Page 1

OROVILLE OPENS NEW YEAR

HOMELESS VETS PROGRAM

WITH HOOPS VICTORIES

Community Action and Hopesource host Open House, Jan. 9 at 11 a.m. OCCAC office in Okanogan

See Sports, Pages A8-9

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 2015 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Dr. David Stangland retires from practice

SNOW KIDDING

Retirement party planned for Saturday at CCC

When he first started, he found the excellent care at North Valley Hospital, along with the opportunity to learn more TONASKET – After nearly 35 years surgical skills from the well-beloved of serving patients in North Okanogan and highly skilled Dr. Stuart Holmes of County through his partnership in Oroville were what drew him to the area, North Valley Family Medicine, Dr. David she adds. And, he believed he could love Stangland has decided to hang up his living here, which he says he has: the fishing, the skiing, the backpacking, and stethoscope. the people. “It was the high The doctor and his wife were married quality of health care shortly after he began his practice here provided by NVH and together they raised a “wonderful” and the practitiodaughter, she said. ners in this area that “After being out in the world for awhile attracted me here now, she has thanked us for raising her over 34 years ago here,” said Cathy Stangland, who invites and I feel blessed to have been a part of Dr. David Stangland the community to wish her husband well at a retirement party on Saturday, Jan. 10 it and to know that from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Community it will continue,” said Dr. Stangland. “I feel fortunate that my Cultural Center of Tonasket “During Dave’s years of service as a family has been welcomed by the local communities and I’ve enjoyed caring for physician, in addition to the primary care of his patients, he many of this area’s pioneer families.” “I feel honored that provided many years of care for the He added that he has you have trusted me emergency hospital, served on varmany patients who will and privileged by what ious committees at the miss him and whom he will miss. you have shared and hospital, built, along his partners, the He started practice taught me.... Thank with current clinic facility in Tonasket in October you for your confi- for which he maintains of 1980, a year after primary responsibility,” he finished his residence...” she adds. dency at Spokane Dr. David Stangland, In addition to his Family Medicine. He Tonasket Physician practice and the clinic, spent that year doing Stangland has been vislocum tenems around the Pacific Northwest, including in in ible in community in other ways. A Tonasket, so that he could decide where number of years ago when it appeared he belonged, according to wife Cathy. the leased land the local ski area was on He says he found the practitioners in was going to be sold he stepped in and the North Valley - Dr. Walter Henze, Dr. spearheaded an effort to purchase the James Helleson, Dr. Laney, and Medex land. The asking price was significant, Mark Patterson - to be physicians and says his wife, but he was able to help raise physician assistants of exceptional qual- enough money to make the purchase so ity, men of character and commitment future generations could continue to ski and friendship and that they were the and exercise. “I feel honored that you have trusted right match for him. Together with these fellow practitio- me, and privileged by what you have ners, a new partnership was formed in shared with me and taught me. I’ve 1980 and named North Valley Family been bolstered by how you have faced Medicine. The name of their clinic stayed adversity and buoyed by your concern the same long after the group joined for my family. Thank you for your Wenatchee Valley Clinic in 1996 and confidence in me, and for expressing only just recently changed to Confluence your appreciation of my care,” said Dr. Stangland. Health. BY GARY DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

For the first time in a couple of years, the North Okanogan Valley was graced with significant snowfall, much of which came down Sunday and Monday. Snow plows and drivers alike might have been a bit out of practice as they relearned how to navigate icy roads. Above and right, Oroville City Crews were still clearing the streets Monday morning as snow continued to fall. While area schools remained open, schools north of the border in the Northern Okanagan of B.C. closed Monday for their first “Snow Day” in over two dozen years when over two dozen inches fell. They remained closed on Monday as well. Gary DeVon/staff photos

2014: The year that Was Major news stories from July to December July Council seat opens up in Tonasket – Eight and a half years proved to be enough for Tonasket Council Member Jean Ramsey. The longest-serving current council member offered her registration. NVH, union settle contract – In a sign of the North Valley Hospital District’s improving financial situation, the hospital’s union employees will be receiving steep increases and other improvements in their three-year contract approved by the NVH Board. Sandalia Resort asks Oroville for dock extension – Representatives of the Sandalia Resort on Lake Osoyoos appeared before the Oroville City Council at their July 1 meeting seeking an extension of their dock. Three kids airlifted to Spokane after rollover accident – All three were under 10-years-old and were airlifted to Sacred Heart Medical following a rollover accident on Highway 97 near

O’Neil Road. One last push – Tonasket City Council approves a plan that all involved hope will be the final step in getting the Tonasket Water Ranch constructed at Chief Tonasket Park. Search continues for possible drowning victim – Authorities were still searching for Darrel L. Williams of Oroville, a retired Border Patrol Agent, who they believe drowned in Palmer Lake. Emerging from warrants – When North Valley Hospital District officially emerged out of debt from Okanogan County for a day to kick off July, it was a landmark moment, but also only the beginning of he next stage of the hospital’s return to financial health. Oroville approves dock extension – The Oroville City Council approved a request from Sandalia Beach Resort to extend their dock following the conclusion of a public hearing on the matter. State’s largest fire now at 67 percent containment – Incident Commanders are declaring the Carlton Complex Fire, the largest in the state’s recorded history, as being 67 percent contained. The fire has burned 250,806 acres and destroyed more than 300 homes. The Tumbleweed Film Festival experi-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 02

ence – Over four nights, Washington’s most unique film festival takes place, bring 40 entertaining short films from around the world to Oroville.

August OSD adopts $8.5 million 2014-15 budget – The Oroville School Board adopted a budget of nearly $8.5 million – about $24,000 more than the previous year’s budget. Man stabbed several times – Police were investigating an assault on an Oroville man who was stabbed several times, including in the chest and back and once in the head. Local primary election results in few surprises – While few local candidates faced challengers in the recent primary, there was one race, that for Okanogan County PUD Commissioner, that drew three candidates and incumbent David Womack made it through to the upcoming General Election. Denney will be new Oroville City Clerk – Councilman Walt Hart, serving as mayor pro tem, announced that JoAnn Denney will be Oroville’s new city clerk/ treasurer following the retirement of Kathy Jones at the end of October. Police seek man for attempted murder

– Police ask help in finding a homeless man accused of stabbing and robbing an Oroville man in his home. Casey: not closing nursing home – Hospital Commissioner Helen Casey sought to quell rumors that the district’s Long Term Care facility was being targeted for closure. She stated unequivocally at a board meeting that this was something that was not on the table. A promised fulfilled: Thorntons receive Five Star Banner – During World War II an Oroville family had five children who stepped up to serve in the U.S. Armed Services. This month they received the Five Star Banner promised to those brave siblings’ mother nearly 70 years ago. Duck race nets nearly $2,500 – It’s just a drop of water in a very big pool, but it all helps. The Tonasket Pool Committee’s rubber duck race – a fundraiser for the pool project that will likely cost around $2 million – brought in $2,465.

September Pursuing even higher learning goals at Oroville High School – OHS is continuing a program of offering more college level classes and looks forward

SEE LOOKING | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

to a time where high schools can award tow-year Associates of Arts degrees. Tonasket school enrollment swells – Tonasket School District administrations expressed excitement about the 2014-15 school year at their final school board meeting of the summer. Buckhorn Mine funds environmental projects – Operators of the Buckhorn Gold Mine near Chesaw will soon spend $180,000 on projects benefiting the environment across Okanogan County. The work is a result of a penalty settlement between the company and the state Department of Ecology. Oroville man recovered from Palmer Lake – After 55 days the body of Darrel L. Williams, 57, Oroville was located using, sheriff credits side-scanning sonar. Firm on board for school projects – The Tonasket School Board votes to accept Supt. Paul Turner’s recommendation to hire Design West Architects to guide the district through the facilities expansion construction project that still has yet to be funded. Canadian company shelves Similkameen River Dam plan – Fortis Inc. will not move forward with their

News Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A4

Community Classifieds Real Estate

A5 A6-7 A7

Sports Calendar

A8-9 A10


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 8, 2015

LOOKING BACK LOOKING | FROM A1 Administrator Linda Michel outlined a dual plan to cope with continuing financial losses at the nursing home facility. Branch discusses Council of Governments – While Branch, Oroville’s director of Community Development discussed several issues, he focused on the COG know as the Okanogan County Council of Governments, which includes the county and cities in their effort to handle a number of issues, especially the distribution of transportation funds. A Thanksgiving dinner invite – Free full turkey meals were offered by the Eva’s Bakery, the Chesaw Community Bible Church, the Oroville Senior Center and others.

December

Gary DeVon/file photo

Summer vacationers watch as a Canadair CL-415 SuperScooper amphibious water bomber lands on Osoyoos Lake last August. While most of the region’s fires were in the south county and Methow, Osoyoos Lake made for a handy place to get water to fight the Carlton Complex of fires. proposed Similkameen River water management and hydroelectric project at this time. The decision was based on the results of the most recent project feasibility studies. Fish & Wildlife warns of cougar in area – The state Department of Fish and Wildlife are seeking a cougar that has killed several small pets between Highway 97 and Lake Osoyoos north of Oroville and a warning has been issued to parents with children in the Oroville schools. $18 million grant to benefit local schools – Oroville and Tonasket School Districts are among 11 districts to benefit from a more than $18 million Gear Up award by the U.S. Department of Education to help students prepare for college.

October Emergency preparedness – Northwest Medstar, a critical care transport service, conducted Landing Zone training with Oroville EMS at Dorothy Scott Airport. They landed one of their air ambulance helicopters and demonstrated how to load patients, with local EMS, fire and police agencies attending. Oroville Police Chief will retire – After seven years as Oroville’s police chief, R. Clay Warnstaff announced his intention to retire at the end of the month. He made the announcement in a letter to the mayor that was shared with the council. Gazette-Tribune receives WNPA ‘General Excellence’ Award – The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune added a second place to its collection of General Excellence awards from the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association’s annual Better Newspaper Contest. Egerton joins school board – Michael “Mike” Egerton was chosen as Oroville School District’s newest school director, bringing the board up to a full compliment of five, something the board has been struggling with for nearly two years. Oroville’s mayor names Hill new police chief – Mayor Chuck Spieth named Sgt. Todd Hill to step into the shoes of retiring police chief R. Clay Warnstaff at the end of the month. State panel meets in Republic

over mine closure – Lt. Governor Brad Owen headed up a legislative panel to discuss “what’s next” as Kinross Gold Plans to close the Buckhorn Gold Mine in 2015. Dumpster debate cools for now – Tensions didn’t boil over, but they certainly were simmering as the Tonasket City Council and two representatives of North Valley Hospital District engaged in some verbal sparring over the placement of garbage dumpsters that had taken up residence along the curb of Western Avenue. Candidates attend forum in Oroville – Candidates seeking local county, state and federal offices were invited to Oroville to introduce themselves and tell voters why they should case a ballot in their favor. Recent fires emphasize need for emergency preparedness – Scott Miller, manager of Okanogan County Emergency Management appeared before the Oroville City Council to discuss the importance of the Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan, especially in light of the recent devastating fires. Kinross offering free Business Development classes – As part of a program to assist the local communities with upcoming change as closure of the Buckhorn Mine approaches, Kinross-Kettle River-Buckhorn is hosting a free series of training and workshops designed specifically for Ferry and Okanogan county residents.

November Concerns addressed – Tonasket City Council member Scott Olson had questions about Okanogan County’s Emergency Management Plan that were addressed by Scott Miller, Emergency Management’s Homeland Security Coordinator, at the Tonasket Council meeting. Enrollment up at Oroville schools – The Oroville School District, which receives basic education monies based on the number of students enrolled, had good news at their Oct. 27 board meeting, enrollment was up 12 kids from September to October. Tonasket ballot measure failing – It looked as if a measure increasing the sales tax by 0.1 percent to raise revenue for criminal justice and fire protection was failing again, according to early ballot counts. The measure was trailing by seven votes. Osoyoos water level lowered – Operators lowered the water on Lake Osoyoos to its winter level to provide more storage for rain an melting snow and to prevent shoreline damage from freezing and flooding. Tonasket Criminal Justice levy pulls ahead by one vote – The measure will not need a recount if the final ballot count remains the same, explained Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb. The measure did remain ahead and passed. Michel presents two-pronged

nursing home strategy – Citing the need to discuss “the elephant in the room,” North Valley Hospital District

Tonasket Schools approve $6.98 million bond – A year ago, Tonasket School District voters rejected a $6 million, 10-year bond that would have helped alleviate overcrowding, build a new Alternative/ Outreach school and upgrade athletic facilities. The district hope voters will pass an even larger bond request on Feb. 10. Sarah Quinlan crowned Tonasket Rodeo Queen – For the third straight year there was just one candidate for the title of Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo Queen. That didn’t dim the smile on Quinlan’s face as she received her crown. Supt. Paul Turner to leave

Gary DeVon/file photo

The annual Haunted Hayride last October was a “spooktacular” success, at least for those in need of a trim. The popular event had more than 500 riders this year.

We are pleased to welcome

Street Smart The Street-Smart self-defense is a new and unique system developed by Master Terry Cariker who has had over 40 years of Martial Art training. This fighting system is based on three principles: 1) Moment of opportunity, 2) Natural movement, and 3) Partnership. This unique, quickly learned system, is being taught by certified instructor Randy Middleton. It is open to anyone 18 and older, male or female and is also appropriate for senior citizens as, Mr. Middleton is also a senior citizen. An introductory workshop is being taught at the Oroville High School from 10-12 noon on January 10. The cost is $50.00. To pre-register with a $5.00 discount and for further info, call Randy @509-429-2200 or 509-486-2341

Micaela Godzich, MD Family Medicine Tonasket Clinic EDUCATION: • MSc: University of Geneva (Geneva, Switzerland)

• MD: University of California, School of Medicine (San Francisco, CA)

ADVANCED EDUCATION: • Residency Contra Costa Regional Medical Center, University of California, Davis Family Medicine (Martinez, CA)

106 Whitcomb Avenue, Tonasket Family Health Centers would like to welcome Margarita Shanks, PA-C to our clinic in Tonasket. Margarita comes to FHC having earned her degrees right here in Washington. She got her Bachelor of Clinical Health Services and degree in Physician Assistant Studies at the University of Washington School of Medicine-MEDEX Northwest. Margarita completed family practice rotations at SeaMar, with clerkships at Harborview, Overlake, Skagit valley hospitals, as well as 3 years Hospice and Palliative Care Volunteering work for Evergreen Hospice in Kirkland. She is also bi-lingual in English and Spanish. “I believe in the core values of FHC and their commitment to provide excellent care to our underserved population. I am passionate about helping my community to achieve wellness, so they can enjoy a healthier, longer life with their family and better serve their communities.”

We are very pleased to have Margarita Shanks as part of our qualified professional staff.

To make an appointment, call 486-0114.

TSD – The school superintendent will see his tenure with the Tonasket School District end with the conclusion of the 2014-15 school year. His decision came after the third time in three years the school board did not extend his contract, which expires at the end of the current school year. North Valley Hospital District CEO resigns – NVH Administrator Linda Michel tendered her resignation at the Dec. 11 board meeting citing a new round of backlash over her attempts to deal with financial losses at the Nursing Home. Wool co-op plans Oroville mill by spring – The local chapter of the North American Wool Co-op has big plans for fiber production, resurrecting an industry, as well as a one-time apple warehouse. There plan is to get a full service wool and fiber mill operating in the old Thorndike warehouse by spring. Kathy Jones talks about 40 years with Oroville – As Jones settled into retirement the former Oroville City Clerk/Treasurer looked back with pride at many of the city’s accomplishments and about the many friends she made in the community. Oroville nears agreement for water rights – The city has been working on getting a transfer of the water right it acquired from Veranda Beach Resort and their predecessors for nearly seven years – that process may soon become reality, according to Public Works head Rod Noel.

SPECIAL INTERESTS: • All aspects of Family Medicine • Women’s Health including Surgical Obstetrics

Dr. Godzich comes to us from Mayers Memorial Hospital and Mountain Valleys Health Center in northern California. She enjoys all aspects of Family Medicine, from child care to OB/GYN care to geriatrics, and everything in between. Prior to that, she worked at Contra Costa Health Services, providing medical care in underserved areas and teaching family medicine residents full spectrum family medicine in Western Contra Costa County, California. Dr. Godzich likes to spend time outdoors, including taking walks with her dog. She is looking forward to living in beautiful Okanogan valley, and taking advantage of outdoor recreation. Dr. Godzich climbed Mount Shasta in June and is looking forward to climbing on a more regular basis.

confluencehealth.org 509.486.2174


JANUARY 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

The court found probable cause to charge Kyle Lloyd Campbell, 26, Oroville, with second-degree theft. The crime allegedly occurred Nov. 26. The court found probable cause to charge Sarah Marie Ohmer, 42, Oroville, with residential burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 29.

DISTRICT COURT Michael Roderick Carson, 36, Omak, guilty of seconddegree DWLS. Carson was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 175 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Edenso was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 84 days suspended, and fined $858. Jovany Figueroa Godinez, 20, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Irwing David Gaytan Balderrama, 20, Okanogan, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of hit-and-run (attended vehicle). Gaytan Balderrama received a 180-day suspended sentenced and fined $868. Cassandra Roberta George, 27, Omak, guilty of DUI. George had an additional charge dismissed: failure to comply with a flagger. George was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended, and fined $2,361. Elena Rose Harry-Gallegos, 20, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Harry-Gallegos received a 90-day suspended sentenced and fined $818. Cheryl Annette Hayworth, 53, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Juventino Hernandez Alcoantara, 79, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Craig Wayne Jones, 65, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: use or possession of a loaded firearm in a vehicle. Jones was fined $200. Wesley Hart Jones, 32, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jacob Dalton Kendall, 23, Riverside, guilty (revoked) of violation of a no-contact order. Kendall was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 353 days suspended, and fined $608.

Ave. in Okanogan. Tires reported slashed. Theft on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Internet router reported missing. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Irrigation pump reported missing. Fraud on River Loop Rd. near Tonasket. Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on N. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Checks reported missing. Theft on Fir St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on W. Johnathan St. in Tonasket. Tires reported missing. Joshua William Combs, 20, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 42, booked for residential burglary and third-degree theft. Justin Kenneth Wilson, 31, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Terry Joseph Hubbard, 34, DOC detainer. Tuesday, Dec. 30, 2014 Structure fire on Garfield St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Theft on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on Third Ave. in Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Chad Winston Vanatta, 28, court commitments for two counts of POCS (methamphetamine). Bryce Jerald Kincade, 38, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Wednesday, Dec. 31, 2014 Theft on Elmway in Okanogan.

Theft on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on W. Second Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Structure fire on Garfield St.in Omak. Warrant arrest on Columbia St. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. Structure fire on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Thursday, Jan. 1, 2014 Warrant arrest on Dayton St. in Omak. Assault on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Omak Lake Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Sage Hill Rd. near Tonasket. Mailbox reported damaged. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Highway 97 near Riverside. Injuries reported. Fraud on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Dayton St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Oak St. in Omak. Custodial interference on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Custodial interference on N. Main St. in Omak. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Burglary on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Ronald Darrell Phillips, 50, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Sandra Louise Cheer, 55, booked for DUI. Joshua Carpenter, no middle name listed, 23, booked on three counts of seconddegree assault. Carolyn Lee Lozano, 36, booked for resisting arrest, thirddegree DWLS and a DOC detainer. Jeremy William Andrews, 30, booked on six counts of ID

theft, one count of seconddegree theft, and a King County FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Desiree Marie Andrews, 27, booked on six counts of forgery and one count of second-degree theft. Dustin Rex Hawley Hennigs, 20, booked on two counts of third-degree rape of a child. Friday, Jan. 2, 2014 Malicious mischief on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Wagon Wheel Loop Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Cash reported missing. Burglary on Pine St. in Okanogan. Cash reported missing. Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on Elmway in Okanogan. Fraud on Bentham Rd. near Omak. Custodial interference on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Koala Dr. in Omak. Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Freedom Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Pine St. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on N. Ash St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Custodial interference on W. First Ave. in Omak. Loitering on Koala Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Central Ave. in Oroville. DWLS on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Robert Wendell George, 45, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Veronica Salinas Montoya, 28, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for

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Saturday, Jan. 3, 2014 Warrant arrest on Jackson St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Hard Cider Dr. near Oroville. Mailbox reported damaged. Threats on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Harassment on Quince St. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Debit card reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Public intoxication on Golden St. in Oroville. Drugs on S. Tonasket St. in Tonasket. John Thomas, no middle name listed, 63, booked for thirddegree DWLS. Gary Austin Vaughn, 46, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. William Lloyd Sasse, 52, booked for assault in violation of a no-contact order (DV), fourth-degree assault (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV). Bryon Dean Lukes Jr., 23, DOC warrant. Donald Joe Sutton, 57, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and first-

degree DWLS. Raymond James Tannehill, 23, booked for third-degree DWLS. Michael William Craig, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order. Sunday, Jan. 4, 2014 Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Assault on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way Rd. near Oroville. Robbery on Omache Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Maddesyn D. George, 21, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Andrea Beth Calico, 35, booked on two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and reckless endangerment. Daggon D. Chaska, 22, booked on two counts of resisting arrest, one count of third-degree possession of stolen property and a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

BEYERS 212 N Highway 97 • Tonasket WA

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Dec. 29, 2014 Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Oakes Dr. near Tonasket. Theft on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Second

third-degree theft. Jacov Marshall Chandler, 30, booked on two counts of POCS (with intent to deliver) (one each for methamphetamine and heroin), and one count each of unlawful possession of a firearm and first-degree DWLS. Dustin Hawk Chambers, 23, DOC detainer. Michael Patrick Connors, 56, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 1, 2015

THE TOWN CRIER

New year, more laws OPINION BY JERRY CORNFIELD THE EVERETT HERALD

With the start of another year comes the promise of another session of the state Legislature and the prospect — no, make that a guarantee — of more laws. A lot more laws. Remember 2014 and seemingly nothing but irreconcilable political differences between the Democrat-run House and Republicancontrolled Senate? The two chambers managed to agree on 229 bills to send to Gov. Jay Inslee. And remember how Inslee proclaimed it would be a ‘hold steady’ year? He signed 225 of those bills into law. Already, nearly 100 pieces of legislation are drafted and in the queue for consideration when the 2015 session gets started on Jan. 12. Here’s a sample of what may engage, and distract, lawmakers this year. Schools rule: Republicans are trying again to set aside money for elementary and secondary schools before giving any to the rest of state government. House Bill 1001 is better known as the ‘Fund Education First” bill. High bar for taxes: It’s back, the idea of amending the state constitution to require a two-thirds vote of the Legislature to raise taxes. It was a law but the state Supreme Court tossed it out. Inserting it in the constitution might do the trick, but that’s unlikely to happen this year. Abortion rights: The Senate Democratic Caucus is united behind a bill to require coverage for abortion services in employer-provided health plans. Senate Bill 5026, with its 75-word title, is an upgraded version of the Reproductive Parity Act that’s failed before. Prime-time for pot’s cousin: With a legal marijuana industry in place, there’s a bipartisan push to do the same for hemp. Under SB 5012, Washington State University would study the feasibility of such a venture. The value of hives: Under an existing tax break, apiarists won’t pay taxes on wholesale sales of honey bee products through 2017. SB 5017 would make the break permanent so beekeepers don’t ever get stung by the taxman. Securing justice: A House bill seeks to ensure that protection in courthouses is the law, not a luxury. The bill would require cities and counties provide security for municipal and district courts – and to pay for it, too. There ought to be an app: When lobbyists report their dealings with lawmakers to the state Public Disclosure Commission, they turn it in on paper. HB 1058 would force lobbyists to file electronically and make it easier to see how influence is being peddled. Make room for mopeds: Didn’t see this one coming. A group of lawmakers want to allow mopeds in designated bike lanes. HB 1057 would let cities and counties decide whether motorized bikes may travel in lanes “separated from vehicle lanes by a painted line.” Assimilate: A bipartisan band of House members figures if state Supreme Court justices want to act like lawmakers (and order them around on matters like school funding) they should be elected like lawmakers. Their bill, HB 1051, would turn judicial contests into partisan races and have justices state their party preference on the ballot. Free the foe-less: Voters could soon face fewer decisions in primaries. Today, all partisan offices appear on the ballot regardless of the number of candidates. HB 1023 says no primary would be held if only one candidate files for the position. That could free up space on the ballot. It also could enable incumbent lawmakers to spend less time campaigning and more time dreaming up legislation to introduce when next year rolls around. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www. heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623; jcornfield@heraldnet. com and on Twitter at @dospueblos.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Hear lots of complaints, but no solutions Dear Gary, Bill Slusher wants us to believe that our nursing home funding problem is due to Obamacare. As usual he just complains and doesn’t offer any solutions. He implies that if we hadn’t passed the ACA then there wouldn’t be a problem, but the underfunding of the nursing home and healthcare in general started years ago long before Obamacare came along. Bill would like shallow thinking people to think everything from Hurricane Sandy to the high price of gasoline is due Obamacare and Obama. Bill wants us to think that it’s only poor Americans that want “free stuff,” but my guess is he enjoys his fair share of free stuff as well. We Americans have become accustomed to having a lot; we just don’t want to pay for it. The mantra, “No new taxes” slowly morphs into the “No taxes,” and as a result, things people want-like nursing care for their loved ones, highway upkeep, good schools, police and fire protection run into funding problems. Americans are going to have to face the reality: If they want good things they are going to have to pay for it, i.e., they’re going to have to tax themselves.

As far as Bill’s dissing Obamacare, I think most people who supported the bill saw the glaring unfairness of a system that left tens of millions of Americans most of whom work for a living and pay taxes (but are) unable to get affordable healthcare. I would remind him of the fellow he wrote about a few months ago who had a car detailing business out of the back of his van-guy did a great job, good attitude, good product for the money. But what about healthcare? Come on Bill, don’t you think he deserves access to affordable healthcare? How about the women who prepare your hotel room over in Spokane or the men who are cooking the food in the nice restaurant you eat at? Guys slapping plywood, picking and processing the food you eat. Men and women who are working at the big box stores who are never given quite

enough hours to move them into the health benefits group. All these people working and paying into a system that helps to keep you living comfortably. Why does a typical American want to have health insurance? It’s because you don’t want to get stuck with a huge bill that might take years to pay, or you don’t want to lose all the good stuff that you own. Well, all these people who now can get affordable healthcare think the same way. They may not have as much, but they want to keep what they have worked for. What’s wrong with that? So Bill Slusher if you don’t like Obamacare, then come up with a better idea. But hey, keep your detailer in mind when you’re considering this. Rob Thompson Tonasket

Time for a new chapter Four and a half years ago, Kim and I rolled to make that business work, but still it surprised into Tonasket sight unseen in a 30-year-old me that getting over losing it was almost like RV that was on its last gasp. What little we processing the death of loved one: Denial. still owned was left in storage in Michigan. Anger. Bargaining. Depression. Acceptance. Jobs, house, my business, one Making it through that first of our cars ... gone. Twenty years year happened largely because of a life built in the area where my of the people at Tonasket Free wife had grown up lie in ruins. Methodist Church, who became It’s a little dramatic but it felt our family when we had no one that way at the time, and looking within five hours’ drive. It was back that feeling hasn’t changed. because of the encouragement When we were at the end our one of my friends there that I rope, a Skype interview ended applied for the Gazette-Tribune with a job offer from Tonasket job when it opened up in 2011. Schools to Kim that provided us And it’s been that family that with the “knot” that kept us from HALF-BAKED has supported me during my time falling off. A job, in the kind at the G-T, people who knew Brent Baker of rural environment that we’d me before I was “the reporter” grown to love, at the height of - some that don’t even read the our desperation...at the time it almost didn’t paper much. There were times it was truly matter where. refreshing when someone had no clue what Kim jumped right in with the TSD crew I’d written that week. and fell in love with her first group of kinWorking here has been great on many dergarten kids that arrived in the fall. It took levels. I’ve met people I might not have met me a bit longer to start living my life again. I without being on the job; great people, some did some manual labor, some freelance writ- of whom I had almost nothing in common ing and photography, tried to start a sports but found that I loved being with. website with little knowledge of the people I’ve learned a ton about local government, or culture here. schools, and the health care system - someI won’t lie: I was mourning the loss of my times against my will, but always with the business, Buckland Media, which was a high desire to communicate dispassionately and school sports website in our rural corner of accurately what was going on. Michigan. I poured my heart and soul into it, But I’ve also learned that my passion for but when the economy flatlined in 2008, Kim’s sports is as strong as its ever been, and I’ve 15-year teaching job and my business were been ready to try my grand sports website both casualties. I’d given every once of myself scheme again ... a little wiser, and a lot more

comfortable with where I’m at both in terms of living here and where I am in life. Which brings me back to our church, where there are some changes taking place. Theresa Wise, wife of Pastor Ron Wise, retired after 18 years of serving as the church’s administrative assistant. When that half time job opened up, and I read the job description, it was like a Godsend, and I don’t use that term lightly. I’ve been toying with finding a way to launch a website again; doing so without risking everything we’ve rebuilt in the last four years seemed unlikely. The church job is 20 hours a week, more or less. The skill set is up my alley, and considering how our church family has helped us to heal and grow these past few years, it’s a way that I can use the things I do well to serve those that have embraced us. The cool thing is, I feel that way about these communities as a whole. People have drawn us in and woven us into the fabric of what is a really cool place to live. So, my time on staff at the G-T comes to a close (though you may still see my name in these pages from time to time). It’s time to begin a new chapter, and I’m excited to find new ways to invest myself in my church and community. I probably won’t be at any council or board meetings in the near future, but other than that, I’ll see you around. Especially if there is a field or gym involved. P.S. Check out my new website, www. okvalleysports.com, when it launches next week!

Boost business by raising the minimum wage OPINION BY CHRIS SOMMERS BUSINESS FOR FAIR A MINIMUM WAGE

As a restaurant owner operating in four states and looking to expand, I’m happy to see the minimum wage going up in 21 states to kick off the new year. I’d like to see the federal minimum wage increase as well to benefit business and our economy nationwide. Last spring, my business partner, Frank Uible, and I raised the minimum wage in our restaurants to $10.10. And we did it without raising prices. Our teams work hard at our restaurants. But some of our employees couldn’t afford to buy the pizza they put so much effort into for our guests. That’s not right. And it’s not good for business. Business owners don’t create more jobs when they have more money in their own pockets thanks to low wages. We create more jobs when other people have more money in their pockets to spend at our businesses. More working Americans walking around with money to spend is what fuels this economy and creates more consumer demand. Some business owners who haven’t run the numbers like us will say they can’t afford a wage increase. I’m here to tell them they can. A sense of right and wrong may have sparked our decision, but it was old-fashioned number crunching that showed we can and should

do what Congress should have already done. Our increased payroll costs were more than balanced by reduced employee turnover rates, increased productivity and greater customer satisfaction. We lost employees before because they couldn’t afford to fill their tank with gas to get to work, or make a car repair. Employees who can make ends meet stay longer, are less stressed and are more productive. Too many people forget that the lower the wage, the higher the employee turnover, which costs businesses time and money in recruiting and training new workers. We spend more than $500 training a new line cook. We threw away thousands of dollars in product a year due to inexperienced employees preparing it improperly. Eliminating just a portion of these expenses pays for increased minimum wages. The morale boost and loyalty we have already gained from our employees also pays for our wage increase. It’s a win-win when employees can concentrate on serving customers, without worrying about how they are going to make rent or put food on their own table. Our more experienced teams take better care of our guests. We’ve gained many new customers who have written us notes telling us how grateful they are that we treat our employees fairly. Those guests are visiting our business more frequently, further contributing to our bottom line. We’ve seen that after implementing a $10.10

minimum wage our teams are performing better, our labor cost is under budget, our sales are great and we’re expanding. To those who say jobs will be eliminated due to wage increases, we say you’re wrong! We didn’t reduce employees at our St. Louis and Washington DC restaurants. We created more jobs. We opened a new Pi Pizza this year in Cincinnati, Ohio and are opening soon in Miami, Florida. We’re planning a second Pi Pizza in Washington DC and are looking into expanding to new states. And we’re far from alone. Contrary to what opponents of a minimum wage raise claim, a 2014 nationwide poll showed that 61% of small business owners with employees support increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 and adjusting it in future years to keep up with the cost of living. It’s time for lawmakers to listen to the majority of business owners who believe a minimum wage increase makes good business sense. Individual business owners can’t do it alone. Individual states can’t do it alone. We need Congress to raise the federal minimum wage for the good of our whole economy. Chris Sommers is Co-Founder of Pi Pizzerias and Gringo Mexican Restaurant based in St. Louis, Missouri, with locations in Washington DC, Ohio and Florida. He is a member of Business for a Fair Minimum Wage.


JANUARY 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Still recovering from the holidays? How long will it take to get rested from the extra fun and games we’ve been involved in during the past few weeks? The New Year came in quietly at our house, for sure. here were 53 folks came to the Oroville Senior Center for Christmas dinner. That’s a very nice turnout. What’s the opposite of a friendly senior citizen? (An Elder Hostel) Kids that got snow toys for Christmas were mostly disappointed as little or no snow fell. One of our small great grandsons from Seattle area, met me at the door at his grandma’s here, was so excited that it was snowing and before he got all his outdoor gear on, it had stopped snowing. We were happy that the book we’ve been working on, got finished and back from the printers, and we gave one to

Christmas on the Coast, NewYears in the Highlands SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

After a fast dash to the Coast to have Christmas with part of our family and their families we returned just in time to have New Years at the Chesaw Community Building and more snow. The trip over was not good. It rained most of the way passed Brewster to Issaquah, and then rained ‘til it was time to return home and then the weather was clear and sunny. We had a good time and as usual our daughter, Shawn, made one of her special dinners. This year it was Prime Rib with all the works. She really

Goodbye to 2014 and welcome to 2015 SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

each of our family, whether they wanted it or not. Telling our grandchildren some of the hardships we endured as we grew up, will sound like fairy tales to them and that is exactly why us “oldies” would be able to adjust easier than they would if, God forbid, we should have another depression in our country. Going to the grocery store is a real chore when you consider all it takes to do the job. First, ya’ gotta figure out what you need, then find it and lift it into the cart. Then lift it onto the check stand and again lift it into the car. When you arrive home, you have to lift it from the car, carry it into the house then again put everything in its proper place. So, if you have a 10 pound sack of flour, you lift it five times or a total of 50 pounds, and so on with the other items. So, it’s no wonder it is a tiring job to go to the grocery, then after

is a good cook. New Years Eve at the Community Hall in Chesaw started at 6 p.m. with your choice of potato soup, tortilla soup or vegetable stew with rolls, meat and cheese plates, apple salad, and apple pie with sparkling cider to toast in the new year – around 9 p.m. In the meantime games of cribbage, Phase Ten and Scream were played with those present. If you did not want to play a game you could just visit with others. It was a fun evening and also an early toast to the new year as we were home and in bed by 10 p.m. To catch you up on the Pinochle winners for 2014, they were for

National Public Radio visits NV Extended Care

NURSING HOME NEWS

SONH COMMITTEE

This past week the Nursing Home was visited by NPR. Our Business Development Coordinator contacted NPR regarding the financial plight of our Nursing Home. This story has relevance for ourselves and similar rural communities state and nationwide. We know that our financial shortfalls are due to insufficient Washington State Medicaid reimbursement. NPR jumped at the opportunity to expose this story on the depletion of resources for this expanding elderly population. A reporter was here on Tuesday interviewing some residents and staff.

Changes in locations, schedule SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM NORTH VALLEY POOL LEAGUE

The second half of the 20142015 pool league season is up and running. The first matches were played last night and we have every confidence that all went well as the first part of our year did. Up to now we’ve had no major problems with teams, sponsors or weather. That being said, we have now had a sponsor close their doors. This put the league officials (Jan) into scramble mode to find tables for two teams to shoot on and get the information out to their opponents for the rest of the season. The Plaza teams have moved to Americas. If your team is set to shoot against one of those teams, their new home tables are at Americas. The schedule is out with the changes made. Also last night a questionnaire was filled out concerning the end-of-year banquet and our

for a month, and then open as a lunch buffet and takeout restaurant. No more fancy pasta dinners served by smiling waiter staff. I’m sad. Our County Association meeting is Friday, Jan. 16 at 10 a.m. at the Okanogan Senior Center. Delegates and Members are invited. It’s Sunday afternoon. The fire is warm, and it’s snowing outside. I’m going nowhere soon. I’m happy. Pinochle door prize, Wayne Naysnerski; Pinochles, Boots Emry; High Woman, Evelyn Dull; High Man, Ken Ripley.

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Street for $8, happy cheap. Our freezer went down Friday morning. Many Thanks to Cascade Mechanical for their quick service. They saved us from having to move all that frozen food. I’m happy. Saturday we celebrated Hometown’s last day serving evening dinners. They’ll be off

SUBMITTED BY KAREN SCHIMPF

Dec. 22 with 37 in attendance the Men’s High went to Darrell Bunch and the Low went to Carl Cole. The Ladies High went to Nellie Paulson and the Low to Danny Weitrick and Judy Bunch took the Traveling. On Dec. 29 with only 28 in attendance the Highs went to Rodney Field and Ina Visser. The Lows went to Don Field and Trisha Devereaux, and the Traveling to George Penner. We hope your holidays were great and see you soon. The Fishing Derby will be a month early this year so get ready now. The date will be Jan. 17, starting at 7 a.m. with registration in the Molson Grange Hall. The fee is $20 for adults and $10 for youth. Lots of prizes will be given. Check last week’s Gazette-Tribune for details on prizes.

HILLTOP COMMENTS

Some happy times. Some sad times. Some never again times. It’s final, last year is over. Okay everybody, welcome to 2015. So, what’s new? January 10, this Saturday, don’t forget our Pancake Breakfast. All you can eat breakfast will be served between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. at the Senior Center 1521 Golden

doing all of the lifting comes the really serious car trouble returning to their hard part, Paying For It! home in Snohomish, after spending It is definitely soup and cornbread Christmas in Oroville. The transmisweather. I learned to make sion went out of the car cornbread, standing in a chair and they were stranded in to be able to reach the counWenatchee. Try explainter. Now I buy it in a box. Is ing that to three little boys, that progress or laziness? who are anxious to be home. Many ask about the status Fortunately, they were close of Bob Hirst… I wish I could to Wendy’s and they were say OD! He’s doing fine, but kind enough to house them that wouldn’t be real accuuntil transportation on home rate. He’s having difficulties was arranged. Yeah! For with his feet and legs, so he kind people! isn’t very mobile, making it I am getting really aggraa struggle to get where he THIS & THAT vated with DISH network needs to go without a great Joyce Emry and FOX Broadcasting for deal of assistance. not giving the service we are Another Bob, who is a paying for. You can bet there long time member of our community, won’t be a reduction in the coming bill loved and well respected by many, is while they squabble. in the hospital again. Bob Irwin, whose Don’tcha just hate taking down and career was spent in various post office putting away Holiday decorations? I facilities in Washington and Idaho and know we shouldn’t have “hate lists” but who is soon to be 95-years-old, has I also hate this COLD weather. provided many a laugh with his humor Our local area is becoming like a through the years. He and his wife have zoo, what with all the deer, cougar, 24-hour care, so it is possible that he will mountain sheep and not to forget the have been released from the hospital by moose that Joanne Thorndike has named the time this is printed. Bullwinkle, that goes in her hay shed and Our grandson, Justin and family, had serves himself a meal now and then.

veterans insurance. Our bed limit is 42. We are usually full. If the first person on the list is on Medicaid and the second is Private Pay, the Nursing Home, by law, is required to admit the first on the list when a bed becomes available. Keep in mind that the population we serve in this county has about an 80% poverty rate (our current Medicaid occupancy is at about 95%). Currently only two people can afford to pay private pay rates. Unfortunately, our insufficient reimbursement level is likely to remain high. For more information call Linda Holden at 509-486-3147 or Karen Schimpf at 509-4862144. If you would like to be added to the Save Our Nursing Home email list, please send your request to busdev@nvhospital. org.

Stay tuned to NPR to hear about us on the radio! We are not yet certain of the date and time. One person interviewed was Bill Colomb, our social worker. He discussed our admission process for which he is responsible. Because our Nursing Home is a public entity, it is subject to laws that determine for whom we care. Usually we have a waiting list with an average of 10-12 people. This waiting list contains information about the potential resident as well as their insurance information. Most people on our waiting list are covered by Medicaid; very few have private pay (insurance paid for by themselves or an employer) or have

Give a Holiday Gift to have another, they will be That Doesn’t End When POOL LEAGUE available next week too. We need your Run input. It’s your league and the Batteries Out. NEWS now’s the time to step up Give a Holiday Gift and take part in it. Sign up for banquet and awards committees and Play That Doesn’t awards/trophies plans. If your End When Pool! team didn’t get one or you’d like the Batteries Run Out.

“Loose Lips Sink Ships” SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

In light of the increased concern for military personnel security both abroad and at home, there has been a push to educate troops and military associated organizations about what information is safe and unsafe to publish. Personal information, comings and goings, as well as their family’s information is to be reviewed. Uniform wearing off base is restricted, car decals identifying family as military, and social media material is to be screened. Many service men and women have removed military oriented info, photos, relationship tags, and are adjusting the security settings on Facebook pages. It is wise for hometown military families to follow suit. I have received phone calls from a French speaking Unknown Caller. After informing him that he must have a wrong number and hanging up, he called back this time speaking in broken English asking me to converse in French. Being the average American, I can only converse in one language, English, I told

The snowy Sunday kept a lot of shooters at home. In spite of the snow, Tonasket had some good shooters with Robert McDaniel

Be prepared to make the most

the Batteries Run Out.

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for thecollege holidays, call or visit today. prepared when that moment arrives. At Edward child’s education. Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy to save for education. Sandra Rasmussen are there for your loved every milestone. college. One option is a at 529 college savings To learn more about yourones education savings options, Financial Advisor plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy call or visit today. ToJoin make your college savings gift in time nearly investors that trust us for you, members the child.* to save forfamily college. One is a 529 college savings 327N million Main St option Suite Aand for the holidays, callforor visit today. with their finances and their aspirations. *Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible a state tax deduction or credit in certain states for those residents. Omak, WA 98841 plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you,

goal – of or other goals – can stay on college track. *Contributions to a 529savings plan may behelp eligible for help a state tax deduction or credit in time year that you save foryou a child’s Jones, wethose areresidents. committed to help you make sure you certain states for

• Wednesday, Jan. 21 - Tonasket Chamber of Conference banquet, 5:30-9:00 p.m. • Friday, Jan. 23 - Open Mic Night - “Jamming in the North Okanogan,” Andy Martincak hosting, 6:00-8:00 p.m. • Sunday, Jan. 25 - Free Community Meal, 2:00-3:00 p.m. • Monday, Jan. 26 - LFW School of Dance, 3:30-6:15 p.m. • Friday, Jan. 30 - Dance Free, 6:00-8:00 p.m. • Saturday, Feb. 7 - 20th Annual CCC Talent Show; Dinner at 5:30 p.m., show at 6:30.

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Musical

Twinkle Snow Globes $49.99 to 74.99

Bill Temby, Randy Cline, 20; Jeff Taylor, 19; Lloyd Temby, Jenna Valentine, 18; Lloyd Caton Jr., 17; Rick Lind, 16; Jeremy Clark, Logan Clark, 9; and Jon Glover, 6. Handicap: Jeff Taylor, 19; Lloyd Caton Jr, 18; Rick Lind, 16; Randy Cline, 15; and Noah Olmstead, 13. Next sunday will be the Tonasket Cub meeting at 1 p.m.

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adVenTUre/COmedY/FanTasY sTarring Readers merYl sTreeP, JOhnnY dePP, emilY BlUnT 124 min Pg YOU NEED HELP – They need work. Fri. 6:30, 9:30. saT.*2:15, 5:45, 9:00 Reach over 2 millionChoose readers with many sUn.:*2:15, 5:45. mOn-ThUrs 6:45 a skills throughout Washington by advertising 137 min Pg13 Region or Go your job in 106 Community Newspapers! unbrOkEn aCTiOn/drama/sPOrT. sTarring Statewide LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE BILL JaCk O’COnnell, dOmhnall gleesOn,

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of this year’s Hometown Soldier Calendar pays homage to WWII calls for civilian responsibility for security. Ours is a jovial reminder to family and friends of Service men and women not to share transport details carelessly. As a Travis AFB Public Affairs Officer put it, “You can share where they have been, but not where they are going, nor where they are.” It’s natural to want to share this information with others. There’s a need to be understood and to share this burden with others. That is why we exist… B e i n g a military family member is not always easy. We encourage you to come to a safe place where your details will be understood and safe. Contact us at ncwbluestars@ yahoo.com or through our facebook page (facebook.com/NCW. Blue.Star.Mothers).

OMAK THEATER

*Contributions to a 529 plan may be eligible for a state tax deduction or credit in Financial Advisor certain states. for those residents. . www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

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312 S. Whitcomb

509-826-1638 family members and the child.*

To for the holidays, call or visit today.

hitting 25. Due to not enough shooters, Oroville did not shoot. Scores are: Robert McDaniel, 25; Craig Jordan, 24; Noah Olmstad, 24;

• Friday, Jan. 9 - OHA presents Highland Wonders: The Hidden Lives of Northwest Wildlife. Dinner at 5:15 p.m., presentation at 6:00. • Saturday, Jan. 10 - Dr. David Stangland’s retirement party (public invited), 2:00-5:00 p.m. • Sunday, Jan. 11 - Free Community Meal, 2:00-3:00 p.m. • Monday, Jan. 12 - LFW School of Dance, 3:30-6:15 p.m. • Friday, Jan. 16 - Evening with Brock Hires, guitar concert / fundraiser for CCC facade, 7:0010:00 p.m.

.

32AN Main St Suite A 32 N Main St Suite WA 98841 Omak, WA 98841Omak, Sandra Rasmussen make509-826-1638 your college savings gift in time 509-826-1638 Financial Advisor

GUN CLUB NEWS

THIS MONTH AT THE CCC

www.edwardjones.com

Everyone has milestones Add an Item to Give a Important Holiday Gift to celebrate life. List. Your Back-to-school That Doesn’tinEnd When

him I did not know French and he began to recite something to me in Arabic. When asked how he got my number he clearly said ‘Facebook’. The only places I publicly published my home phone number was on the NCW Blue Star Mothers Facebook page and the national organization’s webpage. T h i s experience brought it home. Authorities have been notified but there is nothing that will be done because no identifiable threat was made. It was just a form of harassment, a mild form of terrorism. He was saying “We know who you are.” You will see the second page

January events at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket

Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the time of year that you help save for a child’s college education. www.edwardjones.com

Edward Jones can work with you to develop a strategy save foracollege. One option is a Make 529 college Whytonot start new holiday tradition? this thesavings plan, where today’s gift can have tax benefits for you, time of year that you help save for a child’s college family members and the child.* education.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Shooting despite the snow SUBMITTED BY OROVILLE AND TONASKET GUN CLUBS

Many of us remember some twentysomething years ago, when baby Sawyer Werner, was fighting for his life, as he got a bit anxious to enter the world. The years passed and he matured into a healthy young man. Just recently symptoms arose and it has been discovered he has brain tumors (or cysts) and after being in the hospital, he was airlifted to Seattle, surgery was done and as of Sunday, Jan. 4, he is in stable condition. Thoughts an prayers are welcomed. Sawyer is the son of Jill (Forney) and Dick Werner. Have you gotten all the new calendars hung in their proper places? And remember, when you date something to make a “15” instead of a “14.” On Friday, Jan. 9, my husband and I will have been together 68 years. When I asked him if he thought he would ever be married that long, he said, “I didn’t think I would live that long, much be married.” On January 15, I will have another birthday, having been born a LONG time ago. When walking outside, be careful. There is just enough snow to conceal icy spots underneath, which can be detrimental to your health. ‘Til Next Week.

Buy a Region or the Entire State!

One Call One Payment 509-476-3602

Request a free information kit today:

Call this Newspaper for Details

509.476.3602

Jai COUrTneY. Fri. 6:15, 9:30. saT. *2:00, 5:30, 9:00. sUn. *2:00, 5:30. mOn-ThUrs: 6:30 Adult $9.00

Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


PAGE A6 6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 8, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 8, 2015

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Quiet, country park community. Spacious and comfortable. Includes sewer, water and garbage for $650 per month. 509-223-3433

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3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Nanette at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

SUN LAKES REALTY 4 BR, 2 BA, Garage $900; 2+ BR house $700; 3 BR $850; Lakefront Apt $795; Beautiful downtown Apt $495 Call 509-476-2121

TONASKET 1 BEDROOM for $495. Close to town. All appliances. Water and sewer paid. 509-486-1682 or 509429-0873.

Puzzle 10 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

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Puzzle 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Crosswords

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

23. Comparative word

5. Fine thread

24. Buggy terrain

6. “Dig in!�

25. Length x width, for a rectangle

7. Display of kindness, sympathy and generosity

26. Average guys

29. Charlie, for one 30. Legal prefix 31. Stoppered rubber warming containers (3 wds) 36. Had on 37. “How ___!� 38. Marienbad, for one 39. Grafting shoot 41. Accomplishment 42. Hurting 43. Full house, e.g. 44. Miniature sci-fi vehicles 45. Sheds tears 46. “Go on ...� 47. Brings home 48. Assayers’ stuff 49. Beam where upper rafters attach

1. Place 7. Use a scale 12. Peninsula between the Red Sea and Persian Gulf 13. Herald 17. Most contemptible 18. Dance student presentations 19. Be a snitch 20. Capital of Jordan 21. “Sesame Street� watcher 22. Male friend from one’s neighborhood (slang)

Critical Nurse Staffing, Inc. is seeking a LICENSED CNA to join our team and provide comprehensive care to our patients in Okanogan, WA. The role of the CNA in this position will be to work closely with patients and to provide basic care services. The applicant should have an outgoing personality, the ability to communicate effectively, multi- task, remain calm in stressful situations, and be able to give patients the essential social and emotional support, along with providing vital information on patient conditions to nurses.

www.gazette-tribune.com

28. Anger, e.g.

ANSWERS

The City of Oroville is now accepting applications and will conduct a Civil Service Exam to establish an eligibility list for Entry Level Police Officer and for Lateral Officer; please specify which application you are requesting. Two positions available. Applications may be secured from the Oroville Civil Service Commission, Secretary-Chief Examiner Lindsey J. Acord, PO Box 2200, Oroville, WA 98844, Phone (509) 4762926 ext. 14. A $10.00 nonrefundable fee is required before an application may be given to the applicant. Additional information may be secured from the City’s website: oroville-wa.com Applications are due Friday, February 20, 2015 by 4:00 PM. Test date will be Saturday, March 7, 2015 at 8:00 AM. E.O.E.

Found

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Critical Nurse Staffing, Inc. is an equal opportunity employer, m/f/v/d and a drug free work place.

Puzzle 4 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

Sponsored by

51. Astronomy Muse 53. Condition of being moist, fresh and pure

8. Injections of liquid into the rectum 9. Member of the Quechuan people in Peru 10. Enter (2 wds) 11. QB’s cry 14. Study of the physical world (2 wds) 15. Copy 16. Banana oil, e.g. 20. Agreeing (with) 22. Chop finely 24. Blowgun ammo 26. Burlap fiber 27. Diminish 29. Mountain pool 30. Sulk 32. Golf club 33. Chutzpah 34. Inhabitant of ancient Ephesus 35. “___ who?� 39. Archaeological find 40. Birchbark

54. Airline porter

41. Dense growth of trees

55. Bridge positions

42. Impressive displays or collections

56. Compliance Down 1. Family retriever dog, for short 2. Handel bars 3. Hinged sash (2 wds) 4. Evergreen ornamental shrubs in Asia and Mexico

44. Peels 45. Wine stoppers 47. “Empedocles on ___� (Matthew Arnold poem) 50. “A pox on you!� 51. Cable network 52. Appropriate

Health General

ENTRY LEVEL

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Medium, difficulty rating 0.59 8

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ANSWERS

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SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA.

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Career Opportunity

OROVILLE, 98844. 1 BR COUNTRY HOME, where horses are your “neigh�-bors. Compete 2013 remodel. Full bath w/ storage & laundry room. Spacious walkin closet. Beautifully appointed kitchen. Sunny living room w/ atrium doors to patio & back yard; overlooks river valley! $650 / month. Call 509-429-7823.

2 RV SPACES

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Oroville WESTLAKE RD. Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. New carpet, storage shed, computer room. $775/mo, first & last. Need reference. Call 509476-3214

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Robert 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

CLEAN 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH MOBILE HOME Located in quiet, country park. Sewer, water, garbage incl. $475.month. Call 509-223-3433

Puzzle 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

Help Wanted

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

For Rent

with full hook-ups. Long-Term Leases. Close to town. $250.00/month Call (509) 476-3059

For Rent

For Rent

Please apply online at www.cnscares.com or send a resume to humanresources@cnscares.com

www.gazette-tribune.com FREE NAC Class North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning February 2nd 2015. This class will be completed in March. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www.nvhospital.org . This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative & technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after January 14th 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185

Veterans’ Relief Assistant Are you a veteran and want to be of assistance to other veterans? Okanogan County may have just the position for you. Okanogan County is currently recruiting for the position of Veteran’s Relief Assistant. For more information and application instructions, see the full posting at www.okanogancounty.org.

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required Omak Campus: Enrollment Assist. Spec. Full time Temporary. Travel between Brewster and Omak. MA– C Full time. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job. Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required. Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN or Roomer 1 per diem position. English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need.

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF January 5, 2015 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (360) 515-0974 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com HELP WANTED MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED! Train at home to process Medical Billing & Insurance Claims! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at Bryan University! HS Diploma/ GED & Computer/Internet needed. 1-877-259-3880

Did you know? We use... ď Ź Soy Ink ď Ź Recycled Paper ď Ź Excess paper recycled for gardens, ďŹ re starter & more!

Think Green!

See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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JANUARY 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

Outdoor humorist’s comedy returns Businesses must list personal property as part of NW Ice Fishing Festival Ice Fishing contest returns to Sidley Lake and Molson Saturday, Jan. 17 THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – Get in the spirit of spring this winter with a performance of “McManus in Love,” a one-man comedy written by nationally renowned humor writer Patrick F. McManus, and starring his “indentured actor,” Tim Behrens. “Love” follows the hilarious antics of the young Pat and his pal Crazy Eddie Muldoon, as they discover their fear of the dark is child’s play compared to their fear of GIRLS! But something keeps them wondering about love, romance, marriage and what is this thing called dating anyway? Over the course of the evening, they discover why your first date warps your personality forever! Pick up personal grooming tips from the old woodsman, Rancid Crabtree, who takes a bath once every leap year -- because he has this theory that a mixture of soap and water will eat holes in your protective crust. Learn dating moves from cousin Buck, who grew up to be only slightly smarter than celery. Then follow

by April 30

Pat into the movie theatre on that first date with none other than Melba Peachbottom, the prettiest girl in the county. Actor Tim Behrens portrays the one-man cast of 15 characters, including a bat, a bear, a bicycle, and an even stranger assortment of humans. “Love” is one in a repertoire of five McManus Comedies that have toured 23 states and Canada, in 1100 performances to more than 450,000 people. The performance, which is part of this year’s Northwest Ice Fishing Festival, starts at 7 p.m. at the Oroville High School commons on Saturday, Jan. 17. Tickets are $17 in advance or $20 at the door and available at Prince’s Center, Camaray Motel, Tonasket Interiors and online at www.orovillewashington.com. For more information, call Clyde Andrews, Oroville Chamber of Commerce President at (509) 476-3684

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Ice Fishing After anglers got skunked for the third year in a row, the Oroville Chamber of Commerce decided to move the Ice Fishing Festival up to Saturday, Jan. 17 rather than the traditional President’s Day weekend in February, according to Andrews. Registration for the fishing tournament is at 7 a.m. on

Saturday morning in the Molson Grange Hall – $20 for adults and $10 for youth. In addition to cash prizes, there will be prizes awarded for adult, Smallest Fish; adult, Mystery Weight; Oldest Fisherman, Youngest Fisherman and first, second and third place in the Youth Division. While the anglers are on the

lake, there is plenty to do in and around Molson, including in the Molson Grange Hall. The events include an arts and crafts show, music and food, as well as a Pinewood Derby race, raffles and fishing awards presentation. A dog sled demonstration with the possibility of rides is also planned.

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Assessor, Scott Furman, reminds everyone that owns a business, ranch, farm or orchard in Okanogan County that they are required by State Law to provide the Assessor with an itemized list of all taxable personal property as of Jan. 1st of each year. Taxable personal property includes office furniture and fixtures such as desks and chairs: office equipment such as computers, scanners, copiers and printers; store equipment and fixtures such as cash registers, camera security systems, shelving and display cases; farm machinery and equipment such as tractors, balers, swathers, combines, sprayers and handline irrigation pipe; nightly rental furniture and fixtures such as beds, tables, desks, TV’s and deck furniture; and construction equipment such as bulldozers, graders, back hoes and ditch diggers. It also includes signs and office trailers. This is not an all inclusive list. Taxable personal property does not include household goods and personal effects unless they are used in a business activity. It also does not include business inven-

tories including goods for re-sale. This list needs to be mailed or delivered to the Assessors Office by April 30 of each year. If a personal property listing is not received by April 30 of each year, a penalty of 5 percent of the tax due per month, up to a maximum of 25 percent may be applied. Property owners who currently have a personal property listing will be mailed their current listing Jan. 9, 2015. The listing needs to be reviewed by the owner. Items that are no longer in their possession need to be deleted and any new items added. Items need to be listed by acquisition date and cost less sales tax. The listing needs to be signed and returned to the office by the April 30th deadline. New businesses of any kind need to contact the office at 509422-7190 and ask for a personal property listing affidavit so they can fill it out and return it. Attaching a copy of their IRS depreciation schedule related to the personal property items will assist the Assessors office in creating an accurate listing. For additional information, contact the Okanogan County Assessors Office at 509-4227190.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

www.gazette-tribune.com #1 Top Producer Office in North County! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121

Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

4 bedrooms and a family room!

The kind of dining room that your guests remember, w/ its central prominence and craftsman style cabinetry. Open & inviting living room. Big double garage, All appliances stay. Minutes to downtown Tonasket. $179,900

1. Fix what needs fixed! Finish all unfinished projects: Example - Patch holes, fix leaky sinks and toilets, etc... 2. Useable space is a key factor: Example - Make a junk room into an office. 3. Declutter! Put everything away and ready to move: Example - Family photos, knickknacks, etc... 4. Paint! It is amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do. Make it a soft, neutral color. 5. Open your rooms up! You want everything to look bigger! If you have too much furniture in a room, decide which pieces to keep and find a place to store the rest. Arrange the remaining furniture to make the room look larger. 6. CLEAN! CLEAN! CLEAN! Make everything sparkle!

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

Lake and Country

www.windermere.com

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Cute 2 bedroom home right in town! Enjoy plenty of space with the large yard. Home features several upgrades including vinyl windows and wood floors. MLS#719164 $99,900

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

2bed, 2 bath, double wide in excellent condition sitting on .73 acre fully fenced on Eastlake Road. Ready for occupancy with no work needed. $175,000 NWML#668672

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 8, 2015

LOCAL SPORTS Tigers 2nd at Warden Invite

Hornets hang on BY BRENT BAKER

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - A year ago, the Oroville boys basketball team didn’t play in many close games ... and when they did, finishing on the positive side of the ledger was an issue. A new year has meant more competitive basketball and the Hornets are starting to learn how to make key plays in tight situations. Oroville built a 14-point lead over Soap Lake on Friday night, saw the Eagles claw back to within two points with four minutes to play, then pulled away to a 59-52 non-league victory. It also avenged an earlier 66-52 loss at Soap Lake. The Hornets built a 29-19 halftime lead that could have been bigger if not for a late turnover and four missed free throws. “That first half was how I envision us at our best,” said Oroville coach Jay Thacker. “That’s how I want us to play. When we’re good, we’ll hold teams down in scoring and take care of the ball.” The Hornets only turned the ball over twice in the first half, but Soap Lake’s pressure defense turned the tables for much of the second half. Lane Tietje and Andrew Mieirs opened the second half with baskets to give the Hornets a 33-19 lead. But Soap Lake’s Nic Kapalo got untracked offensively in the second half, and Oroville turnovers under Soap Lake pressure set up the Eagles with some quick and easy baskets. “It was tough to play defense in the second half when we were turning over the ball and giving up layups,” Thacker said.” It was defense that made the difference in the end after Soap Lake scored seven straight points - including five by Kapalo, to pull within 50-48. The Hornets outscored the Eagles 9-4 over the final three minutes, including buckets from Dustin Nigg, Joe

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Lane Tietje goes after a loose ball during the Hornets’ 59-52 victory over Soap Lake last Friday. Sarmiento and Nathan Hugus. Sarmiento and Nigg each had key steals in the fourth quarter to keep Soap Lake at bay. “Dustin played really well,” Thacker said. “He made some big plays. “Andrew (Mieirs, a sophomore) is getting a lot better at point guard too. He’s knowing better what I want. I told him that by his senior year, he should be thinking about being the best point guard in the league. If he runs with that, and puts the time in, the potential is there.” 22 points for Soap Lake, including 15 after halftime. Tietje paced a balanced Oroville scoring attack with 14. Hugus and Sarmiento added 12

apiece, with Bryce Glover adding nine.

REPUBLIC 51, OROVILLE 49 REPUBLIC - The Hornets nearly pulled out a tough road victory on Saturday, Jan. 3, but Republic held on after Oroville’s last-second 3-pointer missed. “We played pretty good defense against an explosive offensive team,” said coach Jay Thacker. “We gave ourselves good chances to win it down the stretch, but were not able to finish it this time. “On the road against a solid team that is all you can ask for.” Dustin Nigg scored 14 points, Nathan Hugus added 11 and Joe Sarmiento tallied 10 for the Hornets (3-5).

Oroville girls edged by unbeaten Republic BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

REPUBLIC - Republic’s girls basketball team has big dreams of contending for the state 1B title. The unbeaten Tigers withstood a serious challenge from Oroville on Saturday, pulling away in the final minutes to defeat the Hornets 50-44. The Hornets were coming off Friday’s blowout of Soap Lake, in which coach Mike Bourn said his team played sloppily after a two week break for Christmas. But they led a well-played contest on Saturday 36-33 heading to the fourth quarter before Republic point guard Shania Graham took the game over. “It was a well-attended, hardfought battle and a great game throughout,” said assistant coach Bill Cottrell. “The crowd was pleased with the brand of basketball that was played; we got lots of comments about that after the game.” Graham scored seven of her 20 points in the fourth quarter, but did more than just score to spur the Tigers’ (9-0) late surge. “She got busy in the fourth quarter on both ends of the floor,” Cottrell said. “That is one special ball player.” Lily Hilderbrand scored 13 points, as did fast-improving Kendal Miller, who had just made her first start of the season the previous night. Mikayla Scott and Faith Martin each added eight points and Hannah Hilderbrand added seven. The Hornets (5-4) host rival Tonasket on Friday and travel to Brewster on Tuesday, Jan. 13.

OROVILLE 61, SOAP LAKE 32 OROVILLE - Despite showing the effects of the Christmas break layoff, the Hornets had little trouble handling Soap Lake on Friday, Jan. 2, 61-32. The Eagles, coached by former Tonasket boys coach Agustin Pedregon, trailed just 6-4 midway through the opening quarter. But Mikayla Scott hit a 3-pointer that started an 18-4 run that gave the Hornets a 24-8 lead and Soap Lake never got any closer than 12 points thereafter.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Hannah Hilderbrand (10) picks up an assist courtesy of sister Lily (24) during the Hornets’ 61-32 victory over Soap Lake. “It was sloppy,” said coach Mike Bourn. “I didn’t think we get into sync; we didn’t take pride in our passing. We just kind of flung it into areas instead of right on. Our shooting was off, not nearly what it was before we went 14 days without a game.” Even the coaching staff was a bit rusty, Bourn said, as evidenced by a miscommunication that allowed Hannah Hilderbrand to foul out before halftime. “Someone told me she had three, but she was the one who told me she had four and I didn’t hear her,” Bourn said. “I told her she needed to grab me by the shirt and yell it at me. The hearing’s not what it used to be.” Lily Hilderbrand opened the new year in grand fashion, pouring in 30 points and pulling down 16 rebounds as she was unstoppable near the basket. Kendal Miller, making her first start, tallied 12 points. “Miller played really well, especially for her first start,” Bourn said. “She tied a lot of people up and gives us another shooter.” Mikayla Scott added 13 and Hannah Hilderbrand finished with six.

WARDEN - The good news for Tonasket’s wrestling team: they picked up a second place finish at Warden’s 14-team Jeremiah Schmunck Invitational on Saturday, Jan. 3. The bad news: the Tigers have a ways to go if they want to catch Warden in team scoring at the regional or state tournaments. The Cougars racked up 206 points to nearly double up on the Tigers’ 131.5 to claim the team title. Tonasket edged out other small school state powers such as Kittitas (126), Connell (115), Colfax/Garfield-Palouse (115) and Liberty Bell (100). To be fair, not everyone was at full strength - including the Tigers, who were missing defending state runner-up Jorge Juarez among others. “We’ve been battling sickness and injuries all vacation,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “For who we had and how many guys we had at this tournament and at Royal, I thought we did well.” Chad Edwards claimed the individual heavyweight title and Frank Holfeltz finished second at 195 to highlight a solid day by the Tigers at the upper weights. “Chad had an awesome tournament,” Mitchell said. Trevor Peterson (132), Caleb Lofthus (170) and Lucas Vugteveen (182) each placed third while Zion Butler (138),

SHORTHANDED TIGERS 8TH AT ROYAL ROYAL - Chewelah, Warden and Ephrata battled it out for team honors at Royal’s invitational on Dec. 30, with the shorthanded Tonasket Tigers finishing eighth in the team scoring. Devin Walton (113) led the Tigers with a second place finish, picking up one pin in his two victories before being pinned in the championship match by Warden’s Mikey Canales. Fourth place finishers included Zion Butler (138), who went 3-1 and had one pint; and Frank Holfeltz (195), who had pins in both of his victories. Vance Frazier (120) and Zach Lofthus (160) each advanced to the fourth place match before losing their final bout of the day. Trevor Peterson (132) finished fifth, going 1-2 while losing one match in overtime and the other by a score of 3-1. Also wrestling were Rycki Cruz (145), Wyatt Pershin (152), Lucas Vugteveen (195) and Morgan O’Brien (215).

Tigers split in Spokane BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

SPOKANE - Colton Leep turned in a dominant performance on Tuesday, Dec. 30, scoring 29 points to lead Tonasket to a 70-58 victory over Colville to salvage a split of their two games at West Valley of Spokane. “They had not answer for Colton,” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. “Our ‘bigs’ had career nights.” Adrian McCarthy added 15 points and Christian Garcia had 12 as the Tigers dominated the game inside. Tim Frazier chipped in with nine points. A 21-13 third quarter enabled to Tonasket to break away from a 23-23 halftime tie as Tonasket evened its record at 4-4 on the season. The Tigers travel to rival Oroville on Friday, Jan. 9.

COLFAX 69, TONASKET 32 SPOKANE - Tonasket’s first game at West Valley wasn’t quite as fun for the Tigers, as they fell to state 2B power Colfax 69-32. “They were too fast and very aggressive,” Larson said. “They didn’t miss many shots.” Colfax broke out to a 42-15 halftime lead and never looked back.

BOYS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Brewster Lk Roosevelt Liberty Bell Oroville Tonasket Manson Bridgeport

4 3 2 2 1 1 0 0

Overall W

L

0 0 0 1 2 3 3 4

7 7 3 5 3 4 5 1

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Mabton White Swan Warden Kittitas Waterville Soap Lake

1 0 0 0 0 0

Overall W

L

0 0 0 0 0 1

Your grandson’s silly secrets. Your wife’s soft “I love yous.” These are sounds you definitely don’t want to miss.

3 6 3 6 2 4

GIRLS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Lk Roosevelt Oroville Brewster Manson Liberty Bell Tonasket Bridgeport

4 2 2 2 1 1 1 0

Overall W

L

0 0 1 1 2 2 3 4

8 3 5 3 4 1 1 1

L

0 3 4 4 5 4 8 6

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W

Mabton White Swan Warden Kittitas Waterville Soap Lake

1 0 0 0 0 0

Overall W

L

0 0 0 0 0 1

8 6 4 5 2 0

L

1 2 4 1 3 6

SCHEDULES JAN. 8-17

Thursday, Jan. 8 WR - Omak /Davenport at Oroville, 5:00 pm Friday, Jan. 9 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Oroville, 4:30/6:00 pm

Tuesday, Jan. 13 BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Brewster, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Brewster, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Tonasket / Liberty Bell at Omak, 7:00 pm Thursday, Jan. 15 WR - Oroville at Pateros Mixer, 6:00 pm Friday, Jan. 16 BB (JV/Var) - Manson at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Manson at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 17 WR - Tonasket Apple Pie Invite (incl. Oroville), 10:00 am

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Colton Leep scored a total of 46 points against Colfax and Colville last week in Spokane. Leep led the Tigers with 17 points but no other Tigers scored more than five.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

Let’s face it, living with hearing loss can be frustrating, even dangerous. Hearing aids can allow you to function better in all areas of your life:

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Saturday, Jan. 10 WR - Oroville at Mary Walker (Springdale) Invite, 10:00 am WR - Tonasket at Cascade Invite, 10:00 am

BY BRENT BAKER

THE EFFECTS

Your Work

Rycki Cruz (155) and Zach Lofthus (160) each finished fifth while rookie wrestler Tim Freese went 2-2 on the day. “We only had 10 guys,” Mitchell said. “We did real well as a team with all things considered.” The Tigers host Martin Mitchell’s Chelan squad on Wednesday, Jan. 10, in a dual meet and travel to Leavenworth for Cascade’s tournament on Saturday.

STANDINGS AND SCHEDULES

Do you feel uncomfortable at social gatherings? Are you missing the rewarding sounds of nature or your favorite music? Don’t let hearing loss affect your quality of life.

For your complementary consultation call 509-422-3100

Moomaw Hearing Center, Inc. 5 W. Central Ave., Omak • 509-422-3100 • Toll free 800-898-HEAR (4327)


JANUARY 8, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

LOCAL SPORTS Two titles for Hornets at Banks Lake Brawl Luis Vazquez (106) and Jeff Rounds (120) finished fourth, while Leo Curiel (138) and Brandon Baugher (152) each advanced to the consolation semifinals before being knocked from the tourney. Kacey Dewitte also wrestled. No team scores were kept. The Hornets host Davenport and Omak on Thursday at 5:00 p.m. and travel to Springdale for the Mary Walker tournament on Saturday, Jan. 10.

BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Tonasket’s Johnna Terris (20) and Jenna Valentine pressure a Lakeland shooter during the Tigers’ first game at the West Valley (Spokane) Eagle Classic last week.

COULEE CITY - Jordan Smith won his third straight tournament and was joined atop the podium on Saturday, Jan. 3, by Zane Scott to highlight Oroville’s day at the Banks Lake Brawl, hosted by Almira-Coulee/Hartline. Smith dominated his first two matches, then edged secondranked Tristan Chantry of Selkirk 7-6 to win the 126 pound title. Scott (195) won his first gold of the season with a technical fall and decision.

Terry Mills/Submitted photo

Tigers swept in Spokane THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SPOKANE - Points were tough to come by for the Tonasket girls basketball team over Christmas break, falling at the West Valley Holiday Classic to Lakeland (Idaho) 50-20 and Riverside 44-20. The Tigers trailed Riverside

13-3 at halftime against Riverside and while they picked up the pace in the second half were unable to get back into the game. Jaden Vugteveen scored six points and Kayla Willis added five for the Tigers (1-8), who return to league play Friday at Oroville.

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HORNETS TAKE 4TH AT POWERHOUSE COULEE DAM - Oroville took fourth at Lake Roosevelt’s

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

www.gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

MASSAGE

OPTICAL

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

HEALTH CARE

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

OXYGEN SERVICE

l Your

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center l Oxygen Concentrators l Portable Concentrators l Sleep Apnea Equipment l Nebulizers l Home Sleep Tests

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

Open: Monday - Friday

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

We would be honored to work with you!

Su Ianniello

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

(509) 826-6191

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

24 Hour Crisis Line

www.wvmedical.com

 Ophthalmology

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

(509) 826-5093

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Healthcare Services

Licensed Massage Practitioner

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-6191

CLINIC

 Behavioral

(509) 826-5600

Psychiatric Services

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Radiology

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-8496

OMAK

 Anti

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

Powerhouse tournament on Dec. 30, in an event dominated by Okanogan and Omak. Omak won the tournament with 140.5 points, followed by Okanogan (121.5), Republic (82), the Hornets (75) and Rainier (67). Ten teams were represented at the tourney. Jordan Smith (126) led the way with the first of his two holiday tournament championships. Taking fourth place were Leo Curiel (138), Brandon Baugher (152) and Charlie Arrigoni (182), while Luis Vazquez (106), Kacey Dewitte (170) and Zane Scott (195) earned team points.

Office: 509-826-1688

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

646 Okoma Drive, Suite D, Omak

YOUR AD HERE

Call Charlene today and see your ad in this section 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 or 509-322-5712

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 8, 2015

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

OCCA Homeless Veterans Program OKANOGAN - Okanogan County Community Action and Hopesource - both Community Action agencies are pleased to announce the award of the Supportive Services for Veteran Families by the Department of Veteran Affairs. An information open house will be held on Friday, Jan. 9 at 11 a.m. at the OCCA office to provide details and hear from partner organizations on plans to increase services for veterans throughout the county. Community members are encouraged to attend at 424 2nd Ave, Okanogan. For more info contact OCCAC at 509-422-4041or toll free1-877-641-0101.

Presentation on Local Wildlife Join David Moskowitz - expert wildlife tracker, photographer, author, and outdoor educator - for an evening of amazing photographs and tales exploring the hidden stories of our region’s wildlife on Friday, Jan. 9. From the tiniest shrews to bears and cougars, the signs of wild animals are around us year-round, waiting to be discovered by the observant outdoor adventurist. Dinner is at 5:15 p.m. with the presentation at 6:30 at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Presentation is free; din-

ner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members.

OROVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Oroville Senior Pancake Breakfast

OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce will meet on Thursday, Jan. 8 at 1 p.m. at America’s Family Grill. The speaker will be Susan Marcille on creating an indoor farmer’s market for the off season. Susan is a regular vendor at our farmer’s market, her and her husband John own High Mountain Farm. For the Food, for the People, for the Topic... choose your reason to come. The public is invited to attend.

OROVILLE - There will be a Pancake Breakfast at the Oroville Senior Center this Saturday, Jan. 10 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. All you can eat for only $7.

Retirement Party for Dr. Stangland TONASKET - There will be a retirement party for Dr. David Stangland on Saturday, Jan. 10 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The public is invited to attend the event which is being held at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket.

Self-Defense Workshop A self-defense workshop appropriate for anyone 18 or older, male or female, will be held Saturday, Jan. 10 from 10:00 a.m.-noon at Oroville High School. The cost is $50 per person. Instructor Randy Middleton, certified in techniques developed by fifth-degree Master Terry Cariker, will conduct the training. The two hour workshop begins with basic training and is also excellent for se-

nior citizens. For further information and pre-registration contact Randy Middleton at 509-429-2200.

Oroville May Festival Meeting

Transit Authority Board Meeting

OROVILLE - The Oroville May Festival workers will meet on Thursday, Jan. 15 at Akins Deli at 6 p.m. The group will be glad for help with the parade, Royalty Selection Night and Pageant. Also, they will have a “Park What You’re Proud Of” so will need help in setting that up. Three Oroville High School juniors have signed up to run for royalty and Selection Night will be Feb. 16, 2015 at the High School Commons. The committee asks people to come help put together a ‘May Day, Play Day.’

OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) monthly board meeting will be held on Monday, Jan. 12, 2015 at 307 S. Main St. #4 in Omak. Call 509-557-6177 with questions. Regular meetings will be held on the second Monday of each month. Visit the OCTA website at www.okanogantransit.com.

Tonasket Oroville Food Chamber Banquet Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce officer installation and awards banquet will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 21 from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket.

Diabetes Support Group TONASKET - A Diabetes Support Group will next meet on Tuesday, Feb. 3 (the first Tuesday of each month) from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the boardroom at North Valley Hospital, 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket. This setting will give people an opportunity to ask questions and participate in discussion with other community members touched by diabetes. The discussion will be facilitated by a Certified Diabetes Educator. For more information see www.nvhospital.org or phone 509486-2151.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item in paper, online Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Directory BUSINESS & SERVICES Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Attorney

Automotive

COMMUNITY AUTO REPAIR 4-D

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

Attorney at Law

Oroville Building Supply

n Family

Law n Criminal n Felony / Misdemeanor n Civil Litigation n Estate Planning n Probate

• Computer Diagnostics • Electrical: Lights & Wiring Fuel Injection • Batteries • Air Conditioning • Shocks Complete Service • Starters Alternators • Engine Tune-Up • Water Pumps Lube & Oil Services • Brakes & Mufflers • Transmission Fluid Flush • Complete Cooling Open Monday - Friday 8am-5pm System Services • 25 Pt Vital Service

33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3149  Plumbing  Electrical  Roofing  Lumber

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

 Plywood  Windows  Doors  Insulation

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Engineering BDK

www.osoyoosreadimix.com

Midway Building Supply

RYAN W. GUNN

509-476-2874 509-560-1011

Contracting

Quality Supplies Since 1957

GUNN LAW OFFICES

723 APPLEWAY, OROVILLE

Concrete

Building Supplies

Equipment Rental

Shopping

Insulation

MIDWAY MIDWAY MIDWAY

Engineering, LLC

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ALL VALLEY INSULATION, LLC

Marylou’s Gifts & More

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Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

SUPPLIERS OF:

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Serving Oroville, Tonasket & Area! Business: 250-495-6688 Toll Free: 1-866-495-6688 Credit Cards Accepted!

11648 115th St., Osoyoos at the Buena Vista Industrial Park

Tree removal ForesTry Fencing call

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Installed Fiberglass Insulation / Blown & Batt Ask about our spray foam  Residential & Commercial  Green Guard Indoor Air Quality Certified  Experienced, Professional Service

Land Surveying: Boundary Surveys Boundary line adjustments Short Plats Construction Staking

Civil Engineering: Paint Sprayers n Bobcat Bobcatexcavators, Excavators excavators,n scissor lifts, Bobcat excavators, scissor lifts, Bobcat scissor lifts, Utility & Roadway Design n All Contractor n Scissor Lifts Z booms, reach forklift, forklift, Party Grading Plans booms, Party ZZ booms, reach forklift, Party Equipment n Z Booms Flood Elevation Certificates Rental, Rental, tents,tables, tables, chairs, Rental, tents, chairs, paint tents, chairs,paint paint

Timothy R. Pecha, PE PLS 1105 Koala Drive Omak, WA 98841 (509) 826-2800

n Call Today! Forklift sprayersall allcontractor contractor equipment. sprayers all contractor equipment. sprayers equipment. PARTY RENTALS: 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., 132 Mill Rd., Tents,Clarkson Tables, Chairs & More! n Reach

Tonasket Tonasket Tonasket 509-486-2888

509-486-2888 509-486-2888 509-486-2888 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

OFFICE:

509-486-2624

 Special gift items  Locally handcrafted quilts  Kitchen gadgets galore  Woodwick candles  Many made in USA items

809 14th Ave., Oroville 509-476-3200

CELL:

Check us out!

509-429-0417 Call today for a

FREE Estimate!

Email: avi_john@hotmail.com

Storage

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

509-782-5071

Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 08, 2015  

January 08, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 08, 2015  

January 08, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune