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Wolf population increasing in state Predatory incidents also climbing says study BY COOPER INVEEN WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

For the first time in generations wolf populations are on the rise in Washington State. In 2008 a Conservation Northwest volunteer captured the first images of wolves born in the state since the early 1900s. Since then their numbers have more than quintupled. And this is just the start. “In terms of what we’ve seen in the Rocky Mountain states — Idaho, Montana and Wyoming — we’re at kind of a threshold number in terms of what

“The most support in the state for wolf recovery is where there are no wolves. I’m worried that the disproportionate impact is going to hurt social acceptance of wolves in my area.” Rep. Joel Kretz, Seventh District - Wauconda

we’ve seen in prior years,” said Dave Ware, wolf policy lead administrator at the Washington Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (WDWF). In those cases, wolf populations increased exponentially once they crossed the 50-wolf mark. Today, the department has confirmed at least 52 wolves living in Washington, mostly living in the northeastern part of the state. At the rate they’re currently breeding, the agency anticipates wolves could reach state recovery objectives as early as 2021. Ware presented the findings to a joint House and Senate committee Jan. 14. Although they paint a pretty picture for wolf populations, their re-emergence doesn’t necessarily spell good news for everyone. Especially not for ranchers. “Twenty percent of wolf packs end up causing a depredation at some point,” Ware told lawmakers. “Certainly that number varies significantly, or can from one year to the next. But that can have significant impacts on individual ranchers.” The first recorded wolf attack on

The Gazette-Tribune and local businesses Hughes Department Store of Oroville and Lee Frank Mercantile of Tonasket joined forces over the holidays to give away a sled to a local kid in each community that sent a Letter to Santa Claus that we printed in our special Christmas section in December. Above, Ryken Harris, 8, of Oroville receives his sled from Jack Hughes (right). He’s in Kathy Smith’s class. Right, an excited Sadie Clark, 7, from Loomis, gets her sled from Stacey Garrisson of Lee Franks. She says she’s in Mrs. Lewis second grade class.

livestock occurred in 2007, before any wolves had been officially reported living in the state. Since then, Ware says wolf depredations have been fairly limited, although increases in recent years have forced WDFW officers to take lethal action twice, both in Stevens County: once in 2012 when 16 cows Rep. Joel Kretz were attacked, and again in 2014 when 30 sheep were confirmed to have been attacked or killed by a local wolf pack. When it comes to attacks on livestock, the agency focuses most of its efforts on what Ware calls preventative deterrence. This means helping landowners procure guard dogs and electric fences, as well as sending out range-riders — horsemen dedicated to keeping herds moving, removing animal carcasses from wolfheavy areas and keeping their eyes out for any signs of wolf activity. To date the WDFW has worked with more than 40 individual landowners to help maintain wolf populations, issuing compensation when it must. The agency notes that preventative measures only go so far, and after multiple attacks are attributed to a single pack, its officers have no choice but to take lethal action, Ware explained. Eight wolves have been put down by state officers in the past three years, approximately one-sixth of their minimum population. In the Rocky Mountain

“If we don’t resolve this things are just going to become more polarized and you’ll never have wolf acceptance in my part of the state” Rep. Joel Kretz, Seventh District - Wauconda

states, 15 percent of wolf deaths were attributed to humans before recovery goals were reached. In Washington, that figure is less than seven percent, although no specific total number was given at the briefing. The department recently conducted a public survey that showed strong support for wolf recovery, along with an equally strong support for killing wolves that repeatedly attack livestock. The sur-

SEE WOLVES | PG A2

Chamber, anglers, land success at NW Ice Fishing Festival NW Ice Fishing Festival Gary A. De Von editor@gazette-tribune.com MOLSON – To say fingers were crossed for this year’s NW Ice Fishing Festival was an understatement. After three year’s of getting skunked it was beginning to look like the idea someone could catch a fish in the winter out of Sidley Lake was a fish tale. That, however, came to an end when real trout started being caught within minutes of the tournament’s opening at 8 a.m. Bryan Jones caught the first fish and hustled it all the way back to the official judges trailer to have

it weighted and measured for the “first fish caught” prize. “Ripples of laughter were heard about such a small fish being at that time, in first place,” said Robin Stice, one of the tourney’s organizers, and founder of the event 11 years ago. A total of 86 anglers registered to try their luck that day, 13 youth and 73 adults. By 8:30 a.m.,Terry Davis caught the second fish of the day with a weight of 27.5 ounces and by 8:45 a.m. John DeVlaeminck had a 31.6 ouncer. “The fishing was so hot then, no one felt the cold. I hiked the

whole lake asking each group if they were getting bites, where they were from and getting general feedback about the festival. It was hard work with six inches of powdery snow on top of anywhere from one to four inches of slush depending on location,” said Stice. “The ice reports ranged from 14 inches to 18 inches, again depending on location. Most groups had at least one person getting bites. Everyone that worked so hard to put on the festival was thrilled to hear about the action on the lake.” Fish averaged from 10 1/4 to 17 7/8 inches with a weight range

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Tournament judge Dan Lepley measures a fish caught by Ben Cross, who took second place in this year’s NW Ice Fishing Festival on Sidley Lake near Molson. This was the Omak anglers first year fishing in the tourney. His fish was 17 and 7/8 inches long and wieghed 34.2 ounces. Gary DeVon/staff photo

of 5.8 ounces to 36.6 ounces. Over all 32.9 pounds of fish were officially caught in the 2015 NW Ice Fishing Festival. Grand Prize is based on the weight of two fish. All other places based on only one fish. Judge was Dan Lepley from Oroville Building Supply

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

assisted by two daughters, Heidi and Lillie age 17. The Grand Prize of $500 donated by Hughes Department Store went to Mark Webster, with a total weight of 69.2 ounces. First prize, $100 from Double A. Logging, was awarded to Ben

Cross with 34.2 ounces; second, $75 from OK Chevrolet, went to Jill Mathews with 34.1 ounces; third prize of $75 from OK Chevrolet went to Kim Marshall with 33.9 ounces and fourth prize, $50 from Akins Harvest

SEE AGLERS | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION Valley Life Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Local Sports Obituaries

A10-11 A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 22, 2015

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Anglers outsmart fish at Sidley Lake Foods, went to Mike Sheldon. No one who registered in the youth division caught any fish this year so their registration numbers were put into a can and places drawn. All youth prizes this year were donated by Mary Lou’s Gift Store. First prize went to James Sutton for a sleeping bag and ice fishing pole; second, Austin Norsworthy for a sleeping bag and third, Myles Timm for an ice fishing pole. The 11-year-old festival was moved to January after no fish were caught during the festivals in February 2012 through 2014, with a shrimp hatch and low water being blamed by most, a vote was put to the registered

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Oroville Chamber of Commerce President Clyde Andrews awards the Grand Prize of $500 to Mark Webster.

Tim Behrens portrays several of the characters from Patrick McManus’s books in the play, “McManus in Love.”

WOLVES | FROM A1 Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, said to the committee. “I’m worried that that disproportionate impact is going to hurt social acceptance of wolves in my area.” Kretz expressed concern that a lack of coordination between the state, local and tribal governments is leading to poor management decisions, citing an instance where approximately 1,800 sheep were placed near a wolf-breeding site by mistake. “If we don’t resolve this,” he said, “things are just going to

vey showed that 64 percent support wolf-reintroduction efforts, yet 63 percent are in favor of using lethal force to protect livestock. Support of lethal force is as high as 68 percent in Eastern Washington, where wolves and ranching are the most prevalent. It’s lowest — 56 percent — in the state’s five most populous counties, where no wolves have been recorded. “The most support in the state for wolf recovery is in areas where there are no wolves,” Rep.

become even more polarized and you’ll never have wolf acceptance in my part of the state.” Since 2008, support for wolf reintroduction has been on the rise and opposition has been in decline. Ware remains optimistic and concedes that given the controversial nature of the issue, support will never reach 100 percent. “Every state that undergoes wolf recovery experiences the challenges that we’re experiencing as well,” he said.

Thank-You Dr. Stangland North Valley Hospital District would like to thank Dr. Stangland for his many years of service. He has helped shape the healthcare system in our surrounding communities, and has left a legacy in his path. We hope that you enjoy retirement, as it is well deserved! Dr. Stangland

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fishermen during the awards at the 2014 festival and those present voted to change the month. The NW Ice Fishing Festival is held annually at Molson sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce and hosted by the Molson Grange. Kinross Gold was the largest sponsor for the festival with their money going to pay the electric bill for Sidley Lake aerator and other administrative costs to put on the festival. The aerator is credited with helping the health of the lake, the fish and there have been local ducks enjoying the open water all winter. Sidley Lake is over a mile long and bordered by Nine Mile Road on its north shore. It presents vast space for groups of fishermen in the tournament to set up their sites. This year there were multiple ice huts of various designs and colors. The weather cooperated as well with temperatures in the low twenties early in the day and high twenties early afternoon. Periods of freezing rain, sleet and snow occurred and did not dampen spirits,” said Stice. Later that night the Chamber asked people to join them for the Patrick McManus play “McManus in Love” performed by Tim Berhens at the Oroville High School Commons. The play was well received and the actor was applauded for his lively and interactive one-man performance.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Ben Cross got second place with his nearly 17-inch trout caught just after noon last Saturday. The trout weighed 34.2 ounces.

Another shot at pot Lawmakers prepare marijuana follow-up bills BY COOPER INVEEN WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA--Two years after Washington voters ended pot prohibition lawmakers are wading through a thicket of proposed reforms that aim to stabilize an industry struggling to get off the ground. “Right now I call it the wild, wild west,” Senate Democratic Leader Sharon Nelson, D-Maury Island, said during Thursday’s annual Associated Press Legislative Preview. “We’ve got incongruities in this law that we need to solve.” With seven new cannabisrelated bills pre-filed so far come seven new opportunities to shape Washington’s unprecedented cannabis experiment. From a complete overhaul of medical marijuana to giving those charged with misdemeanor pot crimes a chance at a clean slate, little related to the marijuana issue seems to be off the table. The possible impacts range from subtle to sweeping. For starters, Sen. Brian Hatfield, D-Pacific County, and Sen. Ann Rivers, R-La Center, teamed up to sponsor SB 5003, which would raise the excise tax on cannabis from 25 to 26 percent. Hatfield also co-sponsored SB 5012 with Sen. Jim Honeyford, R-Sunnyside, in order to kickstart Washington’s hemp industry by giving Washington State University researchers an August 2016 deadline to determine if and how such an industry could be properly established.

One of the larger challenges the Legislature may face is finding a balance between establishing a fully state-regulated system and not infringing on the rights of legitimate medical-marijuana users. However, finding that balance becomes even more complicated when discussing how to properly incorporate medical dispensaries into the system voters authorized two years ago with the passage of Initiative 502.. “The most important thing is to come up with a legally sanctioned, safe system for medical-marijuana users,” Gov. Jay Inslee said during Thursday’s AP Legislative Preview. Sens. Rivers and Hatfield have outlined their solution in SB 5052, which has been making headlines. It would require medical dispensaries to exclusively sell edibles and marijuana concentrates if they want to stay open, rather than the dry, smokeable cannabis they sell today. But SB 5052 stands in direct opposition to a bill Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles, D-Seattle, is expected to file in the upcoming weeks, which would fold the entire medical marijuana system into the I-502 structure while cutting back taxes and allowing the average consumer to grow up to six personal plants. Inslee noted that he is open to aspects of both bills and that he will be working with their sponsors and other lawmakers to find the best solution between them. A bill co-sponsored last year by Rep. Sherry Appleton, D-Poulsbo, has been given second life and is to be reintroduced during this session as well. HB 1020, dubbed the “Ric Smith Memorial Act,” prohibits medical professionals from determining a patient’s eligibility for an organ transplant based solely on their use of medi-

cal cannabis. The bill is named for the Seattle pot activist who died in 2012 from kidney dialysis complications after doctors denied his request for a transplant, unsure of how his heavy marijuana consumption would impact the success of the procedure. But the Ric Smith Memorial Act would also protect medical patients from being evicted from their homes because of their cannabis use, particularly if the property owner already permits tobacco use on site. However, not all the bills prefiled this session spell good news for pot smokers. Sen. Rivers has also sponsored SB 5002, which aims to stop stoned driving by making it a traffic infraction to drive while an unsealed container of cannabis is present in the car, whether it’s the driver’s or not. The law would require any amount of cannabis en route to somewhere else be behind an unbroken seal, with all of its original contents still in place. In other words, a glass stash jar just isn’t going to pass examination. Those with pre-existing marijuana misdemeanors could get some relief if HB 1041 is enacted, which would allow for individuals to apply to have those convictions wiped from their records, as long as they were over the age of 21 when the offense was committed. Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon, D-Burien, sponsors the bill after his attempt to pass similar legislation last year failed to make it to the House floor. Regardless of the bills’ eventual outcomes, one thing remains clear through the smoke: Washington legislators won’t be able to make it through the 2015 session without a little weed on their plates.

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JANUARY 22 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SUPERIOR COURT

CRIMINAL Michelle Lynn Carden, 26, Omak, pleaded guilty to attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and thirddegree DWLS. Carden was sentenced to five months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the Sept. 16, 2014 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge David Leslie Louis, 34, Omak, with firstdegree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree possession of stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 4, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Sandra Lee Clark, 50, Genelle, B.C.; with POCS (cocaine). The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 8 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Phillip Nolan Lester, 34, Tonasket, with firstdegree rape of a child and first-degree child molestation. The crimes allegedly occurred between Dec. 1, 2014 and Jan. 1, 2015.

DISTRICT COURT Eugene Reliford, 57, Okanogan, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Bernardino Saldana Rodriguez, 46, Oroville, guilty of fourth-degree assault and violation of a no-contact order. Rodriguez had an additional charge of fourthdegree assault dismissed. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,898. Joseph Allen Rosenbaum, 32, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Charlotte Anna Roy, 47, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Desiree Letha Shelton, 58, Omak, guilty of fourthdegree assault. Shelton received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $1,033. Tyler Lee Shelton, 24, Okanogan, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Shelton was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Taylor Marie Smiley, 23, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Smiley was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 165 days suspended, and fined $768. David John Smith Jr., 42, Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: fourth-degree assault and third-degree malicious mischief. Lue’cinda R. Soriano Churape, 25, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jordan Marie St. Peter, 23, Omak, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) on all counts of DUI, no valid driver’s license without ID, and third-degree malicious mischief. St. Peter was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,436. 911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JAN. 12, 2015 Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fuel reported missing. Theft on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Public intoxication on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Custodial interference on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Rebecca Renee Cheney, 21, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michelle Ann Hernandez, 25, DOC detainer. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS. Darcy Kim Edwards, 42, DOC detainer. Kenneth Ray Squetimkin Jr., 23, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS and four Omak Police Department

TUESDAY, JAN. 13, 2015 Fraud on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Harassment on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Cameron Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Carburetor piece reported missing. Fraud on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Fraud on Dutch Anderson Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on E. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Jackson St. in Omak. Structure fire on W. Ridge Dr. in Omak. Three reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Matthew Lawrence Folden, 29, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI. Shane Michael Heisey, 28, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault. Philip Nolan Lester, 33, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: first-degree rape of a child and first-degree child molestation. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 14, 2015 Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Theft on Sterling Lane near Tonasket. Harassment on Shumway Rd. in Omak. Burglary on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Drugs on Bridge St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Columbia St. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Koala Dr. in Omak. Loitering on Apple Lane near Omak. Harassment on Apple Lane near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Brush fire on Bramble Ave. near Omak. Automobile theft on Cherry St. in Oroville. Forgery on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Robert Odell Peterson, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Ronnie Falling Hail Bell, 20, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Anthony Kevin Baker, 26,

booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS. Emily Ann Wisdom, 23, booked on an FTA warrant for POCS. Jose Gutierrez Cruz, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault. Anthony Abram Grand Louis, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for obstruction.

THURSDAY, JAN. 15, 2015 DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Found property on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Mail recovered. Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Engh Rd. near Omak. Assault on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Shumway Rd. near Omak. DWLS on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Custodial interference on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Maria Rosales Flores, 18, court commitments for residential burglary, first-degree theft and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Carlo Lee Perez, 29, DOC detainer. FRIDAY, JAN. 16, 2015 Assault on Mary Ann Creek Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on E. Third St. in Tonasket. David Condon Soderberg, 20, DOC detainer. Shawn Dennis Fadden, 46, booked for a drug court violation. Joshua Dean Allen, 33, DOC detainer. Donovan Guy Combs, 31, booked for DUI and firstdegree DWLS. SATURDAY, JAN. 17, 2015 Malicious mischief on Ellisforde Bridge Rd. near Ellisforde. Assault on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Television and sewing machine reported missing. Warrant arrest on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Ferry St. in Omak. Trespassing on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Omak Ave. in Omak. Assault on Kay St. in Oroville. DWLS on E. Third St. in Tonasket. James William Van Geystel, 44, booked for DUI. Russell Dene Womer, 41, booked for third-degree DWLS, DUI and a Grant County warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Iris Gail Marroquin, 20, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for reckless driving. Joe Ballesteros Lopez, 20, booked for third-degree DWLS and on two State Patrol FTA warrants: pos-

CHIEF HILL ADDS NEW OFFICER ‘203’

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Police Chief Todd Hill promoted officer Kenneth Waddell to corporal in a small ceremony held in the Chief’s office last week with his wife Jana and Mayor Chuck Spieth attending. “I’m glad you tested... I feel you will show the leadership and skills needed for the job,” said Chief Hill as he pinned on the newly minted corporal’s badge and said his radio call sign would now be “203.” Waddell hails from Sunnyside, Wash. and has worked for the Oroville Police Department for the past six years, his first law enforcement job, he says. He will act as a laison between the chief and his fellow officers. “I’m excited, it is a natural progression and I like to challenge myself in everything I do.” Waddell will need to return to the police academy to pick up additional field and officer training, according to Chief Hill. Waddell’s wife said she was very proud of her husband. session of marijuana and use/delivery of drugs. Michelle Carden, 26, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Lee Andrew Gardee, 43, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant.

SUNDAY, JAN. 18, 2015 Custodial interference on Hubbard Rd. in Riverside. Warrant arrest on Burton Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Eder Rd. near Oroville. Injuries reported. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Miller Rd. near Omak. DUI on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan.

Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Threats on N. Elm St. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Granite St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Found property on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Credit card recovered. April Renea Mathis, 31, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Constancio Vazquez Guzman, 49, booked for DUI. Rose Susan Pauline Vallee, 32, booked for first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree possession of stolen property.

KEY: DUI – Driving Under the Influ-

ence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer RP - Reporting Party DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection. ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 22, 2015

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 15, 2015

THE TOWN CRIER

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Members of the Forthun family make the trip to Sidley Lake each year, have a reunion and hope to bring home fish stories from the annual Northwest Ice Fishing Festival. And, if you’re nice they might just share some hot buttered rum with you.

Really, there are fish in Sidley Lake Fish on! Right on! The 11th Annual Northwest Ice Fishing Festival had something it’s been missing the last three years or so – actual fish. Moving the festival up to the Saturday of Martin Luther King Jr. weekend was a good move on the part of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, which sponsors the annual tournament. While it was somewhat cold on the lake, more and more competitors are bringing their brightly colored shelters, tents and tarps to get out of the wind and that’s the only way to ice fish if you ask me. The shelters weren’t quite as elaborate, as say that of Patrick McManus’ mentor, Rancid Crabtree, but they seemed to stay in one place a whole lot better. If you missed the reference, it’s from a story out of one of Patrick McManus’ hilarious books of outdoor misadventure and growing up in the wilds of Idaho. In addition to the ice fishing tournament the chamber also had Tim Behren’s back and his one-man performance of a play written by McManus and drawing on some of the familiar characters in his books. I missed the play last year to go to a Gonzaga basketball game, but this year the tournament doesn’t interfere with my rooting for the Zags at my old Alma Mater. I enjoyed McManus’ books as a kid, shared Out of his tales while traveling with family when they were made into “books on tape” – literally casMy Mind tapes. And now I’ve gotten a chance to see Gary A. DeVon sette the play. Behrens does a great job and interacts with his audience. Which, by the way was nearly falling out of their chairs during some of the funnier moments. It’s unfortunate the OHS Commons weren’t filled to capacity. People must have been resting up to watch the big Seahawks game on Sunday. Wow, what a comeback! Anyway, money earned from the ice fishing tournament goes to a good cause – helping to finance the Visitor Information Center. I know everyone I spoke to at the tournament and later at the play, enjoyed themselves. Might be a good time to mark your calendars for next year – whether you fish or not, you’ll be glad you took part.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR No need for Similkameen River power Dear Editor, Attending the PUD Meeting on Jan. 5, I learned a new additional power con-

tract providing a larger share of Wells Dam power is now being worked out with Douglas County PUD. This agreement, if signed, will provide our PUD District with our electrical needs until 2048 according to general manager, John Grubich. This is the best news from our PUD in years.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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With this agreement in place, why do we need PUD electrification of the Similkameen River? Why commit every ratepayer to financing a $76-100 million dollar power plant that will provide less than 2 percent of the energy used within the district? The proposed powerhouse, averaging 5 MWH output, would only supply 20 percent of the Oroville Sub-station load. The cost of producing electricity at Enloe is very high. PUD figures confirm this project will lose $1.1 million dollars or more each year long into the future. Just the license and engineering phase is over $12 million not including three previous FERC license attempts. Spending on this project is one of the main drivers behind the last four years of rate increases. The Equity Management Plan is window dressing to please the big bank lenders we have courted. Our public utility can serve us best by concentrating on the maintenance of the wires, poles and transformers. Our public utility can serve us by helping to better insulate and upgrade our homes, businesses, appliances, windows and lighting for increased energy saving. We will start saving money and paying down our utility debt the day we walk away from power production at Enloe Dam. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

What’s your better idea? BY WILLAIM SLUSHER SOCIOPOLITICAL COMMENTATOR

It’s always hard to assess something as complicated as Obamacare because it began life as a political gimmick and advanced to, well, a bigger political gimmick. Thinking back, what else could possibly have come of a 2700 page legislative bill the minority leader of the United States House of Representatives snickered that we’d have to pass to see what it was about. The laughably misrepresented ‘Affordable’ Bill Slusher Care Act passed by a margin of less than one percent, even then only by unusual parliamentary trickery. Healthcare is expensive, and people like ‘free stuff’, so it was a no-brainer that claiming to give people free, or at least cheaper, healthcare would be well received by voters. Republicans would’ve jumped on this vote magnet themselves but there was this nagging problem that has only become... mmm ...naggier. “Good news: More people are gonna get health care. Bad news: We have no way in the world that we’re gonna be able to pay for it.” Quoth Steven Brill who has researched Obamacare for two years for a book, as interviewed by Leslie Stahl on 60 Minutes, January 11, 2015. Brill is a lawyer who teaches at Yale so it’s unlikely any ‘Republican Obama hater’ label will stick. “They’ve created in healthcare an alternate universe economy, where everybody except the doctors and the nurses, makes a ton of money. And nobody is holding them accountable and Obamacare does zero to change any of that.” Dr. Barbara Ruth Bellar, MD, takes a different approach “We’re going to be gifted with a health care plan we are forced to purchase and fined if we don’t, which purportedly covers at least 10 million more people without adding a single new doctor, but provides for 16,000

new IRS agents, written by a committee whose chairman says he doesn’t understand it, passed by a Congress that didn’t read it, but who exempted themselves from it....” Merrill Matthews, resident scholar for Policy Innovation, writing for Forbes, has another rosy outlook: Matthews says we’ve become a “Nation of takers. The Mercatus Center at George Mason University recently reported that about one-third of American households received Medicaid, food stamps or some other means-tested program in 2010. Add in Medicare, Social Security and unemployment and nearly half of all households are getting a government check. Obamacare dramatically expands that number.” While Medicare and Social Security insurance benefits paid for in advance by recipient workers - are not government freebies for most, you get the point. Perhaps this shocker hits hardest as Obamacare heaps yet more crushing burden on America’s most abused, exploited and oppressed minority ... the working taxpayer. So Republicans, always the Scrooges aggravatingly concerned for how taxpayer Daddy is going to pay for Santa Clause government’s free stuff promises, passed on promising ‘free’ healthcare vote-nip. Somebody has to be the grownup. Democrats, ever the apostles of Rahm Emmanuel’s edict that no crisis should go unexploited, did not let nuisance monetary ... er .... thingies stand in the way of a sure-fire vote sucker. Ergo our distinctly unaffordable Affordable Care Act. Further studied criticisms of Obamacare by countless other qualified experts literally fill the internet, so help yourself. Let’s take the next step. A fair question for Obiecare whackers is, what’s your better idea? First let’s establish that no healthcare system will be worth Bill Clinton’s marital fidelity if it is not affordable. That, after all, is Obiecare’s fatal flaw.

I like the plan put forth economically and effectively by Jeffery Romoff, CEO of University of Pittsburg Medical Center, a $12 billion-a-year global health conglomerate - by one estimate, the nation’s top grossing nonprofit hospital. UPMC has... its own ... healthcare insurance agency. 60 Minutes: UPMC’s insurance company’s policies can be used at their hospitals as well as selected rival hospitals in the state. Romoff thinks this idea of hospitals with their own insurance companies could be a model for the nation, and the best way to reduce inflated costs. Romoff says the beauty of it is there’s no incentive for his hospital to overcharge its own insurance company. In other words, there’s nothing to gain in inflating a patient’s bill. Romoff: “We are the same family. It’s the same kitty and our premiums now are among the lowest in the country.” What the UPMC healthcare insurance plan comes down to of course is ... good ole American capitalism. Competition in a free market to provide - in this case - a better healthcare service. A more local, close example is Health Alliance, a Medicare supplement insurance plan working in partnership with Confluence Health, formerly Wenatchee Valley Medical Center. Having endured two operations for sciatica last summer, and much other associated treatment, I’m eminently qualified to tell you Health Alliance is worth every premium cent you’ll pay them. So there’s my ‘better idea,’ plagiarized from UPMC. What’s yours? Because Obiecare is DOA. William Slusher’s latest novel is a bipartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: “Cascade Chaos, or, How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse.” He may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live. com.


PAGE A6

JANUARY 22, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Many folks still under the weather Here we are on the downside of January and not only does it remain cold outside, there are a lot of folks getting zapped with the flu bug. So, when you are one of those, stay home and trap those germs and don’t spread them around. We’ve been playing cards on Monday nights, in Molson, a lot of years, and last week I believe was the smallest crowd I’ve seen. Of course some may still be away extending the Holidays, but several were sick. Tonasket and Omak hospitals were overflowing, so I was told. It is good that a new doctor has been obtained to fill the vacancy of Dr. Stangland, who has retired after many years of dedicated service. A lady, and already I’ve heard good things about her. Next, will be to get her name and I’ve done just that in our local paper. It is

It was ‘fish on!’ at Saturday’s Ice Fishing Festival SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Here we are in the Middle of January, already. Last Saturday was the 11th Annual NW Ice Fishing Festival, sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. This years Festival was held one month earlier than before, due to the fact the three years prior there, was not one fish caught – not true this year. This year’s Festival started out with a cold chill in the air and a few clouds that were tinted with a pink as the sun rose over our hilltop. The pancake breakfast

Micaela Godzich and I hope she is very pleased with her decision to move into the Okanogan Valley. How nice it was to also read positive Nursing Home news. Although it isn’t a permanent fix, it will at least give time for other avenues of financing to keep the very necessary facility open. Just learned at the Senior Center of two Oroville residents, Dean Brazle and Bob Irwin. being moved into Harmony House care center, Brewster, due to other closer facilities being filled. And then, of course reading of the Hilderbrand girls excelling in basketball was exciting (along with the rest of the team). They are family to us and how proud their grandma Ellen Roberts would be to see their photos and good standings in the sports area. The United Methodist Church ladies

HILLTOP COMMENTS was great as usual.You can not find a better breakfast anywhere else. By midday we were getting reports of fish being caught. You should have heard the cheers in the Grange Hall. I am sure they were a bit louder down at the lake. The Sitzmark Ladies did a super job at preparing borscht and chicken soup for lunch. After 3 p.m. it was time to present the winners of the raffles. I apologize for not getting the names of the winners but it was quite loud and hard to hear. You Winners know who you are, and Congratulations. I was not able to connect with the Pinochle winners for Monday, Jan. 12. I am sure I can find out

Certified Nursing NURSING Assistants provide HOME NEWS hands on care SUBMITTED BY NURSING HOME SUCCESS TEAM

Nursing Homes, like other healthcare providers, employ a wide variety of skilled professionals. For residents of a nursing home the most crucial of these employees is the CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant). The CNA or (NAC-Nursing AssistantCertified) is the person who does the hands on care, assisting each resident with all the daily activities they are no longer able to do for themselves. The ”aides” come into the healthcare system at entry level wages after 6-8 weeks of training and passing a state exam. They are the first to see any changes in a residents’

condition, the first to hear what a resident needs to express, and their interactions with residents are intimate and caring. We can look around our community and see many folks who have moved into long term healthcare careers, who took their first step as a CNA. Nurses, Medical Assistants, X-Ray techs, Dietary Services, Administrators, Masseuses, and Therapists of all sorts can be found in our county; many got their start through the NAC program offered at North Valley Hospital. The CNAs who are caring, dedicated and loyal enough to remain in the profession as caregivers in a nursing home deserve extra accolades, because it is the most physically and emotionally demanding

Two speakers coming up in January SUBMITTED BY BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

On Tuesday, Jan. 27 at 11 11 a.m. we will be featuring Becky Desjardins (of Hometown Pizza fame) and Kay Sibley, from Borderlands Historical Society as speakers.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Our computers have arrived, and Tilly is prepping them for our classes. We will keep you posted as to when classes begin. The County Association meeting on Jan. 16 went well. The executive directors for OCTN and IHCCW were there to talk and answer questions. The meet-

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have been manufacturing Raggedy Ann regaining strength, so they can return to and Andy dolls for a lot of years and their own home in Tonasket. And Dave although the concept of that story is very Reynolds is home after being in hospital old, the dolls still remain a in Wenatchee. popular item today. They’re Word has been received soft and cuddly and washable of the death of Ted Hirst, and keep-able and fun for brother of Bob and father of young and old. Tedi Lynn Hirst. Did you know the secret to There is nothing like a big happiness is a good sense of bouquet of tulips, in the midhumor and a bad memory? dle of January to make one What could have been, think spring! A winter birtheven worse, was the recent day isn’t so bad. As a child car/logging truck accident my birthday wasn’t somewhen Allie Miller had a colthing filled with presents lision, near Tonasket. Allie THIS & THAT because it was so close to is the daughter of Scott and Joyce Emry Christmas, but I did always Benie Miller and grandhave an angel food cake. daughter of Judy and Don Now, at my age, I’m just Beanblossom. She was airlifted to glad to be alive! Yeah! Fox broadcasting Spokane but reports were she was in is back on Dish Network. stable but painful condition. Judy was A Gonzaga basketball game against already in Spokane, as Brandy, their a team that was set out to win, because other daughter was in the hospital with they hadn’t done so in 13 years, was just pneumonia. about too much for me, but one point can Other folks having health issues are do the trick! Beverly Storm, Grant and Steve Lewis. And then there is football. I don’t get And word has been received that Jim excited about that because I don’t know and Sandra Chittenden, will be away, the game. But this I do know, if I had two perhaps until spring, where they are thousand dollars, I sure wouldn’t use it receiving therapy and or treatment for for admittance to the Super Bowl game.

for next week. Go Seahawks! Only one more win and we are on our way to Arizona and the Super Bowl. Just in case you have come across cars parked in the middle of our local roads with people, cameras, and telescopes looking off in the distance and wondered who and what they are doing, they are called “Birder” and they are here to watch our local birds. I have been told that we have quite a few birds that are only found in our area. I know some of us are familiar with these birds but others are not. Birders beware, try and get your cars and people off to the side of the road. Thank you. Whoop, Whoop, Whoop. The Did it. They did the impossible. What a Game! Now on to Arizona and the Super Bowl. We will be watching. Until next week position in the healthcare world. These CNAs become and are the families that some of our residents do not have. This week we experienced an extraordinary and very personal incident. One of our NACs, Susan Davis, found a co-worker non-responsive, without respirations and turning blue. Susan was able to initiate CPR immediately and maintain it for 20 minutes while her co-worker was transported to the hospital where the code was taken over by Emergency Staff. Her training and quick response has saved this co-worker’s life and deeply affected all of us who work with them. We recognize Susan for the true professional that she is and are thankful to have her as a member of the North Valley Extended Care team. We honor our committed CNAs and thank them for all that they do.

Still looking for another NVCS Board Member SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Coming up this week North Valley Community School would like to offer the following classes: Navigating Through Windows 7 - Thursday, Jan. 22. Do you feel like you’re the only one still running Windows 7 on your computer? You’re not! Nearly 10 times as many computers are running Windows 7 as are running Windows 8. This class will teach you how to get around in Windows 7 quickly and efficiently. Bring your computer and your questions! Financial Wellness - Monday,

I have had a wonderful friendship with one of my classmates in Missouri, for about 75 years, and she called during the Gonzaga game Saturday. Ya gotta’ know she is special because I didn’t tell I was busy and couldn’t talk just then. (but, I did keep my eye on the score, once in a while). On a slushy, messy Saturday night we went out to attend the humorous works of Patrick McManus, which was very well done, at the high school commons. Little did we know it was snowing all the while we were laughing up a storm inside the building, but it was the kind of snow, that was almost rain. The function was sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce, to bring a little entertainment and fun into the community. The president of the chamber, Clyde Andrews, announced that 19 fish had been caught at the fishing derby at Molson lakes, earlier in the day that was also sponsored by the chamber. After some very anxious moments last Sunday the Seattle Seahawks did win the game and off they go to the Super Bowl. And I still wouldn’t pay the exorbitant admittance fee needed to get into the stadium.

THE LEARNING TREE Jan. 26- There is a lot more involved in healthy living than sleeping, eating and exercising. Financial Wellness is also important for a healthy life. This class will teach you the basics of budgeting, paying down debt, and planning your financial future. Hum Humm Hummus -Tuesday, Jan. 27 - Do you hum for hummus? Come learn how to make this delicious and healthful dip/snack/spread/

meal! Simple and tasty, hummus is best homemade. Whip it up and help your body hum with health! Rock Painting - Thursday, Jan. 29 - Do you have an imagination and a creative side? Come spend an evening bringing that imagination alive. Take a good look at your rock, then use your imagination and creativity to bring alive what you see. This class is for adults. Desktop Publishing with MS Word - Thursday, Jan. 29 Learn to use MS Word to create flyers, posters and more. To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 476-2011 or check out North Valley Community School online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com! NVCS is still searching for a board member. Do you have ideas or opinions? If you do, we can use you on the NVCS board of directors! Call Ellen at 509-476-2011.

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Tonasket Gun Inland Empire Spokesman Review Club 16 YARD Telephonic Shoot 24 Noah Olmstead SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE & TONASKET GUN CLUBS

Oroville Gun Club It was a nice day and a fun bunch showed up. Sometimes it seems like we do more talking than shooting. Scores are: 25 Logan Faris 22 Bob Peterson 22 Vern Cole 19 Scott Peterson 14 Paul Schwilke

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JANUARY 22, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR TIME TO GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will celebrate 20 years of talent shows with a theme of Sentimental Journey. They are hoping to welcome new talent as well as show some of our favorite performers (which is pretty much everyone) from the last 20 years. Call Clare Paris at 509486-1199 to sign up for the show. The 20th Annual CCC Talent Show will be at the center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket, on Saturday, Feb. 7, at 6:30 p.m. A baked potato supper will precede it, at 5:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help set up and clean up, prepare and serve food, bake desserts for the bake sale and help at the door. Call Janet Culp at 509-486-2061 to sign up to help. Volunteers see the show for free.

Tonasket Chamber Banquet TONASKET - The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce officer installation and awards banquet will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 21 from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket.

Superintendent Search Begins TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board is starting the process for the new superintendent search and is inviting the public to attend a meeting with Doug Asbjornsen, the search consultant, on Wednesday, Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. in the district board room. At the meeting, Asbjornsen will explain the search process and will be seeking input from community members.

Helping With Homework 101 OROVILLE - North Valley Community School Class Helping With Homework, two sessions, Tuesday, Jan. 20 and 27 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Get help for your help! As a sixth grade teacher Ila Hall will give you hints and tips on how to best help your child with Math and English homework, grades K-8. Bring your child or come alone.

Martincak at Winery OROVILLE – Esther Bricques Winery brings a musical jam session organized by Andy Martincak to the Tasting Room this Thursday, Jan. 22. Andy and the Gang will provide a wide range of musical styles for this performance Doors open at 6:30 p.m., with music to follow. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861 or check out the Events page on www.estherbricques.com.

Navigating Through Windows OROVILLE - North Valley Community School Class, Navigating Through Windows 7, one session, Thursday, Jan. 22 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. You are not the only one... nearly 10 times as many computers are running Windows 7 as are running Windows 8. We’ll show you how to get around in Windows 7 more efficiently and with greater flare. Bring your computer and your questions. Instructor: Clyde Andrews.

School Commons area. For $5, attendees will get two soft tacos with all the fixings and a drink (pop or water). Please come out and support the Junior class as well as the Tonasket Tigers and Okanogan Bulldogs basketball teams.

School Retirees Meeting OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will hold a no-host luncheon meeting at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 27, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. Bring books to exchange and items for homeless students. Information: Jennie at 509-4222954.

Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - The next meeting of the Stroke Support Group will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 28 at 10:30 p.m. in the Free Methodist Church at 1516 Fir St., Oroville. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a guest speaker and discussion. There will also be refreshments.

Community Action Meeting OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, January 28, 2015, at 5:15 pm at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization. We work with community members of all groups to raise the poor out of poverty, to feed the hungry, to provide affordable housing for all, to empower community members through education, and in the process to return prosperity and hope for the future to our county. If you have questions or need additional information please contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, 509-422-4041.

Care Net ‘Tea’ Party

OROVILLE - North Valley Community School Class Financial Wellness, one session, Monday, Jan. 26 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. This class will teach you the basics of budgeting, paying down debt, and planning your financial future. A workbook will be provided. Instructor: Heather Brownlee.

OROVILLE - Care Net is having a “Tea” party on Saturday, Jan 31 at 2 p.m. to celebrate with supporters and introduce other community members and organizations to Care Net. If you love Care Net please come. If you don’t know much about us please come and learn about our programs and the tremendous value Care Net is to the community. The meeting will be held at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir St.

Taco Feed Prom Fundraiser

First Aid & CPR Class

Financial Wellness

TONASKET - Juniors at Tonasket High School will be putting on a Taco Feed fundraiser to raise money for the 2015 prom. The taco feed will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 27 during the home basketball game against Okanogan. The event will be from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and will be located in the Tonasket High

Diabetes Support Group TONASKET - A Diabetes Support Group will next meet on Tuesday, Feb. 3 (the first Tuesday of each month) from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the boardroom at North Valley Hospital, 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket. This setting will give people an opportunity to ask questions and participate in discussion with other community members touched by diabetes. The discussion will be facilitated by a Certified Diabetes Educator. For more information see www. nvhospital.org or phone 509-4862151.

Green Okanogan Fundraiser TONASKET - Green Okanogan will be having a fundraiser auction and membership drive at the Community Cultural Center on Saturday, Feb. 14. Silent auction and music from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dinner ($10) and live auction start at 7 p.m. Love your community and the Earth by helping Green Okanogan open a recycling center and restore this spring in Tonasket at 3 Rodeo Dr. (Across from Baker’s Acres). To donate auction items call Janet at 509-486-2061. For more info or to volunteer call Carol at 509-556-2250.

NCCS Open House First Aid & CPR Class Event OROVILLE - North Country Christian School is sponsoring a little open house during their regular homeschool hours of 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Oroville Public Library Annex for National School Choice Week. They will have some refreshments and things to look at, discuss.

OROVILLE - A First Aid and CPR Class will be held on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 2, 3, and 4 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For information call Ben Hylton at 509223-3412, leave message.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

NW Ice Fishing Festival Pinewood Derby winners were: Youth: Speed - 1st, Isaha Willsi; 2nd, Cash DeVon; 3rd, Shilow Willis. Best Looking Car - Shiloh Wills Most Unique Car - Kaden Pitts (not pictured). Adult: Speed - 1st Damon Albright, 2nd, Shane DeVon; 3rd, Stephanie Albright. Best Looking Car - Damon Albright Most Unique Car - Stephanie Alrbight.

TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (English) will be held on Saturday, Feb. 21 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 LommisOroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412, leave message.

First Aid & CPR Class TONASKET - A First Aid and CPR Class (Spanish) will be held on Saturday, Feb. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Whitestone Church basement, 577 LommisOroville Rd. Bring a sack lunch and pillow. For information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412, leave message.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-4762386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 22, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 22, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

Announcements

SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Abby at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

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For Rent

1 BR $650 Country home, where horses are your “neigh�-bors. Sunny living room with atrium doors. Leads to patio and back yard. Overlooks river valley! Beautifully appointed kitchen. Full bath with storage and laundry room. Spacious walk-in closet. Oroville. 509-429-7823. 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433 CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475.month. Call 509-223-3433

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 Oroville WESTLAKE RD. Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. New carpet, storage shed, computer room. $775/mo, first & last. Need reference. Call 509476-3214

SUN LAKES REALTY 4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; 2+ BR house $700; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

TONASKET 1 BEDROOM for $495. Close to town. All appliances. Water and sewer paid. 509-486-1682 or 509429-0873.

WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces 2 RV SPACES

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays. FOUND CAT: A very nice, well fed black cat strolled in thru my doggy door Saturday Eve and has made itself at home. Is it yours? 4th & Main Oroville. Call: Day 509-4762241 or Eve 476-2625

Help Wanted OCCDA

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Announcements CRAB DINNER American Legion Post 84 is holding their annual crab dinner on Saturday, Feb 14th at 6 pm Tickets are $25 each and can be purchased at the Lounge or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique on Main St. Only 150 presale tickets, no tickets at the door. FIRST AID & CPR CLASS will be held on February 2nd, 3rd & 4th, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow for the first night. For information, call Ben Hylton 509-223-3412 leave message. PRESS RELEASE The Okanogan Conservation District Board of Supervisors hereby informs the voting public that the incumbent has been re-elected to the currently open seat by reason of being the only person filing for the position by the filing deadline. Therefore, no poll site, absentee balloting or mail balloting will be performed pursuant to WAC 135-110-370. For further information, please contact the District at (509) 422-0855 ext. 111.

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BILINGUAL CLASS AIDE – Oroville. Assists teacher in classroom activities and function as part of the teaching team. Will provide translation services to families and children. High School/GED, WA Drivers license required. Previous experience providing services to pre-school children and families preferred. Salary 9.47 - 10.13 per hr. DOE. 30 hrs. per wk. Bilingual/Spanish required. CLASS AIDE – Tonasket Assist teacher in classroom activities and function as part of the teaching team. High School/GED, WA Drivers license required. Previous experience providing services to pre-school children and families preferred. Salary 9.47 - 10.13 per hr. DOE. 30 hrs. per wk. Bilingual/Spanish preferred. Applications obtained at 101 4thAve.W – Omak. Send application, cover letter and resume’ for either position to: OCCDA - P.O. Box 1844 – Omak, WA 98841. EOE

Veterans’ Relief Assistant Are you a veteran and want to be of assistance to other veterans? Okanogan County may have just the position for you. Okanogan County is currently recruiting for the position of Veteran’s Relief Assistant. For more information and application instructions, see the full posting at www.okanogancounty.org.

Current Employment Opportunity at www.soundpublishing.com

REPORTER NEEDED

The Okanogan Valley Gazette Tribune, a division of Sound Publishing Inc. is seeking a general assignment reporter with writing experience and photography skills. This position is based out of the Oroville, WA office. Primary coverage will be city government, business, and general assignment stories; and could include sports coverage. Schedule may include some evening and/or weekend work. As a reporter for Sound Publishing, you will be expected to: • use a digital camera to take photographs of the stories you cover; • layout pages, using InDesign; • post on the publication’s web site; • shoot and edit videos for the web . • blog and use Twitter on the web; The most highly valued traits are: • commitment to community journalism and everything from short, brief-type stories about people and events to examining issues facing the community; • to be inquisitive and resourceful in the coverage of assigned beats;

• • • •

to be comfortable producing five bylined stories a week; the ability to write stories that are tight and to the point; to be a motivated self-starter; to be able to establish a rapport with the community.

Candidates must have excellent communication and organizational skills, and be able to work effectively in a deadline-driven environment. Minimum of one year of previous newspaper experience is required. Position also requires use of personal vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver's License and proof of active vehicle insurance. We offer a competitive hourly wage and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Email us your cover letter, resume, and include five examples of your best work showcasing your reporting skills and writing chops to: hreast@soundpublishing.com ATTN: HR/OVGT Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Health General

Health General

Statewides particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Patient Accounts Rep. full time Dental Assistant part time on an as needed basis Dentist 2 Full time Omak Medical: MA– C Full time. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job. Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time, shift is split between Jay Ave medical & Brewster Dental clinics WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN Part time, on an as needed basis position. English/ Spanish bilingual required due to business need. Roomer Part time/24 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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PRACTICE MANAGER TONASKET Confluence Health is growing! We are looking for a Practice Manager III for the Tonasket Clinic. This is an upper level management position. The Practice Manager III manages the overall operations of the practice, ensuring a vision and strategy for future growth. The Practice Manager III partners with a physician manager to implement and manage all aspects of the medical practice to support the strategic initiatives of Confluence Health. This position promotes high levels of satisfaction with patients, providers and staff through proactively addressing concerns through meaningful measures and interventions. To learn more about these opportunities and to apply on-line, please go to wvmedical.com and click on the Careers tab. If you’d like to speak with a Recruiter directly, please email us at Jobs@confluencehealth.org or call 509.665.7906

Business Opportunities

DINER FOR LEASE Lease this fully equipped and established 1950’s themed Diner at Veranda Beach Resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington. This is an exciting business opportunity for an experienced and successful food and beverage operator with catering capabilities. The Veranda Beach Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Jim Hammond for details jim@legendresorts.com Check out our website www. verandabeach.com

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JANUARY 19, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a

PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train at home to process Medical Billing & Insurance Claims! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at Bryan University! HS Diploma/ GED & Computer/Internet needed. 1-877-259-3880 REAL ESTATE ***WASHINGTON-Dream-LAND for PENNIES on the Dollar. MOTIVATED SELLER> Opportunity of YOUR Life Time. Visit www.RoheyLand.com or call 1-800-258-3004 Now

Public Notices Basic Service Annual Ad Skyline Telecom is a quality telecommunications services provider that provides basic and enhanced services at reasonable rates within its service territory. Basic services are offered at the following rates: Single Party Residence Service, Monthly Service Charge, $19.50; Single Party Business Service, $25.00; Federal Subscriber Line Charge - Single Line, $6.50: Access Recovery Charge- Single Line $1.50 Touch Tone Service: Touch Tone service is provided as a part of local service rate. Toll Blocking: Available at no charge; Emergency 911 Services: Surcharges for 911 services are assessed according to government policy. Low-income individuals may be eligible for Federal and State Lifeline telephone assistance programs that include discounts from the above basic and local service charges. Basic services are offered to all consumers in the Skyline Telecom service territory at the rates, terms and conditions specified in the Company’s tariffs. If you have any questions regarding the Company’s services, please call us at (888) 7824680. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 22, 2015. #OVG611329 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF BENTON In the Matter of the Estate of: William K Smith, Deceased. No. 14-4-00524-0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 15, 2015. William C Smith P.O Box 4428 W. Richland WA. 99353, Personal Representative Court of Probate Proceedings: BENTON COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT Cause No. 14-4-00524-0 Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette Tribune. January 22, 29, February 5, 2015. #OVG610321

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JANUARY 22 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE January 22, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Legals Continued From Previous Page

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

MATION The modified permit and fact sheet addendum may be viewed at: https://fortress.wa.gov/ecy/ wqreports/public/ f?p=110:302:3939967066958930::N O:RP:P302_PERMIT_NUMBER WA0052434 . The application and other related documents are available at Ecology’s Central Regional Office for inspection and copying between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., weekdays. To obtain a copy or to arrange to view copies at the Central Regional Office, please call 509/575-2027 or write to the address below. Interested persons are invited to submit written comments regarding the proposed permit. All comments must be submitted by February 22, 2015 to be considered for the final determination. E-mail comments should be sent to cynthia.huwe@ecy.wa.gov . Written comments should be sent to: Cynthia Huwe Department of Ecology Central Regional Office 15 West Yakima Avenue, Suite 200 Yakima, WA 98902 Any interested party may request a public hearing on the proposed permit within 30 days of the publication date of this notice. The request for a hearing shall state the interest of the party and the reasons why a hearing is necessary. The request should be sent to the above address. Ecology will hold a hearing if it determines that there is significant public interest. If a hearing is to be held, public notice will be published at least 30 days in advance of the hearing date. Any party responding to this notice with comments will be mailed a copy of a hearing public notice. If you require special accommodations or need this document in a format for the visually impaired, call Cindy Huwe at 509-457-7105. Per-

sons with hearing loss can call 711 for Washington Relay Service. Persons with a speech disability can call 877-833-6341. Publication date of this Notice is January 22, 2015. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 22, 2015. #OVG611224

Washington State Transportation Improvement Board, and other state and federal funding programs. As a result, a number of the state and federal equal opportunity and affirmative action requirements will apply to the selection process and throughout the City’s projects. An engineering firm will be considered for selection based on overall firm qualifications, experience, personnel, professional reputation, experience with funding programs, and other criteria determined by the City. Tonasket will select the firm it deems to be the most qualified and in the overall best interests of the City. Tonasket reserves the right to reject any and all submittals. The City of Tonasket is an equal opportunity employer and affirmative action employer. Minority- and Women-owned businesses are encouraged to submit statements of qualification. Statements shall be submitted to Alice Attwood, Clerk-Treasurer, at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave, P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA. 98855 no later than 4:00 PM on Friday, February 13th, 2015. Each envelope shall be labeled “Engineering Services”. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 22, 29, 2015. #OVG611239

claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: January 15, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Glenna Hauenstein, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 22, 29, 2015. #OVG609717

any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: Jan. 15, 2015. /s/Linda Aronson Linda Aronson, Personal Representative Kristina K. McMullin Attorney for Personal Representative Garlington, Lohn & Robinson, PLLP PO Box 7909 Missoula, MT 59807 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 22, 29, 2015. #OVG609066

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty 0.46)1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is to place the rating numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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Puzzle 10 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

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Puzzle 7 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.71)

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Subscribe to the...

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com 6. Basin for holy water

species in Australia 22. On the fence

7. Use of black magic

24. Corolla part

8. Victorian, in a way

25. “C’___ la vie!”

9. Feminine

26. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g.

10. Above

28. Food preparation instructions

11. Chap

31. Wee

12. Angler’s gear

33. Religious image: Var. 34. Sago palm

13. Wearing a jewelled, semicircular crown

37. ___ Grove Village, Ill.

17. Animal catcher

38. Accomplishments

21. Frillier

39. Busiest

23. Lid or lip application

40. Kind of park

27. Book of maps

42. Devoid of reverence

29. Detachable container

44. E.P.A. concern

30. “Star Trek” rank: Abbr.

45. Sun, e.g.

31. Earn (2 wds)

48. Having threads

32. Cut corners

50. Associate

34. Bean counter, for short

52. Catches

35. Churchyard tree in “Romeo and Juliet”

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56. Arctic bird

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59. Schuss, e.g.

55. Mezzo Berganza

36. Type of leather 38. College conferrals

57. Dizzy

40. Catherine the Great, e.g. 41. Disinclined

60. Broadcasting (hyphenated)

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ANSWERS

Medium, difficulty rating 0.46

Across

43. Skiing in a zigzag course

61. Indications

45. Antsy (2 wds)

62. Appetite 1. PC “brain”

63. Award-winning record producer

4. Boito’s Mefistofele, e.g.

64. After expenses

12. Peter, Paul or Mary

Sponsored by

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16. Woodwind instrument similar to an oboe (2 wds)

509-476-3602

18. Family head

52. “Duck soup!”

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Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

53. Microwave, slangily

1. Narrow open boats with pointed ends

54. One of the two main branches of Islam

2. Am. hickory tree with bitter seeds

19. Ancient Greek inhabitant of Attica

3. Dark

20. Group of plants with 700

5. Advil target

47. Slender nails 51. Coach

Down

14. Cast member 15. Absorbed, as a cost

46. Forwarded 49. Fit for a king

9. Delay

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Puzzle 11 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.62)

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Puzzle 8 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

ANSWERS

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of GLENN M. HAUENSTEIN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00120-8 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Glenna Hauenstein as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY Estate of ELAINE M. SILTMAN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00121-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by

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NOTICE: ANNOUNCEMENT OF AVAILABILITY OF DRAFT MODIFIED PERMIT PERMIT NO.: WA0052434 APPLICANT: CROWN RESOURCES CORPORATION FACILITY: BUCKHORN MOUNTAIN MINE Crown Resources Corporation Buckhorn Mountain Mine has requested a modification of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit No. WA0052434 in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 90.48 Revised Code of Washington (RCW), Chapter 173-220 Washington Administrative Code (WAC), and the Federal Clean Water Act. Following evaluation of the SEPA Addendum and other available information, a draft modified permit has been developed which would allow the addition of Outfall 006 through infiltration. This outfall will be located on private property about 400 feet northwest of the Upper Portal entrance to the underground mine near the Buckhorn Mountain. This area contains an approximate 0.7 -acre depression (small swale) with topographic outlet to the west that drains into South Fork Bolster Creek basin. All discharges to be in compliance with the Department of Ecology’s Water Quality Standards for a permit to be issued. A tentative determination has been made to issue a proposed permit based on the effluent limitations and special permit conditions that will prevent and control pollution. A final determination will not be made until all timely comments received in response to this notice have been evaluated. PUBLIC COMMENT AND INFOR-

REQUEST FOR STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS (RSQ) For PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SERVICES The City of Tonasket, pursuant to (Chapter 61, Laws of 1981), is inviting statements of qualifications and performance information from consulting engineering firms for the year 2015 to provide engineering services and architectural design related to water, wastewater, streets, sidewalks, storm drainage systems and other city owned facilities. Services may include engineering planning, reports, project designs, funding applications and assistance, construction administration and inspection, environmental reviews, rate studies and other work as directed. The City’s current project “Rehabilitate the Sewer Collection System Serving the Community of Parry’s Acreage” is partially funded through the Washington State Community Development Block Grant Program with federal funds provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Potential future projects are water and sewer improvements and street projects. Funding sources on subsequent projects may include the Washington State Community Development Grant Program and other funding agencies such as USDA Rural Development, Washington State Department of Ecology, Drinking Water State Revolving Fund Program,

Sudoku 9

Skyline Telecom is an equal opportunity provider and employer. If you wish to file a Civil Rights Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/ complaint_filing_cust.html or at any USDA office, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information requested in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 22, 2015. #OVG611327

Public Notices

1

OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT SMALL WORKS ROSTER The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District maintains a Small Works Roster to the completion of public works projects in accordance with District’s Resolution No. 2010-02, and RCW 39.04.155 provisions. The maximum cost for any project cannot exceed $300,000.00 which included the costs of labor, material, equipment and sales and/or use taxes as applicable. All interested contractors not currently on the Small Works Roster are encouraged to submit an application at this time. Small Works Roster application can be obtained and submitted to the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, PO Box 1729; Oroville, WA 98844. Inquiries and requests for applications may be directed to the manager at 509-476-3696. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 22, 2015. #OVG610852

Public Notices

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Public Notices

PAGE A9 9

58. “Don’t give up!”

4. “___, humbug!”

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Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

REAL ESTATE GUIDE 7

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If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home! SUN LAKES REALTY

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Lake Osoyoos View Home and so much more! This home sits on approx 1.67 acres, has a terrific layout, and is bright & spacious. Master suite has its own floor and balcony. There is a 2 car garage, and newer shop/4 car garage, with attached guest quarters. A stable with fenced pasture too! Great location! MLS#715611 $285,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide.

— HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS — De-Cluttering Solutions for Your Home

Pack up all your knickknacks, anything that is sitting on top of a countertop, table or other flat surfaces. Anything that you haven’t used in at least a year? Give away what you can, throw away or donate unused items.

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 22 2015

LOCAL SPORTS

Juarez, Knowlton eat pie

STANDINGS AND SCHEDULES GIRLS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Oroville Lk Roosevelt Brewster Liberty Bell Bridgeport Tonasket Manson

8 5 4 5 2 2 2 2

Overall W

L

0 2 2 3 5 6 6 6

13 8 5 6 2 3 2 5

L

0 5 6 7 9 9 11 9

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Left, Tonasket’s Jorge Juarez and Libery Bell’s Meritt Fink faced off in a high-profile match in which both have beaten the other this season. Juarez came out on top, 8-4. Above, Tonasket’s Frank Holfeltz earned a victory in the third place match at the Tigers’ Apple Pie Invitational on Saturday.

Tonasket hosts annual Apple Pie Invitational BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

TONASKET - Jan. 17, 2015 - Warden, Liberty Bell and Tonasket are ranked as the top three Class B teams by the Washington Wrestling Report. Whether or not that is true is open for debate and will be decided for certain at the Tacoma Dome in February. But with just about everyone missing a couple of key wrestlers due to illness or injury, those three all placed in the top four out of 10 teams at Tonasket’s annual Apple Pie Invitational on Saturday. Warden won the team title with 227 points over second place Chewelah (ranked seventh in Class 1A), followed by the Tigers (177), Mountain Lions (128) and Chelan (124). Warden particularly dominated the lower weights, sweeping the four lightweight classes, and went 6-2 in championship matches (with teammates facing off at 285 pounds) and 2-1 in third place matches. Chewelah finished with four champions, while Tonasket and Liberty Bell each had two champs. Of Tonasket’s two champions, one was somewhat expected, the other was a surprise. Jorge Juarez (145) could take nothing for granted as he faced off against Liberty Bell defending state champion Meritt Fink, who had already beaten Juarez this season. This time was Juarez’s turn to take the top spot on the podium as he battled to an 8-4 victory. Austin Knowlton (170) was just glad to be back on the mat;

he ended up with one of Kelly Denison’s apple pies after he pinned three straight opponents, including Chelan’s defending fourth place medalist Juan Garcia in the championship match. Knowlton injured his knee in the opening game of the football season last September and the odds of his making it back in time to qualify for the district meets at one time seemed remote. Despite the long layoff, Knowlton appeared as strong, if not as quick, as he’d hoped to be coming into his senior season. The Tigers also had runners-up in Devin Walton (113), Vance Frazier (120) and Trevor Peterson (132). Walton upset Kettle Falls’ third-ranked Justin Volking in the semifinals before losing to second-ranked Mikey Canales - a two-time defending 1A medalist - in the finals. Frazier beat Oroville’s Drake Fox in the semifinals before losing to Warden’s Josiah Guerra in the championship match. Peterson took on three highlyranked opponents in his three matches, edging third-ranked Peter Manville of Warden 4-1 in the semifinals and losing a tough 3-2 championship match to Chewelah’s Kyle Connall (3rd ranked in 1A). Tim Freese (113), Rycki Cruz (138) and Frank Holfeltz (195) each took third with Zach Lofthus (160) taking fourth.

Leo Curiel (132), Brandon Baugher (152), and Scotty Hartvig (160) had two wins each while Jeff Rounds (113) and Charles Arrigoni (182) picked up single victories in what was the toughest tournament the Hornets will enter this season with it’s freshman-loaded squad.

TONASKET 41, OMAK 40 OMAK - Even longtime Tonasket wrestling coach Dave Mitchell said he’d never seen anything quite like it. The Tigers eked out a nonleague dual match with Omak on Tuesday 41-40 thanks to an unlikely series of events that tilted an odd night the Tigers’ way. With six forfeits and six pins, the match turned on the two matches that went the distance.

BY BRENT BAKER

TONASKET - Free throw shooting proved to be the difference Friday as Manson earned a 55-47 boys basketball victory at Tonasket. The Tigers did themselves in with a 3-for-21 performance at the free throw line. The Trojans outscored the Tigers 17-6 in the fourth quarter in part because Tonasket hit just 2-of-10 charity shots in the quarter. “We didn’t play very well,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “We didn’t have anywhere near the energy we had when we play someone like Oroville. But we still would have won if we’d have shot 50 percent at the line, and even that wouldn’t have been

Tigers’ favor. “I thought I had seen it all,” Mitchell said. “Every now and then you find out you’re wrong.” Heading into the final two matches, Tonasket trailed 40-28. The Tigers picked up six points with a forfeit at 182 and needed a pin from Frank Holfeltz (195) to draw even, and he came through with a second period stick. The only other winner on the mat for Tonasket was Devin Walton (120). Tim Freese (113), Vance Frazier (126), Jorge Juarez (152) and Lucas Vugteveen (182) won by forfeit. Omak’s winners were Tyson Sundust (138), Gerald Sam (145), Rowdy Kruse (170) and Michael Quezada (220), with Shyane Steel (106) and Nate Lowry (285) winning by forfeit.

good.” That was about what Manson shot - 8-of-17 - and was indeed the difference. Manson also hit five 3-pointers to Tonasket’s two.† The Tigers headed in at halftime with some momentum after turning an early deficit into a 24-21 lead at the break, but could never extend the lead. Colton Leep led the Tigers (6-6, 3-5 Central Washington League North) with 15 points, with Ethan Bensing adding 13. Bo Charlton paced Manson (6-8, 1-7) with 13 points; Jorge Juarez added 12.

TONASKET 54, BRIDGEPORT 41 TONASKET - Jan. 13, 2015 - Tonasket outscored Bridgeport

0 1 2 3 4 4

L

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2 3 4 6 8 9

BOYS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Brewster Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Liberty Bell Tonasket Oroville Bridgeport Manson

8 7 4 4 3 2 1 1

Overall W

L

0 1 2 3 5 5 7 7

L

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1 2 5 3 6 8 9 8

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Mabton Warden Waterville Soap Lake White Swan Kittitas

6 3 2 2 1 0

Overall W

L

0 2 2 3 3 4

12 7 5 6 3 0

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3 3 5 6 9 10

SCHEDULES JAN. 22-31

Thursday, Jan. 22 WR - Oroville/Selkirk at Republic, 5:00 pm

Saturday, Jan. 24 BB - Warden at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB - Warden at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Oroville at Ephrata Invite, 9:00 am WR - Tonasket at E. Valley (Spokane) Dream Duals, 8:30 am Monday, Jan. 26 BB (JV only) - Liberty Bell at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GB (JV only) - Liberty Bell at Tonasket, 6:00 pm

FOX MEDALS FOR HORNETS Oroville’s lone medalist was 120-pounder Drake Fox, who earned a pin in his third place medal match. Jordan Smith (126) was in one of the toughest brackets of the tourney as one of five defending state medalists and suffered a tough 8-6 defeat in the final seconds of an elimination match.

6 3 2 1 1 1

Friday, Jan. 23 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 4:00/6:00 pm

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Drake Fox was the Hornets’ lone medalist at the Apple Pie Invitational on Saturday.

Free throws prove costly to Tigers HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

Midway through the match, Tonasket’s Trevor Peterson (132) earned a major decision victory over Omak’s James Monaghan. But as Monaghan left the mat he removed his shoulder straps, penalizing the team a point. Later, the Tigers’ Zach Lofthus (160) manage to avoid getting pinned by the Pioneers’ Alex Aguilar. Though Aguilar won by technical fall, that gave Omak just five team points, rather than six. The match ended in a 40-40 tie after the penalty point had been deducted. Winners of wrestling matches are determined by tiebreak criteria, the first of which is the number of points penalized against the two teams. With Tonasket not having been penalized the tiebreak swung in the

Mabton White Swan Kittitas Waterville Warden Soap Lake

Overall W

L

in every quarter on Tuesday to claim a 54-41 victory over visiting Bridgeport. The Tigers struggled to contain the Mustangs’ Bailey Evenson, who led all scorers with 19 points, but held the rest of the Bridgeport squad to 22 points total. “The boys hustled all night,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson of the Tigers’ second straight win. “They forced (Bridgeport) into a lot of mistakes.” The Tigers had their insideoutside combination of Colton Leep and Ethan Bensing clicking for much of the contest. Leep scored 18 points, including 14 after halftime, to lead Tonasket’s scorers. Bensing added 12 points and Adrian McCarthy had nine, including six before the half.

Tonasket girls top Bridgeport BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

TONASKET - Despite a slow start, Tonasket’s girls basketball team cruised past Bridgeport 40-23 on Tuesday, keyed by a defense that allowed just eight made shots from the field. Bridgeport led 9-8 after one quarter, but the Tigers outscored the Fillies 23-8 in the second half. Jaden Vugteveen scored 14 points, including 10 in the second half, to lead the Tigers. Kayla Willis tallied seven points - all in the second half - and Johnna Terris added six.

Sarah Rios paced Bridgeport (3-7, 2-5) with eight points.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Thursday, Jan. 29 WR - Liberty Bell/Eastmont JV, 6:00 pm Friday, Jan. 30 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt BB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 4:00/6:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 31 WR - Tonasket & Oroville at CWL Mix & Match (Kittitas)

MANSON 27, TONASKET 23 TONASKET - Manson won a defensive struggle on Friday despite outscoring Tonasket in just one quarter. Tonasket led 6-4 after one quarter, but Manson’s 10-2 run in the second gave the Trojans a 14-8 halftime lead. The Tigers were never able to make up the deficit in the lowscoring contest. Rose Walts led the Tigers (2-11, 2-6 CWL North) with six points.

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Tuesday, Jan. 27 BB (JV/Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:00/6:00 pm WR - Tonasket at Okanogan, 6:00 pm

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JANUARY 22, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

LOCAL SPORTS

Hornets can’t overcome Bulldogs Oroville gives Brewster a Battle BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OKANOGAN - Oroville’s girls basketball team has shown there’s a pretty big gap between themselves and the teams below them in the Central Washington League North Division standings. But not nearly so big as the gap between the Hornets and the front-running Okanogan Bulldogs, who torched the Hornets 61-29 on Friday in the second meeting of the season between the league’s top two teams. The score was nearly the same as Okanogan’s 55-29 victory over Oroville in December, but that’s where the similarities between those two games ended. The first time around, Oroville stayed within a point of

Okanogan into the third quarter. This time, the Bulldogs put the hammer down from the opening tip and didn’t let up until the game was safely in hand. That meant a 52-13 lead after three quarters as Okanogan dominated defensively and on the glass. Meanwhile, the Hornets had to pick their poison - Jill Townsend posting up inside for 18 points, a combined eight 3-pointers coming from Jordyn Boesel (16 points) and Alexis Jones (12 points). “There was nothing we could do with them,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “Townsend is just a beast inside. When we collapsed our defense on her, she’s such a great passer, she always found the open shooter. And they have way to many of those. “I’ll be shocked if anyone

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Hannah Hilderbrand and Faith Martin (rear) scrap with Okanogan for a loose ball.

beats them, even (at State).” One team that might be capable of beaten the Bulldogs is former Caribou Trail League-mate Cashmere, whom Okanogan travels to play Jan. 22 in what should be a highly-competitive non-league matchup. In the meantime, the Bulldogs are rampaging through the CWL, and Friday’s win over Oroville showed how much the league as a whole is overmatched. The Hornets have beaten most other league teams by 30 or 40 points an outing. But against Okanogan the Hornets’ best offense for three quarters seemed to be the half-court shot: Lily Hilderbrand, who had no room to operate in the paint, nearly hit a desperation buzzer beater at halftime. And at the end of the third quarter Mikayla Scott did happen to hit one. She went on to hit two more treys in the fourth quarter, but it was much too little, too late. It’s not likely to get easier in future seasons as Okanogan has just one senior as well as a core of six sophomores that included the three leading scorers in Friday’s game. Okanogan improved to 13-0 (8-0 CWL North) with the win. Lily Hilderbrand finished with 12 points, Scott had 11 and Hannah Hilderbrand six to account for all of the Hornets’ (8-5, 5-2) scoring. Oroville 62, Brewster 36 BREWSTER - The Hornets finished strong last Tuesday at Brewster, outscoring the Bears 35-15 in the second half to claim their first win over Brewster since Mike Bourn returned to Oroville five seasons ago. Lily Hilderbrand scored 27 points, mostly while battling Brewster’s Markie Miller in the paint. Hannah Hilderbrand scored 14 and Mikayla Scott added 10 for the Hornets. Miller was the only double figure scorer for Brewster with 18 points.

BY BRENT BAKER

HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

BREWSTER Leagueleading Brewster did what was expected Tuesday in defeating Oroville. But the Bears’ 70-51 defeat of the Hornets was anything but routine as Oroville showed it could well be that team lurking in the weeds that could ruin someone’s season on the right night. Despite missing starters Cade Smith and Timbo Taylor, the Bears still had a huge size advantage inside as the Hornets have no one to match up with Josh Hammons or Chance Williams in the paint. The Hornets didn’t back down, and the Bears didn’t get the ball inside throughout the first half. Brewster, which has been winning its league games by an average of 35 points, trailed for much of the first half and led 28-24 at halftime. A Bryce Glover free throw to lead off the third quarter cut the Brewster lead to 28-25. But from there Brewster - led by Hammons eight points from point blank range - exploded, blasting the Hornets with a 29-10 third quarter to take control. Back-to-back treys by Edgar Najera and four points by Mitch Boesel capped the third quarter and Hammons led off the fourth quarter with a hoop to cap a 31-9 run. “Some of that was us,” said Oroville coach Jay Thacker. “But most of that was that they’re just good.” Thacker was especially pleased that the Hornets continued to battle to the final buzzer even after the Bears were assured of victory. “Last year when we played well, we played like that for a half,” he said. “This year we’re getting that for three quarters on most nights. If we can get that for a whole four quarters, the second half of the season is going to be a lot of fun.” Hammons led all scorers with 18 points, Najera added 17 and Luke Divis tallied 14 for the Bears (11-1, 7-0 CWL North). Lane Tietje scored 16, Glover added 13 points and 11 rebounds

Brent Baker/submitted photo

ryce Glover battles for a rebound during Oroville’s loss at Brewster last Tuesday. and Dustin Nigg finished with 11 points for Oroville (4-7, 2-4).

OKANOGAN 86, OROVILLE 34 OKANOGAN - The Hornets came out flat and never recovered on Friday at Okanogan as the Bulldogs raced to an 86-34 victory. Okanogan’s Jim Townsend broke a 55-year-old school career scoring record in the win. The game itself got out of hand early as Okanogan’s full court press forced Oroville turnovers by the bushel as the Bulldogs ran up a 29-10 first quarter lead. Even with the press called off after the opening quarter, the lead continued to build behind Townsend’s work in the paint and three 3-pointers from Joey Staggs in the quarter. Okanogan led 54-17 at the half. The only suspense was whether or not Townsend would break

the record on this night; with the Bulldogs’ next three games on the road, he stayed in the contest until about four minutes left, when he knocked down the decades-old mark. It was a disappointing performance for the Hornets, who had played a gritty game in a loss to Brewster on Tuesday but didn’t look like the same team against the Bulldogs.† “I’m not sure who that was out there,” said Oroville coach Jay Thacker. “It was like it wasn’t even the same guys that played Tuesday.” Staggs and Toby Pruitt finished with 13 and Mason Guerrette added 12 for Okanogan (11-2, 7-1 Central Washington League North).† Bryce Glover and Joe Sarmiento each scored nine to pace the Hornets (4-8, 2-5).

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 22, 2015

OBITUARIES

PENNY SMITH Penny Smith, age 72 of Tonasket,m died on Friday, January 16, 2015 at Central Washington Hospital in Wenatchee surrounded by family and friends. She was born November 19, 1942 in Pasadena, Calif. and raised by her adoptive parents Rev. Gilbert and Ellen Prince. She met Robert Smith and on April 2, 1966 they were married. They had two children, Stewart and Tina. They lived in Arcadia, Calif. until 1978 when they moved to Tonasket, Wash. Penny enjoyed watching her grandkids play any sports. She wouldn’t miss a game is she didn’t have to. She also enjoyed playing Bingo, Poker, and Pinochle with her friends. After having to retire due to health issues she continued to volunteer at the Omak Visitor Center for many years. Penny was a member of the Tonasket Eagles Auxiliary. She is survived by her children Christine “Tina” Smith, Stewart (Angela) Smith and Bonnie (Rusty) McMartin; three brothers and three sisters; grandchildren Beau, April, Sara, Cierra, Dustin, Dylan, Austin and Makenna and great grandrandchildren: Kannyan, Saige and Fay. Penny was preceded in death by her parents and her husband Robert A. Smith Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, January 24, 2015 11:00 a.m. at the Tonasket Eagles. Memorials may be made to the Tonasket Eagles Scholarship Fund Bergh Funeral Service & Crematory in care of arrangements

Gene Eldon DeLys Sr.

GENE ELDON DELYS SR. On October 22, 2014, Daddy, Gene Eldon DeLys Sr., headed to the “Klondike Nugget Mine” of his dreams. He passionately loved being on the Similkameen River and gold dredging. Camping, sitting around fires and B-essing as his forte! He could keep the conversation going for hours. He had a brilliant mind and you had to have your “Jeopardy hat” on to keep up. He was always challenging you. In the 1970’s he worked at Lincoln Auto Wrecking in Seattle. Then he started his own wrecking yard at our home in Edmonds, Wash. and called it “The Old Volks Home.” He had a natural ability at mechanics. He specialized in Volkswagens. He always told us to go check the water. We learned to drive in one. We grew up as poor junkyard dogs, but we always had at least a bologna sandwich for school lunch. He always had numerous projects in the works. At one time he had a dune buggy and a J-5 Piper Cub airplane. His yard always exhibited his works in progress. A good auction or yard sale would reel him right in. His mind was always full of new inventions. If it was a good bargain, even if he didn’t need it now, for sure in the future. He liked to dabble and experiment with gardening. He was a very private man and disliked gossip. He showed his emotional and sensitive side quite often and it would make you realize that venerable part of him existed. Compliments had to be extracted out of him like pulling a tooth, but when he did give you one, it was memorable. He also

K-12 expense focus of 2015 legislative debates BY COOPER INVEEN WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA--Washington’s lawmakers have opened this year’s legislative session amid predictions of a long and contentious debate focused on budget and tax votes for the K-12 education system. Lawmakers are confronted with a mountain of expensive problems to solve, ranging from transportation to mental health. But education funding is pivotal. The Washington Supreme Court held the Legislature in contempt last year for engaging in “an ongoing violation of its constitutional duty to K-12 children,” by not adequately funding public education. Combined with the responsibility to fund a classsize initiative passed in the recent election, education will likely take a large chunk out of the budget, creating a deficit that may not be filled without spending cuts and tax increases. Meeting the requirements of the Supreme Court’s decision is

k Thin ! n Gree

estimated to cost around $2 billion, with the class-size initiative expected to tack on another $2 billion. Gov. Jay Inslee is pushing a budget proposal that relies on establishing a 7 percent capitalgains tax, a carbon-emissions tax, an excise tax on vaporizers, a 50-cent-per-pack increase on cigarettes, and various tax break repeals. But the governor’s proposals are under fire as Republican lawmakers question whether tax increases are necessary to fill the spending gap. At an Associated Press pre-session leadership forum Jan. 8, Inslee rejected a charge from Senate budget Chairman Andy Hill, R-Redmond, that the increases were included in his proposed budget as a first rather than last resort. Hill has also denied that the state faces a true budget deficit. “When you do the math, you have to generate additional revenue,” Inslee said, claiming the new taxes will help progressivize Washington’s tax system

more than traditional “fallback” increases on sales and B&O taxes. “If we can tax pollution, which we don’t like, instead of business growth, which we do, that’s a good decision,” he said. “If we can tax higher income folks through a capital-gains tax instead of lower income folks when they buy a pair of shoes, that’s a good decision.” Hill disagrees, however, claiming that talk of a regressive tax system is code for thinking an income tax is needed. “When we raise taxes, we’re taking money out of your pockets, and when we do that, we better be sure that we have exhausted all other ways of spending the existing money we’ve taken out of your pocket,” Hill said. The 2015 legislative session began Monday, Jan. 12. Among the major issues facing the 105-day session are efforts to increase the minimum wage, fix the state’s mental-health system, reduce the rate of poverty-related crimes, and increase cleanup funding for oil train spills.

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went from the French pronunciation and spelling to English. Dad had a long, thick pony tail and beard, which was beautiful. He was very prideful of it, but never said it. Both sides of his parents (DeLys and Pickens) still live just two miles apart in Goodman and Anderson, Mo. He was born on a rural farm during the depression and times were tough. He left home at a young age. His mother used pickle juice to wash up everyone because clean water was scarce. He was the oldest of his siblings. Dad was a good cook. He would bake a pan of beans from scratch, with ham or make it chili. He made a lot of homemade bread. He liked hot peppers and salsa. Coffee wasn’t anything unless you could sift it through your teeth. Daddy fought a strong and defiant war against lung cancer down to the end. He had smoked for 65 years, but quit several months before the diagnosis He said that the worst part about quitting was what to do with your hands, since he always rolled his own. A very, very special thanks to each and every medical personnel he encountered. Especially hospice for their personal care and compassionate support they gave our family. If you want to make a donation please send to the OK-snip Veterinarian Clinic in Okanogan, Wash. They have helped control our pet population through donations.

DENTISTRY

Events planned at Omak PAC and Vicki’s Backdoor Club in Oroville

plate negatives and many were not printed. “Many of the slides show that WVC COMMUNITY RELATIONS Matsura was among the first OKANOGAN COUNTY - As to take ‘selfies’... portraits of part of the Wenatchee Valley himself, many of them humorCollege 75th anniversary, the ous,” said Kay Sibley, with the Borderlands WVC at Omak Historical Foundation Society, which “Many of the slides presents two with Magic Lantern show that Matsura was isthehelping Oroville events in among the first to take showing. Okanogan Magic lan‘selfies’....portraits of County on Feb. terns were 6 and 7 that will himself.” introduced in feature early Kay Sibley, Okanogan the 1600s and Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society were the earliCounty photos est form of slide from the colprojectors. They lection of phowere first illuminated by candles tographer Frank Matsura. The first Magic Lantern event and later by kerosene, limelight, is at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 6, carbon arc and electric light. The at the Omak Performing Arts first slides were hand-painted on Center. The second event is glass and projected onto walls Saturday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. at and screens. Scenes often porVicki’s Backdoor on main street trayed cultures, places and stoin Oroville. The suggested dona- ries. Magic lanterns were used in tion for each event is $15 per theaters, churches, schools and fraternal lodges. person. These events are sponsored by Both events include the rare opportunity to see photos of Frank the WVC at Omak Foundation, Matsura, a famous early pho- Borderlands Historical Society tographer of Okanogan County. and Okanogan County Historical Most of his photos were on glass Society. SUBMITTED BY THERESA TAYLOR

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Penny Smith

was very versed in Geology. Some special memories of him are: 1) He always insisted on eating dinner at the kitchen table. More times than not it was a fiasco. Kim, mashed potatoes and fork – oh wow! 2) When he hunted he would sometimes cut up and wrap his catch on the kitchen table with his co-hunt Ray. We ate a lot of venison burgers, gravy and mashed potatoes. 3) Christmas was always done up very colorful and there was presents galore. Daddy would play Santa and hand out presents with his unique tongue-incheek tease. 4) Mom and him had card games parties usually pinochle. Us kids would usually spy on them and pester them. We had a pool table in the rec. room and he had a gift for it. He said, “If you can play you could even play with a broom handle.” We played a lot of pea pool. 5) Camping was educational, ‘survivalistic’ and mostly fun. But Kathy almost drowning, dad smashing the pack rat, him scuba diving too long and came up to a bunch of hysterically crying children, the copper wire trip, Bonnie doing laundry using a rock on a rock making holes, Dan getting lost, me shooing a deer away on a hunting trip, the horse and donkey trailer trips and digging in old garbage dumps for bottles and treasures come to mind. LOL 6) Bedtime was always a “Good night Daddy kiss” and he would suck the notorious toothpick into his mouth for the kiss. Family members that got to the gold claim first and are panning are Art Ray, Jim Kim and Wayne. We love you all. He leaves his ex-wife Caroline. They married in 1954. They lived on the same property since 1999. They were still very close in their own ways. His children with her are Kathy, Kim (passed), Karen (Dan), Kelli and Gene Jr. (Lyn). He had many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. They called him Papa. He is heart-achingly missed by his best friend and mining partner, Nick Spaulding, special nephew, Ancil Humphrey, his river rat buddies (who say, why go to the river anymore without him), and Mamma Cat, whom he loved. Dad’s family crest is the Fleurde-lis emblem. When his grandfather Peter (Dutch) DeLis came to America in 1902 our name

Matsura featured at Magic Lantern Show in February

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 22, 2015  

January 22, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 22, 2015  

January 22, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune