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ESTHER BRICQUES CAROLS

YOUNG WRESTLING, BASKETBALL TEAMS SHOW PROGRESS

Christmas Caroling at the winery Thursday, Dec. 18, 6:30 pm

See Sports, Pages A10-11

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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North Valley Hospital District CEO resigns Michel cites new round of backlash for early retirement BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital District Administrator Linda Michel tendered her resignation to the NVH Board of Commissioners Thursday, Dec. 11, following a lengthy executive session at the end of that evening’s board meeting. Michel, who said she had originally planned to retire in Oct. 2015, moved that date up to April 3. Michel said she would have no public

Attorney General calls defendants ‘scammers’

comment at this time, other than the Michel wrote in her letter. “Nor am I contents of her letter of resignation. willing to watch the Senior Leadership In a letter dated Dec. 4, she cited Team - a highly intelligent, moral, carthe latest round of backlash ing, and committed team - put over her attempts to deal with through the stress of un-truths financial losses of North Valley and speculation about their Assisted Living. At a commisintelligence or capabilities. They sioners’ meeting last month she have sacrificed their most preput forth a plan to form a pair cious gifts, time and family, to of committees: one to find a make the best recommendations way to save the nursing home, for the District as a whole, with and another to determine what Linda Michel little or no appreciation, but very steps would be required to close vocal criticism.” it if such a plan didn’t come to fruition. Michel recalled some of the issues that Critics have accused Michel, the com- arose surrounding the closing of North missioners and the administrative staff of Valley Assisted Living in 2013. intending to shut the facility down. “It was a time of personal accusations, “I am no longer willing to have my inaccurate information, and unproducintegrity or intelligence questioned,” tive actions against the District, when

it was the Governmental Agencies and their reimbursement practices that made such action necessary,” Michel wrote. “These actions put undue stress on the entire staff working for the District. Now with the current estimated financial situation of our 2015 budget, this cycle seems to be beginning again.” Michel was hired in 2010 with the hospital district nearly $3 million in debt to Okanogan County, and with a directive to remedy the district’s debt obligations. During her tenure NVH has climbed out of debt but no longer has the option of borrowing money from the county. “I have thus fulfilled my commitment to the Commissioners, and feel that forward movement of the District will be hampered by my presence here as CEO,” she wrote.

Tonasket Pool Association unveils new plan for city pool

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

SEE LAWSUIT | PG A2

SEE NVH | PG A3

Pool plan gets blessing

MOMENTUM BUILDING FOR TONASKET POOL

Former Tonasket School Superintendent target of lawsuit

OLYMPIA – Randall Hauff, a former superintendent of the Tonasket School District, has been named a co-defendant in a lawsuit claiming he defrauded Medicaid in order to benefit financially. Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson says a Wenatchee-based school consultant company provided fraudulent Medicaid training to districts statewide. The Attorney General’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit filed the lawsuit Dec. 4 allegedly JT Educational Consultants (JTEC) provided fraudulent training to dozens of school districts around the state, leading to tens of millions of dollars in false Medicaid claims. The defendants are Thomas and Sheila Reese, their company, JT Educational Consultants (JTEC), and several employees and contract consultants including Hauff, Scott Adolf, Jack Hedgcock and Janine Welty. “These scammers lined their pockets with millions of dollars meant to serve the healthcare needs of Washington children and families,” said Ferguson. “This fraud will not be tolerated. If you steal from the Medicaid system, my office will hold you accountable.” Washington’s Medicaid program provides a critical safety net of healthcare services to low income residents. Through a reimbursement program known as the Medicaid Administrative Claiming program, participating school districts may receive Medicaid reimbursement for administrative costs they incur that directly support the provision of healthcare services to Medicaid eligible students. This lawsuit targets a group of individuals, including former school administrators and employees, who built a grossly profitable consulting business by marketing a corrupted version of this program, according to the AG’s office. JTEC was the consulting company for the Centralia School District, which settled related allegations for $372,000 in July. Rather than helping school districts obtain reimbursement for legitimate costs incurred helping Medicaid eligible students obtain necessary health care services, the defendants gamed the system and received millions of dollars in “consulting” fees by causing the districts to file tens of millions of dollars of false claims between 2005 and 2014, alleges the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit. “They did this by misrepresenting the

TENSIONS HIGH AT BOARD MEETING A number of passionate speeches and statements, as well as questioning by Commissioner Teresa Hughes, highlighted a tense Board of Commissioners meeting that focused on the possible fate of the nursing home, as well as opinions on hospital district finances. Chief Information Officer Kelly Cariker, speaking on his own behalf in the public comment portion of the meeting, asked that all parties concerned about the nursing home and the hospital district as a whole find a way to work together. “At one point we were $3.8 million in debt,” he said. “We dug our way out,

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council voted Tuesday, Dec. 9, to draft a resolution in support of the Tonasket Swimming Pool Association’s fledgling plan to construct a new swimming pool to replace the one that was condemned more than three years ago. The citizens’ committee has spent that past year working up a plan that would serve the needs of the community while also being affordable. “We really needed a pool that would serve our purposes, would be easy to maintain, and would be something Tonasket could be proud of,” said association president Norm Weddle, adding that the plan the committee settled on differed from the preliminary designs the city paid Pool World for nearly a year ago. “It’s not that the Pool World designs weren’t a good idea. They seemed to us to be expensive to maintain; the other thing is they would encroach on the park and take quite a bit of space. This design would fit the footprint of the old pool. It may go a few feet into the park, but mostly back toward the parking lot.” Weddle said there were a number of “minimum requirements” that the association decided any plan must include:

The Tonasket Swimming Pool Association, a nonprofit citizens’ group dedicated to getting a new swimming pool built, unveiled its preliminary drawings for a pool they say “will be easy to maintain, and something Tonasket could be proud of.”

Drawings supplied by Tonasket Swimming Pool Association

SEE POOL | PG A2

Wool co-op plans Oroville mill by spring Group buys former warehouse BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The local chapter of the North American Wool Co-op has big plans for fiber production, resurrecting an industry, as well as a one-time apple warehouse in Oroville. The chapter was started in 2013 by Australian-born Vicki Eberhart, whose family goes back generations as sheep farmers and wool and meat producers in her home country. After coming to the U.S. and settling in the Okanogan Highlands, Eberhart says she looked around and saw there was a need for fiber producers in the state and helped form the Washington Chapter of the North American Wool Co-op, whose headquarters are now in Oroville. Speaking at the Thursday, Dec. 11, Oroville Chamber of Commerce meeting, Eberhart said, “I come from

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 51

Australia where a whole industry was built on the back of sheep. When I arrived in the U.S. about 12 years ago there wasn’t much of a wool industry here.” She said she went to California and was surprised to be able to purchase Tasmanian sheep, a breed developed in Australia. “They are from an area very similar to this area here in Washington,” she said, adding that in the U.S. it seems most sheep are raised for their meat and that the wool goes to waste, often ending up as “compost.” “In Australia they raise sheep to produce both meat and wool. In certain years you might earn money on one or the other, but in a good year you have both markets and make double the money.” Scott Turnbull is the chairman of the co-op, he said their goal was to address many of the problems local producers have with shipping their wool. “Much of the wool ends up in landfills; that’s why we wanted to start a community owned and operated mill. We thought of locating it in the highlands, but decided it is more practical to locate it here where there are

SEE WOOL MILL | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

existing buildings and it would be easier for farmers to ship to,” said Turnbull. The co-op has purchased the old Thorndike apple warehouse near the end of Kernan Road, next to the Similkameen River Trail trailhead. The site has four existing buildings and one will be used as an office. “We are convinced there are long term benefits to starting the mill here for Oroville and the surrounding communities,” said Turnbull, who presented at the meeting along with Eberhart and Sally Facer, the secretary for the organization. “We want to connect the fiber producers with the mill.” Turnbull said in addition to giving wool and other fiber producers a place to have their products milled, the group has taken steps to increase the quality of fibers by training “graders” who can go to farms to help grade the types of fiber before it is shipped to the mill. So far 22 people have been trained, with five apprentices.

Cops & Courts A4 , A12 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Obituaries Classifieds

A7 A8-9

Sports A10-11 Santa Letters B1-4


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

CIVIC PAYOFF

POOL | FROM A1

Brent Baker/staff photo

In October, Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb and Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth wagered two boxes of apples on the result of the Tonasket-Oroville High School football game. Tonasket won the game, and on Friday Spieth (left) delivered on his promised payoff, trekking to Tonasket to drop the apples off at City Hall with (l-r) Tonasket ASB officers Chad Edwards and Jensen Sackman, ASB adviser Anita Asmussen and Plumb. Half of the apples were donated to the Tonasket Food Bank, while the other half proved to be a healthy game-time snack for the crowd at that evening’s Tonasket High School basketball games.

LAWSUIT | FROM A1 rules of the program, including in training presentations, written training materials, and other communications with the districts, so that the districts would submit false claims for reimbursement and the defendants could take a percentage of the ill-gotten funds,” writes the AG’s office in a press release. “When the agency responsible for administering Medicaid moved to implement a computerbased system that would have enabled districts to more easily and accurately identify costs truly reimbursable under the administrative claiming program, the defendants strenuously opposed the effort and fought hard to preserve the paper based system that was central to the survival of their unlawful enterprise.” In this lawsuit, the state will ask for the return of the ill-gotten Medicaid funds and substantial civil penalties for the false Medicaid claims. Based upon information provided by the Reeses, MFCU investigators estimate that between 1998 and 2011 JTEC netted $12.6 million in consulting fees from school districts. In recent years, this company alone took between 6 and 8 percent of the total Medicaid Administrative Claiming reimbursement coming into the state. The release said neither the Reeses nor their employees or contractors have any special Medicaid training. Most are retired school district employees.

LOCAL SUPERINTENDENTS DISCUSS PROGRAM Current Tonasket School Superintendent Paul Turner and Oroville School Superintendent Steve Quick talked about the history of the JTEC program in the schools they have been associated with. Back in the late 1990s, early 2000s, Medicaid had the idea that school districts were doing some of their referral work and felt the need to reimburse districts for that work. So school districts started jumping on this and getting reimbursement funds from Medicaid, according to Turner. “In this case, JT Educational Consultants started up... they helped school districts work through the government paperwork to manage that,” said Turner at the Tonasket district’s last school board meeting. “What we have now is the Attorney General’s office has just indicted JTEC for Medicaid fraud. “JTEC has had or has over 90 school districts with which they were consulting. We have been one of them. Omak has also been one and I’m not sure who else int he valley. Last spring we were looking at how much money we were getting from Medicaid Match... basically we weren’t even making enough to pay for the consultant. So this fall before this came out, we’d already dropped JTEC and quit doing Medicaid Match. It wasn’t worth our time.” Turner, said called the Attorney General’s office and asked about the ramifications. “According to them, they are going after JTEC which allegedly took advantage of the school districts. What he told me was the indictment listed all the how and why of it. They are going after the company which over 10 or 12 years time made millions off of this,” said Turner, who added that the AG’s office saw the school districts as victims. “He could not say what HCA - Health Care Authority - will do. But we are not their target. The Attorney General won’t be asking us for money - they don’t do that,” said Turner. “HCA could do that; that is still out there and we don’t know what that is. They did collect $300,000 and some back from Centralia and it sounds like they were pretty blatant on some of the claims they made. I am talking with other districts and as I receive more information I’ll let the board know where it is at. Tonasket is mentioned there several times.” Oroville’s school superintendent said when he first got to Oroville the district was still in the program and had been in it when he was in Forks, Wash. as well. “We were still getting money when I first got here, from 2005 to 2007 at least. But then the Medicaid Match regulations became so cumbersome we stopped doing it,” said Quick. Any time the someone met with a student in the district regarding a social service, counselors and teachers, it could be claimed under the program, according to Quick. “It seems like the high school was getting around $10,000 or more a year.” said Quick. “It was loose at the beginning... toward the end of the program it was tightened up and the claims became fewer and fewer and we just stopped using the program.”

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• 75 foot long, six lane pool to accommodate a swim team; • ADA access for the disabled; • safety for children, which includes shallow-depth areas for play, as well as formulating regulations for parental guidance of small children; • a 1-meter diving board, placed to minimize the diving well and maximizing the shallow areas; • new bath house facility. The project will likely cost somewhere from $1.0-1.5 million. Weddle added that after looking into an enclosed, year-round pool, that it was not a viable option, agreeing with earlier assessments as to the financial burden. “However,” Weddle said, “a pool that is in a rectangular shape would lend itself to adding a bubble for extending the season ... that’s one reason we wanted to pull it into this kind of dimension.” The proposal includes solar water heaters to help keep the pool heated overnight during the summer. At this point the association is attempting to raise all of the require funds privately, rather than applying for state or federal grants. By doing so, the project could also accept some in-kind donations and volunteer labor, while accepting government funds would eliminate that possibility; however, donated funds could also be used if the association applied for a grant that required matching funds. “We didn’t like the idea of having to pay somebody to come in and build a pool,” Weddle said. “It wants to build the pool with local money ... we have about $430,000 committed so far. “We are a 501(c)3 ... we can take donations and give you a tax deductible receipt.” Contributions can be mailed to Tonasket Pool Association, P.O. Box 1217, Tonasket, 98855 and more information can be found at the association’s website, www. tonasketpool.com. Council member Scott Olson asked if the committee had planned on how annual maintenance costs - which at various times have been estimated at anywhere from $3050,000 - would be paid. “This is great; how do we pay the maintenance?” he asked. “We haven’t been able to find the money to put in our budget even what we used to put in.” “We’ve talked about, after raising the money for the pool, of trying to put together an endowment,” Weddle said. “It might take a few years to work through that. There’s also a group of people very interested in trying to go for a parks and recreation district ... the problem with that is you don’t want too big an idea of what you want to do. People would need to know exactly what it’s for.” City planner Kurt Danison, who has advised the city on most things involving the pool for

years, approved of the association’s work. “I think it’s a great idea,” he said. “Supporting them to move ahead with this is awesome. You’re not being asked at this point to apply for grant funds, you’ve asked the right questions about maintenance ... “You’re not comitting the city to any course of action other than to approve this group of private citizens to move forward with the design of a pool that someday, if they’re successful in raising the money, they’ll be building in History Park.”

BUDGET APPROVED The council formally approved its 2015 budget, with revenues and expenditures projected to be $2,807,843. The most significant expenses included the sewer fund ($445,100), law enforcement ($431,232), water fund ($431,190), sewer reserve ($331,600), city streets ($186,302) and government services ($111,833). The primary sources of revenue included $552,407 in taxes (led by $248,000 in retail sales tax, $93,657 in general property tax and $85,000 in PUD utility taxes); water fund revenues ($431,190); sewer fund revenues ($445,100); and a variety of transportation taxes and funds ($185,302 total). Council member Scott Olson expressed his appreciation to clerk/treasurer Alice Attwood for her work in building the budget after months of council and committee discussions. “I just appreciate her effort in getting this budget together,” he said. “It really reflects what we’re about.” POLICE STATION ROOF DETERIORATING City manager Hugh Jensen said he was trying to find a way to deal with the leaky roof of the police department. Extensive repairs are likely needed, though the building itself is old enough that such a project would not be worth undertaking. “That roof is in very bad shape,” Jensen said. “Really bad. It must be 60 years old, and it wasn’t put on properly (to begin with)... It’s past its life.” “That building is beyond repair,” Plumb said. Vugteveen said that the police station needed to be moved to the top three of the infrastructure priority list. “We’ve discussed it for years,” she said. “We agree on it but we’ve never moved forward with anything.” Plumb asked Police Chief Rob Burks for an assessment of what the department needs. He said that permit administrator Christian Johnson had done such an assessment at the time the fire hall was built. “He said that to tear down and put in a new building would cost about $440,000, and that was four or five years ago,” Burks said. This was the Tonasket city council’s last meeting of the year; the council next meets on Tuesday, Jan. 13, at 7:00 p.m.

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DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

NVH | FROM A1

WOOL MILL | FROM A1

and it wasn’t easy ... We don’t do everything right. We’re just human. We’re a smart group of people. We really care about this community ... “There has to be some healing and there has to be some trust. If the community can’t trust the people at this table, we’re not going to be able to save this district, no matter what happens.” He responded to suggestions that some elective surgeries be sent to other hospitals, saying that it could start a cycle that could result in the loss of services and dozens of jobs. “Something that seems to make sense in the paper, at first look, can be difficult,” he said. “We’re over an abyss, on a tight rope with a balance pole. Someone said last week it’s Rube Goldberg machine on how we get paid. That’s the truth. If we go upsetting the balance, we’re going to drop into that abyss. “If you don’t trust us, and if we don’t work together, we’re not going to save this district ... we need to be on the same side.” Kristen Super said that closing the nursing home would cost the hospital as well. “People will leave the area because they moved here to take care of their family members,” she said. “It will trickle down to the hospital ... how many patients use physical therapy, lab, x-ray, other facilities in the hospital? They use the ER a lot too. If we lose that, what are we going to do? Hope the general public gets sick a lot?” Super suggested putting together a “restructure” committee. “We will look at who has what job, what their job description is, what their wages are, how many people have been added since Linda got on board, and financial issues as far as how the two facilties are run. I know it can work, absolutely, not a shadow of a doubt.” Board Chair Helen Casey followed with words of her own. “We made a committee for a success strategy, not a closure committee,” Casey said. “We appointed Teresa Hughes (to run the committee) and to have people to help. It wasn’t about restructuring. It’s about doing what we need to do to do it right.” She lauded the work of Michel and her administrative team. “We were in trouble - big trouble - whether you like it or not,” Casey said. “We were far, far in the hole. We made difficult decisions. They weren’t popular and won’t be. But I have to tell you this group of people have had your best interest all along. You can shake your head and say no, but you’re wrong.” Casey said that even the possibility of closing the nursing home had “gone viral” but that the district had to be prepared if a plan to save it couldn’t be enacted in time. “We have things we need to do,” she said. “We need everybody’s help. Everyone has great ideas. But we have to structure it right. It can’t be accusing. “There was a long time I couldn’t even go out in the community (two years ago). At the grocery store I was asked if I needed a bodyguard. We shouldn’t have to go there. Anybody in this room shouldn’t have to go there. Being ridiculed for doing the job. I trust and respect Linda for what she has done.” She repeated that the goal was not to close the nursing home.

BY THE NUMBERS A number of salary comparisons were shared during last Thursday’s Board of Commissioners meeting. In order to get a clearer picture of such comparisons, searches of the Department of Health and Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction yielded the following data. It should be noted that none of these figures take into account years of service, qualifications, prior experience, the size of the various districts or other factors that could affect compensation packages.

HOSPITAL EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 2013 (Department of Health figures)

Name Facility Compensation* J. Scott Graham Coulee Community Hospital, Grand Coulee $226,060 Michael Billing Mid-Valley Hospital, Omak $222,886 Kevin Abel Lake Chelan Community Hospital, Chelan $179,302 Linda Michel North Valley Hospital, Tonasket $173,952 O.E. Hufnagel Three Rivers Hospital, Brewster $161,907 *Compensation includes salary, bonus, non-taxable benefits (Ferry County Hospital did not report in 2013 and 2012 figures were for a partial year)

SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT COMPENSATION 2013-14 School Year (Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction figures)

(School districts included in the above hospital districts) Name District Compensation* Robert Manahan Lake Chelan School District $154,946 Paul Turner Tonasket School District $146,389 Kenneth Swanson Omak School District $145,229 Thomas Venable Methow Valley School District $144,742 Dennis Carlson Grand Coulee School District $134,016 Matthew Charlton Manson School District $131,904 Eric Driessen Brewster School District $131,204 Steve Quick Oroville School District $126,954 Richard Johnson Okanogan School District $125,772 Scott Sattler Bridgeport School District $111,947 James Dean Evans Coulee-Hartline School District $106,089 Michael Hull Pateros School District $98,322 *Includes salary, bonus/stipends, insurance benefits “The goal is to provide education to the community and to our legislators: the state and federal government have our hands tied. It’s not something we can do differently,” she said. Hughes reported on the first meeting of the “Save the Nursing Home” committee and said she felt the committee needed a year to come up with a solution, rather than the March deadline they were initially given. “The public needs more information on how Medicaid reimbursements are calculated,” she said. “How the district funds are allocated to the Hospital and Long Term Care divisions. They want the nursing home to stay open. This is their facility: this is not a private business. It is a publicly owned entity. I believe the public has spoken loud and clear and we need to find a solution.” Informational binders are being put together, grant and fundraising options are being researched, and volunteers for legislative and levy subcommittees are being sought, she said. “I feel the real elephant in the room is that there weren’t enough internal cuts made before we decided we needed to ‘save the nursing home,’” she said. “This is a public entity, not a private corporation. We need to get the management salaries in line with those in the Tonasket and Oroville area.” She said that Michel’s salary, which she said was $176,966, was significantly higher than the salaries of the Tonasket and Oroville School District superintendents, which she said were paid $120,000 and $100,000, respectively, and the Tonasket District Ranger’s pay, which she said was between $80-120,000.

Out on the Town...

She also said that raises given to senior leaders since 2010 would have cut out half of the nursing home’s losses if the monies had been allocated there instead. “How is it acceptable for a facility that was in warrants to do this?” she asked, calling it “shameful.” (Editor’s note: the details of administrative raises, as well as cuts to administrative staff, were covered in an extensive article and editorial in the April 4, 2013 issue of the Gazette-Tribune, which can be found online under the “Green Edition” tab at www. gazette-tribune.com.) Hughes moved to close the Drip Line cafe, which died for lack of receiving a second; she also questioned the opening of a physical therapy office in Oroville; and suggested that in the 2013 budget/income statement that showed the Long Term Care $300,000 in the black. “What has changed so drastically?” she asked. Hughes asked Cariker if it were too late to back out of the continuing with the next phases of the boiler replacement project. The district accepted a $500,000 grant to help with the first phase of the project to replace the 60-plus year old boilers, completed last year, that was contingent on continuing with the rest of the project. “Is it too late to consider backing out of that?” she asked. “What is the full cost?” Cariker said there was about $1.2 million of work left on the project. “We paid around $600,000,” he said. “The first run was a little over $500,000 and we paid for that out of cash on hand. We received the grant afterwards. That money was put aside to continue on with the

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project, and we’ve been using it for that purpose.” During the annual committee appointments, Hughes was placed on the finance committee at her request, serving with Casey, and giving up her spot on the CQI committee with Dick Larson to trade out with Herb Wandler, who had previously served on finance. Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt also reported that as of Thursday afternoon the district had $159,726 cash on hand and had not been in warrants for 28 consecutive days. The commissioners next meet on Thursday, Jan. 8.

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Eberhart said the Australian wool industry “hit a bump in the road” in the 1970s and 1980s, but by banding together farmers were able to turn the industry around. She’d like to see farmers do the same thing in Washington and other states. “Farmers seem to be the only industry where they pay retail price for everything and turn around and get paid wholesale,” she said. By forming their own cooperative Eberhart and the NAWC would like to change that and be in charge of what the farmers get paid for their product. She said the co-op sent out a call for wool and other fibers and within two weeks they had 1000 pounds worth. “We thought we’d get 200, maybe 300 pounds,” she said, adding that the organization has brought in locals who know about working with wool, including Oroville’s Betty Roberts, “The Spinning Lady,” perhaps best known for her hand-crafted spinning wheels. “She gave advice on how to wash the wool. She wants to find a way to help farmers, especially sheep farmers who lost their wool pool,” Eberhart said. “We are not trying to reinvent the wheel, we are going back to the methods our grandparents used and improve upon them.” The mill the group envisions should be operational by spring and is being called an “Eco Mill” both for what it can do for the economy and the environment, according to Eberhart. The group is starting small with equipment purchased overseas, but plans to grow to a point where they can process 2000 pounds a month. “We want to create this for the next generation; we need our grandparents’ skills to be passed on and we desire natural fibers in balance with our natural environment,” she said. While wool products have been replaced with other man-made fibers, wool is starting to make a comeback and still is desirable in the outdoors community and for things like the fishing industry – valued for its warmth to weight ratio and its ability to stay warm when wet. Marino wool, sometimes called “Smart Wool” commands high prices for its softness and warmth. They want to become a local “Pendleton” with the cache that name brings to those who purchase wool clothing and other products. In fact, the Pendleton Company has given the start-up some advice and may be a future market for some of the Eco Mill’s output. And wool isn’t the only thing the mill will be able to handle, the co-op lists everything from alpacas to musk ox. There looking at goat, for cashmere and mohair; rabbit, for angora; and silk worm for Mulberry silk. There are also non-animal fibers, like hemp, flax, bamboo and cotton that can be processed, according to the co-ops powerpoint presentation. For the 2015 roll out the goal for the mill is to be producing carding, roving, batting, felting and quilts; in 2016: spinning, washing, blending, dying and yarn and in 2017: weaving, blankets, rugs and have a shop front. A new product said Eberhart uses the by-products which might normally go to waste. They are woven into a “mulch mat” that can be used as a weed barrier that fertilizes at the same time for gardeners. Producers will get a check for their wool, making it viable to remain in business and allow them to expand their flock, she said. The mill will also be high-tech and allow the farmer, even if they are across the country, to view their wool online as it goes through the processing from washing to milling. She said producers’ fiber won’t just get dumped in with another’s, giving them more incentive to raise higher quality fiber. “They won’t just get their product back and say ‘what happened to my beautiful wool’ because it was dumped in with lesser quality wool like happens in other places,” she said, adding that the co-op will be training their farmers on grading. “We’d like to change the way of thinking and become more community-minded. This isn’t for us, this is a gift to the next generation,” she said. Facer added, “It would be so nice to make a little bit of money with our sheep... make a better product and be more competitive.” The plan is to start in Washington State and have a truck go out and pick up the fiber, cutting down on shipping costs to the farmer. The co-op will also send out graders on shearing days. Stock in the mill can be obtained a variety of ways through membership, work on site or outright investment. There is even a way for 4-H students to volunteer and become part owners in the mill. For more information contact nwacsecretary@gmail.com or call 509-485-3262.

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTS CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT Criminal

Dylan Thomas James Counts, 20, Omak, pleaded guilty Dec. 11 to second-degree burglary, second-degree theft and thirddegree malicious mischief. Counts was sentenced to 14 months in prison and fined $1,612.87, including $502.37 in restitution. The crimes occurred Jan. 26. In a separate case, the court dismissed Dec. 11 a charge against Counts: second-degree possession of depictions of minors engaged in sexually explicit conduct. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. The court found probable cause to charge Brandon Shea Marchand, 40, Okanogan, with second-degree possession of stolen property and obstruction. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 25. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Charlie Atkins, 23, Oroville, with second-degree assault (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Nov. 21. The court found probable cause to charge Manuel Cabrera Jr., no middle name listed, 25, Omak, with first-degree burglary (DV), second-degree assault (DV), interfering with reporting (DV) and third-

degree theft (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Chantelle Rose Mendivil, 18, Oroville, with first-degree possession of stolen property, two counts of possession of a stolen motor vehicle, first-degree burglary, residential burglary, seconddegree burglary, first-degree theft, second-degree theft and theft of a motor vehicle. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 1-2. The court found probable cause to charge Samantha Garcia, no middle name listed, 24, Oroville, with first-degree possession of stolen property, two counts of possession of a stolen motor vehicle, firstdegree burglary, residential burglary, second-degree burglary, first-degree theft, second-degree theft and theft of a motor vehicle. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 1-2. The court found probable cause to charge Tyler Scott Fife, 20, Oroville, with first-degree burglary, residential burglary, second-degree burglary, firstdegree theft, second-degree theft, first-degree possession of stolen property, two counts of possession of a stolen motor vehicle, theft on a motor vehicle, theft of a firearm, POCS (Vicodin), POCS (ecstasy), and two counts of third-degree malicious mis-

chief. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 1-2. The court found probable cause to charge Sean Lee Dahlquist, 23, Oroville, with first-degree burglary, residential burglary, second-degree burglary, firstdegree theft, second-degree theft, first-degree possession of stolen property, two counts of possession of a stolen motor vehicle, two counts of theft of a motor vehicle, theft of a firearm, second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, possession of a stolen firearm, POCS (Vicodin), two counts of second-degree malicious mischief, and one count of first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 1-2. In a separate case, the court found probable cause to charge Dahlquist with second-degree theft, third-degree malicious mischief and two counts of second-degree burglary. Those crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 16. The court found probable cause to charge Gary Ray Raub, 26, Okanogan, with two counts of first-degree child molestation. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 7. The court found probable cause to charge Kane McKinsey Searcy, 32, Okanogan, with second-degree theft and second-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 26

and Dec. 4. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Lewis Hankins, 41, Oroville, with failure to register as a sex offender.

Juvenile

A 16-year-old Okanogan girl pleaded guilty Nov. 12 to fourth-degree assault. The girl was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for three days served, and fined $100 for the Sept. 19 crime. A 14-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Nov. 26 to third-degree theft and obstruction. The boy was sentenced to one day in detention and fined $100 for the Aug. 21 crimes. A then-17-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Nov. 26 to third-degree assault (of a law enforcement officer), minor driving after consumption of alcohol, no valid operator’s license and resisting arrest. The boy was sentenced to seven days in detention with credit for seven days served, and 15-36 weeks at the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration. The boy has since turned 18. He was fined $200, including $100 in restitution, for the Nov. 5 crimes. A 15-year-old Oroville girl pleaded guilty Nov. 26 to POCS. The girl was sentenced to 15 days in deten-

tion with credit for 15 days served, and fined $100 for the Oct. 22 crime. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Dec. 3 to resisting arrest. The boy was sentenced to ten days in detention with credit for ten days served, and fined $75 for the Oct. 20 crime. In a separate case, the same boy pleaded guilty Dec. 3 to attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle. The boy was sentenced to 30 days in detention with credit for nine days served, and fined $00 for the Oct. 17 crime. In another separate case, the same boy pleaded guilty Dec. 3 to second-degree burglary, thirddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The boy was sentenced to five days in detention and 15-36 weeks at the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration. For those crimes, the boy was fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Feb. 25, 2015. Those crimes occurred July 23.

DISTRICT COURT

Elizabeth Ann KinKade, 38, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: violation of a nocontact order. Jeremy John Lavender, 28, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of violation of a no-

contact order. Lavender was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 175 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,816. Randy Benjamin Lepire, 24, Okanogan, guilty of two counts of third-degree theft, one count of third-degree malicious mischief, and two counts of second-degree vehicle prowl. Lepire was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,924. Lyle Zachary Long, 29, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Long was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $808. Brandon Shea Marchand, 40, Okanogan, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Marchand was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 75 days suspended, and fined $408. Monte Louis Nicholson, 47, Omak, guilty of obstruction. Nicholson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 350 days suspended, and fined $258. Jose Ortega Andrez, 18, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: minor intoxicated in a public place. Alejandro Ramirez Gomez, 18, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID. Mireille Ramirez Olea, 27, Tonasket, had a second-degree criminal trespassing

SEE COPS | PG A12

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DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Will Oroville become the next ‘Pendleton?’

Seriously, the next “Pendleton?” No, not the rodeo, but the manufacturer of fine wool clothing, like shirts, pants and coats. If the local chapter of the North American Wool Co-op has their way it will – at least the area would become known for their signature products, made from locally produced fibers and woven at a locally owned and operated mill. Vicki Eberhart and the group have big plans for a fiber mill that would not only turn wool from sheep into finished products, it would do the same for alpaca and llamas which are camelids (we just learned the term, although we knew they were camel cousins), as well as goats, which give us mohair and cashmere; rabbits, angora; musk ox, qivut and of course Out of silk worms. On top of that she and her fellow NAWC members, Scott Turnbull and Susan My Mind Facer, told the Oroville Chamber last week Gary A. DeVon they could also make yarn and textiles from hemp, flax, bamboo and cotton if all goes according to plan. All milled in Oroville and to the benefit of local farmers and others in Washington. It sounds exciting – Eberhart said the co-op already has a contract to do U.S. Military berets – part of the U.S.’s effort to buy American. Not a bad idea, considering all the flack they got when people found out the original new lids were originally purchased from China. We wish the group all the luck in the world and hope their plan to start be in production by May comes to fruition. Our farmers can use all the help they can get and greater Oroville could use the jobs. We’re also glad to see a historic, if a little down on its luck, apple warehouse is going to be used for this purpose. Having one more empty and idle building that could be put to productive use is great. From the group’s Powerpoint presentation: • Started in 2013; • Non-profit, set up to aid farmers in finding ways to resurrect an industry of great importance; • Standardize fiber production with both objective and subjective testing; • Assist farmers in selecting fibers for best products and suitable milling; and • Create a wool pool for cost reduction in like kind fibers pre-sorted by certified wool graders. The purpose of the NAWC, the group says, is to unite fiber farmers and wool producers in the USA and assist in set up of independent for profit community mills across America using locally farmed fibers, to create the highest quality local yarns and products for the U.S. and export markets. The local chapter wants to create jobs while creating an industry, that follows a “corporate responsibility model” which shows that government and society and business can co-exist while being kind to the environment, according to Ebehart. Clyde Andrews, Oroville Chamber President, said he hopes that the mill’s production can become an “iconic” product for the area – a signature product. The group has already contacted the Pendleton Company and they’d be interested in taking fiber from any backlog that develops. They’ve also sought advice from other mills in Ohio, which offered encouragement and advice. We’ve seen startups before, but have a good feeling about these people. They didn’t just jump into things; they’ve been planning this since last year, getting their ducks in a row and working on a business plan. They deserve support and encouragement to carry through with their ambitious plan. We say, good luck and Godspeed.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Work together, or lose it all Dear Editor, This is to the Underserved Citizens of North Okanogan County: I would like to take this opportunity to appeal to the citizens of the northern part of our county. Most of you must know that Okanogan County and hence its small population is one of the most underserved counties in the United States by its demographics and size. I do not understand why the citizens of the northern part of this county would want to become more underserved. This will definitely happen if you do not pay attention to what is happening right here with your - and I mean YOUR - Hospital and Nursing Home. It is quite evident that people have not educated themselves. The bottom line is this: if we are not careful with our negativity about and our neglect of what we have, we will lose it: not just the Nursing Home, but the Hospital. I am currently on the Save the Nursing Home Committee and I worked at North Valley Hospital and Extended care for 37 years. I would like to say that this small town Hospital has been the best employer I experienced in my 41 years of Nursing. It provides care that I have not seen equaled in many places, including places in New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, South Carolina and in this state. We in the north county have been very lucky and I wonder how many of you know that, or care. We should remember that when our Hospital was started that it was the only state of the art hospital of its kind east of Seattle. It continues to be an excellent giver of care with customer service as its main goal. Veterans should be paying attention to this because you could lose your clinic. I wonder how many of you realize what would happen here if we lose not just our Nursing Home, but our Hospital. It is a proven fact that small towns who lose their hospitals can become ghost towns. By their nature hospitals are usually the largest employers in the small towns or region they serve. This means that when they fail, then the businesses around them lose business, the schools lose enrollment, churches lose members, people and new businesses will not come here and on and on. Local economy suffers greatly. I would like to challenge you. I understand that there are legitimate grievances and that the Hospital has made mistakes, but it is time to rise above all of this and work together as

OOOOH ... WONDERFUL OPINION BY BILL SLUSHER SOCIO-POLITICAL WRITER

Nursing homes. Oooh... absolutely wonderful, Bill, I hear you saying. Here I was wondering what I can afford to get the kids this Christmas, wondering where my kid’s tuition is coming from after Christmas, wondering if my military kid is Bill Slusher going to live to Christmas, wondering if the kids and their families are going to visit or call this Christmas, and I was hoping to read something entertaining from you ... but noooo. Nursing homes. I’d rather listen to reruns of Al Sharpton speeches. I sympathize. I’m pushing seventy, and the subject scares me witless. But consider this: About 1.7 million of America’s seniors are in nursing home care, and the boomer generation is just now arriving at the elderly doorstep at 10,000 old geets... a day. Average annual cost of a nursing home room is around $90K/year (climbing at 4 percent/ year), and that’s just the room. Medical treatment administered there is another bill. If you don’t expect to be doing shuffleboard and bingo in a nursing home in the foreseeable, what about your parents?

a small town family to protect what we have from harm. We should be thinking of our children, our elders and our Veterans right now. We need to educate ourselves and stand together to save what we have. We can start by reading the Nov. 13, 2014 article in USA Today about rural hospitals and what they are facing. Dig deeper, search the internet, read the Gazette. Come to or call the Hospital and Nursing Home and ask how you can help. We must make the time to support what we have, or lose it. With Love and Concern, Karen Schimpf Retired Resident Care Manager at the Nursing Home

Take a stand for those who can’t Dear Editor, Attention: All state and local legislative representatives and residents of Oroville and Tonasket. The wolves have been circling for nearly two years since the closing of North Valley Assisted Living in Tonasket. Now the wolves are at the door preparing to slaughter our lambs of North Valley Extended Care. Please save them from being sent to God only knows where to die from confusion, longing for family and friends and trying to adjust to strange surroundings and new medical care. Standup: Take a stand for those who cannot stand up and care for themselves. Please call the North Valley Hospital administration and your elected North Valley Hospital board of commissioners. Thank you, Patricia Atchison Tonasket

Thanks to law enforcement Dear Gary, With all that is going on today in America, I wake up in the morning with a clogged mind wondering how is it we have come to this. A civilized society should never resort to violence and pure criminal activity to solve issues for “perceived” wrongs. The only thing that clears my mind is my time I spend in the Word. Some of us potential nursing home candidates may be able to afford high-dollar, Palm Beach fossil farms, but the likelihood for most of us needing nursing homes is we’ll wind up in an eldercare facility funded mostly by Medicaid (poor folks’ medical assistance) for the room and Medicare (old folks’ medical assistance) for the medical treatment administered. That’s... if we can find one. And if you think it’s been ‘entertaining’ up to now, enter... Obamacare. Obamacare was never a health plan devised by health experts, it was always a political gimmick designed by politicians to get Democrats reelected by the ‘free-stuff’crowd. If this sounds like just another Obama slam, it is, but it’s richly earned. Witness: Our recent national election ran record lopsided against Obama and Obamacare hugely because even Democrats have finally figured out that giving free healthcare to 16 million new patients (for now) by dumping them on medicaid has meant the virtual destruction of the health insurance of many millions of previously insured... working... taxpayers. This is largely why election-2014 Democrat candidates ran screaming into the night when offered endorsements by Obama. Yes, most previously insured working Americans still have health insurance, some few at slightly reduced premiums per se, but... see... their plans are essentially useless until the insured pays out of pocket an annual deductible equal to their annual premium. Thousands of dollars a year... in addition... to the thousands in premiums.

We, and I say We, have turned our society into a “me” society. We have gone against God and now we turn our backs to the the very laws that our great nation was founded on. We have a constitution that a lot of our elected leaders use as a floor mat to simply wipe their muddy boots on. But there is solace where we happen to live, here in the most beautiful part of Washington, State. By that, I mean we have our law enforcement system. Our elected law officers here still believe in the constitution, we are so privileged to have highly trained and ethical law officers patrolling our streets. All the negativity toward law is mainly from the lawless. I can sleep at night knowing that there are officers doing all they can to protect me and my property. Ive always respected our law enforcement with the same respect i give our military. To Protect and to Serve. Without them we would become an uncivilized society. It’s because of them we are able to have and maintain what is ours. When we lose that thought, we become like community’s who believe they are owed something they haven’t worked for or earned. Hence, Ferguson, Missouri. Total lawless criminals using any excuse to pillage and plunder. Yet, any reasonable mind would know that a law was broken and the criminal paid the ultimate price. Pretty simple thinking to me. Everyday our officers hit the street, they face the same chance of paying that price. They are underpaid, and over worked, yet they continue to do it because “it matters.” They are there for “us”. not the other way around. My gratitude for them is not near what they deserve. But I make it a point to say thank you every time i get a chance. A friendly wave or a smile goes along way. Have I been stopped? yes. Have I been ticketed? yes. But a thanks is still in order. They may have just saved my life. To All of you officers out there, I give you my thanks. Keep up the good work. Ive been lucky to meet some of these great servants. To Frank Rogers and all of the county officers a special thanks for supporting our constitution. To Dan and Troy for keeping our game laws up. To Rob, Darren, Preston. Jarrod, thanks for keeping your towns safe. All of you officers that I don’t know... I thank you. I am not alone, your service is appreciated by many. God speed and keep you safe... Merry Christmas Bobby G Penney Jr Tonasket Health insurance that many millions of working Americans paid heavy premiums for but gained solid benefits from, pre-Obamacare, has suddenly been reduced to paying heavy premiums for... nothing... until you pay the deductible equivalent of another year’s heavy premiums in the same year. Unless, of course, you’re among the “free stuff” gang, mostly on Democrat cultivated voter plantations. Then your healthcare is paid for largely by that declining half of American adults who still pay income taxes. But back to nursing homes. Remember, 70 percent of nursing homes, especially rural ones, depend for survival on Medicaid and Medicare. The federal government (you, taxpayer) matches state (you, taxpayer) spending on Medicaid, except for the Obamacare additions which Obamacare (you, taxpayer) will fund at an intentional declining rate in a world where medical costs incline sharply. Read: decreasing net medicaid funds for nursing homes. This is severely aggravated by the reality that cash-strapped states will increasingly balance their budgets by reducing their (and by extension, federal) Medicaid spending. Then there’s Medicare. Obamacare flacks swore that, oh, well yeah, Obamacare would chop Medicare $716 billion (with a ‘B’) over ten years, but, golly gee, “Medicare benefits will not be reduced one cent!” They neglected to say that their bizarre reasoning for this was that they would just cheat doctors, hospitals and... wait for it... nursing homes, by shorting

SEE WONDERFUL | PG A7


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Only one week left, are you ready for Christmas yet? Good Grief! It’s only a week until Christmas. Am I ready? Are we ever really ready? But it comes just the same, and we promise to do better next year and start preparing earlier, like in July. Oh, well, we’ll have good times and just forget those other things that we were gonna do. The snow that came, sometimes in giant sized flakes, has mostly disappeared and we’ve had rain, and milder weather and fog. A nice lot of folks came to the Museum Christmas party. It’s fun to get a bit dressed up and have beautifully decorated tables, good snacks, a silent auction, while making some dollars for the running of the facility. A fun Christmas quiz was given, with some knowing the correct answers, quickly, while some

pondered and thought of the answer after several new questions had been asked. My mom was VERY good at those kinds of party games and I’ll bet she’d have come out the winner. (I didn’t inherit her talents). This sort of fun night was started about 13 years ago, by the late Kay (Sherling) Tracy and how nice that the tradition is being kept alive. There are several volunteers who give of a lot of their time cleaning, changing displays and all the many things that are required to keep ahead of the game. Don’t forget to say thanks, when you meet up with them. Do you know what the secret to happiness is? It’s having a good sense of humor and a bad memory. Do you make fudge candy for the holidays? I have a recipe that is so yellowed

Saving our nursing NURSING home a big job HOME NEWS SUBMITTED BY LINDA HOLDEN

NORTH VALLEY EXTENDED CARE

North Valley Extended Care, historically known as “the Tonasket Nursing Home,” has served our community for many years. We have been privileged to serve and care for the precious elders who have helped raise up this community over several generations. In the past, we have been able to provide consistent quality care with the benefit of state, federal and private funds.

Government funding for elders in Long Term Care has been cut in recent years. Our reimbursement does not cover the cost of care. The very service we value is at risk. Because of continued lack of funding, we are working with dedicated community members to “Save Our Nursing Home!” This is a BIG job needing the support of our family, friends and neighbors. We are forming several committees and are looking for your ideas for, and involvement

Children’s Christmas Party this Saturday

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

SUBMITTED BY JAN HASEN

on Christmas Day. Our Auxiliary meeting attendance pot is slowly growing, please attend our meetings to get your name in the drawing. We still have lots of time until the May drawing for it to grow. Our Joker Poker is doing well. Every Friday, right after meat draw, we draw for a cash prize of $25 or half the total pot if you draw the Joker. You must be a member in good standing and have your membership card in your possession at the time of the drawing. Our Aerie meetings are

OROVILLE EAGLES

Don’t forget the children’s Christmas party on Saturday, Dec. 20 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Santa will be there to hand out gifts. Bring the kids and have a good time. We will have our annual Christmas Party potluck on Saturday, Dec. 20 at 6 p.m. Please sign up on the bulletin board by Thursday and bring your favorite holiday dish. We will close on Christmas Eve at 6 p.m. and will be closed

Christmas Parties, for kids and adults, Dec. 20 SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

We would like to take a moment to remember a year ago we lost Deb Kral, she worked as bartender and manager for 23 years. She has been missed very much. Keep warm as it’s getting cold

TONASKET EAGLES again ( as winter will do). On Saturday, Dec. 20 the Eagles will be having their Kids’ Party from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. There will be lots of food, games, and crafts. Come, enjoy and have fun! Also that same day starting at 6 p.m. will be the adult party. Bring a gift and receive a gift. (guy for guy and girl for a girl). This is a potluck and meat and

PRACTICE SESSIONS ‘Practice Sessions’ to continue in the upcoming year THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Practice Sessions, the hour long program offered by the Oroville Community Library on Thursday mornings at 10:30 a.m. in the library’s activity room will finish up this year’s presentation on Dec. 18. Alene Halliday has been sharing information about American musical standards from the

1920’s through the 1960’s. Steve Pollard, guitarist, accompanies her. The presentations include performance along with learning and rehearsal techniques plus history of style of music many people are unfamiliar with. This ongoing series is free and open to all ages. The series starts again Jan. 18, 2015.

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and difficult to read, and I got it from a co-worker at Thorndike’s warehouse, so many years ago. It always turns out good and makes a bunch. Losing weight doesn’t seem to be working for me, so I’m gonna concentrate on getting taller. And I don’t think that will work either! At church last Sunday, the Bell Choir from the Free Methodist Church, played a few numbers at the United Methodist. It is amazing to watch them and a pleasure to listen to. And they got to initiate the new sound system, which has been eagerly awaited for quite some time. Also, the church walls have a new coat of paint. Just like home, always something in need of replacing or repair. Big headlines this week: Tonasket Hospital CEO resigns. I suppose there

in, any of these groups. • Legislative – To contact our representatives. • Public Forum – To help arrange public information meetings. • Levies – to consider a possible levy. • Fundraising and Grants – No idea too small! If you have questions and/or are interested in any of these committees, please contact Linda Holden, Long Term Care Manager at 509-486-3147. We look forward to sharing more information about this process in the coming weeks. We are excited to see the community involvement in this important issue. the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Happy Hour during Seahawks’ games. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Friday and Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what is happening at your club and join in. We would like to thank all of the people and businesses in the community for support of our benefits and fund raisers for our local area. As always, We Are People Helping People.

cheese trays will be will be provide. Karaoke will follow events, come and have fun. Christmas Eve we will be closing at 6 p.m. and we will be closed on Christmas Day, but open Friday (but no Bingo or kitchen). Pinochle scores from last Sunday as follows: first place Neil Fifer, second place Leonard Paulsen, low score to Gladys Fifer and last pinochle to Carol Ross. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagle in the State.

509.476.3602

Beef stew a big hit at Senior Bazaar SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Our beef stew was a hit. I never chopped so many vegetables in my life as last Friday. Last week was a whirlwind, with computer glitches, bazaar preparation, and beef stew to prepare. A special thanks to all our helpers, and also to those who participated in the bazaar. It seems there were plenty of sellers, but not so many buyers. I guess this meant bargains. But, then, it seems that everyone has to eat.

On Tuesday, Dec. 23, the Ellisforde Church Choir will present music at 11 a.m. In addition, on that day, Hughes Department Store has given us the opportunity to gift wrap presents as a fundraiser 6 p.m. to Midnight. If you are buying last minute gifts, be sure to have our volunteer seniors wrap it. We are definitely planning a turkey and ham dinner on Christmas day. Mark your calendar.

A very social Hill Top this past week

HILLTOP COMMENTS

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Our Hilltop was a very social place to be last week. We started off with the pinochle players – all 32 of them on the eight of December. The Ladies High was Darlene Firpo, and the Low went to Evalyn Dull. The High for the men was Don Field and Darrell Bunch.The Low went to Wayne Adams. The Traveling Winner was awarded to Judy Bunch. Last Friday, Molson was ready and waiting for all that attended the Molson Grange Christmas Party. There were about sixty who braved the cold to come

Major shake up at top of league? SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM NORTH VALLEY POOL LEAGUE

As of press time, our international top three teams had not played each other. Wednesday night Lew’s Brew Crew played Eagles Aiming Fluid and you can bet it was a great pool match-up. Going into the night they were first and second, with The Plaza’s

and enjoy the wonderful Chinese Food prepared by Linda and David Darrow. There were also Pot Luck Dishes to add to the Menu, and it made a great dinner. There were no complaints from our table. Willie had a short program as, usual, that included several attendees in a game of Musical Chairs. It was fun to watch. On Saturday the Knob Hill Club of Chesaw had their Annual Christmas Party, Dinner. This is also when we find out who our Secret Sisters have been for the past year. I am here to tell you I had a really good one this year. I

POOL LEAGUE NEWS Xholos a very close third. Judging by the other competition in the league, the top spots could have a major shake-up. Wednesday was our last league play of the year. We are in our holiday break for the next two weeks. The Pool League would

Time For A Family Meeting To Discuss Financial Preparations? FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

During the holiday season, you no doubt have a lot going on in your life — work functions, gatherings with friends and neighbors, tracking down the elusive “perfect gift,” etc. But you may find it valuable to add one more event to your calendar: a family meeting to discuss those financial preparations that affect you and your loved ones.

Of course, the scope of your meeting will depend on your age and the age of your children, and on whether you have elderly parents. So, let’s look Readers YOU NEED HELP – They need work. at one family meeting scenario that would work Reach over 2 millionChoose readers with many a under two different sets of circumstances: you skills throughout Washington by advertising are meeting with your own grown children or you Region or Go your job in 106 Community Newspapers! Statewide LOW COST • ONE CALL • ONE BILL are meeting with your elderly parents. Buy a Region or the Entire State! In either case, you’ll want to review the following One Call Request a free information kit today: areas: One Payment 509-476-3602 Investment information — It’s a good idea to let your grown children know where you (and your

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are some folks who think that will be home? the answer to all the problems, and I It’s good to have Nancy (Gadberry) wish I could believe that to be true, but back in town. She and her husband I don’t. It is so complicated in so many bought her parents home and have areas. I already wrote, last week, what retired here, and I’ll bet one of these I thought some of the remedy could be, days, they’ll get settled in and become but I doubt that the governmembers of our senior center, ment is gonna listen to what as her parents were for so I have to say. many years. The Christmas Bazaar A class reunion is in the and luncheon was held planning stage for the graduat the Senior Center last ates of the Class of 65. Do you Saturday. Delicious stew know how many years that is? and pie made a tasty lunch, It’s 50, and I have a daughter once again a lot of work and son-in-law in that class. for a few people. I heard No wonder my knees creak some say they were selland sometimes refuse to bend, ing items from their tables THIS & THAT they’ve traveled a mile or two, and also heard that some over the years. weren’t. Are people getting Joyce Emry You know it is fun to meet “burnt out” on bazaar’s or someone and have them say, is it perhaps the economy? “I know you from your picWhen it comes right down to it, most of ture in the paper and I always read your the things are items that aren’t essential column first, when I receive my Gazetteto our daily living. Tribune. “ A fire destroyed the home of Tim Kudo’s to Reta Emry and her helpWoods worth, on Kay Street last Friday ers for gathering together the sizable night. Bad thing to happen, any time, but amounts of food, to distribute to those in in the midst of winter it is very sad. need of extra foods to make the holidays How would you like to go back to the a bit brighter. days before having a microwave in your ‘Til Next Week

spouse, if still living) keep your investments and what sort of investments and retirement accounts you own, such as your IRA, 401(k), and so on. You should also provide your children with the name of your financial advisor. And talk to your parents about their investments. You might think that this could be challenging topic to bring up, but you might be surprised at their willingness to talk. Estate planning documents — Comprehensive estate planning can involve a variety of legal documents, such as a will, a living trust, power of attorney, etc. If you have already created these documents, you need to share both their location and their intent with your grown children, who will be active players in carrying out your estate plans. The same is true with your elderly parents — try to encourage them to share all their estate-planning documents with you, especially if they will be counting on you for their care.

Wishes for future living arrangements — It’s certainly possible that you will be able to live independently your whole life. On the other hand, you may eventually need some type of long-term care, such as that provided in a nursing home or an assisted-living residence. Let your children know what your feelings are about such a possibility, and what preparations you have made. And try to elicit the same information from your own parents.

Funeral or burial instructions — Admittedly, you can probably find topics that are more pleasant to discuss than funeral plans. Yet, if you make your own burial or cremation plans in advance, and possibly even prepay for them, you will be taking a tremendous burden off the shoulders of your loved ones, who won’t be forced to make difficult decisions — or scramble for money at short notice — during a highly emotional time in their lives. Once again, you’ll also want to learn about your parents’ desires for their final arrangements, and Names of professional advisors — As you put what steps they may have already taken in this together your estate plans, you will likely need area. to work with a team of financial, tax and legal By holding a family meeting about these advisors. Make sure your grown children know the issues today, you can avoid a lot of stress and names of these professionals and how to contact misunderstandings in the future. So bring out the them. Similarly, seek the same information from coffee and cookies — and start talking. your parents. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Our election of officers occurred while this was in print. Will report next week. Do not forget to pay your membership dues for 2015. We received a check for computers for our classes, which will begin again in January. Also, we are looking forward to more movie matinees, and euchre games next year. Suggestions for activities are always welcome. I thought a checkerboard, set up and ready to go, would be a nice addition. Or, maybe an indoor, Olympic size, swimming pool. Maybe we could put in for a grant. Pinochle: Door Prize, Nellie Paulsen; High Woman, Mary Lou Barnett; High Man, Leonard Paulsen; Door Prize, Nellie.

was surprised with a pizza delivered to my door, yes, to my door, in Chesaw. She was pretty crafty. For Christmas her gift to me was a gorgeous big bouquet of red, white and pink baby carnations. Made me feel real special. Thank you Beth. This evening was another potluck. Our Hill Top folk never go hungry. On Sunday we had our monthly potluck at the Chesaw Community Bible Church which is open to all on the second Sunday of each month. Yes, it was a potluck. The next event on the Hill Top will be Friday night in Molson at the Grange Hall at 7 p.m. for Bingo. This brings us to the middle of December (can you believe it, already). I want to wish you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. like to wish everyone a safe, warm Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. And don’t forget to Play Pool!

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ANNIE FAMILY/DRAMA/COMEDY STARRING

QUVENZHANE WALLIS, CAMERON DIAZ, JAMIE FOXX. FRI. 6:45, 9:30. SAT.*3:30, 6:30,9:15 SUN.:*3:30, 6:30. CLOSED WED. 12/24. PG 118 min THURS. 6:30, 9:15

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Matinee $6.50

Child $6.50

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

VALLEY LIFE SUBMITTED BY ALLENE HALLIDAY OROVILLE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY

Friend of the Oroville Library have been in a party mood this fall. In mid-October our members gathered at Hometown Pizza to celebrate the decades long active membership of FOL’s former

OROVILLE LIBRARY NEWS president Eilene Smith. Since she’d just spent September visiting family and friends in her home state of Michigan, it was also a welcome home and surprise party. Next was our annual Christmas Party with the Oroville Library Board on Dec. 3. The luscious

luncheon was provided by board members. The only business discussion at this get together had to do with the plans for our big musical festivity Showtime coming up in February and March. It will he held on f our consecutive Saturday evenings at Vicki’s Back Door with two bands entertaining at each event. The names of the musical groups, along with those of the program sponsors, will be announced next month. Our next meeting will be on Jan. 14 at noon in the Oroville Library’s activity room.

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD Oroville May Festival Meeting OROVILLE - The Oroville May Festival Committee will meat on Wednesday, Dec. 17 at the Plaza Restaurant. The public is invited to come help with May Festival, especially parade planning. Home schooled junior girls interested in being royalty are also encouraged to contact Sharon at 509-560-0179 for applications, which needs to be turned in or postmarked by Dec. 17. Those with questions can call Linda at 509-476-2625 evenings.

Oroville Schools Winter Concerts OROVILLE - Oroville Schools Music Students will present winter concerts on Thursday, Dec. 18, with the 4th-6th grade elementary students perform at 10 a.m. in the Oroville Elementary School Gymnasium. The Junior and Senior High music students will perform at 7 p.m. in the High School Commons. Admission to both concerts is free.

Christmas Carols at EB Winery OROVILLE - Esther Bricques Winery will celebrate the holidays with Christmas Caroling this Thursday, Dec. 18, Plan on singing along with a variety of instruments for accompaniment. Bring some Christmas goodies and join the fun. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Legion Children’s Christmas Party The American Legion will host its annual Children’s Christmas Party on Friday, Dec. 19, 2014 starting with a potluck at 6 p.m. Turkey and ham will be provided, please bring side dishes or desserts. Santa will arrive at 7 p.m. All members and their guests are encouraged to attend.

Molson Bingo MOLSON - BINGO at the Molson Grange Hall on Friday, Dec. 19 at 7 p.m. $10 Fee. Bring snacks to share.

CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICES NORTH COUNTY - There are several Christmas Eve Services celebrating the birth of Christ planned in North Okanogan County on Wednesday, Dec. 24. The Oroville United Methodist Church (908 Fir St., Oroville) will be holding their service at 5 p.m., Tonasket Community Church (24 E. Fourth St., Tonasket) at 7 p.m. and Trinity Episcopal Church (604 Central Ave., Oroville) at 11 p.m.

Beulah P. Long, age 79 of Omak, passed away on Friday, December 12, 2014 at Rose Garden Care Center in Omak. She was born September 9, 1935 in Barnesville, Ohio to parents William Leroy Johns and Verna (nee) Hall. Beulah loved Karaoke and playing Bingo. She loved being with her family and friends and loved to travel when she was able. Beulah loved life and had a great spirit about her. She was loved so very much by all, and will truly be missed. She is survived by her children

FREDA BROTT

Freda Brott was born June 25th 1934 in Rogersville, Missouri to the parents of John and Bessie York. She passed away peacefully at home with her family at her side on December 9, 2014. She was 80-years-old. Freda will be long remembered for her amazing cooking and baking skills, her big smile, helping

6

OROVILLE Oroville Women’s Club is once again pleased to provide the gifts for children event on Tuesday, Dec. 23, starting at 9:30 a.m. in conjunction with the food bank’s annual Christmas happening. The club members would also like to thank everyone who has donated to make this event possible. If you would like to help, please contact Kally at Umpqua Bank in Oroville at 509-476-3603.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

CHRISTMAS!

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange Christmas Bazaar-Flea Market is at 622 Fir St. on Saturday, Dec. 20 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Watch for posters and the sign on Hwy. 97 at the south end of town. The bazaar will feature Christmas. The grange will rent table for people to sell their own items. Coffee is available any time. For more information call 509-476-3878.

Self-Defense Workshop A self-defense workshop appropriate for anyone 18 or older, male or female, will be held Saturday, Jan. 10 from 10:00 a.m.-noon at Oroville High School. The cost is $50 per person. Instructor Randy Middleton, certified in techniques developed by fifth-degree Master Terry Cariker, will conduct the training. The two hour workshop begins with basic training and is also excellent for senior citizens. For further information and pre-registration contact Randy Middleton at 509-429-2200.

tasy land, it is simply impossible to balance a checkbook where more debits are withdrawn from less deposits, which has been the soul of Democrat “free stuff” government. There must inevitably be casualties, and America’s nursing homes are among them. True, not all nursing home management is perfect in everyone’s view, but it is still unreasonable to demand that management endlessly do more with less. Doing more with less. Mmmm. How’s that working out for... you... citizen? Merry Christmas, all, anyway!

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Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

DENTISTRY

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune. com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

FAMILY PRACTICE

Call us . . . Se Habla Español

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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hand and teaching and praying for others Freda was proceeded in death by her parents, John & Bessie York. She is survived by her husband, Bud Brott, her son Gregory Brott, and many nieces, nephews friends and family members. Graveside services will be held at Desert Lawn Memorial Park, Kennewick, Wash. on Monday, December 15, 2014 at 1 p.m.

See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

Tonasket Food Bank

Oroville Grange Christmas Bazaar

Freda Brott

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Gifts for the Children

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BEULAH P. LONG

Days Until Christmas!

WONDERFUL | FROM A5 ing their reimbursements $416 billion, and the rest Obamacare would make up in “waste reduction.” Have you ever been reassured by government “waste reduction?” Ever seen any? Know what disgusted doctors are doing as a result? Just what you’d do if your pay got chopped for participating in a government program. They’re bailing out of Medicaid and Medicare in droves. Know what hospitals and nursing homes are doing? Turning away more Medicaid and Medicare patients. Like most things, all this reduces to money. Outside of liberal fan-

Beulah P. Long

Jim Jenkins (Mindie Payne) of Dewey, Ariz.; Vickie Cowell of Casa Grande, Ariz. and Melody (Gary) Webb of Oroville; brothers Guy (Connie) Johns, Keith Johns and Roger Johns; sisters Jo (Ron) Kanya, Bonnie Green and Linda Gorsche; sister-in -law Phyllis Johns; eight grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren Beulah was preceded in death by her husband R.G. Webb; daughter Joann Long; sister Dorothy; brothers Ken Johns, John Johns and Thomas Majors; great grandson Colten Earl Cowell and great granddaughter Delaney Ann Jenkins. Services will be held at a later date in Arizona. There will be a celebration of her life at a later date in Oroville. Bergh Funeral Service and Crematory in care of arrangements.

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Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Eilene Smith honored for service to library

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Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602


PAGE A8 8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • December 18, 2014

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent OROVILLE, 98844. 1 BR COUNTRY HOME, where horses are your “neighâ€?-bors. Compete 2013 remodel. Full bath w/ storage & laundry room. Spacious walkin closet. Beautifully appointed kitchen. Sunny living room w/ atrium doors to patio & back yard; overlooks river valley! $650 / month. Call 509-429-7823. Oroville WESTLAKE RD. Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath house. New carpet, storage shed, computer room. $775/mo, first & last. Need reference. Call 509476-3214 SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA. 3 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Nanette at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

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DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Relief Customer Service Rep Okanogan County PUD This position is part-time, minimum 80 hours per month and is called upon as needed to perform customer service duties at the District’s headquarters in Okanogan, as well as at each of the District’s 5 offices. Applicants must have a high school diploma or equivalent and at least one year of previous applicable secretarial/office, customer service experience. A valid Washington State Driver’s License is required. The position will be assigned to the District’s headquarters in Okanogan and travel time and mileage will be paid when assigned to alternate work locations. Wages are per IBEW contract, health insurance & retirement benefits are provided. Applications and a detailed job description are available online at www.okanoganpud.org or at any District office. Applications must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday, January 5, 2015 at Okanogan County PUD, Attn: Human Resources, P.O. Box 912, Okanogan, WA 988400912. Applications may also be faxed or emailed to: fax 509- 422-8416, laurar@okpud.org.

4 BR, 2 BA w/ garage $910. 2 + BR $700. 3 BR $850. Lakefront Apt $795. Beautiful downtown apt $495. Call 509-476-2121

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Announcements Adopted Election Resolution Notice A poll-site election for a board seat on the Okanogan Conservation District will be held on February 12, 2015 at USDA Building, 1251 2nd Ave. S., Okanogan, WA 98840. Polls will open at 10:00 AM and close at 2:00 PM. Registered voters who reside within the Conservation District boundary are eligible to vote. Candidates must be registered voters residing in the conservation district, and may be required to own land or operate a farm. The candidate filing deadline is January 15, 2015 at 1:00 PM. Election procedures are available at the district office. Absentee ballots are available upon request for eligible voters, but must be requested on or before 2:00 PM on January 22, 2015. Please contact the District office at 1251 2nd Ave South, Room 102, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-0855 for absentee ballots or if you have any questions.

www.gazette-tribune.com Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Crosswords

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Help Wanted OCCDA BILINGUAL CLASS AIDE – Oroville. Assists teacher in classroom activities and function as part of the teaching team. Will provide translation services to families and children. High School/GED, WA Drivers license required. Previous experience providing services to pre-school children and families preferred. Salary 9.47 - 10.13 per hr. DOE. 30 hrs. per wk. Bilingual/Spanish required. CLASS AIDE – Tonasket Assist teacher in classroom activities and function as part of the teaching team. High School/GED, WA Drivers license required. Previous experience providing services to pre-school children and families preferred. Salary 9.47 - 10.13 per hr. DOE. 30 hrs. per wk. Bilingual/Spanish preferred. Applications obtained at 101 4thAve.W – Omak. Send application, cover letter and resume’ for either position to: OCCDA - P.O. Box 1844 – Omak, WA 98841. EOE

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ANSWERS

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www.gazette-tribune.com SPED BEHAVIOR PARAEDUCATOR The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a SPED Behavior Paraeducator, 7 hours per day, Monday through Friday. Position will end at the end of the 2014-2015 school year on June 9, 2014 or if the student is no longer enrolled in Tonasket SD. Applicants must have training and demonstrated skills in effective behavior management strategies and meet the physical requirements without restrictions to consistently lift 50# or push 100# in classroom activities and student supervision activities. Must have an AA degree, 72 quarter or 48 semester college credits, or documentation of successfully passing the State Assessment. Position has an application screening date of December 18. To apply, applicants must complete an on-line application and submit materials through the online system. We will not accept paper copies of applications. Go to the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu Instructions for completing the on-line application are found on the Employment link. Job descriptions are available on the online system also. Please call the district office at 509-486-2126 for help if needed. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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Okanogan County PUD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

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We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome.

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx

We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required Omak Campus: Enrollment Assist. Spec. Full time Temporary. Travel between Brewster and Omak. MA– C Full time. RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time. Travel between sites as needed. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 1 Full time positions. English/Spanish bilingual required Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: Patient Navigator Full time MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN or Roomer 1 per diem position. English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

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Food & Farmer’s Market Desperately need NON-ANTIBIOTIC MEAT, Beef and chicken. Email your price list to glointhedark2@gmail.com

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF DECEMBER 15, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make goodâ€?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (206) 634-3838 for details. HELP WANTED EXPERIENCED DRIVER OR RECENT GRAD? With Swift, you can grow to be an award-winning Class A CDL driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives we offer. The very best, choose Swift. • Great Miles = Great Pay • Late-Model Equipment Available • Regional Opportunities • Great Career Path • Paid Vacation • Excellent Benefits Please Call: (602) 730-7709 DRIVERS – NO EXPERIENCE? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! No matter what stage in your career, its time, call Central Refrigerated Home. (888)793-6503 www.CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com LEGAL SERVICES

52. Confusion

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Instruction / Classes

EVENING WELDING COURSES Improve your welding skills at night. WVC at Omak offers basic, gas or arc welding courses Mon & Wed 6pm-8:30pm. Classes begin Jan 5th. Call Riva Morgan at 509-682-6847.

51. __ vera

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Professional Services

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DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Legals Continued On Next Page


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ANSWERS

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: STEVEN L. PLANQUE, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00112-5

Sudoku

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3

December 15, 2014 Summary of Ordinance #752 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, adopting the budget of the ensuing fiscal and calendar year of 2015. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood

in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: November 25, 2014. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 4, 2014. /s/Anthony Castelda ANTHONY CASTELDA, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Planque Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 4, 11, 18, 2014 #OVG602745

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December 15, 2014 Summary of Ordinance #751 An ordinance of the City of Tonasket, Washington, amending the 2014 Budget Ordinance No. 742 and Ordinance No. 748. For a complete copy of this ordinance contact city hall, 509-486-2132, Tonasket, WA. 98855. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 18, 2014. #OVG606100

Notice of Call for Bids For Concrete Grave Liners 2015 & 2016 Sealed bids will be received for the supplying of concrete grave liners to the City of Tonasket for the years 2015 and 2016. Bids must include price of liners plus sales tax and freight delivered to the Tonasket Cemetery in loads of eight (8) on demand. Bids are to be submitted on a form available at the City Clerk’s office at 209 S. Whitcomb Avenue or call 509-486-2132. Mailing address: City of Tonasket, P. O. Box 487, Tonasket, Washington 98855. Bids will be opened at 7:00 p.m. on Jan. 13, 2015 at the regular Council meeting. All bids must be received prior to bid opening. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any informality. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 11, 18, 2014. #OVG604634

NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative, Sheri L. Thomson, has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020 (1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided

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Call for Fuel Bids The Tonasket School District is now accepting bids for the supply of unleaded gasoline and diesel vehicle fuel for 2015. Sealed bids are due on or before 2:00 PM Wednesday, January 7, 2015. Specifications and bid forms are available from the District Office; 35 Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone: 486-2126. Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 11, 18, 2014. #OVG604475

Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on December 18, 2014. #OVG606100

Public Notices

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Public Notices

Public Notices

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Public Notices

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DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE December 18, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Legals Continued From Previous Page

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Tamara Porter & Joan Cool Cozy revamped bungalow abutting Similikameen River. Lots of extra land with trees for building sites. Remodeled kitchen & bathroom. A MUST SEE! $116,500. Call Today! (509) 476-2121

1. Fix what needs fixed! Finish all unfinished projects: Example - Patch holes, fix leaky sinks and toilets, etc... 2. Useable space is a key factor: Example - Make a junk room into an office. 3. Declutter! Put everything away and ready to move: Example - Family photos, knickknacks, etc... 4. Paint! It is amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do. Make it a soft, neutral color. 5. Open your rooms up! You want everything to look bigger! If you have too much furniture in a room, decide which pieces to keep and find a place to store the rest. Arrange the remaining furniture to make the room look larger. 6. CLEAN! CLEAN! CLEAN! Make everything sparkle! www.windermere.com 509/476-3378

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

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Double income investment property! This recently remodeled home features a main living space with full kitchen, bath and bedrooms and a separate studio living space with private entrance. Can be easily converted to a single family residence or kept as dual rental! Separate backyards. Within walking distance of shopping and other amenities. MLS#662606 $103,000

1520 Cherry, Oroville Comfortable 2 bedroom home on a corner lot. Recently repaired and cleaned up. There is storage on the side of the house plus a storage shed. Nice sized lot borders the alley. NWML#723994 $123,000

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SPRING SPORTS Our Spring Sports Section will be coming in March!

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Contact Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

SPORTS

Bulldogs’ D stifles Hornets

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - At first glance, Okanogan’s 55-29 victory at Oroville on Saturday, Dec. 13, was probably what many expected. Okanogan is favored by many to win this year’s Class 2B state basketball title. But the Hornets gave the Bulldogs all they could handle for a good portion of the game, trailing by one point early in the third quarter before Okanogan put the defensive clamps on to claim the win. “That first half was beautiful,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “We played really well. Then we just kind of hit the wall.” The Hornets outscored Okanogan 14-9 in the second quarter to trim a nine-point deficit to four, closing the half with a Lily Hilderbrand 3-pointer. Faith Martin opened the second half with a trey of her own, and the Hornets were down just 22-21. But for all intents and purposes that was it for the Oroville offense in the second half. Okanogan clamped down in the paint, using their quickness and size to deny passes (and shots) just about anywhere inside the 3-point line. In fact, the Hornets didn’t score on anything other than 3-pointers until Hilderbrand’s rebound bucket with just over a minute to play. Meanwhile, Okanogan switched things up to get the ball to Jill Townsend in the post, who was unstoppable once she got the ball. “They went to their 1-4 high offense, and we weren’t able to cope with that,” Bourn said. “Offensively, we weren’t getting the ball to Lily in a position where she could do anything with it. They do a great job of getting into the passing lanes, and you can’t throw that skip pass against

BOYS BASKETBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W

Okanogan Liberty Bell Brewster Lk Roosevelt Tonasket Oroville Manson Bridgeport

League W

Brent Baker/staff photo

Jeremiah Yaussy-Albright drives to the hoop Saturday at Omak.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Rachelle Nutt and the Hornets had a tough time scoring against the defense of Keanna Egbert (24) and Jill Townsend (32 ) and their Okanogan teammates. them at all. “Things that work against most of the teams we play, won’t work against Okanogan.” The Bulldogs scored the final 11 points of the third quarter to open up a 40-24 lead, then scored the first six points of the fourth to put it out of reach for good. Bourn several times shook off requests for time outs from his players. “I get pretty stubborn about that,” he said. “But I want them to learn to work their way out of these situations. We figured some things out and we’ll see them again, hopefully more than once. “If we play against everyone else the way we did most of tonight, we’ll be in good shape.” Lily and Hannah Hilderbrand

each scored 10 points to lead the Hornets (2-2, 0-1 Central Washington League North Division). Townsend led Okanogan (2-0, 2-0) with 20 points.

OROVILLE 59, SOAP LAKE 36 SOAP LAKE - Lily Hilderbrand just missed out on a triple double, scoring 22 points, pulling down 13 rebounds and making eight steals to lead the Hornets past Soap Lake 59-36 on Tuesday, Dec. 9. The Hornets led 18-3 after one quarter and were never seriously threatened. Mikayla Scott added 14 points and six steals and Hannah Hilderbrand had 11 points and five rebounds for the Hornets.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tigers claim first victory BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - One of the toughest things for a young team to do is learn how to win close games, The Tonasket girls basketball team hasn’t had many chances to do that, but in their first opportunity to claim a nailbiter, made big plays down the stretch to hold off Liberty Bell on Friday, Dec. 12, 46-40. The Tigers twice built built big leads - at 19-4 and 40-26 - but the Mountain Lions kept battling back. Liberty Bell went on a 12-point run to pull within two points and missed a pair off free throws with 1:12 left that would have tied the game. Kayla Willis drilled a clutch 3-pointer with 50 seconds left, and Jenna Valentine and Ashlynn Willis combined to hit 3-of-4 free throws in the final 30 seconds to keep the Tigers out of trouble. Tonasket coach Stephanie Schertenleib said playing with a big lead is something that the team hasn’t had much experience with, either. “No lead is too big because it’s so foreign to them, the steps you need to take to sustain a lead at the varsity level,” she said “You know the other team is going to make a run at some point. You can’t keep making the same mistakes over and over again.” The Tigers bolted to a quick start, with all five starters scoring in the game-opening 19-4 run. Liberty Bell, spurred by fresh-

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Tonasket’s Ashlynn Willis (right) ties up Liberty Bell’s Katie Labanauskas during Friday’s contest. The Tigers won their first game of the season, 46-40, over the Mountain Lions.

BY BRENT BAKER

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man Lauren Ochoa, pulled to within 21-18 late in the half before Kayla Willis hit her first trey of the game to make it 24-18 at the half. Lauren Fitzmaurice scored five straight points early in the third quarter to pull the Mountain Lions to within two points, but Ashlynn Willis’s 4-point play spurred the Tigers’ 15-3 run that gave them just enough of a lead to hold on for their first victory. “It’s been hard the last couple of weeks because we haven’t been able to over a bunch of special situations and what to do with the ball,” Schertenleib said. “We’ve had three games each of the first two weeks so that limits our practices. It’s hard to prepare for two teams in two practices, work on your fundamentals and work on completely new everything. So there’s definitely a learning curve, still. “Tonight we saw the athletic ability start to come in. And being competitive in other sports - they are used to competing in soccer. Playing in that competitive team environment until the buzzer sounds. Most of the girls are used tp that continuous, grind it out attitude that you need to have.” Kayla Willis finished with a game-high 16 points with Ashlynn Willis adding nine and Valentine eight. Ochoa led Liberty Bell with 15 points.

OMAK 47, TONASKET 40 OMAK - The Tigers stayed in the game the whole way, but

playing just 16 hours after the previous night’s victory got off to a slow start at Omak on Saturday and never quite got back in the game. The Pioneers scored several quick buckets late in the first half to take a 26-17 lead and the Tigers never got any closer than the final margin. Ashlynn Willis paced the Tigers (1-4) with 13 points while Jenna Valentine and Jaden Vugteveen added eight apiece.

MANSON 37, TONASKET 29 MANSON - Jaden Vugteveen scored a game-high 11 points, but it wasn’t enough to keep the Tigers from dropping their first road game of the season on Tuesday, Dec. 9. “We could not buy a basket in the first half,” Schertenleib said. “A lot of it has to do with the nerves getting the best of these young players. You try your best in practice to simulate game situation but an actual game just has a different feel to it “They second half they played a very good half. Defensively they were solid and they were much more relaxed on the offensive end, allowing the offense to work instead of forcing it. I am proud of the girls and how hard they fought.” Vugteveen added five rebounds, Jenna Valentine had seven rebounds, Johnna Terris added six rebounds and four steals, Kayla Willis had seven points and seven rebounds and Ashlynn Willis scored seven points.

Tonasket bounces back to top Omak BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket shook off a disappointing showing against Liberty Bell the night before and a slow start to Saturday’s game to post a comefrom-behind 66-57 victory over Omak on Dec. 13. The Pioneers hit seven 3-pointers in the first half, scored the game’s first 10 points and led by as much as 25-10 with six minutes to go in the first half. But the Tigers roared back to within 32-31 at the half, with Ethan Bensing, Adrian McCarthy and Colton Leep scoring all Tonasket’s points during a 21-7 run. “Once we got out of our zone, they didn’t hit nearly so many of those (3-pointers),” said Tonasket coach Mike Larson. The Tigers led by as many as nine points early in the fourth quarter, but Omak wasn’t done yet, either. Raven Boyd, who led Omak with 22 points, ran off seven in a row to pull the Pioneers to within 56-54, and Gabe Timentwa tied the game at 57-57 with two minutes left. Jeremiah Yaussy-Albright put teh Tigers up by one with a free throw, and Omak missed a pair of charity shots with 1:10 to go. Christian Garcia’s offensive rebound put the Tigers up by three points, and the Tigers forced a pair of turnovers that they turned into hoops by Bensing and Leep. David Moreno finished off the Tigers’ 8-0, last minute run with two free throws. “That was a fun game to coach,” Larson said. Bensing (four 3-pointers) led the Tigers with 20 points, with Leep adding 19. Tonasket (3-1) heads to Okanogan on Friday, Dec. 20.

LIBERTY BELL 64, TONASKET 41 TONASKET - Liberty Bell became the first time to slow down the Tigers this year, forcing them to play in a half court offense and using lanky forwards Micah Klemmeck and Connor Cooley to keep he Tonasket defense back on its heels. As Tigers coach Mike Larson noted, his team is reliant on playing solid defense and converting its offensive opportunities so it can set up its back court pressure. “We obviously didn’t do that,” Larson said. “We just didn’t do the things that we are supposed to do.” The Mountain Lions led by as many as 10 points in the first half, but the Tigers closed out the half on a 12-5 run to trail 31-28 at the break. But the Tigers didn’t score their first basket of the second half until five minutes remained in the fourth quarter. By then, they trailed by 20 points as Klemmeck and Cooley scored 15 points during an 11 minute, 20-3 run. Cooley burned the Tigers with 30 points, with Klemmeck adding 23. Colton Leep and Ethan Bensing each scored 11 to lead the Tigers. TONASKET 71, MANSON 44 MANSON - The Tigers won their first Central Washington 2B League game with a 71-44 victory over Tiger alum Eric Helleson’s Manson Trojans on Tuesday, Dec. 9. Helleson played on Mike Larson’s varsity squad 13 years ago during the season he served as the Tigers’ interim coach. Tonasket put four players in double figures as Manson wasn’t able to match up with the Tigers’ athleticism. Ethan Bensing scored 18 points, Colton Leep and Adrian McCarthy added 15 apiece and Jeremiah Albright chipped in with 11 to lead the Tigers.

Oroville falls at home BY BRENT BAKER

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SCHEDULES DEC. 17-31

Wednesday, Dec. 17 WR - Oroville/Pateros/Lake Roosevelt at Tonasket, 6:00 pm Friday, Dec. 19 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30/6:00 pm BB (JV/Var) - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4:00/6:00 pm Saturday, Dec. 20 WR - Oroville NOHI (incl. Tonasket, Brewster, Okanogan, Kittitas and others) WR - Tonasket partial squad at Tri-State Inviatational, North Idaho College, Couer d’Alene, ID GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Pateros, 12:00/ 1:30 pm Monday, Dec. 29 BB (Var) - Tonasket at Eagle Holiday Classic (West Valley- Spokane) Monday, Dec. 30 BB (Var) - Tonasket at Eagle Holiday Classic (West Valley- Spokane) WR - Tonasket at Royal Invitational, 10:00 am WR - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt Powerhouse Invite, 10:00 am

NOTICE OF

EARLY DEADLINES Due to the Christmas Holidays, we have earlier advertising deadlines for the Jan. 1st paper...

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Okanogan’s boys basketball team may have gotten its season off to a late start thanks to many of its players taking part in Bulldogs’ run to the state football championship. Okanogan didn’t look any worse for wear as the Bulldogs blasted to a 24-9 first quarter lead and defeated Oroville 65-41 on Saturday, Dec. 13. The Hornets were unable to slow Okanogan’s fast break, nor could they contain burly tight end/forward Jim Townsend, who scored 12 of his 25 points in the first quarter. Unlike a Week 1 loss to Curlew in which a bad start snowballed into a 50-point defeat, the Hornets kept this one respectable despite not being able to match up with Okanogan’s array of offensive weapons. With Townsend not scoring in the third quarter, Mason Guerrette tagged the Hornets for 13 points. Joe Sarmiento led a balanced Oroville scoring attack with 11 points. Bryce Glover added nine points, Lane Tietje tallied eight and Nathan Hugus finished with seven points. The Hornets (1-3, 0-1 Central Washington League North Division) host Bridgeport on Friday, Dec. 19.

Warden Mabton Waterville Soap Lake White Swan Kittitas

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Classified Display Deadline: Fri., Dec. 19 at 12 Noon.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Bryce Glover slices through the paint for a basket against Okanogan on Saturday. SOAP LAKE 66, OROVILLE 52 SOAP LAKE - The Hornets were outscored in every quarter last Tuesday at Soap Lake, losing 66-2. The Eagles took a 36-29 halftime lead and gradually built on the lead in the second half. Andrew Mieirs scored 19 points to pace the Hornets.

Ad Plus Liner Deadline: Mon., Dec. 22 at 12 Noon Legals: Fri., Dec. 19 at 12 noon

Happy Holidays!


DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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SPORTS

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

Come & Worship...Worship... Worship Christ, The Newborn King! Few things are more meaningful than Christmas carols and candlelight on Christmas Eve.

We invite you to celebrate Christmas Eve with us.

Oroville United Methodist Church 5:00pm Christmas Eve 908 Fir St., Oroville

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Zach Lofthus hangs on for a pin during Saturday’s Okanogan Invitational. The Tigers won their second tournament in two weekends.

Tonasket Community Church

Tigers make it 2-for-2

7:00pm Christmas Eve 24 E. Fourth St.,Tonasket

Tonasket wins Okanogan Invitational BY BRENT BAKER

May the true meaning of Christmas bring renewed hope to your heart and home at this time and all through the coming year.

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Tonasket’s wrestlers brought home their second tournament championship in two weekends, winning the Okanogan Invitational on Saturday, Dec. 13. The Tigers (203.5 points) edged out Ephrata (180) and Liberty Bell (146) for the team title. “It was a great team effort,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “With eight in the finals and one third place, we needed all of those placing points to hold off Ephrata.” Tonasket claimed four individual titles as well. Winning were Trevor Peterson (132 pounds), Jorge Juarez (145), Frank Holfeltz (195) and Chad Edwards (285). Runners-up included Devin Walton (113), Rade Pilkinton (126), Zion Butler (138) and Zach Lofthus (160), with Vance Frazier (120)taking third. Rycki Cruz also earned third place in the 145 “B” bracket. Others who won matches included Caleb Lofthus (170) and Morgan O’Brien (220). Winning exhibition matches were Tim Freese (120) and Daymion Misenas (220). The Tigers will split their squad this Saturday, with about a half dozen team members heading to the Tri-State Invitational at North Idaho College in Couer d’Alene, Idaho. The balance of the team will compete at Oroville’s NOHI on Saturday.

Will Celebrate The Birth Of Christ

— Dec. 24th —

Christmas Eve at 11 p.m.

Brent Baker/staff photo

604 Central, Oroville

Lucas Vugteveen locks up with his Okanogan opponent on Saturday.

OROVILLE

Dec. 20.

TONASKET 56, KETTLE FALLS 12 KETTLE FALLS - The Tigers won their first dual match of the season on Wednesday, Dec. 10, at Kettle Falls, 56-12. Winners included Trevor Peterson (132), Rycki Cruz (145), Ryan Rylie (152), Zach Lofthus (160), Caleb Lofthus (170), Frank Holfeltz (195) and Chad Edwards (285), with Devin Walton (120), Vance Frazier (126) and Lucas Vugteveen (182) picking up forfeit wins.

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. CHRISTMAS EVE: 5 P.M. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Brandon Baugher was in a tough spot for a moment, but rebounded to win this match and finished fourth at Saturday’s Okanogan Invitational.

Hornets showing early gains BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Four Oroville freshmen joined senior Jordan Smith in cracking the top four at the Okanogan Invitational on Saturday, Dec. 13. Smith (132 pounds) split his four matches to finish fourth. “He wrestled tough in losing (two) hard-fought decisions,” said Oroville coach Chuck Ricevuto. Top finishers actually were a pair of freshmen: Luis Vasquez (106) and Zane Scott (195). Two more freshmen, Jeff Rounds (120) and Brandon Baugher (160) took fourth. “(They) stepped it up and got a taste of what it takes against tough competition,” Ricevuto said. Nick Clase, wrestling in a JV bracket, also took fourth at 182, while David Iniguez (220) bowed out early due to injury. Also wrestling were Charlie Arrigoni (182), Kacey Dewitte (170) and Le Curiel (145). The Hornets host their home tournament, the North Okanogan Holiday Invitational, on Saturday, Dec. 20, beginning at 10:00 a.m. Visiting teams include Tonasket, Kettle Falls, Okanogan, Wilbur-

Trinity Episcopal Church

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Oroville’s Leo Curiel finishes off a pin during Saturday’s tournament. Creston/Keller, Almira-Coulee/ Hartline, Eastmont JV, Republic, Pateros, Kittitas, Selkirk and Brewster.

HORNETS HOST MIXER OROVILLE - The Hornets picked up some additional early-season experience Friday, Dec. 12, while hosting Brewster, Pateros and the Tonasket JV. “Home events have become a

precious commodity for wrestling,” Ricevuto said. “We had a decent crowd and some fair earlyseason wrestling.” Recording pins were Jordan Smith (132), Scotty Hartvig (170), Charlie Arrigoni (182) and freshman David Iniguez. Others who wrestled included Jeff Rounds, Drake Fox, Brandon Baugher, Nick Clase, Zane Scott, Kacey Dewitte and Leo Curiel.

Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Trinity Episcopal Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm 602 Central Ave., Oroville “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday Holy Rosary Catholic Church The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket Warden • 476-2022 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

Seventh-Day Adventist

Brent Baker/staff photo

LOOMIS

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. CHRISTMAS EVE: 7 P.M. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

COPS & COURTS - CONT’D COPS | FROM A4 charge dismissed. Ramirez Olea was fined $400. Robert Trevor Richardson, 34, Omak, had a third-degree possession of stolen property charge dismissed.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Dec. 8, 2014

Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Bicycle reported missing. Theft on Timentwa Rd. near Okanogan. Checks reported missing. Credit card fraud on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Found property on Fiker Rd. near Omak. Turkeys recovered. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Tires reported missing. Domestic dispute on Queen St. in Okanogan. Fire on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Fraud on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Nathaniel James Edenso, 34, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. David Raymond Brandon, 40, booked and released for POCS. Charles Frederick Gould, 53, court commitment for thirddegree DWLS.

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014

Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Theft on N. Cordell Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Kermal Rd. in Omak. Threats on Koala Ave. in Omak. Threats on Cherry St. in Oroville. Adam Sylvester Harmon, 36, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Daniel Lewis Marchand, 44, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Jacob Dalton Kendall, 44, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for violation of a protection order. Leonard Leroy Todd, 59, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Violet Lorrean Berry, 22, booked on four OCSO FTA warrants: two for reckless dangerous and one each for eluding and possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams). Cassandra George, no middle name listed, 27, court commitment for DUI. Jordan Marie St. Peter, 24, court commitment for DUI. Larry Gene Visger, 67, booked for violation of a protection order (DV).

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014

One-vehicle roll-over crash on Hwy. 155 near Omak. No injuries reported.

Theft on Lakeview Loop Rd. near Oroville. Prescription medication reported missing. Assault on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Threats on W. First Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Fir St. in Oroville. Theft on Cherry St. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Cody Brandon Speiser, 25, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Daniel Lewis Marchand, 44, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. James Everett Davis, 57, DOC detainer. Tristan Devlyn Rodriguez, 18, booked for unlawful display of a weapon. Marlenna Autum Ankney, 23, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for DUI and two Spokane County FTA warrants: hit-and-run (unattended) and DUI. Ashley Lynnette Picard, 31, booked on three State Patrol FTC warrants: DUI, reckless driving and second-degree DWLS.

Thursday, Dec. 11, 2014

Domestic dispute on W. Third Ave. in Omak.

Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Gasoline reported siphoned. Trespassing on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Chantelle Rose Mendivil, 18, booked for resisting arrest and POCS (both on bond revocation).

Friday, Dec. 12, 2014

Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Kermal Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Northern Run Rd. near Tonasket. Power tools reported missing. Theft on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Hidden Hills Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Mail reported missing. Fraud on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. DUI on Omak Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Conneasha Danial Nannamkin, 23, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and a Grant County FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Lisa Diane Wolf, 34, booked on an Okanogan County Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS.

Saturday, Dec. 13, 2014

Alcohol offense on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Two reports of one-vehicle crashes on Kermal Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported in either case. One-vehicle crash on Jonathan St. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Theft on W. Old Anglin Rd. near Tonasket. Scarves and hats reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Chesaw Rd. near Chesaw. No injuries reported. Alcohol offense on E. Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Weapons offense on E. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Jasmine St. in Omak. Theft on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Structure fire on Kay St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Fir St. in Oroville. Tires reported flattened. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Tyler Lee Shelton, 24, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Richard Leroy Fry, 70, booked for DUI. John Frederick Wayne Carden, 42,booked for operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and seconddegree DWLS. Miguel Salvador Policarpio, 25, booked on a USBP hold.

Sunday, Dec. 14, 2014

DWLS on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Bluebell Lane near Tonasket. DWLS on N. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.. Domestic dispute on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Found property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Safe recovered. Sheila Lee Desautel, 42, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for obstruction and resisting arrest.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC – Washington State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory

COMMUNITY AUTO REPAIR

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

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PAGE B1

DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

May your Christmas sparkle with moments of love, laughter and goodwill and may the year ahead be full of contentment and joy. Have a Merry Christmas.

We hope you will enjoy this special Christmas addition to our newspaper. You will find letters to Santa from children in the Okanogan Valley. Two lucky kids have each won a special donated gift item: an Old Fashioned Sled donated by Lee Frank Mercantile in Tonasket and Hughes Department Store in Oroville. We would like to extend a warm thank you to the advertisers who help support the wonderful section. Sincerely, Gary DeVon, Brent Baker & Charlene Helm

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

May the peace, love and joy of Christmas be with you now and throughout the New Year.

Dear Santa, Christmas is fun. I want a dog. I want legos. I want a cat. I want a X-box. From Xavier Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class Dear Santa, I’ve been a good boy. I want a X-box. Legos and I-Fon. From Aaron Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class

HAPPY HOLIDAYS and Thank You for your Patronage! from

Paul, Linda, Tim, Monica & Karl

Paul’s Service

Hwy. 97, S., Oroville 476-2241

Merry Christmas May your holiday season be bright with good cheer!

We appreciate your patronage and support. We look forward to serving you in 2015!

from all of us at...

Oroville Dental Center Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. - Family Dentistry

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Hours: Thurs., 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

Call about our Monday appointments

Dear Santa, I want legos. I want stuff so I can lrn. I been a good girl. Love, Seaera Holcomb Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, Christmas is fun then are prents. I am a good girl and I work hard. I want a puppy. Love, Liset Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, For Christmas X-box 13 and I-phone 6 and money 2,000 and I-pad. I am a good boy because I help Mom and Dad. Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class Dear Santa, My name is Charlee. Thank you for the gifts last year. I love to play with my little brother. He is 5 years old. I want a dress and an American girl and an iphone 6 please. Love Charlee Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I want a puppy and a kitty. I will take care of them. I will give them milk and wattr. I will give them food that kittys eat and dog eat. I will play with their toys. I will throuw the ball to my dog. I will roll a ball to my kitty. Merry Christmas. Maria Quezaza Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class Dear Santa, I want for Christmas is I-phone and X-box Laptop for my sistar paint. Me and sistar are good. Santa I Love Christmas. Love, Cevina Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class Dear Santa, We have a Winter Concert Comeg up. I my a good boy because I turn in my homework. Love, Ryken Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa Claus, My name is Cody. I am a student. I help my mom and my Brothers too. Thank you for the presents last year. I like them. I want a snowmobile and a four wheeler. Love, Cody Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa My name is Isaac and i’ve been ok and very helpful. Thank you for the dvd player last year. Can I have a stufed animal puppy? I hope you have a great night. Love Isaac Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Have a Safe and Happy Holiday Season! from all of us at...

North Valley Hospital District 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

Dear Santa, I want a Barbie and I was being good and I want some culer pinsls and a kitin. Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, For Christmas I would like money 1500$ and x-box. I want to see you. Would like running power’s. I-pnone. I like Christmas. For sister I hre ben ego hre hapme workhard math got 5 prstn. I want a jeer. From Sidrac Oroville Elementary Mrs. Pat Smith’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Kaylee Edwards and I am in 6th grade. I live in Riverside with my grandma. I’ve been pretty good this year and been doing good in school. I know you’re busy this year but I’d like to send you my Christmas list. 1. Jenga 2. Earrings 3. Monopoly 4. Crafts and paints 5. Blanket 6. Itunes Gift Card 7. Converse All Star high top shoes in gray 8. Harry & Louis dolls from One Direction 9. Xbox 10. 5 Seconds of Summer poster Thank you Santa. Love, Kayle Edwards 6th Grade Dear Santa I help mom wrap presents. Thanks for the batcave now I want a race car please. Love, Ethen Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

Happy Holidays From All Of Us At

VIDEO

1300 Main

476-3900

Dear Santa Clause, I wish you have a Merry Christmas. I wonder how the reindeer are doing? I’ve been good because I have been listening the whole time. May you please bring me a Barbie house? May you please bring me a tablet and may you bring my sister a tablet too and some clothes. Sincerely, Miriam Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa I hope you have a Merry Christmas. Thank you for last year’s gift. I’ve been good by listening to the teacher. May I please have a Tablet, a Monster High Barbie, a board with some colorful markers and an eraser and a purple binder. Thank you Santa. Sincerely, Kimberly K. Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I cleaned my room and my Mom’s. Santa I helped my Dad pick up the can food. Santa I wish for a ipod and I want the color pink. Santa I wish for a scarf and I want the color pink. Love, Abby Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

The Spirit of Christmas

Let us give thanks this Christmas for our greatest gift... The Messiah. At this happy time of the year, we would like to express our sincere thanks to all our patrons. Floyd & Charlotte

We service everything we sell!

560 E. Riverside Dr., OMAK 509-826-2321

Happy Holidays & Warm Wishes in the New Year!

7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183

Dear Santa Claus, I bet your reindeer are doing good. I bet you got a present. I will like a race car for Christmas. I want it for Christmas because I help clean the art room. Sincerely, Alonso Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Zaida. Thank you for the gifts last year. how are you? I am sorry for no milk and cookies. last year my Brother loved his train last year. I loved my Barbie van. My Dad likt the truk. I whant and American girl ples. Love, Zaida Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa Claus I love what you put in my stocking last year. Thank you for the presents last year. I love it so much Thank you! I would like a giant candy bar and some make up too. I love you Santa I will put out some cookies and milk and I will always love you Santa Claus Love Jordyn Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Christine and I’m 7 year’s old, and I have a brother, a mom, and a dad. Thank you for the barbie clothes you got me last year. I will really appreciate it if you get me an ipad, a new barbie, and the other stuff you are going to bring me. I really believe in you. I can’t wait until you come. Love, Christine Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I liked when you were at the city of Oroville. My name is Daisy. I love your presents last year and this year. I hope I can give you cookies and milk. Say hi to Rudolph and miss Santa and everyone thats there. Please remember the puppy! Love Daisy Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa claus, Hi my name is Jon. I live in Tonasket Washington. My teacher is Mrs. Hardesty this year. I have been a good boy this year. Evrey day I go hom e and work. Thanks for all the gifts last year. You gave me a special shaved ice machine. This year I would like a lego Star Wars Ewok village and a good Christmas. Say hello to the elves and reindeer and Mrs. Claus for me. Thanks for everything. Love, John Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Season’s Greetings

Lee Frank Mercantile & Scholz Sporting Goods

324 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2105

Dear Santa Clause, I wish my grandma would get presents because she doesn’t get presents ever. Oh! and Merry Christmas! I’ve been listening in class. I’m 8 years old. I hope my mom and sis get presents. I thank you for the tablet. I wish I would get a doll. Sincerely, Madisyn Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Thank-You For Your Patronage Dear Santa, Thank you for the bike last year. I love you and Christmas. I have been very good in class. How are you and the reindeer? I hope you and the reindeer are doing great. I love the reindeer. I am almost 8 year old. May you please get me a Barbie dream house. I wish for $1000 please. Sincerely, Emma Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

I like you very much and my Mom likes you too Santa and my Dad likes you too Santa. I love you santa and I love my Mom and Dad. Love Kimberly and remember to give me a little puppy Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, This is Cesar. I hope Mrs. Claus is good. I hope the elves are doing well. I hope the reindeer can still fly. I hope you are good. I LOVE you! Santa can you bring a toy train? Sincerely, Cesar Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I am a student in Tonasket Elementary and I help my mom with her stuff. Thank you for the hot wheels last year. I am looking forward to having a bike this year. Thank you for everything you do Santa. Love, Scarlett Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I’m 8 years old. I wish for a tablet. I also wish for a book. I wish for a cat and I wish for some candy. Sincerely, Lily Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Hi my name is Colton. I help my dad build. I am 7 1/2 years old. I would like an xbox1. I would like an xbox 360 for gavin. Thank you very much. Love, Colton Albert Wilson Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Hardesty’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Thank you for giving me presents. I wish for a cat please and thank you. I wish for a remote control car. Could you please also bring something for my cousin Ethan? He is 13 and would like a Batman movie please. Sincerely, Taylor Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, How are you? How is Mrs. Claus? I wish for a Barbie house. I wish for 18 pairs high heels. I wish for a makeup kit. I wish for a jewelery kit. Sincerely, Jolee Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Andrea and I am 8 years old. I have been a good girl because I have been nice to my dog and my sister and my mom and dad. Thank you for all my presents last year. Dear Santa I want a lot of Barbies and a puppy toy and more movies and a new backpack for my birthday I want Monster High Barbies a lot. I hope you and your reindeer have a good day Merry Christmas Santa Claus. Sincerely, Andrea Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa How are you doing? I hope you are okay. Thank you for my DS that you brought me when I was 5. I still like it. This year I wish for a Plants vs. Zombies game for my DS and a toy for it. I wish you coul bring my mom and dad presents too. Sincerely, Isaiahs Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

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Dear Santa, I am 8 years old and my sister is 4 years old. I wish for a Wwe game for my Wii and my sister wishes for a Turtle game for the Wii. My dad wishes for a sniper game for the Wii. I hope you have a happy Christmas. Sincerely, Javier Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, If you can, I hope you can make it this year. Can you give my brother Eernie the new game Call of Duty Advanced Warfare please? Thank you. Love, K’den Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

  

Wishing you a magical and delightful Chrismtas and a Happy New Year! Thank you for shopping with us!

Dear Santa I’m 7 years old. I have been good this year. I always help after dinner. What I would like for Christmas is Super Smash Brothers for my DSXL please. Sincerely, Shea Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

   

 




DECEMBER 18, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Dear Santa, My Name is Josh I am 9 years old. My sister is 6 years old. My brother is 8 years old. I have been nice to my brother and sister even when they are annoying. I am thankful for the bike last year and gloves. I really want a new Lego set for Christmas this year. I hope the reindeer are rested for the trip. Your firend, Josh Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Evelyn and I am 7 years old. I have been a good helper this year helping my family. I have been a good girl too. Thank you for all the wonderful presents you gived to me. This year I want a computer like my brother Omar. Please tell the people in the North Pole for me hi! Even Mrs. Claus and Rudolph the Reindeer. Your Friend, Evelyn Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa Santa are you good? Are the reindeer good too? Is Mrs. Claus good today? Santa please can I get a million dollars? Please can I get a Barbie? Please can I get a makeup kit? Thank you Santa. Sincerely, Angeliane Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I hope you get a Christmas present this year. Are the Elves liking their jobs? Do you like your job? I wish for two big Lego Movie Lego sets, two medium Spider Man Lego sets, one batcopter Lego set and a Seahawks jersey. Sincerely, Laurence Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Charlee and I am 8 1/2 years old. I have been a very good girl this year. I have done the dishes and helped my mom a lot. Thank you for all the good things that I got last year like my American Girl dining room. For Christmas this year I would like a bike and a Ipod. I hope you and your reindeer have fun delivering all those presents! Love Charlee XOXO Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Carmen I am 7 years old. I have helped my mom feed my dog and cook. Thank you for all the presents you gave me like the slippers. I wish ot have an Olaf stuffed animal, boots, blue snow pants, a small owl. One more thing art supplies. Please say hello to Mrs. Claus and thank you and say thank you and say thank you to her too, to Rudof too. Say Merry Christmas to every one at the North Pole. Sincerely, Carmen Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Grace and I am 8 years old. I have been a very good girl this year I mopped and swept. I have washed the dishes and cleaned my room. I thank you for all the books last year and the stuff animals. For Cristmas I want a puppy and a lot of books and stuff animals and a pair of gloves and especially a spanish bible. I hope you and your reindeer especially Rudolph are resting for Cristmas and happy Cristmas Santa Claus! Your friend, Grace Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, How are you doing Santa? Thank you for bringing me the doll last year. I still like it. May I please have a tablet and a Barbie? I would also like a Frozen homelunch that sings Frozen. From, Xitlaly Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa My name is Haley and I am 7 years old. I have been a very good girl. THis year like when my mom tells me to clean my room I clean it. Thank you for bringing me a bow and arrow for Christmas. This year I would like a whole pack of stuff from the movie Frozen and I would like a great Christmas this year. Thank you for the wonderful Christmas. I will leave chocolate chip cookies and a glass of milk. I will leave good treats for the deer. Say hi for me to Mrs. Claus and Rudolph. Love, Haley Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

PAGE B3

Dear Santa, My name is Oralda and I am seven years old. I have been very good this year. I listen to my sister because she is having a baby and I listen at school too. This year I would like a tablet of an Ipad and 2 chargers, a computer and 4 pairs of gloves one small one medium and 2 big. I hope you and your reindeer are resting. Your friend, Oralda Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, Hi Santa! How are you? I was good this year. I cleaned the art classroom, my glasses and my house. I wish you gave me a Lego set and Lego movie. Sincerely, Daniel Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

the

Split End

in Tonasket Happy Holidays to all! Thank you for your patronage!

Dear Santa Claus, I want to know how the elves are feeling? I hope you have a great Christmas. How are you and Mrs. Claus feeling? I have been good because I cleaned my bedroom. I wish that I had a 49ers jersey for my dad please! Sincerely, CJ Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Clas

Happy Christmas Santa I did a good thing I want to tell you. I help mom and help Dad with his truck. I wish for a gray iphone cause I have a ipod but I don’t listen to the music that much. I wish for a push in nose puppy so it can sleep with me in my bedroom. Love, Riley Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

High Mr. C, I love your work and my name is Caiden. I like your magic. This year I have been a very good child, I help make a fire for my grandma because I live in the woods. Thank you for all of the great things you got me last year, like my bike. This Christmas I would really like to have a guitar. Santa I think you would like some extra cookies with your milk be sure to shave with misses Claus and the elves and reindeer and all of the other creatures there, and I hope I will never have a bad Christmas and my whole family and you guys too. Your friend, Caiden Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa I always pick up my messy mess. I have done good things this year. I wish I could have a tablet for Christmas. I wish I could have a green soft fastball. Love, Colton Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

MARYLOU’S GIFTS & MORE May your Christmas be Merry and Bright! 809 14th Ave., Oroville 509-476-3200

Dear Santa Claus, Hello Santa, I would just like to know if Mrs. Claus is feeling sick. I’ve been good because in school I’ve had an awesome attitude. I’d also like to know if you are running low on presents. Can I please have a very warm coat for my mom? Can you also bring me a toy train with a remote control? Love, Abran Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year! from all of us at...

Java Junkie 2306 N. on Hwy 97, Oroville (Les Schwab parking lot)

476-3893

MERRY CHRISTMAS &

HAPPY NEW YEAR

Dear Santa, My name is Zion and I am 8 years old. I helped my mom by doing dishes and getting that bob cat with my bow. Thanky in 2012 you got me a cool set of walky talkys. I really want a new bow with a lot of arrows. I will leave some carrots with cookie and milk for you. Sincerely, Zion Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

From

Happy Holidays

FRONTIER FOODS

from all of us at:

Season’s Greetings from all of us at...

May the Holiday season fill your home with joy, your heart with love and your life with laughter.

from all of us at...

May the spirit of the season fill you with joy all year long!

Midway Building Supply 132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

ALPINE VETERINARY CLINIC Denise S. Krytenberg, D.V.M. Rachel Ross, D.V.M.

512 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-8400

741 Riverside Drive, Omak l 509-826-5882

Oroville Building Supply 33086 Hwy 97, Oroville 509-476-3139 www.midwaybuilding.com


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | DECEMBER 18, 2014

Happy Holidays Dear Santa, I wish you a Merry Christmas. Are your reindeer doing good? I wish that I can have some Hot Wheels. I wish I can have some walkie talkies. Sincerely, Matthew Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Owsley’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Kevin and I am 7 years old. I help my mom wash the dishes every day. Thank you for the legoes I got for Christmas. For Christmas this year I would love a tablet and more Legoes. I will leave carrots by the cookies. See you next year! From, Kevin Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, ISanta my name is Mary Lu and I’m 7 and a 1/2 years old but when you get this letter I’ll be 8 years old. I’m writing to you for a few reasons. 1 is to tell you how good I’ve been so here it goes. This year I’ve been so so so good, I helped my mom on Thanksgiving by making cheese balls for my brother Juan. By the way thanks so so so much for everything you ever gave me in the history of my Christmases. This year I want, no, not my two front teeth. I want the rest of the Harry Potter books and 100 AR points. I really want the Harry Potter books. I think I can earn 100 AR points. Santa, I’ve never seen Mrs. Claus or you or the reindeer I think they’ll be so beautiful can you draw me a picture of them? If you can draw me a picture leave it by the milk and carrots and cookies. Love and great wishes, Mary Lu Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class Dear Santa, I helped my Dad put log in his truck when he told me to. I take out my dog sometimes. I wish I had a nintendo DS. I wish I had the game Pokemon Sapphire. From, Fermin Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class Dear Santa I have been good. I help my Dad ride horses. I take care of the cows and horses. I want a watch that is sparkly a the time is in numbers. I want shoes that has glitter on them and are heelboots. From, Sadie Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Luke Martin and I am 8 years old. I have been kind of good this year because I am nice to my brothers sometimes. Thank you for everything I got last year. Dear Santa I really want a treehouse for Christmas. I hope you have a fun time where you live. Sincerely, Luke Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Rylee and I am 7 years old. I have been good this year. I have taken care of my little sister Mia. Thank you for the dog you gave me last year. For Christmas this year I would love to have a violin. Thank you for the great presents you will give me this year. Love, Rylee Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I deserve a toy because I did chores. I helped my mom carry the tree. I want a blue wii. I want a red tablet. From, Jamyn Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa I’ve been helping my mom. I’ve been helping my dog a lot. I want a tablet. I want a Frozen toye. I want shoes of Frozen. I want a teddy bear. I want a notebook that locks. I want candy. I want clos. I want money a lost. I want a blue dress. I want pink boots. Love Amairan Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I have been helping my mom start our fire. I’ve been helping my chickens. I want a xbox Live. I wish for a football. I want a blue watch. From Gus Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I help my Mom arund the house. I tok care of my three dogs. Can I have a big pack of books, candy, teady Bear, movies and puppy. I want to have some other things, paint, Notbook, Tablet, Ipod, DSH, new clothes, Skates, Shose, Cub tikets, money 20 dollers, pink dress, blue dress, black boots, posters, chapter books, pink boots, crans, joke books, pencill, candy, big notebook, stickey nots, 1000 pack stikers, 100 Junie B. books. From Yaretzi Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I have done good things this year. I listen to my parents. I have helped my little sister get out of the car. I wish for a red football. I wish for a xbox 360 Batman 3 game. Love, Kristian Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, I listin at class and school. I wish for the new sqistr light. Santa I also want a zonbie game. From Levin Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Dear Santa, My name is Jeremy and I am 7 years old. I have been nice. Thank you for my bike. I want a piece of a rock. I want a picture of you. I want some gloves I want a scarf. I love you Santa Claus. From, Jeremy Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Huckaby’s 2nd Grade Class

We appreciate you and your continued support!

Thank you to all of our customers! We appreciate you and wish you and your family a wonderful holiday season!

ROY’S PHARMACY

318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2149

Happy Holidays!

Dear Santa, I helped my Dad cut wood. I helped my mom clean the house. I wish I could have a blue DS. I wish I could have a baby poodle puppy. I wish I could have a binder for when we play school. I wish I could have a phone. I wish my Mom will feel better becuse she got in a car accident. Love, JayLynn Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

www.cj-cycle.com Motorcycle, ATV & Snowmobile

Located at 16-A Hwy 7 (5 mi S on SR 97) Tonasket

509-486-2720

BONAPARTE Lake Resort & Restaurant Ph. 509-486-2828

Dear Santa, I do my chores. I clean my room and do my logry and take care of my pets. I wish for a puppy and a new backpack and a katten. From, Maya Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

& Happy New Year! We Thank You for your business and support in 2014! We will be reopening for weekends beginning January 3.

We’re available for private parties and catering! Call 509.322.1868

Dear Santa, I help my Dad with histrack with his engine because it blow up. I want a ipod I also want to go to the north pole. I want to ride in your sleigh to drop off some presents. I want a lot of cub den tikets I want a thousand dollars. From Emmitt Tonasket Elementary Mrs. Lawrence 2nd Grade Class

Happy Holidays To All Our Customers

We have everything you need for your holiday cooking, baking & entertaining.

Feliz Navidad May your Christmas be Merry & Bright! From all of us at

TRINO’S Mexican Restaurant

1918 Main St. , Oroville 476-9151

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127

Best wishes for a holiday season bright with good cheer.We thank you for your patronage, friendship and support.

Merry Christmas Happy Hanukkah & Blessed Solstice from your friends at the

OMAK THEATER 509-826-0860

www.omaktheater.com

& The MIRAGE THEATER 101 S. Main St.

2 blocks from Omak Theater

KINROSS • Putting People First • Outstanding Corporate Citizenship • High Performance Culture • Rigorous Financial Discipline

DEPARTMENT STORE

OPEN: 8 A.M. - 9 P.M. Everyday

1000 23rd AVE. • OROVILLE, WA 476-3651

Kettle River - Buckhorn

From All Of Us At Kinross, We Wish You A Very Happy Holiday Season!

Our core purpose is to lead the world in generating value through responsible mining.

www.kinross.com

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, December 18, 2014  

December 18, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, December 18, 2014  

December 18, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune