 12 at 6:30 p.m. Applications can be found at the grade and high school offices and online at www.orovillescholarsh ipfou nd at i on . org / v ar i etyshow. Applicants may contact Eric Stiles, OHS Music Teacher, for more information via email at eric.stiles@oroville.wednet.edu or by phone 509-476-3612. The OSF Variety Show raises money for scholarships by holding silent and live auctions, and shares proceeds with the OHS Music Department.

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

First Aid & CPR Class (Spanish)

Look Through this “LENS” when Making Social Security Decisions FINANCIAL FOCUS

Correction:

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 12, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • February 12, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

For Rent

2 BR, 2 BA, 2nd FlOOR apt in Oroville. Nice walk-in closet, washer and dryer hookups. Quiet area and great location. Over looks a nice shade tree and green lawn from covered back patio. Accepting applications. No smoking. No pets. $550 / month + $400 deposit. Call 509-223-3064 or 509-560-9043. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433 CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475.month. Call 509-223-3433 SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

SUN LAKES REALTY 4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; 2+ BR house $700; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

TONASKET 1 BEDROOM for $495. Close to town. All appliances. Water and sewer paid. 509-486-1682 or 509429-0873.

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces RV SPACE

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Announcements

Help Wanted

Statewides

CRAB DINNER

WORKERS WANTED

statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

American Legion Post 84 is holding their annual crab dinner on Saturday, Feb 14th at 6 pm Tickets are $25 each and can be purchased at the Lounge or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique on Main St. Only 150 presale tickets, no tickets at the door. FIRST AID & CPR CLASS will be held on Saturday, February 21st, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm in the Whitestone Church basement 577 Loomis Oroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and a pillow. For information, call Ben Hylton 509223-3412 leave message. Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted Groundman Okanogan County PUD has an opening for a Groundman. A current Washington State driver’s license with Class A commercial endorsement required. Electrical, electronic and mechanical experience preferred. Must have good communication skills and work well with others. High school diploma or equivalency required plus pre-apprentice lineman school. Must have or obtain a first aid / CPR card and flagging traffic control card. Applications & resumes will be accepted through Friday, February 27, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Box 912, Okanogan, WA 98840-0912. Applications may also be faxed or emailed to 509-422-8416, laurar@okpud.org. Okanogan PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Lineworker Okanogan County PUD is looking for an IBEW Journeyman or Hot Apprentice Lineworker. This position is journey level work involving the construction, maintenance and repair of electrical overhead and underground distribution and transmission systems. Requires two years in the electrical trades as an apprentice working under the direct supervision of an IBEW journey level electrical trades worker. Must have CDL with Class A endorsement, have or obtain a Washington first aid / CPR card. Applications & resumes will be accepted through Friday, February 27, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Box 912, Okanogan, WA 98840-0912. Applications may also be faxed or emailed to 509-422-8416, laurar@okpud.org. Okanogan PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Workers needed for the following jobs at the warehouse: * FORK LIFT DRIVER * MECHANIC *SORTERS/PACKERS

Apply in Person: Gold Digger Apples, Inc. 1220 Ironwood, Oroville

Health General

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: MA– C Full time. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. EVENTS-FESTIVALS BIG ONE Snohomish County 4-H Tack Sale Saturday, February 21 9am-3pm. Consignment: Wednesday 4-9pm, Thursday 9am-9pm, Friday 9am-6pm. For more information, 425-308-2815 or https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/416828768476278/416829378476217 EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANTIQUE SALE Snohomish Citywide-Star Center Antique Mall & historic First Street, 400 antique dealers, up to 40% off February 6-8. www.myantiquemall.com or 360 568-2131 EVENTS-FESTIVALS Early Bird Automobile, Antique and Collectible Swap Meet. Puyallup Fairgrounds, February 14 & 15, Saturday, 8-5. Sunday, 9-3, admission $5.00. For information call 1 (253) 863-6211. HELP WANTED Drivers-No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! No matter what stage in your career, it’s time, call Central Refrigerated Home. (888) 793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train at home to process Medical Billing & Insurance Claims! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at Bryan University!! HS Diploma/GED & Computer/Internet needed! 1-877-259-3880 LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ADOPTION *ADOPT:* Affectionate Devoted Married Caring Lawyers Joyfully await Miracle Baby. Excited Grandparents too. *Expenses paid* 1-800-563-7964*

Public Notices

Public Notices

February 9, 2015 City of Tonasket Annual Council Retreat Meeting The Tonasket City Council will be holding their annual goal setting/retreat workshop on Wednesday, February 18th, 2015 at 5:30 pm at Rancho Chico Restaurant in Tonasket. The Council will be discussing Committee Appointments, and ideas and plans for 2015.This meeting is open to the public and those with special language hearing or access needs should contact city hall, 509-4862132, 24 hours prior to the meeting. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Alice Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 12, 2015. #OVG614837

and construction, meeting criteria and standards for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Washington State Aviation and other potential state and federal funding sources. Additional detail for the Airport project is available on the city’s website, www.oroville-wa.com, or may be provided upon request to the city clerk’s office. The City of Oroville reserves the right to retain the services of a Consultant for any and all subsequent phases for the Airport project. Future projects may include water, wastewater, street, architecture, landscape architecture and land survey; and may be (funded or partially funded) through the State of Washington Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program with federal funds provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Washington, the departments of Ecology, Health, and/or Transportation, the Washington Recreation and Conservation Office; the Federal Aviation Administration, Economic Development Administration and/or the Environmental Protection Agency, and not necessarily limited to the named sources. The City of Oroville reserves the right to retain the services of one Consultant for all engineering services, or to utilize a roster to retain the services of consultants particularly qualified in one or more areas of engineering. Statements must specify the type of engineering services a firm desires to provide, descriptions of experience with relative projects, references, and resumes of proposed project engineers. Fees and project scopes will be negotiated for each project. Five copies of the SOQs must be submitted to the City of Oroville no later than 4:00 pm, March 13, 2015. Firms of interest in each area of interest will then be scheduled to attend an interview in Oroville for final selection process on Thursday, March 26, 2015. The City of Oroville is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer and encourages minority and women owned firms to submit. The

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: HARRY H. TOPPING, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00001-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: January 20, 2015. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 29, 2015. /s/Hartley A. Topping HARTLEY A. TOPPING Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Topping Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29, February 5, 12, 2015. #OVG612016

Crosswords

Roomer Part time/24 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF FEBRUARY 9, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a

ANSWERS

Did you know?

CITY OF OROVILLE REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The City of Oroville is requesting statements of qualifications (SOQs) from consulting firms for the development of a roster for engineering services with respect to projects from January, 2015 through December 31, 2017. Projects that are currently in design or construction phases are excluded. An immediate need is for Airport related services; therefore, firms interested in this area must address experience with design, environmental,

Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN Part time, on an as needed basis position. English/ Spanish bilingual required due to business need.

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Legals Continued On Next Page

Think Green!

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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FEBRUARY 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE February 12, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Legals Continued From Previous Page

mated to cost less than $300,000.00 and their Vendors List, consisting of vendors interested in providing supplies, materials, equipment or services between $7,500.00 and $15,000.00 through telephone and/or written quotations. In awarding contracts for such projects, the City of Tonasket shall invite proposals from all appropriate contractors or vendors who have requested to be included on the Small Works Roster and/or Vendors List, and shall select the lowest responsible bid. The City reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. All contractors and vendors, where required by law, must be properly licensed or registered in this state. The City of Tonasket actively seeks participation by minority or women owned firms who otherwise qualify. Forms may be obtained at Tonasket City Hall or by calling 509-486-2132. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 12, 19, 2015. #OVG614834

fied as segregated and recorded nonabandonment of such property. I am the First person in recorded history to do so. I will improve the premises and relocate my driveway from mile marker 264.28 to a point that is the safest to all people of the State of Washington. State property is 100% free of encumbrances and when abandoned is 100% free of encumbrances. Now and Forever to be entered into county taxed land. I do so willingly. Records of said Abandoned 1932 roadway are kept int he maproom basement at the Wenatchee D.O.T. P.U.D. welcome Phone welcome. Posted on Property. WAC458-61-550 Excise tax exempt South of Creek Abandoned roadbed. W.A.C. 197-11-960 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 /s/Roger Rylander Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 2015. #OVG611291

For more information, please contact Mary Lou at 509 476-2375 or email at Cemeterydist4@myhighlandmail.com. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 2015 #OVG613828

Public Notice Posted Proclamation of Reclamation Abandoned State Hwy. 4 (now S.R. 2OE) circa 1932-2015 Feb. 1, 2015 To be recorded on Parcel nos. 3727260002-3727260005-37272600 06 all in Okanogan Co. WA. From Feb. 1, 2015 is unified non-abandonment linked to parcel 3727264005 Homestead-Farmstead Roger Rylander. I Roger Rylander have maintained, improved and paid delinquent property taxes on said parcels. I am the first person to have property identi-

PUBLIC NOTICE Regular Cemetery District 4 Board Meetings The Cemetery District 4 Board will hold their regular board meetings every 2nd Monday of each month for the year 2015. The meetings are held at the Oroville American Legion Hall, 314 14th Ave, beginning at 1:00 pm. The Cemetery District 4 Board conducts and administers all general powers and business of the Cemetery District and is guided under the RCW 68. for all public purposes of the Cemetery District. The public is invited to attend.

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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ANSWERS

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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PUBLIC NOTICE Contractors and Vendors List As authorized under RCW 35.23.352 (2), and RCW 35.23.352(8), the City of Tonasket is updating their Small Works Roster, consisting of contractors interested in performing work for the City of Tonasket which is esti-

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City of Oroville, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprise as defined at 49 CFR Part 23 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. For further information, contact Rod Noel, City Supt., at 509-476-2106 or JoAnn Denney, Clerk-Treasurer, 509-476-2926, ext. 10. Mailing address is PO Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844. ATTEST: JoAnn Denney Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 12, 19, 2015. #OVG614541

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The Perfect Charmer- Delightful 2 bed/ 2 bath + Den on Pretty Lot. Comfortable living room W/ French doors & separate dining area, Breakfast Nook too. Energy efficient including vinyl windows. Large covered deck. Includes much of the home’s furnishings. Only $59,000

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1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015

LOCAL SPORTS

Tigers send 14+2 to Regionals

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Frank Holfeltz was a district runner-up at 195 pounds and will be heading to Regionals in Spokane on Saturday.

Dallas Tyus, who missed most of the season with a hand injury, will head to regionals after his fourth place finish at Districts.

Finish second to Warden for district title

Roosevelt’s Octavio Alejandre won at 285; and Raf Varelas led Brewster with his championship at 138. Host Oroville wasn’t able to earn any automatic qualifications. Jordan Smith (126) finished fifth and is an alternate. The regional tournament takes place on Saturday, Feb. 14, at Northwest Christian (Colbert) High School. “We’re excited for this weekend,” Mitchell said. “Thanks to all who came out to support our wrestlers. And a special thinks to my coaching staff; they are the hardest-working guys around, especially Cole Denison.” Down the road in Omak, Chelan won the District 6 1A title. Tonasket alum and Mitchell’s son

BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OROVILLE - Warden beat back a challenge from Tonasket on Saturday to win the District 5/6 Sub-regional wrestling tournament at Oroville, qualifying 16 wrestlers (including two alternates) for next weekend’s East Regional tournament. The Cougars finished with 304 points to the Tigers’ 275.5, with Liberty Bell (140) edging Okanogan (132) and Kittitas (130.5) for third place. Oroville finished 11th. Warden got district titles from Mikey Canales (113 pounds),

Tyson Yamane (126), Robert Arredondo (160), Jerry Reyes (195) and Joseph Pruneda (220) as well as runner-up finishes from Adrian Tapia (113), Josh Guerra (120), Joseph Pruneda (126), Raul Martinez (145) and Mikey Hernandez (285). The Tigers were led by champions Trevor Peterson (132), Jorge Juarez (152), Austin Knowlton (170) and runners-up Zach Lofthus (160), Frank Holfeltz (195). “It was definitely a roller coaster ride of highs and lows,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “Having 19 guys there made it

especially tough; running from mat to mat and gym to gym.” Tonasket also sends a total of 14 qualifiers and two alternates to regionals, including Tim Freese (4th, 113), Rade Pilkinton (3rd, 126), Zion Butler (4th, 138), Ryan Rylie (3rd, 152), Dallas Tyus (4th, 160), Morgan O’Brien (3rd, 220), Daymion Misenas (4th, 220), Chad Edwards (3rd, 285) and Jimmy Coleman (4th, 285). Alternates (fifth place) are Rycki Cruz (145) and Lucas Vugteveen (182). Liberty Bell’s champions included Trent Skelton (120), Emmett Fink (145) and runners-up Merrit Fink (2nd, 138) and Jacob McMillan (2nd, 152). Anthony Payton won the district title for Okanogan at 106, Lake

Martin Mitchell, the Goats’ firstyear coach, was honored as the

Caribou Trail League Coach of the Year.

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Oroville’s Leo Curiel tries to score against a Liberty Bell wrestler.

Hornets set for district after Brewster win BY BRENT BAKER

HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OROVILLE - The Hilderbrand sisters aren’t twins, but they might have been given their performances in Thursday’s final home game of the season. With Oroville and Brewster

closing out the regular season and the third and fourth seeds out of the CWL North at stake, the Hornets’ Lily and Hannah Hilderbrand each tallied 13 points and pulled down 13 rebounds as their team came from behind to defeat the Bears 60-50. Both were already assured dis-

trict playoff berths, but the path to the state tournament isn’t quite as daunting for Oroville with the higher seed they earned with the win. An opening round contest with White Swan will be no picnic, but winnable games after that first round give the Hornets a chance to at least repeat last year’s

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Tonasket’s Jaden Vugteveen and Oroville’s Hannah Hilderbrand go after a rebound during last Tuesday’s Oroville victory over the Tigers.

first round state appearance. It was far from an all-Hilderbrand effort for Oroville. They needed contributions from all corners to offset a career night from Brewter’s Yvette Sanchez, who took advantage of Oroville’s defensive strategy to net a careerhigh 23 points, including four 3-pointers. “We knew we needed contain Markie and Maret Miller,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn of the Bears’ leading scorers. “You get in a position when you challenge someone else on the other team to beat you. She got in a groove and almost did.” Lily Hilderbrand had to take a seat in the second quarter of her senior night after picking up her third foul. Sophomore Kendal Miller stepped into the scoring void, hitting a pair of treys and scoring 10 points in the second quarter as the Hornets led 28-26 at the half. Hilderbrand returned in the third quarter, but it was Sanchez and the Bears that threatened to pull away, taking a 43-37 lead to the fourth quarter. Bourn switched things up in the fourth quarter, and it paid off. “Lily was getting banged around inside with (Markie) Miller, getting her shots checked,” he said. “We moved her to point and it opened up a lot.” That, and the Hornets slapped on a full court press in the fourth quarter that yielded a series of turnovers and a flurry of quick points. “We also showed some great patience on offense,” Bourn said. “It was the best I”ve seen outof us in awhile. It was really a pleasure to watch.” Miller finished with 10 points for Brewster (9-11, 8-6 CWL North), which plays South winner Mabton to open district tournament play Wednesday, Feb. 11. Faith Martin scored 11 points, Miller had 10 and Mikayla Scott had eight for the Hornets (13-7, 10-4). “Faith and Kendal played some great defense,” Bourn said. “Mikayla (who has been sick) started to look like herself again, and really boxed out well. We something from everyone.”

OROVILLE 50, TONASKET 31 TONASKET - Tonasket came out firing on all cylinders, even as Oroville faced a must-win game to preserve their hopes for the CWL North Division’s third seed to the district tourny next week. But even after the Tigers bolted

to a 10-2 lead on their senior night, the Hornets didn’t panic, outscoring the Tigers in each of the last three quarters on the way to a 50-31 victory on Tuesday, Feb. 3. Kayla Willis scored a layup off the opening tip, and the Tigers controlled the action for most of the opening quarter from there. Hilda Celestino’s 3-pointer and Jenna Valentine’s free throws gave Tonasket its biggest lead at 10-2. “We’ve talked about the late season doldrums,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “I’ve seen it a million times, you’ve seen it a million times, we’ve seen it the past couple weeks. I told them, don’t let yourself keep falling into those. Finish strong for your teammates. “Between that, and the fact we

beat them pretty good the first time, we really weren’t ready. But Tonasket was, they took it right to us.” With Lily Hilderbrand under the weather, Hannah Hilderbrand took control of the paint, finishing the first quarter with a three point play and basket - both off offensive rebounds - to go with a Faith Martin layup to cut the lead to 12-9. “We challenged Hannah about three or four days ago,” Bourn said. “She’s really responded. Good thing too, as sick as Lily and (Mikayla Scott) are right now. Scotty wasn’t even ready at the opening tip.”† The younger Hilderbrand gave the Hornets (12-7, 9-4 CWL North) their first lead at 18-16 midway through the quarter,

GUN CLUB NEWS Inland Empire Spokesman Review Telephonic Shoot SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE & TONASKET GUN CLUBS

Tonasket Gun Club 23 23 23 23 22 21 19 17 15 7 5 19

16 YARD Jeff Taylor Noah Olmstead Rick Lind Lloyd Caton Jr. Craog Jordan Robert McDaniel Randy Cline Jeremy Clark Hunter Swanson Logan Clark Scott Hughes HANDICAP Lloyd Caton Jr.

19 19 18 11 22 20 20 17 9

Jeff Taylor Rick Lind Noah Olmstead Randy Cline DOUBLES Lloyd Caton Jr. Rick Lind Noah Olmstead Randy Cline Jeff Taylor

Oroville Gun Club The regulars showed up and shot. Only two more weeks for the Spokesman Review Shoot, then on March 1 will tbe the Oroville Club Shoot, mark your calendars. 16 YARD 24 Vern Cole 22 Logan Farris 18 Scott Peterson 16 Carl Cole

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FEBRUARY 12, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

LOCAL SPORTS Tonasket outruns Soap Lake in district play BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

BREWSTER - Feb. 7, 2015 File under “anything can happen in the playoffs.” Tonasket and Soap Lake, both

averaging about 54 points a game in the regular season, staged an up-and-down shootout Saturday at Brewster in their District 5/6 play-in game. With the season on the line, the Tigers held off the Eagles 78-69 in

Brent Baker/submitted photo

The Tigers’ David Moreno draws a foul on his way to the basket on Saturday.

a contest that featured no-holds- an opening to come back. Capolo barred run and gun offense, full hit four straight free throws and court pressure and a fast pace of Josh Decker hit a basket to cut the play even after both teams were Tonasket lead to four. The teams too exhausted to do those things combined for a series of six possessions without scoring, and the well. Tigers caught None of that a break when mattered to a lane violathe Tigers, tion wiped out who earned “It wasn’t always pretty, a made Soap their first but we made some free throw post-season big plays when we had Lake that could have victory since to....” cut it down to 2007. three points. “It wasn’t Coach Mike Larson, Ramon hit always pretTonasket Tigers Boys Basketball a momenty, but we tum-swinging made some big plays when we had to,” said 3-pointer with 3:30 left. Bensing Tonasket coach Mike Larson. followed with a pair of layups off “Once we stopped committing of forced turnovers to preserve lazy fouls like we did in the third the lead. “We got contributions from quarter, we were able to stretch them out a bit and built our lead everybody,” Larson said. “Ethan attacking the basket was probably back.” The Tigers led by as many as the difference the game. Colton 12 points in the first quarter as did what he does inside. Then we they ran up a 25-16 lead, and had McCarthy making big plays still took a 43-36 advantage to again, Ramon with his big shot. Tim Frazier’s hustle on defense the locker room. But Tonasket committed the created some big turnovers. “It got sloppy and everyone first seven fouls of the second half - all in the first three min- made some mistakes, but everyutes - mostly on reaching for the one gave us something positive ball after Soap Lake rebounds. too.” Kapalo finished with a gameThat put the Eagles in the free throw bonus very early on, and high 30 points for Soap Lake led by rangy 6-4 senior Nick (5-11). Bensing finished with 23 Kapolo, eventually resulted in a points, with Leep adding 19, 49-48 Soap Lake lead. Adrian McCarty and David McCarthy 13 and Ramon 10. The Tigers take on league coMoreno combined for nine points in an 11-2 Tonasket run champion Brewster (18-2) on to close the third quarter, but Wednesday in Eastmont to open despite the eight point lead they district tournament play. Considering the way the season were far from out of the woods. Thanks in part to their sea- started - Larson wasn’t hired until son-long battle with the free October - it marks a remarkable throw, the Tigers gave Soap Lake finish to the season for Tonasket

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Tonasket boys basketball coach Mike Larson implores his team to “use their heads” during the late stages of Saturday’s district play-in victory over Soap Lake. despite an 8-12 record. “When we started I had no idea what we were going to run, or how this team could play,” he said. “We had guys come out who hadn’t played before. We had to make wholesale changes mid-

season once we figured out what the guys could do. “Now they’re buying in and playing well, and starters and reserves are all contributing. Now it’s a new season and anything can happen.”

Tonasket gets past Oroville to head to playoffs

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Oroville’s Dustin Nigg gets tangled up with Tonasket’s Jesse Ramon during last Tuesday’s showdown between rivals. BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket boys basketball coach Mike Larson has been preaching to junior Adrian McCarthy that when he lets the game come to him, good things are going to happen. It couldn’t have gotten much better for the Tigers on Tuesday as McCarthy came up with a string of plays during Tonasket’s 11-point run in the fourth quarter that put them in control of their showdown with Oroville. The Tigers’ 61-50 victory over Oroville gave them the inside track to the CWL North’s fifth and final playoff spot. A win over last-place Bridgeport on Thursday would lift Tonasket into a Saturday play-in game against either Soap Lake or Waterville. With the Tigers clinging to a 46-43 lead in a back-and-forth game, McCarthy first pulled down an offensive rebound that led to a Colton Leep bucket, made a steal that resulted in two Ethan Bensing free throws, assisted on a Charlie Sanchez layup, and finally drained a 3-pointer with 2:30 left that gave the Tigers a 12-point lead. “We’ve stressed with him, try to get your shots out of the offense rather than trying to create,” Larson said. “It’s much more difficult, lower percentage than when you’re just catching and shooting. That 3 was catch and shoot. He’s a good enough shooter to shoot that.” The game and season hung in the balance for both teams: Oroville needed the win as badly as did Tonasket. In the first game, Leep dominated the Hornets for 33 points. Oroville

coach Jay Thacker had in mind to keep that happening again, and for the most part succeeded. The Hornets pressured the Tiger guards to cut off their passing lanes, and nearly always had two defenders on Leep. The Tigers’ post didn’t score his first points until midway through the second quarter and finished with 15 points and 12 rebounds. “We were pressuring the ball, getting him backside help,” Thacker said. “In the fourth quarter we just kind of forgot what got us to that point. Then we pressed on offense and it got worse.” It also opened up opportunities for other Tonasket players to step up. Ethan Bensing’s 21-point night was a combination of openings on the perimeter as well as lanes opening that let him slash to the basket. “Ethan just played out of his mind,” Larson said. “Probably his two best games have been the last two. “It was much harder getting the ball to Colton. It opened up lanes for other people. Charlie, David, other guys getting layups. All that off ball stuff was huge tonight. You still have to give Colton credit, drawing that much attention.” The Tigers also hit 15-of-19 at the free throw line, reversing a trend that had cost them more than one game this year - most notably a 3-of-21 night against Manson. “This team has never shot free throws like that,” Larson said. The Hornets opened up an 18-10 lead in the second quarter, working the ball patiently on offense and getting 3-pointers from Andrew Mieirs, Joe Sarmiento and Lane Tietje while the Tigers had trouble hitting their shots early. But the Hornets were less patient on offense in the second half, which caused problems on both ends of the floor. “We stopped pressuring the ball,” Thacker said. “We put a lot of pressure on our defense because we were taking one pass and shooting. you don’t make as many shots that way.†Shooting percentage is more choice of shots than it is actual shooting. We don’t shoot a high percentage because we didn’t take good shots.” Mieirs finished with 17 points and Sarmiento had 10 for the Hornets (6-12, 4-9), whose only chance for the playoffs rests with an unlikely trio of upsets that would need to happen. Oroville would need to beat 17-2 Brewster, Manson has to upset Liberty Bell

and Bridgeport needs to upset Tonasket to create a three-way tie for the final spot.† The Tigers (7-11, 4-9) control their own fate: a win over Bridgeport on Thursday, and they are in. A loss and a Manson win (with an Oroville loss) creates a tie that would require an extra playoff game between the Tigers and Trojans. The only thing that is known at this point is that Tonasket will be playing someone, somewhere, on Saturday. Considering the Tigers’ win over Oroville snapped a six-game Tonasket losing streak, it wasn’t something Larson was taking for granted. “It’s the playoffs no matter how you look at it,” he said.

“We’ve played well the past few games, but it feels like we hadn’t won since Christmas.”

BRIDGEPORT 46, TONASKET 41 BRIDGEPORT - Nothing, it seems, will come easily for Tonasket’s boys basketball team. The Tigers, needing a win over last-place Bridgeport to clinch the CWL North’s final playoff spot, fell victim on Friday to a Mustangs team that hasn’t exactly played like a cellar-dweller of late. Kevin Alvarez scorched the Tigers with four 3-pointers in the first three quarters while Tonasket suffered one of its worst shooting nights of the season. Bridgeport led 27-16 at halftime.

The Tigers fought to get back in the game, allowing Bridgeport just five field goals in the second half, including one in the fourth quarter. Colton Leep and Ethan Bensing did most of the damage as Bensing scored 10 of his 13 points after halftime, and Leep had eight of his 11. The Mustangs held on by hitting 7-of-12 free throws in the fourth quarter. Bridgeport finished 4-14 overall, 2-12 in league play. The loss meant the Tigers (7-12, 4-10) had to wait until Friday’s Liberty Bell-Manson game find out if they had qualified for the district play-in game; LB came through with a 61-30 win at Manson to wrap up the Tigers’ playoff spot.

BREWSTER 77, OROVILLE 11 OROVILLE - Oroville made Brewster work for the Bears’ first victory over the Hornets this season when they met three weeks ago. Not so this time as the Bears, getting primed for Wednesday’s district tournament opener, throttled the Hornets 77-11 in the regular-season finale for both teams. Chance Williams scored 19 points, Timbo Taylor added 18, Luke Divis had 14, Mitch Boesel scored 11 and Cade Smith had 10 points and 11 rebounds. Nathan Hugus had six points as the Hornets wrapped up their season at 6-13 (4-10 CWL North). Brewster (18-2, 13-1) takes on Tonasket in the first round of district tournament play on Feb. 11.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015

Groups appeal ATV decision

OBITUARIES untimely passing. Cheryl requested to have no services honoring her.

Monte E. Smith

Cheryl Sylvester

CHERYL SYLVESTER Cheryl Sylvester was born in Tonasket, Wash. on September 27, 1947. She was one of three children of William and Donna Sylvester. Cheryl grew up in an orchard on Highway 7, Tonasket. She attended school in Tonasket and then went to the University of Washington college. She graduated also with a law degree from Columbia University. Cheryl worked for the Department of Interior and recently retired after many years of service. Cheryl and her partner Richard Miller resided in Fairfax, Virg. Cheryl was a gourmet cook, specializing in American to French and Italian cuisine. She loved to travel throughout the world, which included trips to visit her mother Donna and would attend luncheons at the Tonasket Senior Center where she had many friends. She was a talented gardener, which she inherited from her mom and grandma. Cheryl was known to be a kind and generous person, especially to fellow workers. She loved to read and was an avid reader enjoying everything from history and art to mystery novels. Cheryl enjoyed life and projected a positive outlook toward being alive. Her passing was a shock to the Tonasket Community. Cheryl is survived by hr mother, Donna Sylvester, brothers, Allen and Greg and their families and Richard Miller her partner in life who so lovingly attended her during her final days. The Tonasket community mourns her

MONTE E. SMITH

Kathleen Graves

KATHLEEN GRAVES Kathleen Graves age 63 of Tonasket died on January 28, 2015 with her family by her side. She was born to the late Joanne and Glenn Mitchell on October 1, 1951 in Helena, Arkansas. Kathleen relocated to Seattle, Wash. and graduated from Nathan Hale High School. She worked many years in the grocery and service industries, bringing smiles to the faces of the many locals she saw on a daily basis. Kathleen was full of life and her infectious smile and positive disposition were a joy to witness. During her later years, Kathleen found the most satisfaction spending time with her husband, sister and grandchildren. She will be remembered as a loving wife, mother, sister, grandmother, and friend to all whose lives she touched. Kathleen Graves is survived by husband Larry Graves, sister Pam Criswell, brother Mike Mitchell, sons Eric Harry and Thomas Wynne and step children Zabrina and Zachariah Graves. She is also survived by her five grandchildren Tuesday, Tenneesee, Amelia, Myles and Alana. Family Services will be held at a later date. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

Monte E. Smith passed away peacefully surrounded by his family on February 7, 2015 at the North Valley Extended Care in Tonasket, Wash. Born in Tonasket, Wash., on September 16, 1918 to parents Harold L. Smith and Pearl Graves Smith, Monte graduated from Tonasket High School and then attended Washington State College. He returned to work in the Tonasket Post Office for a brief period before enlisting in the Coast Guard in 1941. He served on shore patrol on the East Coast during World War II. Monte and Bonnie J. Holbert were married in Tonasket in 1944 while he was on leave. They spent the next two years in Portland, Maine, where daughter Susan was born on January 25, 1946. Returning home after the war, he worked in the office of Smith & Nelson Inc., the apple-packing warehouse that his father had started in the 1920’s. After a short time he was able to fulfill a dream of owning a fishing boat. He moved the family to Westport, Wash., where with a college friend, he fished commercially. With help from some old time fishermen, they enjoyed success. Then he received word from Smith & Nelson that he was needed back in Tonasket, due to the illness of the current manager. Monte moved his wife and daugh-

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ter to Tonasket, adding son Scott to the family in 1950. Having made many lasting friends in the apple industry, he retired in 1990 at the age of seventy-two when his son Scott became the general manager, Monte is survived by his loving wife of 70 years, Bonnie, son Scott (Montie) Smith, grandchildren Amy Fairburn, Lisa Doud, and Matt (Danika) Smith, and great grandchildren, Casey and Emily Fairburn and Stella Crutcher and Simon Smith. Monte was preceded in death by his parents, Harold and Pearl Smith, sister Delcie Ogle and daughter Susan Doud. Like his forefathers, Monte loved the water, ships and boats. Monte and Bonnie enjoyed many travels to places wherever there was the water and ships. But coming home to be with his family was what he treasured. He always felt blest to have lived his life as he had. A Celebration of Life service is scheduled at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, February 14th at the Tonasket Community Church with Rev. Leon Alden officiating. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting that memorial donations be made to the North Valley Community Health Association, 203 S Western Avenue, Tonasket, WA 98855. Bergh Funeral Service in care of arrangements..

of Appeals, in Spokane, seeks review of the entire ordinance and environmental review process. METHOW VALLEY CITIZENS’ COUNCIL MVCC and CNW have argued WINTROP - The Methow from the beginning that some Valley Citizens’ Council (MVCC) roads are appropriate for ATVs and Conservation Northwest while others are not, but a whole(CNW), a Bellingham-based sale opening of all county roads with speeds regional conof 35 mph or servation less without an organization, “There are important announced engineering or their appeal, safety and environmen- environmenfiled today, of tal analysis tal concerns... ” an Okanogan violates comMaggie Coon Chairwoman, Superior Court mon sense Methow Valley Citizens’ Council ruling on the and the State 2014 county Environmental ordinance Policy Act. opening over 400 miles of county “There are important safety roads to All Terrain Vehicles. and environmental concerns The county ordinance opened with the County ATV ordinance, virtually all county roads with and the Commissioners ignored speed limits of 35 mph or less, those concerns. If the County despite strong opposition from would narrow the list of roads MVCC and many citizens in open to ATVs using safety and the Methow Valley. MVCC and environmental information, this CNW filed a lawsuit in Okanogan lawsuit would be unnecessary,” County Superior Court, arguing said Maggie Coon, Chair of the that the environmental review MVCC Board. was seriously flawed because A decision from the Court of it failed to adequately consider Appeals can be expected in six the expected increase in illegal to eight months. If the decision riding on public and private is favorable to the appellants, the land, among other environmenATV ordinance would be invalital impacts. The ordinance also failed to consider safety issues dated and the county would be of ATVs sharing the roads with required to conduct additional other vehicles. On January 12, environmental review before Judge Rawson ruled in favor of adopting a new ordinance. The appellants remain represented by the County. This appeal to the State Court attorney David Mann, of Seattle. SUBMITTED BY MELANIE ROWLAND

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 602 Central Ave., Oroville Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Healing Service: 1st Sunday “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 12, 2015  

February 12, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 12, 2015  

February 12, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune