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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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A Thanksgiving dinner invite

CATCHING THAT HOLIDAY SPIRIT

Full turkey meals and potlucks offered BY GARY A. DEVON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Free Thanksgiving dinners are being offered in Oroville and Chesaw this Thursday and everyone is invited to come in and share the holiday with family, friends and neighbors. One dinner in Oroville is put together by Eva’s Diner with help serving from several local volunteers, dinner starts at 1 p.m. at the diner located at 712 14th Avenue. The free traditional turkey Thanksgiving dinner will include all the trimmings, as well as a selection of different pies for desert, including pumpkin and apple. John Desjardin, from Hometown Pizza and Pasta will be helping prepare some of the pies. Also in Oroville, at 1 p.m., all are invited to partake of a traditional Thanksgiving meal at the Oroville Senior Center, located at

Above, Oroville students from the OHS Future Business Leaders of America, sell Christmas wreaths as a fund raiser at the Oroville Community Bazaar. This year’s event, a holiday tradition that allows people to get gift ideas for the upcoming Christmas Holidays, was held at the Oroville Elementary School Gym and was well attended by vendors and holiday shoppers alike.

1521 Golden Street. The members of the Senior Center will provide the turkeys, dressing, potatoes, gravy and refreshments. They are also asking those that can to bring the rest of the meal, so that all, even those emptyhanded, may be fed. There will be a potluck dinner for Oroville Eagles members who do not have family or can’t make it to be with their family. The organization will provide the turkey and ham and members are asked to bring a side or desert. The members of the Chesaw Community Bible Church will be cooking for the free Thanksgiving Dinner being held in the Community Building in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 27 starting at noon. The dinner is for everyone in the community and it is free. There will be turkey, yams, mashed potatoes, gravy, dressing, salads, and desserts. Please come and enjoy.

More snowfall by this Friday night THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN VALLEY – While valley residents have been waking up to colder than normal November mornings, the National Weather Service was predicting rain for Thanksgiving with more snow by the weekend. Daytime temperatures were predicted in the lower to mid-40’s with lows ranging from the high 20s to mid-30s through Friday, averaging about 10 degrees higher than last week. However, by Friday night temperatures were expected to drop to as low as 11 to 21 degrees with a 20 percent chance of snow on Friday night. The NWS was predicting most-

Right, Tyler Duchow concentrates as he records weight information from the food drive conducted by Tonasket Elementary School last week. For more information on how the 4th and 5th grade ASB collected more than a ton of food, see page A3. Photos by Gary DeVon and Brent Baker

BRRRR! In addition to snow, low temps are forecast in the low to mid-twenties for the next few days

ly cloudy to start the weekend with highs in the 20s and lows in 10 to 16 degrees. On Sunday, the service predicts mostly cloudy with a 40 percent chance of snow. Highs in the lower 20s to lower 30s. Lows are forecast from 16 to 20 degrees.

Branch discusses Council of Governments Prince Family offers to lease ‘bin lot’ property to city for park use BY GARY A. DEVON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council heard discussion on several items from Chris Branch, the city’s director of Community Development, at their Tuesday, Nov. 18 council meeting. Branch reported on the coalition of governments, known as the Okanogan County Council of Governments, that has formed in order to handle a number of local issues, especially those concerning transportation. The COG was formed by the municipalities and county after they were voted out of the Regional Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n P l a n n i n g Organization (RTPO) that included Chelan, Douglas and Chris Branch

Okanogan County. The other counties and the larger municipalities decided that there wasn’t the same shared interest in regional transportation planning. “Right now we are keeping the focus

“Right now we are keeping our focus on transportation.. The RTPO used to decide what would be funded, now we have to do that” Chris Branch, Director Oroville Community Development

on transportation,” said Branch. “The RTPO used to decide what would be funded, but since we were expelled, if you will, now we have to do that.” The COG includes all the unincorporated cities of Okanogan County, as well as the county itself. Branch also talked about the North Central Washington Economic Development District, or NCWEDD, which still includes the three counties — Chelan, Douglas an Okanogan. The

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 48

organization gets funding from the federal government and is still very supportive of regional planning, according to Branch. Branch said there was a change in leadership for the district, but there is still support for things like the partnership with Canadians along Highway 97 regarding tourism. “Some of the bigger entities which may have wanted us out of the RTPO are still on board. They are willing to finish work on the Highway 97 project,” he said. Branch also talked about the need for a Capital Facilities Plan Update, he said this would be important to the city especially for projects involving the federal government, like the proposed FFA project to move the location of the runway at the city’s Dorothy Scott International Airport. “When it comes out you’re going to go ahead and spend the dollars you have got to have a Capital Facilities Plan or the auditor beats up on JoAnne (Clerk Denney),” said Branch. His commented about the Shoreline Master Plan, which he said was heading the council’s way after being reviewed by

SEE BRANCH | PG A2

Gary DeVon/staff photo

This empty lot located along Highway 97 at the south entrance to Oroville is often full of empty apple bins which are stored there by Gold Digger Apples during the off season. Although convenient for the apple growers’ cooperative, the property often gets complaints about blowing dust from nearby homeowners. The Prince Family has proposed leasing the lot to the city for use as a park.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Shop Local A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Cops & Courts Sports Classifieds

A8 B1-3 B4-5

Real Estate Obituaries

B5 B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014

LOCAL NEWS CHRISTMAS JUST AROUND THE CORNER

What to know before you cut that Christmas tree As you search for that special tree, please follow the US Forest Service guidelines below THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Attendance was down a bit for this year’s Oroville Community Bazaar held at the elementary school on Friday evening and Saturday morning and afternoon, perhaps due to the fresh snowfall speculated some vendors. However, there were lots of items for sale, including many handcrafted gifts just in time for holiday gift giving.

BRANCH | FROM A1 the state Department of Ecology. “We’d like to get it adopted by the end of the year,” he said. In addition, Branch discussed the area of Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park that divides the lake from the pond. Property owners whose property is adjacent to the pond are requesting a right of way in order to move their boats from the pond to the lake. “It might also be in the city’s interest if we want to make the pond accessible to things like paddle boats, etc.,” said Branch. “One of the owners does not have

an easement and he keeps the boat outside of the pond.” Although the council was not asked to make any decisions on the matter, some of the property owners did get in trouble with the city earlier this year when they created their own access by digging a channel on city property. Dog Park Paul Bouchard, an EMT with the Oroville Ambulance, asked if the city might consider a “dog park” area at Veterans Memorial Park where dogs can be taken off their leaches to run. “Omak just did one, it takes a

fence,” said Branch. “I don’t think that’s the right park,” said Mayor Chuck Spieth, who said the city could look at other areas.

NEW PARK? Among the items the city discussed at their budget workshop on Oct. 28, was an offer by the Prince Family to lease the property where Gold Digger Apples stores their apple bins for a park. They discussed a potential fiveyear lease agreement, with five year renewals, but the details have yet to be worked out.

North Cascades Highway closes for the winter THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TWISP – The latest blast of wintery weather on State Route 20, the North Cascades Highway, will keep it closed until next spring. The Washington State Department of Transportation temporarily closed the highway at 9:30 Sunday morning, due to heavy snowfall and a snowslide in the Liberty Bell zone east of Washington Pass. After today’s assessment by maintenance and avalanche technicians who found more slides, WSDOT determined it could not safely keep the North

Cascades Highway open. “Any more snow will pack those avalanche chutes, and we’d be putting the public and our crews at risk if we tried to keep the road open any longer,” said Twisp Maintenance Supervisor Don Becker. More snow at the high elevations is forecast through the Thanksgiving holiday period. Slides below the Liberty Bell avalanche chutes, just east of 5,477 foot Washington Pass, started dumping snow onto the highway Sunday morning. By this (Monday) morning, two more slides had dumped snow across the highway.

Last year, WSDOT closed the North Cascades Highway for the season on Dec. 3. The 37-milelong winter closure zone begins 14 miles east of Newhalem at milepost 134 on the west side of Rainy Pass (4,855 feet) and ends 22 miles west of Winthrop at milepost 171 below Washington Pass. Avalanches usually close the highway between Thanksgiving and the second week of December. Last spring, the highway reopened May 8. It is typically reopened between late March and early May. The earliest opening ever was March 10, 2006.

New office hours at Tonasket Ranger District office SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST

TONASKET – Beginning Monday, Dec. 1, the business hours for Tonasket Ranger District will be 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. with a 30-minute closure for lunch from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. each day. The office provides Forest information, Northwest Forest Passes and other National Forest recreation passes, maps, a small

bookstore and permits for special forest products such as firewood. Forest information and passes are available online at www. fs.usda.gov/goto/okawen and www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r6/passes-permits/recreation respectively. Permit sales for firewood and Christmas trees continue to be available through vendors including: •Hughes Department Store in Oroville • The Junction in Tonasket • Conconully General Store in

On this Thanksgiving Day the

Oroville Scholarship Foundation

Conconully “The change of office hours better reflects service to the public while allowing district staff an available lunch time period” said Matt Reidy, District Ranger. For more information, please contact the Tonasket Ranger District at 509-486-2186.

Correction: Joanne Sutton’s name was accidently left off the program for the Missoula Children’s Theatre production of Rapunzel, which was held in Oroville last weekend. Sutton was a Pixie in the play.

WENATCHEE - If you have any questions, please contact any of our Forest Service offices. You will need a $5 Christmas tree permit to remove a tree from the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Permits are available at all Forest Service offices and various businesses in Okanogan, Chelan, Kittitas, and Yakima Counties. Permits are not refundable. Maximum tree size is 15 feet. The tree may be cut, or dug up and removed as a transplant. The ground starts freezing as early as November. Please fill in the hole created when digging up a live tree. Please remove the entire tree, not just the top. Leave no more than a 6-inch stump. If there are any live limbs still attached to stump after tree is felled, cut them from the stump. When at a trailhead requiring a fee, you will need to display a Northwest Forest Pass on dashboard of vehicle. This can be purchased at any Forest Service office. Christmas tree permits do not allow you to park in a Sno-Park. If you park in a Sno-Park you must have a valid Washington State Sno-Park permit displayed in your vehicle. When choosing a Christmas tree, try to pick a tree from among a group of trees so one area does not become void of trees. The Christmas tree permit system is not meant to be a replacement for our special forest product transplant program. That program is separate with its own guidelines. The Christmas tree program is just that, a program set up for families to cut their own Christmas tree. When you cut your tree, remember to punch out the month, day, and year on the permit tag. Tags may not be re-used. Attach the Christmas tree tag where it is clearly visible on the tree. It should be attached before the tree is removed from the site. Each permit is for one Christmas tree. Only two permits issued per family. Christmas trees can only be cut in the National Forest -- greenshaded areas on maps.

• Within 150 feet of any stream, lake, pond, or wetland area. • In active timber sale areas. • On privately owned and state managed land within the National Forest boundary. • In tree plantations, campgrounds, administrative sites, or other areas where specifically posted.

TREE CARE AND TRANSPORTATION: If a tree is obtained early in the season, it should be kept in a cool place, out of the wind, in a bucket of water. Remember, a tree that is dry is an extreme fire hazard. Carry the tree carefully out of

the woods. If the tree will not fit in the vehicle, wrap it in a tarp to prevent windburn and needle loss during transportation. When you get your tree home, make a fresh cut on the butt to open up the pores which have been clogged by sap. Cut off at least one-half inch. If you do not make a fresh cut, the tree will not be able to drink water. After the cut is made, put the tree in water as soon as possible. An average tree may consume between a quart and a gallon of water per day. Avoid placing the tree next to fireplaces, heaters, television sets, or other heat sources. Forest road conditions can change rapidly this time of year. For current information, please contact the local Ranger District office. District personnel may also be able to help you find the type of tree you would like to take home for the holidays. Be sure to properly dispose of your cut tree after the holidays. Most waste disposal companies offer special pick up times. Never try to burn the tree in your fireplace or woodstove; a chimney fire could result. The employees of the Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests wish you a happy holiday season and hope that your Christmas tree will be a valued addition to your family’s enjoyment.

AREAS WHERE TREES CANNOT BE CUT: • Within congressionally designated Wilderness Areas. • Within Fire Closure Areas. Contact local Forest Service offices for information on specific closure areas. • Within 200 feet of the following roads: Naches District—along State Highway 410, U.S. Highway 12, and Forest Service Roads #1200, #1800, and #1900 Entiat District—along the Entiat Valley Road Cle Elum District—along I-90 and I-97 Methow Valley District—along State Highway 20 over Loup Loup Pass between Twisp and Okanogan. Along Harts Pass road #5400. Along North Cascades Scenic Highway between east and west scenic highway portal signs (including all side roads).

Thanks All Their Donors!

th 26LIGHTED

OSF recently gave

FARM

Eric Stiles

of the OHS Music Dept. $300

As share of the receipts of the jointly held Annual Spring Variety Show & Auction event. The rest of the money raised is used for Oroville Scholarship Applicants. Thank You! Oroville Scholarship Fund - 501(c)3 “Local donors helping local students” www.orovillescholarshipsfoundation.com

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

LOCAL FOREST SERVICE OFFICE CONTACT INFORMATION As the holiday season approaches, the Forest Service is once again offering an opportunity for families to obtain a Christmas tree from the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Christmas tree permits are on sale for $5 each at all ranger stations and the forest headquarters in Wenatchee. The $5 permit allows a family to cut a tree or dig a live transplant tree. Permits may be purchased in person or by mail. For those who can’t make it into any of our offices during daily business hours many local businesses are also selling Christmas tree permits. In the general Tonasket area those include: • General Store, Conconully, 201 N. Main Street, (509) 8263374 • Junction Mini-mart, Tonasket, 509 S. Whitcomb, (509) 486-1800 • Prince’s Center, 1000 23rd Ave., Oroville, (509) 476-3651 When venturing out into the cold and snowy hills in pursuit of a Christmas tree, please follow the tips listed below for a safe trip: Before leaving home, notify a friend or family member where you will be going and when you will return. Then, stick to your plan and let your contact person know when you have returned. Consider carefully your clothing and equipment needs, making certain they are adequate for the worst conditions you might encounter. ALWAYS check out the avalanche hazard before leaving home. Be familiar with the area that you plan to visit. Carry extra clothing, food, and tools in your vehicle for those unexpected mishaps that may occur. High clearance 4-wheel driver vehicles are recommended for driving on national forest roads during the winter months. Remember to leave early in the day to allow for maximum daylight. Also, be prepared for all types of weather.

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NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

A ton of generosity TES students collect more than 2,300 pounds of food

Left, the Tonasket Elementary ASB conducted a food drive last week that brought in 2,302 pounds of food that will be distributed to the families of needy classmates, as well as the Tonasket Food Bank if there is food left over after the initial distribution. The group included (front row, l-r) Sara Sanchez, Micaiah Schell, Sita Watson, Brooke Richey, Alexis Rodriguez, (back) adviser Katie Abrahamson, Tyler Duchow, Carter Timm, Trace Scott, Connor Hardesty, William Ortega and Janet Alvarez. Below left, ASB adviser Katie Abrahamson and some of the Tonasket Elementary Students coordinating the food drive weigh a box of food on Friday.

BY BRENT BAKER BAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - After the first day of Tonasket Elementary School’s Thanksgiving food drive, ASB adviser Katie Abrahamson wondered if there would be enough food to meet what looked like would be a huge demand. As it turns out, the diligence of the fourth and fifth grade ASB officers and the generosity of the elementary students’ families and area businesses paid off with a collection of 2,302 pounds of food that was set to be distributed to needy school district families. The food was set to be distributed Monday to families who had indicated to the school that they had a need, either by picking it up or through delivery if necessary. “We have an extensive list of families who have called in wanting to benefit from it,” Abrahamson said. “We circulated fliers on the doors in the school and throughout the staff. We were primarily doing it for the families here. We didn’t want it to be one of those where the food all goes away and we don’t see the benefit from it. “Any remainders will go to the Food Bank for their giveaway on Tuesday, but I’m not sure that they will.” “This means we can give more than 50 boxes of food back to the community and families in need over the holiday season,” said Elementary Principal Jeremy Clark. “I am so proud of our students and their generous families. AS a school and community we have so much to be thankful for; thank you for allowing us to give back.” The kids made daily announcements over the intercom and the food drive became a competition between grades as the week went on. “We’ve been announcing it over the speaker every morning, the totals from the day before,” Abrahamson said. “So it really started getting competitive. We had one of the kids, Janet Alvarez, give the announcement in Spanish as well. The announcements were written in English; she translated them in her mind before speaking. She’s just really gifted.” Each day the ASB officers gathered in the cafeteria to weigh the boxes of food and tally them by grade for the in-school competition. The kids themselves said that while they knew it was a good thing to be helping those in need, they were finding their own ways of thinking challenged as well. “This doesn’t just change things for the people we’re giving to,” said Tyler Duchow. “It makes changes in our lives; when we’re giving, we’re changing also.” “Thanksgiving is all about giving thank yous and giving,” said Micaiah Schell. “It can change other people’s lives, and ours too, when we contribute and support them.” Sita Watson felt that it was important for people who have a lot to help out those who don’t have as much. “There’s a lot of people who don’t have much money or food,” she said. “A lot of people have children who are hungry. The

Brent Baker/staff photos

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adults don’t have money to buy food; we have the money to get food and give it to the people who don’t.” “Sometimes we think we have it bad,” said Trace Scott. “But we don’t think about others that don’t have as much food as us, or as much money, so when we do something to get a food drive it helps them out in a very special way. It makes me feel kind of like people who have everything are a little spoiled. We don’t have to work as hard to get what we want or what we need. The people who don’t have what they need have to work a lot harder to get that.” Some of the kids, inspired by the generosity of the community as well as concerned for the needs they saw, already had visions of bigger things. “People who don’t have much food can be suffering from a

whole lot of things,” Sita Watson said. “If they were sick and didn’t have that much medicine, a food drive you could bring in medicine or toothbrushes and stuff.” “Food drives are a way we can help people who don’t have money,” Connor Hardesty said. “But it can also give them a jump start to having a good life and go on and do amazing things in the world.” Abrahamson said it also was inspiring to see where some of the food came from, and what the kids learned through the experience. “The first day we were a little skeptical,” she said. “We were afraid we might not have enough donations... after awhile it just started piling in. More and more came, even from families that probably can’t afford to give. “They gave anyway.”

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014

Make a Difference...Shop Local When you Shop Local you help promote and support locally owned, independent businesses. It’s about making your hard-earned money go further, fueling the local economy, and helping to preserve the unique character of our Okanogan County Communities.

Oroville

— Help Okanogan County Thrive

BLACK FRIDAY SALE! Nov. 28 - Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Marylou’s Gifts & More Global Gifts & Gallery Marylou’s Hidden Treasures & World of Gaia Progressive

809 14th 1404 Main 1400 Main 1402 Main Oroville, WA

The Highland Stitchery Ladies will be making quilts and giving demonstrations at MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures. All sales from The Higland Stitchery to be donated to Vanessa Behan Crisis Center.

OROVILLE - Enjoy Oroville’s Christmas Tree Lighting and Tractor Parade Sat., Dec. 6 from 5 to 6 p.m. Make sure to check out all the shops in town for that perfect gift!

Blossom & Briar

OROVILLE - Annual Holiday Open House Sat., Nov. 29. Lots of new gift items. Order your holiday centerpieces! SHOP LOCAL!

Give the Gift of Gratitude!

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$10 at local businesses. Okanogan to Oroville. Call 485-2906

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NCW Blue Star Mothers Put our Local Heroes on your Gift List this year! NCW Blue Star Mothers supporting moms of the military. Not every soldier has a spouse or children...but every soldier has a mother. Ncw.bluestars@yahoo.com. Phone 485-2906

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ROY’S PHARMACY 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2149 Tonasket Community Church Christmas Bazaar TONASKET - Find us at 24 E. 4th St., Tonasket on Fri., Dec. 5 from 4 to 8 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lots of made with love items! There will be a bake sale, out with old...in with new marked down...little vintage corner. One of a kind gifts just for you. Come on out an enjoy Winter Fest Activities and join us for a cup of coffee. Sat., Dec. 6 at 9 a.m. delicious cinnamon rolls from Shannon’s! Get ready for a fun day of shopping in Tonasket. Join us again for lunch on Sat., Dec. 6 from 11 to 2 p.m. Then finish up your shopping. Saturday will watch for Roz Nau’s music students as they travel through town. For more information, please call 509-486-0995 or 509486-2066.

Holiday Bazaar and Gift Show TONASKET - The 19th Annual Holiday Bazaar and Gift Show will be held at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Friday, Dec. 5 and Saturday, Dec. 6. Friday hours are 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday hours are: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With over 30 vendors, everyone is sure to find something for each person on their gift list. Food will be served all day and there will be live entertainment. Come shop for some of the most unique gifts in the area and Shop Local! For more information check the CCC website at: www.communityculturalcenter.org or call 509-4861328. The Community Cultural Center, a nonprofit organization, is located at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket.

Tonasket Classic Christmas Bazaar TONASKET - Classic Christmas Bazaar Friday, Dec 5, 3 to 8 p.m. and Saturday, Dec 6, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Crossroads Church at 415A S. Whitcomb, Tonasket. The bazaar coordinates with the Tonasket Chamber’s Tree Lighting Festival and the opening of the Christmas Holiday.

The Farm Shed Antiques & Gifts 10% - 50%

Wine Tasting - Discounts - Free Gifts - Refreshments

Drawing for Gift Certificates!

Okanogan

Christmas Tree Lighting and Tractor Parade

Girls Night Fri., Dec. 12 from 4-7 pm Out... Wine Tasting, Cheese & More

Savings Storewide Nov. 28 - 30

Thanksgiving Day - Closed

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Friday - Open Early at 8:00 a.m.

521 2nd Ave S, Okanogan

Open 7 days a week until Christmas.

Ph. 509-422-9722

Black Friday Sale OROVILLE - Marylou’s Gifts & More and Global Gifts & Gallery & World of Gaia will have a Black Friday Sale Nov. 28 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. (check out ad on this page) Stop by for wine tasting, discounts, free gifts and refreshments. The Highland Stitchery Ladies will be making quilts and giving demonstrations at MaryLou’s Hidden Treasures. All sales from The Higland Stitchery to be donated to Vanessa Behan Crisis Center.

NCW Blue Star Mothers

OROVILLE - NCW Blue Star Mothers supporting moms of the military. Every Family and Supporter is asked to pick up AS MANY HOMETOWN SOLDIER CALENDARS as you can to help make this fund raiser a success! A very high quality calendar. The calendars are to go for $10 each which will fund next year’s needs. “We are so excited to get these out into our North Valley communities.” ~Daralyn Hollenbeck President NCW Blue Star Mothers 509-485-2906

Antiques & Gifts

Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus presents the Christmas Concert OMAK - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus will present the Christmas Concert Sun., Dec. 7 at 3 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center. Tickets are: Adults $12, Seniors $10, Youth $8, 12 and under FREE. Ticket outlets: Omak: Corner Shelf, Okanogan: Rawson’s, Tonasket: Roy’s Pharmacy, Oroville: Oroville Pharmacy, Brewster: Brewster Drug or at the door. Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus 509-322-0261.

Girls Night Out TONASKET - Baker’s Acres Girls Night Out will be Fri., Dec. 12 from 4 to 7 p.m. Refreshements & More. Come visit our gift shop!

Hidden Treasures Annual Open House TONASKET - Hidden Treasures Annual Open House Sat., Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Refreshments, holiday cookies & coffee. Drawings for discounts on purchases.

2 Rodeo Rd., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-8866

Don’ett! Forg

Sat. Dec. 6! A few ideas for Christmas… Prices in effect Nov. 26th – Dec. 7th, 2014

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496 Starting Dec. Open 7 Days a Week!

Annual Coat and Toy Drive at OK Chevy TONASKET - Our Annual Coat and Toy Drive is on! Please help us fill our showroom pickup with new coats & toys for local kids! Stop by and decorate our tree with gloves & mittens. OK Chevy located at 512 S. Whitcomb Ave. Call 509-486-8400. Proud supporters of North County! Our passion and love for the community runs deep. Please Shop Local this Holiday Season!

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Talking Toolbelt $ Set

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Our passion and love for the community runs deep... please Shop Local this Holiday Season! Help us fill our pickup with new coats & toys! Stop by and decorate our tree with gloves & mittens.

OK Chevrolet 512 S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 509-486-8400

Made in WA. Assorted Sizes & Designs

Tonasket Civic League Bazaar TONASKET - Will be on Fri., Dec. 5 from 4 to 8 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Civic League Bazaar is located at the elementary school in Tonasket, tucked back in the corner. Roz Nau’s students will be at the Civic League Bazaar as well as the Tonasket Community Church. They are still accepting vendors. Call Nancy Inlow (Carl) 509-4862207. Civic League Bazaar located at 35 E. Hwy 20, Tonasket.

Kinetic Sand 2.2lb bag

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324 & 316 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket • 509-486-2105 Monday - Friday 8:00am - 6:00pm Sat. 8am-5pm Sun. 11am-4pm

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127


NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Farewell

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

REP. RICHARD “DOC” HASTINGS

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

As I complete my final weeks in Congress, it is only natural to reflect on the past 20 years. It has truly been my honor and privilege to serve you and represent those who call Central Washington home in Congress. Whether it’s helping seniors with their Social Security benefits, ensuring that veterans are awarded the medals they earned but never received, or cutting through bureaucratic red tape to support local families and small businesses – the opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives is something that I will always be grateful for. And, it’s one of the things I will miss most about this job. Throughout the years, I’ve appreciated your support and your input on ways to strengthen Central Rep. Hastings Washington and our nation. I have had the opportunity to tour local businesses, family farms and hospitals, talk with students in their classrooms, visit dams, take tours of Hanford, irrigation projects, national forests and PNNL, and host countless town hall meetings in communities throughout our region. I’ve received over 800,000 letters, emails and phone calls from Central Washington residents during my time in Congress on a wide variety of issues – gasoline prices, homeland security, taxes, immigration, the national debt, the Second Amendment, Social Security, health care and more. Regardless of whether there was agreement on the individual issue at hand, I’ve always benefited from these communications. The House of Representatives is colloquially known as “The People’s House.” In our form of democracy it’s imperative that Members of Congress hear from those they were elected to represent. Our American system of government, as established by the Constitution, still works over 200 years later. This achievement is largely due to the participation of the American people in their government. Together, we have been able to achieve some real successes for our communities. We have opened up new markets for our agriculture economy and lowered taxes for families and small businesses. We have sought and made real progress on cleanup at Hanford and water solutions for the Yakima and Columbia River Basins. We have advanced much-needed reform of the Endangered Species Act, protected our dams from threats posed by extreme environmentalists, and held federal land and water management agencies accountable for working with their Central Washington neighbors and partners, allowing public access, and actually taking care of the land and waters they have been tasked to steward. When I retire at the end of the year, I will no longer be your voice in Congress, but Central Washington is still my home. I look forward to spending less time on airplanes traveling back and forth to Washington, D.C. and more time here at home in the real Washington with my family and friends. This is my final weekly message to you as your Congressman, and in closing I would like to simply say thank you and wish you health and happiness. Editor’s Note: Just want to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving from our staff and families to yours. We at the Gazette-Tribune have a lot to be thankful for and we hope that you do as well. Even when times are hard we can usually find something to be thankful for -- family and friends, both past and present, enough to eat, a roof over our heads. There are lots of places to get a Thanksgiving meal this year, so if you don’t want to prepare one yourself, why not stop by one of the free offerings around our communities. Again, Happy Thanksgiving. G.A.D.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Leaving the department in good hands Dear Gary, Friday, the 31st of October 2014, was my last day as the Chief Police Officer for the City of Oroville and all the responsibilities that go with the position, but more importantly I consider myself a citizen of the City of Oroville where I have been entrusted with the safety, well being and caretaking of the citizens of this generous little town. I leave this profession as both happy and apprehensive as to what lies ahead for Crish and I, as we make that turn to something new. I have been asked numerous times by friends and citizens “what are you going to do, your still so young” I have to admit I like the sound of that! my answer has not been very definite as I am not sure what I am going to do next, I do have a few ideas but nothing firm. I have spent the last 35 years of my life in one uniform or another and owe both the military and the City of Oroville a great deal of thanks for trusting me to do the right thing, maybe not necessarily what the book says to do, but what was needed and what common sense dictated at the time. I have heard concerns of citizens of what happens next at the department. They want the relationship that has been developed between the citizens of Oroville and their police department to continue. The relationship that started with former Police Chief Randy Wheat. The relationship is that; the officer should be part of the community and not on the outside just looking in. I have tried to continue to nurture this relationship throughout my 15 years as an employee here, and the comments that I have received lately have led me to believe that I have obtained a certain amount of success. I can assure you that I am confident that Todd Hill, who has been employed here at the department for the past 11 years will do a great job of continuing on the values, and common sense attitudes, that have led the department for the past 10 years. I want to thank the following people, for whom without we could not do our duty here at the department; the ladies next door of City Hall, the City Superintendent and his public works guys for what they do on any given day. I want to thank my clerk Brenda Rounds for her daily “can do” attitude and for having all the answers when I needed them the most, the patrolman of the police department as they deserve a lot of credit for the job they do at all hours of the night and early morning and during the weekends and holidays without complaint, and this includes their families who sacrifice so much to ensure that the city is patrolled and the citizens are taken care of. I want to thank Mayor Chuck Spieth for his support and trust. Lastly I want to thank my wife, family and friends for their support during the last 35 years of public service for without their sacrifice and worry, it would not have been possible to do it on my own. Thanks again Oroville, I will see you around. R. Clay Warnstaff Oroville

The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago: November 17 -24, 1939: The Peerless Hotel is announcing a very appetizing menu for Thanksgiving. They invite everyone to make it a real holiday and eat their Thanksgiving dinner at the hotel, enjoying the delicious dinner being prepared for the occasion by Chef Owyen. The menu is: Shrimp cocktail or Tomato Juice, Chicken Consomme’, Heart of Celery - Olives, Roast young tom turkey, Celery Dressing, Cranberry Sauce, Grilled Tenderloin Steak, Mushroom sauce, Mashed or Candied Sweet Potatoes, June peas, Apple pie - Mince pie - Pumpkin pie, English Plum Pudding, hard or brandy sauce, Chocolate Sundae with wafers and Coffee. All for the grand price of $.75. Ike’s Grocery and Ben Prince’s Store both have received some highly complimentary letters recently from W. J. Kahle, President of the Crescent Manufacturing Co. of Seattle, packers and distributors of spices, etc. in regard to fresh and canned tomatoes from this district. A demonstration of the new Ford Tractors, at a price of $685.00 will be held by Gregory Motors of Okanogan. The show will be held at the Ross Hammer place, three miles south of Oroville, and all who are interested are invited to attend. Parents, Teachers, congratulations! Oroville PTA memberships exceed all precious records as revealed at the close of the spirited campaign, with a total of 250 members! Grocery prices: 4# Macaroni, $.15; 4# bag Raisins, $.22; Campbell’s Tomato Soup, 4 cans, $.27; Shrimp, $.11 per tin; 50# bag potatoes, $.59; #2 1/2; Pork & Beans, $2 for $.17; Morning Milk, 8 cans, $.25; Delicious sausage or ground beef, 2# for $.25. Prime ribs of beef, $17 1/2 per lb.; 49 lb bag of flour, $1.17.

Fear for future of my grandchildren Dear Editor, Last week’s columns by Gary DeVon and William Slusher reminded me why I’m ready to withdraw to my couch and woodstove and let the world cruise along without me. Gary is bemoaning getting old in our county and Mr. Slusher points out seven reasons for the decline of our country. I think some of his reasons are questionable and there are others that I would have added, but the man makes his point. Really, Mr. Slusher, seven sins? My generation is pretty much out of the discussion now. The right or wrong of that opinion is a topic for another day. My children’s age group, late thirties and early forties, are the ones out there banging their heads against the system, the bureaucracy, the P.C. sheriffs or whoever and they are the ones who will, probably, get us pointed toward the right direction. I still have some confidence in that group. However, if the tide doesn’t start to turn soon, I do fear for my grandchildren and, now, great-grandchildren. I don’t believe they will be strong enough to correct the political and economic sails and our country will wander further off its two-hundred-plus year course into the anarchy and despair of a third world country, or worse. And, after all that gloom and doom, thank you to James Gutschmidt, Oroville Senior Center President, for reminding us all how good we really do have it here in our community and our nation now. Gai Wisdom Oroville

A reasoned ‘No’ on Enloe Dear Editor, Last Monday’s public meeting at the PUD auditorium centered on Enloe Dam and utility plans to generate power at the site. The updated estimate of construction cost is now $39-45 million dollars. The interest would add an estimated $30 million dollars. Combined with the $11 million already spent, we have a project cost of $80-85 million dollars. Our PUD is already $40+ million in debt. In 2014 our debt service was $3.5 million. When the $45 million dollars borrowed from 2002 to 2011 is paid off in 2040, we will have paid the $45 million dollars on principle plus an additional $38.7 million in interest. The big banks love this. Currently, we are borrowing millions more to repair damage from the Carlton Complex Fire and will borrow still more to replace old infrastructure, aging poles, transformers and wire throughout the district. These costs cannot be avoided. With

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: November, 19 -26 1964: “Americanism” was the subject of a recent essay contest sponsored by the American Legion and was held at the Oroville High School. All students in grades 7 thru 12 participated in this contest and approximately 400 essays were turned in. Winners for the whole school were; first, Carolyn Day; second, Kathleen Kernan and third Vicki Emry. Some sawmills in this state are being forced to shut down due to the export of saw logs, Stafford Lewis told the chamber of commerce and this is of grave concern to Okanogan County. A petition bearing more than 30,000 signatures has been taken to the Secretary of State urging that more northwest timber be placed under the protection of this law and was endorsed by the Oroville Chamber. Residents of this area will be interested to know that a former resident of Oroville has won a seat in the Washington State House of Representatives from the 13th District in Seattle. George Pierre, as Chief of the Colville Federated Indian Tribes won the seat. Pierre attended school in Oroville, was injured during World War II, and has been known as a writer. Pierre is the first Indian Chief to sit in the House. November 1 saw

these growing mandatory expenses the proposed Enloe power plant is a dangerous and risky gamble on our ability to pay the bill. The seasonal stream flows of the Similkameen River cannot produce enough power to justify doubling our debts and continuing to raise rates. The year-round output of the Enloe generators would average 5 Megawatts, 57% of the 9 megawatts often quoted as output by the PUD. Oroville’s substation distributes 27 megawatts to our region. Electrification of Enloe Dam would provide less than 20% of Oroville’s sub-station and only 2% of the Utility’s county wide requirement. This was the reason we abandoned the old power house in 1958. This investment defies logic and common sense. The utility presented revenues and costs projected forward over the next 50 years, with and without Enloe in production. It shows that Enloe power would add to the PUD costs each year until the bonds are paid off around 2049. Commissioner Houston was skeptical of the projected 2.5 to 6 cent per kilowatt/ hour benefit of Enloe power to the ratepayers 50 years down the line. “I look at numbers for a living. The differences in numbers that far out is insignificant. It’s not even within the margin of error”, said Houston. PUD officials have been meeting since May with state and federal agencies, tribes, conservation and non-profit groups working to develop an alternative plan for the Similkameen River. The plan would be funded from sources outside the district and would include sediment studies, sediment removal and removal of the dam itself. It would take about 5 years and cost an estimated $35 million dollars. Why does our PUD continue to say over and over again “dam removal costs would be paid by the ratepayers”? This huge amount of risk will largely profit people who live outside our county. These are the big bankers, the Wall Street investors and brokers, the large corporate manufacturers and the big contractors that will bring their equipment and journeymen to build the project. Except for some lodging, meals, food and fuel spent by workers and equipment over three years, there will be no long term gain to our local economy. Ratepayers elected a new PUD Commissioner, Scott Vejraska, behind his promise to tackle the run-away spending and rate increases at our PUD. With a new perspective and no old baggage to cloud his thinking I hope he sees it is time to cut our loses on Enloe and get back to serving the people of Okanogan County with affordable electricity. Joseph Enzensperger Oroville

the change of ownership of the Union Oil Heating business in Oroville. Dan Lynch, long time resident of Oroville purchased the business from Leon Fleming and took over the operation the first of the month. Dan is well known in and around Oroville, having lived here all of his life. At the PUD Commissioners November 18th meeting, the commission of the Okanogan County Public Utility District #1, announced that it had authorized its manager to prepare a proposal to the Molson-Chesaw Cooperative to acquire facilities and take over the operation of the cooperative. The Cariboo Growers and other property owners in that area presented a petition for annexation to the city of Oroville at the November 16th meeting of the City Council. The matter was taken under advisement and a committee was formed to further investigate. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, official observer: November 11th, 1964, 43 degrees maximum and 36 degrees minimum; 12th 42 and 30; 13th 45 and 29; 14th 41 and 26; 15th; 45 and 25; 16th, 49 and 37 and 17th, 45 and 33. Total precipitation for the week, .20 inches. Grocery Prices: Tom Turkeys, 17 to 25 lb.,$.35; Oysters, 12 oz. can, $.55; Libby’s Pumpkin, 303 size can, $.09; Center cut Pork Chops, $.55 per lb.; oven ready Hen Turkeys, 10 - 14 lb., $.39.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: November 16 - 30, 1989: Gold exploration will continue until the first of the year on Buckhorn Mountain, located east of Chesaw, and there are already reports that future mining activities in the area will be as big, if not bigger that those near Republic, WA. Crown

SEE PAST | PG B6


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Another Thanksgiving! This year the grand’s decided to come for Christmas, so our table had a lot of empty chairs, but to keep harmony within the families we have to take turns. As one of our small great grandsons has taught us, “Take what you get and don’t throw a fit.” What a clever babysitter he had that taught him that phrase. For those who have lost loved ones during the year “first holidays” are difficult. Just cherish the memories from all the past happy times. John Myrick, Molson, (Sidley Lake), left for his higher rewards last week. He was in Wenatchee hospital, his wife, Nita was in Tonasket hospital, both were brought home by their son and John passed away, but at least they had that little time together. Condolences go to

What do you do with your indoor plants in winter?

the surviving family. I missed a Gonzaga basketball game by misreading the schedule. But they won, without me. A visit with Bob and Margaret Hirst last Thursday evening found them pretty much rested up from Bob’s birthday bash with 17 members of their family there. This could be a good birthday wish, “Wisdom of a 90-year-old! Body of a 20-year-old and the energy of a threeyear-old.” Keep in mind the Senior Center is having a family style Thanksgiving dinner with the center providing the turkey, dressing, potatoes and gravy and, vegetables and desserts will be furnished by the guests, but if you can’t contribute, you’ll be assured of a good meal, with-

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

SUBMITTED BY AUDREY HOLMES

weeks. They require a minimum of water. Too much watering will kill them. She treats the other potted plants like the rest of us – water them when they are dry. Not all, but some of us, put plant food in their soil like Miracle Gro or Schultz’s Instant Liquid Plant Food. A get well card was signed for Mary Luzer who is ill. A paper was passed around to sign up for the potluck dishes to bring to the annual Christmas Dinner at the Free Methodist

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

Barbara Hansen held the Monday, Nov. 10 meeting in her country home surrounded by fall plants still booming. There was one guest, Phyllis Snyder, from Missouri. She was brought by her sister-in-law member Elena Dunakin. The roll call was “What do you do for your indoor plants during the winter?” Barbara has some orchids and she puts four ice cubes in their pots every two

Free Thanksgiving Dinner this Thursday

HILLTOP NEWS it is free. There will be turkey, yams, mashed potatoes, gravy, dressing, salads, and desserts. Please come and enjoy. In Chesaw on Dec. 2 at 5 p.m. in the Community Building there will be several local firemen in attendance with FireWise Information on how to protect your property and home with lots of good tips. Everyone is welcome and will get good information. On Thursday, Dec. 4 at noon the Ladies Auxiliary will host their Christmas party at the home of Mary Louise Loe. There will

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Our Hilltop will be buzzing the next couple of weeks. The first thing will be the Pinochle games on Monday, Nov. 24 in Molson at 7 p.m. The members of the Chesaw Community Bible Church will be cooking for the free Thanksgiving Dinner being held in the Community Building in Chesaw on Thursday, Nov. 27 starting at noon. This dinner is for everyone in the Community and

Holiday Bazaar, Dec. 5 and 6

TONASKET CCC

SUBMITTED BY RIVER JONES

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. That Doesn’t End When the Batteries Run Out.

With more than 30 vendors, everyone is sure to find someThe 19th Annual Holiday thing for each person on their gift Bazaar and Gift Show will be list! Food will be served all day held at the Community Cultural and there will be live entertainCenter of Tonasket on Friday, ment. Come shop for some of the December 5 and Saturday most unique gifts in the area and December 6. Friday hours are: Shop Local! www.edwardjones.com 2:00-8:00 and a Saturday For more information Why p.m. not start new holiday tradition? Make this thecheck hours are 10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. the CCC website at: www.comtime of year that you help save for a child’s college

Church at 1 Stanton Loop Road, Tonasket, on Monday, Dec. 8 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dinner will be at noon. There will be a short meeting afterwards. Then someone will deliver non-perishable food items and canned goods to the Food Bank. Also, gift bags will be delivered, including fruit and cookies and candy, plus Christmas Cards with a check in each one for each resident who resides at the Adult Family Home in Tonasket. We encourage guests and new members to attend the meetings, the number to call for time and place is 509-223-3427. The next meeting will be on Monday, Jan. 12 at the Hillside Apartments at 1:30 p.m.

be a $10 gift exchange and the luncheon will be Ham and all the trimmings. On Friday, Dec. 5 there will be BINGO starting at 7 p.m. Bring your friends and Families. At the Grange Hall. The Molson Grange Christmas Party will be held at the Grange Hall on Friday, Dec. 12. This will be a potluck starting at 6:30 p.m. There will be a gift exchange for children, only’ so please bring a gift if you are bringing a child. Here are the scores for the pinochle on Nov. 17. Men’s and women’s Highs went to Clayton Emry and Mary Lou Barnette. The Low Scores went to Carl Cole and Ina Visser, with the Traveling went to Lani Thompson. Until next week.

munityculturalcenter.org or call (509) 486-1328. The Community Cultural Center, a nonprofit organization, is located at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket.

CCC OF TONASKET

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Happy Thanksgiving

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All invited to our Thanksgiving SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT - OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Our Bazaar tables are filling up, so, if you want to reserve a table, or donate, for our December 13 Bazaar, call Betty Hall at 509476-2788. Our annual election of Officers for Oroville Senior Citizens will be held at our business meeting on Dec. 16 at 11 a.m. Present your nominees to Betty Steg or Raleigh Chinn. Our County organization, OCSCA, held its annual election Nov. 21. Holy Cow! Yours truly was elected President for the year 2015. I’ll also sit as president of the Board of Directors for OCTN and OCSCA. The other officers

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome.

Pg

tHE HungEr gaMES - MOckIng Jay

Pg cH. 1 saT.–sun.–mOn.–Tues., Thurs.–Fri. nOV. 29–30, deC. 1-2,4-5. bIg HErO 6 saT.–sun.–mOn.–Tues., g Thurs.–Fri. deC. 6-7-8-9-11-12. shOwTimes On Fri. & saT.@ 7&9:10Pm

duMb & duMbEr tO deC 13-14-15-16. 7 & 9:10Pm

OMAK THEATER Omak and mirage TheaTers are nOw digiTal

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

tHE HungEr gaMES 123 min Pg13

MOckIng Jay cH. 1 adVenTure/ sCi-Fi sTarring JenniFer lawrenCe, JOsh huTChersOn, liam hemswOrTh. Fri. 6:30,9:30. saT.*3:30,6:30, 9:30. sun.*3:30,6:30. wkdYs.6:45

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

HOrrIblE bOSSES 2

COmedY sTarring JasOn 108 min BaTeman, JasOn sudeikis, r Charlie daY Fri.: 6:30, 9:45. saT: *3:45, 6:30, 9:45. sun: *3:45, 6:30. wkdYs: 6:45

PEnguInS Of MadagaScar

animaTiOn/adVenTure/COmedY sTarring TOm mCgraTh, Chris miller, ChrisTOPher knighTs. Pg 92 min Fri. 7:00, 9:15. saT.:*4:00, 6:15, 9:15. sun.:*4:00,6:15. wkds 6:30

duMb and duMbEr tO

COmedY sTarring Jim CarreY, JeFF daniels, rOB riggle. Pg13 Fri. 6:45, 9:30. saT.:*3:30, 6:45, 9:30. sun.:*3:30, 6:45. 109 min wkds 6:45 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

(509) 826-6191

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Columbia River

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

& growing

1.800.660.2129

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

MASSAGE

OPTICAL

Su Ianniello

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

OXYGEN SERVICE

We would be honored to work with you!

l Your

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center l Oxygen Concentrators l Portable Concentrators l Sleep Apnea Equipment l Nebulizers l Home Sleep Tests Open: Monday - Friday

suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

Toll Free

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

Coagulation Clinic

Licensed Massage Practitioner

(509) 826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

 Ophthalmology

Health  Walk In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Healthcare Services

 Behavioral

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

 Radiology

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Physician-owned and patient-centered

 Anti

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Psychiatric Services

CLINIC

www.olivertheatre.ca

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

OMAK

IntErStEllar Thurs.-Fri. nOV.

HEALTH CARE

Call us . . . Se Habla Español

HEALTH CARE

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

elected were Bob McDaniel, Vice President; Dave Dumas, second Vice President; Sharron Kenniston, Secretary and Cathy Best, Treasurer. Doris Hughes is to be commended for her many hours of work selling produce for our inhouse Farmers Market. Jim Fry is retiring from can recycling. Many thanks to him for his service. We are now looking for another “Can Man” to purchase our aluminum cans. We’re also looking for someone to shovel snow from our walkways in the mornings. Door prize, Ed Craig; Pinochle, Leonard Paulsen; High Man, Wayne N.; High Woman, Bev Holden. Try something new. Euchre, a card game, will be played Tuesdays after lunch. Vallerie will teach newcomers.

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Oliver Theatre

27-28. 1 shOw nighTlY aT 7:30Pm

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

On this Thursday, Nov. 27, at 1 PM, all are invited to partake of a traditional Thanksgiving meal, par excellence, at the Oroville Senior Center, 1521 Golden Street. We will provide the turkeys, dressing, potatoes, gravy and refreshments. We ask that others bring, potluck style, the rest of the meal, so that all, even those empty-handed, may be fed. And, let’s celebrate our bounty. Remember, the original Pilgrims and Native Americans met as a community that first Thanksgiving Day.

Care Credit

MOVIES

ting up? The above mentioned snow got serious about it, around five o’clock and it snowed for a while like it would never stop, huge, wet flakes and continued for a couple of hours. I don’t know if it was due to the snow, but the crowd at the Community Bazaar wasn’t much of a crowd, Friday evening. Perhaps Saturday had more foot traffic. Lots of nice things on display! Break-ins are happening again. So be sure to secure things when you leave home. Churches really seem to be on the hit list. When I started writing the column this week, I had so few thoughts, and “things” just keep happening and I add on. News has just come of the death of Barbara Forrester. She has fought the valiant battle of cancer for over five years, and as nearly always, she lost. She was such a beautiful lady in so many ways, filled with faith and determination for living. She is now free of her discomforts. Remember her husband, of over 50 years, with love and support for the difficult times ahead. ‘Til next week….

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Cherish the past happy memories

out cost at 1 p.m. Thursday for. I always wonder if America is such a Heated seats in the car are a great bad place, as thought by many countries, thing! why are so many trying so hard, legal or Someday, when I have illegally, to get here. time, I’m gonna count the It seems that last week pages in one of the magaI got the Lemaster/Curtis zines and see which has the Thanksgiving dinner kinda most pages, the advertisemixed up. It was Will and ments or the articles. Gail that had the dinner so Having an earlier deadline Joe and Pia could be with this week finds me a little them, along with the Curtis’s. unprepared, but a topic that Anyhow, it was good to have hasn’t been mentioned for a the family sharing love, while is snow. And although wherever the dinner was. we are much better off than Legion member tells me THIS & THAT thatA Bob Buffalo, N.Y. getting seven Irwin is now home, feet of the white fluffy, we Joyce Emry after a short hospital stay, did get our first of the year, with him and his wife needFriday, just before noon. I ing 24-hour care. Bob has wasn’t ready for that, were you? But been a special addition to the commuthe snow tires had been put on the car nity after he returned, to his home place, Thursday, so with careful driving and when he retired from the post office and warm coats and gloves, I guess we can he is truly missed at the “coffee hour” by muddle through. Why can’t we have the guys at their favorite hangout. three seasons and forget this winter busiAnother good quote: “So much to do. ness? No desire to do it”. Hopefully all you readers had a wonNow this is a real dilemma – A guy is derful Thanksgiving with family and perched on the edge of his bed, With a friends. Although there are many things shoe in his hand and his teeth in a cup, in our country that could be better, we I’m looking for clues, so I don’t have to have so many things to be truly thankful ask, Am I going to bed now or just get-

Office: 509-826-1688

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

646 Okoma Drive, Suite D, Omak


NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Thanksgiving Dinner available for our members SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN OROVILLE EAGLES

We will be closed Thursday for Thanksgiving. There will be a potluck dinner for our members who do not have family or can’t make it to be with their family. The Eagles provides turkey and ham, please bring a side or desert and you must let us know by Wednesday you will be there. There is a sign up sheet in the bar. We will have Steak Night on Friday. Come out and support your club, bring your family and have a great meal. Remember all of our cooks, preppers and wait

EAGLEDOM AT WORK staff are volunteers and love what they do. Our Auxiliary meeting attendance pot is slowly growing, please attend our meetings to get your name in the drawing. We still have lots of time until the May drawing for it to grow. Secret Sisters - don’t forget your S.S., only three more holidays left. Our Joker Poker is doing well. Every Friday, right after meat draw, we draw for a cash prize of $25 or half the total pot if you draw the Joker. You must be a member in good standing and have your membership card in your possession at the time of the

drawing. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Happy Hour during Seahawks games. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Friday and Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what is happening at your club and join in. We would like to thank all of the people and businesses in the community for support of our benefits and fund raisers for our local area. As always, We Are People Helping People.

Tonasket Elementary hosting Book Fair THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - The Tonasket Elementary School is hosting its Winter Book Fair, Dec. 1-6. The Book Fair will be open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. through 4 p.m. and on Friday

evening from 5 p.m. through 8 p.m. Additionally the Book Fair will be open on Saturday from 10 a.m. through 4 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Come by and get some great Christmas presents for the kids. The online fair is open Nov. 23-Dec. 13.

Go to the Tonasket Elementary School web page at es.tonasket. wednet.edu, and look for a link to the Book Fair Webpage under the “Quick Links” column. For questions, call Tonasket Elementary at 509-486-4933 during school hours.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw CHESAW - The Chesaw Community Church will be serving a complete free Turkey Dinner starting at noon on Thursday, Nov. 27. Come and share this dinner with your friends, relatives and neighbors, everyone is welcome to attend.

Thanksgiving at Senior Center OROVILLE - The Oroville Seniors are planning a Thanksgiving dinner for Thursday, Nov. 27, at 1 p.m. at the Center. We will provide the turkey, dressing and potatoes with potluck vegetables and dessert. All are invited at no charge.

Sing-Along Messiah ELLISFORDE - The annual community “Sing-Along Messiah” will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren. Anyone who enjoys selections from the traditional “Christmas” portion of Handel’s masterpiece is invited to sing along, or simply sit and listen. The informal sing-along will feature musicians from the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus under the direction of Don Pearce. Mary Koch will play the church’s pipe organ. Soloists are not required to audition, but if you are interested in performing a solo aria, you’re asked to advise Autumn Martin, (509) 322-0495, or Mary Koch, (509) 3220177. Admission is free. Free-will donations to the pipe organ maintenance fund will be appreciated.

OCCA Board Meeting OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, December 3, 2014, at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave.

Okanogan. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization that works with community members of all groups to raise the poor out of poverty, to feed the hungry, to provide affordable housing for all, to empower community members through education, and in the process to return prosperity and hope for the future to the county. If you have questions or need additional information call Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 422-4041.

Holiday Bazaar and Gift Show TONASKET - The 19th Annual Holiday Bazaar and Gift Show will be held at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Friday, Dec. 5 and Saturday, Dec. 6. Friday hours are 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday hours are: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With over 30 vendors, everyone is sure to find something for each person on their gift list. Food will be served all day and there will be live entertainment. Come shop for some of the most unique gifts in the area and Shop Local! For more information check the CCC website at: www. communityculturalcenter.org or call 509-486-1328. The Community Cultural Center, a nonprofit organization, is located at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket.

Food Drive for Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE – The Oroville Food Bank will be having at food drive at both Atkins Harvest Foods and Frontier Foods on Saturday, Dec. 6 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. They will be collecting food for Christmas and trucks will be set up at both Atkins and Frontier Foods. Come and donate if you can as the local food bank has gone from helping 120 plus families per week to sometimes over 200. The board and volunteers thank all who have supported the Food Bank. For more information

or if you need a donation picked up you can contact Reta Emry at 509476-3488, Gail Fraiser at 509-4762045 or any of the food bank board – President Jeff Austin, 509-4763978; Vice-President Linda Saldana; Secretary/Treasurer Sarah Umana, 509-476-2386 and Coordinator: Dawn McClure, 509-476-2309.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

2015 Hometown Soldier calendars are available in Oroville, Tonasket

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

The 2015 Hometown Soldier Calendars in Oroville at the Oroville Pharmacy, in Tonasket at The Junction, and in Omak at Gene’s Harvest Foods! The goal of this calendar is

threefold. To provide funds to assist military mothers living in North Central Washington during times of duress created by their child’s service. The funds see to it that mothers are able to be at the side of their child during times of injury, recovery, death, or other important events. The funds provide boxes of supplies and a touch of their hometown to our area’s soldiers. It also puts the

International lineup of league leaders in Week 3 of play

POOL LEAGUE NEWS

SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM NORTH VALLEY POOL LEAGUE

Week three and all is well. The holidays are upon us and good cheer abounds in your pool league. Well okay, that might be a bit much, but we are having a good time. As of week 3 Eagles Aiming

Fluid, The Plaza Xholos and Lew’s Brew Crew are your top ranked teams. That’s an international line up isn’t it? There will be some changes in the schedule starting in week 4 so be aware and watch for them. Are you filling out the back of your score sheet? If you don’t you will

faces and stories of our local active duty young men and women in front of the eyes of our community which provides a connection that encourages prayer support, their family’s emotional support, and community awareness which makes this all possible. The cost of the calendar is $10. Give the gift of gratitude. Put our local heroes on your shopping list this year. Look for the calendar with the soldier boots on the front in once of these fine businesses! Or, you can contact us at 509-485-2906, ncwbluestars@yahoo.com. face the wrath of Jan, and we all know how wrathful she can be. She needs that information for the year-end stats. Take good care out there as you travel to and from your games. If the weather impedes or delays the matches there are options. Contact your opponent and work it out. If all else fails, contact Ernie Wisdom. He’s your league president. As winter closes in on us remember, there is more to life than football. Get out there and Play Pool.

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 9:30 - 10:10 a.m. L.I.F.E. - Duck Dynasty Faith Commander all November 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11:15 a.m. Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT

Criminal Jared Wendell Chaney, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 18 to residential burglary and seconddegree malicious mischief. Chaney was sentenced to 75 days in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the Sept. 26 crimes. Robert Brian Bradshaw, 28, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Nov. 18 to second-degree burglary, second-degree trafficking in stolen property and three counts of third-degree theft. Bradshaw was sentenced to 45 months (3.75 years) in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the April 17 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Dale Edward McGowan, 63, Tonasket, with first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Nov. 16. The court found probable cause to charge Gilberto Valensuela Acasito, 47, Tonasket, with second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and firstdegree criminal trespassing. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 12.

DISTRICT COURT

Cameron John Taylor, 20, Omak, guilty of possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams). Taylor was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $608. Brandon Scott Thomas, 22, Omak, had a charge dismissed: hitand-run (attended vehicle). Mariah Kirsten Todd, 21, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Virgil Duran Tonasket, 29, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Paul Tinywolf Tonner, 26, Okanogan, had two charges dismissed: third-degree theft and attempted third-degree possession of stolen property. Brandon Ray Valentine, 33, Riverside, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI. Valentine was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $2,361. Gonzalo Cruz Vargas, 52, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Vargas received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $1,483. Cruz Viveros, no middle name listed, 20, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge

dismissed. Viveros was fined $500. Alex D. Walker, 24, Tonasket, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Walker was fined $500. Matthew Dwayne Webster, 22, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Webster received a 90day suspended sentence and fined $818. Terrence Lee George Williams, 33, Omak, had two third-degree DWLS charges dismissed. Jacob Nicholas Wilson, 34, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wilson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $858. Wesley Paul Wirth, 37, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Julie Ann Wisdom, 30, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: failure to transfer a title within 45 days. Ronald Harry Wolff, 59, Okanogan, had three reckless endangerment charges dismissed. Karissa Marie Zamudio, 23, Okanogan, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Luis Joe Zarate Harry, 26, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Zarate Harry was fined $400.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Nov. 17, 2014 Malicious mischief on Dun Horse Rd. near Okanogan. Vehicle damage reported. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Electronics reported missing. Theft on W. Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. DWLS on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Theft on Nigg Rd. near Oroville. Tools reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Mail reported missing. Trespassing on S. Fourth Ave. in

Okanogan. Fraud on Wards Rd. near Oroville. Found property on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Mail recovered. Domestic dispute on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Structure fire on Ridge Dr. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Ferry St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Shumway Rd. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Automobile theft on N. Main St. in Omak. Found property on Main St. in Oroville. Wallet recovered. Illegal burning on Fir St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, DOC hold. Joe Alex Martinez, 36, booked a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS and a DOC secretary’s warrant. Stuart Adam Grim, 28, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for POCS. Anthony Michael Sanchez, 20, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and seconddegree DWLS.

Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2014

Failure to register as a sex offender on Hanford St. in Omak. Drugs on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on Hungry Hollow Rd. near Oroville. Assault on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Vic Smith Rd. near Omak. Mail reported missing. Assault on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Backpacks reported missing. Harassment on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Shaun Anthony Baker, 28, booked on a DOC warrant.

Trudie Leigh Mapes, 27, DOC detainer.

Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014

Trespassing on Sour Dough Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Airport Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Pine Crest Rd. near Tonasket. Forgery on Pine Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Hwy. 20 near Wauconda. Threats on S. Main St. in Omak. Ian Ray Tatshama, 44, booked on three FTA warrants: thirddegree theft, DUI and violation of a no-contact order (DV); and a Spokane County warrant.

Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014

Illegal burning on Barnholt Loop Rd. near Okanogan. Automobile theft on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Summit Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Failure to register as a sex offender on Jackson St. in Omak. Weapons offense on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. DUI on Fig Ave. in Omak. Assault on S. Cedar St. in Omak. DUI on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on Fir St. in Oroville. Harassment on N. State Frontage Rd. near Tonasket. Nico Louis Hall, 22, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for MIP/C. Thomas Jay Roomsa, 33, booked for DUI. Clint Thomas Black, 34, booked for second-degree assault.

Friday, Nov. 21, 2014

Malicious mischief on Omak Ave. in Omak. Threats on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak.

Disorderly conduct on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Threats on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Omak Airport Rd. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Fish Lake Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Vehicle prowl on Columbia St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. First Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Camera equipment reported missing. Burglary on First Ave. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Trespassing on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Malicious mischief on E. Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Amy Elizabeth Tatshama, 30, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and third-degree DWLS (revoked). Heather Mae Taizan-Kilgour, 39, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Jesse Owen Jane, 28, DOC detainer. Mariah Shyler Gallaher, 22, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for DUI. Nissa Ann Birdsbill, 34, booked for second-degree TMVWOP.

Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014

One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hart Rd. in Oroville. Assault on Koala Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Structure fire on Lime Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Leonel Martines-Oros, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014

Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan.

Fraud on Main St. in Riverside. Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Birch St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Hopfer Rd. near Omak. Drugs at the Oroville Port of Entry in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Automobile theft on Shumway Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Dogwood St. in Oroville. Burglary on 16th Ave. in Oroville. David Leslie Louis, 33, booked on an FTA warrant for intimidating a witness and two counts of fourth-degree assault (bond revoked). Charles David Cox, 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant thirddegree DWLS. Michael Reyes Hansen, 23, DOC detainer. Jacqueline A. Stotts, 51, booked for first-degree assault (DV). Robert Kacee Webb, 25, booked on three Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: fourthdegree assault (DV), disorderly conduct and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Rocque Frederick Nobert, 41, booked for possession of anabolic steroids (felony) and a USBP hold.

KEY:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA/C – Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

ALL-LEAGUE TEAMS FOOTBALL

Coleman

Edwards

Honorable Mention Defense Victor Macedo, Bridgeport, DB; Breven Evenson, Bridgeport, LB; Mikey Pittman, Manson, LB; Joe Toolson, Manson, LB; Toby Pruitt, Okanogan, LB: Dakota Huff, Okanogan, DL; Arnulfo Mercado, Okanogan, PK; Nathan Hugus, Oroville, DB; EZ Delgado, Oroville, LB; David Moreno, Tonasket, DB; Rycki Cruz, Tonasket, DB; Brock Henneman, Tonasket, DE; Jesse Manring, Tonasket, LB.

GIRLS SOCCER Fulmer

Holfeltz

Juarez

Mills

Abrego

Liberty Bell; Josiah Klemmeck, sr., Liberty Bell; Ryan Widhalm, jr., Riverside Christian; Chris Oates, jr., Lake Roosevelt; Eli Nielsen, fr., Liberty Bell; Willy Duguay, sr., Liberty Bell.

BY BRENT BAKER 2nd Team Sam Thomas, sr., Manson; Garrett Palm, sr., Liberty Bell; Adrian McCarthy, jr., Tonasket; Angel Garcia, sr., Manson; Edgar Guzman, so., Brewster; Robert George, jr., Lake Roosevelt; Bryden Hires, jr., Tonasket. Honorable Mention Brady Busching, so., Brewster; Abe Podkranic, sr., Tonasket; Kaden Trotter, jr., Lake Roosevelt; Ramiro Rincon, fr., Brewster; Justin McDonald, fr., Tonasket; Smith Condon, sr., Tonasket; Tyler Hoffman, jr., Riverside Christian.

Celestino

GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY

Nigg

Ramon

Ripley

Vugteveen Henneman

Tietje

Yaussy-Albright

Walts

Thompson wins cage fight to go 3-0

Valentine

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

AIRWAY HEIGHTS - Nathan Thompson feared he might be a bit rusty after nearly a year between professional MMA bouts. It turned out not to be an issue Nov. 15 as the Oroville fighter won his lightweight bout in 45 seconds at the Northern Quest Resort and Casino just outside Spokane. Thompson (3-0 in his pro career) finished off Donald Gouge (1-1) by a first round key lock submission. “My last fight was a year ago in December, so I was nervous stepping in with what we call ‘cage rust,’” Thompson said. “I had huge fan support and didn’t want to let them down.” Thompson said he was overwhelmed with the support not only by his sponsors (Oroville Fitness, Trinos Mexican restaurant, P&D Pub, C&E Orchards, C&C Photography/Graphics and Crispin Ramirez_ but by the group of fans that made the trip to Spokane for his fight. “Without the help from you guys I wouldn’t be able to do the sport I love,” he said. “Also want to thank everybody that went to my fight and cheered me on. That was the loudest crowd I have ever heard it was awesome. There is nothing better then the living in a small community because of all the support and help I get from everybody! Small towns stick together.” Thompson now begins preparation for his biggest professional challenge yet: a fight against Matt Coble, who sports an 18-8 record, at the Tulalip

Submitted photo

Nathan Thompson of Oroville improved to 3-0 in his professional MMA career with a victory on Nov. 15. Casino on March 13. “He is really going to test my skills,” Thompson said. “He’s definitely the toughest guy I have faced in my career.”

A. Willis Wilson

CENTRAL WASHINGTON 2B LEAGUE NORTH DIVISION Offensive MVP: T.J. Morris, Okanogan Defensive MVP: Jim Townsend, Okanogan Coach of the Year: Erick Judd, Okanogan Sportsmanship: Manson 1st Team Offense Timbo Taylor, Brewster, jr., QB; David Guillen, Manson, sr., RB; Riley Prescott, Okanogan, jr. RB; Isaiah Yaussy-Albright, Tonasket, sr., RB; Cade Smith, Brewster, jr., WR; Luke Divis, Brewster, sr., WR; Jim Townsend, Okanogan, sr., TE; Chris Varelas, Brewster, jr., C; Brad Nearents, Okanogan, sr., OL; Gage Cotner, Okanogan, sr., OL; Chad Edwards, Tonasket, sr., OL; Frank Holfeltz, Tonasket, sr., OL; Dustin Nigg, Oroville, sr., P. 2nd Team Offense Benny Cate, Okanogan, sr., QB; Chip Jones, Liberty Bell, sr., QB; Raf Varelas, Brewster, sr., RB; Hayden Bayha, Brewster, sr., RB; Jalen Moses, Okanogan, jr., RB; Jorge Juarez, Tonasket, jr., RB; Mitch Boesel, Brewster, sr., WR; Dustin Nigg, Oroville, sr., WR: Lane Tietje, Oroville, sr., TE; Joe Toolson, Manson, sr., C; Raul Olvera, Brewster, jr., OL; Michael Sanchez, Manson, sr., OL; Mick Fulmer, Oroville, sr., OL; Jimmy Coleman, Tonasket, sr., OL. Honorable Mention Offense Jonathan Oregon, Bridgeport, RB; Julio Pena, Manson, OL; Tyler Cox, Okanogan, OL, Joe Mintzer, Okanogan, OL; Charles Arrigoni, Oroville, OL; Blake Rise, Oroville OL; Christian Garcia, Tonasket, OL; Dallas Tyus, Tonasket, OL. 1st Team Defense Chris Varelas, Brewster, jr., LB; Raf Varelas, Brewster, sr., LB; Joe Esquivel, Okanogan, jr., LB; Greyson Fields, Okanogan, so., LB; Hayden Bayha, Brewster, sr., DL; Logan Mills, Oroville, jr., DL; T.J. Morris, Okanogan, sr., DE; Gage Cotner, Okanogan, sr., DE; Mitch Boesel, Brewster, jr., DB; Cade Smith, Brewster, jr., DB; Chip Jones, Liberty Bell, sr., DB; Jalen Moses, Okanogan, jr., DB; Raul Olvera, Brewster, jr., PK. 2nd Team Defense Raul Olvera, Brewster, jr., LB; Jacob McMillan, Liberty Bell, sr., LB; David Guillen, Manson, sr., LB; Jorge Juarez, Tonasket, jr., LB: Jesse Ramon, Tonasket, fr., LB; Edgar Perez, Brewster, DL: Mason Cameron, Manson, so., DL: Mick Fulmer, Oroville, sr., DE; Chad Edwards, Tonasket, sr., DE: Luke Divis, Brewster, sr., DB; Mason Guerrette, Okanogan, DB: Dustin Nigg, Oroville, sr., DB; Dustin Nigg, Oroville, sr., PK.

CENTRAL WASHINGTON B LEAGUE (based on league meet finish) K. Willis

CENTRAL WASHINGTON B LEAGUE Player of the Year: Mia Kennedy, Liberty Bell Coach of the Year: Dean Klepec, Okanogan Team Sportsmanship: Oroville 1st Team Cameron Moses, Okanogan, sr., GK; Karina Rincon, Brewster, sr., Def.; Jenny Salazar, Bridgeport, sr., Def.; Aidan O’Connor, Okanogan, sr., Def.; Haley Post, Liberty Bell, fr., Def.; Mia Kennedy, Liberty Bell, so., Off.; Aden Jones, Liberty Bell, jr., Off.; Emmy Engle, Okanogan, jr., Off.; Jill Townsend, Okanogan, so., Off.; Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, jr., Off.; Kayla Willis, Tonasket, so., Off.; Ashlynn Willis, Tonasket, so., Off. 2nd Team Lauren Ochoa, Liberty Bell, fr., GK; Katrina Guzman, Brewster, sr., GK; Anna Post, Liberty Bell, fr., Def.; Keanna Egbert, Okanogan, jr., Def.; Hilda Celestino, Tonasket, sr., Def.; Fernanda Maria Abrego, Tonasket, sr., Def.; Leslie Carrillo, Brewster, sr., Off.; Daisy Gonzalez, Brewster, sr., Off.; Viridiana Santana, Bridgeport, jr., Off.; Denise Hernandez, Bridgeport, jr., Off.; Danielle Mott, Liberty Bell, so., Off.; Alexis Jones, Okanogan, so., Off.; Kambe Ripley, Oroville, fr., Off.; Rose Walts, Tonasket, jr., Off. Honorable Mention Sarah Rios, Bridgeport, sr., GK; Xochil Rangel, Oroville, so., GK; Madison Gariano, Tonasket, fr., GK; Satya Kent, Okanogan, sr., Def.; Myra Gaytan, Tonasket, jr., Def.; Yvette Sanchez, Brewster, fr., Off.; Ntalya Paz, Entiat, fr., Off.; Ana Spencer, Entiat, sr., Off.; Aja Paterson Silliman, Entiat, sr., Off.; True Downey, Okanogan, fr., Off.; Kali Peters, Oroville, sr., Off.

BOYS CROSS COUNTRY

Hires

McCarthy

CENTRAL WASHINGTON B LEAGUE (based on league meet finish) 1st Team Oren Cox, jr., Bridgeport (League Champion); Ben Klemmeck, jr.,

1st Team Camille Wilson, fr., Tonasket (League Champion); Katie Henneman, Tonasket; Jenna Valentine, Tonasket; Kayla St. Pierre, Lake Roosevelt; Koharu Yonebayashi, Liberty Bell; Victoria Cole, Riverside Christian; Amelia Pruiett, Riverside Christian.

VOLLEYBALL Submitted photo

The Oroville girls soccer team, which included (in no particular order) Kali Peters, Perla Salazar, Keyla Layata, Xochil Rangel, Yessica Nemecio, Tori Kindred, Paz Lopez, Kambe Ripley, Tylynne Watkins, Marissa Aubin, Katie Egerton, Lilliana Nava, Alexia Garcia, Areli Ocampo, Tamera Verellen, Itzel Castillo, Lyndsay Koepke, earned the WIAA Distinguished Scholastic Award for its work in the classroom.

Nutt

Perez

Soccer earns WIAA scholastic award THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Sawyer

Young

CENTRAL WASHINGTON 2B LEAGUE NORTH DIVISION Player of the Year: Miriam Navarro, Okanogan Coach of the Year: Michelle Daling, Okanogan Sportsmanship: Bridgeport 1st Team Marquette Miller, jr., Brewster; Sean Garvin, fr., Lake Roosevelt; Lauren Fitzmaurice, so., Liberty Bell; Maddee Ward, so., Manson; Vanessa VanderWeide, sr., Okanogan; Jordyn Boesel, so., Okanogan; Miriam Navarro (libero), sr., Okanogan.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Hornet Girls Soccer team recently received the WIAA Distinguished Scholastic Award by achieving a combined 3.0 - 3.49 Grade Point Average on their classroom work while actively participating in interscholastic activities. The award exemplifies the excellence achieved by the young people of today and the future leaders of

tomorrow. “Early in the season the Lady Hornets set goals to improve in both in the classroom and on the field,” said Oroville coach Tony Kindred. “The girls are very pleased with the award as it is the result of hard work and dedication to academics all the while working hard to see great improvement on the field by the end of the season. The girls have a better understanding of hard

Out on the Town...

work and its rewards.” Other awards for the year were given out at the recent awards banquet. Team awards: Most Inspirational went to freshman Kambe Ripley and Most improved to Lilliana Nava. Receiving team captain awards were Tori Kindred, Kali Peters, Kambe Ripley and Xochil Rangel. Each of the ladies received a letter for their involvement with the team and Hornet athletics.

Dining & Entertainment

2nd Team Maret Miller, fr., Brewster; Anita Velazquez, sr. Bridgeport; Jordan Peart, jr., Bridgeport; Ashley Watson, sr., Liberty Bell; Peyton Oules, jr., Okanogan; Cassidy Townsend, sr., Okanogan; Areielle White (libero), jr., Lake Roosevelt Honorable Mention Vanessa Terrones, jr., Brewster; Bethany Anderson, sr., Brewster; Alexis Madden, sr., Brewster; Shaylee Polvos, so., Bridgeport; Brianna Rogers, sr., Bridgeport; Kammi Rosenbaum, sr., Lake Roosevelt; Erin Schuh, so., Liberty Bell; Kendra Ellsworth, sr., Manson; Baylee Ward, so., Manson; Amanda Erks, sr., Okanogan; Rachelle Nutt, sr., Oroville; Andrea Perez, sr., Oroville; Alissa Young, sr., Tonasket; Rachael Sawyer, sr., Tonasket.

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

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Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close Advertise your specials and events here! Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014

SPORTS

Tonasket Girls Soccer - League Champion and State Tournament Qualifier Tonasket Football - State Tournament Qualifier Tonasket Boys Cross Country - State Finals Qualifier Tonasket Girls Cross Country - League Champion and State Finals Qualifier

Oroville and Tonasket

Jesse Ramon - Tonasket Football

Kayla and Ashlynn Willis - Tonasket Girls Soccer

Johnna Terris - Tonasket Girls Cross Country

Logan Mills - Oroville Football

Brock Henneman - Tonasket Football

Hunter Swanson - Tonasket Boys Cross Country

These fine Businesses Wish to Say Congratulations! Lee Frank Mercantile SCHOLZ

Sporting Goods

AMERICA’S 509-486-2105

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1518 Main St., Oroville 476-4500

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Community

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OROVILLE: 815 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 723 Appleway, Oroville OMAK: N.Main MainSt. Street, 826-1156 1 Block2off (next to the Eagles) BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

Tonasket Inc. Smith & Nelson,

Athletic "CHECKED FOR QUALITY" Booster Club

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Hwy. 97, South, Oroville Great Hamburgers, Milkshakes & More Phone: 1102 Main 476-2241 St., Oroville • 476-4545

A family warehouse for our growers! Appleway & Ironwood Oroville, WA. 98844 OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. ce:476-3646 Whitcomb, 486-2917 General Offi OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 www.golddiggerapples.com BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

for all your prescription needs!

Roy’s Pharmacy

RX Billing for Numerous Insurances 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

(509) 486-2149 Fax: 486-2196

Great Milkshakes & More 512 Hamburgers, S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

1102 Main St., Oroville • 476-4545

Tonasket, Washington

By applying the most up-to-date technology, our experienced, dedicated and hard working crew continues to provide the best possible service to both growers and consumers.

HORNET’S NEST BURGERS

A family warehouse for our 476-3679 growers! Oroville Auto Parts Center Appleway & Ironwood Oroville, WA. 98844 OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 Hwy. 97, TONASKET: 323 S. ce:476-3646 Whitcomb, 486-2917 General Offi Oroville OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156

www.golddiggerapples.com BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

476-3893 Oroville OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Dental Tel: 509-476-2151 Center Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Tel: 509-826-1930

2306 N. Hwy 97, Oroville

Oroville Pharmacy 509-476-3411

1416 Main St., Oroville for all your prescription needs!

P.T. WORKS

Roy’s PHYSICAL THERAPY Pharmacy Diane MacFarland, P.T. INC.

RX Billing for Numerous Insurances

39 Clarkson Mill Rd.,Tonasket Tonasket 318 S. Whitcomb, (509)509-486-1616 486-2149 Fax: 486-2196

DISCOUNT

• FriendlyFIREWORKS Service • One Stop Grocery Shopping • Cold Pop & Beer • Chips & Snacks OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 • Groceries, Meats & Produce TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917

Good Luck To The OMAK:th 2 N. Main Street,all 826-1156 18BREWSTER: W. 4 , Tonasket 538 W. Main,486-2127 689-0904 Athletes! OROVILLE Quick Oroville

Stop

OROVILLE:

2208 Juniper St.,1600 Oroville N. Main St. (Across from Prince’s) Dental Tel: 509-476-2151 509-476-9999 Center OMAK: Quik - Mart

23 S. Ash St., Omak 1501 Main St., Oroville Tel: 509-826-1930

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

476-3893 • Friendly Service • One Stop Grocery Shopping • Cold Pop & Beer • Chips & Snacks OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 • Groceries, Meats & Produce TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917

2306 N. Hwy 97, Oroville

OMAK:th 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 18BREWSTER: W. 4 , Tonasket 538 W. Main,486-2127 689-0904

Oroville GOLF CLUB "Come visit our World Independent Franchise of Pacific Pride Famous Groundhogs"

615 11th Ave., Oroville Phone:www.rominefuel.com 509-476-2390

509-476-2161

509-476-3610 2 mi. W. of Oroville on Nighthawk Rd.

Oroville

Lee Frank Oroville GOLF CLUB Mercantile

BOOSTER Sheila’s Shoppe CLUB

83 B Eastlake Rd., Oroville

Supporting 476-2051

Hornet Athletes!

"Come visit our World SCHOLZ Famous Groundhogs"

Sporting Goods

Phone: 509-476-2390

509-486-2105

2 mi. of Oroville on Nighthawk Rd. 316W. South Whitcomb, Tonasket


NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS

Post-season and Honors

Oroville Football - District Qualifier

Tonasket Boys Cross Country

Dustin Nigg - Oroville Football

Tonasket Girls Cross Country

Jaden Vugteveen - Tonasket Girls Soccer

Andrew Mieirs - Oroville Football

Elias Abrego - Tonasket Football

Madison Gariano -Tonasket Girls Soccer

Brent Baker/staff photos

Jorge Juarez and Chad Edwards - Tonasket Football

Rose Walts - Tonasket Girls Soccer

These fine Businesses Wish to Say Congratulations! Lee Frank Mercantile COMMUNITY SCHOLZ AUTO REPAIR 4D

g Goods Oroville Spo 723rtin Appleway, 509-486-2105

316509-476-2874 South Whitcomb, Tonasket

509-560-1011 Tonasket

Athletic Tonasket Booster Club Athletic Supporting Booster Club Tiger

Supporting Athletes! Tiger Athletes!

Paul’s Service

Wash & Wax Your Car...

2 BAY SELF SERVER WAND SYSTEM

ALLEN’S Community

CAR WASH

Good Luck Tiger Athletes! 308 723 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket Appleway, Oroville 1 Block off Main St. (next to the Eagles) 509-486-2921

Wash & Wax Your Car...

2 BAY SELF SERVER WAND SYSTEM

Sheila’s Shoppe Community 83 B Eastlake Rd., Oroville

CAR WASH

476-2051

723 Appleway, Oroville

1 Block off Main St. (next to the Eagles) Oroville Tire Center 476-3902

Oroville Pharmacy A family warehouse for our growers! Appleway & Ironwood Oroville, WA. 98844 OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. ce:476-3646 Whitcomb, 486-2917 General Offi

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket Oroville Auto Parts Center 476-3679 486-2183 97, 7 DaysHwy. A Week: 8 a.m.Oroville - 8 p.m.

OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156

www.golddiggerapples.com BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904 509-476-3411

1416 Main St., Oroville

HORNET’S Pizza, Subs, NSalad ESTBar, Calzones, Lasagna, BURGERS Wraps & More!

Great Hamburgers, Milkshakes & More TONASKET PIZZA COMPANY

110215 Main • 476-4545 WestSt., 4thOroville St., Tonasket

509-486-4808

Oroville Pharmacy Oroville Tire Cen ter 476-3902

OROVILLE:

• One Stop Grocery Shopping

Your one• Cold stopPop & Beer for complete • Chips & Snacks OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 • Groceries, Meats & Produce auto repairs! TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK:th 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 18 W. 4 , Tonasket BREWSTER: W. Main,486-2127 689-0904 Hwy. 97, South,538 Oroville Phone: 476-2241

OROVILLE Quick

Stop

2208 Juniper St., Oroville (Across from Prince’s)

509-476-9999

509-476-3411

Oroville Auto Parts Center 476-3679

1416 Main St., Oroville Hwy. 97, Oroville

Oroville

Paul’s Service • Friendly Service

for all your prescription needs!

Quik - Mart

1501 Main St., Oroville 509-476-2161

Oroville

476-3893

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

1420 MainN.St., Oroville, 2306 Hwy 97,509-476-3602 Oroville

www.gazette-tribune.com

Oroville

BOOSTER CLUB

Independent Franchise of Pacific Pride

615 11th Ave., Oroville www.rominefuel.com

Supporting 509-476-3610 Hornet Athletes!

Oroville GOLF CLUB


PAGE B4 4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 27, 2014

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

Announcements

SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

3 & 4 Bedroom Starting at $450 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Nanette at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

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For Rent Hillside Park Senior Apartments

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SUN LAKES REALTY

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

3 BR, 2 BA, Garage $850. Deluxe lakefront apt $795. Two + Bdrm Home $750. Riverfront Home $795. Nice Apt $495. 509-476-2121.

Found

TONASKET BUY OR RENT 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with 8 acres. $850 a month. Call 509-322-0347 or 509-476-2234.

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

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9

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Did you know?

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.59

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Puzzle 46 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

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10. Table part

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11. Minnesota’s capital (2 wds) 2

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12. “___ we having fun yet?� 7

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13. “___ alive!� (contraction) 5

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25. American symbol

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22. Amount of hair

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21. Colorado resort

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40. “What are the ___?�

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37. California fractures (3 wds)

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36. “Roots,� e.g.

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35. Western blue flag, e.g.

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32. Bumpkin

7

31. When it’s broken, that’s good

9. More apathetic

2

27. Door-to-door salesman

8. Fly high

5

Puzzle 43 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

4 5 1

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37. Chesterfield, e.g.

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33. Passageway below

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30. Jungle climber

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34. ___-relief

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39. Seafood entree

Puzzle 40 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

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44. Mame, for one

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45. Increase rapidly in number 5

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54. Blabs

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52. “Snowy� bird

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51. Not fitting

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50. Eyelashes

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49. Medieval oboe

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47. Pool contents?

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Puzzle 37 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

6 4 7

Down

2

66. Damon of “Good Will Hunting�

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65. Transmitted

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64. Chasers

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63. Clean by rubbing gently

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Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

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Puzzle 45 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

3

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Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

62. Alka-Seltzer sound

4

6 2

1

61. Japanese-American

6

3

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60. Apple spray

38. Spirit capable of appearing in human or animal form (Muslim) 8

2 9

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57. Permit

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3 2

53. Big wheel bike (British, hyphenated)

32. Pie cuts, essentially

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48. Deliver

46. BB rifle, e.g.

5

4

44. Letters sent by plane

29. Chimera

1

43. “A pox on you!�

28. More terrible

2

42. Doing nothing

26. “Dang!�

9

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Puzzle 44 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

41. “The Prime of Miss ___ Brodie,� film

8

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Puzzle 47 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

24. Let

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23. Gauge

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Puzzle 42 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

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Puzzle 38 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

14. Gulf of ___, off the coast of Yemen

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9. Kenyan tribesman

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5. 0.001 of an inch (pl.)

2

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1. “Darn it!�

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8

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 www.gazette-tribune.com

59. Hokkaido native

Across

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ANSWERS

6

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

Crosswords

9

509-476-3602

3

Sponsored by

8

ANSWERS

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Clinical Informatics Specialist Full time WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required Omak Campus: Enrollment Assist. Spec. Full time Temporary. Travel between Brewster and Omak. MA– C Full time. RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time. Travel between sites as needed. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 3 Full time positions. English/Spanish bilingual required Brewster & Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem

7

2

recycled for gardens, ďŹ re starter & more!

2

2

ď Ź Excess paper

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ď Ź Soy Ink ď Ź Recycled Paper

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We use...

Think Green!

8

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Health General

55. Carpentry tool

56. Soon, to a bard

15. Assortment

1. Member of an African people of N Nigeria and S Niger

16. Eyeball benders

2. Barely beats

57. Former measure of the U.S. economy (acronym)

17. ___ fruit

3. Prison rooms

58. “Flying Down to ___�

18. Arm bone

4. Bowie’s weapon

19. Jimmies

5. Puddinglike dessert

20. Aggressive expression of one’s views (hyphenated)

6. Misfortunes 7. Ancestry

Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: Patient Navigator Full time MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-C or LPN or Roomer 1 per diem position. English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF NOVEMBER 24, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (206) 634-3838 for details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED - GOVERNMENT NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. $ for school. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil THE NAVY IS HIRING: Top-notch training, medical/dental, 30 days’ vacation/yr, $$ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (800) 8870952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HIGH-TECH CAREER with U.S. Navy. Elite tech training w/great pay, benefits, vacation, $ for school. HS grads ages 17-34. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE: training with U.S. Navy. Good medical/dental, vacation, great reer. HS grads ages 17-34. Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, jobs_seattle@navy.mil

Paid pay, caCall or

NAVY RESERVE: Serve part-time. No military exp needed. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. Retirement. Call Mon-Fri (800) 887-0952, or jobs_seattle@navy.mil LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Okanogan County Cemetery District 4 Board that a Public Hearing is set for Monday, December 8, 2014, beginning at 1:30 pm, at the American Legion Hall 314 14th Ave, in Oroville, WA. This hearing is to consider the final adoption of the 2015 Budget for the Cemetery District 4 in Oroville, Washington. Persons wishing to comment may attend the hearing or submit their comments in writing to the Cemetery District 4, PO Box 764, Oroville, Washington. The Public is welcome to attend. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 20, 27, 2014. #OVG599780

Public Notices IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In re the Estate of: LORNE G. TAYLOR, Deceased. Probate No. 14-4-00109-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first publication: November 20, 2014 Personal Representative: Evelyn M. Taylor Attorney for Personal Representative: Peg R. Callaway Address for Mailing or Service: 700-A Okoma Drive Omak, WA 98841 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Okanogan County Superior Court, Cause No. 14-400109-5 Dated this 17th day of November, 2014. CALLAWAY & DETRO PLLC By: /s/Peg R. Callaway Peg R. Callaway; WSBA #13786 Attorney for Estate Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on 11/20, 27, December 4, 2014. #OVG600847 PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Okanogan County Comprehensive Plan and Interim Zone Code Notice is given that the Okanogan Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on December 22, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. to consider resolutions adopting the revised Okanogan County Comprehensive Plan, Methow Valley sub-area plan, and the Methow Valley sub-unit A sub-area plan. An ordinance will be considered that adopts an interim zone code and interim zone map. The public hearing will be held on December 22, 2014 at 3:00pm in the Commissioners auditorium located in the Virginia Grainger Building at 123 5th Ave North, Okanogan, WA 98840. Verbal testimony will be taken on the proposed interim zone code and interim zone map in accordance with RCW 36.70.795. Each speaker will be limited to 3 minutes for comment. Written comments regarding the interim zone code and interim zone map may be submitted at the hearing or in advance at the following address: Lalena Johns, Clerk of the Board at 123 5th Ave N, Okanogan, WA 98840 or ljohns@co.okanogan.wa.us Information regarding these documents is available at the Office of Planning and Development. Direct questions to: Perry Huston, Director at Okanogan County Office of Planning & Development, 123 5th Ave. N, Suite 130, Okanogan, WA 98840, (509) 422-7218, phuston@co.okanogan.wa.us. Date of publication: November 27, 2014 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 27, 2014. #OVG602252 The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, December 3, 2014, at 5:15 pm at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, WA. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization. We work with community members of all groups to raise the poor out of poverty, to feed the hungry, to provide affordable housing for all, to empower community members through education, and in the process to return prosperity and hope for the future to our county. If you have questions or need additional information please contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, (509) 4224041. Published: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 27, 2014. #OVG602263

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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Puzzle 39 (Very hard, difficulty rating 0.86)


NOVEMBER 27, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Awarded $22,500 by Washington State Department of Commerce SUBMITTED BY DEBBIE ROBERTS CO-CHAIR, TONASKET FOOD BANK

TONASKET - The Washington State Department of Commerce (Building Communities Fund Program) has notified the Tonasket Food Bank that it has been ranked number seven (of 29 projects) in its grant for $22,500 toward purchase of its current building. The Food Bank anticipates receiving formal notice of approval after the next Legislature session in late spring or early summer, 2015, with funds to be allocated in the fall. With this good news of being able to purchase our building, we can now focus on the regular expenses of running the program ñ food, utility expenses (which are higher now that we own the building), needed renovations, and regular upkeep. The Tonasket Food Bank

board if directors is extremely grateful to Montie Smith for her guidance through the grant application process, and to the community at large for their contributions in time, money and food for the Food Bank’s ongoing mission. As we enter the holiday season, the board wants to remind everyone that the work of the Tonasket Food Bank is ongoing. The holidays can be stressful times when families are expected to join in a festive spirit while they are worried about making ends meet . The Tonasket Food Bank provides food for an average of 150 households each week, about one-third of those being children under the age of 18. With the building purchase almost complete, contributions can now be designated for regular operating fund. The Board of Directors wishes to sincerely thank the generosity of the wider community, and asks that they please keep those contributions coming! Their new mailing address is Tonasket Food Bank, 101 Highway 97, Tonasket, WA 98855. For more information, please contact Debbie Roberts, 509-4862192.

Did you know?

Think Green!

Tonasket Food Bank tabbed to receive grant Tonasket Food Bank volunteer Leona Longanecker and a pair of food bank clients are among those who stand to benefit from a $22,500 Washington State Department of Commerce Building Community Funds grant.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE Find The Right

HOME

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you... Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home!

HELPFUL HINTS TO SELL YOUR HOME

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

1. Fix what needs fixed! Finish all unfinished projects: Example - Patch holes, fix leaky sinks and toilets, etc... 2. Useable space is a key factor: Example - Make a junk room into an office. 3. Declutter! Put everything away and ready to move: Example - Family photos, knickknacks, etc... 4. Paint! It is amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do. Make it a soft, neutral color. 5. Open your rooms up! You want everything to look bigger! If you have too much furniture in a room, decide which pieces to keep and find a place to store the rest. Arrange the remaining furniture to make the room look larger. 6. CLEAN! CLEAN! CLEAN! Make everything sparkle!

1422 Main St., Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602 l 888-838-3000

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HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS De-Cluttering Solutions for Your Home

Pack up all your knickknacks, anything that is sitting on top of a countertop, table or other flat surfaces. Anything that you haven’t used in at least a year? Give away what you can, throw away or donate unused items.

www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

HILLTOP REALTY Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com  158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

www.windermere.com

Lake and Country

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Beautiful custom-built log house on 20 acres. Spectacular views of the Cascade Mountains and wildlife abounds here! Open concept home with attention to detail throughout including 2 master suites, hardwood and tile flooring, and vaulted ceilings! MLS#534491 $254,000

509/476-3378

SUN LAKES REALTY

#1 Top Producer Office in North County!

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee 4 Lakeshore Dr., Oroville-Amazing lake access with nearly new multi-level home with lake/mountain views. Slate, tile, oak floors. Stone gas fireplace. Stainless appliances. Granite counters, pantry. Master suite has walk-in closet, double sink vanity, separate tub/shower. Huge family room. Daylight basement has gas fireplace in rec room, two bedrooms, full bath. Half bath, laundry room on entry level. Oversized two car garage with cabinets/sink. In ground irrigation. Many upgraded features. Wonderful home. NWML # 377262 $344,900

1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121

Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

Like new with great view of valley in Tonasket neighborhood. 3 bdrm 2 bath home has open floor plan. Modern kitchen/dining rooms with large sunny windows. New carpeting. Freshly painted interior walls. Deck off dining room. Full basement. Attached garage. $159,500.

WINTER SPORTS Our Winter Sports Section will be coming in December!

Don’t miss out...reserve your space now! OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Contact Charlene at 509-476-3602 or 509-322-5712


PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 27, 2014

OBITUARIES

Donetta Bunde

DONETTA KAY BUNDE Donetta Bunde, 69, passed away November 9th at Salem Hospital with her husband, Kent at her side. She was born in Salem to Don and Eleanor (Doerfler) Blades, being the only daughter with two older brothers, Dennis and Roger, followed by two younger brothers Wally and Jimmy. Donetta enjoyed her childhood on the family farm taking care of typical livestock and other chores farm life brings. One of her favorite pastimes was to horseback ride, her dad said she could ride most anything he would bring her. Donetta would jokingly reminisce about those times as to how hard it was to be the only daughter with all those brothers but she cherished those years as told by her fondness to share the stories of her childhood, with her brothers, many cousins and lifelong friends. Donetta graduated in the last class from St.

Boniface High School, Sublimity in 1963, participating as a cheerleader, and playing softball. She married Kent Bunde at St Boniface Church on Sept. 12th 1964, and they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary this year. After marrying, Donetta and Kent moved and lived in Pierre, South Dakota where David was born, within a few years Bridgette came along, shortly after they moved back to Oregon were their youngest son Kevin was born. She spent the majority of her younger life raising a family on Silver Falls Hwy. Kent and Donetta lived in Ferndale, Tonasket, and Wenatchee, Wash. for approximately 10 years during the late 80’s though the 90’s. She enjoyed many activities while in Washington most memorable were gardening, crabbing, clamming, and snowmobiling. She had her own snowmobile and could handle it well. Donetta enjoyed watching sports but mostly NFL football in which she was a Seattle Seahawk fan. Soon after Kent retired they sold their home and purchased a large 5th wheel RV that would be their home for approximately the next 10 years as Kent traveled the western United States subcontracting as a mainline Fiber Optic inspector. She enjoyed the times traveling which lead them to most of the states west of the Mississippi. Donetta spent most of her life as homemaker, however as the kids grew older she did have many part time jobs as well as volunteering at a local hospital. Donetta always enjoyed gatherings with family and her many friends she had met over the years. She typically would spend hours cooking a meal that always turned out wonderful. Donetta was preceded in death by her parents, Don and Eleanor Blades, and brothers Dennis and Jimmy. She is survived by her husband Kent and

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their three children David (Donna) Bunde, Bridgette (Michael) Sterling, and Kevin (Amy) Bunde and five grandchildren, Nicole, Melissa, Jake, Kyle and Monica. She also leaves behind her two brothers Roger and Wally Blades. Recitation of Rosary will be Wednesday, November 12, 2014 at 7 p.m. and Mass of Christian Burial will be Thursday, November 13, 2014 at 1 p.m. both at St. Boniface Catholic Church in Sublimity. Interment will be in St. Boniface Cemetery, Sublimity. Serving the family, North Santiam Funeral Service, Stayton.

Barbara Forrester

BARBARA J. FORRESTER Barbara J. Forrester was born on December 18, 1934 in Oroville to parents Giacamo and Angeline Scacco. She grew up in Oroville and was raised by her sister Rose Marie and

Web Hallauer. On March 21, 1953 she married Richard Forrester and together they raised two sons, Richard E. and Dane C. Their entire married life they spent on the farm raising apples. Barbara was very family oriented and was active with her boys as they were growing up supporting them in their sports and school activities and family outings including skiing .. For many years she and Richard owned and operated Dick’s Furniture until retirement in 1997. Over the years, Barbara was active in Bridge Clubs, ran several tournaments for charitable organizations and taught others how to play. She was an excellent Bridge player. She was a charter member of the Oroville Golf Club and served as President of the Ladies Golf Club. Barbara traveled extensively and especially enjoyed those times with her family and friends. Gardening was a part of her life and her green thumb produced beautiful flowers and vegetables; and she loved to cook, especially Italian food , and liked to entertain. Her grandchildren were very special to her and she spent as much time as possible with them. Barbara is survived by her husband whom she loved dearly, two sons, Richard E. (Debbie) Forrester of Ft. Worth, Texas and Dane C. (Joyce) of Oroville; six grandchildren and five great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by two brothers, Frank and Guy Scacco; one sister, Rosie Hallauer, one grandson, Eric Jon Forrester and Web Hallauer. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church in Oroville and 11 a.m. on December 3, 2014 with the Rev. Marilyn Wilder officiating. Memorials may be made to Trinity Church, PO Box 1270, Oroville or Oroville Streetscape, Box 299. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville is in care of arrangements.

Resources, a Denver based firm, has been drilling test holes on 4,100 acres of property, on or near Buckhorn Mountain, for over a year now and expects to have completed the frilling phase by Christmas. Two votes could mean that Oroville incumbent Mayor, Ed King, may retain his position as mayor, according to the Okanogan County Auditor’s office. “The fat lady ain’t sang yet,” was the comment of challenger Mick Munson, who has called for a re-count. Regal Fruit of Tonasket is a co-op and according to manager, Gerald Alumbaugh, “fruit co-ops will always be the backbone of the apple industry and co-ops will always listen to their growers.” The banquet honored the celebration of Regal’s 41st anniversary as a co-op. Centenarians Ted Germain, age 102, Mamie Wurman, age 102 and Jessie Pickering, age 100, receive plaques honoring their longevity and contributions to the community, from Tonasket Student Body members Debbie O’Neal, Vice President, for publicity, Paula Bensing, President and Kristi Walker, Vice President for programs. The students, by the way, say they are all age 17. A meeting concerning the Old Oroville Cemetery has been called for Thursday, December 7, at the offices of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation Company. The meeting is open to all interested in putting up a fence around the cemetery. Dorothy Petry, caretaker of the Oroville Cemetery, said, “the land has been surveyed by Guy Fisher, who volunteered his time, and former Oroville resident, Lawrence Perkins, says that he will pay for the fencing materials.” Petry further stated that the Oroville Grange will volunteer help put up the fence. Many of the first pioneers of the Oroville area are buried in that plot. Subscribe to the...

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 27, 2014  

November 27, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 27, 2014  

November 27, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune