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MAGIC LANTERN SHOW

NVH HAS NEW CT SCANNER

Saturday, February 7 at 7:00 p.m. Vicki’s Backdoor Club

See Page A2

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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County officials testify on fire in Olympia

DID YOU MISS YOUR HOMETOWN?

Rep. Joel Kretz proposes changes THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OLYMPIA Members from the Carlton Complex Fire Recovery Group and Okanogan County officials traveled to Olympia Thursday to discuss the Carlton Complex Fire that burned more than 256,000 acres and destroyed more than 400 structures. The entire two-hour meeting of the House Ag r i c u ltu re and Natural Resources C o m m i t t e e Rep. Joel Kretz was dedicated to reviewing challenges and lessons learned from the fire. First, the state Department of Natural Resources presented the agency’s work in responding to the fire. Jim DeTro, Ray Campbell and Jon Wyss from Okanogan County testified about the fire response. They presented evidence of the problems with mismanagement and lack of communication. “Indecision in initial stages led to incredible losses suffered last summer,” County Commissioner DeTro said. “Lack of awareness regarding the resources available and their location resulted in delayed responses and ineffective deployment. We’re asking for authorization in statute directing that local emergency response plan contains procedures for wildfire response in the crucial first hours following discovery [of a wildfire].” Fellow County Commissioner Campbell shared how local smokejumpers were sent to a fire in Oregon and flew over one of the smaller fires that ended up

Gary DeVon/staff photos

John and Becky DesJardins are known to take time off in the winter, this year they didn’t head for warmer weather. Instead they closed Hometown Pizza and Pasta and reopened as a restaurant with a different spin on things. It’s something they’ve been wanting to do for quite a long time and John is a baker at heart. While you can still pick up a pizza pie, you can now get other types of pies and a wide selection of baked goods as Hometown now offers a full service bakery. The pasta items are gone, but now they’re offering breakfast sandwiches. Hometown’s hours have changed -- they will be open 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Customers can dine in from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and after 3 p.m. only takeout will be available.

joining the Carlton Complex Fire. “Those smokejumpers should have been deployed right there in their backyard,” Campbell said. “Within the valley, we had numerous contract firefighters, and we had plenty that didn’t get deployed.” Wyss talked about the agriculturalists, foresters, environmentalists, tourists and economy that make up Okanogan County. “Right here, the decisions we make today, will decide it all. Are we going to continue with the policies that are allowing these large fires, or are we going to provide new direction and ensure a future for our county and state?” Wyss, with Gebbers Farms, said. “It all starts with you, the elected officials who have oversight and can propose legislation, to ensure this type of fire doesn’t happen again.” Later in the hearing, Carlene Anders, executive director of the Carlton Complex Recovery Group, shared her experiences as a volunteer firefighter from Pateros. “Firefighting has changed from the time I started until now. I felt safer 20 years ago than I did in this situation. If it weren’t for the gumption of the local people, we would have had people die in this fire. It is so important to fight fires aggressively, and if we don’t, then we put more firefighters in danger,” Anders said. Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, was given time during the hearing to share photos he took while fighting the fire with locals. Many of the photos showed agency representatives driving away from the fire while other photos showed the constant work of

SEE FIRES | PG A2

First cases of bird flu found in county Sites near Riverside and Oroville under quarantine BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – A second flock of backyard poultry, this time near Oroville, was found to be infected with avian influenza, or bird flu last week and a six mile radius has been put under quarantine restrictions, according to the state Department of Agriculture. The first cases in Okanogan County were discovered in late January. Forty pheasants and a dozen turkeys from game flock of about about 5000 birds in the Riverside area had contracted avian influenza. The birds in Riverside were tested and confirmed positive for highly pathogenic avian influenza on Tuesday, Jan. 27. The specific strain of avian influenza has not yet been identified, according to Hector Castro, with the WSDA. On Thursday, Jan. 29, a team of veterinarians from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and WSDA began assessing the area for poultry flocks and contacting bird owners in the immediate vicinity of

the infected flock. The WSDA, USDA additional tests will be needed to identify and Okanogan County Public health the specific strain, according to Castro. are working with the flock owners in This second infected flock consists of developing a response plan to this latest about 100 birds, with at least half already report, he said. succumbing to the disease. This site of the Riverside flock is under Currently, WSDA has a third avian quarantine and no influenza quarantine birds are being moved zone in place in Clallam from the property. As County, a response to “None of the bird flu recently as November, an infected flock disin Washington State is covered there. Tests on the flock owners had their birds tested and, from flocks in the associated with human birds at that time, they surrounding area have illness,” said Hector showed no sign of all come back negative avian influenza in the for avian influenza. Castro, Washington flock. Because migratory On Sunday, Feb. 1 wild waterfowl popuState Department of the WSDA adopted lations can carry the Agriculture. an emergency rule disease, including the Hector Castro, to establish a second highly-pathogenic quarantine zone in Washington State Dept. of Agriculture strains of avian influenOkanogan County, za (H5N2 and H5N8), covering an area of WSDA is encouraging roughly six miles bird owners to protect around a site in Oroville where avian their domestic birds from contact with influenza was confirmed in a flock of wild waterfowl and remain vigilant in mixed poultry and other birds. their biosecurity measures. The quarantine restricts the movement There is no immediate public health of eggs, poultry or poultry products out concern due to the avian influenza virus of the identified zone with exemptions detected, however public health officials made for operations that obtain spe- routinely contact owners of infected cial permits and meet specific criteria. flocks as a precaution. Avian influenza WSDA received test results on Saturday, does not affect poultry meat or egg prodJan. 31 that found the flock was infected ucts, which remain safe to eat. As always, with the avian influenza virus, though both wild and domestic poultry should

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 06

be properly cooked, advises the WSDA. Other outbreaks of the avian flu have been reported in Benton and Franklin counties, but involved much smaller numbers of poultry. WSDA continues to advise commercial poultry growers and backyard flock owners to be vigilant with biosecurity measures. This should include limiting contact between your birds and wild birds, especially waterfowl. “We are wrapping up work in Benton and Franklin Counties where the infected flock was very near the border of two counties.... we lifted the quarantine after three weeks,” Castro said. WSDA has determined that the avian influenza detected in the two Benton County backyard flocks in December does not appear to have spread beyond those two sites. To reach this conclusion, a team of veterinarians with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and WSDA visited approximately 1,800 premises in the quarantine area and tested samples from birds at more than 70 locations. All samples tested negative for avian influenza. As a result of this action and lifting of the quarantine, there are no longer restrictions on the movement of poultry or poultry products within the areas of Benton or Franklin counties. Such restrictions remain in place in parts of Clallam County after a flock was confirmed infected with the H5N2 avian

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

influenza virus on Jan. 16. Three strains of avian influenza have now been detected in Washington state: H5N8 – found in a falcon fed wild duck H5N2 – detected in a wild duck in Whatcom County, in two backyard flocks in Benton County, and in a backyard flock in Clallam County. H5N1 – detected in a wild duck in Whatcom County “None of the bird flu in Washington State is associated with human illness,” said Castro. The sub-type of the H5N1 virus detected in Whatcom County is genetically different from the virus with the same designation that has circulated in Europe and Asia in recent years. The Eurasian H5N1 has infected people. To date, there have been no cases in the United States of humans becoming ill from any of these viruses. Deaths or illness among domestic birds should be reported to the WSDA Avian Health Program at 1-800-6063056. While the risk to the public is low, it is not zero. People with known close contact with infected birds, including owners of infected flocks, will be contacted by public health officials as a precautionary measure.

Local News A2-3 Cops & Courts A4 Letters/Opinion A5

Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8 Real Estate A9

Sports Valley Life

A10-11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015

FIRES | FROM A1 locals, including orchard sprayers, to prevent further fire damage. “A lot of my frustration is that the fire was coming all day, and a lot could have been done in preparation to put down fire lines and water down some of the land and protect the houses the fire was heading for. I never saw anything being done to prepare except by the private individuals using whatever resources we had,” Kretz said. “I saw firsthand the lack of management and communication from the command center. We had trained, capable and willing firefighters waiting to be put to work, only to have to sit and wait for orders.

Submitted photo

Mary Lou Kriner will take over the Hidden Treasures Gift Store that Norma Jean Hart started some 25-years ago after converting the old Noots Drive-in, They invite everyone to stop by this Saturday for the Grand Opening of the new Hidden Treasures.

Hidden Treasures begins a new legacy Norma Jean Hart retires after 25 years, Mary Lou Kriner to take over Tonasket gift store THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - Norma Jean Hart and her daughter Jenny purchased the old Noots Drivein” 26 years ago, remodeled the building and transformed it into Hidden Treasures and The Split End. She was 57-years old at the time and now at 81 has decided to finally retire from Hidden Treasures and move on to other adventures in her life. “I will miss the people most of all. I feel so fortunate to be apart of this small community who has supported me for the past 25 years and many who have

become my dear friends,” she She is planning a Grand opensaid. ing on Saturday, Feb. 7 celebrate Mary Lou Kriner will be the Hart’s retirement and the start new owner of Hidden Treasures. of her chapter in the Hidden She moved here from the Treasures story. “Coast” to get She asks that away from the people stop by rat race of the “Please join me in wel- and celebrate big city and to with wine and become a part coming Mary Lou to hors d’oeuvres. of a small comHart says our community and munity, as well she plans on as fulfill a life Hidden Treasures. I feel being in the time dream to so grateful to her keep- store ever so open her own often with gift store. She ing Hidden Treasures as Kriner and to set out she set visit with her a gift store.” out three and a old customNorma Jean Hart, half years ago ers and meet Former owner, Hidden Treasures to open up her some of the very own gift new ones. store which she Hart adds, called Marylou’s Gifts and More “Please join me in welcoming and was located in Oroville. “Thank you for your sup- Mary Lou to our community and port Oroville. An opportunity Hidden Treasures. I feel so gratearose for me in Tonasket and ful to have her keeping Hidden I boughyt and am taking over Treasures as a gift store. She is Hidden Treasures from Norma excited and looking forward continuing Hidden Treasures legacy.” Jean Hart,” she said.

We had experienced locals with equipment available to stop the fires, but many were told they did not have permission.” Kretz is proposing several changes to the way a wildfire is handled in the state in direct response to some of the things that happened during the Carlton Complex Fire. House Bill 1237 would give locals in an active fire situation access to state lands to put down fire lines or clear brush and timber in order to suppress the fire. House Bill 1508 would allow counties to choose to be exempt from the property fire assessment and instead collect the dollars locally to manage fires locally.

House Bill 1509 would require the state to use local contractors to fight a fire who are closest to that fire. Kretz is also co-sponsoring other wildfire legislation sponsored by legislators in the 7th and 12th Legislative Districts. “What needs to change the most, I think, is the current mindset that the state is ‘managing’ forest fires, instead of actually putting them out. More can and should be done by the state to prevent this kind of devastation. Our area will be rebuilding for nearly a decade. But we will, because we are resilient,” Kretz said.

North Valley Hospital gets new low dose CT Scanner THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET – North Valley Hospital’s newest CT Scanner promises the ability to scan even the most challenging patients in the North Okanogan. With the convergence of low dose technology, image quality, and speed found in GE Healthcare’s Optima660 CT scanner, area physicians are now able to diagnose even the most challenging patients. This innovative technology can help enable clinicians to diagnose more patients whom have trouble holding still due to faster scan times and at the same time still achieve hi quality images while using the low-dose scanning capabilities. “As diagnostic imaging has grown to become an important part of patient care, our goal of keeping radiation to a minimum has become more important,” said Shane Pyper, North Valley Imaging Center’s Manager. Today, more than 70 million computed tomography (CT) scans are done per year in the U.S. with tremendous clinical value in helping physicians to provide a fast and definitive diagnosis across a wide range of applications. CT is a non-invasive and expedient way to look inside the body at organs, soft tissues, vascular structures and bones using

x-rays to generate very high reso-

equipped with ASiR, GE’s low Submitted photo

NVHs new GE Optima660 CT Scanner in the newly finished CT Room. An open house is planned for Feb. 13 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. lution images of the body. It does this by rotating an x-ray source and detector around the patient as the patient is moved through the device. The wide coverage and increased detectors of the Optima660 CT allows healthcare providers to scan organs such as the brain, heart, liver and pancreas, in faster rotation times which will reduce breath hold times for patients. Also, the speed of this new technology allows providers to gather information about function as well as anatomy. NVH’s Optima660 CT comes

dose technology which routinely reduces dose up to 40 percent with the same image quality. Furthermore, clinicians can help reduce patient anxiety with the Optima660 CT as: • The scanner is 50 percent quieter than previous generation CTs • Optima660 CT provides soft ambient lighting and personalized gantry displays • It can comfortably accommodate more patients with a longer scan table that has a 500lb weight capacity.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Community feedback helps shape closure planning Kinross Kettle River - Buckhorn is implement- ception of their quality of life, reasons including ing a comprehensive Social Closure Plan (SCP) “friends and family” (51%), “quiet or peaceful” targeted at assist(37%), and “safe community” (22%) ing the commuwere identified most often. For those nity through the residents who had a negative perclosure process. ception of their quality of life, the top Specific aspects suggestion given on how to improve of the plan intheir quality of life was “more or better clude a Social and jobs” (57%). Economic Impact LOCAL ECONOMY Analysis, a comA total of 38% of residents think munity survey to the economy has declined in recent assist with local years, while fewer residents (22%) planning efforts, think the local economy has improved. fully sponsored In the near future, mining will play a entrepreneur and reduced role in local economies. Kinross Most residents (40%) felt that the economy has remained the same. proprietor train- is dedicated to mitigating the impact. • For those residents who think the economy ing opportunities, individualized and confidential has improved, nearly half said it was due to meetings with current vendors and contractors to an increase in jobs. Almost one-in-four rereview potential impacts, and community meetspondents, all of them Okanogan residents, ings. It is important for the community to get inmentioned the re-opening of the plywood and volved and participate in proactively taking control veneer plant in Omak as an important factor. of the economic viability of their own future, utiliz• Of those residents who said the local econing Kinross’ SCP and other resources as tools to omy has declined, 51% said there are fewer assist them. jobs in their communities. A lack of opporAs mentioned, one of the available resources tunities for young people, elevated cost of will be the results of a community survey that was living, and an increase in regulations were conducted in September 2014. Over 300 resialso given as reasons they believe the local dents of Ferry and Okanogan Counties were sureconomy has declined. veyed, providing responses to questions related to One in four residents (25%) said they bethe Buckhorn Mine, the mining industry, and most importantly, their views on the local economy and lieve the local economy will improve in the next future outlook of their communities. Here are five years. A similar proportion (24%) think the economy will decline, while 45% feel it will resome of the key findings of the survey: main the same. When asked which industries should be exQUALITY OF LIFE On a scale of 1 (very poor) to 10 (very good), panded or developed in the region, residents residents of Ferry and Okanogan counties gave had a wide variety of answers, with agriculture an average response of 7.2 to rate their quality of and ranching, retail, timber, and mining as the life. For those residents who had a positive per- top responses.

What industries would you like to see expanded or developed in your region? Total Agriculture/ranching Retail Timber Mining Restaurants/bar/food service Construction Education Manufacturing Visitor industry/tourism Health care Arts/entertainment None/no expansion Business/professional services Retirement communities Non-profit/social services Government (local, state, federal) Other* Don’t know

15% 14 14 11 8 8 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 1 1 <1 13 22

Ferry County 18% 6 31 33 4 1 2 7 3 15 8 24

Okanogan County 14% 16 11 8 9 9 8 7 6 6 5 3 4 1 1 <1 14 22

One purpose of the survey was to identify actions that should currently be taking place in order to help prepare the community for its future. Residents suggested offering trainings and working with businesses as top priorities. Both of these activities are occurring as part of KRB’s social closure planning process, so we encourage you to take advantage of these opportunities. What is the most important thing to be doing between now and when the mine closes, in order to prepare for the future of your community after the mine closes? Ferry Okanogan Total County County

Keep exploring Offer training Work with businesses Finding a job Education Environmental concerns Help school district Maintain donations/charity Other* Nothing Don’t know Refused

17% 14 7 6 3 2 1 <1 11 4 46 <1

23% 4 2 2 25 3 55 -

16% 16 8 7 4 2 2 <1 9 5 44 <1


FEBRUARY 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

Task Force arrests three for guns, drugs GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

BRIDGEPORT – The NCW Narcotics Task Force with the aid of local and federal law enforcement arrested three Bridgeport men on drug and gun charges after a search was conducted on two Bridgeport locations Jan. 22. The Task Force, U.S. Border Patrol and Douglas County Sheriff’s office served the search warrants and three men were arrested Eduardo Picazo. 23, Banjamin Angel Torres-Lopez, 24, and Faustino Cruz-Garcia, 35. They were booked into the Okanogan County jail on multiple drug charges ending a four month long investigation, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. During the search of the two locations Task Force detectives located falsified residency cards, false social security cards, SKS rifle, semiautomatic pistol, ammunition, drugs, scales and packaging material for distribution. Detectives also seized cash and a Chevrolet Corvette. Picazo and Torres-Lopez are alleged to be gang members and in July of 2014 the two were arrested by California Highway Patrol after a traffic stop resulted in the finding of a substantial amount of methamphetamine and stolen firearms, according to Rogers. “It is believed the two were

NEWS ‘The World Needs More Birders’

transporting a significant amount of methamphetamine from California back to Douglas and Okanogan County for distribution,” said the sheriff. Rogers added, “Charges from the 2014 California arrest include possession of a controlled substance, transport of a controlled substance, carrying a concealed stolen weapon, carrying a stolen loaded firearm, CCW/criminal street gang and carrying a loaded firearm/gang member. Both Picazo and Torres-Lopez were out on bail from the 2014 California arrest.” Eduardo Picazo was booked on three counts delivery of a controlled substance cocaine and three counts delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school bus stop. Benjaim Angel Torres-Lopez was booked on four counts Delivery of a controlled substance methamphetamine and one count delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of school grounds Faustino Cruz-Garcia was booked on four counts Delivery of a controlled substance cocaie, four counts Delivery of a controlled substance cocaine within 1,000 of a school bus stop carrying enhanced sentences. All three suspects have additional charges pending, according to Sheriff Rogers.

Submitted photo

Birding is becoming more and more popular in the United States and there are many opportunities to do so in the Okanogan. SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE CONSERVATION COORDINATOR, OHA

Renowned biologist, birder, and author Dick Cannings will bring his vast knowledge of birds to Highland Wonders on Friday, February 6, 2015. In his inspiring presentation, “The World Needs More Birders,” Cannings will demonstrate how going out to enjoy and watch birds can also generate

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valuable information about the abundance and distribution of bird species in our region. Drawing on a long career as a professional biologist, Cannings will convey anecdotes, stories, and experiences that underscore the need for citizen science programs. Through coordinated efforts, the public can be actively involved in turning bird watching into a collective database of bird breeding, bird behavior, and migration. Community members will be encouraged with the knowledge that anyone can become a birder, and contribute to a better understanding of the future for bird populations in a changing world. Cannings will provide examples of chance sightings that have sparked comprehensive mapping projects, which now contribute critical knowledge of unique bird species. This Highland Wonders event will also illustrate how the passion of amateur naturalists can catalyze a chain reaction that begins with data collection, which supports the need for studies, which in turn produces the studies needed for habitat protection to be legislated. Amateur birders can provide the legwork,

people-power, and on-theground observation needed for professional biologists to carry out scientific studies. These studies can only be funded when sufficient data have been collected to indicate that a problem or issue needs to be addressed. While there aren’t enough biologists to collect all of the needed data, local birders can help fill in the gaps, which then helps produce the studies needed for critical habitat to be protected. Cannings will also share puzzling changes in specific bird populations, highlighting mysteries that citizen science might help unravel in the future. “By developing programs that allow birders to gather scientific data while they are having fun watching birds, we can use the expertise and enthusiasm of the birding community to create large, continental-scale databases that will shape conservation biology in the decades to come,” Cannings says. “We can now combine field observations with cutting-edge web technology to get very detailed information on the numbers, distribution and movements of birds—information that is critical to modern

land management decisions. And anyone can get involved!” Born and raised in the Okanagan Valley of southern British Columbia, Dick Cannings grew up in a family of avid birders. Still residing in the Okanagan, Cannings works as a consulting biologist, teaches field ecology overseas, writes about the natural world, and coordinates many programs for Bird Studies Canada – including Canadian Christmas Bird Counts, the Great Backyard Bird Count, the eBird program, the BC Breeding Bird Atlas and the British Columbia Owl Survey. Birding has been a way of life for the Cannings family, and his son, Russell, is continuing the family tradition, working as a field biologist and setting a new BC record in 2010 for birds seen in one year. The following month, on March 6, Dr. Mark Oswood will present on Stream Ecology. Last summer’s small group was pleasantly surprised to discover how captivating aquatic entomology can be when taught by a charismatic instructor who is passionate and proficient in his field of study. Community members agreed that more people should have access to this excellent learning opportunity, which the March Highland Wonders event will provide. The events take place at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, beginning at 6:30 p.m., with a dinner benefiting the CCC at 5:15 p.m. The dinner will be $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members (no charge for the presentation). OHA is a non-profit organization that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The Highland Wonders educational series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources by helping increase awareness of local natural history. Donations are always welcome, see www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw.

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Enloe project making strange bedfellows

While it wasn’t that long ago it was people for the re-electrification of Enloe Dam versus those against it, mainly environmental groups who wanted to pull the dam out and free the Similkameen River. It took years of spending millions of dollars, but Okanogan County PUD seems to have accomplished something no one thought could happen – uniting the environmentalists with the farmers, ranchers, Republicans, you name it – all in an effort to stop the Enloe Dam re-electrification project. Strange bedfellows indeed. Of course these groups have different goals in mind, but they are united by one factor – cost. The numbers just don’t pencil out. Even if the dam were ungraded and a new powerhouse built, we continue to lose money on the venture well into the future. That didn’t even make sense before the PUD spent $6 million on a new headquarters, despite our electric rates going up. The argument it was all money from excess power sales did little to sooth our wounds. It could have been better spent on upgrading equipment or put aside in a capital improvement fund or even to Out of keep rate increases down. Or negotiate a bigMy Mind ger percentage of Wells Dam for a more secure Gary A. DeVon source of power than we are get from the BPA. The market fluctuates but right now the cost of generating electricity from natural gas is so low it has taken away our ability to make big bucks off excess power sales. No one could have predicted this 20 years ago, even 10, but it is a fact right now. Who know if and when that will change anywhere in the foreseeable future and make Enloe power a profitable commodity. If we wait it won’t get any cheaper to rehab the dam – but the time to have done so is now water over... well you know. Our best bet might have been nearly three decades ago when a Bellevue-based company was going to rehab it, sell the power and turn it back over to the PUD after 10 years. So-called environmental interests shut that down over a demand for expensive fish ladders. These would have created a fish run into Canada that their government and the local Indian Bands did not support. A run that did not exist, according to tribal lore and scientific study, before the dam was built in the first place. While there are groups united against placing a further burden on the ratepayers, there are still separate agendas out there. Some of the same environmentalists would like to pull the dam out altogether, while other groups would like to keep it as a historical part of Similkameen dating back to around the turn of the previous century. Others worry about the cost of pulling the dam out and who would shoulder the burden and what kind of mess it would create. Someone will have to pay and the ratepayers would not like that either. Claiming federal agencies will step in to remove it and clean up all the silt that would wash down river is easy to say, but until we see Congress actually appropriate the funds pardon us if we remain skeptical. The best of all worlds would be a historical dam left on the river as a tourist attraction with no cost to the ratepayers or taxpayers. If the PUD has to spend money, look for some grant money to shore up the old powerhouses and make it a tourist attraction on the Similkameen Trail, put out a couple tables for trail users to sit and watch the majesty that is the Similkameen River as it cascades over old Enloe. Work with the Borderlands Historical Society and put up some historic photos of the railroad, early dam development and mount some webcams so we can all enjoy it no matter where we are.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Put your foot down and say ‘No on Enloe”

Dear Editor, For three years north county ratepayers have been challenging PUD commissioners and managers trying to re-electrify Enloe Dam. Eight years of spending on applications, high priced lawyers and well paid consultants has drained $12 million dollars from the PUD balance sheets already. Enloe Electrification requires $39 million in additional borrowing plus $23 million dollars in interest. The PUD estimates the new Enloe power plant will lose between $1.1 and $1.7 million dollars each year. We will go deeper in debt every year of operation. The borrowing of $44.5 million dollars since 2000 leaves the Utility currently owing $38.5 million dollars on principle and $24.7 million due in interest. This is bad management at work. Anyone familiar with Similkameen Falls knows it to be one of the most amazing water places in the region. The salmon and steelhead fishing hole just below the falls is a treasured special place to local fishermen and local friends of the Similkameen River. We cannot stand on the sidelines while the PUD makes plans to build a budget busting power plant atop one of our most precious resources. Commissioner Bolz, our PUD representative, is completely out of touch with north county ratepayers. People are standing up to say loudly and clearly “No on Enloe!” A crucial deciding vote will take place at the next PUD Meeting on Feb. 9, 2015, 2:30 p.m., at the PUD Auditorium, 1331 2nd Ave. N, Okanogan. One resolution will authorize the building of the proposed power plant at Enloe Dam. The second resolution would terminate all further activity by the PUD on the Similkameen River. Urge all three commissioners to support the second resolution to De-Commission Enloe Dam. Call or email all three Commissioners: Ernie Bolz 509486-2553, ernieb@okpud.org; Steve Houston 509-429-9248, steveh@okpud.org; Scott Vejraska 509-826-7088 scottv@okpud.org. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

Hoping for a multi-use park where bin lot was

Dear Gary, I was delighted to see the front page article containing information that the bin lot in Oroville is being leased for a park. A big thank you to the Prince family. I was also happy to see that a sand lot is being considered for its possible use. Here’s my thoughts. We already have an excellent soccer field and baseball field complete with walking track that gets regular use. We have tennis courts available to anyone so inclined. We have two wonderful picnic parks, Deep Bay and Veteran’s Park (recently acquired and as I understand, doing financially well). Both are complete with their own bodies of water for swimming related activities, both highly used. What we don’t have is a multi-use or a sandlot park. Definition: A vacant lot used especially by children for unorganized sports and games. And… it’s in a perfect part of town! I’m envisioning children walking to this park to roller blade or skate, shoot a few baskets, or an impromptu baseball game. I could even see a small skate board area. I’m also envisioning an area that could be flooded and frozen for ice skating in the wintertime. (Ha Ha, if we ever get enough cold weather again…!) A covered area with a few picnic tables would be nice also. Maybe a small overflowing fountain for small children water play. One of the best visions I could see is that this park along Hwy 97 could be decorated for the Christmas Holidays or any holidays. It would be a bright addition to the appeal of the town as residents and visitors approach the city. You have to admit, that once you cross the Okanogan River bridge things look a little dismal ‘til you get closer in. This park brightly lit and decorated would be a huge eye appeal. I know, I know, this would all take some money. However, I think it’s entirely possible and I’m hoping that the powers that be will not just simply put in another grass covered area that has to be watered and mowed. What

do you say Oroville? Sincerely, Naomi Noel Alloway Oroville

Remember the future of our students

Dear Editor, The Tonasket school district capital improvement bond is for the students of the district. These students have names and faces. The job of educating students is difficult in many ways. Tonasket has a dedicated education team and the lack of adequate facilities makes their job of properly educating the students much more difficult, sometimes nearly impossible. An advisory committee of community members looked at the needs of the students & teachers. This is not a “wish” list. This bond was their recommendation which the school board accepted. When the current school was built 20 years ago there was a shortage of funds to complete the building. The middle school gym was built without enough room to extend the bleachers fully. The Ag Shop space was severely reduced making it impossible for students to utilize some machines and equipment. These and other issues that impact the students learning & safety have surfaced since then and would be remedied with this bond. Programs have been mandated by the State of Washington, with little or no funding. This bond would provide the space to implement these programs. Increasing taxes is difficult for all of us, but this is a tax that directly benefits our community & the future of our children & grandchildren who are the future of Tonasket and our country. The previous bond was paid off last year. If you have questions, please contact us or the District Office. Remember the future of our students, community and country and vote Feb. 10. Patti and George Hill Tonasket

Ever had a ‘god or goat’ moment? Imagine you’re a player for one of the top American professional football teams which is playing the championship game in its league. The winner goes to the Superbowl. I know, you’re sick of hearing about football. I can relate. I can’t get into quilting or baseball (too slow). Likewise mouse trap testing or hockey (too fast). But bear with me. There are two minutes left to play in this football game. The opposing team has just scored but your team remains safely ahead. The other team must now kick the ball to your team, that your team may have possession and try to widen its lead. If by some freak of statistical improbability the other team somehow gets the ball while it is kickBill Slusher ing to your team then your opponents may win, but a team retrieving the ball as it is kicking to an opposing team is rare. The short of it is, if your team simply catches this kicked ball, victory is cinched. Your team has won. It will be going to the pinnacle game in the sport. Now, you’re a pro. This is how you feed your family. For you and many of your teammates, this may be all you can ever do that earns you a hundredth of what you’re getting paid. Winning this game is job security in a viciously competitive profession of fickle employers. There is no affirmative action in football. You earn or burn. Winning means enormous amounts of money, priceless pride, and prestige to the max for your whole team. Remember, your team doesn’t have to score again to win; it is already slightly ahead.

All your team needs to do is catch the ball kicked to it then stall with possession until the remaining seconds on the game clock expire as is done often. Game over. Superbowl bound. What could go wrong? Well ... here’s where you come in. The opposing team that must now kick to yours has one miracle chance to avoid soon losing this game, and it’s a very long shot. It’s a trick kick designed, not to rocket the ball way down the field, but to make it fall only a few yards away so the kicking team has a distant chance of recovering it to try to score again before time runs out. Your team anticipates this. Your job, in the first row, practiced in countless drills to face this tactic, is strictly to block the oncoming players to give the teammates behind you their assigned chance to catch the kicked ball. There is no question in anyone’s mind what these assignments are. The ball is kicked, you crouch to block as assigned, but you see the short-kicked ball arcing directly for ... you. You know you should block but the ball is coming right to you! Suppose the guys behind you fail and the other team recovers the ball? And scores? And wins? You have a nanosecond to make a crucial judgement call. You go for it. You leap high to preclude the fast arriving opposing players from catching the ball. You extend your arms. The ball is still coming right to you. It’s an easy catch you’ve made hundreds of. You’ve done it! Yes! You hear the accolades, feel the slaps on your back, see the joy in your teammates’ and coaches’ eyes as... you... win it for the team! You see Mom smiling! It feels so fine!

Until... the ball plummets between your hands, whacks you in the helmet face-mask and bounces directly into the arms of an opposing player. Oh no! No, no, noooo! The opponents win in overtime. Your team’s entire season effort is... lost. You weren’t reckless or stupid or a glory hog. Your motives were the best. You just made a hard call to take a risk you believed in your heart would secure victory for the team family you love. But ... rather than the god, you’re now the goat. Instead of high-fives, you get a scathing on-screen tongue lashing from the coach, scowls from your teammates. Boos roar around the stadium. Rather than the rave of sportswriters tomorrow, you’re going to be the screw-up they jeer at, the guy who sank your team’s Superbowl hopes, the dork whom nighttime TV comedians make audiences cackle about. And it could mean you’re stocking warehouse shelves for minimum wage next year. Oh... oh... how it hurts. If you haven’t had any god or goat moments yet, be patient, they’re coming, guaranteed. You’ll have tried your heart out to do the right thing but it will have cruelly rolled back all over you. When it happens you’ll feel like the only person it’s ever happened to... but you won’t be. We all have our god or goat moments. William Slusher’s latest novel is a bipartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or, How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. He may be insulted and complained to atwilliamslusher@live.com.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Sitzmark’s open, so there must be snow Sitzmark is open so there must be snow A new month, already! Still cold, but no snow, however I read that Sitzmark Ski Hill is open, so if we go high enough, there is some snow. On going into Hughes Department store, last week, I thought I was in the wrong building. What a facelift! A total new look! Good job! In and about town are a lot of folks that have had the flu, of one kind or another. The hospital, E.R. rooms etc. have been filled to capacity and doctors and nurses doing double time and even some of them have been ill. Sympathy goes to Grant and Elsa

Lewis, due to the death of their son, Steve. Also Grant has some serious health issues. Grant will be taking a series of radiation treatments, in Wenatchee which hopefully will alleviate some of the discomfort he is having. Also condolences to Charlene Helm, our ad gal at the G-T and her sister, Shannon Mieirs, in the loss of their mother, Janis Allison. Keep in mind another Oroville Senior Center breakfast coming up, Saturday, Feb. 7. Great food and plenty of it! There is interest from the community in saving the nursing home in Tonasket as is being shown by the attendance at the meetings that are being held. If

enough people have ideas and input exchange a few books, get an update on surely something positive can be worked the buffalo situation and some chit-chat about the rest of the family. out. Well, the football game and went Another Gonzaga win! Only one loss after a lot of hullabaloo and so far this season! the wrong team one. All the After a week of “regular snacks, drinks and shirts and food” try an evening out with hats and other Seahawks some Mexican cuisine. Spice mementos made for a lot of up your life a bit. fun and now it’s all over ‘til January is usually the next year. month that a lot of diets are A long time resident, started, and some are seriMargaret Straga, has gone to ous about it and some, by Moses Lake to be near famFebruary, are back to their ily, as she needed extra care old habits. “People who say, and was wheelchair bound. “Nothing tastes as good as THIS & THAT Moose are getting very skinny feels, have obviously Joyce Emry brave and going very near never had bacon,” (or a hot homes, looking in the winfudge sundae), should I go dows. A pair were sighted at the Lamar on? Today, Saturday, I must clean the Wooley home and one was up close and refrigerator, because for the past four friendly at Bea and Leon Aldens home, days that has been my mission and now east of Tonasket. Betty Bair took Barbie Fremuth for a I’m all out of week. It’s great to have a drop in visit scenic drive, last Saturday in the Loomis from Larry Eder, share a cup of coffee, area and they saw many deer, and a lot

Squash, welding, non-profits, perfect pies and paracord projects

THE LEARNING TREE

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Submitted photo

Volunteers wrap packages for the Oroville Women’s Club’s Gifts for Kids program before last Christmas. In addition to all the volunteers that help make the program such a success there were many people who made donations towards the purchase of the Christmas gifts.

Community makes ‘Gifts for Kid’s’ program a success SUBMITTED BY KALLY BERLINGER OROVILLE WOMEN’S CLUB

The 2014 Gifts for Kids program was very successful again this year thanks to all the donations we received. The Oroville Women’s Club has been doing this program for several years and would not be able to help so many kids in our community if not for the help of others. We are a small group of ladies who believe in giving children in our community a chance to wake up Christmas morning and have a toy of their very own to unwrap. As parents we know what it is to struggle in life, for some people paying a bill or having Christmas is not an option. Our hope is that

New Nursing Home booklets are out SUBMITTED BY THE NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

Here Ye, Here Ye! Finally the Fact Sheet notebooks we promised are printed and are now spread all around the North County. They were compiled by the Nursing Home Success Team and can be read easily and quickly. You can even pick and choose what you would like to learn or use. “Nursing Home Success Team” booklets are now at libraries, schools, pharmacies, some churches, some businesses, some restaurants and Senior Centers. Distribution areas include Tonasket, Oroville, Loomis, Chesaw, Molson, Bonaparte and Wauconda. Each notebook contains a page of facts about the Nursing Home. In addition, there is a Foundation brochure to look at. Also provided is contact information for your state and federal legislators along with a sample letter to send. The last page is the Administrator’s Report presented at the Hospital Board meeting on Dec. 31, 2014. This contains a lot of useful information about the Nursing Home as well as what is happening on the state level. Please read these booklets. We encourage you to send letters to your legislators. You may use the sample form letter and resource information to contact them.

OROVILLE WOMEN’S CLUB this program takes that burden from those families at Christmas time and gives a child the joy of Christmas. Thank you to the Seventh Day Adventist Church for letting us host the program through your building, thank you to Umpqua Bank for letting us store and wrap the gifts in their building and thank you to all the people who donated money or gifts. We had three anonymous donations, as well as donations from Surjit Singh (76 station), Terry Lotwin, Oroville Masons, Hughes Department Store and Rebekah, Eli, and Arlie Christensen, Oroville American Legion, Lloyd and Bev Curtis and Marilou Kriner (Marilous Gifts). Also, thank you to the people

NURSING HOME NEWS There are extra sample letters and resource pages in the booklets that you can take and use as well as extra fact pages. There is a correction on the Resource page. Doc Hastings should be replaced by Dan Newhouse. Everyone is welcome to come to the Nursing Home to visit and if you want information you can ask for Kim Black. If you would like to phone and ask for information you may call Karen Schimpf at 509-486-2144, Linda Holden at 509-486-3147 and Sandy Vaughn at 509-485-2281. We hope you were able to listen to the National Public Radio spot done this past week about

who spent hours of your time helping us wrap all those gifts, thank you to the staff at Umpqua Bank for helping organize, sort and wrap and to the folks that helped us transport them to the church. To the young people who helped us out, Rosa Rivera, Alex Gonzales and Ali Miller, thank you for your time and effort to help us out and to their employers for giving them time off to come out and get involved in their community. It takes volunteers to help grow a community, without volunteers these special events would not take place. Our community is in need of volunteers. Please get out and find an organization that you would like to take part in to help our little town grow in programs and keep them going. Again, thank you from the Oroville Women’s Club - Renee Ewalt, Kally Berlinger, Patty Clark, Susan Speiker, Anne Brown and Lisa McCoy.

the plight of Public Nursing Homes. They interviewed at the Nursing Home and included Allen Hole, Daryl Coleman and Sandy Vaughn in their broadcast. It was fun to hear folks we know on NPR! You may access this broadcast on the NPR website: nwpr.org/Public Nursing Homes Close One By One. Again, no our Nursing Home is not closing, but the risk remains. Have a good week. Comments about the booklets are appreciated. If there any problems or if extra green and yellow sheets are needed you may call Karen Schimpf. We are printing more.

Correspondents continued on page A12

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of other wildlife. It was like a giant zoo. And the next day a ground cover of white greeted us, but that snow was so full of water it melted quickly. I don’t like surprises like that snow. I thought we were finished with snow for the winter, but I should know better, because we often get snow in February, but it doesn’t stay long. Remember that the Kiwanis Groundhog supper is Saturday, Feb. 7 at the Tonasket gym. Always good home cookin’ with lots of yummy desserts. The Picard house, located on the corner of Deerpath and 23rd has a for sale sign on it. Jane lived there for many years and since her death her sons, Chris and Jon, have been undecided about selling or keeping and have reached a decision. Hometown Pizza reopened Tuesday. Different menu, more bakery items, big salad bar, whole new atmosphere and shorter hours. Stop in and wish them well and have some lunch or take something home for later.

North Valley Community Schools is offering several interesting classes. Coming up this week NVCS would like to offer the following classes: Introduction to Squash – Saturday, Feb. 7, at 9:45 a.m. Squash is good for you! I don’t mean just the garden variety. Squash is a sport that gives you a full cardio workout, as well as being fun! Come learn to play this sport and get in shape at the same time.

Art of Welding - Monday Feb. 9 at 6 p.m. This class will cover several types of welding, for art or use. Bring items made of iron and learn how it’s done! Grant Writing for Non-Profit – Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 6:30 p.m. This class will cover grant writing, specifically for non-profit organizations. Learn where to look for grants, how to write a letter of interest and what sort

Six more weeks of winter, really?

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER

before you know it. On Saturday, Feb. 14 we will be having a Sweet Heart Dinner for everyone’s sweetheart. Come enjoy a great dinner of prime rib with all the trimmings for only $17. Karaoke with Linda Wood to follow. Bingo is doing well, there is

TONASKET EAGLES #3002

The groundhog saw his shadow, that means six more weeks of winter. Do you really believe in a groundhog?. Good Job for the Seattle Hawks, OOOPS at the end of the game. Next year will be here

More winter or not, only the groundhog knows for sure

HILLTOP COMMENTS means bigger pay back. Come and join us at 7 p.m. The next Pancake Breakfast will be at the Molson Grange Hall on Sunday,Feb. 22 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bring a friend or family or neighbors. To catch you all up (well almost) to the Pinochle Winners, here we go. Jan. 12 the Highs went to Carl Cole and Mary Louise Barnette and the Lows went to Joe Gubser and Danny Wietrick. Traveling – not sure. On Jan. 19 the Highs went to Joe Gubser and Bev Holden, with the Lows going to Carl Cole and Evelyn Dull and with no one

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

This week starts the first week in February. Sure hope it is a good day for the groundhog on Feb. 2 You all know how that goes – sun if he sees his shadow Spring will be soon or? if he does not see a shadow we have six more weeks of winter. What – ever. You do know that the Bingo nights at the Grange Hall on the first and third Friday’s of each month, are still happening. The group is getting bigger - that

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of information you may need to provide. Perfect Pie Making 101 Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 5:30 p.m. It’s as easy as pie! How easy is that? Come find out! In this class you will learn how to make a homemade, perfect-every-time crust along with a pie filling that doesn’t run. Paracord Bracelets -Thursday February 12 at 5:30 p.m. Come learn how to make a unique bracelet from paracord. It could even be used as a survival tool! To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509476-2011 or check out North Valley Community School online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com! NVCS is still searching for a board member. Do you have ideas or opinions? If you do, we can use you on the NVCS board of directors, call Ellen at 509-476-2011.

still over $14,000 in Pick 8 to be won. The kitchen is open at 5:30 p.m. Bingo starts at 7 p.m. Joker Poker is moving up there again come in and win half of $2,137 can’t win if you don’t play. (Must be present to win) . Don’t forget we have pinochle on Sundays at 1 p.m. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The biggest Little Eagles in the State.

taking the Traveling. This week was the fifth week of play and Rodney Field , being the winner. On the Jan. 26 with 28 players in attendance the Highs went to Alan Moore and Judy Ripley. The Lows went to Al OBrian and Betty Hall, Becky Cross (Marilyn) took the Traveling Award. Well, that takes care of the Pinochle numbers for January. Until next week.

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IntO thE wOODS saT.-sUn.-mOn.-TUes. FeB 7-8-9-10 shOwTimes On saT. @ 7 & 9:20Pm

thE IMItatIOn GaME

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PaDDInGtOn ThUrs.Fri. FeB 19-20. maTinee OF This shOw On saT., FeB. 21 aT 2:00 P.m. all seaTs $4.50 FOr The maTinee

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aMErIcan SnIPEr 132 min r

aCTiOn/BiOgraPhy/drama sTarring Bradley COOPer, sienna miller, kyle gallner. Fri. 6:30,9:30 saT.*3:00,6:00,9:00. sUn.*3:00,6:00 mOn.-ThUrs.6:30.

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

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OUt Of watEr. animaTiOn/adV./COmedy.

sTarring TOm kenny, anTOniO Banderas, Frankie mUniz. Fri. 6:45, 9:30, saT. *2:45,

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PrOjEct alManac sCi-Fi / Thriller sTarring amy

106 min

Advisor Financial AdvisorFinancial www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

landeCker, sOFia BlaCk-d’elia, Virginia gardner Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT. *2:30, 5:45,8:45. sUn. *2:30, 5:45. mOn.-ThUrs. 6:30.

509-826-1638

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certain states. for those residents.

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Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

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Child $6.50


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015

LOCAL SPORTS

Tough finish to week for Oroville boys BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - The good news, as far as the Oroville Hornets are concerned, is that they had some margin of error heading into Friday’s home contest with Manson. The bad news for the Hornets is that margin is now gone after falling 51-50 at home to the Trojans on Friday. The loss sets up Tuesday’s contest at Tonasket: Oroville (6-11, 4-8 CWL North) will clinch a spot in the district play-in game with a win, but a loss will mean they’ll need to upset co-league leader Brewster and hope the Tigers (6-11, 3-9) lose to Bridgeport on Friday. “It all comes down to Tuesday,” said Oroville coach Jay Thacker. “Manson played well and was able to steal a win.” The Hornets battled foul trouble all night †as starters Andrew Mieirs, Bryce Glover and Lane Tietje all fouled out. Partially as a result of their foul trouble the three combined for just 14 points. That left others to pick up the slack; Jetta Youker finished with a season-high 11 points for the Hornets on 5-of-6 shooting, with Dustin Nigg also scoring 11. Spencer Ward led all scorers for Manson with 16 and Bo Charlton added 15. Manson’s (7-10, 2-9) only league wins of the season have come on the road at Tonasket and Oroville, disrupting the playoff aspirations of both teams.

LAKE ROOSEVELT 71, OROVILLE 31 COULEE DAM - Jan. 29, 2015 - Lake Roosevelt’s Raiders are getting healthy, and that could spell trouble for other teams as the post-season nears. An Oroville squad that had been surging for the past couple of weeks had a less than enjoyable night as visitors on the Raiders’ home floor, falling 71-31 on Thursday. That, despite the Hornets taking a 16-13 lead after one quarter. Lake Roosevelt’s full court press paid dividends, keying a 44-8 run from the start of the

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Brent Baker/submitted photo

The Hornets’ Joseph Sarmiento glides to the basket at Bridgeport last Tuesday.

Dustin Nigg stands firm in taking a charge during Oroville’s win at Bridgeport.

second quarter to a few minutes into the fourth. “We like to play up and down and get into our opponent, then adjust to how they’re playing,” said LR coach Matt Simpson. “If they’re turning the ball over, we’ll press more and keep them uncomfortable.” The Hornets figured they had a chance to stay in the game, given their defeat last week of Libety Bell, a team that was just coming off a win over the Raiders. But after hitting four 3-pointers in the first quarter, the Lake Roosevelt pressure dominated the

10-point win over Manson was simply the Raiders’ getting closer to full strength. Chance Garvin missed the Bridgeport game with a family emergency; Austin Rosenbaum was nursing a bad thumb; and another starter was recovering from a rolled ankle.

game, and though the Hornets were less than pleased with the 28-8 edge in free throw attempts that afforded by LR, Hornets never found a way to stop the Raiders’ big run. Jackson Louie scored 14, Jesse Louie added 12 and three players scored nine to lead a balanced attack for the Raiders (10-6, 8-3 CWL North). Oroville (6-10, 4-7) was led by Nathan Hugus with nine points. Simpson said the difference between Thursday’s rout and close a two-point win over Bridgeport last week and a

OROVILLE 61, BRIDGEPORT 52 BRIDGEPORT - Bridgeport hasn’t been playing like a last place team, so Oroville figured it would have a tough game on its hands before visiting the Mustangs’ home floor on Tuesday. And that was before Bryce

Glover, the Hornets’ leading scorer and rebounder for the past few weeks, got sick and had to stay home. The Hornets overcame Glover’s absence, all sorts of foul trouble and a hot shooting night by the Mustangs’ Kevin Alvarez to pick up a key CWL North road victory, 61-52. “Our bench was huge,” said Oroville coach Jay Thacker. “Jetta (Youker) and Jaxon (Blackler) in the first half played really solid. Jetta had seven or eight rebounds after a shaky start. “I’m really proud of them.” Foul trouble hit both teams

early as Bridgeport’s Bailey Evenson and Oroville’s Nathan Hugus each picked up their second fouls within the first four minutes of the game. The Hornets held as much as a six point lead in the second quarter. Lane Tietje got called for his third foul - and a technical foul gave him his fourth - and Alvarez hit four straight free throws to tie the game. Alvarez’s trey gave the Mustangs their first lead since early on, but Dustin Nigg drained a trey at the halftime buzzer to put the Hornets back on top, 28-26. With Evenson back in the game, Bridgeport threatened to take control in the third quarter, leading by as many as four points. But Nigg and Hugus each took charging fouls on consecutive possessions - including one that gave Evenson his fourth foul and that sparked the Hornets on a 17-3 run that put them up 10 points. “Dustin and Nate - they were tough,” Thacker said. “Taking those charges... they were a lot smarter in the second half as far as playing with fouls, too.” Evenson and Alvarez led one final Bridgeport charge back to within five points late in the fourth quarter. But with a minute to go, Tietje - who only played the last few minutes of the second half buried a 3-pointer to give the Hornets an eight point lead. “It’s those things we have to learn heading to the playoffs that teams will do what they need to to get under your skin,” Thacker said. “ When we were in the position we were last year no one had any reason to get under our skin. Now that we’re trying to get in a position to go to districts, they have a reason to try. “If we can get to districts, we believe anything can happen.” Andrew Mieirs led the Hornets (6-9, 4-6 CWL North) with 19 points, with Joe Sarmiento added 13. Nigg also had 13 and Tietje scored 10. Alvarez had 19 and Evenson scored 11 for Bridgeport (3-12, 1-10).

Raiders bounce Hornet girls again BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

COULEE DAM - When Lake Roosevelt won at Oroville, it was a surprise to many. Thursday, Jan. 29, the Raiders did it again, topping the Hornets at home 48-40 and setting themselves up to claim the second seed to the district tournament in less than two weeks. As they did before, the Raiders jumped out to an early lead. This time, Oroville fought all the way back - twice - tying the game in the second quarter, falling behind again, and briefly taking the lead early in the fourth before LR pulled away at the end. Lake Roosevelt’s aggressive defense - back court pressure, heavy perimeter defense collapsing on Oroville star Lily Hilderbrand any time she got the ball anywhere near the paint - disrupted the Hornets’ offense even as LR piled up the fouls. But it paid off as the Hornets suffered an 0-of-18 night from 3-point range and hit just 16-of28 free throws. “It was just the type of game you need to help you get ready for districts,” said Lake Roosevelt coach Peewee Pleasants. “The girls had to make adjustments, and they did. They had to play through contact. “The main thing on defense was I told the girls, just keep playing. (Oroville coach) Mike Bourn is a great coach and he makes you work for everything you get.” The Hornets never did effectively break the Raiders’ backcourt pressure. It didn’t force many turnovers, but the Hornets often used up nearly all of their 10 second allotment just getting the ball into the front court, cutting a lot of time off the shot clock in which to run their offense. And when they did, Hilderbrand often found herself shooting through or passing out of triple-teams. “Their pressure bothered us, especially in the first half,” Bourn said. “It took time off

the clock, and then we didn’t execute. At the end of the game, we just had people do things they weren’t supposed to do at the wrong times. “They collapsed on Lily and left us open, and we didn’t make the shots.” LR quickly jumped out to a 14-4 lead. The Hornets responded to tie it at 18 on Hilderbrand’s 3-point play, but Riley Epperson, Lachelle Bearcub, Katelyn Schilling and Kayla St. Pierre all scored in the final two minutes of the half to give the Raiders a 26-18 margin at the break. Oroville again fought back, scoring most of its points off of Hilderbrand offensive rebounds or at the free throw line. At one point Pleasants went airborne when the Raiders had piled up 15 fouls to Oroville’s three. Hilderbrand knocked in an offensive rebound to give the Hornets a 35-34 lead late in the third quarter, but it turned out to be Oroville’s only lead of the night. Hilderbrand had another 3-point play with 1:10 left to cut the Lake Roosevelt lead to 43-40. The Hornets put together a solid defensive possession, but Riley Epperson provided the dagger with a 3-pointer as the shot clock ran out to make it a six point lead with less than 40 seconds on the clock. “Our diagonal play was working,” Bourn said. “We were getting shots but we weren’t making them. It puts great pressure on the post defender. If we shoot better, that makes a big difference.” Epperson led the Raiders (126, 10-2 CWL North) with 12 points, while Hilderbrand finished with 21 points and 15 rebounds to lead Oroville (10-7, 7-4). The two could meet again in a loser-out, winner-to-state game in at the district tournament, but there’s a lot that could happen between now and then.

OROVILLE 50, MANSON 26 OROVILLE Oroville bounced back from its defeat at Lake Roosevelt 24 hours ear-

lier to bounce Manson 50-26 on Friday. The Hornets jumped out to a 23-10 lead and extended it to 43-15 after three quarters as eight players scored in the contest. Oroville’s full court press yielded 16 steals that kept Manson from developing any offensive rhythm. “Before the game Coach (Mike) Bourn asked the team to play these final league games solely for their teammates and nobody else,” said assistant coach Bill Cottrell. “They responded to the challenge and it was our best overall team effort so far this season.” Freshman Hannah Hilderbrand

had what Cottrell called her best game of the season with 13 points and 12 rebounds as Manson focused on containing older sister Lily Hilderbrand (who had 12 points, eight rebounds and five blocks). “Mikayla Scott, Faith Martin and Kendal Miller all played well,” Cottrell said. Scott added eight points and nine rebounds as Oroville improved to 11-7 (8-4 CWL North). Bayley Ward led Manson (5-12, 2-9) with 10 points.

OROVILLE 61, BRIDGEPORT 41 BRIDGEPORT - Jan. 27, 2015 - Bridgeport gave Oroville a battle before the Hornets pulled

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Rachelle Nutt and Kendal Miller apply some pressure defense at Bridgeport last Tuesday.

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Oroville’s Kali Peters draws a charge at Bridgeport during the Hornets’ victory over the Fillies.

away in the second half Tuesday to claim a 60-41 victory on the Fillies home floor. The Hornets led 34-18 at the half, but needed a 12-1 burst to end the second quarter to build that lead. “We didn’t have much energy tonight,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “I don’t know what it is. With Lake Roosevelt coming up Thursday, maybe they were looking forward to that. But if we play like this they’ll run us out of the gym.” Lily Hilderbrand had 21 points at that half, but Bridgeport coach Stuart Dezellem switched up the defense to slow her down after halftime.†

Samantha Martinez played her best game of the season for the Fillies and was a big reason they crept back to within 34-24 midway through the third quarter. But Hilderbrand, passing quickly out of the heavy defense she faced, assisted on 3-pointers by Kendal Miller and Kali Peters, and Peters added another bucket to give the Hornets a 17-point lead after three quarters. Hilderbrand finished with 24 points and 15 rebounds to lead Oroville (10-6, 7-3 CWL) and Mikayla Scott added 12 points. Martinez finished with 22 points for Bridgeport (3-12, 1-10).


FEBRUARY 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

LOCAL SPORTS

Raiders edge out Tigers in OT BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

Terry Mills submitted photo

Jill Townsend shooting over Jenna Valentine and Sydney Breshears

Tigers fall at Lake Roosevelt Wills, Valentine and Breshears lead Tonasket scoring BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

COULEE DAM - Tonasket played on even terms with Lake Roosevelt in the second half in Coulee Dam on Friday. But the Tigers, who trailed 28-11 at halftime, needed a bit more than that to pull off what would have been an upset against one of the hottest teams of the league in the second half of the

season. The Tigers managed just a pair of free throws in the opening quarter and trailed 9-2. Johnna Terris scored all her team-leading seven points in the third quarter as the Tigers pulled to within 12, 35-23. The well went dry again offensively in the fourth quarter, though defensively Tonasket still held the Raiders (12-6, 10-2 CWL North) to nine points. Kayla Willis, Jenna Valentine and Sydney Breshears each scored four for Tonasket (3-15, 2-10). The Tigers also lost to undefeated (17-0) Okanogan 89-9 on Tuesday, Jan. 27.

COULEE DAM - A seasonlong issue was a prime culprit in denying Tonasket its biggest win of the season. The Tigers played their best game of the year at Lake Roosevelt on Friday, leading the Raiders nearly the entire game. But free throw shooting, which has been costly on a number of occasions this year, aided Lake Roosevelt comeback in the fourth quarter to force overtime. The Raiders pulled away for 65-59 victory. “We led the whole game,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “We played our best, complete game. But 5-for-12 from the free throw line (in the fourth quarter) doesn’t get it done.” That and the awakening of LR star Chance Garvin undid the Tigers’ lead. “Our defense was tough,” Larson said. Garvin, limited to five points through the first three quarters, went off for 10 points in the fourth, including a pair of 3-pointers, to lead the Raiders’ surge. Tonasket held a 33-25 halftime lead and was still up by five heading to the fourth. Ethan Bensing led the Tigers (6-11, 3-9 CWL North) with 14 points. “He played sick,” Larson said. “And he had his most complete game of the year.” Jesse Ramon added 12 and Adrian McCarthy finished with . Lake Roosevelt (11-6, 9-3) had Jesse Palmer with 17 points, Garvin with 16 and Taren Redstar with 13. The loss could have been costly for the Tigers in the race for the final playoff spot, but Manson’s upset of Oroville kept Tonasket one game behind the Hornets. The two faced off on Tuesday, with the winner likely headed to Saturday’s district play-in game against an opponent and site yet to be determined.

BY BRENT BAKER

OROVILLE - Oroville will be playing host to this year’s District 5/6 North Subregional tournament this weekend. The opening round, as well as the first consolation round, will take place this Friday, Feb. 6, beginning at 4:00 p.m. The tournament resumes Saturday morning at 10:00 a.m. with the championship quarterfinals. The top four wrestlers from each weight class will advance to next week’s East Regional tournament at Northwest Christian (Colbert) near Spokane. The top five finishers there will earn trips to the state Class 1B/2B tournament at the Tacoma Dome. Tonasket and Oroville both took part in the league mixer at Kittitas to finalize seeding for the district tournament. Hornets included in the top four seeds (favored to advance)

include Jordan Smith (seeded 4th at 126 pounds), Scott Hartvig (4th, 160) and Charles Arrigoni (3rd, 182). Smith finished third at the state tournament last year. Zane Scott (185) is seeded fifth and the remainder of the young Oroville squad is seeded seventh or eighth in their respective classes. Warden comes into the tournament with seven top seeds and 13 in the top four. Tonasket has three top seeds and 14 in the top four, while Liberty Bell has four top seeds and a second seed. “Anything can and will happen at this level of competition,” said Oroville coach Chuck Ricevuto. “Some competitors are hungrier and healthier than their opponents. You must be ready to defeat someone who beat you during the season and be willing to remove the “Doubt Demon.”

HORNETS HOST SENIOR NIGHT OROVILLE - Oroville’s

seniors were honored on Wednesday at the Hornets’ Senior Night, though it won’t be their final home match of their careers. That’s because Oroville will be hosting the North Sub-district tournament on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6-7. But in their final regular home match, senior Jordan Smith (126 pounds) had a pin and senior Leo Curiel (132) picked up two wins by major decision. Senior Andrea Perez was also honored for her four years as manager and statkeeper. Other winners for the Hornets were juniors Scott Hartvig (160) and Charles Arrigoni (182) who each earned pins. Jeff Rounds, Drake Fox Nick Clase and Zane Scott also wrestled.

OROVILLE AT EPHRATA EPHRATA - Scott Hartvig and Charles Arrigoni led the way for Oroville, winning their weight

GIRLS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Oroville Brewster Liberty Bell Manson Tonasket Bridgeport

12 10 8 8 4 2 2 2

Overall W

L

0 2 4 4 8 10 10 10

18 12 11 9 4 5 3 3

League W

Mabton White Swan Kittitas Waterville Soap lake Warden

9 6 4 3 2 1

Overall W

L

0 2 4 5 7 7

17 13 10 7 3 5

SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE & TONASKET GUN CLUBS

Oroville Gun Club Due to Super Bowl, turnout was low. It was windy and slushy so scores were lower than normal. There are three more weeks left in the Spokesman Review shoot, so there is still time to participate. March 1 is Oroville Club Shoot March 8 is Tonasket Club Shoot March 15 is Omak Club Shoot

and March 22 is Okanogan County Shoot at Oroville Scores are: 22 Logan Faris 21 Paul Schwilke 18 Scott Peterson 17 Vern Cole

Tonasket Gun Club 20 20 20 17 17 15 3

16 YARD Robert McDaniel Jeff Taylor Lloyd Caton Jr. Randy Cline Rick Lind Hunter Swanson Scott Hughes

23 19 17 11

HANDICAP Lloyd Caton Jr. Rick Lind Jeff Taylor Randy Cline

L 2 4 7 9 12 13

BOYS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Terry Mills/photo

Tiger Adrian McCarthy shooting over Okanogan Bulldog Jim Townsend. OKANOGAN 74, TONASKET 53 TONASKET - Jan. 27, 2015 - Jim Townsend poured in 11 fourth quarter points, while Benny Cate, T.J. Morris and Mason Guerrette added four 3-pointers as Okanogan finished Tuesday’s contest with a 28-13 fourth quarter that broke open what had been a competitive game with Tonasket, 74-53. The Tigers trailed 28-27 at halftime as Townsend, the Bulldogs’ leading scorer, had just two points. Meanwhile, Colton Leep had

12 first half points and Jesse Ramon hit a pair of 3-pointers to have Tonasket thinking upset at halftime. The Bulldogs led 46-40 heading to the final quarter before their finishing kick put to rest any such hopes. Townsend led Okanogan (13-3, 9-1 CWL North) with 18 points, with Guerrette and Morris adding 14 apiece, Cate scoring 12 and Cody Pruitt chipping in with 11. Leep and Adrian McCarthy each scored 14 for the Tigers (6-10, 3-8), with Ramon adding 11.

classes at the Ephrata Invitational on Jan. 24 Hartvig (160) and Arrigoni (182) each pinned all of their opponents on the way to the win. Leo Curiel (132) finished second in losing a close decision in the championship match. Jeff Rounds (113) and Drake Fox (120) each took third and Zane Scott (195) took fourth, dropping the third place match 3-0. Brandon Baugher (145) also won a match while Luis Vazquez (106), JOrdan Smith (126), Kacey Dewitte (152) and Nick Clase (170) also wrestled.

OROVILLE AT REPUBLIC REPUBLIC - Oroville’s wrestling team visited Republic for a mixer on Thursday, Jan. 15 recording three pins on the night. Drake Fox (120 pounds), Jordan Smith (126) and Leo Curiel (132) each had pins for the Hornets. Also victorious were

Brandon Baugher (145) and Zane Scott (195). Jeff Rounds (113), Luis Vazquez (106) and Kasey Dewitte (152) also wrestled.

HORNETS AT PATEROS MIXER PATEROS - Oroville turned in a successful night of wrestling at the Pateros mixer on Wednesday Jan. 14, which also served as the Billygoats’ Senior Night. “It was great to be in the Bill Haley Wrestling Palace, and equally great to help honor Bill’s senior wrestlers,” said Oroville coach Chuck Ricevuto. Leo Curiel highlighted the Hornets’ night with a pin and an 8-3 victory at 132 pounds. Zane Scott (195) won a 2-0 decision, while pins were recorded by Jeff Rounds (113), Drake Fox (120) and Brandon Baugher. Also wrestling were Kacey Dewitte (152) and Luis Vazquez (106).

Brewster Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Liberty Bell Oroville Tonasket Manson Bridgeport

11 11 9 7 4 3 2 1

Overall W

L

1 1 3 5 8 9 9 11

16 15 11 12 6 6 7 3

League W

Mabton Warden Soap Lake Waterville Kittitas White Swan

9 6 4 3 2 1

Overall W

L

0 2 5 5 6 7

16 13 5 8 2 3

FEB. 5-14

Thursday, Feb. 5 GB (JV/Var) - Brewster at Oroville, 4:00/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Brewster at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm Friday, Feb. 6 GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 4:00/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 4:30/7:30 pm WR - Sub-regional at Oroville (incl. Tonasket), 4 pm

Saturday, Feb. 7 WR - Sub-regional at Oroville (incl. Tonasket), 10 am BB - Tonasket or Oroville vs. TBA, time and location TBA, district play- in game Wednesday, Feb. 11 GB - Oroville at District Tournament (Eastmont HS), time and opponent TBA BB - Boys District Tournament (Eastmont) if Oroville or Tonasket qualify.

Saturday, Feb. 14 WR - East Regional at NW Christian (Colbert) - Tonasket and Oroville qualifiers

North Half from 8-12pm

You can upload your own community events.

Try our new calendar at...

L 3 5 9 10 15 15

SCHEDULES

Valentines Scotch Doubles Sweetheart Pool Tournament Sat. Feb 14th $10 per couple 1pm sign up - 1:30 play Steak and Prawns Dinner at 6pm: $25/couple Music by

L 2 3 6 5 11 11 11 13

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B)

GUN CLUB NEWS Only three weeks left in the Inland Empire Spokesman Review Telephonic Shoot

L 0 6 7 9 13 13 15 15

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B)

Oroville to host District Wrestling HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

STANDINGS AND SCHEDULES

www.gazette-tribune.com


PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Giving to fire and TONASKET/ flood survivors OKANOGAN TONASKET/OKAN.VALLEY LIONS CLUB

The Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club (T/OVLC) has distributed almost $10,000 in donations to Carlton Complex Fire/ Flood survivors since November 2014. A majority of the funds raised were collected in July in Tonasket as the fires were still burning. That collection and donations

VALLEY LIONS CLUB

from individuals, businesses and Lions Clubs around Washington State has helped 11 families. 100% of donations go to survivors. T/ OVLC has been able to purchase firewood, snow tires, a generator, building materials, rent and utility bills to help survivors recover

Tonasket High School announces Honor Roll Seniors 4.0: Polina Gladkaya, Alexander Mershon, Abraham Podkranic, Anna St. Martin, Aspen Verhasselt. 3.5-3.99: Abran Alvarez, Hilda Celestino, David Curtis, Colt Hatch, Emma Kuusela, Jesse Manring, Mary Naylor, Cesar Reynoso, Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, Dalton Smith, Alyssa Warner. 3.0-3.5: Deoha Braggs, Kahlil Butler, Dirrick Christensen, James Coleman, Smith Condon, Travis Deggeller, Chad Edwards, Allison Glanzer, Diego Goudeau, Adam Halvorsen, Somer Hankins, Blaine Hirst, Johan Jjaltason, Frank Holfeltz, Colton Leep, Haley Montowski, Brooke Nelson, Sabrina Perez, Jensen Sackman, Dallas Tyus, Lucas Vugteveen, Jeffery Wilber. Juniors 4.0: Pablo Chavez, Madeleine Graham, Rade Pilkinton.

3.5-3.99: Omar Calderon, Cassandra Duran, Jonathan Freese, Bryden Hires, Alexee Howell, Jordan Hughes, Kasey Nelson, Trevor Peterson, Rachel Silverthorn, Boaz Sphar, Kyra Whiting. 3.0-3.5: Leighanne Barnes, Janelle Catone, Nicholas Crandall, Kendra Davisson, Dylan Douke, Cayden Field, Dallin Good, Baillie Hirst, Cade Hockett, Sammantha Keller, Kayla Mathis, Sarah Quinlan, Ryan Rylie, Matus Sitar

Timm, Suzan Van Dyck, Katlen Wagner.

Sophomores 4.0: Elijah Antonelli, Samuel Nelson, 3.5-3.99: Brenden Asmussen, Amanda Drew, Thomas Kennedy, Bonnie Siegfried, Hunter Swanson, Johnna Terris. 3.0-3.5: Taundra ChaskaWebber, Luis Ferreira, Timothy Freese, Tawan Murray, Breanne Nolan, David Ornelas, Wyatt Pershing, Lorena Sanchez, Alexa Sutton, Richard Temby, Conner

Freshmen 4.0: Madison, Gariano, Spencer Gariano, Elsbeth Hjaltason, Nicole Juarez Zelaya, Jesse Ramon. 3.5-3.99: Griselda AlvarezTorres, Chadwick Bretz, Cinthya Calderon, Madyson Clark, Rycki Cruz, Mikah Haney Williamson, Katie Henneman, Esmerelda Mathis, Justin McDonald, Taylon Pilkinton, Kallysta Ray, Joseph Schell, Destin Sphar, Logan Thompson, Alycia Tibbs, Alina Vlahovich, Brooklynn Ward, Camille Wilson, Jacob Wilson. 3.0-3.5: Sydney Breshears, Jessie Burks, Samuel Flores, Elijah Harris, Meri Hirst, Hayley Larson, Sandra Magdaleno Espinoza, Joseph Ogborn, Rodrigo Ornelas, Jacob ReisnerCallum, James Silverthorn, Olivia Sutton, Morgan Tyus, Myhe Williams.

Magic Lantern Show Feb. 6, 7 SUBMITTED BY THERESA TAYLOR WVC COMMUNITY RELATIONS

Frank Matsura featured at Omak, Oroville OKANOGAN COUNTY - As part of the Wenatchee Valley College 75th anniversary, the WVC at Omak Foundation presents two Magic Lantern events in Okanogan County on Feb. 6 and 7 that will feature early Okanogan County photos from the collection of photographer Frank Matsura.

Applications need to be in by Feb. 23 SUBMITTED BY SALLEY BULL OROVILLE SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION

Local talented singers, dancers, instrumentalist, readers, magicians and others are sought by the Oroville Scholarship Foundation, OSF, to perform at the Spring

DENTISTRY

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Advertise your specials and events here!

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

villescholarshipfoundation.org/ varietyshow. Applicants may contact Eric Stiles, OHS Music Teacher, for more information via email at eric.stiles@oroville. wednet.edu or by phone 509-7463612. The OSF sponsored Spring Variety Show raises money for scholarships by holding silent and live auctions, and shares proceeds with the OHS Music Department.

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

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Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

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Variety Show on Thursday, March 2 at 6:30 p.m. Groups and soloists of all ages are encouraged to participate in this fund raising event. The application deadline is Monday, Feb. 23, with auditions following on Tuesday through Thursday, Feb. 24 – 26. Applications can be found at both grade and high school offices and online at www.oro-

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

your guide to

& Entertainment

Borderlands Historical Society, which is helping with the Oroville showing. Magic lanterns were introduced in the 1600s and were the earliest form of slide projectors. They were first illuminated by candles and later by kerosene, limelight, carbon arc and electric light. The first slides were hand-painted on glass and projected onto walls and screens. Scenes often portrayed cultures, places and stories. Magic lanterns were used in theaters, churches, schools and fraternal lodges. These events are sponsored by the WVC at Omak Foundation, Borderlands Historical Society and Okanogan County Historical Society.

Sign up for OSF Variety Show

Out On The Town

Dining

The first Magic Lantern event is at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 6, at the Omak Performing Arts Center. The second event is Saturday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. at Vicki’s Backdoor on main street in Oroville. The suggested donation for each event is $15 per person. Both events include the rare opportunity to see photos of Frank Matsura, a famous early photographer of Okanogan County. Most of his photos were on glass plate negatives and many were not printed. “Many of the slides show that Matsura was among the first to take ‘selfies’... portraits of himself, many of them humorous,” said Kay Sibley, with the

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1422 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com

(509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Toll Free

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

 Radiology

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

509-826-1800

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

OPTICAL

MASSAGE

Su Ianniello

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

(509) 826-6191

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

 Ophthalmology

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

24 Hour Crisis Line

www.wvmedical.com

Healthcare Services

826-7919

(509) 826-5093

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

CLINIC

 Walk

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Behavioral

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Psychiatric Services

OMAK

 Anti

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“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

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Growing Healthcare Close to Home

SUBMITTED BY CATHY BAILEY, FIRE RECOVERY CHAIR

their lives, and well being. Several businesses helped the recovery with generosity and exceptional service including John Pence, Home Depot, Valley Lumber, North 40 and Superior Auto. The recovery is not over. If you would like to make a donation or volunteer please contact T/ OVLC Relief Chair Cathy Bailey P.O. Box 120, Tonasket or the Okanogan County Community Action Council (509)4224041  Lions International is the largest service orga nization in the world. T/OVLC was chartered in January 2013 and would like anyone interested to contact us.

 Emergency  VA

Clinic

 Surgical

Center

 Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical  Imaging

Services

 Full-Service

Laboratory Care  Swing Bed Program  Extended

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

March 25.

DISTRICT COURT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Sondra Lee Clark, 50, Genelle, B.C., pleaded guilty Jan. 27 to POCS (cocaine). Clark was sentenced to 28 days in jail and fined $2,110.50. The crime occurred Jan. 8 at the Oroville Port of Entry. Manuel Cabrera, no middle name listed, 26, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 29 to second-degree assault (DV). The court dismissed three additional charges: first-degree burglary (DV), interfering with reporting (DV) and thirddegree theft (DV). Cabrera was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 302 days suspended and credit for time served, and fined $1,110.50. The crime occurred Nov. 18, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge James Michael Erikson, 32, Riverside, with residential burglary, third-degree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 11. The court found probable cause to charge Anthony Kevin Baker, 27, Omak, with first-degree robbery, first-degree burglary, second-degree theft and second-degree assault. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 27, 2014. In a separate crime, the court found probable cause to charge Baker with first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred between Jan. 8-15. The court found probable cause to charge Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, Omak, with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 19. The court found probable cause to charge Lyle Zachary Long, 29, Omak, with six counts of violation of a no-contact order. The crimes allegedly occurred between October 2014 and January 2015. The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Michael Fink, 31, Omak with second-degree assault. The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 14.

JUVENILE

A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 21 to first-degree criminal trespassing. The girl was sentenced to one day in detention with credit for one day served, and fined $100 for the Aug. 17, 2014 crime. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 28 to possession of marijuana. The boy was sentenced to 16 days in detention with credit for 16 days served, and fined $75 for the Oct. 5, 2014 crime. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Jan. 28 to second-degree DWLS. The boy was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for three days served and fined $100 for the Aug. 7, 2014 crime. A 15-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Jan. 28 to two counts of fourth-degree assault. The girl was sentenced to three days in detention and fined $100 for the Oct. 13, 2014 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for

Ladies Night Out

Jorge Alberto Alvarez Urapo, 24, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Alvarez Urapo was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 332 days suspended, and fined $808. Billy Dale Anderson, 46, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Anderson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $858. He also had a charge dismissed: failure to transfer a vehicle title within 45 days. Robert Charlie Atkins, 23, Oroville, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Atkins was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 324 days suspended, and fined $893. Paul Bruce Beatty, 31, Tonasket, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Beatty received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $1,018. Vanessa Marie Bejar, 30, Okanogan, guilty of cyberstalking. Bejar received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,018. Delora L. Bostic, 57, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Leonard Ray Burke, 27, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Burke received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $818. Tina Marie Caruthers, 47, Okanogan, guilty of fourthdegree assault and guilty (other deferment revoked) of another count of fourth-degree assault. Caruthers was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,566. Brandon William Cate, 28, Omak, had a charge dismissed: failure to stop and give information. Daggon Devoy Chaska, 22, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree possession of stolen property and two counts of resisting arrest. Chaska was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 165 days suspended, and fined $1,616. Chaska also had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Mistia Alicia Clark, 27, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Clark was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 353 days suspended, and fined $1,183. Thomas Lee Cohen Jr., 44, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Cohen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 180 days suspended, and fined $1,308. Peter Lee Colomb, 64, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JAN. 26, 2015

DWLS on Dayton Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Kermal Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Emery St. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Cell phone reported missing. Trespassing on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Kay St. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville.

Harassment on Tenth Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. David John Donovan, 61, booked for third-degree DWLS and failure to stop for an officer. Michael John Hyde, 44, booked for failure to obey, thirddegree DWLS, second-degree TMVWOP and obstruction. Annika Rachel Kennedy, 30, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief (DV).

TUESDAY, JAN. 27, 2015

Warrant arrest on Ernie Robinson Rd. near Oroville. One-vehicle crash on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Hahn Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Harassment on Tenth Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Vehicle prowl on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Hector Berry Cardenas, 40, booked for POCS (methamphetamine). Raymond Valentine Dispenza, 74, booked on eight OCSO probable cause warrants: one for second-degree rape of a child, three for second-degree child molestation, one for first-degree incest and three for seconddegree incest. Linsey Robbin Ortiz, 27, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jesus Dominguez Martinez, 31, court commitment for firstdegree DWLS. Carlo Lee Perez, 29, booked for second-degree burglary, thirddegree malicious mischief and second-degree theft.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 28, 2015

Threats on Main St. in Loomis. Theft on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Check fraud on Hendrik Rd. near Omak. Theft on Rocky Point Lane near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Koala Dr. in Omak. Four reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Omak Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Alana Lee Vanbrunt, 28, booked for possession of drug paraphernalia. Bruce Leroy Wisner, 51, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Tina Marie Caruthers, 47, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Davis Henderson Tatshama, 30, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for third-degree assault. Rudy Martin Garcia, 26, booked for delivery of a controlled substance (heroin) (within 1,000

feet of a school zone). Thomas Edward Isakson, 42, booked on two counts of POCS (within 1,000 feet of a school zone).

THURSDAY, JAN. 29, 2015

Trespassing on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Phone charger and car keys reported missing. Fraud on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. Threats on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Hi-View Lane near Tonasket. Illegal burning on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Oak St. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Fuel reported missing. Trespassing on Omak Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on N. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. Fraud on N. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Cigarettes reported missing. Theft on Oak St. in Omak. Jewelry reported missing. Burglary on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on W. Second St. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Jeremy John Lavender, 29, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, DOC detainer. Orlando Gutierrez Najera, 23, court commitment for two counts of third-degree DWLS. Wesley Paul Wirth, 37, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, and an FTA bench warrant for second-degree retail theft. Daggon Devoy Chaska, 22, booked for POCS (with intent) (marijuana) and possession of drug paraphernalia.

FRIDAY, JAN. 30, 2015

DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Theft on N. Main St. in Conconully. Fuel reported siphoned. Domestic dispute on Sidley Lake Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Assault on W. First Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Fence reported damaged. Daniel Keith Parker, 49, booked for possession of a stolen motor vehicle. Cergio Santiago Britt, 28, DOC detainer. Dustin Hawk Chambers, 23, DOC detainer. Madison Leigh Louie, 29, booked on an FTA warrant for seconddegree burglary.

SATURDAY, JAN. 31, 2015

Drugs on N. Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Country Vue Rd. near Omak.

F C

Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus present the

Held at:

Feb. 12, 2015

Join Us From 4-7pm for fun, refreshments, prize drawings, new treasures, and great discounts!

The Farm Shed 521 - 2nd Ave S. Okanogan, WA

509-422-9722

Be Sure to Mark Your Calendar with these Future Ladies Night Out 2015 dates: June 11, Sept. 17, Dec. 3

Surprise Your

Sweetheart

amily

KIDS! Join orchestra members for Kids’ Corner before the show!

oncert

Sunday, February 8 • 3 p.m. Omak Performing Arts Center

With Flowers!

Adults $12 • Seniors $10 Youth $8 • 12 and Under FREE

509-476-3193

• Valentine Candy • Floral Arangements • Balloons, Gifts

Second Strings will perform in the Multipurpose Room during intermission

The Chorus will feature songs from the Disney favorite, “Frozen.” The Orchestra will play “A Hectic Overture,” selections from Mary Poppins, and premier a new work by Choir Director Jonathan McBride called “Stampede.”

Blossom & Briar

Just 2 miles North Of Oroville 33436 US Hwy 97., Oroville, WA 98844

Ticket outlets: Corner Shelf, Omak; Rawson’s, Okanogan; Roy’s Pharmacy, Tonasket; Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville; Brewster Drug, Brewster; and at the door.

Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus ovocinfo@gmail.com • 509-322-0261

DUI on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Weapons offense on LoomisOroville Rd. near Loomis. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Weapons offense on Sunrise Heights Rd. in Okanogan. Theft on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Firearm reported missing. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Daniel Grant Keith, 60, booked for DUI. John David Price, 54, booked for DUI. Lois Elaine Perez, 53, booked for second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. James Walker Jr., 48, court commitment for DUI.

SUNDAY, FEB. 1, 2015

DUI on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Mailbox reported damaged. One-vehicle crash on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Theft on Landen Lane near Oroville. Firearm reported missing. Theft on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Tools reported missing. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Cell phone reported missing. Malicious mischief on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Residence reported egged. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Senna St. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Tommy Eugene Moore, 48, booked for third-degree theft, thirddegree DWLS and third-degree possession of stolen property.

Ciara Marie Lasarte, 29, DOC detainer. Aldolfo Gutierrez Valle, 28, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. George Scott Smith, 41, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI, a State Patrol FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTA warrant for seconddegree DWLS. Suzanna Marie Marchand, 32, booked for residential burglary. Martin Thomas Stanley, 45, booked for residential burglary and a Grant County FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Juliana Yvonne Terry, 30, booked for residential burglary, POCS and two Grant County warrants: residential burglary and dumping waste without permission. Maria Amezcua Limon, 20, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV) and two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: no valid operator’s license without ID and reckless driving.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV– Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer RP– Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP– U.S. Border Patrol CBP– U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE– Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Three more arrested on drug charges THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

MALOTT - North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force, Okanogan County Sheriff’s office, Colville Tribal Police and Washington State Patrol served two search warrants on residences in the Malott HUD site, Malott Washington. At the site of the first search warrant, Rudy Martin Garcia, 26, Malott, was arrested and booked into Okanogan County Jail on state charges of one count delivery of a controlled substance heroin and one count delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school. Garcia also faces Tribal drug charges for possession of heroin, possession of heroin with the intent to deliver, delivery of heroin, and enhancements associated with those charges,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers. “When Garcia was arrest he was found in possession of Heroin that has a street value of $6,000. “In 2009 Garcia was convicted of Involuntary Manslaughter after the shooting death of David E. McCraigie in Omak. Garcia was released from

prison in 2013.” The second search warrant was served at another residence in the Malott HUD resulted in the arrest of two more individuals. Arrested at the scene were Thomas E. Isakson, 41, and Robert R. Ruiz, 41, both of Malott. “During the search of the home detectives located suspected marijuana, methamphetamine, psilocybin mushrooms, hash and a semiautomatic pistol. Isakson was booked in to the Okanogan County jail on charges of delivery of a controlled substance methamphetamine (two counts) and delivery of a controlled substance methamphetamine within 1,000 feet of a school bus stop. Ruiz was booked into the colville tribal jail on charges of delivery of a controlled substance methamphetamine (two counts) and delivery of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a school bus stop. “Both men will be facing additional charges for the drugs found inside the home during the search,” said Rogers.

The family of Janis Allison

would like to say thank you to everyone for love, support, cards, flowers, food, attending the service, music and sharing of memories. Thank you to North Valley Hospital and North Valley Extended Care for caring for her in her last days. Your kindness and compassion was greatly appreciated. Thank you to Bergh Funeral Service (Scott), The Lutheran Church and Rev. Dan Kunkel for the moving service, Dave Wildermuth for the special reading from mom’s bible, Elva Helm for playing the beautiful music, Hailey Helm for singing Grandma Elva’s “Mother’s Day” song and the beautiful poem, Carly Mieirs and all the friends and family who shared loving and kind words at the service. Jessica Helm for creating the precious memory board (a glimpse into a special life). Thanks so much to all the ladies of the Lutheran Church for preparing food and making such a nice place for us all to congregate and share memories of our mom. Mom would’ve been pleased to see the love she was given in her passing. Much love to all. Sincerely, Greg & Charlene Helm, Nick & Shannon Mieirs, Mike Bailey & Family


FEBRUARY 5 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR Assessor Furman at Oroville Chamber OROVILLE - Scott Furman, Okanogan County Assessor will present the impact the fires and the closing of Kinross will have on property taxes at the Thursday, Feb. 5 meeting of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce at America’s Family Grill at 1 p.m. The public is invited to come with your general questions, but questions that concern your own personal property assessment is best taken up directly with the Assessors office. He can, however, certainly explain the process that can be taken to re-valuate any property.

Heartsaver First Aid/AED

North Valley Community Schools presents Heartsaver First Aid/AED on Thursday, Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. It’s a dangerous world out there! The more people who know first aid and CPR, the safer all of us are. This comprehensive First Aid/CPR class covers the basics of First Aid including medical, injury, and environmental emergencies, and adult, child and infant CPR with usage of AED. Students will receive an American Heart Association certified First Aid/CPR card, valid for two years, upon completion of the course. To sign up call Ellen at North Valley Community School at 509-476-2011.

World Needs More Birders

TONASKET - Renowned biologist, birder, and author Dick Cannings will bring his vast knowledge of birds to Highland Wonders on Friday, Feb. 6 at the Tonasket CCC. In his inspiring presentation, “The World Needs More Birders,” Cannings will demonstrate how going out to enjoy and watch birds can also generate valuable information about the abundance and distribution of bird species in our region. Drawing on a long career as a professional biologist, Cannings will convey anecdotes, stories, and experiences that underscore the need for citizen science programs. Through coordinated efforts, the public can be actively involved in turning bird watching into a collective database of bird breeding, bird behavior, and migration. Community members will be encouraged with the knowledge that anyone can become a birder, and contribute to a better understanding of the future for bird populations in a changing world. Dinner benefiting the Community Cultural Center at 5:15 p.m, followed by the presentation with tea, coffee and desserts. The CCC is located at 411 S Western Ave, Tonasket. The presentation is free; dinner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members. More info: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw

Intro to Squash

North Valley Community Schools offers an Introduction to Squash on Saturday, Feb. 7, at 9:45 a.m. Squash is good for you! We don’t mean just the garden variety. Squash is a sport that gives you a full cardio workout, as well as being fun! Come learn to play this sport and get in shape at the same time. To sign up for this class and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011.

CCC Talent Show

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will celebrate 20 years of talent shows with a theme of Sentimental Journey. The 20th Annual CCC Talent Show will be at the center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, on Saturday, Feb. 7, at 6:30 p.m. A baked potato supper will precede it, at 5:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help set up and clean up, prepare and serve food, bake desserts for the bake sale and help at the door. Please call Janet Culp at 509-486-2061 to sign up to help. Volunteers see the show for free.

OVOC Family Concert

Okanogan Valley Orchestra & Chorus is pleased to present our Family Concert on Sunday, February 8th at the Omak Performing Arts Center beginning at 3 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend as we highlight song selections for the entire family. The Chorus will feature a medley from the Disney favorite, “Frozen” and the Orchestra will play selections from Mary Poppins. As a special treat, the Orchestra

will also be premiering a new work by Chorus Director, Jonathan McBride! Come early and join Orchestra members for Kids’ Corner where kids can learn about different Orchestra instruments and hear the different sounds that each instrument makes. In addition, Second Strings, a beginner string group under the direction of Roz Nau will be performing in the multipurpose room at intermission.

Perfect Pie Making

North Valley Community Schools offers Perfect Pie Making 101 Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 5:30 p.m. It’s as easy as pie! How easy is that? Come find out! In this class you will learn how to make a homemade, perfect-everytime crust along with a pie filling that doesn’t run. To sign up for this class and more, call Ellen at 509-476-2011.

Darrelle London & Kevin Fox

OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Darrelle London and Kevin Fox on Thursday, Feb. 12 at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 7:30 p.m. This music event features Kevin Fox, a multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter and composer. Darrell London’s highlights include collaborating with Chantal Kreviazuk The Osoyoos Community Theatre is located at 5800 115th Street, Osoyoos BC. For more information see www.osoyoosarts.

Come see the new CT Scanner

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital will host a CT Scanner Open House on Friday, Feb. 13 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 203 S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Light snacks & Refreshments will be served Come see the newly finished CT Room with 32-Slice CT Scanner.

Oroville Senior Breakfast

OROVILLE - The Oroville Seniors will be serving breakfast on Saturday, Feb. 14 between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. with a scrumptious meal of pancakes, bacon, sausage, hash browns, fruit, coffee, orange juice, milk, all for the miserly price of $8, cheap. Look for the Valentines theme. Mark your calendar. Bring your own honey. And, don’t forget your sweetheart.

Green Okanogan Fundraiser

TONASKET - Green Okanogan will be having a fundraiser auction and membership drive at the Community Cultural Center on Saturday, Feb. 14. Silent auction and music from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dinner ($10) and live auction start at 7 p.m. Love your community and the Earth by helping Green Okanogan open a recycling center and restore this spring in Tonasket at 3 Rodeo Dr. (Across from Baker’s Acres). To donate auction items call Janet at 509-486-2061. For more info or to volunteer call Carol at 509556-2250.

Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed

OROVILLE - The Oroville Episcopal Church will be hosting a Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed on Tuesday, Feb. 17 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the church hall at 604 Central Ave. The breakfast will be sausage, pancakes, and homemade applesauce. Tickets are available at the Oroville Pharmacy or the door. Adults, $6; seniors, $5 and children 12 and under, $3.

Tonasket Library Preschool Storytime

TONASKET - The next Tonasket Library Preschool Storytime is Friday, Feb. 19 at 10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime is at the Tonasket Library, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket. Any questions please call the library at 509-486-2366

First Aid & CPR Class (English)

TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (English) will be held on Saturday, Feb. 21 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 Lommis-Oroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412, leave message.

First Aid & CPR Class (Spanish)

TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (Spanish) will be held on Saturday, Feb. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 Lommis-Oroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412, leave message.

Dock Side Drive

OSOYOOS - Osoyoos Arts presents Dock Side Drive a music event on Thursday, March 12 at 7:30 p.m. This popular swing and show band features Swing, Blues, Jazz and Show tunes. The event takes place at the Osoyoos Community Theatre at 5800 1115th Street in Osoyoos. Tickets available at Imperial Office Supply in Osoyoos or at the door. For more information see www.osoyoosarts.

Practice Sessions

OROVILLE - Practice Sessions, the hour long program offered by the Oroville Community Library on Thursday mornings at 10:30 a.m. in the activity room will continue throughout January and February. Allene Halliday shares information about American music from the 1920’s to the 1960’s that has endured and is relevant to the present day. Steve Pollard accompanies her renditions on guitar. The presentations include performances as well as rehearsal techniques plus the history of the style of musc that is still used in current entertainment venues, such as popular movies, etc. This ongoing series is free and is for all ages to enjoy. Call 509-476-2589 for additional information

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

www.gazette-tribune.com

OKANOGAN VALLEY ORCHESTRA & CHORUS

SUBMITTED BY LYNN HOOVER OVOC COORDINATOR

OKANOGAN - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus is excited to bring you a fun, formal event for Valentine’s Day, Saturday, Feb. 14 - a Valentine’s Day Masquerade Ball at the Old Flour Mill in Okanogan. Grab your favorite friend or loved one and join us for a funfilled evening of dinner, dancing, silent and live auctions. It’s a great opportunity to get dressed up and have a “ball” - masks are not required, but encouraged! This is a much needed fundraiser

for Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus to continue to bring you four concerts per year and the annual spring musical. Dinner will be catered by Breadline Cafe featuring alfredo seafood pasta, artichoke chicken cordon bleu, peppercorn steak marsala and more scrumptious options! Silent and live auction items range from beautiful jewelry to relaxing getaways! Finish off the evening by dancing the

night away! Tickets are $40 per person and can be purchased from any OVOC Board Member or by contacting Lynn Hoover (Omak/ Okanogan area) at 509-3220261 or Lisa Lindsay (Oroville/ Tonasket area) at 509-560-3828. Tickets are limited and advance purchase is required.

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

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OVOC Valentine’s Masquerade Ball

ON-SITE ~ Professional ~ Jewelry Repair SINCE 2001

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE 8 A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 5, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE â&#x20AC;˘ February 5, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discriminationâ&#x20AC;?. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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For Rent 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433 CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475.month. Call 509-223-3433

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: â&#x20AC;˘ Water. Sewer. Garbage â&#x20AC;˘ Washer and Dryer â&#x20AC;˘ Air conditioning â&#x20AC;˘ Play area â&#x20AC;˘ Storage Space For more information contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

SUN LAKES REALTY 4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; 2+ BR house $700; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

TONASKET 1 BEDROOM for $495. Close to town. All appliances. Water and sewer paid. 509-486-1682 or 509429-0873.

Announcements CRAB DINNER American Legion Post 84 is holding their annual crab dinner on Saturday, Feb 14th at 6 pm Tickets are $25 each and can be purchased at the Lounge or at Vickiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Unique Boutique on Main St. Only 150 presale tickets, no tickets at the door.

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Health General

Announcements

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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Help Wanted Lee Frank Mercantile Tonasket, WA We are accepting applications for a FULL-TIME SALES AND YARD POSITION. Experience preferred. Some lifting required. 324 S. Whitcomb Ave Tonasket, WA 98855 509-486-2105 OCCDA BILINGUAL CLASS AIDE Oroville. Assists teacher in classroom activities and function as part of the teaching team and provide translation services to families and children. High School/GED, WA Drivers license required. Previous experience providing services to pre-school children and families preferred. Salary 9.60 - 10.26 per hr. DOE. 30 hrs. per wk. Fluent Bilingual/Spanish skills required. Applications obtained at 101 4thAve. W â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Omak. Send application, cover letter and resumeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to: OCCDA - P.O. Box 1844 Omak, WA 98841. EOE

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WORKERS WANTED Workers needed for the following jobs at the warehouse: * FORK LIFT DRIVER * MECHANIC *SORTERS/PACKERS Gold Digger Apples, Inc. PO Box 2550, Oroville, WA 98844

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE? JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

OKANOGAN: Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: MAâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; C Full time. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN Part time, on an as needed basis position. English/ Spanish bilingual required due to business need. Roomer Part time/24 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required.

Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE Contractors and Vendors Lists As authorized under RCW 35.23.352(2), and RCW 35.23.352(8), the City of Oroville is updating their Small Works Roster, consisting of contractors interested in performing work for the City of Oroville which is estimated to cost less than $100,000 and their Vendorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s List, consisting of vendors interested in providing supplies, materials, equipment or services between $7,500 and $15,000 through telephone and/or written quotations. In awarding contracts for such projects, the City of Oroville shall invite proposals from all appropriate contractors or vendors who have requested to be included on the Small Works Roster and/or Vendors List, and shall select the lowest responsible bid. All contractors and vendors, where required by law, must be properly licensed or registered in this state. The City of Oroville actively seeks participation by minority or women owned firms who otherwise qualify. Individual Assurity Bonds acceptable. Forms may be secured at the Oroville City Hall or by calling 509-4762926. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 19, 2015. #OVG613640

the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representativeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: January 20, 2015. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 29, 2015. /s/Hartley A. Topping HARTLEY A. TOPPING Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Topping Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 29, February 5, 12, 2015. #OVG612016

WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;make goodâ&#x20AC;?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality EVENTS-FESTIVALS health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 welcome. We have the following opportunities available:

Public Notices

Statewides

million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. EVENTS-FESTIVALS BIG ONE Snohomish County 4-H Tack Sale Saturday, February 21 9am-3pm. Consignment: Wednesday 4-9pm, Thursday 9am-9pm, Friday 9am-6pm. For more information, 425-308-2815 or https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/416828768476278/416829378476217 EVENTS-FESTIVALS

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: HARRY H. TOPPING, Deceased. NO. 15-4-00001-1 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time

EVENTS-FESTIVALS Early Bird Automobile, Antique and Collectible Swap Meet. Puyallup Fairgrounds, February 14 & 15, Saturday, 8-5. Sunday, 9-3, admission $5.00. For information call 1 (253) 863-6211. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com ADOPTION *ADOPT:* Affectionate Devoted Married Caring Lawyers Joyfully await Miracle Baby. Excited Grandparents too. *Expenses paid* 1-800-5637964*

Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

Crosswords

Miscellaneous

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ANSWERS

Across 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Nightmare on ___ Streetâ&#x20AC;? 4. Not honored 13. Certain surgeonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;patientâ&#x20AC;?

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23. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come in!â&#x20AC;?

7. Federal agency for mail delivery (abbrev.)

24. Weightlifting maneuver

8. Formerly known as

27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? problem

9. Lead sulfide

28. Bull markets

10. Ritual hand washing

31. Of more dubious character

11. ___ v. Wade

32. Note prolongation

12. Bit

34. Bamboozles

13. Pith hat

35. Unwanted item (2 wds)

20. Salad oil holder

38. Lentil curry

22. Like the Marx Brothers

39. Sudden outburst (hyphenated)

24. Woodworking tool

40. Logarithmic unit of sound intensity

25. Copper

42. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To ___ is human ...â&#x20AC;?

29. Favor

43. Crumb

30. Common sense?

46. One who twists threads

31. About 1.3 cubic yards

47. â&#x20AC;&#x153;M*A*S*Hâ&#x20AC;? role

32. Entering a legl document into public record

21. Australian runner

49. Baby carrier?

10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A jealous mistressâ&#x20AC;?: Emerson

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Legals Continued On Next Page

ANTIQUE SALE Snohomish Citywide-Star Center Antique Mall & historic First Street, 400 antique dealers, up to 40% off February 6-8. www.myantiquemall.com or 360 5682131

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Oroville - Studio apartment. 350 Square feet, Kitchen, ž bath, private yard and we pay electricity. WSG. $385. Call mike at 509-429-3500.

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BENTON In the Matter of the Estate of:

14. Sartre novel 15. ___ constrictor 16. Face-to-face exam 17. Flowering plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reproductive organ

26. â&#x20AC;&#x153;48___â&#x20AC;?

50. Telephone circuit connecting multiple subscribers (2 wds)

33. C.S.A. state (abbrev.)

54. Elephantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight, maybe 56. Masked man with a stick

36. Main house on a ranch (Spanish)

58. Keats, for one

37. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Faster!â&#x20AC;?

59. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ ...â&#x20AC;?

38. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Springâ&#x20AC;? subject (abbrev.)

60. Chronicles

41. Pauper

61. Colors

43. Loathsome

62. Oolong, for one

44. Wife of a rajah (pl.)

63. Wish undone

45. Allowances for waste after deduction for tare

64. Balaamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mount Down 1. Astray 2. Shack (hyphenated) 3. Donnybrook

18. Certain digital watch face, for short

4. So unusual as to be surprising

19. Fir tree seed producers

6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No problem!â&#x20AC;?

5. Indian bread

35. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was close!â&#x20AC;?

48. Beginning 50. Qualm 51. Apple spray 52. Anger, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;upâ&#x20AC;? 53. Makeup, e.g. 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sesame Streetâ&#x20AC;? watcher 55. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ to Billie Joeâ&#x20AC;? 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;?


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7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

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LIC.#ALLVAVI945DC

Quality Readi-Mix Concrete, Concrete Sealers and Accessories & Aggregates!

 Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Storage units are fully fenced, easy 24 Hr. access, close to town. 132 Clarkson Mill Rd.

Tonasket

509-486-2888

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

 Water Well Drilling  Pump Systems  Water Treatment  Full Service Store  Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

 Free Water Analysis  Zimmatic Pivots  Hydrofracturing  Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville  Spokane  Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

www.foglepump.com

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Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

SUPPLIERS OF:

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149

n Civil

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n Felony / Misdemeanor

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www.osoyoosreadimix.com

Oroville Building Supply

Law

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

RENTAL RENTAL RENTAL

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

n Criminal

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n Family

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509-476-2874 509-560-1011

Equipment Rental

Midway Building Supply

Attorney at Law

• Computer Diagnostics • Electrical: Lights & Wiring Fuel Injection • Batteries • Air Conditioning • Shocks Complete Service • Starters Alternators • Engine Tune-Up • Water Pumps Lube & Oil Services • Brakes & Mufflers • Transmission Fluid Flush • Complete Cooling Open Monday - Friday 8am-5pm System Services • 25 Pt Vital Service

Concrete

Quality Supplies Since 1957

RYAN W. GUNN

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723 APPLEWAY, OROVILLE

Building Supplies

GUNN LAW OFFICES

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Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

COMMUNITY AUTO REPAIR 4-D

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Well Drilling

Attorney

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Puzzle 12 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

Puzzle 8 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

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Directory BUSINESS & SERVICES Automotive

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon Lake and Country Beautiful new construction home with expansive views of the valley! Situated on 1.43 acres, plenty of space featuring a master bedroom on the ground floor and 2 bedrooms upstairs. Attention to detail! Good access from paved road. Come see for yourself! MLS 489214 $179,000

Insulation Land Call Charlene at Surveyor 509-476-3602 to advertise Pumps in the Business & Service Directory

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This secluded home on 6 acres is surrounded by evergreen forest, is well maintained, has many updates, and is close to the Okanogan National Forest. NWML# 735107. $120,000

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Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

PRICE REDUCED! Brand New Re-Done 3 Bedroom home. Walk in across the new glistening floors. This home sparkles. Garage, Fenced Yard. Don’t miss your opportunity. CALL TODAY! $107,000

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www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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Puzzle 11 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.62)

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4 Easy, difficulty1rating 0.43

509-476-3602

509/476-3378

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1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121

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www.windermere.com

#1 Top Producer Office in North County!

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REAL ESTATE Guide SUN LAKES REALTY

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ANSWERS

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www.gazette-tribune.com

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Subscribe to the...

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Public Notice Posted Proclamation of Reclamation Abandoned State Hwy. 4 (now S.R. 2OE) circa 1932-2015 Feb. 1, 2015 To be recorded as Parcel nos. 372726002-372726005-372726006 all in Okanogan Co. WA. From Feb. 1, 2015 is unified non-abandonment linked to parcel 3727264005 Homestead-Farmstead Roger Rylander. I Roger Rylander have maintained, improved and paid delinquent property taxes on said parcels. I am the first person to have property identified as segregated and recorded nonabandonment of such property. I

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PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Oroville City Council has scheduled a workshop for Tuesday, February 10, 2015 at 6:30 pm. Purpose of the workshop is to review and discuss potential utility rate increases. City Council meetings are held the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of each month beginning at 7:00 pm. If you have any questions, please call JoAnn Denney at 476-2926 x 10. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 2015. #OVG612126

Puzzle 6 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

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William K Smith, Deceased. No. 14-4-00524-0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 15, 2015. William C Smith P.O Box 4428 W. Richland WA. 99353, Personal Representative

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. 2

PUBLIC NOTICE Regular Cemetery District 4 Board Meetings The Cemetery District 4 Board will hold their regular board meetings every 2nd Monday of each month for the year 2015. The meetings are held at the Oroville American Legion Hall, 314 14th Ave, beginning at 1:00 pm. The Cemetery District 4 Board conducts and administers all general powers and business of the Cemetery District and is guided under the RCW 68. for all public purposes of the Cemetery District. The public is invited to attend. For more information, please contact Mary Lou at 509 476-2375 or email at Cemeterydist4@myhighlandmail.com. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 2015 #OVG613828

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am the First person in recorded history to do so. I will improve the premises and relocate my driveway from mile marker 264.28 to a point that is the safest to all people of the State of Washington. State property is 100% free of encumbrances and when abandoned is 100% free of encumbrances. Now and Forever to be entered into county taxed land. I do so willingly. Records of said Abandoned 1932 roadway are kept int he maproom basement at the Wenatchee D.O.T. P.U.D. welcome Phone welcome. Posted on Property. WAC458-61-550 Excise tax exempt South of Creek Abandoned roadbed. W.A.C. 197-11-960 Roger Rylander 288 Howard End Rd. Tonasket, WA 98855 /s/Roger Rylander Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19, 2015. #OVG611291

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Court of Probate Proceedings: BENTON COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT Cause No. 14-4-00524-0 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette Tribune. January 22, 29, February 5, 2015. #OVG610321

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Legals Continued From Previous Page

Sudoku

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE February 5, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 05, 2015  

February 05, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 05, 2015  

February 05, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune