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Earlier NW Ice Fishing Festival

LOOKING BACK AT 2014 While there was a lot to read about in 2014, there were also great photos that showed that recorded the events that impacted our lives. Right, the Table Mountain Star Party camped at Eden Valley Guest Ranch with a great view of the heavens last July (it will be returning this year Aug. 11-15 . Below, fire was on the minds of many county residents, especially with last summer’s Carlton Complex. Fire also affected the Tonasket area on July 21. Below right, Oroville firefighters took the opportunity for a little fire practice using their 50-foot ladder truck on a pile of old bins on the south end of town.

Patrick McManus show returns for second year BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – After anglers got skunked for the third year in a row, the Oroville Chamber of Commerce decided to move the Northwest Ice Fishing Festival up to Saturday, Jan. 17 rather than the traditional President’s Day weekend in February. “We have moved the date to the Saturday of Martin Luther King’s Birthday Holiday because in the past three years fish have been caught in the lakes right up until the end of January,” said Oroville Chamber of Commerce President Clyde Andrews, who adds the organization has also brought back Tim Behrens to star in “McManus in Love.” Registration for the fishing tournament is at 7 a.m. on Saturday morning in the Molson Grange Hall – $20 for adults and $10 for youth. In addition to cash prizes, there will be prizes awarded for adult, Smallest Fish; adult, Mystery Weight; Oldest Fisherman, Youngest Fisherman and first, second and third place in the Youth Division. While the ice fishing festival is hosted by the chamber of commerce, there are several “Gold Sponsors” including Kinross, Hughes Department Store and OK Chevrolet. The chamber is looking for additional sponsors as well, contact Andrews at 888-699-5659. In the past the event has attracted over 100 fishing registrants and over 250 come for the breakfast sponsored by the Molson Grange. During mid-day families enjoy the dog sled demonstrations and still others come for the arts and crafts displays, demonstrations and performances in the hall, according to Andrews. “Because last year’s Pinewood Derby was so well received, we are doing it again, with $200 in cash prizes sponsored by OK Chevrolet. After breakfast, Sitzmark Ski Club comes in to provide lunch items. Most everyone hangs around until the last raffle ticket is drawn,” said Andrews. The play, “McManus in Love” was written by the well-known humorist Patrick McManus. It will be performed by Behrens on Saturday night at 7 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. Tickets are $17 in advance or $20 at the door and can be purchased at Prince’s Center, the Camaray Motel, Tonasket Interiors and online at www.orovillewashington.com.

Brent Baker & Gary DeVon/ staff photos

2014: The year that Was Major news stories for January through June January Former legislator ‘Web’ Hallauer dies – Wilber “Web” Hallauer, former Oroville City Councilman, state representative and state senator, passed away at age 99 in his Oroville Home at end of 2013. A half baked plan to reconfigure WIAA sports – Sports reporter Brent Baker took on the Washington Interscholastic Athletic Association’s tinkering with various leagues in his Half Baked column. Zosel Lumber loses small log machine, building in early morning fire – A spark from an unknown source was suspected as the cause of an early morning fire at Zosel Lumber Company’s chip mill. Appeals Court upholds Mathis murder conviction – The Washington State Court of Appeals upheld the first-degree murder conviction of

Tansy Fae-Arwen Mathis in the 2009 murder-for-hire death of Michelle Kitterman. State auditor reports NVH finding – Auditors found that North Valley Hospital District complied with state laws in “most areas,” with the exception of use of internal labor on the hospital’s second floor construction project. OHA wants mine to address water pollution – A watchdog group called on Crown Resources to address water pollution problems at the Buckhorn Gold Mine near Chesaw and demanded corrective action. Cities may ban pot stores, grows – Oroville had been leaning toward not allowing marijuana stores, grows or processing within the city limits, and learned that the city would be within its right under a new voter-approved law allowing recreational use of marijuana. New high school hour requirements an issue at Oroville – Requiring 1080 teaching hours at high schools throughout the state could be problematic for Oroville, eliminating in-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 111 No. 01

service training time for teachers, late start Mondays and early releases among other things.

February Swimming pool yes, Heavy Haul no – The possibility of a rebuilt Tonasket swimming pool again took center stage at the Jan. 29 council meeting. Mayor Patrick Plumb is at odds with county commissioners over expanding the Heavy Haul corridor through town and to Pateros. Getting DNA from strawberries; loving iPads – The Oroville School Board heard a variety of reports, including one from a sixth teacher who said her students had extracted DNA from strawberries and said her students loved their iPads. The district has a one-to-one plan to get an electronic device, like iPads and computers, in the hands of each student. Fraud investigation leads to body – The investigation of possible Social Security fraud by an Oroville area man led to the discovery of his father’s dead body buried 16 miles northeast

of Ellisforde. FFA OKs Oroville Airport Plan – The long awaited approval of the revised Capital Improvement Plan for Oroville’s Dorothy Scott International Airport was received from the Federal Aviation Administration. Voters approve school levies, Tonasket bond fails – Voters in the Oroville, Tonasket, Pateros, Brewster, Okanogan and Omak School Districts all approved levies, however a measure that would have expanded facilities and replaced the Tonasket Alternative School failed to get the 60 percent needed to pass. Fest but no fish – The fish were biting at Sidley and Molson Lakes – two weeks ago. However, by the time of the NW Ice Fishing Festival nearly 5000 planted fish had done a vanishing act. Group asks for blues fest at Deep Bay Park- A new group planned on holding a blues festival in conjunction with the annual Run for the Border charity motorcycle ride in hopes the hundreds of riders will spend more time in the Oroville area. Outpouring of support: Young couple

March Mine gets updated permit – Ecology says a new permit will correct Buckhorn environmental issues. The updated wastewater discharge permit issued to the mine will better protect water quality and help correct environmental problems that have challenged the mine since operations began in 2007. Tonasket Schools to hold off on bond re-run – The Tonasket School Board has every intention of making another attempt at passing a capital improvement bond to fund expansion and upgrade facilities, but wants more time

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INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

overwhelmed by donations after fire – Most lessons on what is truly important in life come in the form of trials and tribulations that test the spirit. An area couple have been living that experience these past few days after the Bonaparte Lake Resort cabin that housed their studio apartment burned to the ground.

Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

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Classifieds Real Estate Outdoors

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Sports Obituaries Calendar

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 1, 2015

LOOKING BACK LOOKING | FROM A1 to consider options and gather public comments. Oroville Clerk talks retirement – This will be Kathy Jones last year as city clerk/ treasurer for Oroville she made the announced at the council’s March 4 meeting. Burglar arrested after being tracked by ankle bracelet – An Oroville man arrested for breaking in to and burglarizing the Okanogan Eagles, was tattled on by his court-ordered monitoring ankle bracelet. Trail groups applaud Kinross Gold, donors – The latest newsletter from the Pacific Northwest Trail Association expressed gratitude for the purchase of property near the Whistler Canyon Trailhead that the county was selling. Really….? County scoops up recycle bins after yet another poop incident – the bins located near the entrance to Chief Tonasket Park have been heavily used for years for cardboard and aluminum recycling, however someone’s insistence on using the cardboard bin for

depositing organic matter led Public Works to remove them. Oroville awards bid for Central and Cherry Projects – Versatile Industries Inc. of Ione, Wash. Is awarded the bid for the Central and Cherry streets Overlay and Water Improvement Project at $563,312. Brad Scott appointed to school board – Scott was added to the Oroville School Board at-large position, bringing the board to a full compliment of five members for the first time in nearly a year. Mayor, county spar over highway – The proposed expansion of the Heavy Haul corridor from Oroville to Pateros was one of 10 points Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb discussed when he met with county commissioners on March 24. Full TSD Board Slate – The Tonasket School Board had a full and varied slate to discuss, covering everything from finances to curricula, grading methods and a spectrum of administrative reports.

April FBI and ATF seize ‘incendiar-

ies’ – Agents from the FBA and ATF seized some of the contents of a storage unit, which included illegal substances, located at 140 Chesaw rd., but would not comment on why they had served the warrant. The owner of the storage business had discovered reloading equipment and “powder” that could be used for reloading or making fireworks when he inventoried the unit for auction for unpaid rental. NCWEDD talks economic development with city – Jennifer Korfiatis of the North Central Washington Economic Development District was on hand to discuss the NCWEDD with the Oroville Council and the potential to utilize the existing heavy haul corridor to export goods to Canada and create more jobs. Kylee Davis May Queen 2014 – This year Kylee Davis, daughter of Ray and Nina Davis will be crowned Oroville’s May Festival Queen and Bethany Roley, daughter of Ross and Nysa Roley, as May Festival Princess. Health care ‘task force’ to meet – NVH CEO Linda Michael shared with the board of com-

missioners that she and others who attended a county-wide hospital/health care confab have been asked by the county commissioners to meet with the other hospital administrators. WSDOT officials visit Tonasket Council – Two state Department of Transportation officials met with the council to discuss topics including a proposed Heavy Haul extension and the US97 chip seal project. Oroville Council updated on blues festival – Vicki Hinze was on hand to report on progress regarding he upcoming Rally at the Border Blues Festival scheduled in May. The inaugural event will be held at the city’s Deep Bay Park. First responders, school, stage disaster drill – Tonasket School District and multiple first-response agencies stage a drill to gauge the effectiveness of those entities in coordinating a mulch-casualty event. The drill included a mock buscar crash with students portraying accident victims. Emrys are May Fest Grand Marshals – Clayton and Joyce “Boots” Emry were selected as the 2014 May Festival Grand Marshals – a year when Oroville’s special event marked its 80th anniversary.

May

Brent Baker/staff photo

Motorcycle racing turned out to be a huge addition to the annual Tonasket Comancheros Demo Derby in 2014, contributing to the largest crowd in years for that event at the end of the summer.

County commissioners deny hospital consolidation is their goal – Okanogan County Commissioners are not angling to consolidate the county’s three hospitals, they assured a North County-heavy audience in a session called by Commissioner Sheilah Kennedy. Mandates could further tighten elementary space – Early projections for the 2014-15 enrollment looked solid – while good news for the budget, it continued to highlight the Tonasket School District’s facilities needs. NVH Warrants continue to sink – North Valley Hospital’s debt to Okanogan county continued its downward trend to as low as $396,000, down from a one time $3 million debt in 2012. Walk on the Wild Side – Queen

Kylee Davis and Princess Bethany Roley ruled over the 80th anniversary of Oroville’s May Festival. The event featured a Grand Parade, fun run, bass tournament, three on three basketball tournament and much more. Blues on the Border – Six blues bands took over Oroville’s Deep Bay Park on Armed Services Day as part of the first annual Rally at the Border Blues Fest. The entertainment was provided as a way to try and keep the hundreds of motorcycle riders who participate in the Run for the Border charity ride to stay in Oroville for more than just a few hours. Sabatoge? - Tonasket EMS Director Michael Greene asked the question after Tonasket ambulances began to turn up with mysterious issues. Greene hoped by going public someone would come forward with information to shed light on the situation. School librarian arrested for sexual misconduct – A 37-yearold Tonasket High School Librarian admitted to, and was later arrested for, sexual misconduct with a student 19 years her junior. Even though the student was 19-years-old at the time the affair was a violation of state law. Kari Alexander to be front and center for a day as Grand Marshal – Alexander, who has organized the Tonasket Founders Day parade for the previous four years, is honored for her volunteerism.

June Librarian indicted on five counts of sexual misconduct – A former Tonasket School District librarian accused of sex with a high school senior was arraigned in Superior Court. Elizabeth Ann KinKade pleaded not guilty June 2 after Judge Henry A. Rawson indicted her on five counts of first degree sexual misconduct. Echo Bay to end Buckhorn gold exploration – Echo Bay, a subsidiary of Kinross Gold decided to call it quits and withdraw their Buckhorn Exploration Project which had proposed exploring nearly 10,000 acres

of federal, state and private land surrounding the Buckhorn Gold Mine which is slated to close in 2015. Sarmiento stays as OHS Principal – Although the decision wasn’t announced during the May 26 school board meeting, it appeared high school principal Kristin Sarmiento would not be transferred back to a teaching position for the 2014-15 school year. Graduation Day – Coverage of the Tonasket and Oroville High School graduations included photos of graduates and listing the many scholarships awarded to the Class of 2014 from both towns. Jack Black on board for pool, spray park fundraiser – Comedic actor Jack Black, who has ties to Tonasket, will be participating in a fundraiser to raise money to help complete the spray park and jumps start the pool effort. Tonasket seeks grant for Parry’s Acres sewer rehab – Following a public hearing the Tonasket City Council voted to move forward with an application for a state Community Development Block Grant to partially fund improvements to the Parry’s Acres sewer collection system. Molson Midsummer and Conscious Culture festivals – We previewed the upcoming festivals which take place in the Okanogan Highlands. The Molson event is a long running tradition which grew out of family celebrations. The Conscious Culture Festival featured 42 bands that filled the highlands fairground with music and art. OSD doesn’t renew teacher’s contract – The Oroville School Board denied the renewal of a popular social studies teacher, a move that evoked strong, often vocal, emotions on both sides of the issue. Jet ski races on Lake Osoyoos – Oroville was preparing for the first ever Lake Osoyoos Cup jet ski races at Deep Bay Park. Hosted by the chamber of commerce and sponsored by the International Jet Boat Sporting Association, the two day even promised high performance action, including a nearly 10 mile endurance race and stunt riding.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn poured its one millionth ounce On December 15, 2014, Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn poured its one millionth (1,000,000th) ounce of gold from the Buckhorn Mine, which began pro- Butch and Dan pouring the duction in late millionth ounce of Buckhorn gold. 2008. The Kettle River Mill itself has processed ore from six different mines in Ferry and Okanogan Counties since 1989, totaling over 2.5 million ounces. The bar holding This milestone pour was the millionth captured in a 30-second ounce contained 894.82 oz. doré iPhone video. To watch it, go and consisted to the Kinross World website of 75.988% gold at http://www.kinrossworld. and 14.37% silver. kinross.com/en/home, where you will see Dan Graham and Howard (Butch) Schmitt, two veteran KRB Refiners, complete the live pour.

ing a number “One million ounces of safe production of skill-building is a great milestone by a fantastic team of miners,” said Mark Ioli (Vice-President and training & General Manager, Kettle River – Buckprograms to horn). “I am very proud and honored to support our people. The be a part of next training this KRB opportunity will family, this KRB employees posing with the millionth focus on marcommunity, ounce bar. keting skills, and this and is scheduled for January 14th. company.” You can see more photographs and follow our Now, as KRB achieves its one mil- closure planning efforts on the Kinross Kettle lionth pour, the mine River – Buckhorn Facebook page, available here: is preparing for clo- https://www.facebook.com/KinrossKRB “Dan and I poured the first sure. Based on the ounce at Buckhorn, and we’ll be here to pour the last existing mineral reserves at Buckhorn, ounce at Buckhorn.” - Dan Join us at the Republic School Graham, a Refiner with KRB the mine is schedCafeteria, 30306 E Hwy 21, Republic for 20 years, and Howard uled to continue pro(Butch) Schmitt, a Refiner WA 99166, on January 14th, 5:30-7:30, duction through the with KRB for the last 8 for “Marketing: Telling Your Story.” end of 2015. In an years) effort to help miniContact Deana Zakar @ 509-775-3157 mize socioeconomic impacts that could be realized or go to www.krbcommunity.com for more as a result of the mine closure, KRB is leading an information and to register. extensive transition program in partnership with the state and the local community, and is sponsor-


JANUARY 1, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Sheriff’s Briefs

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTS CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal

Leslie Stuart, no middle name listed, 30, Omak, pleaded guilty Dec. 24 to second-degree possession of stolen property. The court dismissed a second-degree vehicle prowl charge. Stuart was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $860.50. The court found probable cause to charge Miranda Nicole Mann, 23, Omak, with first-degree assault of a child. The crime allegedly occurred May 18, 2013. The court found probable cause to charge Bjarne Matthew Olson Jr., 36, Omak, with second-degree assault (strangulation) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Krystal Ann St. Peter, 40, Omak, with six counts of forgery and five counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 15. The court found probable cause to charge Tyler James Mieirs, 17, Riverside, with first-degree rape of a child. The crime allegedly occurred between June 15 and Sept. 30. The court issued an arrest warrant for Dustin Rex Hawley Hennigs, 20, Okanogan, for two counts of thirddegree rape of a child. Bail was set at $50,000.

DISTRICT COURT Josue Gutierrez Angeles, 25, Oroville, had a reckless driving charge dismissed. Dwight Eldon Backherms, 51, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Backherms had two charges dismissed: thirddegree possession of stolen property and an additional third-degree DWLS charge. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 82 days suspended, and fined $858. Kevin Anthony Baker, 48, Omak, guilty of DUI, second-degree DWLS and hit-and-run (attended vehicle). Baker was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 244 days suspended, and fined a total of $4,236. Lisa Louise Best, 43, Omak, guilty of disorderly conduct. Best was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $258. Miranda Leona Joy Bishop, 40, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Garret Lee Bruce, 46, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Bruce was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $858. Jeffrey Alan Butler, 52, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Manuel Cabrera Jr., 25, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Cabrera was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 83 days suspended, and fined $858. Joseph Emery Dagnon, 48, Tonasket, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Dagnon had two additional counts of violation of a no-contact order dismissed. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,283.

harassment (DV) (both on bond revocation). Darryle Clint Gua, 30, DOC detainer for POCS. Matthew Russell Carden, 27, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants, all for third-degree theft; an Omak Police Department probable cause warrant for thirddegree theft; and a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Manuel Arevalo Hernandez, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for non-emergency use of the 911 system. Audrey Ann Huckins, 51, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for harassment (threats to kill) and a Tribal FTA warrant for physical control. Tuesday, Dec. 23, 2014 Domestic dispute on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Ruby Two Moons Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Cougar Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Theft on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Theft on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Sex offense on Benton St. in Omak. Sex offense on Maple St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Birch St. in Omak. Assault on S. Juniper St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 20, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for MIP/C. Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2014 Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Harassment on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Found property on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Mail recovered. Assault on Robinson St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Custodial interference on Cherry St. in Oroville. Angela Jo Morgan, 33, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michael Roderick Carson, 36, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Anjelina Mayo Neff, 29, DOC detainer. Alyssa Kay Bray, 18, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for MIP/C. Thursday, Dec. 25, 2014 Assault on N. Orchard Loop Rd. near Tonasket.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Dec. 22, 2014 Domestic dispute on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Burglary on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Theft on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Mail reported missing. Burglary on Engh Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Hanford St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Jaqueline Anne Stotts, 51, booked for first-degree assault (DV) and

Weapons offense on S. Granite St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on Oak St. in Omak. Marlon Josue Garcia Pineda, 25, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Tyler Andrew Thrasher, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Friday, Dec. 26, 2014 Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Theft on Shumway Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on W. Oak St. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Custodial interference on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Juvenile problem on Miller Rd. near Omak. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on W. Fifth St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Found property on Main St. in Oroville. Bicycle recovered. Forgery on S.Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Christopher Alan Wayland, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Saturday, Dec. 27, 2014 DUI on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Burglary on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on Sage Hill Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Domestic dispute on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Robbery on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Pine St. in Okanogan. TMVWOP on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Elm St. in Oroville. Custodial interference on Cherry St. in Oroville. DWLS on Central Ave. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on E. Bonaparte Ave. in Tonasket. Zachere Ryan Priest, 25, booked for DUI. Deena Jean Lazard, 26, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for possession of a legend drug.

Street Smart The Street-Smart self-defense is a new and unique system developed by Master Terry Cariker who has had over 40 years of Martial Art training. This fighting system is based on three principles: 1) Moment of opportunity, 2) Natural movement, and 3) Partnership. This unique, quickly learned system, is being taught by certified instructor Randy Middleton. It is open to anyone 18 and older, male or female and is also appropriate for senior citizens as, Mr. Middleton is also a senior citizen. An introductory workshop is being taught at the Oroville High School from 10-12 noon on January 10. The cost is $50.00. To pre-register with a $5.00 discount and for further info, call Randy @509-429-2200 or 509-486-2341

Residents catch burglary suspect Joseph Nathanael Bowers, 22, booked for resisting arrest and on four FTA bench warrants, all for third-degree assault. Justin Kenneth Wilson, 31, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Sunday, Dec. 28, 2014 Theft on Tyee St. in Okanogan. Theft on Rone Rd. near Tonasket. Prescription medication reported missing. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. DWLS on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Elm St. in Omak. DUI on N. Ash St. in Omak. Assault on Engh Rd. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Koala Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Elm St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Juniper St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Joseph Allen Rosenbaum, 32, booked for DUI. Anthony Kevin Baker, 26, booked for POCS (heroin). Elijah George Noel, 34, booked on a Superior Court probable cause warrant for endangerment with a controlled substance. Irwing David Gayton, 20, booked for fourth-degree assault, fourthdegree assault (DV) second-degree vehicle prowl and third-degree theft. Gwen Vera Allen, 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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BREWSTER - The body of a Brewster man who had been missing for over a week was found under a bridge on Saturday, Dec. 27, according to the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office. Juan A. Oros-Morales, 33, was reported missing by family members at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 19 from Gebber’s Camp 2 near Brewster. The family reported that the last time they had seen him was that day around 2 a.m. “The family advised that he had been having some medical issues and left the residence and no one had seen him since,” said Sheriff Frank Roger. “A search was done of the surrounding area but there was no true area to search since the family did not know where he had went.” A week later Okanogan Deputies received a call that family members had found the body of Oros-Morales under the bridge along SR97 where the Okanogan River flows into the Columbia River. He was found in a marshy reed area along the river. “There was no trauma found on the body and it is believed that Oros-Morales died from the elements. Oros-Morales was found only wearing, shorts, a light shirt and tennis shoes,” said Rogers, adding that an autopsy has been ordered.

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OKANOGAN – A woman was held up at gunpoint and $3000 cash stolen from her at her residence at the Blue Mountain Motel in Okanogan last Saturday evening. The sheriff ’s department got a call at around 9 p.m. and deputies responded to trailer number 10 at the Blue Mountain Motel in reference to a robbery and shots fired, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. When Deputies arrived they contacted the victim, DeeDee L. Tompkins, 28, of Okanogan. Tompkins said that she was in her trailer when four masked subjects entered her trailer with handguns. Tompkins said that she was punched several times in the face and chocked by one of the suspects and they stole approximately $3000 in cash from her. Tompkins said the four suspects then fled the scene and ran towards south Third Avenue and fled in a dark colored SUV. Tompkins boyfriend who was also at the residence was also assaulted and when the suspects fled he chased them towards Third Avenue. It was reported that the suspects shot several rounds as they were running but no spent casings were found and at this time we have found no one injured from the shots being fired, according to Rogers. “We are currently looking into the matter and have obtained statements from subjects at the scene. We are chasing down several leads with information on possible suspects. It is believed the four suspects knew Tomkins. Tompkins was transported to Mid-Valley Hospital for her injuries,” said Rogers, adding, the case is still under investigation.

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TONASKET – After reporting hearing noises in their Crumbacher area residence in the early morning hours last Monday, the homeowners found an Oroville woman hiding in the pantry and held her there for police. On Monday at around 3 a.m. Okanogan County Sheriffs Deputies were called to 20 Oakes Drive, about nine miles south of Tonasket, where the homeowners reported that someone had broken into their residence and that they believed the suspect was still in the house, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. The owners of the residence had heard something in the kitchen area and had gotten up to investigate. As deputies were responding along with Tonasket Police officers and the Washington State Patrol when the homeowners advised dispatch that they had located the suspect hiding in a pantry in the kitchen and were currently holding her until law enforcement arrived. “When deputies arrived they arrested Sarah M. Ohmer, 42, of Oroville, who was the one that had broken into the residence. The residence was searched further and no one else was found in the house,” said Sheriff Rogers, adding that Ohmer is well known by law enforcement. She was transported to the Okanogan County Jail and booked on residential burglary and third degree theft.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 1, 2015

THE TOWN CRIER

Top news 2014, in hand and online

What was the top story for 2014? Some might say our North Valley Hospital District – the closing of the Assisted Living was certainly the top story of 2013. However, with $3 million in warrants paid down to nearly zero, the hospital district – administrators and commissioners, aren’t the targets they once were. Don’t get us wrong, things are heating up again with the Nursing Home looking like it’s going the way of the AL if someone doesn’t come up with a way to get it operating in the black again. No, the top story of the year was one that didn’t take place in our backyards at all, but in our neighbors’ to the south. The Carlton Complex Fire certainly drew the most attention from readers – both in the newspaper, on our website and especially through social media. 2014 could definitely be labeled the Year of Fire with the largest fire in the state’s recorded history. While the traditional newspaper – the one you can hold in your hand, is still king at the Out of G-T, our website certainly gets its share of traffic with nearly 280,000 page views in 2014 My Mind 219,000 of those being “unique.” The stories Gary A. DeVon –read on the website certainly reflect what was most important to our readers. It’s no surprise that the front page got the most hits, but obituaries and then cops and courts were next. The next most frequented part of the website was our Green Editions, where you can see all the news and ads, just as they appear in the hard copy each week. Then came General News, Sports/Outdoors and Community. The number one read story online this year involved fire as well. “Tonasket makes contingency plans for fire” had over 3000 views. It’s no surprise the obituaries get lots of hits, people want to read about their loved ones no matter where they live and that often means the other side of the country and even abroad. There were five individuals whose obituaries made the top 50. Brent and I had a couple of our columns top the list of most read online as well. It’s also no surprise that crime stories attract a lot of attention – not only the crime stats, but the big stories like the high school parapro librarian arrested for sexual misconduct with a Tonasket student, the man sought and later arrested for attempted murder, the investigation of Social Security fraud that led to the discovery of the grave of the suspect’s father and the story of the contents of the storage locker that were seized by the ATF and FBI in Oroville. We’ll keep in mind that in 2014 that any story with Jack Black’s name in it made the top 50 (even one written in the summer of 2013). Among other things, the comedic actor, whose father and step-mother live in the Tonasket area, has been enlisted to help raise funds for the spray park and swimming pool. Not surprisingly one of the most read stories was the warning from state Fish and Wildlife when a cougar was spotted wandering around where kids wait for the school bus in the morning. And just because they get a lot of hits doesn’t mean they’re recent stories either. One article written in October 2013, Golden Opportunity? An ancient river of gold” has staying power because it was in the top 25 most viewed story online last year. Hope you have a happy New Year and take the time to look back with us this week and next as we review some of the stories and photos that made the news in 2014.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Local animal rescue in need of donations

Dear Editor, On behalf of The Nourishing Hand Animal Rescue, I would like to ask for help of hay or monetary funds to purchase hay. Your financial support helps us continue our mission to educate animal owners and/or rescue animals in need. Lack of community support has caused us to make a decision to start putting some of the animals down. It has made us wake up that the community wants and needs our help but is not want to support us. We take the money out of our own pockets to make it possible to keep the animals fed. We do this all on donations with “NO” help from the county. The generous support of individuals like you makes it possible for The Nourishing Hand Animal Rescue to exist and to make the community a great place to live. My husband is a disabled veteran and at times we have to depend on his check to make it work to feed the horses. At this time we are feeding 20 horses and two cows hay and our hay and fund supply has run out. We feed four ton a month and have run out. We also have nine turkeys as we take all animals. Wal-Mart donates for everything but the hay for the horses and cattle. All our other donations went to help the fire victims, so when we asked them for help for the rescue we were denied, as they said it was us or the victims. And, no, we never got any donations of funds from the Carlton Complex Fire. We do not go out looking for these animals, they are brought to us by the Sheriff’s Department or by others like those who were effected by this year’s Carlton Complex Fire and had no where else to take them. We have been helping our community since 2010. We also have the pet food bank for Okanogan County and have helped many people feed their dogs and cats. But we need hay to keep going with the animals we have now or we may have to go against everything we stand for and have

them put down rather than starve. So, if you can find it in your hearts to help, you can donate by visiting http://www. gofundme.com/5ihi9s or send a check or money order to The Nourishing Hand, P.O. Box 2106, Oroville, WA. 98844. Janice Andrew (Founder) The Nourishing Hand Animal Rescue

Where the buck stops for North Valley Hospital

Dear Editor, NVH CEO Linda Michel said some tough decisions had to be made to get NVH back in the black. Apparently, raising the administration salaries $423,000 since 2010 while NVH literally had it’s hand in the pockets of Okanogan taxpayers was one of them. The surplus would vanish if the Drip Line; which has never shown a profit; and is physically in the lobby of the hospital were put on the hospital books where it belongs instead of on the Extended Care books. Michel states she is tired of the scrutiny of her and her administration. Seriously, you are a public servant taking care of the public’s hospital! Why would you fear public scrutiny and not welcome it to demonstrate what a good job you are doing? What is with all the delay tactics when someone requests the hospital financial records?

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Let’s review NVH under the stewardship of Linda Michel: 1. NVH no longer has it’s Oroville or Tonasket clinics. 2. Assisted Living was closed despite the public offering to take out an additional bond to save it because that could hurt the hospitals efforts to get funding in the future. It was mentioned at a meeting that the hospital had no plans for the building. As soon as the building was closed, a full blown plan appeared for office space, etc. 3. The state audit that was released early this year citing NVH for breaking numerous RCW’s concerning construction and costing the taxpayers millions of dollars. I submitted a letter to this paper shortly after it happened demanding to know exactly who was responsible for this outrageous incident. The silence is deafening. 4. Now we have the same dog and pony show that surrounded the Assisted Living closure happening with Extended Care. Early this year, there was a murmur that Extended Care is losing money. In September, there were adamant statements from the Board and Linda Michel that Extended Care is absolutely not closing. Then the community outreach to save the Extended Care. The next step will be to announce it’s closure sometime next year. Then surprise! A full blown plan for use of the now empty facility will magically appear. The only thing left to close is the VA clinic. Has anyone heard any murmurs about it losing money yet? In my letter earlier this year when the state audit came out, I stated Harry Truman had a sign on his desk that read “the buck stops here.” Every good or bad thing that happens in an organization is ultimately the responsibility of the person in charge, whether they own up to it or not. Linda Michel’ s salary of $176,000 is 10 times more than a lot of people around here make in a year, as are the salaries of her administration. They don’t understand the resentment from the hard working taxpayers paying those enormous salaries? To illustrate obliviousness, when Marie Antoinette was told the people have no bread to eat, her flippant response was “then let them eat cake.” Linda Michel plans to retire and get out of Dodge. Seriously, I think that myself and all the other taxpayers who got sold this bill of goods deserve a refund first. Dave Wolosik Oroville

But I didn‘t understand! OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIO-POLITICAL COMMENTATOR

Gun control is getting out of control. I went to North 40 to buy a new gun. They did all the paperwork and I was taken to the front of the store to pay for my purchase. So far, so good. But now the young lady at the checkout register smiled sweetly and said: “Strip down, facing me.” I thought this was a bit much even in today’s antigun bigotry mood, but what are you gong to do in the face of government bullying? So I complied as she Bill Slusher had instructed. When all the hysteria, shrieking and alarms subsided, it was frostily explained to me that what the cashier had meant was that I should face her while holding the magnetic strip on my credit card downward as I passed it through the card reader. Oh. I was invited not to shop at North Forty again, but I really think they need to make their instructions to us senior citizens a bit more clear! OK, OK, by now I hope you know I’m borrowing falsely from a joke I read on FaceBook, but regrettably today’s requirements just to exercise one’s Second Amendment civil rights aren’t all that far off the joke. And they’re getting worse every year. Consider the imbecilic nonsense, I-594, the anti-2A initiative passed last November largely by urban anti-gun-rights bigots on the westside. I-594 ludicrously purports to block unsavory or mentally ill purchasers from buying guns, but if you can believe the initiative is either about that or can possibly accomplish that, then I have a great idea for a Cuban ski resort you’ll want to invest in.

When a social majority does not share experience and appearance with a social minority, and thus fears and hates the minority and machinates to disenfranchise that minority by compromising its civil rights, this abysmal, ignorant human behavior is appropriately called... bigotry. Except, somehow, when the minority is lawful gun owners and the ignorant bigots pretend I-594 contrivances are to make them ‘safe’ from the minority, rather than to render the minority subject to their presumed superior rule, whatever the cost to the civil rights of all. I-594 is merely a perfumed version of the tired old government gun registration ploy by the same old anti-Second-Amendment bigots backing gun confiscation. Anyone who desires to use a gun for criminal purposes will never submit to such a registration scam for obvious reasons, and will simply obtain their gun on the black market, steal one themselves, or ‘borrow’ one from family. I-594 is functionally useless. Thus it is bigotry, not safety, domestic violence issues, not even legitimate concern for our children that is driving such ignorance, just as bigotry drives most forms of ignorance. When a social majority once felt American black people were dangerous and prone to violence, it sought to ‘protect’ itself, its women and its kids from the ‘risk’ of having ‘dangerous’ black people in its midst. It compromised their rights to freely associate, to come into businesses, schools and homes. The fact that - just as with lawful gun owners - American blacks as a group were no more likely to be dangerous or threatening than any other group mattered not because facts don’t matter to bigots, only bigotry matters to bigots. Even the reality that there was no evidence to support the compromise of American black people’s rights - for ‘safety’ - didn’t matter. Bigots just make it up as they go along.

Likewise, anti-gun-rights bigots - not lawful gun ownership - are what’s truly ‘dangerous’. Ignorance is always dangerous. Ignorance made into law is the worst kind thereof. Witness: Truth is something anti-Second-Amendment bigots avoid at all costs, but for the record: The U.N. has just issued a report (Seattle Times - McClatchy, Dec 28th, 2014) that shows that homicides are ... down ... all over the world. Despite (or more probably because of) the huge rise in private gun ownership in America and the prolific increase in concealed-carry self-defense rights in the U.S., the American homicide rate has gone ... down ... (per the U.N., mind you, itself no friend of gun rights or the U.S.). Despite the lying, bigoted mainstream liberal news hysteria about ‘guns killing more Americans!’, the actual U.S. homicide rate is ... down ... to 5.4 deaths per 100,000 people, a rate largely inflated by urban gang and drug violence done with stolen guns. (The world homicide average is 6.7/100K, down from 8.05/100K.) Remove the urban criminal gang factor and U.S. gun violence falls further into the basement, notwithstanding the understandably dramatic if misleading impressions left by such tragedies as the Sandy Hook school shooting and other such events. Interestingly, the homicide rates went ... up ... only in Latin American nations where gun rights are stringently oppressed by dictatorial anti-gun-rights governments. Clearly thus, gun rights don’t kill. Ignorant, anti-gun-rights bigots kill. Slusher’s latest novel is a bipartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or, How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. He may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live.com.


JANUARY 1, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Can you believe it’s a new year already? Happy New Year (2015) Can you in Minnesota, where Steve and Laura believe we’re off and runWilkerson recently moved ning into a New Year? back to make a new home, The weather hasn’t been report milder weather than very conducive to skiing, so normal for there. We will far, and that’s what you’re miss the Wilkerson’s. Nice supposed to do in winter for folks and whoever purchased outdoor fun, isn’t it? And their home, here, got a nice it makes it financially trouone. blesome for the ski resorts, For the first time in many when their season is fairly years, we missed Christmas short anyway, to not be filled Eve breakfast, with the Ben up with folks having fun. Hylton family, near Loomis. And apparently, the mild- THIS & THAT I’m embarrassed to say that er weather is general, as Joyce Emry we over-slept and missed the phone calls from my home whole she-bang! state, Missouri, told of sunMentioning Loomis shine and mild temperatures, and even reminds me that I saw an ad that the

Best wishes in the new year SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

We hope that everyone has a great New Year Eve and that this year brings you all happiness. We will be having Bingo and Kitchen this Friday, Jan. 2, the Pick 8 is over $14,000. Can’t win if you don’t come in and play. We also have some new pull tabs, Name Game and Shake a Shift. Thank you again for all the

TONASKET EAGLES volunteers that made some many things happen for the club (Hats off to all of you). Our New Years Eve party will start at 8 p.m. with party favors, snacks, champagne with a great band, Bad Habits. Come enjoy and have a great time and a safe trip home. On Jan. 10 the Aerie will be having a steak feed from 5:30

Striving to improve to communications, accountability

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

At the County level, OCTN and IHCCW, our focus is to improve communications and accountability. We look at our services as very good, but improvable. And we strive to regard each and every member, and their Delegate, as our bosses. They are the Kings and owners of these corporations. OCTN is now receiving County transportation funds, and is in the process of applying for Federal matching funds for improving its transportation

services. Friday, Jan. 16 at 10 a.m. is our first meeting of the year for the Okanogan County Senior Citizens Association OCSCA. It will be held at the Okanogan Senior Center. Delegates, members and the public are invited. We have, also, invited representatives from OCTN, and OCSCA to give us an annual report. As far as Oroville Senior Citizens, OSC, our local affiliate, we are planning breakneck numbers of events for 2015. We will begin with a pancake break-

Spokesman Review Shoot to begin On Monday, Jan. 5 the Tonasket Gun Club will start the Spokesman Review shoot which ill last for eight weeks. All new shooters are welcome and there will be instructors on

restaurant is once again open. Something we’ll have to try real soon. A recent phone call to Gail Frazier, reported that Ryan was recovering from the collapsed lung issue, but was not released from the doctor to travel home, so therefore he was alone in Seattle for Christmas. I find myself shortening the list of “things I need to do,” how about you? One of the really good things I have seen advertised on TV is the mop bucket with the “self wringer.” I bought one in Wal-Mart and it’s great. I’m really upset with Dish and Fox TV. Some of my favorite programs are on that network and at this time it is out of broadcast. Oh! well, as long as

p.m. to 7 p.m. This benefit is for our building fund (lots of things to do). Cost of this great meal is $12. Come and support the Aerie. Pinochle scores are as follows: first place Gladys Fifer and Joann Michels; second place Carol Ross and Val Bradshaw; Low Score went to Ken Cook and Jo Porter, last but not least, Last Pinochle went to Ken Cook and Jo Porter. Good Job everyone. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

fast on Saturday, Jan. 10, all you can eat. The fourth Tuesday we will have computer classes for our seniors at 11 a.m. Tilly Porter will be our teacher. The fourth Friday we will host Movie Matinee at 1 p.m. These are in addition to Pinochle every Saturday evening; Euchre on Tuesdays after lunch; Bingo after lunch Tuesdays and Thursdays; Exercise Sessions Tuesday andThursday mornings at 9:30 a.m. Then, In March along with every thing else, we are anticipating holding our annual St. Patricks Day of party Pinochle and Bridge. Penny Rader, an RN, certified foot care nurse has offered her services Tuesday or Thursday mornings according to need. She will charge only ten dollars for basic care. You can contact her at 541-520-4392.

For more information call Bob at 509-485-3716.

TONASKET GUN CLUB

FINANCIAL FOCUS

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HAPPY NEW YEAR, ONE AND ALL! Love, Keith, Gayle, Sheryl & Penny Reach

We’ve Got You Covered

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If you are interested in saving for retirement, here’s some good news: For 2015, the IRS has raised the maximum contribution limits for 401(k) plans from $17,500 to $18,000. And if you’re 50 or older, you can put in an extra $6,000, up from $5,500 in 2014. These same limits also apply to 403(b) plans, for employees of public schools and nonprofit organizations, and to 457(b) plans, for employees of state and local governments and other governmental agencies, such as park boards and water districts. So, in other words, a lot of workers have gotten a “raise” in their ability to contribute to taxadvantaged retirement plans.

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Not closing in March SUBMITTED BY KAREN SCHIMPF SONH COMMITTEE

All of us here at the Nursing Home would like to wish all of you a very Happy New Year! The time between Christmas and New Years Eve at the Nursing Home is usually a quiet time. Everyone has had their fill of goodies and they are sitting back, sated after the hustle and bustle of getting everything ready for the Christmas holiday. The quantities of mail decrease, activity slows, visitors do not come as

NURSING HOME NEWS often and it can be a somewhat lonely time for residents. Visitors are welcome anytime. Once again, be reassured that the Nursing Home will not close by the end of March. When Linda Michel made her budget presentation at the Hospital Board meeting on Nov. 13, she emphasized the need for strategic planning for the financial viability of the Nursing Home. The deadline for the success team to submit a plan will be March 27, 2015, due to the start

OROVILLE GUN CLUB

Christmas Meat Shoot SUBMITTED BY LINDA SCHWILKE OROVILLE GUN CLUB

A merry Christmas Meat Shoot was held on Saturday, Dec. 20 t the Oroville Gun Club Trap Range on Hwy. 7. It was a fun day for all members and guests who came to compete for beef steaks, pork steaks and of course, the elusive bacon birds. The weather was wet, then really wet, but everyone shot with rain drops on their glasses and took home a lot of steaks and bacon. Trap shooters are tough and neither rain, snow or heat of the burning sun can stop them from hitting their targets. Jeff Taylor had several perfect scores from the 16 and 20 yard lines. There will be good eating at

though. Having Christmas Day in the middle of the week, makes it seem like the next several days are Saturdays and we no sooner get it straightened out and we do it al over again, for New Years. Then we can hang up the new calendars and get on the right track. “After a certain age, if you don’t wake up aching in just about every bone in your body, you are probably dead.” It was nice to get phone calls and letters from some of out former exchange students. You know you’re getting old when: your head makes promises your body can’t keep. ‘Til next week.

his house! For the Annie Oakley it was Paul Schwilke winner with Scott Peterson runner up. Joe Portlance won six times! Once at 22 yard, twice at 23 yards, 25 yard chipper, once at 27 yards and then again at 30 yards! That’s a lot of beef steaks! Think I’ll go to dinner at his house! In case you didn’t know, Oroville has a gun club and we have been meeting and shooting since 1949. Through the winter month we practice on Saturday afternoons and compete in the Telegraphic Spokesman Review competition that runs every Saturday through March. Shooting starts at 1 p.m. on Sunday and since it is cold we have hot coffee and hot chocolate along

will ever contribute the maximum amount to your retirement plan, you may still benefit from making small increases each year. Unfortunately, many people don’t do this.

of the fiscal year on the first of April. The Save the Nursing Home Committee has been meeting regularly and has been working on helping community members learn. Fact sheets will be available to read in locations around the north county community shortly after the New Year with public forums following. We look forward to sharing information with you. For information call Linda Holden at 486-3147 and Karen Schimpf at 486-2144. If you would like to be added to the Save Our Nursing Home email list, please send your request to busdev@ nvhospital.org. with a good pellet stove to warm you up inside and out. This competitive shoot is held throughout Washington trap clubs and those are the scores you will see posted in the Gazette-Tribune. Come join us for a good time with your family. There are groups for women and kids – so everyone can shoot. Club meeting for election of officers is Sunday, Jan. 11, 2015. For more info call Paul at 509476-2241 or Vern at 509-4767031.

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my basketball games are on, I guess I’ll survive. Wednesday, Jan. 7 is the Red Cross blood drive from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the United Methodist Church. Does your house seem extremely quiet now that the visitors have gone home? Ours sure does and with the little guard dog that comes along and with his really keen hearing, it really is quiet. We had a wonderful time together with family and ate too much and played games, some old and new. One grandson always brings a new game and sometimes we enjoy it and sometimes it is too difficult for grandma and grandpa and we resort back to pinochle. So, no snow came. It surely did try,

In fact, approximately 30 percent of eligible workers don’t even participate in their employer’s 401(k)-type plan, according to the Employee Benefits Security Administration, an agency of the U.S. Department of Labor. And the median savings rate for these plans is just six percent of eligible income, with only 22 percent of employees contributing more than 10 percent of their pay, according to a recent report by Vanguard, an investment management company. In any case, you do have some pretty strong motivations to put in as much as you can possibly afford. First of all, your 401(k) earnings grow on a tax-deferred basis, which means your money has more growth potential than it would if it were placed in an account on which you paid taxes every year. Eventually, though, you will be taxed on your withdrawals, but by the time you start taking out money, presumably in retirement, you might be in a lower tax bracket.

72 cents to spend as you choose. But if you put that same dollar into your 401(k), which is typically funded with pre-tax dollars, you will reduce your taxable income by one dollar — which means that if you did contribute the full $18,000, you’d save $5,040 in federal income taxes. Your particular tax situation will likely be impacted by other factors, but you’d have that $18,000 working for you in whatever investments you have chosen within your 401(k) plan. If you kept contributing the maximum each year, you will be giving yourself more potential for a sizable fund for your retirement years.

Even if you couldn’t afford to “max out” on your 401(k), you should, at the very least, contribute enough to earn your employer’s match, if one is offered. (A common match is 50 cents per dollar, up to six percent of your pay.) Your Human Resources department can tell you how much you need to contribute to get the greatest match, so if you haven’t had that conversation yet, But you can also get a more im- don’t put it off. mediate tax-related benefit from contributing as much as you can As we’ve seen, investing in your to your 401(k). Consider this hypo- 401(k) is a good retirement stratthetical example. Suppose that you egy — you get tax benefits and the are in the 28 percent tax bracket. chance to build retirement savings. For every dollar you earn, you must And with the contribution limit inpay 28 cents in taxes (excluding creasing, you’ve got the chance for state and other taxes), leaving you more savings in the future.

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Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844 l 509-476-3602 or 888-838-3000 l www.gazette-tribune.com


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 1, 2015 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 1, 2015

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Real Estate Wanted TONASKET SO I AM GONNA Try and shake the tree a little. I am still looking for a small house in Tonasket with an owner carried contact. I have regular income. Maybe a small commercial building. I will have to remodel some already to make it wheelchair friendly. I have a construction background. I will be a plus in your space that hopefully will become mine. Please respond to wauconda@tetevar.com Thank you, Debby Curren

For Rent Oroville WESTLAKE RD. Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. New carpet, storage shed, computer room. $775/mo, first & last. Need reference. Call 509476-3214 SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space

For Rent

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For more information contact Nanette at

OROVILLE, 98844. 1 BR COUNTRY HOME, where horses are your “neigh�-bors. Compete 2013 remodel. Full bath w/ storage & laundry room. Spacious walkin closet. Beautifully appointed kitchen. Sunny living room w/ atrium doors to patio & back yard; overlooks river valley! $650 / month. Call 509-429-7823.

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

TONASKET 1 BEDROOM for $495. Close to town. All appliances. Water and sewer paid. 509-486-1682 or 509429-0873.

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 1 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40) The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Announcements

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ANSWERS

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required Omak Campus: Enrollment Assist. Spec. Full time Temporary. Travel between Brewster and Omak. MA– C Full time. RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time. Travel between sites as needed. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time position. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time. No experience needed! We will train you on the job. Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/ Spanish bilingual required.

Statewides

FREE NAC Class

paper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning February 2nd 2015. This class will be completed in March. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www.nvhospital.org . This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative & technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after January 14th 2015. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185 Relief Customer Service Rep Okanogan County PUD This position is part-time, minimum 80 hours per month and is called upon as needed to perform customer service duties at the District’s headquarters in Okanogan, as well as at each of the District’s 5 offices. Applicants must have a high school diploma or equivalent and at least one year of previous applicable secretarial/office, customer service experience. A valid Washington State Driver’s License is required. The position will be assigned to the District’s headquarters in Okanogan and travel time and mileage will be paid when assigned to alternate work locations. Wages are per IBEW contract, health insurance & retirement benefits are provided. Applications and a detailed job description are available online at www.okanoganpud.org or at any District office. Applications must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday, January 5, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Box 912, Okanogan, WA 988400912. Applications may also be faxed or emailed to: fax 509- 422-8416, laurar@okpud.org. Okanogan County PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Professional Services Instruction / Classes

Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN or Roomer 1 per diem position. English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer. Subscribe to the...

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Help Wanted

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

www.gazette-tribune.com

EVENING WELDING COURSES Improve your welding skills at night. WVC at Omak offers basic, gas or arc welding courses Mon & Wed 6pm-8:30pm. Classes begin Jan 5th. Call Riva Morgan at 509-682-6847.

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF DECEMBER 29, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington News-

EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (206) 634-3838 for details. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices LEGAL NOTICE NEGOTIATION OF STATE LEASES WITH EXISTING LESSEES BETWEEN FEBRUARY AND MARCH 2015 EXPIRES: JUNE 2015 10-071138-GRAZING-N1/2, SW1/4, W1/2SE1/4, Section 36, Township 38 North, Range 27 East, W.M. Written request to lease must be received by January 31, 2015, at Department of Natural Resources, 225 S Silke Rd, Colville, Washington 99114-9369. Each request to lease must include the lease number, the name, address and phone number of applicant, and must contain a certified check or money order payable to the Department of Natural Resources for the amount of any bonus bid plus a $100.00 deposit. The envelope must be marked “Sealed Bid� and give lease number, expiration date of lease applied for and give applicant’s name. The applicant must be prepared to purchase improvements that belong to the current lessee. Persons wishing to bid to lease any of these properties can obtain more details, bid packet, and qualification requirements by contacting the Colville office or calling (509) 684-7474. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 31, 2014 (OVG607832) PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 1/5/15 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM EZ Loader. Lic# N/A WSP inspection required after sale Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 1, 2015. #OVG607201 THE OROVILLE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION HAS SCHEDULED A SPECIAL MEETING TO BE HELD MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015 AT 4:00 PM IN THE CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS. PURPOSE OF THE SPECIAL MEETING IS TO REVIEW NEW TESTING MATERIAL THE NEXT REGULAR MEETING WILL BE HELD MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2014 AT 4:30 PM IN THE CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 1, 2015. #OVG608017 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE The attached Notice of Sale is a consequence of default(s) in the obligation to Fred L. Cook, the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust and owner of the obligation secured thereby. Unless the default(s) is/are cured, your property will be sold at auction on Friday, January 9, 2015. To cure the default(s), you must bring the payments current, cure any other defaults, and pay accrued late charges and other costs and attorney fees as set forth below by December 29, 2014 (11 days before sale date). To date, these arrears and costs are as follows: Delinquent Payments from in the amount of/ Currently due to reinstate/ Estimated amount that will be due to reinstate on December 29, 2014 (11 days before the date set for sale) Late charges:/$300.00/$400.00 AttorneyFees:/$1,250.00 /$1,250.00 Title Report:/ $ 400.00/$400.00 (estimated)

Legals Continued On Next Page

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JANUARY 1, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OUTDOORS

The Hidden Lives of Northwest Wildlife

A Highland Wonders Event, Jan. 9 SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OHA CONSERVATION COORDINATOR

TONASKET - On Friday, January 9, 2015, David Moskowitz - expert wildlife tracker, photographer, author, and outdoor educator - will provide an evening of amazing photographs and tales exploring the hidden stories of our region’s wildlife. From the tiniest shrews to bears and cougars, the signs of wild animals are around us year-round, waiting to be discovered by the observant outdoor adventurist. From the wild coastline to alpine tundra and from rain forests to deserts, David will share tips on how to find wild animals and interpret the signs they leave behind on the landscape including tracks, feeding sign, and scent marking. “For me, animal tracks and signs have an almost magical quality to them,” Moskowitz says. “They give us a window into the intimate and unseen lives of the wild animals that live around our homes and in the places we work and play.” David Moskowitz is the author of two books, “Wildlife of the Pacific Northwest” and “Wolves in the Land of Salmon.” He has contributed his technical expertise to a wide variety of wildlife studies regionally and in the Canadian and U.S. Rocky Mountains, focusing on using tracking and other non-inva-

David Moskowitz/staff photo

David Moskowitz, who will be lecturing at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Jan. 9, captured this shot of a bull moose and will be speaking about the “hidden lives” of regional wildlife. sive methods to study wildlife ecology and promote conservation. He helped establish the Cascade Citizen Wildlife

Monitoring Project, a citizen science effort to search for and monitor rare and sensitive wildlife in the Cascades and

other Northwest wildlands. David’s extensive experience as an outdoor educator includes training

mountaineering instructors for Outward Bound, leading wilderness expeditions throughout the western United States and in Alaska, teaching natural history seminars, and serving as the lead instructor for wildlife tracking programs at Wilderness Awareness School. David holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and outdoor education from Prescott College. David is a certified Track and Sign Specialist through Cybertracker Conservation, as well as an evaluator for this rigorous professional certification program. Contact David directly to inquire about his photography, classes and workshops or about hosting an evaluation in your region. The event takes place at the Community Cultural Center (CCC) of Tonasket, beginning at 6:30 pm, with a dinner benefiting the CCC at 5:15 pm. The dinner will be $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members; there is no charge for the presentation. OHA is a non-profit organization that works to educate the public on watershed issues. The Highland Wonders educational series features the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas. OHA’s Education Program, which is offered free of charge, is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources by helping increase awareness of local natural history. Donations are always welcome. Details are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw.

January 1, 2015 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Legals Continued From Previous Page

the exact amount you will be required to pay. Tender of payment or performance must be made to Dale L. Crandall, Attorney at Law, whose address is P.O. Box 173, Loomis, Washington 98827, telephone (509)223-3200. AFTER DECEMBER 29, 2014, YOU MAY NOT REINSTATE YOUR DEED OF TRUST BY PAYING THE BACK PAYMENTS and COSTS AND FEES AND CURING THE OTHER DEFAULTS AS OUTLINED ABOVE. In such a case, you will only be able to stop the sale by paying, before the sale, the total principal balance on the Deed of Trust in the amount of plus accrued interest, costs and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the documents and by curing the other defaults as outlined above. You may contest this default by initiating court action in the Superior Court of the county in which the sale is to be held. In such action, you may raise any legitimate defenses you have to this default. A copy of your Deed of Trust and documents evidencing the obligation secured thereby are enclosed. You may wish to consult a lawyer. Legal action on your part may prevent or restrain the sale, but only if you persuade the court of the merits of your defense. The court may grant a restraining order or injunction to restrain a trustee’s sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130 upon five days notice to the trustee of the time when, place where, and the judge before whom the application for the restraining order or injunction is to be made. This notice shall include copies of all pleadings and related documents to be given to the judge. Notice and other process may be served on the trustee at: Dale L Crandall Attorney at Law PO Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 (509) 223-3200 If you do not reinstate the secured obligations and your Deed of Trust in the manner set forth above, or if you do not succeed in restraining the sale by court action, your property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by your Deed of Trust. The effect of such sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through or under you of all interest in the property. DATED this 3rd day of September, 2014. /s/ Dale L. Crandall Dale L. Crandall, Trustee Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 11, 2014 and January 1, 2015. #OVG604271

Notice of Special Election Okanogan County, State of Washington Tuesday, February 10, 2015 A Special Election will be held in the below mentioned districts for the purpose of submitting to the voters for their approval or rejection the following. Okanogan School District No 105, Special Election - Proposition 1 Replacement Maintenance And Operation Levy Tonasket School District No 404, Special Election - Proposition 1 Bonds to Expand and Improve School Facilities Republic School District No 309, Special Election - Proposition 1 3 Year Replacement Levy For Maintenance And Operations Grand Coulee Dam School District No 301J, Special Election - Proposition 1 Replacement Maintenance And Operation Levy Curlew School District No 50, Special Election - Proposition 1 Three-Year Maintenance and Operation Levy Bridgeport School District No 75, Special Election - Proposition 1 Capital Levy For Health And Safety Improvements The registration deadline for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is January 12, 2015. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditor’s Office up to and including February 2, 2015. You can register or obtain registration forms at the Auditor’s Office, on line at www.vote.wa.gov, and Department of Licensing. The Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, will be open so voters may obtain replacement ballots, drop off voted ballots, obtain provisional ballots, and use the Accessible Voting Units, at the following times. Monday - Friday 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM January 23 - February 9, 2015 On Election Day only, February 10, 2015, 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM. Drop boxes are in 2 locations around the county. Tonasket - Tonasket City Hall/Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket Omak - Next to Police Station, 8 N Ash, Omak Drop boxes will close at 8:00PM on Election Day Voters needing additional information or assistance with voter registration forms or voting may call (509) 422-7240. Voters unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditor’s Office. Ballots require sufficient first class postage and must be postmarked by the day of the election. Check with your local Post Office for deadlines to have your ballot postmarked prop-

Title Company Fees:/$100.00/ $ 100.00 (estimated) Crumbacher Estates Owners Association dues in the sum of/$953.42/ $ 953.42 Six Monthly payments at $500.00 each: (March 5, 2014)/$3,000.00 /$5,000.00 Recording Fees:/$145.00 /$145.00 (estimated) Postage:/$ 11.00/$11.00 (estimated) Publication Fees:/$0/$300.00 (estimated) Reinstatement Fees:/$0/$250.00 TOTALS:/$6,159.42/$8,809.42 To pay off the entire obligation secured by your Deed of Trust as of the 2nd day of September 2014 you must pay a total of $22,094.56 in principal plus other costs and advances estimated to date in the amount of $2,500.00. From and after the date of this notice you must submit a written request to the Trustee to obtain the total amount to pay off the entire obligation secured by your Deed of Trust as of the payoff date. As to defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. Amount Due as of Default/Estimated as of 11 days before date of sale/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to show cure $953.42 to HOA/$953.42 plus accued interest/Proof of payment of HOA Assessments of $953.42 You may reinstate your Deed of Trust and the obligation secured thereby at any time up to December 29, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) by paying the amount set forth above and by curing any other defaults described above. Of course, as time passes, other payments may become due, and any further payments coming due and any additional late charges must be added to your reinstating payment. Any new defaults not involving payment of money that occur after the date of this Notice must also be cured in order to effect reinstatement. In addition, because some of the charges can only be estimated at this time, and because the amount necessary to reinstate may include presently unknown expenditures required to preserve the property or to comply with state or local law, it will be necessary for you to contact the Trustee before the time you tender reinstatement so that you may be advised of

Public Notices

Public Notices

III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: a. Failure to pay the following pastdue amounts, which are in arrears: Six Monthly payments at $500.00 each: (March 5, 2014 through August 5, 2014)/$3,000.00 Six Monthly late charges at $25.00 for each monthly payment not made within five (5) days of its due date/ $150.00 TOTAL PAST-DUE AMOUNTS /$3,150.00 b. Defaults other than failure to make monthly payments: Failure to pay Crumbacher Estates Owners Association dues in the sum of/$953.42 Cost of trustee’s sale guarantee for foreclosure/$300.00 Trustee’s fees and Attorney fees/ $1,250.00 TOTAL OF CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS/$2,503.42 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust referenced in (a) above is: Principal $22,094.56, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made withNOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE out warranty, express or implied, reI. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the garding title, possession, or encumundersigned Trustee will on January brances on Friday, January 9, 2015. 9, 2015, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at The default(s) referred to in parathe East entrance to the Okanogan graph III must be cured by DecemCounty Courthouse, at 149 3rd Ave- ber 29, 2014 (11 days before the nue N. Okanogan, Washington, sell sale), to cause a discontinuance of at public auction to the highest and the sale. The sale will be discontinbest bidder, payable at the time of ued and terminated if at anytime on sale, the following described real or before December 29, 2014 (11 property, situated in the County of days before the sale date), the deOkanogan, State of Washington, to- fault(s) as set forth in paragraph III and all payments becoming due wit: LOT 19, PINE CONE ESTATES, AS hereafter are paid and the Trustee’s PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED fees and costs are paid. The sale IN VOLUME H OF PLATS, SEC- may be terminated any time after TION 2, PAGE 38, RECORDS OF December 29, 2014 (11 days before THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN the sale), and before the sale by the Grantor or the Grantor’s successor in COUNTY, WASHINGTON. which is subject to that certain Deed interest or the holder of any recorded of Trust dated June 15, 2012 and junior lien or encumbrance paying recorded on July 17, 2012, under the entire principal and interest seAuditor’s File No. 3174292, records cured by the Deed of Trust, plus of Okanogan County, Washington, costs, fees and advances, if any, from Tamara Lethco, a single per- made pursuant to the terms of the son, as Grantor, to Inland Profes- obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and sional Title, LLC., as Trustee, to se- curing all other defaults. V. cure an obligation in favor of Fred L. Cook, as his separate estate, a sin- A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee gle person, as Beneficiary. to the Grantor or the Grantor’s sucII. No action commenced by the Benefi- cessor in interest at the following adTamara Lethco aka Tamaciary of the Deed of Trust or Benefi- dress: ciary’s successor is now pending to ra Daharsh 36 Oakes Drive, Tonasseek satisfaction or the obligation in ket WA 98855 by both first class any Court by reason of the Grantor’s and certified mail return receipt redefault on the obligation secured by quested on April 24, 2014 proof of the Deed of Trust. The undersigned which is in the possession of the Dale L Crandall, Attorney at Law, Trustee; and the Notice of Default has been substituted as Trustee by was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in the Beneficiary. erly. For additional information on the election or regarding voter registration. vote.wa.gov/okanogan myvote.wa. gov, Local newspaper, radio, and TV www.pdc.wa.gov Meetings of the Okanogan County Canvassing Board are open, public meetings and shall be continued until the activities for which the following meetings are held have been completed. Canvass Board meetings are held in the Okanogan County Auditor’s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, in Okanogan. Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at 11:00 AM to determine the status of any provisional or challenged ballots Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 11:00 AM to canvass the votes cast and certify the election This notice is in accordance with RCW 29A.52. Dated at Okanogan, Washington this 26th day of December, 2014. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections By Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on January 1, 2015. #OVG607809

Public Notices Paragraph I above and/or the Grantor or the Grantor’s successor in interest was personally served on with said written notice by the Beneficiary or his Trustee, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VI. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the abovedescribed property. VIII. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. DATED this 2nd day of September, 20 14. TRUSTEE: Dale L. Crandall, Attorney at Law By:/s/ Dale L. Crandall Dale L. Crandall, WSBA #32168 P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Telephone: (509) 223-3200 FAIR DEBT COLLECTIONS ACT NOTICE UNLESS YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THIS DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE OF ANY SUCH DISPUTE IN WRITING WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM RECEIVING THIS NOTICE, THIS OFFICE WILL OBTAIN VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT OR OBTAIN A COPY OF A JUDGMENT, IF ANY, AND WILL MAIL YOU A COPY OF SUCH VERIFICATION OR JUDGMENT. IF REQUESTED BY YOU IN WRITING WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS NOTICE, THIS OFFICE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. ANY SUCH REQUEST MAY NOT PREVENT US FROM FILING A LAWSUIT, OR FROM PROCEEDING WITH A LAWSUIT, IF ONE HAS BEEN FILED, WITHIN THE ABOVE TIME PERIODS. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 11, 2014 and January 1, 2015. #OVG604273

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 1, 2015

OUTDOORS

Brent Baker/staff photo

Under the watchful eye of Chief Tonasket, Churchill Clark - fourth-great grandson of William Clark of Lewis & Clark fame - demonstrates his dugout canoe, Crazy Mary, that he carved mostly at Founders Day Park this fall.

One foot in the past, the other in the present Churchill Clark brings his family legacy to life BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Churchill Clark has the look of a man who stepped out of history. The weathered face, flowing silver mane and laid back mannerisms speak of another time and place. So does the adze a hand tool the Clark uses to transform 750 pound tree trunks into the kinds of dugout canoes used by Native Americans and European explorers alike in the days of the American frontier. Many Tonasket residents met him - or at least his canoe while he spent much of the fall hollowing it out by hand in the middle of Founders Day Park. The process of completing the canoe might have gone faster, but the affable canoe artist also spent hours sharing his craft, his story and a little bit of the history of the age of American exploration of the West. He even has the blood of one of those explorers coursing through his veins. Churchill is the fourth-great grandson of William Clark, who along with Meriwether Lewis led the Corps of Discovery: a few dozen men dispatched by Thomas Jefferson in 1804 to explore the uncharted West shortly after the Louisiana Purchase. That journey covered a northwest route from St. Louis to the Pacific Ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River. And since he was five years old, Churchill Clark was determined that he would follow, as literally as possible, in his great-great-great-great grandfather’s footsteps. “My dad was trying to explain it to me,” Churchill says of that first conversation about his family history. “I was like, he was an explorer? He went camping? And Dad was like ‘Yeah, son, he went camping.’ I asked where he went - he said on a real long camping trip out west. “I said, ‘Dad, I’m going to do it.’ I had no idea what I was talking about at all, but I was going to do it.” While in high school, Churchill says he noted that the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark journey was approaching and set the goal of retracing the trail at that time. As the date approached in 2004, he discovered he wasn’t the only one with that goal in mind. “I got hooked up with these guys reenacting about a month before I went to St. Louis,” he said. “I had a one way ticket already; I was going to land in St. Louis with my backpack and get started. Instead I got thrown into a full scale reenactment with a keel boat, the men, a dog, everything. “I had a couple of cousins already in the group that I’d never

Above, Churchill Clark says that about 95 percent of his carving is done using an adze, with a little bit of help as needed from more modern tools. Left, scenes from the 2.5-year Lewis & Clark reenactment that Churchill (far left) took part in from 2004-6. Photos at left provided by Churchill Clark met. They weren’t as welcoming until they saw the family tree, then they welcomed me aboard. That was really cool and I thought William would be proud to have a couple of us out there.” A reenactment can only go so far though, especially when it can’t be staged in a closed environment (as many Civil War reenactments are). “We read Lewis and Clark’s journals daily so we were privy to what we were doing,” Churchill says. “We climbed the same hills, met a bunch of the tribes. But the tribes have moved all over the country. They’re in different places. You’ve got the dams on the rivers, the private land, especially when you’re on horseback. It wasn’t usually an issue but it can be. And riding through towns is definitely an issue on a horse.” He said it was an interesting experience, keeping one foot in the 19th century and the other in the 21st. But one of the most rewarding parts of the journey was meeting with tribes. “It’s been seven generations; the seventh generation is the one to restore the hoop,” Churchill says. “I learned through the tribes everywhere I went. It was a big deal. I met with chiefs that were descendents of the chiefs who met with William. We didn’t know what to do with the moment except make it good. They were like ‘Yeah, you look hungry, let’s get you something to eat. But let’s sweat you first.’ I got to drum in a powwow, and that was amaz-

ing. A real honor. I stayed in a Wanapum’s long house. So many examples of kindness and mutual respect out there.” Some areas of the trail, are still nearly as isolated as they were in the early 1800s. But other areas have been moved or obliterated by logging despite efforts to protect it. “Coming over Lolo Pass is about as remote as it gets,” he says. “There are even places where there are dirt ‘wannabe roads’ so you can get to certain areas. And these roads are very, very long at a slow pace. Resupplying, anything like that, well there’s no 7-11 and in some places no water. It was very much like it was for William. “There are views I will never forget up there. But there are also places where trails are being destroyed. Trees are being felled over the trail. They put up signs that say where the trail is, but it really isn’t, which is deceiving. Clear-cutting areas where they are supposed to be protecting the trail. I don’t like that at all. It’s very deceptive, but it’s really in your face when you’re out there. We really saw it on the Idaho side of Lolo. “It’s different no matter how you look at it. It was the longest reenactment that was ever done and we did it the best we could.”

PASSION RENEWED Returning to civilization after more than two years on the trail is a mentally draining prospect. The original Corps of Discovery team

struggled to reintegrate with society. Meriwether Lewis committed suicide in 1809 and has no direct descendents; two centuries later, Churchill similarly found himself suffering from depression. Things got worse before they got better. “I had a bad scooter wreck,” Churchill says. “I broke my face, my back, was blinded, lost my sense of smell and taste all at the same time. It rocked me.” He’d carved a couple of dugout canoes during the expedition, but someone gave him a cottonwood log that he began to work. “Knotty (the canoe) came to me,” Churchill says. “I went ahead and accepted this cottonwood even though I could barely see (surgery his since restored most of his sight). “I did that one and it rejuvenated me. I took it across Nebraska, still blind. That was a trip. She was about 700 pounds at the time. After the journey, I carved another 3-400 pounds out of her, she’s at about 250. She’s in North Dakota now. Knotty the Dugout Canoe.” In his travels, Churchill has carved about a dozen dugout canoes, using cottonwood, redwood, pine, whatever is available. “All the trees have a different story,” he says. “I never know where I’m getting them, how I’m getting them, who I’m getting them with, who’s going to work on it with me. “This one (in Tonasket)is going to paddle the Okanogan with me.

Down to the Columbia. I just don’t know when. It took forever for her to tell me her name, which is Crazy Mary, but she told me about the river trip about two weeks before. It was about time. We’re three blocks away from the river and she told me. It’s beautiful.” And then, he says, another one of the best parts of carving out a canoe with a personality: coming to what amounts to an agreement on the water. “You get in touch with the rivers,” Churchill says. “Once you go through the process of making one of these and you take it to the river, introduce it to the water, the three of you do the dance and she becomes a canoe. Once you do that, it’s hard to paddle plastic, you know?” And then there is the sharing, and talking about that makes Churchill’s eyes light up as much as anything, despite lingering effects from his accident. “I’m in pain 24/7,” he says of his back. “I don’t talk about it much but I have to stop on a regular basis. But it’s going to be hurting anyway; I can still do this and bring smiles to the neighborhood, open the kids’ minds, give them something creative. “It just changes their lives. You see them open their minds up to the possibilities. At first it’s like the weirdest thing they’ve ever seen, but they can’t keep their hands off it. Then they realize, every once in a while, there’s one that wants to be a canoe carver. I

show them what the adze is, tell them where to get one and tell them to go find a tree. They’re always open to that. “But it’s more about opening your mind and following your dreams, no matter what they may be.” He says he’s considering limiting his itinerant ways and possibly setting up a home base in the area. He’s still finding ways to share his art and history with others, including the descendents of the tribal leaders Lewis and Clark met with. “I’ll never be able to top the experience of the reenactment,” Churchill says. “But I’m paddling the Missouri again, soloing with my rock star canoe. I’m meeting with the tribes along the way, offering to carve canoes for them to repay their kindness. All of them have said, ‘Yes. Please!’ They’re losing their carvers and I’m booked already to do make two canoes next year. “I’m trying to plan everything out, trying to figure out how to get back here in time for Barter Faire next year.” Whether he’s talking about his two year expedition in the footsteps of his ancestor, or his canoe carving tour, Churchill Clark knows where he’s been and where he’s going, even if it’s on his own sometimes unclear path. “That was the story of the journey: the people,” he says. “It’s never the destination, it’s the ride. The people along the way make the journey what it is.”


JANUARY 1, 2015 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

SPORTS / OUTDOORS

Tonasket Booster Club Forest Service job help looking to expand Forest need to submit job applications online between Jan. 6 and Jan. 12, 2015. Approximately 50 temporary fire-related positions will be filled this summer on the OkanoganWenatchee NF. Positions in timber, recreation, botany, range, wildlife and other programs may also be available. The job announcements for these positions are located on the Forest Service Albuquerque Service Center web site at http://fsoutreach.gdcii.com/ Outreach. Position qualifications can be found at the Office of Personnel Management web site at http://www.opm.gov/

SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN

OWNF PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket Booster Club, which has been revitalized for the past four or five years, is seeking to expand its base as it tries to find ways to continue to enhance the Tonasket High School athletic programs. “ W e ’ v e done a good job of getting involved with the high school athletes’ parents,” says first year president Clint Duchow. “We also have a few of those community members that are members of just about everything that help out. “We haven’t done a good job of reaching other people that might be interested in helping out: letting them know, one, that we exist, and two, give and opportunity to help out.” Part of the issue with most high school sports: only football, basketball and volleyball bring in revenue via admissions fees on a consistent basis. Buying anything beyond basic equipment usually exceeds a school’s athletic budget, so other sources, like the booster club, are necessary for those things to happen. Considering that the parents of high school athletes already foot the bill for a number of related expenses, it’s hard to count on that limited pool to raise funds for other things such as blocking

sleds, new uniforms, scoreboards and the like. “Ultimately it’s tough to provide those things for the kids, especially for the bigger purchases,” Duchow says. “A lot of the stuff isn’t really ‘extra.’ But a cool thing that we do beyond that is the money for the kids going to state, like a $25 gift card, just to have something to buy a shirt or extra little thing. They’ve been really appreciative of that.” Duchow said one group he is hoping to help out are parents of younger athletes, whose kids could benefit from enhancements to the athletic programs for their entire high school careers rather than just a year or two after something is purchased. “People always talk about places like Cashmere or Royal, that have good teams it seems just about every year,” Duchow says. “Those are places that have all these ‘extra’ things. They’re good because they have more than just a field. They have linemen’s chutes for football, and extra goal in soccer. These additional tools can make a huge difference in what coaches and athletes can do.” The club now has an active Facebook page at https:// w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / p a g e s / Tonasket-Athletic-B o oster-

Club/282263545125031. In addition to equipment, the club is hoping to raise funds for a digital readerboard to replace the antiquated board near U.S. Bank; scoreboards; updated the basketball record boards; and possibly purchase a track and field record board. One project that should be completed this year will be a Tonasket athletic “Wall of Fame” featuring state champion and runner up teams and athletes, of which Duchow said there were more than the club had expected. “I think the first one was Ed Buchert in track or something back in 1936,” he said. “No one realizes how many state champions we’ve had at Tonasket because memories tend to be short and for a lot of programs its been tough the past few years.” Typically the club’s primary fundraiser is the annual dessert auction, which in 2015 is slated for mid-March. “Last year we raised something like $6,600. Physicals are our other fundraiser. But there are only so many desserts you can sell. We’re trying to get it to where membership dues are our main driver of revenue.” Duchow added that the booster club’s growth over the past few years has already help enhance the athletic programs more than it had for awhile. “Five or six years ago there wasn’t much going on,” he says. “Kacy Braman did a lot to change that, and Kirsten Williams did it for a couple of years and helped it expand more. “We’re just trying to continue that momentum.”

TONASKET - The Tonasket Ranger District is hosting a workshop to assist those interested in obtaining summer employment with the Okanogan Wenatchee National Forest. The workshop will be Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Okanogan PUD building in Okanogan. Staff will be on hand to explain the hiring process to interested applicants. People planning to apply for temporary fire jobs on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

HEALTH CARE

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

 

Call Charlene at 476-3602

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

Healthcare Services

Call today and see your ad in this space next week!

(509) 826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

YOUR AD HERE

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

CLINIC

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

Physician-owned and patient-centered

509-826-1800

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

OMAK

Anti Coagulation Clinic Ophthalmology  Radiology  Behavioral Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program 

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

OXYGEN SERVICE

OPTICAL

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. CHRISTMAS EVE: 5 P.M. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

We would be honored to work with you!

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God Your Complete Respiratory Equipment Center l Oxygen Concentrators l Portable Concentrators l Sleep Apnea Equipment l Nebulizers l Home Sleep Tests l

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Trinity Episcopal Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm 602 Central Ave., Oroville “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday Holy Rosary Catholic Church The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket Warden • 476-2022 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

Seventh-Day Adventist 

qualifications/. To apply visit the USA Jobs website at www.usajobs.gov; while there be sure to allocate enough time to create a user account and build an applicant profile. Information about summer employment for fire related positions is available from Jason Heinz at 509-664-9235 or Assistant Training Officer Taija Corso at 509-664-9346. Information is also available on the Forest Service outreach website https://fsoutreach.gdcii. com/Outreach where people can search for jobs and find duty locations and vacancy announcement numbers.

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. CHRISTMAS EVE: 7 P.M. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

Open: Monday - Friday

Office: 509-826-1688

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

646 Okoma Drive, Suite D, Omak

YOUR AD HERE

Call Charlene today and see your ad in this section 509-476-3602 ext. 3050 or 509-322-5712

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 509- 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 1, 2015

OBITUARIES

COMMUNITY CALENDAR STROKE SUPPORT GROUP

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group will meet on Wednesday, Dec. 31 at 10:30 a.m. in the Oroville Free Methodist Church at 1516 Fir Street. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a presentation and discussion. There will be refreshments.

PLANNING FOR FIRE SEASON 2015 MEETING

BREWSTER - Reps. Brian Blake and Joel Kretz will host “Planning for Fire Season 2015” on Monday, Jan. 5 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Brewster High School Library, 503 S. 7th St., Brewster. Legislators and invited local and state officials including Peter Goldmark, Commissioner of Public Lands, and Frank T. Rogers, Okanogan County Sheriff, as well as Chuck Duffy, Washington State Fire Marshal, among others will be in attendance at this public information meeting.

LOCAL WILDLIFE EXPERT

TONASKET - Join David Moskowitz - expert wildlife tracker, photographer, author, and outdoor educator - for an evening of amazing photographs and tales exploring the hidden stories of our region’s wildlife on Friday, Jan. 9. From the tiniest shrews to bears and cougars, the signs of wild animals are around us yearround, waiting to be discovered by the observant outdoor adventurist. Dinner is at 5:15 p.m. with the presentation at 6:30 at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Presentation is free; dinner is $7.50 for CCC members and $8.50 for non-members.

SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP

TONASKET - A self-defense workshop appropriate for anyone 18 or older, male or female, will be held Saturday, Jan. 10 from 10:00 a.m.-noon at Oroville High School. The cost is $50 per person. Instructor Randy Middleton, certified in techniques developed by fifthdegree Master Terry Cariker, will conduct the training. The two hour workshop begins with basic training and is also excellent for senior citizens. For further

information and pre-registration contact Randy Middleton at 509-429-2200.

her hand-made knitted goods. Jude was a wonderful person who was full of adventure, forgiveness, kindness and spirit. She will be missed dearly. A memorial service will be held at the Cultural Community Center of Tonasket on Wednesday, January 7th, 2015 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. It will be a potluck and all friends of Jude are welcome. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

TRANSIT AUTHORITY BOARD MEETING

OMAK - The Okanogan County Transit Authority (OCTA) monthly board meeting will be held on Monday, Jan. 12, 2015 at 307 S. Main St. #4 in Omak. Call 509-557-6177 with questions. Regular meetings will be held on the second Monday of each month. Visit the OCTA website at www.okanogantransit.com.

TONASKET FOOD BANK

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

LISTING YOUR ITEM

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Jude Hockman

JUDE HOCKMAN Jude Hockman, 68, of Tonasket, Wash. died in the early morning of December 14th, 2014 losing an unexpected battle with cancer. She passed away in the home of granddaughter, Alexandra Hockman and she also leaves behind a daughter, Jean Hockman (aunt to Alexandra), a sister Susan Belger and many friends. Jude came to Tonasket in 1999 with Alexandra to begin a new life. She participated in Market Fair, a group of businesses that resided in what is now Christina’s Furniture Shop. She went to school in Wenatchee to become a barber and owned a storefront on Tonasket Main Street as The Lady Barber. Even after retiring the business she was active in the community – She would attend the local spring Farmer’s Market selling doggie treats and

Jenny Mateo. She was preceded in death by her brother, Patrick G. Kelly. In lieu of flowers, should you wish, please make any contributions in Maureen’s name to the American Cancer Society. A Memorial with family and friends to follow this summer. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

MAUREEN L. KELLY Maureen L. Kelly left us to be with Our Heavenly Father on the morning of December 18, 2014, peacefully in her sleep. This is not how she came into the world-she was premature, so she was born fighting for her life. From this, she derived her great strength and passion for everything she attempted and ultimately overcame. She was an ardent lover of music, the arts, education, antiques, animals and all things beautiful. She loved her mountains and her forests, and was fiercely proud of her Irish heritage. She was touched by her multitude of friends and was much-loved by all who knew her in Chesaw and elsewhere. She returned the love ten-fold. “Grandmama” was so proud of her grandson, Robert, a recent graduate of the University of Colorado, Boulder. Maureen was 67-years-old. She leaves behind a daughter, Kerry M. McIntosh (Dale) and grandson, Robert E. Adamson, as well as her dearest best friend,

Steven Curtis Long

STEVEN CURTIS LONG Steven Curtis Long of Stringer, Miss. passed away December 27, 2014 after a tough battle with cancer. He was born in Aberdeen, Wash. on May 23, 1956 Steve attended high school in Tonasket, Wash. Although Steve did not seek a college degree, he continued his education through self-study and completing many voc-tech classes at several col-

leges and vocational technical schools throughout the Gulf Coast region of the United States. Steve went on to become a merchant sailor, attaining his oceans captain’s license and sailing the world’s oceans and seas, working principally in the marine petrochemical industry. Steve never met a stranger and was rarely seen without a smile on his face, he had a heart of gold and would help anybody anytime that he could be it spiritual, muscle, or monetary that their needs might be. Preceding Steve in death are his father Ron Long of Reno, Nev.; stepfather Richard Long of Pleasant Hill, Ill; brother Dirk Long of Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. Surviving Steve are his mother Nadean Fisher, stepfather Ike Fisher, sisters Sherrie Thomas and Ronni Sandoval, all of Tonasket Wash., sister Christine Richiey and stepbrother Mel Fisher both of Spokane Valley, Wash., step brother and step sister Terry Fisher and Pam Fisher of Spokane, Wash. Other survivors include stepson Rorrick Ward of Placitas N.M., step brother Ron Fisher of Radcliff, Ky., brother Mark Long of Taylorsville, Miss. and many aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces, and nephews scattered across the country. Steve will be sorely and sadly missed by friends and family. A memorial celebration of Steve’s life will be held at a later date.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 01, 2015  

January 01, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 01, 2015  

January 01, 2015 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune