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NORTH COUNTY RIVALS MEET

NW ICE FISH FESTIVAL

ON THE BASKETBALL COURT

Tournament on Sidley Lake at Molson on Saturday, January 17, registration at 7 a.m.

See Page A8-9

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Some good news for Nursing Home

BABY NEW YEAR 2015

LTC gets larger than expected Pro-share payment BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET – The North Valley Hospital Board learned that the hospital will receive nearly twice as much in Disproportionate Share Payments from the state for the Long Term Care (LTC) as it did the previous year. The Pro-Share payment for 2015 will be $399,805, compared to $201,000 in 2014. While the extra cash was a good thing, the district is still looking at a loss in the Long Term Care Division, according to numbers shared with the board by District CEO Linda Michel. The payment, with a $30,000 lower Labor & Industries statement, will cut the LTC Division’s projected loss down from $809,145 to $558,572. Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt explained that the reason the payment was larger was because there were only six remaining nursing homes that were still attached to hospitals in the

state and that some hospital districts were no longer participating in the program “because it is a lot of work.” The money that was budgeted by the legislature was divided amongst a smaller group and that caused the payment increase. However, she cautioned the district could not rely on the payment to be there in future years. Verhasslelt went over the financials for November, explaining that December’s, being the end of the year, were not yet available. “I like the numbers,” said Helen Casey, chairman of the hospital board. “I do too, especially when you consider it was payroll day, also when we are on a 16 day medicare payment delay. For November the hospital had a net of $38,000 while the extended care lost $45,000,” said Verhasselt. “The VA Clinic for November currently has 745 vets, last year it was 681

SEE NVH BOARD | PG A2

Groups suing county over Comp Plan

Pamela Thacker/submitted photos

adoption of all documents by the County Commissioners. The Citizens’ Council TWISP - The Methow Valley Citizens’ says it is taking this action now even Council (MVCC) and Futurewise though the county will hold a belated have filed a lawsuit in Superior Court public hearing on Feb. 2. The hearing has against Okanogan County, challenging been scheduled so the county commisits recent adoption of a Comprehensive sioners can take oral testimony on the Plan, the associated Interim Zoning, Comprehensive Plan, which the groups and Determination of Non-Significance say they failed to do in error on Dec 22, under the State Environmental Policy and now wish to correct. “Since the county Act (SEPA) for the Commissioners Plan and Zoning. According to the “‘First come first served‘ for have not responded input from con21-page lawsuit limited water is not a plan to cerned citizens in filed with the court for the future....” the past, we expect clerk on Friday, that this hearing Jan. 9, the plainPhil Millam, Board Member, will be pro forma tiffs are asking the Methow Valley Citizens’ Council and result in no court to rule that changes,” said the the Comprehensive groups in a recent Plan, approved by the Okanogan County Commissioners press release. “From MVCC’s perspecon Dec. 22, 2014 is “invalid and in viola- tive, the plan is Comprehensive in name tion of the requirements of the Planning only.” From their release: Enabling Act (chapter 36.70 RCW), First, it fails to meet state law by not the Growth Management Act (chapter 36.70A RCW), the State Environmental providing for the protection of water Policy Act (chapter 43.21C RCW) and quality and quantity or taking water its implementing regulations, and other availability into account when setting the allowed densities. applicable provisions of state law.” They say the lawsuit comes after years of debate and citizen participation, and SEE LAWSUIT | PG A2 THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Meet little miss Victoria Reyes Giron. She was born at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket on a snowy afternoon on Jan. 4, 2015 at 2:03 p.m. She weighed six pounds, 10 ounces and was 19 inches long. Her parents are Adelina Giron and Dimas Reyes and she is number five of their beautiful family of five daughters. The family was gifted with an assortment of hand-made items made by the nursing staff and the foundation members, plus WalMart gift cards and a goody bag filled with toys, diapers, wipes and baby products. NVH staff said they were happy to introduce this little wonder and wish her well in her first New Year!

Oroville Council asked for help in purchase of K-9 BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council was treated to a dog and pony show, without the pony, at their Tuesday, Jan. 6 meeting as two county deputies displayed the skills of one of their K-9s and asked for help in obtaining another to be located in the north county area. Deputies Terry Shrable and Shane Jones explained to the council that K-9 officers can be an important tool whether searching for narcotics or apprehending the bad guys. “I’ve been in canines for 12 years and this is my third dog,” said Deputy Jones, who brought his dog Basco, a Belgian Malinois, to show what trained dogs were capable of. “He’s imported from Holland and he’s the best of the best.” Deputy Scrable is in the process of getting a dog to use, especially in the north end of the county, which hasn’t had a K-9 with the sheriff ’s department located here since Deputy Kevin Kinman retired Jake a few years back. “We’ve currently undertaken a county-wide funding effort and are actively pursuing donations from all members of the

county that can benefit,” said Schrable, who added that he has had donations from municipalities, as well as local businesses. He said the dogs would be invaluable in helping to search for suspects in burglaries like the ones that occurred recently in the Oroville area. He added that the dog would be available to aid the Oroville Police Department any time they gave him a call. “Most departments have one dog, we have three and we are going to have four. This is the next step for me and my career,” said Shrable. “I know how frustrating it can be for me or Officer (Ken) Waddell or Chief (Todd) Hill when we make a stop and we know there are drugs in that car and there isn’t a dog available. With a dog in the area we can change that.” The deputies explained that the dogs won’t hit on marijuana, because it is legal in Washington State, but they excell at locating other drugs. Basco demonstrated by locating some methamphetamine that had been hidden in the council chambers. “We just had some major drugs found by a dog in the Methow. We got a lot of meth, a lot of heroin and a gun,” said Jones.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

SEE K-9 COP | PG 2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 03

Okanogan County Sheriff’s Deputy Terry Shrable plays “bad guy” to demonstrate K-9 Basco’s ability to subdue a suspect and hold him for law enforcement. Shrable and Deputy Shane Jones appeared before the Oroville Council last Tuesday. They are looking for funding to purchase another Belgian Malinois Dog and training. This would bring the number of K-9s with the sheriff’s department to four, with the new dog located in north Okanogan County.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Local News Valley Life Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A4

Community A5 Classifieds/Legals A6-7 Real Estate A7

Sports Calendar Obituaries

A8-9 A10 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 15, 2015

NVH BOARD | FROM A1

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Deputy Shane Jones and Basco, a Belgian Malinois with the Okanogan County Sheriff’s office. Basco demonstrated his ability to sniff out drugs that were hidden in the Oroville City Council chambers last Tuesday. The dog can also be used to track and apprehend suspects.

so it’s continually growing,” she said. “If you look department by department the VA Clinic is not making a profit either.” The CFO said that the district was asking the Veterans Administration to increase the amount of reimbursement for services. “The service is extremely worthwhile so we are going to renegotiate our contract and hope to offer more services,” she said. Verhasselt said swing bed use had gone from an average of 3.74 in 2013 to 4.25 in 2014 and that the district had room to add more. “Registered warrants last year at this time were over $1 million, as of today we have cash on hand of $119,593. We should also be receiving $194,000 from the state because they underpaid us that much in 2013,” she said.

“Registered warrants last year at this time were over $1 million, as of today we have cash on hand...” Helen Verhasselt, CFO North Valley Hospital District

Newport with 9,067. “We are losing about $50 per resident per day. Forks is losing about $208 per resident per day. What that tells us is we are working a lot more efficiently than

other facilities,” she said. The Thursday, Jan. 8 meeting actually began with a one-hour closed door executive session. Most of the public who were attending, some sitting in the hallway because the boardroom was overflowing, waited patiently for the board to return. Afterwards the board took public comment and heard impassioned pleas for finding a way to keep the nursing home open. They also heard some praise for outgoing hospital administrator Michel and others on the staff for there efforts to pay off the hospital’s warrants. The next meeting of the North Valley Hospital board is on Thursday, Jan. 22. Chairman Helen Casey said the board would try to find a larger meeting place if there were as many in attendance as there were last Thursday night.

CELEBRATING ‘TWO OF A KIND’

K-9 COP | FROM A1 The K-9 cop also showed how he could be used to apprehend a suspect by biting down on his arm. This was demonstrated with Deputy Shrable wearing protective padding on his arm while the dog subdued him. “He’s a very obedient dog... you can put him around kids and people and he won’t bite,” said Jones. Shrable said that they had been asking for a donation of $1000 for the dog and training which costs $17,000.

On the extended care side Verhasselt said she felt that of the six hospital districts with nursing homes, NVH’s had the most Medicaid patient days at 16,035. The next highest she said was

“I’d appreciate your support and would consider it a privilege to work with you and your department,” said Shrable. “I have no problem giving something, but $1000 is a lot of money,” said Councilman Jon Neal after the deputies had left. Mayor Chuck Spieth asked if forfeited funds from drug crimes could be used toward the donation. The same funds were used recently to buy Tasers and towards the purchase of a patrol vehicle.

“Why don’t we research that and see if they can be used to help,” said Spieth.

DEPARTMENT HEADS ANNOUNCED Mayor Spieth announced his appointments, in this case reappointments, of department heads for 2015. They are: Mick Howe, city attorney; Rod Noel, superintendent of public works and fire chief; JoAnn Denney, clerk/treasurer and public records officer; Todd Hill, police chief and Debra Donahue, EMS coordinator.

LAWSUIT | FROM A1 Second, the law requires that the county designate Resource Lands best suited to forestry, agriculture, and mining. Yet the plan designates only public lands as resource lands; it fails to designate any private lands that are currently used for, or best suited for, agriculture. Third, the plan ignores the lessons learned from the record 2014 wildfires and floods. The county made no changes to the plan after the fires and mudslides, failing to reconsider land use and zoning in flood-prone areas, the water needed for future firefight-

ing and fire prevention, or whether some roads are adequate for emergency egress during fires, given the allowed densities. They add that the county’s analysis of the plan’s likely environmental impacts under SEPA also fails to take limited water supply, increased fires, or increased flooding and slides into account and is equally flawed. We are asking the court to direct Okanogan County to correct these deficiencies and to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Perhaps the most significant result of an EIS would

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be to demonstrate the obvious water supply deficit, compelling the county to either improve the plan or acknowledge that it is adopting a plan that is doomed to failure. ‘“First come, first served” for limited water is not a plan for the future. Unfortunately, county officials acknowledge that this is how the county’s water supply would be allocated under this socalled “Plan,”’ said Phil Millam, a board member with the MVCC and former director of the EPA’s water program, through the federal agencies Seattle office.

Submitted photo

TONASKET - On Wednesday, Jan. 7 Gerald and John Oakes “identical twins” born in 1935, celebrated their 80th birthday at Whistlers Restaurant with immediate family. The twins were born up North Pine Creek on the Oakes’ homestead on a very cold and snowy day. Born to Bill and Lena Oakes, they joined three sisters - Leona Bliss, Irene Freeman and the late Betty Clarkson. The twins went to elementary and high school in Tonasket, turning out for sports where they earned their reputation. They both grew up in and stayed in Tonasket, where they married and raised their families. Joining them on their birthdays were Irene, Leona and her husband Carman, Gerald’s youngest son Jerry, from Oroville, and John’s son, Johnny, from Tonasket, as well as Gerald’s wife Peg. They helped them celebrate with food and ice cream cake. Jerry’s wife Colleen was missing because of her job and John’s wife Adaline couldn’t attend because of illness. They all enjoyed talking about all the different memories of the last 80 years until closing time.

Oroville Chamber of Commerce

McManus Plays Presents “McManus In Love” on Saturday, January 17th, 2015

NW ICE FISHING FESTIVAL Saturday, January 17th, 2015 in Molson Washington

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Other Activities at the Molson Grange Hall Presented By

Races For All Ages $200 In Prizes! • Best Looking & Unique Car Awards • CASH prizes courtesy OK Chev

SATURDAY, January 17th at 7pm Oroville High School Commons $17 Advance $20 at the door

Buy Tickets at: Princes Center, Tonasket Interiors, Camaray Motel, Or Order Online at www.orovillewashington.org Sponsored by: Oroville Chamber of Commerce (509) 476-3684

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Saturday Night

• McManus Play: Sat., 7pm at Oroville High School.

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JANUARY 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Blake Forrest Lannoye, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 6 to third-degree possession of stolen property. Lannoye was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 301 days suspended with credit for 63 days served. Lannoye was fined $1,010.50 for the Nov. 4 crime. Alexander David Schaler, 21, Okanogan, was found guilty (jury trial) of obstruction. Schaler was also found not guilty (jury trial) of seconddegree assault. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 350 days suspended and credit for 14 days served. Schaler was fined $500 for the April 14, 2014 crime. Shanyce Rachel Rodriguez, 21, Oroville, pleaded guilty Jan. 8 to first-degree burglary, fourth-degree assault, thirddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Rodriguez was sentenced to 15 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Jan. 25, 2014 crimes. In a separate case, Rodriguez pleaded Jan. 8 to conspiracy to commit residential burglary and POCS (buprenorphine). The court dismissed two counts of unlawful possession of a legend drug. In that case, Rodriguez was sentenced to 10.5 months in prison and fined $1,600. Those crimes occurred May 7, 2014. The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 23, Oroville, with five counts of second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crimes allegedly occurred Jan 1. The court found probable cause to charge Desiree Marie Andrews, 27, Omak, with six counts of second-degree ID theft and two counts of second-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 19-20. The court found probable cause to charge Jeremy William Andrews, 30, Omak, with six counts of second-degree ID theft, two counts of seconddegree theft and one count of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred between Dec. 18 and Jan. 1.

JUVENILE

A 16-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Jan. 7 to fourthdegree assault and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). The boy was sentenced to one day in detention with credit for one day served, and fined $100 for the Oct. 25, 2014 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for March 25.

CIVIL

The state Department of Revenue assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes, penalties and fees: Silvernail Rental and Repair, Oroville, $2,460.48; Lawrence Construction Services of Washington LLC, $3,213.59; Armor

Painting, Oroville, $4,820.37; and Camaray Motels Inc., Surrey, B.C., $5,878.95. The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties and fines: Alejandre Orchards, Tonasket, $1,121.82; and Tonasket Autosales LLC, Tonasket, $534.13. The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits, penalties and fees: Cesar Carranza, Oroville, $266.24; Brett Carlson, Omak, $339.90; Rona Williams, Omak, $355.47; Duane Hall Sr., Omak, $231.47; Lawrence J. Fry Jr., Omak, $584.04; and Kyle C. Davis, Omak, $876.53.

DISTRICT COURT

James Edward Mengle, 46, Okanogan, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Mengle was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Timothy James Mieirs, 50, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Thomas Larry Moore Jr., 46, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Sandra Rose Moses, 28, Omak, guilty on two counts of second-degree DWLS and one count of third-degree theft. Moses was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,799. Ryan Robert Nixon, 37, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Nixon was fined $1,175. Brenden Joe Otsbey, 20, Oroville, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Marsha Leona Pakootas, 30, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Pakootas received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $858. Dwayne Michael Paul, 56, Omak, had a second-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Juan Carlos Perez Hansen, 20, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams). Perez Hansen was fined $400. Gary Ray Raub, 26, Okanogan, had two fourth-degree assault (sexual motivation) charges dismissed.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, JAN. 5, 2015 Domestic dispute on Bridge View Rd. near Tonasket. Vehicle prowl S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Stereo reported missing. Theft on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Fuel reported missing. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Theft on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Wood reported missing.

Disorderly conduct on Old Riverside Hwy. near Riverside. Trespassing on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Bartlett Ave.in Omak. Theft on Koala Dr. in Omak. Shoes reported missing. Eric Daniel Cruz, 35, booked on three counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. Jaime Alexis Zavala Galindo, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV), interfering with reporting (DV) and a USBP hold. Nickolas Gilbert Andrews, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV), third-degree malicious mischief (DV) and an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Alyssa Kaylynne Bray, 18, booked for third-degree theft. April Lynn Jobes, 32, booked on an Omak Police Department warrant for third-degree theft.

TUESDAY, JAN. 6, 2015

Violation of a no-contact order on Second St. in Riverside. One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Burglary on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Omak Mountain Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Fraud on Sunrise Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on S.Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jesse James Ytuarte, 32, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: first-degree criminal trespassing and thirddegree theft. Shaun Anthony Baker, 28, DOC detainer. Trevis Mayfred Munson, 41, DOC detainer. Rebecca Lynn Cabrera, 54, DOC detainer. Tina Marie Caruthers, 48, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Lenny Lee Belgarde Jr., 23, booked on three Omak Police Department warrants: DUI, thirddegree DWLS and seconddegree DWLS.

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Burglary on Early Sunrise Dr. near Tonasket. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Pharr Rd. near Riverside. Power tools reported missing. Burglary on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Stage Coach Loop Rd. near Oroville. Mail box reported damaged. Structure fire on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Burglary on Omak Ave. in Omak. Structure fire on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Harassment on E. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Locust Ave. in Tonasket. Brian Kristopher Boyd, 34, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: first-degree negligent driving and third-degree theft; and three Omak Police Department FTA warrants: two for third-degree theft and one for first-degree criminal trespassing. Kyle Louis King, 22, booked on four Omak Police Department

Dr. Godzich comes to us from Mayers Memorial Hospital and Mountain Valleys Health Center in northern California. She enjoys all aspects of Family Medicine, from child care to OB/GYN care to geriatrics, and everything in between. Prior to that, she worked at Contra Costa Health Services, providing medical care in underserved areas and teaching family medicine residents full spectrum family medicine in Western Contra Costa County, California. Dr. Godzich likes to spend time outdoors, including taking walks with her dog. She is looking forward to living in beautiful Okanogan valley, and taking advantage of outdoor recreation. Dr. Godzich climbed Mount Shasta in June and is looking forward to climbing on a more regular basis.

probable cause warrants, all for violation of a no-contact order. Michaella Jean Flores, 31, DOC detainer. Richard Allen Matthew Bush, 27, DOC detainer. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for malicious mischief.

FRIDAY, JAN. 9, 2015

Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Road reported blocked. Theft on Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Generator and marijuana plants reported missing. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Custodial interference on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Engh Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Drugs on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Third Ave. in Oroville. Assault on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Sonda Lee Clark, 50, booked for POCS (cocaine) and an ICE detainer. Stacy Lavon Adrian, 47, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS. Jesse Owen Jane, 38, booked on a DOC warrant. David Allen Gorr, 56, booked for first-degree DWLS and on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Virginia Winchester Donovan, 63, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for DUI.

SATURDAY, JAN. 10, 2015

Assault on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Hahn Rd. near Omak. Mail reported missing. Burglary on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Second St. in Riverside. Burglary on Second St. in Riverside. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on Highland Dr. in Okanogan. Structure fire on Sunrise Dr. in Omak.

Automobile theft on Dayton St. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Omache Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Maple St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Juniper St. in Oroville. Theft on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jeremiah John Bordwell, 32, booked for DUI. David Lee Fitzgerald, 54, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and resisting arrest. Christie Jennifer Burke, 31, booked for DUI. Ronald Edward Salas, 24, booked for residential burglary and third-degree malicious mischief. Mistia Alicia Clark, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft.

SUNDAY, JAN. 11, 2015

Theft on Tyee St. in Okanogan. Assault on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Pontiac Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Columbia St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Custodial interference on Omache Dr. in Omak. Fraud on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Shumway Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Joshua Michael Chapa, 23, booked on an FTA bench warrant for POCS, a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS and a Tribal FTA warrant for theft. Raymond Joseph Moore, 53, booked for DUI. Gerald W. Floresca, 64, booked for DUI. Silvino Juan Dos Santos, 24, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Justin Mikel Pearson, 32, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV) and second-degree criminal trespassing (DV). Tim Travis Johnson, 53, booked for DUI.

BEYERS

Automobile theft on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Burglary on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Theft on Rodeo Trail Dr. near Okanogan. Theft on Apple Way Ave. in Okanogan. Mail reported missing. Theft on Rise Rd. near Oroville.

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Dog reported missing. Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Structure fire on Ironwood St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Golden St. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Philip Nolan Lester, 33, booked for first-degree rape of a child and first-degree child molestation. Donald Joe Sutton, 33, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: obstruction and first-degree negligent driving. Samuel David Cuevas, 47, booked on an OCSO warrant for fourth-degree assault. Adam Courtney Flores, 27, DOC detainer. Stephen Charles Williams, 39, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Carl Robert Coshow, 31, booked for third-degree assault of a child (DV). Manuel Eduardo Lauriano, 26, DOC detainer. Danail Joseph New-Detwiler, 25, booked for harassment (DV).

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 15, 2015

THE TOWN CRIER

Brent, we already miss you at the G-T

You might have noticed, either through his absence at last Thursday’s hospital board meeting or by reading his Half Baked column last week, that our fearless Tonasket reporter, Brent Baker, is no longer on the job. At least not for the Gazette-Tribune, he’s off in pursuit of a new adventure with his church as assistant administrator and an old one, firing up his sports website again. Of course if you look at this week’s sports pages you wouldn’t know he was gone, maybe because the layout isn’t up to his standards, but the stories and photographs are all his. He’s agreed to carry on on a freelance basis until we can find his replacement. That’s going to be hard to do. I’ve enjoyed working with several reporters Out of since becoming editor at the G-T, but I have to say Brent has been the best sports reporter we’ve My Mind ever had and I know we will have to search far Gary A. DeVon and wide for someone who knows that part of the job as well as he did. I’ll miss having Brent around not just because of his talents in reporting, photography and newspaper layout, but just having him around to talk to. I know I’ll be seeing him around at sporting events, but it won’t be the same around the office without him, even though it was usually just two days a week. So, I guess those in Tonasket who haven’t seen me at council, school and hospital board meetings for awhile are stuck with me, at least for now. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get to the last school board meeting. I enjoyed attending the hospital board meeting, other than having to wait an hour for the public portion to start because of an executive session. I know that was frustrating to most of the folks there. So far we’ve had some interesting applicants – a couple from the East Coast, one from Pasco and one from Pocatello, Idaho. It will be interesting to see if the job seekers from New York and New Hampshire would be willing to come out to Eastern Washington for a job interview. Until we get someone else hired I hope everyone will continue to support Brent’s efforts in our newspaper and into the future with his website venture.

On another note The killing of the cartoonists at Charlie Hebdo magazine in Paris drives home the point that anyone, especially those who are critical of radicals, can be a target. We should all join in with shouts of “Je Suis Charlie” and stand up for freedom of the press. Having the right to express your opinion is just as important to a small community weekly newspaper as it is to the largest newspapers and television networks. At the Gazette-Tribune we offer a forum through our letters to the editor that allows people to express their opinions and share their thoughts on a wide variety of ideas. Not all of them are popular with those that work here or with all our readers and this can lead to a lively debate -- with words, not bullets. And that’s what it’s all about, whether you are expressing yourself through words or cartoons -- it is human to have an opinion and although you may be willing to die to express yourself no one should have to. In France, like the U.S., there is a long tradition of protecting speech, whether we like what is being said or not. When people start dieing because some group feels they have been offended, that’s when we all must become “Charlie” and take up the banner for the free expression of ideas.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

At the State Capital

K-12: Expensive focus of 2015 legislation BY COOPER INVEEN WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA--Washington’s lawmakers have opened this year’s legislative session amid predictions of a long and contentious debate focused on budget and tax votes for the K-12 education system. Lawmakers are confronted with a mountain of expensive problems to solve, ranging from transportation to mental health. But education funding is pivotal. The Washington Supreme Court held the Legislature in contempt last year for engaging in “an ongoing violation of its constitutional duty to K-12 children,” by not adequately funding public education. Combined with the responsibility to fund a class-size initiative passed in the recent election, education will likely take a large chunk out of the budget, creating a deficit that may not be filled without spending cuts and tax increases. Meeting the requirements of the Supreme Court’s decision is estimated to cost around

The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago: January 5-12, 1940: At the first Oroville Town Council meeting in 1940, the discussion on the purchase of the ground for the city airport, centered on the terms of the original purchase from G. M. Scott. The original terms were to pay Mr. Scott $50 with the balance to be paid at $100 per year. Under the new deal, the town was to pay $100 to receive a deed, and then the balance was to be on a mortgage payable $100 each year until the balance of $500 was paid. The Vocational Education Department, established by the Smith-Hughes Act of the Congress in 1917 provides for teaching agriculture in regular classes of high school. In addition to this, it provides for evening classes of adult farmers and part time classes for out of high school youths. (2015; this writer feels that a shop class should be re-instituted for beginning vocational education.) According to Postmaster W. A. Grube, the Oroville Post Office business increased over the previous year in all departments. Stamp sales in 1938 of $7,984.50 was increased to $8,091.20 for 1939; box rent for 1938 was $652. 70 and for 1939, $673.75; during 1938, 14,131 money order were purchased and in 1939, 14,653. Economy Motors offers the new 1940 Oldsmobile. The new Olds “Sixty” has a 95 HP engine and sells for $899 delivered in Lansing, Michigan, including Safety Glass, Window reveals, Bumpers, Spare Wheel, Tire, Tube, Dual trumpet horns, Vacuum booster pump, Two windshield wipers, and Two sun visors. Grocery Prices: Bananas, $.05 per lb.; Coffee, 2 lbs. $.53; Home cured Bacon, $.15 lb.; Albers Corn Flakes, 4 pkgs. $.25; Peach Blossom Flour, 49lb. bag, $1.63 or barrel, $6.39; Alaska Pink Salmon, 2 cans, $.27.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: January 7-14, 1940: An anguished protest arose from the Oroville Chamber of Commerce Tuesday when Elmer Titus, Manager of the Okanogan County PUD, reported that the Federal Power Commission has denied a request to move the Similkameen

$2 billion, with the class-size initiative expected to tack on another $2 billion. Gov. Jay Inslee is pushing a budget proposal that relies on establishing a 7 percent capital-gains tax, a carbon-emissions tax, an excise tax on vaporizers, a 50-cent-per-pack increase on cigarettes, and various tax break repeals. But the governor’s proposals are under fire as Republican lawmakers question whether tax increases are necessary to fill the spending gap. At an Associated Press pre-session leadership forum Jan. 8, Inslee rejected a charge from Senate budget Chairman Andy Hill, R-Redmond, that the increases were included in his proposed budget as a first rather than last resort. Hill has also denied that the state faces a true budget deficit. “When you do the math, you have to generate additional revenue,” Inslee said, claiming the new taxes will help progressivize Washington’s tax system more than traditional “fallback” increases on sales and

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

Dam hearing from Wenatchee to Oroville. What really raised the ire of the chamber, was one of the objections to the change of location made by the State Department of Fisheries, in which it alleged, “The roads in the northern part of Washington, which provide access to Oroville, are often rendered impassable due to snow and are generally hazardous to travel upon during the month of January.” It just isn’t so, the chamber declared. The mail hasn’t missed a day and neither have the busses or the Daily World. Our food comes in and our apples go out in January as in other months. The chamber members also thought it strange that the fisheries people consider roads in Okanogan County too hazardous for their own driving but safe enough for the large number of Okanogan County residents who would have to travel to Wenatchee. (2015 -- strange but this is still the thinking of government officials in matters such as this) Winter activities in this area include a variety of sports, skiing at Sitzmark is becoming more popular each week. Skin diving in Lake Osoyoos, under the ice, has become a favorable pastime with a few. Sleigh-ride parties are being held, but ice skating has slowed down because of the snow. Editor Cleland Emry says,“Finding someone to run for president of the chamber, is always a problem but this year Pete Valentine and Stafford Lewis have entered their names. It seems that no one in the community is willing to take part in this important part of the area. Whether it is because of disinterest or whatever reason, it’s a job that needs to be done to keep our community and area in the scheme of things important. It is time each and everyone took a more active part in its progress. Grocery Prices: U&I sugar, 10 lb. $.85; Peanut butter, 3 lb jar, $.99; Grapefruit, 12 for $1.00; Wenatchee Pack Steaks, Round Sirloin or Club, $.79 lb.; 2 heads of lettuce, $.29. Weather-wise by Marge Frazier, official observer: January 6th, 33 degrees maximum and 22 degrees minimum, 17

B&O taxes. “If we can tax pollution, which we don’t like, instead of business growth, which we do, that’s a good decision,” he said. “If we can tax higher income folks through a capital-gains tax instead of lower income folks when they buy a pair of shoes, that’s a good decision.” Hill disagrees, however, claiming that talk of a regressive tax system is code for thinking an income tax is needed. “When we raise taxes, we’re taking money out of your pockets, and when we do that, we better be sure that we have exhausted all other ways of spending the existing money we’ve taken out of your pocket,” Hill said. The 2015 legislative session began Monday, Jan. 12. Among the major issues facing the 105day session are efforts to increase the minimum wage, fix the state’s mental-health system, reduce the rate of poverty-related crimes, and increase cleanup funding for oil train spills.

inhes of snow‚ Jan. 7th, snow; 7th, 29 and 18, 17” snow; Jan. 8th, 30 and 16, 17” snow; Jan. 9th, 32 and 24 16” snow; Jan. 10th, 35 and 28, 15” snow; Jan. 11th, 33 and 26, 14” snow and Jan. 12th, 33 and 26, 14” snow.. Precipitation, .16 inches.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: January 4-11, 1990: After what he described as 20 “mostly good” years Chesla Williams will be officially retired from the Tonasket City Council with the coming of the New Year. Chesla has faced retirement before as he retired from the Post Office after serving 24 years there. An excerpt in “Talk about Town,” compiled by Sandy Hilderbrand; January, 1909, Oroville Gazette. Okanogan County has 72 School Districts and the high school in Oroville is on the accredited list. At present, it maintains a two-year course but a full four year course is to be put in this year. Oroville organized the first football team in the county and the first game was played two years ago. Basketball for both girls and boys is indulged during the winter months. Monte E. Smith, Manager of Smith & Nelson, in Tonasket, for 39 years, retired Dec. 31, 1989. He had been employed by that company since being discharged from the service in March, 1946. Scott B. Smith has been promoted to Manager. Jarrod Koepke, son of Mr. & Mrs. Sam Koepke of Oroville, has been ice skating since he was seven-yearsold. He joined the Sun Bowl Ice Rink in Osoyoos, winning many competitions. It got to be so expensive for the family to keep him going and finally had to hang up his skates. The family attended a Disney Production of Pinocchio in Portland and he was able to skate with a few of the cast members, which led to an audition to join the group. After not skating for two years, he was accepted into the group and traveled all over the world. Lake Roosevelt showed North County, especially Oroville, why they are on top of the Caribou Trail League. The raiders came to Oroville with a 6 and 0 record and left with a 7 and 0, still undefeated in league play. The final score was 69 - 50. On Friday, the Hornets invade the land of the Jackrabbits of Quincy and redeemed a portion of their pride. The final score of that encounter was, Oroville, 60 and Quincy 48.


JANUARY 15, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Time to enjoy the Golden Years Happy Birthday to me today! Last week an appointment in Wenatchee caused us to drive when it was snowing but after Omak, there was very little snow. And also very little in Wenatchee and the sun was even shining some. Our 21st Street was so slick Tuesday night the paper deliverer couldn’t get stopped. We stayed with Verna Forney and had a good visit. While there we were introduced to a couple new varieties of apples, at the warehouse where her son has been employed for many years. Similar in appearance and taste of the Fuji, but called Kiku, coming from New Zealand, and the second one is called Kansi and I forgot where it comes from. My first thought is, don’t we have enough kinds, already? Our Thursday pinochle group met at my house and once again we had peanut butter pie for refreshment. Guess I’ll keep making that until they say, “enough already.” I don’t know which we enjoy

Ice Fishing Festival coming to highlands SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The “big” day will be here on Saturday. That’s the 11th Annual Oroville Chamber of Commerce Northwest Ice Fishing Festival Saturday, Jan. 17th at Molson. Registration begins at 7a.m. along with a Pancake Breakfast with all of the trimmings. You know all of the trim-

most, the card playing, the visiting or the eating, but twice a month we continue to do it, and have for many years. The 20th of this month will mark 12 years since the death of a dear friend, and excellent next door neighbor, Marian Corrigan. She is missed by so many who knew her, and especially by her loving family. Our town has very few places open for serving food, these days, what with vacations and remodeling and repairs, so, very few cars are seen on the Main, sometimes. The following is an article I found in my “Big Book of Stuff” where I keep things, that seem important (or funny) at the time. This is also said by many that have reached their “Golden Years:” “Who changed everything when I wasn’t looking? I’ve noticed that everything is farther away than it used to be. It’s even twice as far to the corner… and they have added a hill. I’ve given up running for the bus, as

HILLTOP COMMENTS mings – ham, eggs (fried or scrambled), pancakes (buckwheat or buttermilk). You can fish from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The entry fee for Adults is $20 and for Youth $10. There will be Pinewood Derby with $200 in Prizes at 1:30 p.m. Activities inside the Molson Grange Hall will include lunch by Sitzmark, raffles, prizes, arts and crafts and goodies. For more

Put our breakfasts on your calendar

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

What a wonderful breakfast we had last Saturday. One very thin man I know, with a hollow leg, went back for seconds and thirds of pancakes, hash browns, eggs, sausage, bacon, fruit, coffee, orange juice.... Gosh, what a marvelous breakfast. Put it on your calendar for the second Saturday of February 8 a.m. to 10

a.m. We can do it all over again! This Thursday, at the Okanogan Senior Center, our Senior Association is meeting at 10 a.m. Delegates and members are encouraged to attend. We ordered computers for our computer classes. They are held on the fourth Tuesday of the month at 11 a.m. Tilly Porter, a

Some unexpected NURSING revenue from the HOME NEWS state for this year SUBMITTED BY KAREN SCHRIMPF EXTENDED CARE TEAM

We would like to thank the many members of our community who came to the North Valley Hospital Board meeting on Thursday, Jan. 8. We are so grateful to all of you for coming out in support of the Nursing Home. While it is sometimes difficult for so many people to hear speakers when a lot of people are present, it was evident that we were all learning together. We know that it was difficult to have to sit around and wait for the Hospital Board to come back after an executive session. Most of you stayed, visiting around the room with each other. Those minutes turned into a positive time of information sharing. The meeting had a respectful tone, with everyone listening to the speakers. Reports were given without interruptions, questions were asked with responses given, and discussions were pertinent and enlightening. There was good news to be shared by the manage-

ment team with the community. All of this is heartening. It is so encouraging to see a community start to pull together over something we care so much about. Building trust and understanding is an important step and we feel like this is starting to happen. It is a great beginning. Part of the good news shared at the Board Meeting is regarding a “Disproportionate Share” payment from the state. This is money paid into by nursing homes that is divided and redistributed by the state based on the percentage of Medicaid residents each facility cares for. Several factors play into this, one being the unfortunate fact that many nursing homes have closed prior to the funding distribution, thereby giving remaining participants a larger share. A second factor is the amount of paperwork which must be submitted. Requirements are overwhelming enough that several other facilities opted out. With our Medicaid percentage at 95 percent we were awarded a payment of $399,805. This is double what we were expecting based on what we received

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it leaves earlier than it used to. It seems Tonasket, played high school basketball to me they are making the stairs steeper against Oroville, and they were star than in the old days, and have you players and it always seemed there were noticed how much smaller at least four of them instead the newsprint is? And, there’s of just two, when it came to no need to ask anyone to read fouls. Being such look-alikes aloud anymore, as everyone we were always sure they speaks in such a low voice, I were having more than their can hardly hear them. fair share of fouls. The years And the material in dresses have gone by and the boys is so skimpy now – espehave reached their 80th birthcially around the waist and day. Congratulations to both hips – it’s almost impossible of them (see related article, to reach one’s shoelaces. elsewhere in the newspaper). Also, the sizes don’t run the We received a seed cataway they used to. The 12’s THIS & THAT logue. I’m not sure how we and 14’s are way smaller Joyce Emry would get on a mailing list of than before. Even people are that sort, as we at this address changing. They are so much are probably two of the worst younger than they used to be when I was gardener’s to come down the pike. their age. On the other hand, people my Friends of Mary (Kernan) Moran are own age are so much older than I am. I sorry to learn that she has been admitted ran into an old classmate recently, and to the hospital, due to stroke symptoms. she had aged so much, she didn’t even Dave Reynolds, should be home from recognize me! I got to thinking about my the hospital by now, as reported by Dee dear friend while I was combing my hair Patterson, Sunday, after spending a few this morning and I glanced at my own days for observation of health issues. reflection. Really now – they don’t even Hometown Pizza, is getting a face-lift make mirrors like they used to!” in appearance and a big change in menu Ah! Yes!.. It’s fun to accept with choices, as John, will be devoting his humor, that we can’t fool Mother Nature time, to his first love of just baking. He’s or Father Time! like a kid with a new toy, as he describes I too, have reached the so called Golden his new, exotic oven and Becky will not Years, but I can still remember when the miss the late hours which will no longer Oakes Twins, Gerald and John, from be on the agenda. The community will

information call 1-888-699-5659 or visit www.orovillewashington. com. If you are not a fisherman just come to Molson and or the lake on Saturday just to see the activity. Last week with bad weather there were only 19 in attendance for the pinochle games in Molson. The Highs went to Ray Visser and Judy Bunch and the Lows went to Darrell Bunch and Willie Penner and the Traveling to Rae Morris. This week’s get well wishes go out to Bobbi Jo, Cleta Adams, Sally Facer and Larry Smith.

former college computer instructor, is teaching the classes, and doing a great job of it. Any member can participate. We have an excellent lineup of speakers for this month. Included are the high school music director, the American Legion president, and Becky from Hometown. Our business meeting is on Jan. 20. So don’t miss out. Attend Tuesdays at 11 a.m. and have a good time. Remember, being a Senior has nothing to do with high school, but is just as much fun, depending on how you look at it. God Bless.

last year. While this helps ease immediate concerns about our expenses, it is not an annual payment we can count on. There will be fact sheets available to be read by the beginning of February which will be placed in many places in the north part of the county. We are beginning to build a coalition with the six remaining public Nursing Homes connected with public hospitals in this state. Plans have been started to form a coalition for future legislative work as we realize this is a long term problem affecting elders in areas expanding beyond our local community. Thank you again for your support. Stay tuned for the NPR spot which is coming soon.

Back to class with North Valley Community Schools SUBMITTED BY CINDY NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

The holidays are over and it’s time to get back to school. Watch for the blue class catalogs around town for a complete list of winter quarter classes. Coming up in the next week North Valley Community School is offering the following classes: Helping With Homework 101 – Are your kids pleading for help with homework in subjects you haven’t given a thought to in 20 years? Are you trying to help with homework but your child isn’t understanding? Get help for your help! As a sixth grade teacher, instructor Ila Hall will give you hints and tips on how to best help your child with Math

miss their “full service” restaurant, but will somehow adjust. The Plaza Restaurant, owned by Trino Medina, is closed for repairs and Eva’s was closed for holidays, but they should be reopened soon. Shirley Moser reports that the Red Cross Blood Drive was another success and the next one will be hosted by a high school senior for his/her senior project, and held in the high school, and announcement will be made nearer the date.. Remember during these cold months when some of the outdoor workers are unemployed, and that always brings longer lines at the food bank, which is held on Thursdays, at the Seventh Day Adventist Church. They always need food donations and empty plastic bags are useful for distributing the items. Two functions that are always looked forward to are the Ground Hog Dinner in Tonasket and the Shrove Tuesday pancake feed at the Episcopal Church, in Oroville. Those are February happenings but remember to watch for those dates. I notice that the G-T will be losing the writings of Brent Baker, as he has a great love for sports writings and will be trying his hand on a new venture in that line. A replacement is being searched for. Try and keep warm.

THE LEARNING TREE and English homework, grades K-8. Bring your child or leave him at home, either way you will be provided with a refresher in these subjects and tools to help your child learn. Navigating Through Windows 7 – Do you feel like you’re the only one still running Windows 7 on your computer? You’re not! Nearly 10 times as many computers are running Windows 7 as are running Windows 8. This class will teach you how to get around in Windows 7 quickly and effi-

MOVIES

GUN CLUB NEWS Inland Empire Spokesman Review Telephonic Shoot SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE & TONASKET GUN CLUBS

Oroville Gun Club It was a cloudy day, but not too cold for shooting. Scores are: 23 Scott Peterson 21 Bob Peterson 21 Logan Faris 20 Vern Cole 16 Paul Schwilke We had our annual meeting and officer elections. It was decided to raffle a Henry Golden Boy rifle or equivalent for nonshooters. Tickets are available at Paul’s Service or any club member. Come join us for practice on

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If you’re an investor, you probably had a pretty good year in 2014. But what’s in store for 2015? It’s essentially impossible to make precise predictions about the performance of the financial markets — but it is possible to identify those economic conditions and market forces that may help shape outcomes in the investment world for 2015. By paying close attention to these conditions and forces, you can gain some valuable insights as to what investment moves might make sense for you. Here are a few of these moves: Consider adding stocks. With stock prices having climbed higher and higher for more than five years, you might be wondering if it’s time to scale back on your ownership of equities. After all, no “bull” market lasts forever. Still, some factors point to continued

strength for stocks over the long term. First, we are seeing signs of improving economic growth; employment gains and low oil prices are giving consumers more confidence, leading to a boost in spending. Second, corporate earnings — a key driver of stock prices — were quite strong in the second half of 2014, and companies appear poised to show more good results in 2015. Third, stocks — at least largecompany stocks — are still reasonably valued, as measured by their price-to-earnings ratios (P/E). Given these factors, you might want to think about adding quality stocks to your holdings — assuming, of course, these stocks can help meet your needs for a balanced portfolio. And be aware that even the most favorable conditions can’t assure a continued run-up in stock prices, which can and will fluctuate.

Prepare for rising interest rates. For several years, interest rates have been at, or near, historical lows. Given the strengthening economy, and the decreased need for stimulus, the Federal Reserve may well raise short-term interest rates in 2015, perhaps as early as this summer. But long-term rates may start rising even before then, so you may want to take a close look at your bonds and other fixed-rate investments. As you probably know, when interest rates rise, the value of existing bonds typically falls because investors won’t pay full price for your bonds when they can get newly

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What Does 2015 Hold In Store For Investors? FINANCIAL FOCUS

ciently. Bring your computer and your questions! Financial Wellness – There is a lot more involved in healthy living than sleeping, eating and exercising. Financial Wellness is also important for a healthy life. This class will teach you the basics of budgeting, paying down debt, and planning your financial future. To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011 or check out North Valley Community School online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com! Where are the new board members hiding? NVCS is still searching for a board member. Do you have ideas or opinions? If you do, we can use you on the NVCS board of directors, call 509-476-2011.

issued ones that pay higher rates. One way to combat the effects of rising rates is to build a “ladder” consisting of short-, intermediate- and long-term bonds. With such a ladder, you’ll be able to redeem your maturing short-term bonds and reinvest them in the new, higher-paying bonds. Look for investment opportunities abroad. Although economic growth has been slow in parts of the world, especially China, many countries have now initiated policies to spur economic growth. These actions can create opportunities for international equity investments. Keep in mind, though, that international investing involves particular risks, such as currency fluctuations and political and economic instability. So if you are considering foreign investments, you may want to consult with a financial professional. There are no guarantees, but by following the above suggestions, you may be able to take advantage of what looks to be a fairly favorable investment environment for 2015. While you should make most of your investment decisions based on long-term considerations, it’s always a good idea to be attuned to what’s happening in the world around you — and to respond appropriately. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

TAkEN 3

109 min

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aCTiOn/Crime/Thriller sTarring liam neesOn, FOresT whiTaker, maggie graCe Fri. 6:30, 9:45. saT.-sun: *2:30,6:00,9:15. mOn. *2:30, 6:00. Tues-Thurs 7:00

INTO THE WOODS

musiCal/COmedY/FanTasY sTarring merYl sTreeP, JOhnnY dePP, emilY BlunT 124 min

Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT.-sun.*2:00, 5:45, 9:00 mOn.:*2:00, 5:45. Tues.-Thurs. 6:45

Pg

95 min

Pg

PADDINGTON

FamilY/COmedY sTarring hugh BOnneville, Ben whishaw, niCOle kidman. Fri. 6:15, 9:30. saT. -sun: *2:15, 5:30, 9:00. mOn. *2:15, 5:30. Tues.-Thurs: 6:30 Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 15, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 15, 2015

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

For Rent

For Rent

Found

CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475.month. Call 509-223-3433

SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA.

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space

www.gazette-tribune.com Oroville WESTLAKE RD. Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. New carpet, storage shed, computer room. $775/mo, first & last. Need reference. Call 509476-3214

For more information contact Nanette at

Career Opportunity

Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

ENTRY LEVEL

www.gazette-tribune.com

4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; 2+ BR house $700; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications and will conduct a Civil Service Exam to establish an eligibility list for Entry Level Police Officer and for Lateral Officer; please specify which application you are requesting. Two positions available. Applications may be secured from the Oroville Civil Service Commission, Secretary-Chief Examiner Lindsey J. Acord, PO Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844, Phone (509) 4762926 ext. 14. A $10.00 nonrefundable fee is required before an application may be given to the applicant. Additional information may be secured from the City’s website: oroville-wa.com Applications are due Friday, February 20, 2015 by 4:00 PM. Test date will be Saturday, March 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM. E.O.E.

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Puzzle 5 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

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49. Aromatic ointment used in antiquity 51. Triangular metal bracket for joist strength 56. Thick white paper for pencil and ink drawings (2 wds) 60. Legal prefix 61. Aroma 62. Accustom 63. 20-20, e.g. 64. ___-mutton 65. Adjust, as laces 66. “Cool!� 67. At one time, at one time 68. Hillsides

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21. Essential oil from flowers 22. Catch 26. Aces, sometimes 28. Intro to physics? 29. “Beowulf,� e.g. 30. Church part 31. Coaster 32. Catch fly balls 33. “I, Claudius� role 34. Boosts 35. Some Olympians, nowadays 37. Coin featuring Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man 40. Design transferred from an engraved plate 41. Gnatlike insect 46. Early release of a prisoner, subject to continued monitoring 48. Crackerjack 50. Equestrian 52. More rational 53. Expectorated matters 54. Like “The X-Files� 55. Ashes, e.g. 56. Bat’s home 57. Length x width, for a rectangle 58. Bluster 59. Small cave 60. Ballpoint, e.g.

DINER FOR LEASE Lease this fully equipped and established 1950’s themed Diner at Veranda Beach Resort on the shores of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville Washington. This is an exciting business opportunity for an experienced and successful food and beverage operator with catering capabilities. The Veranda Beach Diner seats 30 inside and 60 on the Veranda and is licensed for adjacent pool side service. Contact Jim Hammond for details jim@legendresorts.com Check out our website www. verandabeach.com North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning February 2nd 2015. This class will be completed in March. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www.nvhospital.org . This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative & technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after January 14th 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185

Swift (4 wds)

27. Offices of public officials in the Chinese Empire

47. Acceptances

15. Battering wind

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45. Idle talk or rumor

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LATERAL POLICE OFFICER

FREE NAC Class

www.gazette-tribune.com

44. Breezed through

1. Two-masters

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

43. Delhi dress

ANSWERS

AND

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

42. Eagerness

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2 RV SPACES

Announcements

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Crosswords

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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TONASKET 1 BEDROOM for $495. Close to town. All appliances. Water and sewer paid. 509-486-1682 or 509429-0873. 5

Sudoku

SUN LAKES REALTY

9

3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

www.gazette-tribune.com

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1 BR $650 Country home, where horses are your “neigh�-bors. Sunny living room with atrium doors. Leads to patio and back yard. Overlooks river valley! Beautifully appointed kitchen. Full bath with storage and laundry room. Spacious walk-in closet. Oroville. 509-429-7823.

2

For Rent

Help Wanted

Veterans’ Relief Assistant Are you a veteran and want to be of assistance to other veterans? Okanogan County may have just the position for you. Okanogan County is currently recruiting for the position of Veteran’s Relief Assistant. For more information and application instructions, see the full posting at www.okanogancounty.org.

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Patient Accounts Rep. full time Dentist 2 Full time WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Omak Campus: MA– C Full time. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistant Part time, on an as needed basis Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job. Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual required. MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN Part time, on an as needed basis position. English/ Spanish bilingual required due to business need. Roomer Part time/24 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required.

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF JANUARY 12, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train at home to process Medical Billing & Insurance Claims! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at Bryan University! HS Diploma/ GED & Computer/Internet needed. 1-877-259-3880 HELP WANTED Drivers - No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! No matter what stage in your career, its time, call Central Refrigerated Home. (888)793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com

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PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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JANUARY 15 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE January 15, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7 9

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 01/20/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1985 Volvo 740 GLE Lic# AEX4979 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 2015. #OVG609383

the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: January 15, 2015 /s/Dale L. Crandall, Attorney for Glenna Hauenstein, Personal Representative P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 22, 29, 2015. #OVG609717

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: Jan. 15, 2015. /s/Linda Aronson Linda Aronson, Personal Representative Kristina K. McMullin Attorney for Personal Representative Garlington, Lohn & Robinson, PLLP PO Box 7909 Missoula, MT 59807 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 22, 29, 2015. #OVG609066

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 01/20/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 2000 Ford Explorer Lic# ALB6734 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 15, 2015. #OVG608544 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of GLENN M. HAUENSTEIN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00120-8 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Glenna Hauenstein as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY Estate of ELAINE M. SILTMAN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00121-4 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030)

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 8, 2015

LOCAL SPORTS Hilderbrand’s grand in Hornet victory

STANDINGS AND SCHEDULES GIRLS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Oroville Lk Roosevelt Brewster Bridgeport Liberty Bell Manson Tonasket

6 4 3 4 2 1 1 1

Overall W

L

0 1 1 2 4 4 5 5

11 7 4 5 3 1 4 1

L

0 4 4 5 6 8 8 10

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Mabton White Swan Warden Kittitas Waterville Soap Lake

4 2 1 0 0 0

Overall W

L

0 0 1 1 2 3

11 8 5 5 2 0

L

1 2 5 3 5 8

BOYS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Brewster Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Liberty Bell Oroville Tonasket Bridgeport Manson

Brent Baker/submitted photos

Above, Oroville coach Mike Bourn presents Lily Hilderbrand with a basketball autographed by her teammates following Friday’s victory over Tonasket. Hilderbrand scored her 1,000th career point in the first half of the game. Right, Hilderbrand also made things tough for the Tigers’ Jaden Vugteveen at the other end of the floor.

6 5 3 3 2 2 1 0

Overall W

L

0 1 1 2 3 4 5 6

10 9 5 7 4 5 2 5

L

1 2 4 2 6 5 7 7

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B)

Oroville senior scores her 1000th point in rivalry game BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

OROVILLE - Oroville’s girls basketball team had a take-noprisoners attitude toward its rivalry game with Tonasket on Friday. The Hornets came out firing on all cylinders, rolling to a 20-6 first quarter lead on the way to a 47-22 victory. But the highlight of the game honored by both teams between the boys’ and girls’ varsity games - was Lily Hilderbrand’s 1,000th career point scored in the second quarter. Hilderbrand needed 12 points to reach the mark, and Oroville coach Mike Bourn called a time out after she hit a 3-pointer that put her over the top late in the first half. Many in the crowd didn’t know about the milestone at the time, and in fact it was

only that day that assistant coach Bill Cottrell figured out how close she was to reaching it. “It’s a nice milestone for her,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “She’s definitely one of the best players I’ve ever coached. “I’m not sure I’ve ever had anyone that is as good with both hands as she is. Her rebounding has really picked up on the offensive end and she’s finding that’s a good way to score. And she’s probably our best passer and our best ballhandler too. “Her teammates like playing with her, too. They know if a defense collapses on her, they’ll get their shots. She knows the value of keeping everyone involved. Any coach loves to have a player like that.” Hilderbrand was presented a ball autographed by her teammates during the ceremony. “She’s a very unselfish player,”

Bourn said. “Even too unselfish at times. If she wanted to, she could have scored her 1,000th (a year ago).” There was still the business of the game at hand, of course. The Tigers trailed 31-12 at the half and weren’t able to cut into the lead, but the Hornets (7-4, 4-1 Central Washington League North) only held a 16-10 scoring edge in the second half. The fourth quarter was primarily played by JV players from both squads. Hilderbrand led all scorers with 16 points, all in the first half, with Mikayla Scott adding 11. Jenna Valentine scored eight and Ashlynn Willis added five for the Tigers (1-10, 1-5).

LAKE ROOSEVELT 43, TONASKET 27 TONASKET - Tonasket went

toe-to-toe with Lake Roosevelt for most of their Tuesday, Jan. 6, loss to the Raiders, but a 17-2 LR run in the first half proved to be the difference in the game. Tonasket led 6-5 before the Raider run in which five players scored to give LR a 22-8 lead midway through the second quarter. The Tigers held the Raiders to two points in the third quarter and pulled to within eight on Johnna Terris’ 3-pointer. “We couldn’t get a shot to drop,” said Tonasket coach Stephanie Schertenleib. “We got a lot of shots and most of them were good ones; we just didn’t make very many of them.” Tonasket stayed within 8-10 points halfway through the fourth quarter until LR pulled away in the final minutes. Jaden Vugteveen scored seven points and Rose Walts added six for the Tigers.

Riley Epperson paced LR with 12 points.

OROVILLE 44, MANSON 30 MANSON - Oroville dominated Manson in the first half on the way to a 44-30 victory that wasn’t as close as the score suggested. The Hornets led 27-6 at the half and substituted freely in the second half. Lily Hilderbrand had a huge all-around performance, scoring 20 points, pulling down 14 rebounds, making three steals and not turning the ball over once. Hannah Hilderbrand added nine points and six rebounds, Mikayla Scott had five points, seven rebounds and four assists, and point guard Faith Martin had no turnovers while scoring seven points, pulling down five rebounds, dishing out two assists and making five steals. Maddie Ward scored nine points for Manson.

Juarez, Holfeltz, win at Cascade BY BRENT BAKER

HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

LEAVENWORTH - Tonasket’s wrestling team is getting closer to being back at full strength, and it showed in the results at the Bavarian Invitational at Cascade on Saturday. Jorge Juarez (152 pounds) and Frank Holfeltz (195) won individual titles to lead 10 Tiger medalists. “It went well,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell as the Tigers finished a half point behind Naches Valley for second place. Second place finishers were Trevor Peterson (132), Zion Butler (138) and Chad Edwards (285). Tim Freese (113), Vance Frazier (120), Rade Pilkinton (126), Zach Lofthus (160) and Lucas Vugteveen (182) each took third.

“All of those guys lost only one match on the day, and most had three or four wins,” Mitchell said. Taking fourth while going 2-2 were Devin Walton (120), Rycki Cruz (145), Ryan Rylie (152) and Caleb Lofthus (170), with Morgan O’Brien also winning a match. The Tigers host their annual Apple Pie Invitational on Saturday, Jan. 17, beginning at 10:00 a.m.

TONASKET 42, CHELAN 20 TONASKET - Some of the best battles in dual meet action in recent years have come between Chelan and Tonasket as both regularly have contended for the Caribou Trail League dual title. This year was a bit different as reclassification has separated the

wrestling rivals; this non-league match also featured Chelan’s new coach, Tonasket alum (and Dave Mitchell’s son) Martin Mitchell. It was the first dual meet between the two Mitchells’ squads. Unfortunately, both teams were missing some of their top wrestlers thanks to illness, injury and/or missing practices over Christmas Break. The Tigers won the match 42-20 as a number of the younger Tigers wrestlers came through with solid bouts. Winning matches for the Tigers were Zach Lofthus (160, overtime decision); Caleb Lofthus (170, decision); Lucas Vugteveen (182, pin); Frank Holfeltz (195, pin); Chad Edwards (285, forfeit); Tim Freese (120, decision); Rade Pilkinton (126, pin); Trevor Peterson (132, decision); and Zion Butler (138, pin).

4 2 1 1 0 0

0 1 1 2 2 2

9 7 3 2 0 4

L

3 3 7 5 8 4

SCHEDULES JAN. 15-24

Thursday, Jan. 15 WR - Oroville at Pateros Mixer, 6:00 pm Friday, Jan. 16 BB (JV/Var) - Manson at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Manson at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Okanogan, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Okanogan, 4:30/7:30 pm Saturday, Jan. 17 WR - Tonasket Apple Pie Invite (incl. Oroville), 10:00 am Tuesday, Jan. 20 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 4:30/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville, 4:30/6:00 pm Wednesday, Jan. 21 WR - Cascade/Cashmere/Okanogan at Tonasket, 6:00 pm

Friday, Jan. 23 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 4:30/6:00 pm

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Tonasket’s Zion Butler claimed a win by pin on Wednesday against Chelan.

Saturday, Jan. 24 BB - Warden at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB - Warden at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Oroville at Ephrata Invite, 9:00 am WR - Tonasket at E. Valley (Spokane) Dream Duals, 8:30 am

Rounds improvement highlights Hornet week BY BRENT BAKER

Brent Baker/submitted photo

Mabton Warden White Swan Soap Lake Kittitas Waterville

Overall W

L

Thursday, Jan. 22 WR - Oroville/Selkirk at Republic, 5:00 pm

HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

Rade Pilkinton recorded a first round pin during the Tigers’ 42-20 victory over Chelan on Wednesday, Jan. 7.

League W

SPRINGDALE - Illness, as well as some wrestlers coming in over weight, hampered the Oroville wrestling team Saturday, Jan. 10, at the Charger Invitational in Springdale. Jeff Rounds (113), who had a big week, was the lone medalist as he took third place. “He had a great scrap against one of the better wrestlers in the state, Justin Volking (Kettle Falls),” said Oroville coach Chuck Ricevuto. The Hornets opened with a strong opening round that included pins from Rounds, Leo Curiel (138), Brandon Baugher (152) and Scott Hartvig (170).

Only Rounds and Hartvig, who lost the bronze match in overtime, made it through to the medal rounds. “After (the first round) we did not perform near our potential,” Ricevuto said. Also wrestling were Luis Vazquez (106), Charles Arrigoni (182) and Zane Scott (195).

HORNETS HOST MIXER OROVILLE - The Hornets hosted Davenport and Omak in what Ricevuto termed a “much needed” home meet on Thursday, Jan. 8. Zane Scott (195) highlighted the Hornets’ efforts with pins in both of his matches. Also recording pins were

Drake Fox (120), Jordan Smith (126), Leo Curiel (138) and Brandon Baugher (152). Ricevuto also cited the performance of Jeff Rounds (113) as a highlight of the meet. Flying a bit under the radar with a 12-5 loss to Davenport’s ____ Stauffer, the coach pointed out that Rounds had been dominated by Stauffer in in earlier meet. “Not this time,” he said. “Jeff was down 6-5 going into the third when a mistake allowed his opponent to pick up six unanswered points. He is a real scrapper who continues to improve.” Luis Vazques lost a 7-6 decision, while Kacey Dewitte, Scott Hartvig and Charles Arrigoni also wrestled.


JANUARY 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

LOCAL SPORTS

Tigers battle past Hornets BY BRENT BAKER HALFBAKED@OKVALLEYSPORTS.COM

TONASKET - There wasn’t much more to be asked of a rivalry game, except possibly for a win for the Oroville Hornets. Tonasket was quite happy to take the W after claiming a rough-and-tumble 63-48 victory over their rivals in a game that crackled with energy. The game likely will have playoff implications down the road, as the two squads at the moment appear to be fighting for the league’s last playoff spot. But that was secondary to the prospect of one-upping one another. “You can throw the records out the window when it came to tonight,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “Between Oroville and Tonasket, it had kind of gone away because of the discrepancies in the score the past few years. But all the rivalry games I ever participated in it didn’t matter what the score was, it was a physical battle. This was a fun game. Both sides played very hard and well.” For all the defensive intensity, loose balls, physical contact, rallies and counter-rallies, the game boiled down to one simple factor: the Hornets never found a way to contain Tonasket post Colton Leep.

After struggling in the first quarter, Leep finished with a career-high 33 points, including 22 in the second half. “I impressed my will on the boys that our big guys would get the ball in the second half,” Larson said. “That needs to be our first option, especially with Sarmiento in foul trouble. They couldn’t guard him. First quarter it felt like he was 0 for 15. Finally took the lid off the basket and the game completely changed.” Sarmiento - as well as Nathan Hugus, Lane Tietje and Andrew Mieirs - spent most of the game in foul trouble for the Hornets, and Jaxon Blackler missed much of the second half after suffering an injury. Oroville coach Jay Thacker was none to pleased with the disparity in fouls, yelling at officals at one point during the game, “Are we really that more physical than they are?” Other than pointing out Oroville’s 31-18 edge in fouls during the contest, Thacker wouldn’t go there after the game. “The kids maintained composure in those tough situations and I praised them for that,” he said. “The effort was really good. There were some plays we made that weren’t good plays - we need to make solid plays rather than trying to make great plays. “The kids know that they’re on the cusp of being a pretty dang good team, and they’re playing like it. They’ll continue playing like it even though we’ve got a couple of really tough ones coming up in Brewster and Okanogan.” Leep started getting untracked

Brent Baker/photo

Bryce Glover ran into trouble on this drive to the basket against Tonasket on Friday, but led the Hornets with 21 points.

late in the first half as the Tigers, who trailed 12-6 early on, took a 30-22 halftime lead. Three straight Leep baskets extended the lead to 14 points early in the third quarter. “The guys have confidence in him,” Larson said. “You’ve got to go there.” “He’s never spent this much time in the key in his life as he is now,” Thacker said. “Usually he was popping out there and shooting 3s.” Added Tonasket assistant coach Dave Kirk with the unintentional pun, “He’s just made a huge leap in ability this year.” Speaking of Kirk, he made one of the key plays of the night after physical play in the paint in the third quarter resulted in some mild pushing and shoving between Hornets and Tigers. Several Tonasket players began to charge off the bench, but the quick-footed Kirk managed to get in front of several players one third his age and prevent what could have turned into a more serious situation. Tonasket’s David Moreno was ejected. At that point Tonasket held a 10-point lead, but Sarmiento hit a pair of free throws on the technical foul, and Mieirs scored five straight points to cut the Tonasket lead to 42-37. But the Tigers, who’d given up a 16-0 run in the fourth quarter to Lake Roosevelt on Tuesday, responded with a 13-point run of their own - Leep and Ethan Bensing scoring all the points to put the game out of reach at 55-37. “This team and Brewster are the two toughest matchups for us, because of their size,” Thacker said. Jesse Ramon added 13 points for the Tigers, all in the first half, including 9-of-10 at the free throw line. Bryce Glover led the Hornets with 21 points, with Mieirs adding 11. The Hornets (4-6, 2-3 CWL North) and Tigers (5-5, 2-4) will meet again in Tonasket on Feb. 3, in the next-to-last game of the regular season, very possibly with a playoff spot on the line. “I’ve got some ideas,” Thacker said. “The kids are going to give them a battle when we play in Tonasket, I’ll tell you that.”

OROVILLE 34, MANSON 32 MANSON - The Hornets may not match up well against all their opponents. But they’re quickly becoming a team that no one wants to face in a close game. Dustin Nigg’s snapped a 32-32 tie with two free throws in the final seconds to lift the Hornets to a road victory at Manson last Tuesday and improve their record to 4-1 in games decided by fewer than 10 points. “It was a defensive struggle,” Thacker said. “But we gutted one out on the road.” The Hornets led 12-8 after one quarter but were unable to extend the lead in a game that was close throughout. Andrew Mieirs and Bryce Glover each scored 11 points to lead the Hornets, but neither scored in the fourth quarter. Instead, Joe Sarmiento had two key baskets, and Nigg’s free

throws were his only points of the night.

LAKE ROOSEVELT 66, TONASKET 48 TONASKET - Tonasket gave Lake Roosevelt all it could handle on Tuesday, Jan. 6. But Chance Garvin’s breakaway slam dunk early in the fourth quarter changed all that. “We had a plan, and for three quarters we stuck to it,” Larson said. “But we started rushing shots after that dunk and it got away from us.” The Tigers held a narrow lead through much of the first half, getting points from six out of their eight available players. Merle Picard’s 3-pointer gave the Raiders a 28-26 lead at the half, and LR opened the third quarter with an 11-4 spurt to take a 39-30 lead. Adrian McCarthy and Ethan Bensing helped spur the Tigers’ comeback that got them to within 44-42 early in the fourth quarter. With a chance to tie, Colton Leep got the ball in the post but had his shot roll around and out. Garvin broke free, took the outlet pass and soared in for a tomahawk dunk that shifted momentum for good. The Raiders went on a 16-point run that took less than three minutes to put the game away. Jackson Louis led LR with 20 points, including 11 in the first quarter, with Garvin adding 16. Bensing led the Tigers with 17, Leep had 10 and McCarthy added nine points.

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Brent Baker/submitted photo

Colton Leep proved to be a matchup the Hornets had no answer for Friday, scoring 33 points in the Tigers’ 63-48 victory.

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 15, 2015

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Oroville May Festival Meeting

Banquet

OROVILLE - The Oroville May Festival workers will meet on Thursday, Jan. 15 at Akins Deli at 6 p.m. The group will be glad for help with the parade, Royalty Selection Night and Pageant. Also, they will have a “Park What You’re Proud Of” so will need help in setting that up. Three Oroville High School juniors have signed up to run for royalty and Selection Night will be Feb. 16, 2015 at the High School Commons. The committee asks people to come help put together a “May Day, Play Day.”

TONASKET - The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce officer installation and awards banquet will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 21 from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket.

Nuance First 2015 Performance at Winery OROVILLE – “Nuance,” a new instrumental trio, opens the 2015 season at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, Jan. 15. Walt Gilbert, Sam Howell, and Scott Teagarden will perform primarily on guitar, clarinet, and percussion. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Spiritual Movie Night OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Jan. 17 at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200.

Tonasket Chamber Awards

Helping With Homework 101 OROVILLE - North Valley Community School Class Helping With Homework, two sessions, Tuesday, Jan. 20 and 27 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Get help for your help! As a sixth grade teacher Ila Hall will give you hints and tips on how to best help your child with Math and English homework, grades K-8. Bring your child or come alone.

Navigating Windows 7 OROVILLE - North Valley Community School Class, Navigating Through Windows 7, one session, Thursday, Jan. 22 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. You are not the only one... nearly 10 times as many computers are running Windows 7 as are running Windows 8. We’ll show you how to get around in Windows 7 more efficiently and with greater flare. Bring your computer and your questions. Instructor: Clyde Andrews

Financial Wellness OROVILLE - North Valley Community School class Financial Wellness, one session, Monday, Jan. 26 6 - 7:30 p.m. This class will teach you the basics of budgeting, paying down debt, and planning your financial future. A workbook will be provided. Instructor: Heather Brownlee

MOLSON - The NW Ice Fishing Festival, sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce, takes place on Saturday, Jan. 17 on Sidley Lake. Registration at 7 a.m., events including arts and crafts show, music and food at Grange Hall, as well as a Pinewood Derby Race. A dog sled demo is also planned.

MCMANUS IN LOVE

Eileen Newman

EILEEN NEWMAN Lila Eileen Ann Frost Newman died peacefully at home on January 6, 2015 after a brief illness. She was born the youngest child of parents Frankie and Grover Frost on March 18, 1922 in Stuart, Nebraska. E i l e e n at t e n d e d Union College in Lincoln Nebraska prior to her marriage to John W. Newman on July 7, 1945, in Sidney, Nebraska. She was a devoted mother, raising seven sons and was known for her gardening, cooking, and recipe collection. She returned to college in 1996, earning her Associates Degree from Reliance Wyoming Junior College, a Bachelor of Science in 1969 from Northern Arizona University, and her Masters of Education from Eastern Washington University in 1973. With her elementary education teaching degree, she moved with her family to Loomis, Wash. in 1969 where she and John were the last couple to teach all six grades in the two-room Loomis School. She taught four years of public school in Tonasket, Wash. and an additional 13 years, teaching in Seventh Day Adventist schools in Elliforde, Wash., Council Bluffs, Iowa and St. Joseph, Miss. After retiring from teaching in 1985, the Newmans retired to Grand Junction Colo., moving back to Okanogan County in 1987. Eileen remained an active member of the Seventh Day Adventist Church in every place she lived. She was preceded in death by her husband, John, and her siblings Lynn and Niles Frost and Lovena Keuter. She is survived by her seven sons and their families, which include many grandchildren, great grandchildren and great great grandchildren. Her sons are John Newman (Betty) of Bouse, Ariz., Frank Newman (Cindy) of Belgrade, Mont., Floyd Newman (Patty) of Twisp, Wash., Neal Newman (Mariann) of Oroville, Wash., David Newman (Nancy) of Ridgefield, Wash., Donald Newman (Patti) of Oroville and Craig Newman of South Pass,

School Retirees Meeting OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will hold a nohost luncheon meeting at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Jan. 27, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. Bring books to exchange and items for homeless students. Information: Jennie at 509422-2954

Diabetes Support Group TONASKET - A Diabetes Support Group will next meet on Tuesday, Feb. 3 (first Tuesday of each month) from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the boardroom at North Valley Hospital, 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket. This setting will give people an opportunity to ask questions and participate in discussion with other community members touched by diabetes. The discussion will be facilitated by a Certified Diabetes Educator. For more information see www.nvhospital.org or phone 509-486-2151.

GAIL ALICE SHEENA Gail Alice Sheena, age 49 of Oroville, died Tuesday, January 6, 2015 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. She was born June 9, 1965 in Merritt, BC to parents Christine August and Angus Archochan. As a teen she travelled with her grandparents and her mother, Christine to Oroville as seasonal workers. Gail travelled many places and in 1987 she travelled the farthest to California, but always gravitated back to Oroville which she called home.

CEMETERY MARKERS

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Oroville Food Bank

Green Okanogan Fundraiser & Membership Drive

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at 509-476-3978 or Sarah Umana at 509-476-2386.

TONASKET - Green Okanogan will be having a fundraiser auction and membership drive at the Community Cultural Center on Saturday, Feb. 14. Silent auction and music from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Dinner ($10)

With the help of her mother, she raised five children. She was always lending a helping hand to others in need. She enjoyed her loud music and hollering when listening to Mexican music. Gail was interested in a variety of books, loved beading, collecting any and all owls, fishing and scratch tickets. She enjoyed her last years with Santo making memories with each other. She is survived by her companion, Santo Bello Salas; mother, Christine August; children Lea Rodriguez, Christopher Sheena, Levon Garnica, Juanita Garnica and Cash Garnica; siblings Ricky August, Jade Sheena, April Lindley, Gerald Archochan and Rene Archochan and five Grandchildren She was preceded in death by her father, twin siblings and one nephew. Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, January 17, 2015 at 1 p.m. at Valley Christian Fellowship in Oroville with Pastor Randy McAllister, officiating. Memorials may be made in Gail’s name to Umpqua Bank, acct#7805966087, P.O.Box 430, Oroville, WA 98844.. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

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Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

ADMISSION $8

Listing Your Item

OkanoganValley

Faith Lutheran Church

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Monuments & Bronze

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at 509-486-2192.

OROVILLE

MOTORHOMES • FIFTH WHEELS TOY HAULERS • TRAVEL TRAILERS TENT TRAILERS • CAMPERS & MORE

Gail Alice Sheena

Tonasket Food Bank

OROVILLE - Tim Berhans performs in the Patrick McManus play “McManus in Love” on Saturday, Jan. 17 at the Oroville High School. Tickets are $17 in advance or $20 at the door and available at Prince’s Center, Camaray Motel, Tonasket Interiors and www.oroville washington.com.

OBITUARIES Wyo. Viewing for family and friends is scheduled for Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at the PrechtHarrison-Nearents Chapel on Elmway in Okanogan. Funeral services are planned for 10 a.m. Thursday, January 15, 2015 at the Precht-HarrisonNearents Chapel in Okanogan. A procession and graveside service will follow at the Loomis (Mountainview) Cemetery in Loomis, Wash.. Please join the family for a gathering of family and friends at the Tonasket Seventh-Day Adventist Church to share memories and food after the graveside service. Memorials can be made in Eileen’s name to the Peaceful Valley Christian School at 32084 Hwy. 97, Tonasket, WA 988559206. Precht-Harrison-Nearents Funeral Chapel of Okanogan, WA has been entrusted with the arrangements.

and live auction start at 7 p.m. Love your community and the Earth by helping Green Okanogan open a recycling center and restore this spring in Tonasket at 3 Rodeo Dr. (Across from Baker’s Acres). To donate auction items call Janet at 509-486-2061. For more info or to volunteer call Carol at 509-556-2250.

NW ICE FISHING FEST,

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

Good All Weekend Kids 12 & under FREE w/adult Senior Day Thursday - Save $1

HOURS

Thursday: Noon-8pm Friday: 10am-8pm Saturday: 10am-8pm Sunday: 10am-4pm www.spokanervshow.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 15, 2015  

January 15, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 15, 2015  

January 15, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune