Page 1

JANUARY 21-27, 2015 I VOLUME 40 I NUMBER 3

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

CALIFORNIA KILLING: THE TWISTED L.A. STORY OF TWO LOCAL STRIVERS» PAGE 9

ARTISTS VS. BROS WHAT’S UP WITH THOSE POSTERS ON CAPITOL HILL? PAGE 5

E M A C IT

BEN GIBBARD NEW LIFE FOR DEATH CAB PAGE 27

! A E S E H T M F RO

NG TID I K E H T T A H W

EC

GE. N A H C E T A M I OUT CL L PER S ON » PA GE 11 B A S U L L E T AN ANIE BY D


2

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015


inside»   January 21–27, 2015 VOLUME 40 | NUMBER 3 » SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»5

news&comment 5

ART ATTACK

BY KELTON SEARS | As Capitol Hill gets colonized by bros, artists fight back. Plus: Seattle becomes Aerospace City 2.0, and two locals cross paths lethally in L.A.

11 TIME AND TIDE

»15 Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller

BY DANIEL PERSON | An annual

Music Editor Gwendolyn Elliott

astronomical convergence shows what climate change could do to our coastline.

Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert

food&drink

15 LOVE: THE OTHER WHITE MEAT

BY JACOB UITTI | A vegetarian tempted back to the dark side highlights restaurants that play both sides of the fence. 15 | FOOD NEWS 15 | THE WEEKLY DISH 16 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 17 MONSTER IN THE BOX

BY ROBERT HORTON | How Frankenstein made me a film critic.

17 | THE PICK LIST 19 | OPENING NIGHTS | A Gorky

musical and an alien invasion.

23 FILM

OPENING THIS WEEK | Anne Hathaway

sings, Jessica Chastain delivers fuel oil, and Timothy Spall plays J.M.W. Turner.

25 | FILM CALENDAR

27 MUSIC

BY DAVE EINMO | Ben Gibbard speaks!

Also: Jonah Tolchin, Jukebox the Ghost, improv at Cafe Racer, and more. 31 | THE WEEK AHEAD

odds&ends 34 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

ILLUSTRATION BY KEITH CARTER

Connect with your community and ignite your mind, body and spirit with the unique experience of yoga in Chihuly Garden and Glass’ inspirational Glasshouse. Accessible and designed for all skill levels, local instructors from Core Power Yoga Studio will take participants through a special 60 minute session, drawing inspiration from the creative environment. Space is limited. All levels welcome.

17

$

Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Interns Bianca Sewake, Alexa Teodoro Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, James Ballinger, Michael Berry, Roger Downey, Alyssa Dyksterhouse, Jay Friedman, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Chason Gordon, Dusty Henry, Rhiannon Fionn, Robert Horton, Patrick Hutchison, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, Terra Clarke Olsen, Jason Price, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Tiffany Ran, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti

FEBRUARY 7 | MARCH 7 8:30am: Check-in 9:00am — 10:00am: Session

PURCHASE TICKETS AT CHIHULYGARDENANDGLASS.COM LOCATEd AT THE bASE Of THE SPACE nEEdLE, SEATTLE CEnTER

PRODUCTION Production Manager Sharon Adjiri Art Director Jose Trujillo Graphic Designers Nate Bullis, Brennan Moring

We treat the whole you.

Photo Intern Kaia D’Albora ADVERTISING Marketing/Promotions Coordinator Zsanelle Edelman Senior Multimedia Consultant Krickette Wozniak Multimedia Consultants Sam Borgen, Cecilia Corsano-Leopizzi, Peter Muller, Matt Silvie DISTRIBUTION Distribution Manager Jay Kraus OPERATIONS Administrative Coordinator Amy Niedrich

FREE HEALTH TALKS One-Pot Anti-Inflammatory Meals Jan. 24, 10:30 a.m. to noon Mindfulness for Stress Reduction Feb. 12, 6 – 7:30 p.m.

Publisher Bob Baranski COPYRIGHT © 2014 BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 / USPS 306730 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLI SHED WEEKLY BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC., 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 • FOUNDED 1976.

Wellness.BastyrCenter.info 206.834.4100 3670 Stone Way N., Seattle

Attentive care that considers every aspect of your health – mind, body and spirit. We look to treat the root cause, not just the symptoms. Naturopathic Medicine • Nutrition • Ayurveda Acupuncture & Chinese Herbs • Counseling

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

20 | PERFORMANCE 21 | VISUAL ARTS 22 | BOOKS

WAKE UP WITH YOGA

3


SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

FRIDAY 2 \ 6 \ 15 \ 12:00 MIDNIGHT SIFF CINEMA EGYPTIAN

4

$12 {$7 EMP + SIFF MEMBERS}

E T H D IE S D KA RR AK D S EI H D TE THE BEST IN HORROR-TINGED SHORT FILM REVEL IN THE DANGEROUS, THE MYSTERIOUS, AND THE TABOO WITH THIS MIDNIGHT SHOWING OF DARK SHORTS.

EMP WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT OF SCIENCE FICTION + FANTASY SHORT FILM FESTIVAL:

DON’T MISS MORE SFFSFF TENTH ANNIVERSARY EVENTS DURING THIS MULTI-DAY CELEBRATION OF ILLUMINATING FILMS! FULL SCHEDULE AT EMPMUSEUM.ORG


news&comment Taking It to the Streets

A new Public Safety Art project finds local artists waxing philosophical on a changing Capitol Hill. BY KELTON SEARS

MENG YU

KEN MCCARTY

poster bearing the message “ALL DICKHEADS FUCK OFF”—which utilizes unusual kerning that makes it difficult to read at first glance—is what he calls “a final sort of middle finger.” “I’d like to think that somehow the neighborhood might turn around,” he tells me, “but I just think it’s too late.”

power from the sheeople » Google Glass Gone

Last week, Google announced that it would end its controversial Glass Explorer program. “It is sad to see them giving up on the people who spend thousands on the device, travel to buy the device, accessories, etc.,” Seattle’s most famous Explorer, Nick Starr, told Seattle Weekly. Dave Meinert, who earned international press for banning Glass from his restaurants, had a different take: “It’s nice that in some small way decent normal people won against an uncaring tech giant and its tech-geek sheeople,” he said. “Hopefully this is the start of a trend that draws some limits between personal privacy and new tech.” Added Starr, “Fuck Dave Meinert.”

W

hen I meet Malcolm after Monday’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day protests, he is smiling. And he is excited, barely able to sit still as we discuss the Black Lives Matter movement and police brutality over coffee in a south Seattle Starbucks near his home. After a few minutes of talking to the 21-year-old Seattle native and Franklin High school alumnus, I realize Malcolm is the most positive protester I have ever met. How did you get started in the protests? It started back when the minimum-wage fight got going. I met people from Working Washington [a local advocacy group], and they got me going in the fight for a $15 minimum wage. I’ve always been an outgoing person, but I’d never thought of myself as being an activist before that. They opened my eyes to the issues. It was so empowering. We brought attention back to the workers. Was it easy to transition to the Black Lives Matter protests? Absolutely. I’ve had my own

personal issues with the police, and I was happy to get involved.

Can you describe your experience with the police at the protests? Their very presence just

feels like oppression. We’re supposed to be a community with some control over how things happen around us. But the police seem to always be against us, rather than offering support.

Have you had any problems with police at the protests? I got arrested once. We marched to

Bellevue for minimum wage and I got arrested. How did that feel? It was empowering. Have you been involved in the protests as more than a participant? Yeah. I’ve had the

opportunity to speak at a few events, including the one today for Martin Luther King Day. How do you prepare for that? I don’t prepare anything, really. I’m not the writing type. Plus, when it comes to speaking to people and reaching them, I feel that has to come from the heart. So what’s next for the movement? I just see the movement getting stronger. I don’t see this going away anytime soon. We’re going to be protesting for as long as it takes. As long as there are groups willing to be out there, I’ll join them. We’re just getting started. And what’s next for you? I’m interested in social justice now. The issues are too real. Amazing things are happening right now. I’ve been learning more about black history because I don’t think you can understand where you’re going if you don’t know where you’ve been. Plus, a lot of black history isn’t taught to us. I’ve been thinking about going back to school too, to study social justice. E

news@seattleweekly.com

Profiles in Protest is an ongoing series spotlighting local activists involved in the Black Lives Matter protests.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Somewhere among Petersen’s, Criscitello’s, and Lundgren’s contributions sits that of local artist Meng Yu. “WELCOME to the neighborhood AGRO BRO!” it blares, featuring a spiky-haired, beefy young man. “Do! Look people of color in the eye, smile, say hi! Don’t! Destroy property, harass women and queer folks.” “This is a topic I’m really passionate about,” Yu tells me. “There’s so many angles to go about Greg Lundgren—a 20-year Capitol Hill resident, it. I’ve personally been a victim of several violent arts advocate, and owner of nearby First Hill hangmuggings, but I wanted outs Vito’s and The Hideout—feels the opposite. “I think we as a community to address it in a way that wasn’t purely from a place “I’m an optimist,” he tells me. “I don’t think throwing have to fight for our identity of anger. I wanted to call the changing demoin the towel and giving up and to educate some of the out graphic of Capitol Hill on the neighborhood is productive. I can’t do that. new people coming in.” without alienating folks. If an aggro bro walks past I think we as a community the poster, I want him to see it and kind of laugh have to fight for our identity and to educate some of at himself without feeling defensive.” the new people coming in about the history of this The project’s diversity of voices promises to place and where they are at. I don’t think we’ll do make for a very interesting public conversation, that successfully by telling any one group of people one Sheehan hopes will “mutate” as people catch ‘You can’t be here, you have to go away.’That’s so not on and maybe start adding unsolicited contribuCapitol Hill—we’ve always welcomed everyone.” tions from outside the planned artist designs she Lundgren’s contribution to #CapHillPSA and Getahun have in store for the near future. reflects his nuanced approach to the conversation; “I think it reflects the complexity of the situation,” rather than a pointed message or image, he wrote Sheehan says. “There’s no single coherent message.” a small essay: “Capitol Hill is a neighborhood “Ambiguity is the word,” Getahun chimes in. full of weirdos and freaks, queers and artists, and “It’s exciting. These artists are telling very different people with really different ideas about how to sides of the conversation.” E live. It is a family of brave misfits who choose to do it their own way. I love it. Respect it.” ksears@seattleweekly.com

BY PATRICK HUTCHISON

PATRICK HUTCHISON

A

bout six months ago, poet and arts advocate Yonnas Getahun was walking between 10th and 11th Avenues on Pine Street when he heard something he hadn’t heard on Capitol Hill before. “For the first time I’m hearing people say racist stuff, derogatory stuff towards communities that call this place home,” he says. “I got so defensive.” It’s something Courtney Sheehan, program director at Northwest Film Forum, was also noticing—stories from Capitol Hill residents “throwing in the towel” on the neighborhood after their friends got beat up, mugged, or harassed for being gay in one of the gayest neighborhoods in America. The two weren’t alone—The Seattle Times’ Pacific NW Magazine declared its agenda for 2015 would be to “explore how newcomers are changing our community,” a phenomenon for which Capitol Hill is ground zero. Rather than having that same “gentrification” conversation, Getahun and Sheehan decided to do something about it: a guerrilla street project they’ve entitled Capitol Hill “Public Safety Art,” or #CapHillPSA. Starting last Friday, with the help of local postering company Polite Society, pithy messages that Getahun and Sheehan solicited from notable local artists began popping up on the telephone poles of the Pike/Pine corridor. “We were definitely inspired by John Criscitello’s WOO girls,” Sheehan says, referencing the local artist whose guerrilla street art skewering the Hill’s new demographic has become wildly popular online: sloppy-drunk blonde “WOO!” girls wearing tiaras, bros making out with each other, fists with “BRO HOME” written around them. In that true “art imitating life imitating art” way, photos of real WOO girls stumbling drunkenly past WOO-girl posters and images of raging drunk bros going aggro next to “bro home” posters have begun to crop up online in the past couple of months. Criscitello’s contribution to the #CapHillPSA project, an image declaring that “Tech Money Kills Queer Culture Dead,” continues the theme of his series. But the most interesting thing about Sheehan and Getahun’s project is how it is illuminating the complexities of the issue. “I hate to sound depressing, but I think the neighborhood is pretty fucked,” Christian Petersen says over the phone before laughing. A GIF artist and graphic designer who has created album covers for local hip-hop group Shabazz Palaces, Petersen has spent nine years living in the art community on Capitol Hill and watching what he calls the “totally sad David-and-Goliath story between super-rich developers and artists” unfold, and he’s had enough—he’s looking at moving to L.A. His contribution to the project, a

Profiles in Protest The Happy Warrior

5


SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

PROUD TO BE HERE BUILDING SOMETHING BETTER.

6

-----------------• Washingt on state is - - - - - - - - - - - - near ly half of all B oein home t o g employees w or ldw ide -----------------. • B oeing has added n ear ly 30,000 employee- - - - - - - - decade, inc lud ing more s in t he past t h a n 3 ,700 new hires in 2014 -----------------. ----------• B oeing is pr oud t o b e t h and has invested bil lion e state’s largest pr ivate employer, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - s of do ll ars in Washingt on since 2003 . ------------------------At Boeing, we’re proud of our State of Washington heritage and Washington workforce, now 81,000 strong. Add to that more than 2,000 partners and suppliers across the state. Facts that underscore our continued growth, investment and commitment to this very special place.


news&comment

Space Race

Billionaire Elon Musk wants to put humans on Mars. But first, the 43-year-old mogul will look to settle Seattle. He’s not the only one. BY MATT DRISCOLL

SPACEX

A

and Aerojet Rocketdyne, as a huge draw for upstart companies such as his. “It gets down to facilities,” he says. “In the manufacturing and building of a satellite, as a start-up, we don’t necessarily want to build up all our facilities. [In the Pacific Northwest,] those things are available to rent. We can rent them the same way Boeing does.” But make no mistake, the Pacific Northwest’s pool of potential employees is the region’s biggest selling point. Among Planetary Resources’ workforce are Pacific Northwest natives and University of Washington grads skilled in the trade of aerospace. SpaceX will likely pull some of its own workforce from the same population. “There’s a huge amount of talent in the Seattle area, and a lot of you guys, it seems, don’t want to move to L.A.,” Musk told the crowd—described by Dominic Gates of The Seattle Times as “handpicked engineers identified by SpaceX recruiters as potential hires”—during a private event last week at Fischer Pavilion. Seattle is quickly establishing itself as a big-time destination for companies looking to make money off the stars. As Alex Pietsch, director of Gov. Inslee’s aerospace office and an advisor to the governor on issues related to space, notes, “I think the SpaceX decision just further illustrates that fact.” Pietsch tells Seattle Weekly that the state offered no incentives to lure SpaceX to town, but he admits that the Pacific Northwest is one of a handful of regions known as hotbeds of the industry, and that the competition among these places to land future business is very real. With L.A., Houston, and Washington, D.C., Pietsch says, the Puget Sound region is on the short list for any company looking to get into the business. Other states, like Colorado and Ohio, are aggressively trying to break in, according to Pietsch, and are not shy about routinely offering things like tax breaks, cash payments, facilities, and infrastructure as incentives. In other words, the space race is real, and will likely only intensify. “States and regions are competing every day for this type of investment. We’re competing every day,” Pietsch says. “There are states that would kill for this kind of opportunity.” E

mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

s we learned last week, Elon Musk’s innovative commercial rocket company, Space Explorations Technology—or SpaceX, as it’s more commonly known—has landed in the Puget Sound area. Expecting to employ 60 people “in the short run,” according to Bloomberg News, Musk describes the future workspace as “a satellite office for satellites.” And while Musk’s company has interplanetary designs—this month SpaceX conducted its fifth commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station for NASA, and Musk’s ultimate goal of making human life on Mars a reality is well known—in the Northwest the company’s biggest impact may be on the local economy. Headquartered in Los Angeles, SpaceX already employs over 3,000 people across the country, including in offices in Houston and Washington, D.C. Musk has said that his new SpaceX office—in Redmond, reportedly—will hire as many as 1,000 people in three or four years. Space, just as it’s been since Boeing began construction of the Lunar Rover back in 1969, is big business in the Northwest. And Musk isn’t alone in identifying our region as a prime location to do business. While the aerospace industry is nothing new to our region, within the past decade a number of smaller companies have also decided to call the Seattle area home. According to Governor Jay Inslee’s office, roughly 30 companies statewide (excluding Boeing) do space business in Washington, employing some 2,000 people. Planetary Resources, for example, also based in Redmond, has built a nimble company of over 40 employees working on the mining of asteroids. Company President and Chief Engineer Chris Lewicki has been known to optimistically foresee the Pacific Northwest as the “Silicon Valley of aerospace.” “Seattle is a center for innovation in a lot of different things,” Lewicki tells Seattle Weekly when asked why Planetary Resources chose to locate here in 2010. “Boeing has a very long arm here, and for a long time that included a lot of aerospace activity.” Lewicki identifies the existing aerospace institutions and facilities that have been built here over the years, thanks to institutions like Boeing

Satellites like this CRS-S Dragon will fuel Seattle’s economy.

7


G N I S O L

! E L A S

C

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

&

INVENTORY AND FIXTURE LIQUIDATION

60% OFF

OR MORE

CLOTHING, COSTUMES W E E KVINTAGE LYAND WOMEN’S M USIC CLOTHING

G

EV ENT S

PR O M O T I ONS

APPAREL RACKS, DISPLAYS AND COLLECTIBLES CAPITOL HILL 310 & 312 Broadway East, Seattle APRIE.COM REDLIGHTVINTAGE.COM

F IL M

HA P P Y H OUR

PROMOTIONS NEWSLETTER The inside scoop on VIP events, free tickets, and event photos.

Need a

A R T S A N D EN T E R TAI NM E NT

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

DR NK?

8

Find Hundreds of Happy Hours near you. Search “Happy Hours” and download for free. Available for iPhone, Android, and Blackberry.

Happy Hours shows all of the food and drink specials going on near you. Click through to see photos of the bar or restaurant, and details such as the menu, location, amenities, and what other people have to say. Happy Hours Mobile App brought to you by


news&comment»

To Live and Die in L.A.

Two Seattleites chase their dreams to California only to become tangled in a twisted case.

W

SEATTLELAND

ANTONY HARE

Then came McDonald’s night of rage. According

to police and court records, here’s how it unfolded: Around 9 p.m., Winkler went to visit Mulligan, who was with two other people in apartment 201 where Mulligan and McDonald lived. McDonald, who was acting and speaking strangely, had pushed his way into an apartment down the hall, where he seized a large kitchen knife and began threatening the two female residents. One barricaded herself in the bathroom and called 911, while the other ran outside. She showed the first deputy to arrive a cell-phone picture of McDonald and explained what was happening. Attorneys for the Winkler family say that that information was never passed on to other deputies. McDonald tried and failed to enter another apartment, then climbed out on a balcony to enter his own apartment, coming through the sliding doors with his knife. He sat on a couch next to a guest, Chris Potter, talking nonsensically, before stabbing him in the thigh. In the hallway, deputies responding to the earlier 911 call were interviewing witnesses and discussing strategy. One condo resident showed a deputy cell pictures of both McDonald and Winkler. The deputy showed McDonald’s picture to another deputy and said “Alex is our guy,” according to the Winkler family lawsuit. Several deputies were allegedly also given a description of McDonald: “Tall, black hair, black shirt, black backpack, khaki shorts.” (Winkler, a balding blond, was wearing a white shirt.) As deputies prepared to break into the apartment, Mulligan and Winkler rushed McDonald, but were driven back by his knife; Mulligan was cut on the neck. Winkler then grabbed Mulligan, applying pressure to the bloody wound, and pushed him to the condo door. Seconds after opening it and running out, both were shot by deputies. According to the lawsuit, “LASD Deputies Michael Fairbank, Byron Holloway and Gerardo

Baldivia opened fire and shot Mr. Mulligan [once] in the thigh. Mr. Mulligan fell to the ground and Mr. Winkler jumped over him with his hands above his head. When Mr. Winkler jumped over the wounded Mr. Mulligan, he was shot” four times by the deputies and died immediately. The sheriff ’s department later admitted Winkler and Mulligan were shot by mistake. Deputies were confused, said LASD Chief Bill McSweeney, because they saw Winkler “lunging at the back of the fleeing victim.” L.A. County Prosecutor spokesperson Ricardo Santiago says deputies fired their weapons believing Winkler was the attacker. McDonald was charged with the killing because, under state law, his actions led to the fatal outcome. Still, says Winkler family attorney Sim Osborn in an interview, “If they thought John was attacking Mulligan, why did they shoot Mulligan, too?” He notes that in 2010, the rate of unarmed suspects shot by LASD officers began to increase sharply, and the department has failed to meet its own standards for scenario-based and firearm training. Deputies are also being sued for killing two other unarmed men in 2013 and 2014. Alex McDonald is being held on $4 million bail,

and has pled not guilty. His sister Patricia and their family are anguishing over the charges. While conceding that McDonald bears responsibility for his actions, they question the fairness of charging him with the deputies’ mistake. “You wouldn’t think they’d shoot the first people out the door,” says Patricia. Her brother, born in California but raised and schooled in Edmonds, took business courses at Shoreline College and ran a Student Painters franchise here before becoming a graphic and web designer, she says. He moved to L.A. around 2010 and studied design art at UCLA. He was head of

product design at a firm called Pogoseat, and, his sister says, was finally making serious money. In a web portfolio, McDonald says of himself, “I’m at the point in my career where I just get it, and I’m starting to push the boundaries. I know what people want to see and I know what it takes to produce good, meaningful design.” Alex is one of her four brothers, Patricia says, and “he’s never been in trouble, doesn’t get into fights, and is not violent in any way.” The family is hoping for answers from an expert who is conducting a psychiatric evaluation. “Alex never had any mental illness,” she says, “but there is some history of it within our family.” A toxicology report from the fatal night showed there were no drugs in his system that would explain his behavior. “At his arraignment, witnesses who knew Alex said they did not recognize my brother that night,” Patricia says. “They didn’t know who he was.” Winkler’s aunt, Anne-Marie Van Wart, told the Hollywood website The Wrap that Winkler was a lovable guy with a breezy charm. She recalled the time his grandmother was dying, having reached the final stage in hospice care. “She was just pretty much asleep and Johnny walked into the room and said, ‘Hi, Grandma, how’s it hanging?’ He put out his hand and she just woke up, like, ‘Oh, Johnny, how are ya?’ ” Van Wart said. “I think he was there six or seven hours, just chatting with his grandma. That’s the kind of kid he was.” Winkler, who graduated from the Seattle Film Institute in 2010, moved to L.A. last fall. “John dreamed of being a writer or producer of a TV show,” says his mother. “He had a true love for that. So he finally packed up and went for it, and in a short period of time, got his foot in the door. That was not very likely to happen, but he did it.” It was a backstage job with Tosh.0, but he couldn’t have been more excited, says Ostegren. And he made a quick impression: After Winkler died, comedian Daniel Tosh and Comedy Channel extended “heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends during this tragic time.” Tosh and other comedians also put together a benefit honoring Winkler in May at the Hollywood Improv. On Facebook, comedian TK Kelly reported that they’d “sold the room out and had a great time thanks to Daniel Tosh, Matt Braunger, Owen Benjamin & Ahmed Bharoocha, and we managed to raise nearly $3000 for the Boys & Girls Club! John McKay and I sincerely thank you all for helping us honor our friend John Winkler with a night he would have absolutely loved.” In recent months, L.A. County officials have scheduled three meetings to discuss a settlement in the Winkler case, then canceled all three, says Lisa Ostegren: “For me, that’s a kind of slap in the face.” The deputies in question were quickly returned to duty, she says, and results of an internal probe into the shooting remain unannounced. “My son was helping a wounded friend escape a dangerous situation,” Ostegren says, “but the greater threat was just outside the door in LASD uniforms.” E randerson@seattleweekly.com

Rick Anderson writes about sex, crime, money, and politics, which tend to be the same thing. His latest book is Floating Feet: Irregular Dispatches From the Emerald City.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

asn’t this a movie? A book, maybe? Two strangers from the same place move separately to a far-away city, seeking their dream jobs. Finally on the road to success, their paths fatefully cross, leaving one dead and the other charged with murder. Though the victim was killed in a hail of bullets, the accused killer had no gun. Unfortunately, it’s not fiction, but the true story of two young Seattle-area men—similar in age and aspirations—who first met as neighbors in a Los Angeles apartment BY RICK ANDERSON house. Their brief friendship ended suddenly one night last April in the kind of tragic timing and circumstance befitting a Hollywood script. Thirty-year-old John Winkler, a Puyallup High School graduate and newly hired production assistant on Comedy Channel pop culture series Tosh.0, was killed. Alexander McDonald, a 28-year-old graphic artist and graduate of Meadowdale High in Lynnwood, was arrested and is being held on charges of murder, attempted murder, and torture. Though Winkler’s Seattle connections were previously reported, McDonald’s local connections haven’t been revealed until now. Officials and family members confirmed to Seattle Weekly that the two never met until late 2013 after Winkler moved into the same condo building as McDonald. Not that the story needed another twist. But it was Los Angeles Sheriff ’s Department deputies who actually killed Winkler—while he reportedly held his hands over his head in surrender—and wounded a second man, McDonald’s roommate Liam Mulligan. Both were innocent victims shot by mistake. “This is a journey to better understand how this nightmare happened,” says McDonald’s sister, Patricia McDonald of Seattle, about her quest to explain her brother’s actions. “But we hope focus is also given to the fact that the police entered the room shooting.” She’s at a loss to say why her brother had an apparent psychotic break the night of April 7, 2014, stabbing several people at a sleek five-story condo on Palm Avenue in West Hollywood. “Alex is heartbroken about what happened to John Winkler and Liam Mulligan,” she says. Heartbroken doesn’t begin to explain how John Winkler’s mother feels. “There are days I cry all day,” Lisa Ostegren of Gig Harbor said this week. “It’s like my heart has been torn in two.” She and former husband Mark Winkler, John’s father, are now suing the sheriff ’s department for $25 million. Wounded roommate Mulligan has also filed a separate lawsuit. Ostegren’s son was one of several hostages being held by McDonald during a standoff at the condo where they lived. “John did not know Alex here in Seattle,” says Ostegren, but they became friends, and fellow Seahawks fans, in L.A. “One of my brothers,” says Alex’s sister Patricia, “went to visit Alex a month prior to the event and got the impression that Alex and John often hung out together.”

9


ONE W E E K ONLY !

tickets $29

ER

LIT

F RID

ING

JANUARY 24–31, 2015

CHOOSE AVAILABLE ORCHESTRA LEVEL SEATS TO THE CONCERTS LISTED BELOW FOR JUST $29 EACH. FEBRUARY 12 & 14 BERLIOZ

LU D

OV IC

MO

RL OT

APRIL 10–12

MAY 28, 30 & 31

ROMÉO ET JULIETTE

PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND

MOZART’S VIOLIN CONCERTO NO. 5

FEBRUARY 20 & 21

>>>LIMITED TICKETS

JUNE 5–7

BACH’S ORCHESTRAL SUITES

APRIL 16, 17 & 18

A TRIBUTE TO RAY CHARLES WITH ELLIS HALL

SEATTLE POPS SERIES Sponsored By

FEBRUARY 26 & 28

SHOSTAKOVICH’S LENINGRAD SYMPHONY

MOZART’S PIANO CONCERTO NO. 22

APRIL 21

MARCH 1

CELEBRATE ASIA >>>LIMITED TICKETS

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

>>>LIMITED TICKETS

MAHLER’S THIRD SYMPHONY

MAY 7 & 9

MAY 15 & 16

HANDEL, VIVALDI & MORE

MARCH 12 & 14

MAY 17

SIBELIUS’ SYMPHONIES 3 & 4

FOR PROGRAMMING DETAILS SEE OUR WEBSITE

MOZART’S PIANO CONCERTOS NOS. 17 & 24

SEATTLE POPS SERIES Sponsored By

MARCH 19, 21 & 22

JUNE 18 & 20

APRIL 23 & 25

PIANIST SIMON TRPČESKI IN RECITAL

SIBELIUS’ SYMPHONIES 1 & 2

MORLOT CONDUCTS BRAHMS’ FIRST SYMPHONY

SEOUL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

GRIEG’S PIANO CONCERTO

RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN CELEBRATION

10

JUNE 11, 13 & 14

MARCH 3

MARCH 6–8 SOME ENCHANTED EVENING:

SEATTLE POPS SERIES Sponsored By

ROMANTIC UNTUXED MAY 26

VIOLINIST PINCHAS ZUKERMAN

IS LL

LL

HA

E

WITH PIANIST ANGELA CHENG I NW

N

AN

DM

MARCH 26 & 28

I

L RO CA

SIBELIUS’ SYMPHONIES 5, 6 & 7 APRIL 2 & 4

CHOPIN’S PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2

R

TE OR

P NE

O

SIM

2014-2015 Masterworks Season Sponsor:

20 6 . 215. 4747 | S E AT TLE SYM PHONY.ORG


KEITH CARTER

T

ROYAL PAIN Seattle will get a taste of what climate change has in store this weekend when King Tide comes ashore. By Daniel Person That still holds true for the Swinomish Tribe on Fidalgo Island in Skagit County. For thousands of years, the peoples of the tribe have lived off the bounty of the ocean, and to this day feast on shellfish harvested during low tides on their coastal reservation. Yet up to 15 percent of the reservation could be put under water by rising sea levels, according to a study the tribe completed in 2009. That includes 160 homes worth $83 million, as well as businesses and the roads that provide the tribe’s only link to the mainland. In addition to an economic impact, rising sea levels could have a serious impact on the tribe’s culture—archeological sites could end up under water, and the salmon and clam harvests that have sustained its people could be seriously compromised. “It’s safe to say, we’re facing devastation in the loss of resources,” says Debra Lekanoff, Swinomish intergovernmental affairs liaison. “As sea levels rise and our clam beds are

destroyed and salmon are impacted, we’re asking, how can we address this?” With climate change, man has seized the tide

line from the old woman in the cave. And we are slowly pulling it up over our own villages. With each ton of coal burned and gallon of gas guzzled, humans are placing more and more heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere—hotboxing ourselves with carbon dioxide. As the temperature rises, so too will sea levels, for two reasons: First, warmer global temperatures—2014 is thought to have been the hottest year ever recorded globally, though the data is still to be finalized—cause the polar icecaps to melt, introducing more water into the ocean. Second, ocean temperatures are rising, which is causing water molecules to expand. Thermal expansion means that the water in the ocean takes up more room, causing it to move up shorelines across the globe—

anywhere between 1 and 6 feet, depending on which study you read. All of which is quite frightening, but still fairly abstract: An extra four feet of water in Puget Sound is hard to picture without any kind of visual demonstration. Which is why climate activists hope you’ll take a look at the water this Friday and Saturday, when the year’s highest tides will give a little preview of what could be the new normal in a few decades. Compared to other environmental catastrophes, climate change has met with a notably listless response from humans. Part of the problem is that the solutions climate change demand are extreme, and become more extreme the longer it goes unaddressed. But another reason is that it’s very difficult to point at any specific natural occurrence and definitively blame it on a warming planet. Forests have always caught on fire, and geologists tell us that California was experiencing droughts long before the internal combustion engine was invented. Blaming these things on climate change opens the door to deniers’ counter-claims that subzero temperatures prove global warming is a hoax. In fact, Wheel of Fortune host and prominent climate skeptic Pat Sajak did just that last year on Twitter. So it is important to be clear that nobody is suggesting that the high tides forecast for Friday and Saturday are caused by climate change. Rather, these so-called “king tides” are a phenomenon as old as the ocean itself.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

he Tlingit people of southern Alaska have a story about when the tides began. There was an old woman in a cave at the end of the world who controlled the ocean with a line in her lap. She used to hold the line very tightly, never letting the seas rise or fall, which meant the people could not eat all the seafood that would otherwise be revealed by a low tide. When the people started to go hungry, their helper, Raven, flew across the great water to the woman and kicked sand at her. The old woman dropped the line, causing the water to drop, and the Tlingit had a feast. But soon they saw that when the tide was always out, fish could not come back up the shore and were dying as a result. So Raven went back and helped the old woman get hold of the line again. In thanks, she agreed to let the water in and out, so the fish could live and the people could eat. Another legend, this one from the Haida, indiginous to northern British Columbia, tells of a stranger who showed up on the shore of a village on the ocean. It was low tide and she sat down at the edge of the water. When the tide started to move in, she stood up, walked up shore a bit, and sat again. Each time she sat down, the water would follow her up. Soon she was at the village, and the water had followed her. Sensing their watery doom, people built rafts to survive the flood. Eventually she was high on a mountain, and all the land was under water. For these tribes, and others along the Pacific, the ocean was both a provider and, potentially, a destroyer.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 13 11


12

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015


ROYAL PAIN » FROM PAGE 11 Tides, of course, are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and, to a lesser but significant extent, the sun. Tides are highest during full and new moons, since these are the times that the moon and sun are aligned in such a way that they work together. On top of this, in the winter the moon is closer to Earth than in the summer, so it has a more pronounced effect on the tides this time of year. Taken all together, these factors cause the highest tides of the year to come in the winter. Other things like low pressure systems and high winds can push tides even higher; in 2012 the king tide reached 14.5 feet in Seattle, setting a new local record. High tides on Friday and Saturday aren’t forecast to reach anything close to 2012 levels. Still, at 13 feet, they should be 3 feet higher than average. What does any of this have to do with climate

change? Experts say that by the end of the 21st century, the tides we'll see later this week could be decidedly commonplace everyday occurrences. Predicting exactly how sea levels will change in any given spot is tricky because of other factors such as tectonic shifting. In parts of Washington, namely the northwestern portion of the Olympic Peninsula, sea levels could

32,000 FANS AND COUNTING facebook.com/seattleweekly

are a gift. They have become an important teaching tool on what rising sea levels will mean for the region—a seeing-is-believing approach to climate-change education. “You can hear the sea-level rise figures, but if you can see what things look like, see the sidewalk where you usually walk is under water, then that will have more of an impact,” says Jamie Mooney of Washington Sea Grant, which is coordinating king-tide education efforts across

The practice of Sant Mat is based on meditation on inner Light & Sound, ethical values, service to others and love for all creation.

3:00 pm - Sat., Jan 31st Douglas Truth Library - Meeting Room 2300 E Yesler Way, Seattle

877-633-4828

“If you can see what things look like, see the sidewalk where you usually walk is under water, then that will have more of an impact.”

findlightandsound@msn.com

Spirituality Sant Mat

Sant Baljit Singh

The path of inner Light and Sound

(Talk given by authorized speaker - Event is not sponsored by Seattle Public Library)

The goal of Sant Mat is to enable the soul to return and merge into its source; the purpose of human life described by mystics of all traditions. Admission Free

the state. The central component of these efforts is to collect citizens’ photos of king tides from all across western Washington, which provide the eye-catching visuals Mooney talks about. Alki Beach has proven a perfect model for showing what a higher sea level might look like for Seattle. Photos from December, when tides reached past 13 feet, show the boardwalk, usually given over to joggers, completely submerged. A similar scene should be on display this week.

www.santmat.net

The Duwamish River will also be hard-hit. During high tide, the river actually can flow inland instead of into the Sound, and during king tides, water often floods parks and lowlying streets in the South Park and Georgetown areas. The city of Seattle has reported that all these areas will see regular flooding by 2050 due to rising sea levels. Mooney says that on top of documenting how higher sea levels will look, photographing king tides “gives [people] ownership” of the rising levels. “It’s giving people the opportunity to engage year after year,” she says.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

1210818

actually drop 9 inches by 2100, since the ocean floor is dropping. However, nowhere in Puget Sound is that expected to happen, meaning the sea-level rise won’t be a matter of if, but of how much. Projections range between 6 inches to just over 4 feet by the end of the century. Today, high tides regularly reach 10 feet. With 3 feet of sea-level rise, that puts the water at 13 feet. And it would put king tides somewhere around 16 feet—levels never seen by a Seattle that’s very much dependent on, and at the mercy of, Puget Sound. For those hoping to inform the public about the effects of climate change, king tides, then,

Box Office: (425) 392-2202 • January 22 - March 1, 2015 • VillageTheatre.org

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

KING COUNTY

In a vision of the future, Alki Beach succumbs to the king tide.

13


ROYAL PAIN

Follow us! instagram.com/

The Lost Pelican 2400 1st Ave, Seattle

206.441.5132 • thelostpelican.com Happy Hour 3pm-7pm / Late Nite Menu 10pm-1am Weekend Brunch 10:30-2

,

KING COUNTY

New Orleans & Regionally Inspired Southern Cuisine

3 -

The 63rd Avenue Pump Station in West Seattle gets soaked with salt water. Not good.

» FROM PAGE 13 Flooded parks are just the beginning of what

rising water might bring to Washington state. Since 2007, King County has been studying how changing sea levels could affect public-works infrastructure along Puget Sound. John Phillips, a planner with King County’s wastewater treatment division, says Seattle plan-

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

“People wonder, ‘What’s happening? What does my future hold?’ Well, we can show them. We have a crystal ball.”

14

23rd & Union • Cheapest & Closest to Downtown! Free Parking | Open 7 Days | Dog-Friendly | No Medical Card Needed | 21+ DISCLAIMER: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit-forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use by adults twenty-one or older. Keep out of the reach of children. *Prices accurate as of December 1st, 2014. Sourced from a sample of recreational pot shops from around WA state, sourced from www.Leafly.com. Special Deals & Pricing while supplies last.

ners designed many facilities in the 1950s and 1960s with 4 inches less water to account for, which means that some systems are already starting to see complications from higher water levels. For Phillips and his colleagues, king tides provide a perfect test case to see where problems will arise as water gets even higher. So far, county spending on preparing for higher sea levels has been modest, he says, sitting at about $850,000. These preparations have been as simple as taking higher water levels into account when building new water-treatment facilities, or affixing one-way gates on wastewater outflow pipes so overflow sewage doesn’t get pushed back up into the system by a surge of saltwater. But the problems could get worse over time if rising sea levels aren’t accounted for, Phillips says. The biggest issue is salt-water intrusion into those sewage-outflow pipes. If higher water levels are able to push salty Sound water into the county’s wastewater-treatment system, corrosion will worsen. This has already been seen to a certain extent, Phillips says, with equipment that should be lasting 50 years breaking down after 20. Elsewhere in Washington, higher sea levels are threatening to foul freshwater aquifers as salt-

water seeps into inland wells and causes serious erosion along vulnerable shorelines. In sum, Phillips says, what king tides demonstrate is that a 24-inch rise in sea levels can have a considerable effect on a state with more than 3,000 miles of marine coastline, much of it inhabited by people. “People wonder, 'What’s happening? What does my future hold?' Well, we can show them,” he says. “We have a crystal ball for ourselves, and this is what we’ll see.” As for the Swinomish Tribe up in Skagit County,

few government entities are more active in preparing for rising sea levels. It has already produced a 100-plus-page action plan with contingencies for everything from finding alternative places to grow and harvest shellfish to devising ways to preserve banks from erosion. Debra Lekanoff says the tribe has strongly emphasized working with other governments in the area to find collaborative solutions that benefit everyone—for example, finding ways to prevent agricultural pollutants from entering Puget Sound during storm surges that flood much of the low-lying lands in the Skagit River valley. All in all, she sounds optimistic that solutions will be found to deal with rising seas. “The Coast Salish people have always adapted,” Lekanoff says. “Everything that makes a person a coastal Salish—from their name to their physical characteristics—comes from the shoreline. “And they will find a way to make this place sustainable.” E

news@seattleweekly.com

Sustainable Seattle will host two king tide parties this weekend, both of which will include hot beverages, snacks, and information about the king tide project. On Friday, January 23, the public is invited to gather at McNeil’s Landing (7797 Eighth Ave. S.) from 7 to 7:30 a.m. to witness the tide. On Saturday, the Duwamish Waterway Park (7900 10th Ave. S.) will be the site of another gathering, from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.


food&drink

A Vegetarian (Temporarily) Turns Carnivore for Love

FoodNews BY JASON PRICE

The Pioneer Square food-scene expansion continues with the opening of Casco Antiguo, a Mexican eatery more in the vein of Frontera Grill than Taco Time. Sure, you can still get a plate of tacos and watch the game on the big screen here. But the food is focused on using seasonal, locally sourced ingredients and prepared in the traditional style of Mexico City. Cool tip: Enter through the back alley door for late-night margaritas.

But ends up meeting his partner somewhere in the middle. BY JACOB UITTI

I

For discerning drinkers: The Michael Mina group has designed a program to assist in the discovery of new spirits, varietals, and cocktails. Throughout January, RN74 will highlight white and red Burgundy selections by the glass or half-glass or as part of a flight to experience the differences in terroir and winemaking. E morningfoodnews@gmail.com

Patxi’s classic meat pizza.

Spinasse’s butter and sage pasta.

THOMAS BARWICK

tionship (romantic or otherwise) to be open to trying new things. Alas, though, I’m a vegetarian at heart. So while I himself, this cured meat was salty, chewy, and bright. might still accept a spoon-fed bite of meatball from When people mumble “Mmmm, meat is so good!” my girlfriend from time to time, armed with these while chewing, this is one of the reasons. And don’t seven great spots, I know I can happily share a meal even get me started on the curry and bacon fried with her—without rice from Ma‘ono compromising my own Fried Chicken & Whisky. I’m a sucker “It began as a bite of homemade tastes. for fried rice. When Phinney Market beef meatball in her apartment. and The High Life: I I was a kid, my go-to comfort food was pork both because ‘Here, try this?’ she said. ‘Does it mention Norm’s B.L.A.T. fried rice from a place they each have amazcalled King’s Castle. have meat in it?’ I asked, staring ing black-bean burgMa‘ono’s is somehow ers, and P.M. serves at the steaming spoon. ‘Well...’” theirs with delightful even better. Yet despite these shoestring fries. It also recent dietary shifts, I still don’t order a whole offers bacon Caesar salad and classic lamb meatentrée of meat for myself—no rotisserie chicken balls. H.L. serves Penn Cove mussels, barbecue or lamb burger for me (it would still make me sliders, and braised short ribs. tired!). When asked, I still claim I’m a vegetarian, Marination Ma Kai: You can’t have just one, but I do hesitate. The point is not that I’m going or two, or even three. Their tofu tacos are tangy to go out and order a huge Fred Flintstone steak, but subtle, bite-sized yet bountiful, and will or fundamentally change who I am for another leave you craving the sesame-lime-jalapeño person. The point is this: Food is an amazing way recipe. Marination also serves spam musubi to share what you love about the world—the and pork sliders for meat fiends. flavors, the smells, the history and culture packed Spinasse: Maybe my favorite dish in all of into each bite. It’s something to be excited about, Seattle is their tajarin pasta with butter and sage. to look forward to. And it just may benefit a rela» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

TheWeeklyDish Prosciutto Benedict BY GAVIN BORCHERT

Glorious. There’s not much better in the city. Ditto

GAVIN BORCHERT

venison salumi from Da Pino. Made by Pino

The poached egg in a Benedict is there for texture, not as a load-bearing flavor; its lush silkiness is what makes the brunch perennial so sybaritic. The effect is particularly ohhhh-inducing in the Row House Cafe’s version, where it acts a velvety foil to the salty snap of prosciutto; in turn, the fat in the latter doubles the richness (much more than does the traditional Canadian bacon). This opposites-attract thing duplicates the allure of the Row House itself, set as it is among the gleaming, coldly virginal new buildings in gentrifying South Lake Union: The three linked cottages, wooden and ramshackle, with a creaky porch hidden by an eclectic array of greenery, seem to have been transplanted whole from one of Florida’s keys, and not one of the posher ones, either. E

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Two years ago I started seeing a beautiful, articulate, funny, charming woman. She is more into food than anyone I know. She loves sushi, spaghetti, oysters, omelets. She has a refined palate and can detect individual flavors in a single bite. So in the interest of sharing, I started eating meat again. Slowly at first. It began as a bite of homemade beef meatball in her apartment. “Here, try this?” she said. “Does it have meat in it?” I asked, staring at the steaming spoon. “Well . . . ” Then it was the day vacation we took to BowEdison. “I just love oysters,” she said. “Let’s go to Taylor Shellfish, it’s right down there! They can shuck us an oyster each on the spot!” I loathe oysters. Yet I said, “Great!” The slimy thing fell down my throat, unwanted bits of shell and all. This is what can happen (cue the Meatloaf song: “I would chew anything for love!”) when you fall for someone who loves food and eats meat. But I have no regrets. My relationship exposed me to new flavors, and opened parts of my palate that had been closed. I became enchanted by tagliatelle alla carbonara with pancetta from Artusi. A melt-inyour-mouth, creamy, buttery dish, it opened my eyes to just what meat can mean to my taste buds.

If you’ve been one of the lucky few who have braved the long lines for a plate of perfectly made pasta at Il Corvo, you’ll be excited to learn that chef/owner Mike Easton has decided to add a Saturday dinner service two nights a month beginning January 24. Joining him in the kitchen will be Miles James, owner of the late Dot’s Charcuterie. To date, three nights have been announced and are already booked. So check ilcorvo pasta.com often, and book your table quickly.

JOHN VALLS

still remember the turkey sandwich. It was from a deli I went to in college around the corner from my shabby, smoke-stale apartment. It was wrapped in plastic: a 6-inch sub roll, shredded pale lettuce, tomato slices not in season, honey-glazed turkey, and, my favorite, Swiss cheese. After eating it that fateful afternoon, I had the severe urge to take a nap. They say that turkey puts people to sleep, and that may have been the case, but this was not the first meat-infused meal I’d eaten that made me drowsy. But it was the last. Upon waking up from my sandwich stupor, I made a declaration: no more meat. It makes you tired, and feeling tired is antithetical to eating, which is supposed to provide energy! At the time I was a student aiming to get a 4.0 each semester in college. A philosophy major minoring in creative writing and political science, I was doing good at my goal, sometimes hitting it, sometimes falling just short. But the point is, I didn’t want to waste time in my day napping when I could be reading or working. Before this, I’d eaten whatever I wanted. I was a chubby kid. I ate Pringles out of the can and gorged on Celeste frozen pepperoni pizza. I looked forward to cheesesteaks with extra meat, extra cheese, and a fried egg. I unabashedly heated up meatball Chef Boyardee and put a slice of Cheddar on top. In the 10 years since that post-sandwich decision, I’ve remained a vegetarian. Until this year. What was the catalyst? Love, of course!

15


WANT TO WIN DVDS, CONCERT TICKETS & MORE?

food&drink

FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT US AT: seattleweekly.com/promo/freestuff

» FROM PAGE 16

CHECK OUT OUR FREE STUFF PAGE!

Drinking on the Eastside: Underrated?

FRESH FRESH WILD KING SALMON

W

GO SEAHAWKS! We Ship

We Ship We Ship Seafood Overnight Seafood Overnight Seafood Overnight Anywhere in the USA Anywhere in the inUSA Anywhere the USA or We Pack for or We Pack for or Air We Pack for Air Travel Travel Air Travel

University Seafood & Poultry University University Seafood & Poultry Seafood & Poultry 1317 NE 47th, Seattle

1317 NE 47th, Seattle (206) 632-3700 or (206)632-3900 (206) 632-3700 or (206)632-3900

1317 NE 47th, Seattle

(206) 632-3700 or (206) 632-3900

THEBARCODE

ANDREA WALKER

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

RESTAURANT 2207 1st Ave • BELLTOWN 206.956.9329 OHANABELLTOWN.COM

NFC CHAMPIONS AGAIN!!

$4 BLUE HAWAIIANS & $6 HAWK TOUCHDOWNS TIL SEATTLE WINS THE BIG GAME!

DINING

WEE K LY COURTESY MA’ONO

Seattle’s Best Sushi

DINING NEWSLETTER

The inside scoop on openings, hotspots and offers.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

16

$3.99 PUPUS, SUSHI & HANDROLLS $4.00 COCKTAIL SPECIALS, SAKE & WINE $15.00 SAKE MARGARITA PITCHERS MON & TUES ALL NIGHT, WED & THURS & FRI 5-7PM LATE NIGHT: SUN-THURS 9-11:30PM HEATED DECK IS OPEN!!!

1/21 - ALOHA WEDNESDAY TWO STORY ZORI!! 1/22 - GET RIGHT THURSDAY - DJ CHINKEYE!! 1/23 - FRIDAY - DJ KUSH-KO!! 1/24 - SATURDAY- DJ HEAD-ACHE!! 1/25 - SUNDAY - KARAOKE W/ AURY MOORE! $3 LATE NITE HAPPY HOUR 9 - MIDNITE! MONDAY & TUESDAY ABSOLUTE KARAOKE W/ CHASE SILVA & $3 HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT W/ ABSOLUT DRINK SPECIALS!! 1/28- ALOHA WEDNESDAY PAK & DA LOLOZ!!

Now Open Every Day for Lunch

Kids eat Free Sundays till 6pm

COCKTAILS! BURRITOS! TACOS! Happy Hour 7 Days a Week 4-6pm & 10pm - Midnight

Food Specials $1 off Wells & Drafts WEEKEND MEXICAN BRUNCH SATURDAY & SUNDAY 11AM - 3PM BOTH LOCATIONS! KITCHEN OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT FRIDAY & SATURDAY Phinney Ridge 6711 Greenwood Ave N 206.706.4889 Alki Beach 2620 Alki Ave SW 206.933.7344 www.facebook.com/bar.chupacabra

M U SI C

Top: tofu tacos at Marination. Bottom: Ma‘ono’s curry and bacon fried rice.

It melts in your mouth in its buttery glory. But Spinasse also offers a fine braised veal- and porkstuffed agnolotti, as well as braised wild boar. Ridgeback Café: Waffles! I highly recommend their Triple B: apple-smoked bacon, brie, and fresh basil on a Belgian waffle. Vegetarians can substitute field roast (a delicious Seattle-made, grain-based meat substitute). R.C. also has a wide assortment of sweet and savory crepes for you Frenchies out there. Patxi’s Pizza: The newest pizza place in Ballard, Patxi’s offers delicious deep-dish that can be ordered with some of their 11 meats on one half and some of their 16 veggies on the other. There’s even a vegan pizza. Starters include meatballs as well as Brussels sprouts. Norm’s: I’ve never known a vegetarian slider before I went to Norm’s. But I love theirs: little soft buns with a spicy aioli. Norm’s also serves beef burgers, B.L.A.T.s (bacon, lettuce, avocado, and tomato), and a chickenand-brie sandwich. Morsel: One word: biscuits. Try the Fastbreak sandwich at the U District location. Meat eaters: Get it with the savory bacon. Vegetarians who eat eggs: Substitute bacon for their delicious pickled jalapeños. Or if you want to go simple (and eggless), have their cheesy biscuit with the amazesauce tomato jam or traditional biscuits and mushroom gravy. Hit the cowbell on the way out if you’ve loved your experience. It’s tradition! Seven Stars Pepper: Asian restaurants are perfect spots for vegetarians and carnivores to break bread, or fortune cookies. S.S.P. offers hand-shaved noodles and maybe the city’s best cold sesame noodles (a personal favorite) in addition to their vast meaty menu. E

F IL M

R MENU!! HAPPY$3.00HOU SUSHI & BEER

e in the food and beverage industry call it going over to the Dark Side. Every so often, a talented server or bartender moves to a restaurant in Bellevue or Kirkland, and those of us in Seattle sadly shake our heads. We understand and we don’t at the same time. The conventional wisdom is that you can make a lot of money as a frontof-house BY ZACH GEBALLE employee on the Eastside, even if the clientele isn’t supposedly as sophisticated as it is in Seattle. Yet visiting a couple of new bars has opened my eyes toward an opportunity I hadn’t considered. It’s an open secret in the local restaurant community that there are too many cocktail bars and not enough bartenders in Seattle these days. Sure, plenty of folks can stand behind a bar top, throw together a halfway decent Manhattan, and give off the air of aloofness that seems to increasingly pass for expertise. Yet the idea of going to a cocktail bar to learn and explore has given way to a desire to show off, both by customers and bartenders. Five years ago an interested neophyte might be able to walk into a dozen or so local bars and learn about amaros or rye whiskeys or any other obscure bottles on the shelf. While that environment certainly still exists, it’s harder to find, even at certain bars where you might expect it. Yet the Eastside is still largely uncharted territory for high-concept cocktail bars, as I discovered. At Kirkland’s Bottle & Bull, bar manager Silas Manlove explained it to me: “We have lots of people who come in and thank us, because now they don’t have to cross the bridges. We’re not quite a Seattle cocktail bar, we’re just trying to do what feels right.” In this case, that’s devising a cocktail program that walks the line between innovative and approachable. Bottle & Bull is an homage to the travels of Ernest Hemingway, and while it might be a bit odd to not see any absinthe on the drink list (though it does sit behind the bar), current trends like draft cocktails and lower-alcohol drinks are there. Bellevue’s smartly named Bar Code (get it, Bar Code, my column . . . ) is much the same, deftly toying with ingredients like mezcal and cachaca that until recently were only used regularly in the 206 area code. More important, the conviviality and conversation sadly rare in many Seattle bars is strongly represented. “This bar gives me plenty of chances to ‘take the reins’ and help guide someone’s experience,” Manlove explained. “Usually they’re on to something customized by the third drink, at the latest.” While any bar should cater to a wide range of drinkers (Bottle & Bull has Bud Light on draft, and a few bottles of Red Bull stashed away), it’s clear that both bars are hoping to keep the Eastside’s “cocktail chasers” on that side of the lake as much as possible. While the challenges of commuting to and from might dissuade some Seattle industry pros (and drink enthusiasts) from exploring the Dark Side, I suspect that we’ve been underestimating its true power. E

HAP P Y HO U R

food@seattleweekly.com

EVENTS

PROMOTIO

AR T S AN D E N T E R TAI N M E N

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com


arts&culture

How Channel 7’s late-night horror movies turned this boy into a film critic and author of a new book about Frankenstein.

ThisWeek’s PickList

BY ROBERT HORTON

The Three Sisters

Monster in the Box

THURSDAY, JAN. 22

Editor’s Note: The following is excerpted from Frankenstein, to be published next month. © and all rights reserved, 2015, Wallflower/Columbia University Press

I

BRENNAN MORING

I first saw Frankenstein almost 40 years after it had been made, and by then it was firmly entrenched as a cult classic. (Can a movie that was an enormous box-office success and a permanent fixture in popular culture be called a cult film? I believe so, especially if we emphasize the religious overtones contained in the word “cult.” And Frankenstein may have many fans all over the world, but there is still something forbidden about it, something outside the main of respectable culture.) Even though I was coming to the picture as part of a second, or perhaps third, generation of fans, even though I had already read about the

Monster and seen his image refracted in everything from Mad magazine to The Munsters, it still seemed fresh—and thanks to the peculiar intimacy of late-night television, that first experience was also deeply personal. Frankenstein belongs in a dark room, late at night. The moviegoers of the 1930s and ’40s who saw the film in theaters are the people that gave the Monster its first life, without question. (Mel Brooks, who would make a detailed parody of the mythos in his 1974 comedy Young Frankenstein, amusingly recalls his boyhood fear that—against all logic—the Frankenstein monster would somehow stomp its way to Brooks’s boyhood home in Brooklyn.) Yet it was the TV generation that turned the Monster and his ilk into icons, a generation crammed with future filmmakers weaned on latenight horror films (among them Steven Spielberg, Robert Zemeckis, Sam Raimi, and Joe Dante). What is it about Frankenstein, in particular, that seems to touch a nerve? Some of the issues are imbedded in the celebrated book that inspired the film. Even if Hollywood jettisoned many of the Romantic complexities of Mary Shelley’s novel, the book nevertheless manages to grin out from beneath the streamlining and backlot sets. At the elemental level, surely Frankenstein gets to us because it is a story of birth—and of “giving birth.” The mystery of how we got here is one childhood draw. Another early childhood anxiety surrounds the realization of death, and Frankenstein messes with the possibility of life after death; it even makes the process look scientific and achievable. How could children not be intrigued by the movie? E

film@seattleweekly.com

IT’S ALIVE!: FRANKENSTEIN ON FILM Fri., Jan. 23–Sun., Jan. 25 at SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff.net. Horton will introduce Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein (7 p.m. Fri., $7–$12) and teach a class on the latter film (11 a.m. Sat., $15–$20).

Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, see acttheatre. org. $15–$25. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

FRIDAY, JAN. 23

Naked Lunch & Burroughs: The Movie Burroughs in his early career.

SW FILE PHOTO

Frankenstein, a man of science who sought to create a man after his own image without reckoning upon God. It is one of the strangest tales ever told. It deals with the two great mysteries of creation—Life and Death. I think it will thrill you. It may shock you. It might even horrify you. So if any of you feel that you do not care to subject your nerves to such a strain, now is your chance to . . . Well . . . we’ve warned you . . .  This is going to be good. And here it comes: a clammy graveyard (ah, excellent start), tasty stuff about an abnormal brain, sensational lab scene in an electrical storm. Now the entrance of the monster: first a tease, then the horrible face. Can I stand to look at it? Yes. It’s weird but bearable. The Monster stomps and kills but also suffers, and the villagers go after him in a burning windmill. The End. The movie has delivered, and those of us in the room have lived through something. In childhood, staying up late to watch horror movies is a rite of passage, a test, a communal ceremony in which fears are met, endured, analyzed. Nightmares will come, but that’s part of the ritual too (although my fears at bedtime tend more toward the Wolf Man, whose dexterity and ferocious claws are more threatening than the Frankenstein monster’s clomping brute strength). We have seen Frankenstein, and the Monster is ours—a hero, in a strange way.

This two-fer tribute comes slightly overdue, since 2014 was the centennial of William S. Burroughs’ birth (he died in 1997). Still, David Cronenberg’s amusingly deadpan 1991 adaptation of Burroughs’ novel Naked Lunch gets the tone right, and Peter Weller is quite marvelous as Bill, the droll authorial stand-in. The film, running second tonight, is packed full of pert supporting performances from Judy Davis, Roy Scheider, Julian Sands, and Ian Holm. Much more seldom seen is Howard Brookner’s 1983 doc Burroughs: The Movie, made over a halfdozen years and including Burroughs cronies like Allen Ginsberg, Patti Smith, Lucien Carr, and

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

f a cult is anything, it has rituals and ceremonies and a schedule of worship. And here is ours: Friday nights, gathered in somebody’s basement, sleeping bags staked out on the floor. There are chocolate-bar wrappers scattered around and a half-eaten bag of Fritos waiting to be finished off. This is 1970, or possibly 1971 or 1969, and as 12-year-olds our beverage of choice is something innocuous, Kool-Aid or Coke. It’s almost 11:30, so the parents have already looked down a final time and said their goodnights, and the lights are appropriately low. If anybody managed to smuggle in an issue of Playboy it’s been put away, because we need to concentrate on television now. There’s a plaster Madonna looming in a corner, that home icon of the Catholic family, which is apt because we are gathered here for something like a religious ceremony ourselves. The local 11 o’clock news program on KIROTV, Seattle’s Channel 7, is ending. As always, the broadcast signs off with an editorial comment from station manager Lloyd E. Cooney, a bespectacled square perpetually out of step with the turbulent era (Channel 7, owned by the Mormon Church, is a conservative business). Strange, then, that every Friday night Cooney’s bland homilies are immediately replaced by a dark dungeon, a fiend in a coffin, and three hours of evil. At 11:30 sharp comes Nightmare Theatre, a double feature of horror movies. Each film is introduced by Channel 7’s resident horror-movie host, known as “The Count” (actually a station floor director named Joe Towey). His make-up is a Halloween-costume version of Dracula, with cape and fangs. He clambers out of a coffin, welcomes us, and introduces the first feature of the evening; his Bela Lugosi accent is terrible, but his maniacal laughter is accomplished. Tonight it’s that most famous title of all, Frankenstein. The film is already legendary in my mind—I am well aware of its status in the horror pantheon. I have seen that green-faced, heavybooted image in books and TV shows (though I am still somewhat confused about whether “Frankenstein” is the name of the monster or the name of the mad scientist), and finally I am allowed to stay up late enough to watch the film on television. Here with other like-minded fifthgraders, I await the arrival of something monumental and, with luck, terrifying. The Count finishes his intro with a cackle. When the film begins, it too has a host, a neat little grey man who comes out from behind a curtain and delivers a message that sounds both sinister and whimsical: Mr. Carl Laemmle feels it would be a little unkind to present this picture without just a word of friendly warning. We are about to unfold the story of

“Moscow! Moscow! Moscow!” Oh, the aching sadness of the provinces, so far from culture, ballrooms, and eligible bachelors. Surrounded by peasants and filth, visited by drunks and boring yokels unacquainted with culture, deprived of the latest news or gossip—it’s enough to drive a woman insane (or: three of them). Anton Chekhov’s wistful 1900 drama of thwarted lives is necessarily sad, but also a lesson in coping. You married the wrong man. You hate your sister-in-law. Your father, the late General Prozorov, ruined your life. You’ll never have children or hear Beethoven played properly again. And yet life must go on. (Here we see a lineage from Chekhov to Beckett.) Olga, Masha, and Irina are never going to enjoy the freedoms of their brother, being women in late 19th-century Russia. Their options are circumscribed by sex, class, and custom, yet their lives aren’t over. As a provincial doctor (and frequent traveler), Chekhov surely encountered dolorous, unfulfilled women like them. And what prescription could he offer? Not hope, surely, which gnaws away at the soul like a spiritual cancer. Rather, there’s acceptance, endurance, and perhaps a solidarity in suffering for this fading gentry. John Abramson plays young Prozorov, with Julie Briskman, Alexandra Tavares, and Sydney Andrews as his three unhappy sisters. John Langs directs this second production by The Seagull Project. (Through Feb. 8.) ACT

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 17


arts&culture» » FROM PAGE 17 Terry Southern. But the star attraction, of course, is Burroughs himself, who discourses upon his artistic methods, discusses the accidental shooting of his wife, and enacts a passage from Naked Lunch. Surprising to some will be the sad presence of his son, William Jr., an addict who died during the long course of the film’s production. The author, worshipped by so many young acolytes, rarely spoke of him afterward. (Through Sun., Jan. 31.) Grand

BEGINS FEBRUARY 5

Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusion cinema.org. $5–$9. 7 & 9 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

stubbornly comparing apples and oranges, or insisting something is true because you read it on the Internet (or heard it on FOX News)—these are the hallmarks of our proud American intellect. We are a nation that follows our gut, while McKinley favors her cranium. If you’ve got a daughter you’re trying to interest in the sciences (or programming or any other quant endeavor), she provides a good role model. Also, McKinley has been known to sing songs about entropy and wave/ particle theory, which more musicians really ought to do. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-

6600, elliottbaybook.com. Free. 7 p.m. T. BOND

ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

July in her movie The Future.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Miranda July

18

No, we haven’t read The First Bad Man, but we expect the girls on Girls to talk about it very soon. Nobody does zeitgeist the way July does zeitgeist, and whatever turns her film-directing career has taken (as in Me and You and Everyone We Know and The Future), she’s got a knack for working her way into all the right cocktail-party conversations. The novel, her first, actually describes the sort of midlife crisis that should be years away for July, and her heroine is a thwarted, unsuccessful recluse with whom the author has little in common—except, of course, a baby. July, with her artist/filmmaker husband Mike Mills (Beginners), is now a parent, and her protagonist Cheryl becomes a kind of surrogate parent in the novel. First Cheryl agrees to shelter the surly 20-year-old daughter of her boss; then that daughter, Clee, turn out to be pregnant. And by caring for one new little human, Cheryl learns to take better care of herself. July’s fans already know the plot, of course, and they’ve been buying artifacts—or possibly narrative clues?—inspired by the novel on July’s website, mirandajuly.com. Long before she started publishing, July was a successful performance artist who understood how to sell her brand. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-

4849, stgpresents.org. $31.50 (includes book). 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER SATURDAY, JAN. 24

Christine McKinley

The Portland author of Physics for Rock Stars: Making the Laws of the Universe Work for You (Perigee, $16) is a deservedly popular host on Brad Meltzer’s Decoded on the History Channel. (What that has to do with history we’ll leave to another day.) She’s a trained mechanical engineer who loves to explain things, which often takes the form of debunking things. And in that regard, she’s got a lot of material to work with. Superstition, poor math skills, failure to consider the evidence,

TUESDAY, JAN. 27

Frank Capra Restored

We film critics have ambivalent feelings about Capra (1897–1991), one of the most successful writer/directors of the 1930s and ’40s. He won all the awards, he sold millions of tickets, but then he suddenly became obsolete in the postwar period—totally square. Baby boomers in particular were dismissive of his conservative values and coerced sentimentalism (“Capracorn” is the enduring shorthand slight). He was an auteur before the Cahiers du Cinéma crowd coined the term, but American critics shuddered to grant him such status. Apart from that holiday perennial It’s a Wonderful Life (which has played for 44 consecutive years at the Grand Illusion), his canon has fallen out of favor. So here’s a chance, with five 4K digital restorations running Tuesdays through February 24, to appreciate the craftsmanship in his very populist oeuvre. Tonight, the road comedy It Happened One Night (1934) was just the tonic we wanted during the Great Depression. Clark Gable, as a wisecracking journalist, perfectly embodied the ideal American response to hard times: flippant, jaunty, indefatigable, never discouraged, always game for a new adventure or a new dame—the latter of course being escaped heiress Claudette Colbert, whom he rescues from snootiness and dull fortune. Capra loved to celebrate the common man, without airs or pretensions; yet that same noble everyman was also fundamentally a Hollywood construct. We bought the fantasy for a time, then grew tired of it as Capra kept pushing the same product. (Following are Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Lost Horizon, You Can’t Take It With You, and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.) SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff. net. $7–$12. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER E


(1/12) Town Music Third Coast Percussion (1/13) Debate: Daniel DiSalvo and Michael McCann ‘The Power of Public Unions’

Briefly associated with Lenin, Alexei Maximovich Peshkov adopted the pen name of Gorky (or “bitter”). If Riis’ photojournalism evoked pure pity, Gorky’s writing blurred the line between pity and disgust. Here his unvarnished gutterdwellers create an aversion to a predicament in which we bourgeois theatergoers are complicit. The new songs lend romance, though they fail to update this pre-revolutionary stage relic to the age of Thomas Piketty. IRFAN SHARIFF

The Lower Depths THELAB@INSCAPE, 815 SEATTLE BLVD. S., 800-838-3006, BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM. $12–$18. 8 P.M. THURS.–SAT. PLUS MON., JAN. 26. ENDS JAN. 31.

12TH AVENUE ARTS, 1620 12TH AVE., WASHINGTONENSEMBLE.ORG. $15–$25. 7:30 P.M. THURS.–MON. ENDS FEB. 2.

ROBERT FALK

(1/19) Wes Moore How to Live a Meaningful Life

stage@seattleweekly.com

TOWN HALL

(1/20) Anya Kamenetz The Perils of Standardized Testing

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(1/21) Amir Aczel The Roots of Numbers (1/22) Andrew Keen The Internet’s Unseen Consequences (1/22) Seattle Neufeld Community & ParentMap: Dr. Gordon Neufeld Parent-Child Power Struggles (1/22) Joshua Davis Immigration, Robots, & DREAMers (1/23) Kimberly Parker: ‘Lost in Sound: A One Woman Play’ (1/24) Saturday Family Concerts The Bushwick Book Club Seattle A.A. Milne’s ‘Winnie-the-Pooh’ (1/24) Early Music Guild: Pallade Musica:‘A Mio Modo’ (1/25) Seattle Festival Orchestra Brahms, Saint-Saens, Tchaikovsky, and Bryant (1/26) StolenYouth presents Sex Trafficking: Changing a Culture of Demand (1/26) Stephen R. & Anthony R. Palumbi Diving Into the Mysteries of the Deep Sea (1/27) Mozart Birthday Toast TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

FREE Community Concert Bring your

Family & Friends

J A N U A R Y

Doors open @ 7:00 SOLOS & DUETS

Jim Page Reggie Garrett Urban Acoustic Folk-Soul

Ernestine Anderson Place 2010 S. Jackson St. SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98144

MORE INFO:

www.upbeatonjackson.org

COMMUNITY

(1/28) The YAMS Collective WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG Race, Art, and Being Black (1/28) Nazila Fathi The Evolution of Iran (1/30) James K. Galbraith Understanding Inequality in America and the World (1/30) Michael Shermer The Scientific Approach to Morality (1/31) Seattle Arts & Lectures: Patton Oswalt Off the Page (2/2) Nikil Saval The Past and Future of Our Workplaces (2/2) Adidas Outdoor presents Reinhold Messner (2/3) Norman Doidge How the Brain Heals the Body (2/4) Seattle Arts & Lectures: Sherman Alexie (2/4) George Friedman FEB 12-14 / MEANY HALL / 206-543-4880 / UWWORLDSERIES.ORG Europe’s Pending Catastrophe

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Buried in the boilerplate of the real-estate contract-cum-program for Washington Ensemble Theatre’s world premiere is a term I had not heard before: “American Terriblism,” there defined as a movement—forged by John Waters and Tim Burton and continued by the likes of Adult Swim’s Eric Wareheim and Tim Heidecker—that mocks the vacuity of the American suburban experience. Indeed, this 90-minute one-act apocalypse comedy by Joshua Conkel—whose Milk Milk Lemonade WET produced in 2011—draws more laughs skewering the dreams and dislikes of characters reared on pizza bagels and room freshener than churning dust storms of sci-fi camp. Pregnant Shawna (Samie Spring Detzer) and misanthropic Monique (Laura Hanson) are a pair of realtors who’ve organized a book-club meeting at one of their listings: a crappy new spec home in a middle-of-nowhere development. (The tract is rendered bland as flour paste by set designers Pete Rush and Christopher Mumaw in WET’s first production in the new 12th Avenue Arts building.) Guests converge in amusing vignettes: Elaine (Marc Kenison, aka “boylesque” dancer Waxie Moon), the mayor’s condescending wife, prone to preening her hair into a planetary nimbus; a gay couple, both halves of whom are named William ( Justin Huertas and Ben McFadden); and friends Heather ( Jessie Underhill) and Bibi (Leah Salcido Pfenning). Except for Shawna, all are drawn by the social occasion—not the aspirational-pablum featured book, Whisper to the Stars. Director Ali el-Gasseir paces the comedy perfectly, with a light, nuanced hand. Cute touches like Bibi’s bookshelf-motif blouse—thanks to costumer Alirose Panzarella— snap us into the weird fairy-tale reality of the play’s world. However, my interest waned as occult phenomena overtook Conkel’s amusingly drawn characters. The book-club members are stung by soul-infiltrating insectoids, then gradually become insectoids themselves—who are far less interesting than the people they started out as. Strobe lights, swampy gases, vomiting, alien voices, seizures . . . pretty much the full warehouse of horror-genre misfortunes gets trundled out. But even while the plagues rain down, regular old situational comedy works better for Conkel. (One of the Williams wants a baby, tries to steal Shawna’s minutes-old spawn, but forgets to cut the umbilical cord. Boing! Splat! The Three Stooges would approve.) The cast’s all-in verve and character honing temporarily plugs many a logic hole in this enjoyably inane doomsday scenario. Nonetheless, like a tangle of cul-de-sacs, the play itself doesn’t really go anywhere. MARGARET FRIEDMAN E

on

(1/15) NatureBridge presents ‘Return of the River’ Film Screening

Sprawl

Natasha (Cox) and the actor (Waldstein) share a moment of solidarity.

In 1890, muckraking photographer Jacob Riis’ How the Other Half Lives documented the squalid tenements of New York City. His middle-class readers had never seen such poverty and were forced to confront it; the book’s title became shorthand for progressivism and social reform. A dozen years later in imperial Russia, Maxim Gorky’s The Lower Depths had much the same effect. In Theatre Machine’s revival, we’re thrust into a poor house, run by cruel, conniving Wassalissa (the formidable Alissa Cattabriga), where residents waste away their lives drinking and bickering. The din is disturbing as denizens talk over one another; slips and panties hang in the foreground, cots line the ground, and cheap booze flows. Whose turn is it to sweep? The fallen baron (Phillip Keiman) has an aversion to manual labor that bounces the responsibility from one to the next. As the bookish prostitute (Sharon Barto), the cirrhosis-stricken actor (Mark Waldstein), and the pragmatist of the group (Cole Hornaday) argue over whose turn it is to clean, Natasha (Brittany Cox), Wassalissa’s daydreaming, wide-eyed sister, introduces the newest boarder. Compassionate interloper Luka (Bill Badgley) is both a godsend and a curse to this group. His rhetoric is incendiary, giving these derelicts hope. But who is he? While the boarders are more caricatures than individuals, Luka is purely a plot device. He’s in, then he’s out, leaving the residents to only briefly contemplate self-improvement—or even revolution. At a time when Oxfam is predicting that one percent of Earth’s population will soon control 50 percent of global wealth, director Melissa Fenwick’s adaptation is surely topical, but with a twist: This show is a musical. Ryan Ricks and a band provide live melodic/melodramatic accompaniment: tunes by Tom Waits, Neil Young, and even a beautifully tragic rendition of The Verve Pipe’s “The Freshmen” (sung by Badgley). Call it a gimmick, but the soundtrack at least partially offsets our frustration with typical characters who never pull themselves up by their bootstraps and get out of their rut. All we see are slivers of compassion and humanity—not a class uprising.

(1/14) Steven Brill Fixing American Healthcare

Featuring

Opening Nights

(1/14) Marin Katusa The Future of the Global Energy Trade

19


arts&culture» Stage & Visual Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

ANNIE JR. You loved it on the big screen (or at least

your kids did); now see it performed by Youth Theatre Northwest. Stroum Jewish Community Center, 3801 E. Mercer Way, Mercer Island, 232-4145, youththeatre. org. $13–$17. Opens Jan. 23. 7 p.m. Fri–Sat., 2 p.m. Sat.–Sun. (except Jan. 24). Ends Feb. 8. AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS Five actors take on a total of 39 roles in this madcap adaptation of Jules Verne’s adventure novel. Village Theatre, 303 Front St., Issaquah, 425-392-2202. $35–$67. Preview Jan. 21, opens Jan. 22. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see village theatre.org for exact schedule. Ends March 1. (Runs at the Everett PAC March 6–29.) A DELICATE BALANCE Albee’s drama about troubled, brittle people in close quarters. Trinity Parish Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 332-7908. Pay what you can. Opens Jan. 23. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see theatre912.com for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 14. THE EPIPHANY A reading of Bruce Olav Solheim’s new play about Norway during the Nazi occupation. Nordic Heritage Museum, 3014 N.W. 67th St., nordic museum.org. $10–$12. 7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. FAMILY AFFAIR Jennifer Jasper’s “hilarious, twisted, and ultimately relatable” cabaret on the theme of family. JewelBox Theater at the Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., jenniferjasperperforms.com. $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 21. 4,000 MILES A grandson and grandma bond in Amy Herzog’s drama. ArtsWest Playhouse and Gallery, 4711 California Ave. S.W., 938-0339, artswest.org. $15–$46.50. Opens Jan. 22. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 15. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Book-It not only turns novels into theater, but in this case newspapers—namely, 90 years of The Jewish Transcript. Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., spl.org. Free. 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. MWINDO Cheryl L. West’s new play, based on a Central African tale, sounds roughly Lion King-y: the exiled son of a chief goes on a coming-of-age quest. Seattle Children’s Theatre, Seattle Center, 441-3322. $20–$36. Opens Jan. 22. Runs Fri.–Sun. plus some Thurs.; see sct.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 15. OUR TOWN Thornton Wilder’s iconic drama is opening one of the theaters at 12th Avenue Arts. 1620 12th Ave., 800-838-3006, strawshop.org. $18–$36. Opens Jan. 22. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 21. THE PIANO LESSON Family members clash in Depression-era Pittsburgh in August Wilson’s Pulitzerwinning play. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $17–$102. Opens Jan. 21. 7:30 Wed.– Sun. plus some Wed., Sat., Sun. matinees; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 8. THE THREE SISTERS SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 17.

• 

• 

CURRENT RUNS

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

AETERNO ELEMENTUM This unambitious, self-effac-

20

ing rock opera tells “the tragic story of mankind’s final fall” through a troupe of “fire-dancers . . . aerial acrobats, martial-arts experts, and fully armored knights engaged in authentic medieval combat,” all set to heavy metal. Oh, is that all? Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., Kirkland, 425-893-9900, kpcenter.org. $30. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 24, 6 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. THE BLACK LODGE Design your own Twin Peaks episode at this improv show. Unexpected Productions Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 587-2414, unexpected productions.org. $12–$15. 8:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends March 7. DIRTY DANCING Nobody puts this 1987 movie classic in a corner. But they did put it onstage. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-STG-4TIX. $25 and up. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see stgpresents.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 1. THE 4TH GRADERS PRESENT AN UNNAMED LOVE-SUICIDE A child’s final testament becomes

a drama-within-a-drama as his classmates re-enact it. Ballard Underground, 2200 N.W. Market St., 3955458, ghostlighttheatricals.org. $12–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 18. Ends Jan. 24. THE LOVE LIST In Norm Foster’s comedy, two guys think they’ve cracked the secret of finding the perfect woman. SecondStory Repertory, 16587 N.E. 74th St, Redmond, 881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. $22–$27. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus 2 p.m. Sat., Jan. 31. Ends Jan. 31. THE LOWER DEPTHS SEE REVIEW, PAGE 19. MEASURE FOR MEASURE In this legalistic dystopia, directed by Desdemona Chiang for Seattle Shakespeare Co., marriage costs money; and by fornicating outside of marriage, you can lose your head—literally. While the legitimate Duke of Vienna

• 

(David Anthony Lewis) pretends to be out of town, petit-tyrant Angelo (a subdued Bradford Farwell) sentences Claudio (Moses Yim) to death for fornicating with his girlfriend without the proper license (marriage). Claudio’s novitiate sister Isabella (Cindy Im) intercedes on Claudio’s behalf, but refuses Angelo’s quid pro quo demand of her chastity. In fact, his attempted rape of Isabella is played almost for slapstick. Fonts of more conventional humor include lowlifes Lucio (Tim Gouran), concave and jangling with the DTs, who heckles from the audience; natty pimp Pompey (Scott Ward Abernethy), who moonlights as executioner; and pillow-bellied constable Elbow (Harry Todd Jamieson) with his whoopee megaphone. In general, Chiang and company get the balance right to this problematic “unfestive comedy,” which proves again how lust and justice are perilous companions. Just ask Eliot Spitzer. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Center Theatre at Seattle Center, 7338222. $29–$43. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see seattle shakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 1.

THE MODERN ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES The audience takes the place of Sir Arthur

Conan Doyle in this improv mystery. Jet City Improv, 5510 University Way N.E., 352-8291, jetcityimprov.org. $12–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri. Ends Feb. 13. PIGGYBACK Improv inspired by a preceding stand-up routine. Unexpected Productions’ Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, 587-2414, unexpectedproductions. org. $10. 8:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 8. THE SECRETARIES A black-comic satire of gender stereotypes set in an Oregon lumber mill. Theater Schmeater, 2125 Third Ave., 324-5801, schmeater.org. $22–$29. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Feb. 14. SPRAWL SEE REVIEW, PAGE 19. A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE Directed by L. Zane Jones for Civic Rep, this production of Tennessee Williams’ great warhorse strips away the Southern accents. While this staging is not devoid of charm, it fails to connect the dots of the play with a sense of tragic inevitability or heft. The interpretation feels oddly weightless—ungrounded in space and time—despite the formidable rantings of a very enjoyable Stanley. Frail and lovely, Blanche (Robin Jones) arrives in dainty vintage togs with her scuffed trunk of sartorial “tools” for nabbing a man who might save her from moral and financial ruin. Sister Stella (Kelli Mohrbacher) confusingly sports a tattoo, long, streaky blond highlights, and ’50s-style cat-eye glasses. Stanley (a terrific David Nail) looks pure Ballard: L-shaped sideburns, bowling shirt, and pate-stubble. Their dialects seem random—Jackie O, San Fernando Valley, and Queens, respectively. Somehow Blanche just isn’t Blanche without her distinctly Southern cadences. Her words don’t cast their bayou-inflected spell. But the bigger problem is an abiding tentativeness among the central cast. Among them, Nail’s big-throated, Archie Bunkerlike Stanley is the performance I’ll remember. He seems to sniff every room he enters and every person he evaluates, trusting that most basic sense over the eyes’ and ears’ vulnerability to seduction. MARGARET FRIEDMAN New City Theatre, 1410 18th Ave., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $10–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Jan. 25. TEATRO ZINZANNI: HACIENDA HOLIDAY TZZ’s new show keeps its dinner-cabaret formula fresh with acts that mash up entertainment skills in pairs: aerial plus dance en pointe by PNB alumna Ariana Lallone; trapeze plus contortion with Duo Rose; juggling plus the speed and aesthetic of thrash metal by Gamal David Garcia; and ballroom dance plus pole work by the astounding Vertical Tango. All this is organized by just the lightest spritz of storyline: Vivian Beaumount and Clifton Caswell (Christine Deaver and Kevin Kent) return to a swanky hotel to renew their vows. By the end, the gender-melding is complete—Beaumount and Caswell reconcile, each adopting at least two sexes, maybe more. It’s a romantic finale as spicy as the Southwest-inspired menu. GAVIN BORCHERT Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $99 and up. Runs Thurs.–Sun. plus some Wed.; see zinzanni.com/seattle for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 31. THE VELVETEEN RABBIT Toys come to life in this children’s classic. SecondStory Repertory, Redmond Town Center, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425-8816777, secondstoryrep.org. 1 & 3 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends Jan. 25.

• 

Dance

CARMONA FLAMENCO Traditional music and dance.

Café Solstice, 4116 University Way N.E., 932-4067, carmona2@comcast.net. $15–$20. 8 & 9:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 24.


32,000 FANS AND COUNTING Classical, Etc.

Openings & Events

THE MET: LIVE IN HD Opera from NYC at a moviehouse

BRANDON ALESON Same Difference is a video instal-

• 

• 

•  •  • 

• 

(No show Feb 1)

A musical journey re-living the past, celebrating the present, and looking to the future on a hilarious girls night out! Recommended for 18+

THURSDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: All Tickets: $20 (Youth: $10) Regular Admission: VIP $50 Adults: $30 Senior/Military: $25 Youth (25 & Under): $10 TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE!

253-661-1444 • CENTERSTAGETHEATRE.COM

Ongoing

• CITY DWELLERS A dozen contemporary Indian artists are represented in this show originating entirely from the private local collection of Sanjay Parthasarathy and wife Malini Balakrishnan. Scenes and icons from Mumbai to New Delhi are represented via photography and sculpture, from an all-native perspective. As tourists know, India is ridiculously photogenic, from its colorful idols and deities to the slums and beggars. It all depends on what you want to see. Dhruv Malhotra, for instance, takes large color images of people sleeping in public places—some because they’re poor, others because they simply feel like taking a nap. Nandini Valli Muthiah opts for more stage-managed scenes, posing a costumed actor as the blue-skinned Hindu god Krishna in contemporary settings; in one shot I love, he sits in a hotel suite, like a tired business traveler awaiting a conference call on Skype. Sculptor Debanjan Roby even dares to appropriate Gandhi, rendering him in bright red fiberglass and listening to a white iPod. This impudent figure tweaks India’s history and the relentless consumerism that now links us all, from Seattle to Srinagar. BRIAN MILLER Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $12–$19. Weds.-Sun. Ends Feb. 15. PATRICK DRISCOLL & BARRY STONE Driscoll is a painter, but he prefers T-shirts and underwear to canvasses. Stone’s “data-bending” work uses technology to warp his photo and video pieces. James Harris Gallery, 604 Second Ave, 903-6220, jamesharrisgallery.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat. Ends Feb. 14. INCANTATION AND FOLLIES Incantation, inspired by death, rebirth, winter, and ritual, is group show featuring work with strong mystical influences. Mark Mitchell’s Follies features clothing inspired by pharmaceutical companies and the AIDS epidemnic. Roq La Rue, 532 First Ave S., 374-8977, roqlarue.com. Noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Jan. 31. JAMES MARTIN Cartoony, circusy gauche paintings full of monkeys, lions, characters from King of the Hill, Mariners players, and more. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave S., 622-2833, fosterwhite.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Jan. 31. MUSEUM FOR AN IMAGINED CITY A bunch of artists from Scotland create art based on what they think our city might be like. SOIL Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264-8061, soilart.org. Noon-5 p.m. Thu.-Sun. Ends Jan. 31. DYLAN NEUWIRTH Neuwirth’s “post-human” art often ponders the odd relationship humans have with technology. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org. Noon-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. Ends Jan. 31. POLICE AT WORK In light of the events of Ferguson, artists in this group show present smartphone footage taken of police officers in the field (all benign, we hope). Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com. Noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Jan. 24.

• 

• 

• 

• 

B Y K E LT O N S E A R S

B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com

January 23 - February 8

Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

Win Seahawks Playoff Tickets,

Taking appointments and walk-ins

see our Facebook page for details! Haircuts Massage Waxing Manicure Color Pedicure Complimentary beverages Free parking 228 Park Lane Kirkland, WA 98033 425-828-2000

facebook.com/knockoutswa

1205502

• 

lation meant to explore “the natural plasticity of the digital through its mediation of the physical.” Glass Box, 831 Seattle Blvd. S., glassboxgallery.com. 6-9 p.m. Wed., Jan. 21. JOHN GRADE Middle Fork is a replica of a giant Western hemlock created with plaster molds and real wood chunks. Opening reception Noon-5 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. MadArt, 325 Westlake Ave. N., 623-1180, madartseattle.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Apr. 25. HOLD TIGHT TO A THING THAT MOVES, VOL. 3 The newest volume in an ongoing series features local artists musing on Seattle’s wintertime darkness. Gallery 1412, 1412 18th Ave., gallery1412.org. 8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. IMAGINATURE Surreal nature-inspired work from local artists. Opening reception 6-8:30 p.m Fri., Jan. 23. Kirkland Arts Center, 620 Market St., 425-822-7161, kirklandartscenter.org. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends March 27. JAMES MONGRAIN During his brief residency, the artist will create modern interpretations of 18th- and 19thcentury vintage Venetian glass art. Museum of Glass, 1801 Dock St. (Tacoma), 284-2130, museumofglass. org. $5-$15. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed.-Sun. Ends Jan. 25.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

near you. This week, Renée Fleming sings the title role in Lehár’s The Merry Widow. See fathomevents.com for participating theaters. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 21. SEATTLE OPERA In the title role of Puccini’s 1900 opera Tosca, Ausrine Stundyte proves a courageous actress, adeptly playing up her not-so-attractive side—her coquettishness and jealousy—as well as her later heroism. The soprano’s one vocal issue was a vibrato that, curiously, sounded fully under control only in Act 2—luckily, this act includes Tosca’s big solo, “Vissi d’arte,” which was gorgeous: passionate and thoughtful, artful and emotionally direct. Singing her lover Cavaradossi, Stefano Secco’s voice has a fairly baritonal color, richly easy on the ear and lacking nothing in carrying or penetrating power. And as Scarpia, Greer Grimsley engagingly lets his voice go a little “Italian” at times, with just hints of the scoops, slides, and sobs you’ve never heard him use as Wotan in Wagner’s Ring. He and Stundyte rightfully earned unexpected mid-act applause after Scarpia’s powerfully staged and sung death scene. GAVIN BORCHERT McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 389-7676. $25 and up. Ends Jan. 24; see seattleopera.org for exact schedule. SEATTLE SYMPHONY Pink Martini is the special guest band. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $69–$109. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. THE BALLAD OF ISHTAR Wayne Horvitz, Beth Fleenor, Paris Hurley, and Ahamefule J. Oluo are among the collaborators in Heather Bentley’s semi-improvised electroacoustic opera, a contemporary take on the myth of the Babylonian goddess. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave.N., heatherbentleymusic. com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22–Sat., Jan. 24. SEVEN LAST WORDS Haydn’s devotional, meditative string quartet is woven with new verse by Robert Bringhurst and Jan Zwicky. Trinity Parish Church, 698 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 23. SEATTLE CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY Six concerts plus other events, Jan. 23–31. Recitals at 6:30 p.m., concerts at 7:30 (except where noted). Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., seattlechambermusic.org. Single tickets $16–$48, series $135–$270. • Jan. 23 Recital: Anne-Marie McDermott plays two Haydn piano sonatas. Concert: Bach, Martinu, and Elgar’s Piano Quintet, which I’d argue is his best work. • Jan. 24 Recital: Harpsichordist music from Luc Beauséjour. Concert: Handel, Beethoven, Dohnányi. • Jan. 25 2 p.m. recital: Oboist/pianist/composer Ben Haussmann performs. 3 p.m. concert: Mozart’s pianoand-wind quintet and a handful of Vivaldi concertos. SEATTLE OPERA FROST FEST Vocal music and kids’ activities in this family event. Cornish Playhouse, Seattle Center, seattleopera.org. $5 (under 18 free). 12:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 24. PALLADE MUSICA Biber’s Mystery Sonatas and more from this Montreal group. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild.org. $20–$45. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 24. SEATTLE SYMPHONY A joint concert (Hindemith and Tchaikovsky) with members of the Seattle Youth Symphony. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 2154747, seattlesymphony.org. Free. 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. AUBURN SYMPHONY CHAMBER CONCERT From ASO musicians, works by Harrison, Stockhausen, and Webern. Really. St. Matthew Episcopal Church, 123 L St. N.E., Auburn, 253-887-7777, auburnsymphony.org. $10–$17. 4 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. MEG BRENNAND & DAVID WHITE From this cellist and pianist, the second of three concerts of Beethoven’s cello works. This one includes the Sonata in A Major, probably the most popular of them all. First Church Seattle, 180 Denny Way, $10–$25. 5 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. MUSIC OF REMEMBRANCE A concert to mark the 70th anniversary, to the day, of the liberation of Auschwitz. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., music ofremembrance.org. Free, but reserve a ticket via 2154747 or at the Benaroya box office. 5 p.m. Tues., Jan. 27. WINDS OF THE BAROQUE Chamber music for flute, oboe, and bassoon. Christ Episcopal Church, 4548 Brooklyn Ave. N.E., 633-1611, salishseafestival.org. $15–$25. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Jan. 27. MOZART BIRTHDAY TOAST The “Dissonance” string quartet, bits from Don Giovanni, and more, plus bubbles and bonbons, to celebrate Wolfgang’s 259th. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave,. townhallseattle.org. $13–$18. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Jan. 27.

facebook.com/seattleweekly

21


GOOD BOOKSTORES A Reader’s Guide

SPOTLIGHT ON

Elliott Bay Book Company How to be Both: A Novel by Ali Smith

"How to be Both is a rare kind of novel. Smith changes the way we think about time and our connections to people and events past, future, and present. This contemplative and unique story incites endless shades of meaning." - Keith

Find the perfect book at your local bookseller and...

Let this be YOU!

The Age of Anxiey

by Andrea Tone

A fascinating look at how prescription tranquilizers have helped and hindered people with anxiety disorders. The difficulty in identifying and treating mental disorders took center stage in our discussion of the book. Our medical system has gone from authoritative and totalitarian asylums to neglectful and callous HMOs.

The Marshmallow Test

The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami

The Peripheral

The Boys in the Boat

by Charles Petzold

by Walter Michael

by William Gibson

Code

The Innovators

A Boat, a Whale, & a Walrus: Menus and Stories

by Walter Isaacson

Zombies and Calculus

by Renee Erickson

THE ELLIOTT BAY BOOK COMPANY CELEBRATING OVER

40 YEARS

OF INDEPENDENT BOOKSELLING SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Ada’s Technical Books

All the Light We Cannot See

by Daniel James Brown

22

SPOTLIGHT ON

Staff Picks from Ada's Technical Books

Hild by by Nicola Griffith

Shop from 250,000 titles and find a complete list of author events & sign up for our blog at:

www.elliottbaybook.com 1521 Tenth Avenue · Seattle 206-624-6600

by Colin Adams

Good Books, Great Events, Free Parking Live Music Friday & Saturday Nights Lake Forest Park Towne Center 206-366-3333 www.thirdplacebooks.com

Joyce carol oates

Come see Ada’s new home at 425 15th Ave E Seattle, WA

adasbooks.com

Largest Selection of

Metaphysical Books In Downtown Seattle

February 5 • 7PM

u district store visit

ubookstore.com/events

Author Events M.A. LAWSON Viking Bay is his new crime thriller. Third

Bestsellers at Elliott Bay Book Company: by Anthony Doerr

a&c» Books

MIND • BODY • SPIRIT • EARTH

Books • Tarot • Goddess Magic Astrology • Tibetan Statues Sage • Crystals Candles • Incense Oils Aromatherapy • Hemp Global Exchange Fair-Trade & much, much more!!

Best Psychic Readings Daily! 1530 FIRST AVE (1st & Pine) 206.467.7745

Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com. 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 21. KATE E. THOMPSON Bigfoot Hunters Never Lie is his debut novel. University Book Store (Mill Creek), 15311 Main St., 425-385-3530, bookstore.washington.edu. 7 p.m. Wed., Jan. 21. AMIR D. ACZEL He’ll discuss his Finding Zero: A Mathematician’s Odyssey to Uncover the Origins of Numbers. Ravenna Third Place, 6500 20th Ave. N.E., 523-0210, ravennathirdplace.com. 7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. TESSA ARLEN There’s murder at the estate in her Edwardian thriller Death of a Dishonorable Gentleman. Eagle Harbor Books, 157 Winslow Way E. (Bainbridge Island), 842-5332, eagleharborbooks. com. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. KAREN GAUDETTE BREWER She shares recipes from Seafood Lover’s Pacific Northwest: Restaurants, Markets, Recipes & Traditions. University Book Store (Mill Creek), 7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. JOSHUA DAVIS His goes inside a broken educational system in Spare Parts: Four Undocumented Teenagers, One Ugly Robot, and the Battle for the American Dream. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. NICK DIMARTINO The local novelist considers whether straight-gay male friendships are possible in Golden Handcuffs. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, bookstore.washington.edu. 7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. HOLLY J. HUGHES Sailing by Ravens is her memoir of life in Alaska. Third Place, 7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. ANDREW KEEN The eminent cyber-thinker and CNN journalist discusses his The Internet Is Not the Answer. Town Hall, $5. 6 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. RANDALL KENAN The novelist (A Visitation of Spirits) talks about his craft. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. $5-$12. 7 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. SUSAN MEYERS An instructor at Seattle U, she places grief and loss at the center of her debut novel Failing the Trapeze. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. 5 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 22. ARDETH DEVRIES She shares rescue-dog tales from Old Dog Haven: Every Old Dog Has a Story to Tell. Elliott Bay, 3 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. KATHRYN KEVE Beautiful Bainbridge Island collects her photos in a coffee-table album. Eagle Harbor, 3 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. JULIA QUINN Her latest historical romance is The Secrets of Sir Richard Kenworthy. University Book Store, 3 p.m. Sun., Jan. 25. JOELLE CHARBONNEAU Her sci-fil trilogy is called The Testing. University Book Store (Bellevue), 990 102nd Ave. N.E., 425-462-4500, bookstore.washington.edu. 6 p.m. Mon., Jan. 26. STEPHEN R. PALUMBI AND ANTHONY R. PALUMBI The father and son team of science writ-

ers talk about their The Extreme Life of the Sea. Town Hall, $5. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Jan. 26. PETER G. TORMEY The former Husky footballer discusses his coach in The Thursday Speeches: Lessons in Life, Leadership, and Football from Coach Don James. University Book Store, 7 p.m. Mon., Jan. 26. ERIC AVILA In Kane Hall, Room 120, the UCLA prof will discuss his The Folklore of the Freeway: Race and Revolt in the Modernist City. Free, but RSVP to grad. washington.edu/lectures. UW Campus, 6:30 p.m. Tues., Jan. 27. MARIE MATSUKI MOKETT In the family memoir Where the Dead Pause and the Japanese Say Goodbye: A Journey, the author goes back to Fukushima, site of the recent tsunami and nuclear accident. Third Place, 7 p.m. Tues., Jan. 27. RICHARD VAN ANDERSON The retired doctor has written a medical thriller, The Organ Takers. University Book Store (Bellevue), 6:30 p.m. Tues., Jan. 27. SUSAN ADRIAN The author of Tunnel Vision is joined by Kendare Blake (Anna Dressed in Blood) and Lish McBride (Hold Me Closer, Necromaner). University Book Store, 7 p.m. Weds., Jan. 28 NAZILA FATHI The Iranian-born author discusses her The Lonely War: One Woman’s Account of the Struggle for Modern Iran. Town Hall, $5. 7:30 p.m. Weds., Jan. 28 IVOR DAVIS The Beatles and Me on Tour is his memoir of ‘64. University Book Store, 1 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 29.

• 

BY B R IA N M I LLE R

Send events to books@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended


arts&culture» Film

Opening ThisWeek

serious American moviemaking style employed 40 years ago by directors like Sidney Lumet and Francis Ford Coppola, in which a system’s structure is brought into the cold, hard light. Chandor’s update proves there’s plenty of material still cloaked in darkness. ROBERT HORTON

PMr. Turner

Song One

OPENS FRI., JAN 23 AT SUNDANCE AND LINCOLN SQUARE. RATED R. 149 MINUTES.

yellowness” of one painting), Leigh and his Oscar-nominated cinematographer Dick Pope periodically pull us out of the artist’s quotidian. In widescreen (not Turner’s own ratio), the movie pauses for us to see 19th-century views as he did: lambent light on a Flemish canal, the sun filtered through sea mist near the shore, locomotive steam bursting into a halo above the green countryside, and—this shot made me gasp—a digital recreation of 1839’s The Fighting Temeraire, a famous battleship being towed up the Thames to be rendered as scrap. Unlike his peers, Turner observes the scene without pity: There goes history, about to be transformed into salable art. Thanks to Spall’s marvelous, gruntingly animalistic performance, Pope’s eye, and Leigh’s deep methodology, Mr. Turner gives us an immersion if not an understanding of the gnomic artist. (At one point he calls Leigh is absorbed by the details of Turner himself “a gargoyle.”) (Spall) and his trade. There’s no plot, no real structure beyond the alternating domestic scene/beauty shot pattern, and the would-be analysis of the lisping young critic John Ruskin ( Joshua McGuire) is mostly played for laughs. Turner is a selfish yet sensitive man, uncompromising in his art and personal life, resistant to interpretation. I won’t speculate how much Leigh might identify with him, but the respect is total. The filmmaker frames him in a portrait, leaving us to grope for psychological shapes and colors. BRIAN MILLER

PA Most Violent Year OPENS FRI., JAN 23 AT GUILD 45TH, LINCOLN SQUARE, AND MERIDIAN. RATED R. 125 MINUTES.

In the wintry air of A Most Violent Year, a wouldbe business magnate named Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) sports a handsome camel-hair topcoat. He’d like to achieve success the honest way, and that immaculate coat is like his shining armor. Problem is, this is 1981-era New York, the business is heating oil, and nothing stays clean for very long here. Writer/director J.C. Chandor is skillful with these details—this is a very intricate story—and quiet in his approach. Abel’s jacket is the flashiest thing about the movie.

The opening sequence has Abel and his lawyer (a fine Albert Brooks) striking a deal to buy a choice piece of East River waterfront. If Abel can just secure the financing to close the deal in a few days’ time, he’ll be set up for life in the heating-oil game; and he’ll have gotten there—at least according to his own bearings— honestly. Then the financing collapses (longtime Seattle actor John Procaccino delivers nicely in a couple of scenes as a banker), and Abel must scramble to get money from people who do not usually keep their coats so clean. Added to the pressure is an insinuating district attorney (Selma star David Oyelowo) and Abel’s fierce wife Anna ( Jessica Chastain), who happens to be the daughter of a local mobster. It’s possible she admires Abel for his ethical stance, but her take on life is a little worldlier than his. Beneath the Armani dresses is a Lady Macbeth who will do what needs to get done. The actors are a splendid pair: Isaac, of Inside Llewyn Davis, captures the immigrant’s go-go drive for success; and the only problem with Chastain in this film is that she isn’t in it enough.

ATSUSHI NISHIJIMA/A24 FILMS

SIMON MEIN/SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Hathaway’s Franny on a musical quest.

Chastain and Isaac as stylish fuel-oil merchants.

This is a chess-game kind of plot, where each move affects a dozen other moves. The pieces include not just politicians and goodfellas, but also truck drivers and salesmen. At the lower end of the food chain, Elyes Gabel and Catalina Sandino Moreno play a working-class couple directly damaged by all these machinations. In creating this dog-eat-dog world, Chandor doesn’t exactly make fresh observations. His first two films, Margin Call and All Is Lost, were more startling and original. But he does manage the game with dexterity, and the re-creation of a grungy era is completely convincing. On the latter point, Chandor is paying respect to a

People who don’t like musicals always fall back on the Realism Argument, contending that in real life we don’t start singing during conversations or solo walks in the Alps or whenever. This argument can be answered in a variety of ways: Don’t most of us have a soundtrack on shuffle in our heads? More important, who says musicals are supposed to be realistic? The indie musical, embodied by the 2006 sleeper Once, has tried to sneak around the argument. In these movies people sing because they’re musicians; they sidle up to music, they shrug their way through a tune. They emphatically do not plant their feet and belt out a showstopper in the Broadway tradition. That sort of modesty (or is it embarrassment?) can be effective, although just as often the result feels as artificial as a Rodgers and Hammerstein showstopper. Case in point: Song One, in which music threads through the tale of a street busker who spends most of the film in a coma. I always feel bad for actors cast as coma victims, so let’s mention his name here: Ben Rosenfield plays Henry, a starving musician who ends up in the hospital after an accident. His sister Franny (Anne Hathaway) returns from studying anthropology in the Middle East to tend to him; also at the bedside is their mother (Mary Steenburgen), a stock irresponsible-ex-hippie character. Franny listens to her brother’s music and frequents his favorite haunts—they’d been slightly estranged, and the script insists she does this to get to know him better. She also strikes up a bond with Henry’s hero, a sensitive folkie songwriter named James Forester ( Johnny Flynn). He’s got sensitivity, musical chops, and an accent, which means he doesn’t have to shower much to succeed with women. They do some impromptu singing together and grow close. The kid stays in the coma. You can see that writer/director Kate Barker-Froyland is sincere, and in fact the film is admirable for avoiding conventional A-B-C plotting; scenes tend to drift into each other in an unpredictable way, and the movie’s got a dark, tough look. But there’s something just too precious about it all, and there’s also Anne Hathaway. I do not dislike the Internet-reviled Hathaway, who won an Oscar for her last musical, Les Misérables. But introspection and angst do not sit easily with her supersquare personality, and Song One tends to vanish into her very earnest eyes, like a song that trails off in the air. ROBERT HORTON E

film@seattleweekly.com

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Besides William Sr., his business is run by the devoted maid Hannah (Dorothy Atkinson), who’s plainly, painfully in love with her indifferent master. (He is by turns tender and terrible to the women who surround him.) “Remember me, but forget my fate,” sings Turner, somewhere near the right key, when he encounters a harpsichord player at the estate of a potential buyer. That he knows Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas shouldn’t be entirely surprising: This selfmade man, son of a barber, is constantly quoting the Greeks and citing Continental paintings that few of his countrymen have ever laid eyes on. Yet though well-traveled and cultured, he plays up his uncouthness for his clients (some noblemen, some tycoons in a newly industrialized England). He’s a bit of a showman when others watch him paint, hamming up his gestures at the easel and spitting on the canvas to blur the colors and shapes. Is that a ship, a rock, or a wave? Turner and his art are mutable. He travels under an assumed name to the coastal village of Margate, where he eventually takes a new lover, Sophia (Marion Bailey), to replace poor Hannah. As Turner ages and grows out of fashion (young Queen Victoria scoffs at the “dirty

OPENS FRI., JAN 23 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. RATED PG-13. 88 MINUTES.

CINDIGM/FILM ARCADE

Must the great man also be a nice guy? The movies give us conflicted signals these days, from The Imitation Game (pro-crank) to Selma (dignity slathered on dignity). English painter J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851) was unquestionably a genius, and recognized as such in his day, but Mike Leigh’s comprehensive biopic tempers our admiration for the man. Covering the last 25 years of his life, with very few guideposts along the way, Mr. Turner is all about process. (So too is Leigh’s filmmaking method.) We see paint being mixed, canvases being stretched, rival artists sparring at a group show, patrons being flattered, and the mechanisms of the sale. Turner (Timothy Spall), when we meet him, is famous, prosperous, and possessed of a nice London home, where buyers are carefully ushered into his salesroom. He spies on clients through a pinhole while his cagey old father (Paul Jesson) reveals the color swirls of landscapes and marine paintings that are just beginning to edge toward abstraction. Turner is an artist, but also an entrepreneur.

23


4“THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR!”

ACADEMY AWARD® NOMINATIONS

facebook.com/seattleweekly

INCLUDING

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY BEST COSTUME DESIGN

BURROUGHS

A

f i l m

b y

M I K E

T I M O T H Y

THE MOVIE

JAN ��–��

-Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

L E IG H

SHOWTIMES

JANUARY 23 - 29

S PA L L

FRI - TUES @ 7:00PM / SAT - SUN @ 3:00PM

The New York Times

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 23

LINCOLN SQUARE CINEMAS 700 Bellevue Way NE, Bellevue (425) 454-7400

SUNDANCE CINEMAS SEATTLE 4500 9th Avenue NE, Seattle Reserved Seats +21 All Shows sundancecinemas.com

TROLL 2

THE ROOM

Emmett

AE: (circle one:) Angela Maria Josh

(circle one:)

Staci

Steve

Ronnie

Tim

Jane

BEER & WINE!

NOW PLAYING

EGYPTIAN

GR ANDILLUSIONCINEMA.ORG ���� NE ��TH STREET | ���-����

ART APPROVED

THE IMITATION AE APPROVED GAME

NEW YORK CITY, 1981

CLIENT APPROVED

THE STAKES ARE HIGH

Midnight Adrenaline | Jan 23-24

UPTOWN

Ava DuVernay’s

SELMA

9 Oscar Noms including Best Picture

BIRDMAN

Independent Spirit Award Nom

THE IMITATION GAME

A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT Godard in 3D

GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE

8 Academy Award Nominations including Frank Capra restored Best Picture , Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress IT HAPPENED NOW PLAYING | Egyptian

FESTIVAL 2015 PASSES & TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

ONE NIGHT | Tue Jan 27 Best Actress Oscar nominee

TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT Opens Jan 30

FILM CENTER Jan 23-25

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

JAN ��, ��, �� & �� ON ��MM

Deadline:THE BIG LEBOWSKI

Confirmation #:

24

THURSDAY @ 8:00PM

NOW SERVING

Fri Jan 15 - Thu Jan 21

Artist: Heather

IT’S ALIVE!: FRANKENSTEIN ON FILM Classic films, panels, and special guests, and more! Recent Raves

ROSEWATER Jan 26

SIFF EDUCATION

One-day film making challenge

CRASH CINEMA Jan 24 | SIFF Film Center Cinema Dissection with Robert Horton

BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

Best Picture Academy Award Nomination NOW PLAYING | Uptown

FRIDAY - WEDNESDAY @ 9:30PM

A long-lost, gritty documentary about the legendary writer.

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.MRTURNERMOVIE.COM 4.81" X 3.5" WED 1/21 SEATTLE 206.324.9996 WEEKLY SIFF.net DUE FRI 12PM

SPIRITED AWAY

Jan 24 | SIFF Film Center

FIRST DRAFT

Jan 26 | SIFF Film Center

“A V I B R A N T C R I M E S T O R Y...

CRACKLING-TAUT-OPERATIC.

IT CAPTURES US AND DOESN’T LET GO.” KENNETH TURAN,

“PULPY, MEATY, ALTOGETHER

TERRIFIC

” .

A. O. SCOTT,

“ HHHHH DYNAMITE.” JOE NEUMAIER,

“A

DRAMATIC

DREAM TEAM.” ROBBIE COLLIN,

A BRILLIANT

GANGSTER FILM.” JOSEPH BRAVERMAN,

“FEROCIOUS.” ALONSO DURALDE,

W I N N E R N AT I O N A L B O A R D o f R E V I E W

BEST FILM OF THE YEAR

BEST ACTOR OSCAR ISAAC

B E S T S U P P O RT I N G A C T R E S S J E S S I C A C H A S TA I N

More programs at SIFF.net

SIFF CINEMA EGYPTIAN | 805 E Pine St SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN | 511 Queen Anne Ave N SIFF FILM CENTER | Seattle Center NW Rooms

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS

START FRIDAY, JANUARY 23

BELLEVUE Cinemark Lincoln Square Cinemas (800) FANDANGO #2172

SEATTLE Landmark’s Guild 45th Theatre (206) 547-2127

SEATTLE Regal Meridian 16 (800) FANDANGO #808


arts&culture» Film Local & Repertory • THE BIG LEBOWSKI The Coen brothers’ 1998 stoner-

• 

• 

• 

tially a kids’ fairy tale, rich in enchantment and shapechanging, with a dreamy Never-Never Land setting. While moving to their new home in the country, tenyear-old Chihiro and her parents stumble upon a spirithaunted abandoned amusement park; soon her folks are turned into pigs, leaving Chihiro to fend for herself and search for ways to break the spell. Gradually she ingratiates herself at a kind of vacation bathhouse for the Shinto spirit world’s genius loci figures. Miyazaki’s visual artistry is undeniable; any one individual cel from Spirited Away would look great on a gallery wall. As a movie, however, it’s lacking. (PG) B.R.M. Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684. $7-$9. 7 p.m. Fri.Tues. & 3 p.m. Sat.-Sun. TROLL 2 This is the 1990 sequel to 1986’s gentle fright flick Troll. Here, however, the main foe are a town full of goblins who threaten a family vacation. (PG-13) Central Cinema, $7-$9. 10 p.m. Fri.-Wed.

Ongoing

AMERICAN SNIPER Clint Eastwood’s deliberately

neutral take on this real-life war tale is a measured approach likely to disappoint those looking for either a patriotic tribute to the troops or a critique of war and its effects. Chris Kyle (ably played by a hulked-up Bradley Cooper) was a sharpshooter whose action in four Iraq War tours reportedly made him the deadliest sniper in U.S. military history. His life had a lurid ending—a terrible irony that reframes his story in a larger context of troubled veterans and PTSD. The film, scripted by Jason Hall from Kyle’s memoir, has some standard-issue military bonding and uneven dialogue. What really works is the way it’s structured around parallel sequences, nowhere more intensely than the repeated images of the sniper at his gun, scanning the world for insurgents. One such sequence is the film’s most unnerving: As Kyle idly looks through his gunsight at passersby on the street below, he talks to his wife (Sienna Miller, now a real actress) on the phone, half a world away. Their conversation could be taking place in an Applebee’s, or a suburban backyard, but the finger stays on the trigger and the eye searches for threats. In other places in the film, Eastwood’s uninflected approach has a flattening effect. Here it creates one of the most chilling scenes in recent American film. (R) R.H. Cinerama, Sundance, Majestic Bay, Kirkland, Bainbridge, Cinebarre, Pacific Place, Ark Lodge, Lincoln Square, Thornton Place, others BIG EYES The pancake-eyed-waif portraits of Walter and Margaret Keane became inexplicably popular during the ’60s. For director Tim Burton, at least, they still hold a kitschy fascination. As we see in this lighthearted, factually inspired account, the Keanes’ success was born from the beatnik Bay Area of the late ’50s, reversed at the 1964 World’s Fair, and collapsed during the Nixon end of the ’70s. The nation turned more cynical during that span, or developed more sophistication, but Burton isn’t interested in diagnosing the American mood. Big Eyes is a simple comedy of female vindication, and it’s enjoyable as such. Any film with Amy Adams (as the naive painter Margaret), Christoph Waltz (as her credit-stealing husband Walter), and Terence Stamp (as the New York Times critic who calls them out) is a film I want to see. Because of Waltz’s lupine charm, Walter’s decision to slap his name on Margaret’s art doesn’t seem so implausible. Burton’s been down this road before with Ed Wood, also written by Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski. Yet if Margaret is a less colorful figure than Wood, and if we can laugh about her art today, we can never mock her. (PG-13) B.R.M. Pacific Place, Oak Tree, others BIRDMAN A movie star in a career skid since he stopped playing a masked superhero named Birdman back in the ’90s, Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton) is preparing his big comeback in a Broadway adaptation of Raymond Carver stories, funded and directed by himself. Obstacles abound: Riggan’s co-star (Andrea Riseborough) announces she’s pregnant with his child; his grown daughter (Emma Stone) is his assistant, and not his biggest fan; a critic plans to destroy the play. And, in the movie’s funniest headache, Riggan must endure a popular but insufferable stage actor (Edward Norton, doing a wonderful self-parody) who’s involved with the play’s other actress (Naomi Watts). This is all going on while Riggan maintains a tenuous hold on his own sanity—he hears Birdman’s voice in his head, for one thing. To create Riggan’s world, director Alejandro González Iñárritu and Gravity cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki present the film as a continuous unbroken shot (disguised with artful digital seams). Birdman has a few stumbles, but the result is truly fun to watch. (R) R.H. Sundance, SIFF Cinema Uptown, Pacific Place, Kirkland, Majestic Bay, others

NOW FEATURING LASER PROJECTION, DOLBY ATMOS RESERVED SEATING, BEER, WINE AND CIDER

NOW PLAYING

AMERICAN SNIPER N O M I N AT E D F O R S I X A C A D E M Y AWA R D S INCLUDING BEST PICTURE AND BEST ACTOR

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CINERAMA.COM OR OUR BOX OFFICE 2100 4TH AVENUE SEATTLE, WA 98121

• 

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

g all Playin KS W SEAHAMNF and es! Gam

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

noir is Raymond Chandler filtered through dirty bong water, where almost every line of dialogue is a hazy, hilarious non sequitur. My favorite is when accidental P.I. Jeff Bridges (forever the Dude) is ambushed in his tub by nihilists bearing a ferret. “Hey, nice marmot,” he greets them, with his usual unflustered amiability. Nothing rattles Bridges’ Dude, not a lost rug, not a leering Tara Reid, not a lisping John Turturro, not a raving John Goodman, not a simpering Steve Buscemi, and not even shrieking performance artist Julianne Moore, who joins Bridges in a Busby Berkeley-style bowling fantasy that sums up the movie’s sweet, silly spirit. (R) BRIAN MILLER SIFF Cinema Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 324-9996, siff.net. $7-$12. 11:55 p.m. Sat. & Sun. CHILDREN’S FILM FESTIVAL SEATTLE This annual festival, now in its tenth year, offers a lot more than movies. Music, dance, filmmaking workshops, a pancake breakfast, and other kiddie activities are also on the schedule. Opening the fest on Thursday is the Buster Keaton classic Steamboat Bill, Jr., accompanied by live music. Caspar Babypants performs two shows as part of Friday’s pajama party. Several packages of animated and live-action shorts are presented in themed screenings throughout the fest. Visiting filmmakers will attend selected screenings; see website for full schedule and details. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 267-5380, childrensfilmfestivalseattle.nwfilmforum.org. $6-$8. Thurs., Jan. 22-Sat., Feb. 7. CINEMA ITALIAN STYLE From 1963, Luchino Visconti’s sumptuous adaptation of the classic novel The Leopard stars Burt Lancaster as the aristocrat uneasily watching his fortunes (and Italy’s class system) fade during the 1860s. With Claudia Cardinale and Alain Delon. (PG) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $63–$68 series, $8 individual. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through March 19. GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE We haven’t seen it, but of Jean-Luc Godard’s new 3-D movie, The Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw says it’s “an uncompromising and exasperating 70-minute cine-collage placed before us on a take-it-or-leave-it basis, composed of fragments of ideas, shards of disillusionment.” (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net. $7-$12. Fri-Thurs. IT’S ALIVE!: FRANKENSTEIN ON FILM In addition to the talk and seminar by our own Robert Horton (see page 17), this weekend fright-athon includes screenings of Frankenstein, The Bride of Frankenstein, Young Frankenstein, Flesh for Frankenstein, Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, and Frankenweenie. (NR) SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff.net. $7-$12. Fri.-Sun. IT’S GONNA BLOW Director Bill Perrine will introduce his music doc about San Diego’s music underground, covering the years 1986-96 and including bands like Drive Like Jehu, Rocket from the Crypt, and Crash Worship. (NR) Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 5233935, grandillusioncinema.org. $9-$13. 8:30 p.m. Sat. & 3 p.m. Sun. ROSEWATER Making his debut behind the camera, Jon Stewart’s life-inspired movie is about the IranianCanadian journalist Maziar Bahari (Mexican star Gael García Bernal). In 2009 Bahari was arrested by Iranian authorities while covering the disputed elections in Tehran; included in the “evidence” against him was a Daily Show segment. We see Bahari’s home life in Toronto and his journalistic work for Newsweek in Tehran, where his mother (Shohreh Aghdashloo) still lives. Once in prison, his main tormentor (Kim Bodnia) obsesses over whether Bahari’s arthouse DVDs are actually pornography and the question of just how many Jews are running the world. Stewart relishes these absurdities, as you would expect. Rosewater too frequently has a dutiful quality, careful always to balance the negatives of the Iranian authorities with the positives of Iranian culture. The movie doesn’t announce the arrival of a born filmmaker, but it’s much better than a dilettante project—Stewart keeps a difficult storytelling subject moving right along. And there are sequences, like García Bernal’s exhilarating solo dance at a crucial point in his imprisonment, that convey a real appreciation for the human element that survives amid political horror. (NR) ROBERT HORTON SIFF Film Center, $7-$12. 7 p.m. Mon. SATURDAY SECRET MATINEE Hosted by The Sprocket Society, this Saturday matinee series (through March 28) features the 1941 serial The Adventures of Captain Marvel, preceded by various vintage cartoons and shorts. Total program length is about two hours. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$9. 1 p.m. Sat.

SPIRITED AWAY Hayao Miyazaki’s 2001 anime is essen-

25


Voted Best Movie Theater

D I N I NG

By Seattle Weekly Readers! Thank You!!

F

2014 W

INNER

W EEK LY

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

4500 9TH AVE. NE • 206-633-0059

Monday is $6 ORCA Day

F IL M

Show Your Orca Card and ALL Seats are $6 ($7.50 for 3D).

Tickets Avail at Box Office Only. Not good on holidays.

Tuesday is Girls Movie Night Out!

2 or more ladies get $5 ($6.50 for 3D) Admission All Day. Tickets Avail at Box Office Only.

AMERICAN SNIPER THE IMITATION GAME MR. TURNER

CAKE

MORTDECAI

SONG ONE

SELMA THE WEDDING RINGER

BIRDMAN BLACKHAT

*Tickets available at the box office.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

SUNDANCECINEMAS.COM

26

» FROM PAGE 25

FILM NEWSLETTER The inside scoop on

upcoming films and the latest reviews.

invited documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras ( Oath) and The Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald into his Hong Kong hotel room. In this absorbing character study, they debate how and when to spill the information he took from his job at the National Security Agency. Clicking the SEND button carries as much weight as Bob Woodward meeting Deep Throat in All the President’s Men. This straightforward documentary may be smaller-scaled than a political thriller, but it has similar suspense: Everybody in the room realizes the stakes—and the dangers—of exposing a whistleblower to public scrutiny. One man’s whistleblower is another man’s traitor, a debate that Poitras doesn’t pause to consider, so confident is she of Snowden’s cause. Having this access to Snowden in the exact hours he went from being a nonentity with top-secret clearance to a hero/pariah is a rare chance to see a now-historical character in the moment of truth. (NR) R.H. Crest A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT This debut feature by Ana Lily Amirpour is a very studied mood piece, dryly humorous and more inclined toward the arthouse than the drive-in. There will be blood—and it will be sucked—but Amirpour has more on her mind than horror in this black-and-white, Farsi-language vampire movie. Sheila Vand plays our unnamed heroine, a young woman who walks (and yes, sometimes skateboards) down the streets of Bad City at night. Clad in her chador, drenched in the movie’s black-and-white gloom, she has a great vampire vibe. Her soulmate also moves through the nocturnal city: Arash (Arash Marandi), whose vintage T-bird has been claimed by a local gangster—yet even without wheels, he’s still cool. When he dresses as Count Dracula for a costume party and runs into the vampire there, their union is written in blood. Amirpour, an experienced hand at short films, is content to let the movie float along on its gorgeous monochrome look and punk attitude. She seems to have taken the attitude that if vampires have nothing but time, why shouldn’t scenes just keep going on and on? (NR) R.H. SIFF Cinema Uptown • GONE GIRL What’s exceptional about Gillian Flynn’s adaptation of her 2012 novel, directed with acid fidelity by David Fincher, is that Gone Girl doesn’t like most of its characters. Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) soon falls under suspicion of murdering his missing wife Amy (Rosamund Pike). The small-town Missouri police investigation (led by Kim Dickens) goes entirely against Nick for the first hour. He behaves like an oaf and does most everything to make himself the prime suspect, despite wise counsel from his sister (Carrie Coon) and lawyer (a surprisingly effective, enjoyable Tyler Perry). Second hour, still no body, but flashbacks turn us against the absent Amy. As we slowly investigate the Dunnes’ very flawed marriage, funny little kernels of bile begin to explode underfoot. How the hell did these two end up together? Flynn’s foundational joke answers that question with a satire of marriage. The movie poster and tabloid-TV plot suggest a standard I-didn’t-kill-my-wife tale, but matrimony is what’s being murdered here. (R) B.R.M. Crest • THE IMITATION GAME A ripping true story can survive even the Oscar-bait effect. Benedict Cumberbatch plays the brilliant English code-breaker Alan Turing as a borderline-autistic personality, a rude brainiac who during World War II fiddles with his big computing machine while his colleagues stand around scratching their heads. Turing’s homosexuality only gradually enters the picture, and even when he proposes marriage to fellow code-breaker Joan Clarke (Keira Knightley), it isn’t treated as a really big deal. Even if the movie sketches simplistic conflicts among its principal characters, the wartime world is so meticulously re-created and the stakes so compelling that it emits plenty of movie-movie sparks. (Morten Tyldum, of the ridiculously entertaining Headhunters, directs.) But the real reason to like this movie is that it’s so diligently pro-weirdo. Especially in Cumberbatch’s truly eccentric hands, Turing stays defiantly what he is: an oddball who uses rationality to solve problems. (PG13) R.H. SIFF Cinema Egyptian, Sundance, Kirkland, Cinebarre, Lincoln Square, Thornton Place, others • INHERENT VICE Why Thonas Pynchon would go back to 1970 with his late (2009) hippie detective spoof is obvious: nostalgia, command of period color, and unfinished business as one optimistic decade curdles into another—trying to locate Where It All Went Wrong. But what mysteries are there for Paul Thomas Anderson to plumb? Doc Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix) is a mutton-chopped gumshoe operating near the L.A. beach, salt air and cannabis fumes constantly in his lungs, vaguely pursuing a missing-person case in

HAPPY HOUR

PR O M O

E VE NT S

MUSIC

has • CITIZENFOUR Fugitive leaker Edward Snowden The

SE AT TLE

Two Ways To Save At Sundance Seattle

arts&culture» Film

which the real-estate developer in question. His “old lady” Shasta (Katherine Waterston) turned him onto the case, which sends him stumbling through a gallery of SoCal eccentrics. (These include Martin Short, Owen Wilson, and Benicio Del Toro.) The squares of Nixon’s silent majority are represented by Martin Donovan (as a string-pulling tycoon), Reese Witherspoon (a D.A. and Doc’s new squeeze), and Josh Brolin as Bigfoot Bjornsen: police detective, part-time actor, and Doc’s possible doppelgänger. Both Bigfood and Doc are confronting the MacGuffin that is the Golden Fang: possibly a conspiracy, possibly a paranoid stoner misunderstanding. Don’t expect any mysteries to be solved here; Doc is a P.I. who collects very little hard evidence, yet he persists, unperturbed by the absence of such facts. (R) B.R.M. Guild 45th, Meridian, Thornton Place, Oak Tree, others INTO THE WOODS Cue the irony that this sly modern classic musical (songs by Stephen Sondheim, book by James Lapine) has been taken up by Disney, history’s busiest purveyors of the happy ending. Its fairy-tale happy ending comes halfway through the action, then Cinderella and company must decide what to do next. Into the Woods presents a crowded roster, with Meryl Streep earning top billing as the Witch, the blue-haired crank who sets things in motion with a curse. (James Corden and Emily Blunt play the baker and wife who want a child; also on hand are Anna Kendrick, Chris Pine, Tracey Ullman, and Johnny Depp as various familiar fairy-tale characters.) Director Rob Marshall brings his usual clunky touch, hammering home the big moments and underlining subtlety with a broad brush. The singing tends toward the Broadway-brassy, although Blunt and Corden—working in a more casual style—are completely charming. (PG) R.H. Majestic Bay, Pacific Place, Thornton Place, Bainbridge, Cinebarre, Lincoln Square, Kirkland, others SELMA A lot of Selma is good, and a lot of it is dutiful lesson-telling. But even when it feels like civics class, Selma benefits from its timing: Coming at the tail-end of 2014, a truly rotten year for race in America, the film’s depictions of protest marches and boiled-over tensions can’t help but create ripples of excitement in a movie theater. Director Ava DuVernay keeps her focus on the events surrounding the march to Selma, when the horrifying violence of Alabama law enforcement against black protesters—televised in a newly immediate way—helped turn public opinion toward the idea of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This very American story has a curiously Brit-dominated cast, including David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King, Jr. and Carmen Ejogo as his wife Coretta. The casting is not a huge issue, although anybody with direct memories of the larger-than-life presences of LBJ and Alabama governor George Wallace can be forgiven for finding Tom Wilkinson and Tim Roth (respectively) insufficiently vulgar in the roles. Cameos by the likes of Oprah Winfrey (as a victim of the ludicrously unfair methods of keeping African-Americans away from the voting booth) and Cuba Gooding, Jr., carry an unfortunate TV-movie guest-star air about them, although one understands the value of getting marquee players in a relatively low-budget project. (PG-13) R.H. SIFF Cinema Uptown, Meridian, Thornton Place, Lincoln Square, Bainbridge, Kirkland, Sundance, Ark Lodge, Majestic Bay, others WILD Though I have reservations about the fulsome emotional blasts of director Jean-Marc Vallée (Dallas Buyers Club), and though the adaptation by Nick Hornby (About a Boy, An Education) leans rather too hard on the death of memoirist Cheryl Strayed’s mother (Laura Dern), this is a movie that—like its solitary hiker heroine—cannot be stopped. Reese Witherspoon’s ironclad casting makes matters even more inevitable. Here is a woman who bottoms out—with men, drugs, and grief—then straightens out while hiking 1,100 miles on the Pacific Crest Trail from California to Oregon, even without disavowing all her past actions. Wild is essentially a memory trip, presented non-sequentially, as Cheryl plods north. Various men figure in her past (including a brother), but none memorably. In the movie’s second half, more maudlin than its smart start, Wild is all about mommy. Yet don’t mistake Wild for an easy, conventional healing narrative (though healing does of course come at the end). Rather, it’s more a coming-to-terms account. Or as our heroine puts it, “Problems don’t stay problems. They turn into something else.”(R) B.R.M. Seven Gables, Cinebarre, Kirkland, Meridian, Thornton Place, Lincoln Square, others

AR T S AND E NT E R TAI NM

BY B R IA N M I LLE R

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended


» Music

Ben Gibbard on Life After Walla

A chat with the Death Cab front man about the new album and recording after Chris Walla’s departure.

BY DAVE EINMO

SW: After achieving so much as an artist, how do you stay inspired as a songwriter?

Talk about that—wishing it would go away. Do you feel as though sometimes songwriting takes you to deeper, darker places that make you reflect on things that maybe you don’t really want to?

I would never release a song where I felt uncomfortable with the subject, or I was fearful of people prying too much, or being fearful of ridicule for earnestness. There are things that are off limits—just as there is for everyone. But I feel like if I ever start pushing into that territory, I’ll back off, or I’ll write something for my own adaptation and not release it.

As a band, you guys seem pretty open to expressing your feelings. Kintsugi marks the first album since the departure of Chris Walla. What was it like making an album without him?

It was unusual at first to not have him producing

the band. But I have to say the record wouldn’t be the record it is. It would not have been the creatively rejuvenating force that it was for us if we had done things the ways we’d always done them with having Chris produce the record. And I don’t mean that as a slight to Chris and to his talents, because he obviously has innumerable music talents. But I think at this point in the band, 17 years in, we needed to shake things up. I really enjoyed working with [producer] Rich Costey. It think it really provided a shot in the arm that we really needed. If you could give advice to a young Seattle band, what would that advice be?

Oh, man. I feel like the culture of being a band now is so different. There are so many things that are different now than when we started. There’s nothing that makes me feel older than saying that. Things have changed very quickly. But I think the most important thing for any young band to do is to meet other bands and make friends and start a scene. That scene can be a scene within a scene. Obviously there is a Seattle music scene. But there are other small clicks happening within Seattle with like-minded musicians who play shows together and tour together. I love that shit. That is the most important thing, especially for a band that is an independently minded band. To me that was always the best part of being a band: the community. The people. In the early days, when you are playing with your friends, and you think they are all brilliant, and you’re playing shows with them every weekend, and you’re going to see your friends, and you’re getting psyched on what they are doing. I think forming and being a part of a community, even if it’s just those three or four bands that always play shows together—I think that’s the best part of being in a band. Feeling like you are part of something bigger than yourself, something bigger than the band that you are in. Looking back on the early days of our band, we wouldn’t have gotten nearly as far as we did if we didn’t embrace that idea of being a part of a larger community, leaning on friends and other bands when we needed a place to stay or we needed a show in some weird town. That’s one part of being in a band I love the most. E

music@seattleweekly.com

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

Gibbard: Not to sound cheesy, but life is pretty inspiring. As a songwriter I’m constantly trying to document my life and the lives around me, and try to either pose questions or provide answers to problems in songs. Sometimes it’s just a matter of documenting a particular observation about a moment in time. I go through periods where I do a lot of writing and other periods where I do less. Being a songwriter, or being an artist of any medium, it is within you. It doesn’t really go away. At times you almost wish it would go away. [Laughs.] It’s built into who I am.

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

I

f Seattle had a Music Hall of Fame, the bronzed heads of Death Cab for Cutie would rest near the top of the shrine. Few of Seattle’s major artists have enjoyed the longevity and continued success of this city’s favorite indie-rock band. Since DCFC formed in 1997, it’s released seven studio albums, been nominated for numerous Grammys, debuted at #1 atop Billboard’s Top 200, and toured the world several times. In March, the band will release its eighth album, Kintsugi—its first without founding guitarist, keyboardist, and producer Chris Walla. We caught up with front man Ben Gibbard to talk about his songwriting inspirations, the new album and what it was like recording without Walla, and his advice for young Seattle bands. Read the full interview at seattleweekly.com.

27


2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

FLIGHT

TRIBAL SEEDS 1/22

with HIRIE + LEILANI WOLFGRAMM

FACILITIES with BEAT CONNECTION

2/21

8PM

GUITAR IN THE SPACE AGE! TOUR

2/24

STANTON MOORE TRIO WED, JAN 21

with PARADISE FEARS

8PM

Moore’s natural drumming rhythm emerges through blues, heavy metal, jazz, funk and alternative rock!

TOWER OF POWER THUR, JAN 22 - SUN, JAN 25

9PM

2/26

with MISS MAY I + NORTHLANE + FIT FOR A KING + ERRA 2/16

7PM

MOTION CITY SOUNDTRACK

2/17

with WILLIAM BECKETT, BRICK + MORTAR

2/18

RIFF RAFF

LYNNE, CARLA, GRACE TUES, JAN 27 - WED, JAN 28

8PM

Allstar power jazz piano, sax and vocal trio.

COAL CHAMBER

RUSS FREEMAN AND THE RIPPINGTONS THUR, JAN 29 - SUN, FEB 1

with FILTER + COMBICHRIST

+ AMERICAN HEAD CHARGE

3/11

MXPX FIVE IRON FRENZY

7:30 PM

with SUCCESS

3/14 8PM

RUN DMC REMIXD

KARL DENSON’S TINY UNIVERSE featuring VOKAB KOMPANY with BROWNOUT

East Bay soul legends and annual funk favorite!

SHOWBOX AND KISW METAL SHOP PRESENT

COMMIT THIS TO MEMORY 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY TOUR

2/19

9PM

ANDY GRAMMER ALEX & SIERRA

BILL FRISELL LEIGHTON MEESTER AUGUST BURNS RED

1/31

JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

9PM

Grammy-nominated American contemporary jazz band celebrating their 25th anniversary and new release Fountain of Youth

7PM

MELISSA ALDANA & CRASH TRIO MON, FEB 2 Chilean saxophonist/composer and 2013 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition winner

all ages | free parking | full schedule at jazzalley.com

8PM

GEORGE EZRA

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

8:30 PM

4/6

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

SHOWBOX SODO

28

KIP MOORE STROMAE DIN ING IRATION MASTODON +CLUTCH

1/31

with CANAAN SMITH

8PM

4/6

8PM

W EE K LY

MUSIC

EV

THE MISSING LINK TOUR

with STICK FIGURE + HOURS EASTLY

2/20

8PM

IN FLAMES with special guest WOVENWAR

7PM

THE FUTURE HEARTS TOUR

ALL THAT REMAINS 3/7

4/26– ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10AM

7:45 PM

ALL TIME LOW with

5/6

ISSUES + TONIGHT ALIVE + STATE CHAMPS

6PM

F IL M

MUSIC NEWSLETTER

H APPY H OU R

The inside scoop on upcoming shows

SHOWBOXPRESENTS.COM

and the latest reviews.

AR


arts&culture» Music

THE NILE PROJECT

Jam On

Through tragedy and triumph, the Racer Sessions commemorate five years of music with Cry & Roar V.

Musicians from 11 countries across the Nile Basin create the new sound of a shared Nile identity.

January 30

BY BIANCA SEWAKE

MEANY HALL ON THE UW CAMPUS | 206-543-4880 | UWWORLDSERIES.ORG

wanted to do every single week,” says Jacob Zimmerman, saxophonist in the band Lawson. “[The] Racer Sessions is one of those.”

bsewake@seattleweekly.com

CRY & ROAR V: FIVE YEARS OF THE RACER SESSIONS With Lawson, Young Nudist, Heatwarmer, Shannon Kerrigan, Dio Jean-Baptiste & Geoff Traeger, WA (Simon Henneman & Gregg Kepplinger), Evan Woodle, Aaron Otheim, Christian Pincock, Lori Goldston, King Tears Bat Trip, Neil Welch, Iji. Cafe Racer, 5828 Roosevelt Way N.E., 523-5282, caferacerseattle.com. Suggested donation $5–$15. 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 23–Sun., Jan 25.

“Women of the Nile” Seattle Asian Art Museum, Jan 28, 7PM Free admission with RSVP “Civic Engagement and the Management of Water Resources” Meany Hall, Jan 30, 6-7pm Ticket to performance required

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

This year’s event, called Cry & Roar, is named for Andrew Carrico, a member of the Racer community who passed away shortly after the shooting a few years ago. Carrico was booking bands that came into the cafe, and slotted the Sessions on Sundays when they began. The name Cry & Roar comes from Carrico’s description of his saxophone’s sound. “A lot of the music that people are going to hear at the festival will resemble, literally, that description,” says Sessions founder Aaron Otheim, who plays keyboards in the band Heatwarmer. “It’s a very strong, declarative way of describing one’s own sound, and I think it in some ways describes tenacity and the conviction that all the artists who are in this circle take into their music-making.” It’s also a tribute to Carrico. “It’s a reminder to us of how important it is to value and enjoy the lives of each other, the times that we spend with each other,” Zimmerman says. On Sunday, a special Racer Sessions will close out the event with special guest Iji. “You’re guaranteed to hear things you have never heard before and so am I,” says Welch, “and that’s a really exciting thing.” E

COURTESY OF CAFE RACER

I

t started with a search. Back in 2010, a handful of graduates of the University of Washington’s School of Music were looking for a space to host improvisational jam sessions, when they came upon Café Racer, nestled right in the U District. “We went there as a quirky place to play music and hang out,” says Christopher Icasiano, who plays drums in King Tears Bat Trip. “We were going there fairly frequently, and got to know a lot of the folks who worked there and became fans of the bands that played there regularly.” The cafe soon became what Icasiano calls a home away from home when he and colleagues founded an informal improvisation series called the Racer Sessions: a jam session inclusive of multiple music styles and open free to the public every Sunday night. The group also took on a curatorial role, leading the weekly sessions with a 30-minute set of original music to set a creative musical tone for the evening. Performers jamming afterward play shorter sets, riffing off the themes. “The beautiful thing about the Racer Sessions is that it really helps embolden musicians and gives them a voice and a place to play in an environment that otherwise might not be hospitable to what they see as the expression they want to give forth,” says co-founder Neil Welch, who plays saxophone in KTBT. The collective hosts an annual three-day Racer Sessions fest, which this year marks five years of the improv series. It’s an achievement worth celebrating, given the devastating shock to the community of the 2012 shooting spree there that left six dead. “It’s really quite extraordinary,” says Welch. “This is the continuation of an idea, and that idea is just bringing people together towards a common goal of being creative and expressive.” “There’s very few things in my life I’ve ever

Café Racer: home of the jam.

Related Events

29


HYDRO 4 LESS

Hydroponics Supplies & Gardening Store

ALL

50% OFF ADVANCED NUTRIENTS PRODUCTS SPECIAL

Fan and Carbon Filter Combo

FRIDAY, MARCH 27

199.

$

95

Can-Lite 8” carbon filter and 8” Hurricane inline fan

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10

30

Sunshine Mix #4 or

HP Mycorrhizae 3.8 cf

29.95

$

each

SPECIAL

1000w Digital Light Package

279.95

$

Solistek Air-Cooled 1000w Ballast, Dominator 8” Reflector, Plantmax 1000w HPS bulb

www.hydro4less.org

EMAIL hydro4less206@gmail.com

SEATTLE 9100 E Marginal Way S

FIFE 2001 48th Ave Ct E #C

Seattle, WA 98108 • 206-767-8082

Fife, WA 98424 • 253-200-6653

Become a Graphic Designer. A SCHOOL THAT SUPPORTS YOUR SUCCESS. • Supportive environment • Hands-on instruction

• Financial Aid advisors • Career Services advisors

Call to receive a free

888-279-8111

Career Guide. sanfordbrown.edu/seattle

645 Andover Park West | Seattle, WA 98188

Classes start January 26th.

Sanford-Brown cannot guarantee employment or salary. Credits earned are unlikely to transfer. Financial Aid is available for those who qualify. Find employment rates, financial obligations and other disclosures at www.sanfordbrown.edu/disclosures. 0831650 15-SB-034 12/14


arts&culture» Music

TheWeekAhead Thursday, Jan. 22 Wednesday, Jan. 21

Growing up in Seattle wasn’t all sunshine and rainbows for rapper GABRIEL TEODROS, who chronicles some of his struggles on his latest album, the SoulChef-produced Evidence of Things Not Seen. On “Bus Stops,” for instance, Teodros talks about thinking he would be “outlined in chalk” before he graduated from high school and being embarrassed that his clothes came from thrift shops. But the rapper also acts as an older brother on Evidence, offering bits of wisdom like “Don’t do business unless it’s a winwin” and “Don’t let anybody else’s idea of success define yours” on “Light Attracts Light & Everything Else Too.” It’s advice we’ve all heard before, but something about Teodros’ delivery, plus features from Jonathan Emile, Sarah MK, and Shakiah, who is opening this show, makes it really sink in. With Dex Amora, Shakiah, EarDr.Umz, The MetroGnome. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $10 DOS. All ages. If the “ooh-ooh-oohs” from MATES OF STATE’s “Palomino” are still stuck in your head more than three years after the indie-pop duo’s last release, Mountaintops, fear not; the band is working on new music. The pair hasn’t released any new tunes just yet, but the volley of vocals from the husband-and-wife team of Jason Hammel (drums) and Kori Gardner (keys) fits a variety of sounds, from the peppy (“Palomino,” “Sway,”) to songs like “Unless I’m Led” and “At Least I Have You,” which, while still stirring, are just a tad mellower than the band’s typical fare. With Fictionists. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $16. 21 and over. Adult-contemporary singer JILL COHN doesn’t believe in slowing down. In recent years she released two projects: the Yellow Rose EP and Cinema, a collection of remixes of songs from across her discography. These projects, of course, led Cohn, who has opened for the likes of Dave Matthews and Jewel, to tour for a majority of the year. While on and off the road, Cohn found time to write her 11th album, Heartstrings Touching Ground, with producer Malcolm Burn (Daniel Lanois, Bob Dylan, Emmylou Harris). At this record release show, Cohn will celebrate Heartstrings and kick off what is sure to be another jam-packed year. With Hereward. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7:30 p.m. $10 adv./$17 DOS. All ages.

Join us in the Trophy Room for Happy Hour: Thursday Bartender Special 8-Close Fridays: 5-8pm

THE FABULOUS DOWNEY BROTHERS. Not ringing

any bells? How about “the band whose members wear a variety of oddly shaped headpieces while performing?” Perhaps now the name is starting to sound familiar? The seven-piece is about experimental as it comes, without factoring in those headpieces. Its latest, Scare, is a collection of controlled punk- and 8-bit-tinged chaos with lots of erratic vocals. It’s questionable whether the headgear—from multicolored geometric shapes to the faces of strange creatures covered in faux fur—adds anything to the music, but it definitely adds to the experience. With Verbal Tip, Nestoria. The Benbow Room, 4210 S.W. Admiral Way, Suite A, 4661953, benbowroom.com. 9 p.m. $5. 21 and over. HAUNTED SUMMER is an appropriate name for the dream-pop duo of Bridgette Eliza Moody and John Seasons, but not in the spooky sense. The pair’s blend of experimental guitar riffs, ethereal orchestral features, and Moody’s trance-like vocals—plus a ton of oddball electronic sounds that add even more texture—creates a sound that sticks with you. Their psychedelic tunes strike a balance between channeling nostalgia and staying in the present, and while there are a lot of pieces to the Haunted Summer puzzle, there’s a simplicity to the latest, Birth, that makes for easy listening. With Goodbye Heart, Golden Gardens. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009, columbiacity theater.com. 8:30 p.m. $8 adv./$10 DOS. 21 and over. For the past few months, THEORETICS has been working on “One a Month,” a project in which the local electronica five-piece collaborates with artists like Hanna Stevens, Grynch, Afrok, Moe Betta, Shelton Harris, and The Bad Tenants (which is opening this show) on a new song each month. This month’s release, “Exit Signs,” featuring Maiah Manser, is also included on the band’s upcoming EP, Fugue State. Manser gives “Exit Signs” both an ethereal and a jazzy edge, but Theoretics’ hip-hop influences come through loud and clear. Fans can hear that, and more, live first at this Fugue State release show. Also with Klozed Sirkut. Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectarlounge. com. 8 p.m. $7 adv./$9 DOS. 21 and over. When master wordsmiths Aesop Rock (The Uncluded, The Weathermen, Two of Every Animal) and Rob Sonic (Sonic Sum) team up, what can you expect except one lyrically complex tune after the next? With DJ Big Wiz, they perform as HAIL MARY MALLON (the woman who allegedly infected more than 50 people with typhoid fever) and released their sophomore album, Bestiary,

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

RESERVE THE TROPHY ROOM FOR YOUR NEXT EVENT!

COCKTAILS • TASTY HOT DOGS • LOTSA PINBALL

2222 2ND AVENUE • SEATTLE

206-441-5449

Ron Carter

SWEEPSTAKES! See below.

Bill Charlap In the Wee Small Hours Sinatra’s Capitol ‘50s catalogue

Jonah Tolchin

Kurt Elling

Friday, Jan. 23

Elling Swings Sinatra featuring Art Abrams Swing Machine Big Band

FEBRUARY 18 –MARCH 1

Tolchin’s songs. It’s that feeling you got the first time a folk song truly moved you, a feeling Tolchin never lost. DEVON LEGER With Debbie Miller, Tobias the Owl. Fremont Abbey, 4272 Fremont Ave. N., 414-8325, fremont abbey.org. $8 adv./$10 DOS. 8 p.m. E

Taylor Eigsti · Becca Stevens · Lucky Peterson · Joe McBride · Vijay Iyer Freda Payne · Christian McBride · Nicholas Payton · Lee Konitz · Julian Lage Frank Catalano · Bebel Gilberto · Hal Galper · Cyrille Aimée · Bobby Torres Billy Childs · Luis Conte · Benny Green · Devin Phillips · Hailey Niswanger

amtrak.cascades.com

Tickets Available at portlandjazzfestival.org or call 503.228.5299 SWEEPSTAKES! Enter to win festival tickets, Amtrak Cascades train travel and hotel.

Visit www.kplu.org and search “giveaways” to enter.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

COURTESY OF YEP ROC RECORDS

There sure are a lot of bearded folk singers out there these days plying newly written age-old songs, but what sets this New Jersey roots songwriter apart is his craftsmanship. On his debut full-length, Clover Lane, Tolchin sings like a master woodcarver, each word shaping the song with effortless fluidity. There’s a strong kinetic motion to Tolchin’s vocals, a kind of snap that ends a verse at just the right moment. That’s the hand of a master at work— the same kind of easy motion you see in the hand of an artist as he or she whips pencil across paper. As a folk singer, he’s clearly indebted to the fruits of the 1960s folk revival, first as a young kid listening to his dad’s eclectic record collection (his father once ran a record store in the Mississippi Delta). As a teenager playing the Newport Folk Festival, he crossed the generational divide with songs that paid easy homage to Appalachian roots, country and urban blues, and old-school country. Now, at a still-young 21, Tolchin’s debut album, arriving by way of Yep Roc Records, is a pastiche of American roots traditions, but it’s a quiltwork that never succumbs to imitation. There’s something deliriously hopeful in

31


QN I G H T C L U B U P C O M I N G

E V E N T S

S A T U R D A Y, J A N U A R Y 2 4 T H

L.A. vation | Saturday, January 31st A tribute to the music of U2

House of Floyd | Friday, February 6th

ICON

A tribute to the music of Pink Floyd with laser show

FRID AYS

TH URSD AYS

Motley Crue’d | Saturday, February 7th A tribute to the music of Motley Crue Bikini Contest at 7:30 PM

ANTHONY ATTALL A ANJUNADEEP TOUR GOLDROOM HUXLE Y MIKE MAGO JACKMA STER

01/22/15 01/29/15 02/05/15

01/30/15 02/20/15

02/19/15 02/26/15

SATURD AYS

EEKKOO KILL FRENZY ARCTIC MOON

01/24/15 01/31/15 02/07/15

W ED N ESD AYS

GRE AT DANE + SEVNTH WONDER BRENMAR + PROMNITE SALVA + GIRL UNIT SWEATER BEATS + POMO

02/04/15 02/11/15 02/18/15 02/25/15

Mardi Gras Party | Friday, February 20th

TICKETS AVAIL ABLE AT W W W.QNIGHTCLUB.COM 1426 Broadway - Seattle, WA

Blues Brothers Revue | The Boom Room | 10:00 PM

El Corazon

Burlesque, Costume Contest & Party Favors

The Police Experience | Sat, February 21st A tribute to the music of The Police

www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY JANUARY 22ND

GET A $100 PASS FOR ALL SHOWS!

GRAYSON ERHARD

Tickets $10 advance | $15 day of show | 21 and over Doors 7:00 PM | Shows 8:00 PM

| Full entertainment schedule online SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

01/23/15

02/12/15

The Long Run | Saturday, February 14th A tribute to the music of the Eagles

TINA T DJ CIDE J AY C E E O H

with Zero Down, Late September Dogs, Tatarus Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 8:00 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $20 ADV / $25 DOS

FRIDAY JANUARY 23RD

MONDAY JANUARY 26TH

DARK TRANQUILITY

with Insomnium, Hallows Descent, Sausage Slapper, Last Bastion Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $20 ADV / $23 DOS / $55 VIP

SATURDAY JANUARY 24TH MIKE THRASHER PRESENT:S

POWERMAN 5000

with Hed(pe), Knee High Fox, Sanction VIII, Peratus Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 8:00 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $18 ADV / $20 DOS

SUNDAY JANUARY 25TH MIKE THRASHER PRESENT:S

SILVERSTEIN

Kingston, WA • www.the-point-casino.com • 1.866.547.6468 Tickets available now at these locations: In the gift shop | On our website For more information Call 866.547.6468 | Ages 21 and over The Point Casino is proudly owned and operated by The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe. See the Wildcard Players Club for complete details. You must be a member of The Point Casino’s Wildcard Players Club to participate in some programs. Some restrictions may apply. Point Casino promotions, offers, coupons and/or specials may not be combined without marketing management approval. Management reserves all rights to alter or cancel without prior notice. You must be at least 21 years old to participate in gaming activities, to attend entertainment events and to enter lounge/bar areas. Knowing your limit is your best bet—get help at (800) 547-6133.

32 TPC-5290-5 Seattle Weekly.indd 1

1/20/15 1:16 PM

JAKE E. LEE’S RED DRAGON CARTEL

with Morning Bear, Megasapien, Common Law Cabin, Foreign Sons Lounge Show. Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS KISW (99.9 FM) METAL SHOP & EL CORAZON PRESENT:

Close to Home... Far From Ordinary.®

MONDAY JANUARY 26TH

with Beartooth, Hands Like Houses, Major League, My Iron Lung Doors at 6:00PM / Show at 6:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $18 ADV / $22 DOS

CALABRESE

with Hades Machine, Raw Dogs, Crossroads Exchange, Plus Guests Lounge Show. Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

TUESDAY JANUARY 27TH MIKE THRASHER PRESENT:S

MAYHEM

with Watain, Revenge Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:45 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $25

THURSDAY JANUARY 22ND MIKE THRASHER PRESENTS:

PERIPHERY with Nothing More, Wovenwar, Plus Guests Doors at 6:00PM / Show at 6:30, ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $18 ADV / $20 DOS

THE PERIPHERY AFTER SHOW PARTY 21+ LOUNGE SHOW featuring live music from Tyranny Theory FREE Music begins at the conclusion of the Periphery show in the main showroom.

JUST ANNOUNCED 2/4 LOUNGE - AIROSPACE 2/18 LOUNGE - HAIL THE SUN 3/5 LOUNGE - NATHAN KALISH & THE LASTCALLERS UP & COMING 1/29 - SKULL FIST 1/29 LOUNGE - THE TOASTERS 1/30 - THE FALL OF TROY 1/31 - MISTER MASTER 1/31 LOUNGE - BOATS! 2/3 - KARMA TO BURN / SCOTT KELLY (NEUROSIS) AND THE ROAD HOME 2/5 LOUNGE - RAW FABRICS 2/6 - THE DICKIES 2/7 - JUCIFER 2/8 LOUNGE - Q DOT 2/10 BEHEMOTH / CANNIBAL CORPSE 2/11 LOUNGE - SHIRIN 2/13 - SUPER GEEK LEAGUE 2/14 - PIRATEFEST FEST. ALESTORM Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com


arts&culture» Music » FROM PAGE 31 last year. Like its predecessor, Are You Gonna Eat That?, the album proves why Rock and Sonic are two of hiphop’s most sought-after writers. You may not catch every obscure reference the first time around, but that’s all the more reason to keep Bestiary on repeat. With Homeboy Sandman, DJ Abilities, Dark Time Sunshine. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $20. All ages. Local quartet CORESPONDENTS’ instrumental tunes are so vivid, you can practically hear the lyrics telling the accompanying story. Just take “Winner of My Disco Tent,” the first single from the band’s recently released cassette, lolcats, for instance. With a ton of thick, twangy guitar riffs and dusty percussion, the song could be on the soundtrack to an old spaghetti Western, no questions asked, but hints of nontraditional instruments add a worldly feel. At this cassette-release show, the band will let “Winner,” plus other fantastically named tunes like “(All Up in My) Drug Rug,” “Audios Amigos,” and “The The Tar Tar Pits,” do the talking. With Ben Von Wildenhaus with the Professional Band, Diminished Men. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. 9 p.m. $8. 21 and over. “I’m not hiding from who I am inside,” classically trained vocalist KATHLEEN PARRISH sings on “Hard to Breathe” from her debut EP, Veins, being released tonight. With as much honesty and openness as she can muster, the alt-jazz singer gives listeners an all-access look into her life across the EP’s four tracks. From wanting to protect a friend from harm (“Red Fleece Jacket”) to finding inner strength (the title track), Parrish’s Veins sounds like verbatim passages from her journal. With Bleachbear, Emily Clementine. Vera Project, 305 Warren Ave. N., 956-8372. 7:30 p.m. $6 adv./$8 DOS. All ages.

Friday, Jan. 23

Rarely if ever has a press bio made me feel like I needed to go back to school as much as that of Brooklyn R&Btinged electronic duo BEACON, aka singer/producer Thomas Mullarney III and producer Jacob Gossett. According to their bio, their latest EP, L1, was inspired by a phenomenon called Lagrangian points, which

mark when an object, like a satellite, can remain stable when orbiting between two gravitational pulls, like those of the Earth and the Sun. Confused? Don’t worry; the idea of balance and influence translates to the music thanks to Mullarney’s vocals, which sound much like Tom Krell from How to Dress Well. With Lord Raja. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, thebarboza.com. 7 p.m. $10 adv. 21 and over.

Saturday, Jan. 24

Glasgow-based indie-pop band THE VASELINES broke up in 1989, just two years after it formed, but Kurt Cobain, a huge fan of the band, helped keep its name and music on everyone’s mind by singing the band’s praises in interviews and covering Vaseline songs with Nirvana. Back together since 2008, the group, fronted by founding members and vocalists/guitarists Eugene Kelly and Frances McKee, recently released its third full-length, V for Vaselines. The album features the vocal harmonies and indie-pop energy that made Cobain, and so many others, fall for the pair way back when, but they also debut their folkier side on songs like “Single Spies.” With Loch Lomond. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $18 adv. 21 and over.

Tuesday, Jan. 27

Sometimes all it takes is a single word to ignite a creative spark. For singer/violinist KISHI BASHI, leading his string quartet at this show, that word was Lighght (pronounced “light”), the name of his latest album and a one-word poem by Aram Saroyan. But while the poem and album share a title, the similarities end there. The poem’s extreme minimalism is juxtaposed against Bashi’s loop-heavy mix of orchestral and electronic elements, plus layered vocals galore. Even still, the album is as buoyant as its title suggests. With Elizabeth & The Catapult. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stg presents.org/neptune. 8 p.m. $25 adv./$27 DOS. All ages. BY A Z AR IA C . P O D P LE S K Y

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for more listings.

Tuesday, Jan. 27

Think of Jukebox the Ghost as the second coming of A-Ha, if the latter had an interest in both postmodern philosophy and all-night dance parties. The Brooklyn trio is an exuberant bunch, a group for whom it makes perfect sense to pair heavy topics with light, syncopated melodies. “We like talking about life and emotion and deeper things,” vocalist and keyboardist Ben Thornewill explains, “but we also want to be doing pop music, music people will enjoy listening to and enjoy dancing to.” Thornewill says his band’s previous album, Safe Travels, was written in a time of emotional turmoil; topics like mortality and the supernatural are paired with sweeping orchestral arrangements. The band’s most recent self-titled album is more radio-friendly,

moving from feel-good anthemic tracks like “Girl” and “Hollywood” to “Undeniable You,” a heartwrenching solo piece that has Thornewill railing with—and against—his own voice, looping his vocals in the live arrangement. But what makes this power-pop group pop is not its music’s crafted aspect, but its ability to draw inspiration from and riff off its surroundings. Three days into its latest tour, the band had already swapped covers with opening act Twin Forks. With guitarist Tommy Siegel, Thornewill keeps the banter going, always quick with a joke about the latest tour stop. Drummer Jesse Kristin pulls the dynamic together, a perpetual smile on his face as he keeps the beat. In an age of music-on-demand, each performance is a different experience. JULIA COOK With Twin Forks (feat. Chris Carrabba), Secret Someones. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. $13 adv. 7 p.m.

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Jukebox the Ghost

in This Bring T And ge n o p Cou Tizer e p p A one 2 oFF! For 1/

33


SPAS

Appliances

JESSICA’S

ULTIMATE SPA Sensual Relaxation 425.765.0376

NEW APPLIANCES UP TO 70% OFF All Manufacturer Small Ding’s, Dents, Scratches and Factory Imperfections *Under Warranty* For Inquiries, Call or Visit Appliance Distributors @ 14639 Tukwila Intl. Blvd. 206-244-6966

MON - SAT 10am - 10pm • SUNDAY - By Appt 1084 KIRKLAND AVE NE RENTON, WA 98056

GRAND OPENING 10AM - 9PM

13985 Interurban Ave., Suite 200 Tukwila, WA 98168

(206) 243-2393

ADULT PHONE ENTERTAINMENT Free FORUMS & CHATROOM 206-753-CHAT 253-203-1643 425-405-4388 MAN to MAN Free chatrooms! 206-753-CHAT 253-359-CHAT 425-405-CHAT WebPhone on LiveMatch.com

Tired of talking to your cat? 206-753-CHAT 253-203-1643 425-405-4388 WebPhone on LiveMatch.com Ladies free to talk w/VIPs!

Seattle

206.877.0877 Tacoma

253.882.0882

FREE to listen and reply to ads!

FREE CODE : Seattle Weekly

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2589

Eastern Wa. Lots & Acreage

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

TONASKET

34

20 FLAT ACRES. Tired of paying utility bills? Water, sewer, garbage and electricity getting too expensive? Own your own Off-The-Grid Power Solar panel, well, septic all installed. 2 BR, 2 BA, fenced. 24’x56’ dbl wide mobile. Plumbed to propane. 15 min to Tonasket $35,000 (cash) 206.619.9674. WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent

STACK LAUNDRY Deluxe front loading washer & dryer. Energy efficient, 8 cycles. Like new condition * Under Warranty * Over $1,200 new, now only $578 or make payments of $25 per month

BIG D TOWING Abandoned Vehicle Auction Wednesday 01/28/15 @ 11AM. 2 Vehicles. Preview 10-11am. 1540 Leary Way NW, Seattle 98107

%206-244-6966% Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

WARNING HOT GUYS!

Professional Services Music Lessons GUITAR LESSONS Exp’d, Patient Teacher. BFA/MM Brian Oates (206) 434-1942

Announcements

NORTHEND MASSAGE FOR YOUR HEALTH LAURIE LMP #MA00014267 (206) 919-2180 Appliances AMANA RANGE Deluxe 30” Glasstop Range self clean, auto clock & timer ExtraLarge oven & storage *UNDER WARRANTY* Over $800. new. Pay off balance of $193 or make payments of $14 per month. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360-9021857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Home Furnishings

ENTERTAIN THIS YEAR W/ YOUR RETRO DINING ROOM Solid Maple table, beautiful sideboard and 6 padded chairs. Sleek design from the late 1960’s. Clean lines. Very good cond.! $450. Call for details.

Vashon Island

KENMORE FREEZER

1 BR APT HOME $700 incl private entrance, cable, water, sewer and garbage. Background check and $400 deposit. Auburn 253-906-0410. Greenlake/WestSeattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

Repo Sears deluxe 20cu.ft. freezer 4 fast freeze shelves, defrost drain,

interior light *UNDER WARRANTY* Make $15 monthly payments or pay off balance of $293. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

KENMORE REPO Heavy duty washer & dryer, deluxe, large cap. w/normal, perm-press & gentle cycles. * Under Warranty! * Balance left owing $272 or make payments of $25. Call credit dept. 206-244-6966

Thursday 01/29/15 Preview 8:00 AM Auction 9:00 AM A-Seattle Towing, LLC 13226 1st Ave S. Burien 206-856-1388 www.towseattle.com

UNDER WARRANTY!

was over $1200 new, now only payoff bal. of $473 or make pmts of only $15 per mo. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

Open 7 Days a Week

ABANDONED VEHICLE AUCTION

BIG D TOWING Abandoned Vehicle Auction Tuesday 01/27/15 @ 11AM. 1 Vehicle. Preview 10-11am. 1540 Leary Way NW, Seattle 98107

REPO REFRIGERATOR Custom deluxe 22 cu. ft. sideby-side, ice & water disp., color panels available

Vina Sauna

Auto Events/ Auctions

206-304-1451 Auto Events/ Auctions

ABANDONED VEHICLE AUCTION Sunday 01/25/15 Preview 8:00 AM Auction 9:00 AM A-Seattle Towing, LLC 13226 1st Ave S. Burien 206-856-1388 www.towseattle.com

Stan’s Mountain View Towing Inc Abandoned Vehicle Auction 9000 Delridge Way SW, Seattle WA Wednesday 1/28/15 Gates Open 9AM, Auction 12 PM 206-767-4848

Employment Computer/Technology Computer/Technology ServiceNow Inc, provider of enterprise IT cloud services, has job openings in Kirkland, WA for Software Development Engineer (3154): Build scalable and reliable cloud computing solutions to support the growth of SaaS products; and Associate Software Development Engineer (3521): Build a highly scalable and robust cloud automation manageability suite that automates various customer life cycle events. Mail resumes and ref. job code to: ServiceNow Inc, 3260 Jay St, Santa Clara, CA 95054 Attn A.B. Global Mobility. ENGINEERING Various levels of experience Cypress Semiconductor Corporation, leading provider of highperformance, mixed-signal, programmable solutions, has an opening in Lynnwood, WA for Architect Member of Technical Staff (ARC01): Perform Analog and mixed-signal component and system architecture development for next generation Cypress Programmable System On Chip(PSOC) platform products. Mail resume (must reference job code) to: Cypress Semiconductor Corp., Attn: AMMO, 198 Champion Court, M.S. 6.1, San Jose, CA 95134. Program Manager: Responsible for program management for the performance & data engine for visual analytics software product. Req MS in Comp Sci, or rtd field, & 3 yrs prog mgmt exp: devp rqmts & user stories for sw prods to supp deliv & release of prods util Agile dev methods (incl Scrum); manage the deliv of tech projs from design to release, incl report gen using SQL & Excel, customer interaction, & post-release mgmt; analyze SQL queries & sw code for perform issues, troubleshoot & recommend improvements; present sw features to customers & staff at conferences & training events; & update & maintain tech doc, incl functional rqmts & specs, using Confluence wiki. Position at Tableau Software, Inc. in Seattle, WA. To apply, please e-mail resume & cover letter to jobstableau@ tableausoftware.com. Software Engineer, Core Storage Twitter, Inc. seeks Software Engineer, Core Storage in Seattle: Build the nextgeneration distributed storage systems that hold data used by millions of people as they connect, explore, and interact with information and one another. Build highly-available, high-performance, redundant, scalable distributed storage systems. Req’s: MS(or equiv.)+2 yrs. exp. OR BS(or equiv.)+5 yrs. exp. Submit resume w/ref. to Req.# SK210(SW) at: ATTN: Mercedes Sperling, Twitter, Inc., 1355 Market St., Suite 900, San Francisco, CA 94103.

Employment Computer/Technology TECHNOLOGY Help build the next generation of systems behind Facebook’s products. Facebook, Inc. currently has the following openings in Seattle, WA (various levels/types): Mechatronics Engineer (3947N) Develop innovative concepts for product design in accordance with design criteria and performance objectives. Industrial Designer (IDN) Contribute to all aspects of product development process from product research and early concept development through engineering and transfer to manufacturing. Mail resume to: Facebook, Inc. Attn: JAA-GTI, 1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Must reference job title and job# shown above, when applying.

Employment General

Multi-Media Advertising Consultant SEATTLE Be a part of the largest community news organization in Washington! Do you have a proven track record of success in sales and enjoy managing your own territory? Are you competitive and thrive in an energetic environment? Do you desire to work in an environment which offers uncapped earning opportunities? Are you interested in a fast paced, creative atmosphere where you can use your sales expertise to provide consultative print and digital solutions? If you answered YES to the above, then we are looking for you! Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is looking for self-motivated, resultsdriven people interested in a multi-media sales career. This position will be responsible for print and digital advertising sales to an eclectic and exciting group of clients. As part of our sales team you are expected to maintain and grow existing client relationships, as well as develop new client relationships. The successful candidate will also be goal oriented, have organizational skills that enable you to manage multiple deadlines, provide great consultative sales and excellent customer service. This position receives a base salary plus commission; and a benefits package including health insurance, paid time off, and 401K. Position requires use of your personal cell phone and vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. Sales experience necessary; Media experience is a definite asset. Must be computer-proficient. If you have these skills, and enjoy playing a proactive part in impacting your local businesses’ financial success with advertising solutions, please email your resume and cover letter to: hreast@sound publishing.com ATTN: SEA. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employee (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com hreast@soundpublishing.com

Employment General ART DIRECTOR Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. has an immediate opening for an experienced editorial art director. The art director is responsible for the overall design quality and integrity of the publication. He/she must be able to conceptualize and produce modern, sophisticated, and vibrant design for covers, features, and editorial pages. This individual must be an exceptionally creative designer who has experience commissioning high-quality photography and illustration, negotiating fees, clearing rights and managing a budget. The art director will work with and manage other designers in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment so will need the ability to balance strong leadership with strong collaboration in order to thrive in a team environment. Applicants must have a superior understanding of typography and expert-level skills in Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, and Acrobat. Editorial design experience is a plus. The successful candidate will possess excellent communication and organizational skills and the ability to juggle several projects at once. Knowledge of PDF and postscript technology is beneficial. Other talents such as illustration or photography are desirable, but not required. Sound Publishing offers competitive salaries and benefits including healthcare, 401K, paid holidays, vacation and sick time. Qualified applicants should send a resume, cover letter, and a few samples of your work to: hreast@soundpublishing.com Be sure to note ATTN: HR/ADSEA in your subject line. Sound Publishing, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website at: www.soundpublishing.com to find out more about us! CALENDAR ASSISTANT Seattle Weekly Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. has an immediate opening for a calendar assistant. This is a Part-Time position, working approximately 16 hours over 3 days per week. The calendar assistant will assist both the arts and music editors in the creation and upkeep of Seattle Weekly’s extensive events listings. He/she must be detail oriented, able to comb press releases and online calendars and manually transcribe mind-numbing information with great accuracy and gusto. A proven ability to write succinct, lively copy is a must, as is a working knowledge of most art forms and familiarity with Seattle’s arts and music scenes, from the high-art institutions to the thriving underground. Obsessive knowledge about one or two particular disciplines (Appalachian folk songs and Kabuki, say) is not required, but is definitely a plus. If you have trouble meeting deadlines, don’t apply. Applicants must have a working knowledge of Microsoft Office. The successful candidate will possess excellent communication and organizational skills and the ability to juggle several projects at once. Qualified applicants should send a resume, cover letter, and a few samples of your writing to: hreast@soundpublishing.com Be sure to note ATTN: HR/CASEA in your subject line. Sound Publishing, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website at: www.soundpublishing.com to find out more about us! Incite Informatics, LLC seeks a Business Intelligence Analyst (work location: Seattle, WA) to analyze, design, schedule, construct & deliver business intelligence solutions to meet client expectations. Req. Master Degree or foreign educ. equiv. & 2 yrs. exp. Travel 10%, inc. international. May telecommute. Send resume, cover letter, job code BIAINSW to: M. Griffin, Incite Informatics, LLC, 37000 Grand River Avenue, Suite 310, Farmington Hills, MI 48335.

Employment General CTFC – Gaming Division Mill Bay Casino/ Located in Lake Chelan Recruiting: CAGE MANAGER $40,140 to $56,999 * Minimum of 5 years of supervisory experience, preferably in a cash handling operation * Minimum of 1 year of high school or college bookkeeping/accounting, or the equivalent training in a recognized business school * Minimum of 1 year experience as a full-charge bookkeeper or in a regulated cash handling environment. Great Benefits pkg /Backgrounds check, & Pre-employment/Random Drug Testing required Indian Preference employer ALL APPLICANTS WELCOME Request an application from Mill Bay Casino, HR sandral@colvillecasinos.com 509-687-6924 Closing Date: January 30, 2015 DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Lynnwood: Regional Manager If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE.

Tree Climber/ Trimmers Experienced Tree Climbers Wanted Full Time/ Year Round Work. Must have own Gear & Climb Saw Reliable Transportation & Driver’s License req. Email Work Exp. to recruiting@evergreentlc.com 800-684-8733

Employment General DONT SETTLE FOR SEASONAL WORK YEAR-ROUND We are looking for motivated, independent, individuals who don’t mind talking to people. No sales involved just short conversations face to face with home owners. Work outdoors around your own schedule. Earn $500-$750 per week/ top reps make $1200+ Allowances for Cell phone, travel, medical compensation can be earned Company provides all market areas, apparel & training. Vehicle, DL, Cell phone & Internet access req. Email resume to recruiting@evergreentlc.com or apply online at www.tlc4homesnw.com

Employment Services WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

Employment Social Services VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Must live in Seattle area. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

WANT TO WIN DVDS, CONCERT TICKETS & MORE?

CHECK OUT OUR FREE STUFF PAGE! FOR MORE DETAILS, VISIT US AT: seattleweekly.com/freestuff


NTS

Do you have PTSD and alcohol problems?

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

Seeking free treatment? Paid research opportunity. Call the APT Study at

Classified

Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM

“Seattle Stu”

Jazz Trio or Quartet for Hire Available for Parties & Restaurants (TOPPS!) Please Call: (206) 223-1110 from 1pm -7pm E-mail: sinison@comcast.net

HAPPYHAULER.com

Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted!

HomeWell Senior Care Franchising is growing! Recession proof business. Only 8 available territories in Western Washington. $85K Initial investment includes Franchise Fee. Next Step: Visit www.HomeWell.biz Improve Your Relationships and Earn $200 Practice Connection and Self-Expression Skills UW Study recruiting any two people who want to get closer: friends, coworkers, siblings, romantic partners, etc. www.uwconnectionsstudy.com/206-221-4296

Singing Lessons

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

PROMOTIONS NEWSLETTER

PROMOTIONS

The inside scoop on VIP events, free tickets, and event photos.

206-543-0584.

WANT TO KNOW ABOUT UPCOMING EVENTS, CONTESTS OR LOCAL PROMOTIONS? SIGN UP FOR SEATTLE WEEKLY’S PROMOTIONS NEWSLETTER. Go to: seattleweekly.com/signup

DINING

WEEKLY

EVENT

MUSIC MUSIC NEWSLETTER

The inside scoop on upcoming shows and the latest reviews.

The choice is yours FILM HAPPY HOUR... ... choose to succeed!

CAREER TRAINING

If you want to change your life for the better, choose career training from Everest College!

1-888-291-1362 • www.EverestLearn.com

Proof Due

Ad #: AR TS T Deadline

121

Publicatio Section: B Specs: 4.8

TAppro TAppro TRevis

Initial ___

5 LOCATIONS: Bremerton • Everett Renton • Seattle • Tacoma Financial aid available for those who qualify. Programs and schedules vary by campus. For useful consumer information, please visit us at www.everest.edu/disclosures.

filtering the best of

THE NORTHWEST!

S A N D E N T E MEDICINE R TA I N M E N T

Walk-ins Welcome

On-Line Verification Available Providing Authorizations in Accordance with RCW 69.51A

$99 includes Authorization and Card Doctors available Tuesday 2 - 6 • Thursday 11 - 3, Friday 11 - 6

Also Open Sunday 12 - 4

4021 Aurora Ave N. Seattle, WA 98103 • 206-632-4021 www.medicinemanwellness.com Now accepting all major credit/debit cards!

instagram.com/

SE ATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

MAN WELLNESS CENTER

35


Reserve your SEAT TODAY :

Hiring Event Sat. 1/24 @ 4:30 pm!! 1619 9

th

Camlin Resort

Ave, Seattle, WA. 98101 10th Floor

RSVP to john.kennedy@wyn.com or Call John Kennedy (425) 498-2745 Wyndham Vacation Ownership

Kickoff Your Career!! Full and Part-Time Positions Available! Reserve Your Wyndham Vacation Ownership: Make Vacation Your Career! Seat!

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 21 — 27, 2015

“Brand Ambassadors” Needed for Special Events

36

If you bring high energy, strong communication skills and a positive attitude we can show you how to excel in this position! NO experience required!!! However, you must be: coachable and have a strong desire to succeed!

See what opportunities lie ahead @ wvojobs.com

Requirements:  Reliable Transportation  Stable Employment History  Loyal and Career Minded  Able to adapt to change  Professional Presentation  High Energy / Social  Motivated to Succeed  Competitive in nature  Coachable / Trainable  Strong work ethic  No Fear of Rejection Job Highlights:  Great Pay  Days, Nights and Weekends  Hourly Rate Plus Weekly Commission, and Monthly Bonus  Strong opportunity for Career Advancement!  Stellar Training

Profile for Sound Publishing

Seattle Weekly, January 21, 2015  

January 21, 2015 edition of the Seattle Weekly

Seattle Weekly, January 21, 2015  

January 21, 2015 edition of the Seattle Weekly