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WEST MY FRIEND CONCERT

Football and ‘Futbol’ both bow out of state playoffs

CCC of Tonasket Friday, Nov. 21, 7:00 p.m.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Tonasket Criminal Justice levy pulls ahead by one vote

FABULOUS 50’s FUND RAISER

If final ballot count remains the same the measure passes without recount, says Mayor Plumb In an all mail election, and with the increased use of the Tonasket City Hall ballot drop box, it is premature to call OKANOGAN – If Tonasket’s Criminal any local elections until all the ballots Justice measure were a horserace, it have been processed at the Auditor’s would be a photo finish and it looks as Office, according to Plumb. “I have heard at times that more than though the self-imposed tax of ).1 perhalf of the ballots cent has won not received by the by a nose, but by a “Although the language of are Auditor’s office whisker. the tax is quite open-ended, after 8 p.m. on As of the last vote day,” said count, taken Friday, I would like to assure peo- election Plumb. “I am surNov. 14, the meaple that the entire amount prised at the outsure which would of the elecincrease the sales we collect in this tax will come tion, and I appretax to raise revbe entirely expended on ciate the voters enue for criminal the sacrijustice and fire proCriminal Justice fees now making fice to help us meet tection costs, was our obligations to leading by a single and into the future.” provide Criminal vote out of the 273 Mayor Patrick Plumb Justice services to votes cast. The elecCity of Tonasket Tonasket.” tion day count had The mayor Proposition 1, a added, “Although Sales and Use Tax Levy trailing by 12 votes. The following the language of the tax is quite openFriday’s vote still had it behind, before ended, I would like to assure people that this last count pushed the measure across the entire amount we collect in this tax the finish line, evoking surprise and sev- will be entirely expended on Criminal eral comments from Tonasket’s Mayor, Justice fees now and into the future.” Patrick Plumb. SEE JUSTICE | PG A2 BY GARY A. DEVON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

North Valley Community Schools held their 50’s Dance last Saturday night at Vicki’s Back Door to raise money for the many popular classes they offer to adults in Oroville and Tonasket. Above, Lynn Cuff and Paul Bouchard and Janice and Spence Higby cut a rug at the event. Right, Project 3:16 played many popular old tunes from the 50s, as well as the 60s and 70s. Below, right, Linda Colvin, Ellen Barttels and Helen Casey serve up treats at the annual fund raiser. Below, Kevin Brewster and Leah Palmer, look marvelous as Elvis and Marilyn. For more see page A3.

COLA or raise? Tonasket debates pay increases

Gary DeVon/staff photos

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Is it a raise or a cost of living adjustment? That discussion dominated much of the City of Tonasket’s budget hearing Wednesday, Nov. 12, as the City Council attempted to shoehorn rising expenses into a stagnant revenue pool. Council members Jill Vugteveen and Scott Olson, comprising the finance committee, had proposed a two percent COLA for city employees. That resulted in a sharp debate between Vugteveen and Mayor Patrick Plumb about the nature of COLA and what the city could afford. This issue was complicated by the fact that the city is also trying to play “catch up” with one employee they deemed to

be underpaid, in terms of entry compensation for similar positions. The two percent across the board COLA would come to a total of $9,110 in cost to the city, though not all of it would come from the general fund that has been so strapped for cash. “If you do a percent increase, flat rate across the board ... then we wouldn’t be doings this catch up crap with lower paid employees,” Plumb said. “Because with a flat rate it would be a bigger percentage for the lower paid staff than the higher paid staff ... it balances out over time. (With percentage) the top ones go up faster, as we’ve done yearly the past few years, which has created more of a difference.” Plumb suggested taking the total increase of $9,110 and distributing that increase equally to each employee, regardless of what the percentage would

SEE COUNCIL | PG A3

Michel presents two-pronged nursing home strategy Focus groups to formulate both success and closure contingency plans BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Citing the need to discuss “the elephant in the room,” North Valley Hospital District Administrator Linda Michel outlined a dual plan to cope with continuing financial losses at the North Valley Extended Care nursing home facility at the Thursday, Nov. 13, board of commissioners meeting.

The commissioners unanimously approved the recommendations formulated by Michel and the district’s senior administrators that formed a pair of teams: one, to find a way to make the nursing home financially viable; the other, to come up with a contingency plan to close the facility if the first team is unable to come up with such a plan. The nursing home is projected to lose nearly $893,000 in 2014 and another $809,000 next year. The district, although it has climbed out of warrants and will finish 2014 about $1.2 million in the black this year and a projected $707,000 next year, is at risk if those losses continue. Michel said this risk is thanks to rising costs and looming changes in how hospitals will be paid for Medicaid and Medicare patients, which comprise the

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 47

majority of North Valley Hospital’s base. Also, she said, the facility has more than $2 million in capital needs, including about $1.4 million in repairs and maintenance that she characterized as urgent but were not factored into the operations budget. Those needs include equipment (cardiac monitoring system, patient lift, lab equipment, etc.) as well as facility needs (new windows in the Extended Care, roof and parapet on the older portion of the hospital, work on the HVAC system, and computer work to keep up with changing federal standards). On top of that, the state has mandated that counties no longer loan hospital Brent Baker/staff photo districts money to make up for shortfalls North Valley Extended Care’s future could be determined by March as two committees in daily operations - warrants - making have been formed by the Board of Commissioners to either come up with a plan to make SEE NVH | PG A2 it financially viable, or provide a contingency plan for its closure.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Missoula Theatre A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Cops & Courts Sports Schools

A8 B1-2 B3

Classifieds Real Estate Obituaries

B4-5 B5 B6


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 20, 2014

MISSOULA CHILDRENS THEATRE

Cast of Characters - Tower Rapunzel, Sheridan Blasey; Room Rapunzel, Gwen Hankins; Prince #1, Maxwell Turner; Prince #2- Cody Renfroe; Madame Gothel, Paige Wirth; Maurice, Christina Herrick; Monique, Hadley Blasey; Wood Elves- Gracie Hill, Emily Grunert, Samantha Turner and Darbey Carleton; Ears of Corn- Kylie Acord and Katie Maynard; Potato, Kensie Hugus; Pixies- Jezebel Cline, Michael Oaks, Isaac Gomez, Maya Spikes and Cintia Morales; Gremlins- Deana Lohnes, Cevina Morales, Hailey Helm, Gordon Booker, David Corrales and Carmen Herring; Billy Goats Gruff- Della Mae Hankins, Rebekah Martin and Bailee Allen; Troll- Jamen Griffin; Three Bears- Baylee Taber, Isaac Hill and Ava Singer; Bucky the Beaver- Trevor Lindsay; Ogres- Vicki Martinez, Seraphina Marie, Savannah Berg and Jasmine Sutton; Mushrooms- Emma Carranza, Alexis Lindsay, Brody Booker, Kya Freeze, Shiloh Willis, Leah Martin, Lesly Corrales, Miley Taber, James Sutton, Destiny Cline, Marisol Comez-Pina, Abigail Martin, Sandra Minigell, Sydney Lewis, Jr. Lavigueure and Elizabeth Cline; Fun Gus- Abigail Martin; and The Piano Accompanist, Vicki Haney. Frenchy, Tour Actor/ Director Alex Kowalchik and The Director, Tour Actor/Director: Kristen Gilbert. This play was conceived and written by Michael McGill who also wrote the music and lyrics.

Rapunzel retold through Missoula Children’s Theatre The Missoula Children’s Theatre brought another whirlwind production to Oroville last weekend with their take on the classic fairy tale of Rapunzel and her long golden hair. The production was put on with less than a week of rehearsals by Oroville students. From the program: “Would it surprise you to know that the story of Rapunzel happened France? Well it didn’t really, but our story takes you on a frivolous frolic through the French countryside. The Ogres garden in the Mushroom patch while the Corn and Potato spies report back to Madame Gothel. Frenchy and his intense friends, the Wood Elves, do their best to help Rapunzel escape the grasp of Madame Gothel. The lost Prince, Rapunzel’s Parents, and her friends the Unicorns try to help. Just when you think it’s safe to cross the bridge a Troll and Three Billy Goats Gruff get in the way. It doesn’t help that the Three Bears (or is it four) confuse Rapunzel with Goldilocks and chase her through the forest. Add to that the Gremlins trying to play tricks on everyone and you have chaos! Well, it’s not that bad because the Pixies foil the Gremlin’s plans most of the time. In short, Rapunzel and all the rest of the characters tell a silly tale of personal triumph and friendship.� Throughout its 40 year existence, the Missoula Children’s Theatre International Tour has fostered developmental life skills in more than a million kids. Just this year, we will work with 65,000 children in more than 1,200 communities in all 50 states and 17 countries. The Missoula Children’s Theatre relies on your generosity to close the gap between low tour fees and the actual cost of touring. If our program has had a positive impact on you or a family member, and you would like to help ensure this experience for future generations, contact Development Director, Cate Sundeen at csundeen@ MCTinc.org. The MCT production of Rapunzel in Oroville was sponsored partially by The National Endowment for the Arts and the Montana Arts Council, as well as the Oroville Booster Club.

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NOVEMBER 20, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

It’s not easy getting old Just as we’re getting over the shock of the Assisted Living being closed, we now have to contend with the knowledge that the Nursing Home in Tonasket may be hurtling towards the same fate. Again, there are legitimate reasons given for the potential closure of the facility, but that wouldn’t make it any easier. In fact closing the Nursing Home would have a much greater impact on our friends and family members who are no longer able to get along without 24-hour care. At least with the Assisted Living the residents most were able to care for themselves. While the signs may have been there for years, when the hospital district closed the Assisted Living it felt like there was little warning. A lot of people were upset by the decision. People had to find new places for their loved ones to live, sometimes miles away from there homes. At least the hospital commissioners and administration seem to be more out front with the issue of the Nursing Out of Home. They are being proactive by forming two – one to study how to keep the facility My Mind committees viable, and one to prepare for closure if the district Gary A. DeVon can’t find a way to cover the over $800,000 in losses expected this year and again in 2015. It’s been an up and down ride for the Nursing Home. At one time it was bailing the hospital out of debt, but those times are no more. Reductions in what the government pays for residents who rely on public pay to live in nursing homes is a factor everyone who runs a public facility like the one at North Valley have had to contend with for a number of years. Twenty-four hour care comes at a high price and the majority of the residents in the home are on some sort of public pay which no longer covers the cost of full time care. Unlike our public hospital district, private facilities can not only cover costs but even operate at a profit because their mix of residents leans much more heavily to the private pay end. It’s doubtful that a private company will come in and take over the Nursing Home any more than they would have the Assisted Living. Before the protests signs come out this time, let’s hope the commissioners do their best to let the public know what’s going on now, rather then waiting until it’s a foregone conclusion. The Nursing Home is worth saving, but no amount of protest is going to save it if the funding is not there. It’s unfortunate that times have changed and the facility can no longer support itself. The hospital administrator says that the facility will remain open if the district can find the means to do so, even if it just breaks even or has to spend a little over revenues. But in addition to less government reimbursements, we also have an aging facility. And now that state law has changed there is no more going to the county to extend credit to our hospital district when the revenues fall short. The hospital district has to live within its means. Whenever the care of our loved ones, especially our elderly, is at stake it is emotional. If the rest of the district’s Extended Care closes down, a lot of families will have to make tough decisions. Finding places for their loved ones won’t be easy and the district needs to be on top of things and do their best to help these important members of our North Valley communities. If this subject is near to your heart, be proactive – talk with one of your hospital commissioners, attend the hospital board meetings or keep reading Brent Baker’s articles on the board meetings. You might not be able to change things, but then again you just might.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PUD needs to educate the ratepayers Dear Editor, I keep hearing rumbles about the Enloe Dam project. I have also noticed that my electric bill keeps going up. I wonder if these two issues are connected? One reason the rate payers are paying more for electricity is because we (PUD) is in debt for other projects. Going forward with the Enloe Dam project will require that we add $40 million dollars to that debt. That means our rates will go up once again. I know the generation, transmission, and maintenance of the electrical grid is complicated and expensive because generation of power must closely match real-time use. Too much generation and too little demand causes as many problems as too little generation and too much demand. One problem the managers of “the grid” have is that demand fluctuates with season and even time of day. I’m having a hard time understanding how going into $40 million dollars of debt to rebuild power generation at Enloe Dam will solve our budget or power generation problems. Enloe Dam only has excess water (water not already in use) running over it in the spring run-off season. The same season of peak potential power generation for our current source of power – hydro generation on the Columbia River. Why was power generation at Enloe Dam ended 50 years ago? Maybe because it was not cost effective? Too much debt crashed the economy and we know private equity “investors” get their cut no matter what. Maybe 60,000 County residents adding $40 million dollars of debt to our electricity budget is an issue we should re-examine. Is it worth adding $40 million dollars of debt to private investors in order to generate “almost” enough power

to run Oroville should there be a power shortage in the spring? Will Enloe Dam generate enough power to pay for itself? I wish the PUD would come to the ratepayers with some education about the challenges of power generation and listen to rate-payers on ideas to change the dynamic of ever increasing debt. Gee, maybe we could work together to come up with an investment plan that would create jobs and solve generation, transmission, and maintenance problems, and reduce costs. Roberta Hackett Chesaw

Our economical fence Dear Editor, Immigration Reform is the taxpayers’ Golden Spike. The Underground Railroad: who gets credit for the fence; and I voted for Ike? Thank you, Roger Rylander Tonasket

Time to get to work for the 4th District Dear Editor, I will soon travel to our nation’s capital to meet with my new colleagues and start the process for committee assignments. But before I go there are some things I would like to say. First, I would like to thank the voters of Central Washington for the honor to serve you in the U.S. House of Representatives. I am humbled by your trust. I promise that I will spend the next two years working hard to make you proud of my efforts. Next I would like to thank the many people

who helped my campaign. To the thousands of volunteers who waved signs, knocked on doors, called voters, encouraged friends, gave financially, and did all the other things that make a campaign a success -- we could not have done this without you. I also want to thank my opponent for running a spirited campaign. We didn’t see eye-to-eye on everything, but we agreed on many issues. For those of you who may have supported the other candidate in this race, I plan to work hard to represent you to the best of my abilities. I’d be happy to work with you and my door will always be open. Finally, I would like to thank Representative Doc Hastings for being a dedicated public servant during his twenty years in Congress. He has set a high standard for his successor to meet. Now it’s time to get to the hard work of getting Washington, DC to listen to us. Central Washington, and all Americans, have important issues that need to be fixed. We need to stop the wasteful spending and pass a Balanced Budget Amendment. We have to simplify the tax code and make our job creators more competitive. We must reform out health care system so that it actually reduces costs and increases access and quality of care. We need to reform our immigration system to secure our border and provide a stable workforce going forward. We need to make sure land-use decisions are handled at the local level using sound science rather than by distant federal bureaucrats. We have to hold the Federal government accountable for cleaning up Hanford. And we need more water storage in Central Washington. That’s a lot to do, and it won’t be easy, but I’m excited to get to work. Best Regards, Dan Newhouse Representative Elect for the 4th District

Devine or decline? No voter ID. Let’s face it, there is no practical obstacle whatsoever to obtaining ID in America. In fact it is practically impossible Especially when one has shed blood for to be voting age in America and not already one’s country, it is monumentally disturbing have had to display ID hundreds of times. to arrive at one’s fossil years suspecting one’s Ergo there is no excuse for allowing a voting system that America used to pride itself upon beloved country is in decline. to become corrupted by voter fraud. Granted, this suspicion has been If we actually believe the partisan voiced many times in America’s legend that no damaging voter fraud history without grounds, but I see problem exists then we all risk being unprecedented and startling signs. “disenfranchised” by the vote banIn no particular order, they are: dits of all parties. Too much power Borders. Yes even “native” is at play not to secure a fraudAmericans immigrated to North bulletproof voting system. America, immigrants have made Marriage, read: the decline theregreat citizens, and our borders have Bill Slusher of. I was a two-time loser at the altar long been “porous” but never has before I got it blessedly right. Hell is there been the population volume coming to America illegally that we’ve experi- Disneyworld compared to a bad marriage, but enced recently and never did they bring such a a good one has so much to offer the married load on the American taxpayer. Consequently and our country. I’d suggest doubters compare our failure to secure our borders (as other the economic, incarceration and assimilation nations do much more effectively) is degrad- success records of groups of Americans who ing America as earlier, legal immigration have rejected marriage on a predominant never did. Our social services net (already scale to those who have embraced it. Case overladen with domestic burdens) will even- closed. Obesity. I’m fifteen pounds overfed, but tually overwhelm the taxpayer’s finite drainable blood. Our heretofore diverse but none- epidemic obesity in America drastically theless singular American national identity threatens more than our physical health and is already blurring under the onslaught of our healthcare economy, it puts our national immigrant factions seeking merely to bring mental health at risk. Generally - right, wrong, their own cultures under a more socially gen- fair or unfair - neither sex finds the other erous government, rather than to become part or themselves as attractive where seriously obese. We may argue to psychological esoof the once world-envied American culture. Language: Likewise, no nation can long terica whether this is right, but it remains a sustain fractured by many disparate languag- national reality highly unlikely to change. It es. Without a required, national language contributes significantly to romantic discord, we become vulnerable to social, educational, harms self esteem, will further degrade the cultural and economic divisions that divide marriage rate, and will exacerbate American us into mutually ignorant tribes rather than unhappiness on a tragic scale. No draft. Wonder why America suffers unite us into a single, world leading nation. Even among legal Americans, failure to speak unprecedented percentages of twenty-someEnglish correctly helps significantly to hold thing men still dressing like five-year-olds and entire communities of citizens in economic living in Mommy’s basement? The causes are plural but an important one is that there is no paralysis. SUBMITTED BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIOPOLITICAL COMMENTARY

longer any social force in America to snatch young adults from Mommy and force them to become self-supporting, to require them to think about matters of more gravity than this weekend’s party, to physically work-out, to learn cooperation toward a shared goal, to acquire toughness and resilience, and often to learn a career. There is a catch. If a draft is reinstated, it must incorporate girls too. Why should males go in harm’s way for their country while post-modern “equal” females safely continue advancement of their educations and careers? Moreover, conservatives serve in the all-volunteer American military 23 to 1 to liberals. This too is equally unfair to both liberals and conservatives, as well as a further threat to American unity, as in where any group serves at risk while another rides for free. This brings us to that cancer of American character, political correctness. It has always existed in American culture, just never so corrosively as today. Once political correctness sanctioned slavery and allowed that women weren’t up to voting. Now it has metastasized to become toxic to our education system, our domestic and military security, our justice system, our voting system, our civil rights, and our reputation as a country to respect. I’ve fought a war. I’ve paid taxes and voted for half-a-century, and the young don’t pay much heed to the old, in part due to modern political correctness. So for truths and solutions, younger Americans, you are bound to look within. I wish you well...because it’s you in the cockpit. ‘William Slusher’s latest novel is a bipartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or, How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. He may be insulted and complained to at williamslusher@live. com.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 20, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Baby, it’s suddenly cold outside BRRR! Baby it’s cold outside! All so suddenly. Oh well, It had to happen sometime. And now I can’t repeat that we have had no killing frost. We’re on a countdown to Thanksgiving, and already have Christmas sales advertising and programs on TV. Have we forgotten the true meaning of the above mentioned holidays? And do dollars speak louder than old-fashioned common sense and family values? And remember when Sundays were Sunday and stores were closed, for the most part, and a family dinner with friends invited to share the day with, and there were no electronic devices at the table, but people actually talked to each other? If you let your kids use electronics at the dinner table, then you are part of the problem. My age is showing again, isn’t it?

We attended the Veteran’s Day program at the school, and what a nice celebration it was. So many small children from the elementary school, sitting on the floor, and so well behaved. Their singing and line dancing was performed very nicely, the high school band sounded very good and the boys who were the MC’s looked so nice in dress shirts and ties. We were impressed! The Legion members in dress uniform look so regal as they march in carrying our beautiful flag. Growing older has some perks, like, having a chair offered to you when in a crowded area, being asked questions of the past, having a great grandson make his way in the crowd, at the Vets Assembly, to give his grandpa and me a hug, watching third generation kids maturing and remembering their parents,

TONASKET EAGLES

All our volunteers are appreciated SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Hoping everyone is keeping warm as the cold air is just that. We would like to thank all of our volunteers that have done such a great job you are appreciated more than you think. This Friday, Nov. 21 will be the Bingo Turkey play off. Get your dabbers and come in and

win a large turkey everyone can win something, there is no losing at this event. The kitchen will be open at 5 p.m. and Bingo starts at 7 p.m. Don’t forget Karaoke with Linda Wood on Saturdays starting at 9 p.m. This Thanksgiving we are having a free dinner or by donation from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and the Aerie will be closing at 6 p.m. If you don’t want to cook or

HILLTOP COMMENTS

Free Thanksgiving dinner in Chesaw SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Chesaw Community Bible Church will be serving a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 27. Everyone is invited to share a full turkey din-

ner with all of the trimmings including dessert at noon. A Celebration of Life will be held for John Webster Myrick on Saturday, Nov. 22 at 1 p.m. at the Grange Hall in Molson. Beverages and desserts will be available.

AT THE LEGION POST

Seeking names for Veterans Liberty Tree SUBMITTED BY VICKI HART AMERICAN LEGION HODGES POST #84

We will be submitting names for our Veterans Liberty Tree Leaves twice a year, with the first batch coming up soon. If you want to add the name of a veteran or member currently serving in our armed forces please

contact Walt or Vicki Hart at 509-476-4633. We need to know the spelling of the name, the way you want it listed, the branch of service, and the years he or she served. We are asking for a minimum $5 donation per leaf.

OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Free Thanksgiving dinner offered at the Center SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER PRESIDENT

As I sink into my recliner, controller in hand, tired, but a good tired, the firewood laid up for the winter, the freezers full, autos ready, snow blower gassed and dozer in tune, I think of the our many blessings. In spite of the looming Shemitah judgment, the blood moons and, the darknesses predicted upon our nation, I take this time to say thanks. Thanks that I live in a country where the poorest of the poor are richer than half the worlds populations, and richer by far than our grandfathers imagined. Thankful to our creator for our bounty, that we can gather in community to celebrate. On Thursday, Nov. 27, at 1 p.m., all are invited to partake of a traditional Thanksgiving meal, par excellence, at the Oroville Senior Center located at 1521 Golden Street. We will provide

the turkeys, dressing, potatoes, gravy and refreshments. We ask that others bring, potluck style, the rest of the meal, so that all, even those empty-handed, may be fed. And, let’s celebrate our bounty and our freedoms that those in the past came, empty handed, fleeing despots and oppressors, to arrive in this New World where everyone is a king. Our Bazaar tables are filling up, so, if you want to reserve a table, or donate, for our Saturday, Dec. 13 Bazaar, call Betty Hall at 509-476-2788. Our annual election of officers for Oroville Senior Citizens will be held at our business meeting on Dec. 16 at 11 a.m. Present your nominees to Betty Steg or Raleigh Chinn. Our County organization, OCSCA, will be holding an election this Friday Nov. 21, starting at 10 a.m., at the Okanogan County Senior Center. The 18 Delegates will elect five Directors, for terms of three years. They will sit as the

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and these a just a few. And of course group of local elementary children in there are some down sides, like having doing a production of Rapunzel. It is aches and pains in the knees and other absolutely amazing what they can do joints, wrinkles, dim print, in such a short time with people mumbling instead of the children. Two workers speaking up, steeper stairs, and over 50 children and thinning hair etc. three days practice. And not We don’t have CVS pharto forget the accompanist, macies in our neighborhood Vicki Haney... do we ever get but they have stopped selling too old to go see the perforcigarettes in their business mance of our kids? (Not yet places. Good for them. we haven’t.). Thanks to the Kudos’ to the faithful Booster Club and the PTO workers and contributors of for their financial support items to the local museum bringing these programs THIS & THAT in that helps it to continue to and thanks to the many who grow! They had an increase Joyce Emry attended. HINT: Next year in attendance and from 6 of advertise more. I had people the 7 continents, last year. tell me they didn’t know of It’s colder! Make a bigger pot of soup. the group coming except from reading it Wednesday night burgers, at the in my “This and That.â€? American Legion is drawing bigger I was just thinking‌. Do folks still gatherings. Try it, you’ll like it! read “bedtime storiesâ€? to their chilMy neighbor had a gorgeous shaped dren? I never hear of the old-fashioned tree with so many fall colored leaves on “Mother Gooseâ€? tales any more and we it and along came a couple of days of have lots of little ones around us. wind and now it is an ugly skeleton. And this is no fairy tale‌ another Saturday we went to the school again, cougar in the neighborhood near the this time to see Missoula Children’s Paw’s fruit stand, in the Dwinnel Bros. Theater worker’s as they assisted the orchard area. Ray Ballard says, don’t let

want to meet new friends, this is a great place to come. Our Joker Poker is building again, it’s up to $1079 – you could win half, but you can’t win if you don’t play. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Gene Michels, second place Betty Paul, low score to Ted Zachman and last pinochle went to Carol Ross and Gene Michels. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Don’t forget BINGO on Friday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m. Pinochle Scores for Monday, Nov. 10: With 40 players the Men’s High went to Jim Fry and the Ladies’ Highwent to Danny Wierick. The Men’s Low went to Jo Gubser. The Ladies’ Low went to Ina Visser. Winner of the first Series (5 weeks) Bev Holden. The Traveling Award went to Carl Cole – for the second week in a row.

The Legion Kid’s Christmas Party for members and their guests is set for Friday, Dec. 19 at 6 p.m. for potluck and 7 p.m. visit from Santa. Our annual crab dinner fund raiser will be held on Valentine’s Day. We presell and limit our ticket sales so we will be sure to have the right amount of food for everyone. Don’t miss out. Tickets will be $25.00 each and will be available the middle of December 2014.

Boards of Directors of OCTN and IHCCW. (This will not affect the Executive Director positions.) The OCSCA Delegates will also elect their own officers for the year 2015. Members and the public can attend. As the interim President of OCSCA I believe I have my hands full. And I give thanks for that. Door prize, Danny Wietrich; pinochle winners -- High Man, Ed Craig; High Woman, Danny Wietrick. Try something new. Euchre, a card game, will be played Tuesdays after lunch. Vallerie will teach newcomers. ‘Til next time.

Ninth annual Jammin’ Against Hunger Nov. 21 SUBMITTED BY THERESA TAYLOR WVC COMMUNITY RELATIONS

OKANOGAN - Support the ninth annual Jammin’ Against Hunger community benefit show, sponsored by Wenatchee Valley College at Omak student government, and enjoy an evening of entertainment. The benefit show takes place on Friday, Nov. 21, from 7 to 11 p.m. at The Key, 120 Pine, Okanogan. Admission to attend this event is five cans of non-perishable, unexpired food items per person. The student government’s goal this year is to raise at least a ton of food for the local food banks. Food banks are requesting donations of canned fruits and proteins such as peanut butter and meat, according to Tammy Combs, Associated Students of Wenatchee Valley College at Omak events coordinator. She said that WVC at Omak student government recognized the needs of the valley following a destructive fire season.

anyone tell you,� a fat boy can’t run’� especially if there is a cougar on your porch. A new haircut and style brings compliments, but one needs that hairdresser each morning to help us get ready for the day. Joe Lemaster has been home for a few days from Alaska, but had to return to work before Thanksgiving, so Beverly and Lloyd hosted dinner for him and his family, early. Do you ever make “dump cake?� It is so simple, so quick and so good. Dan and Jane Gerth, a quiet couple, have the unique hobby of doing antique tractor pulls (before the 50’s). You just never know what looms inside your friends and acquaintances, do you? Our computer has been doing lots of “strange� things, or could it be the old operators? Whatever, I don’t know what we’d do without our #1 grandson. He comes, and with a few pokes and pushes on the keys and sometimes a new part, has it going again. I’m so sorry for those that don’t have a Jason in their life! And I imagine he sometimes wishes he lived far away!

WENATCHEE VALLEY COLLEGE “We all saw the power of a community that comes together to help due to the effects of the Carlton Complex fires,â€? Combs said. “The season of Thanksgiving and Christmas is a time of heightened need, with this year being no different. Jammin’ Against Hunger is a wonderful opportunity to have fun as well as gift the community with a much-needed donation‌. We look forward to being a part of the solution for hunger in Okanogan County.â€? Featured entertainers are Cody Beebe and the Crooks—the band’s fourth appearance at this event. Opening for them is local band, The Company Band. The show also includes a dance contest with a $100 first-place prize in addition to many other prizes. Seattle’s Cody Beebe and the Crooks make rock music that is inspired by the frontier attitude of the American Heartland, with Americana and blues roots. Rather than eclectic, the music comes off with a directness and unpretentious nature characteris-

tic of their hometown’s rock and roll. After five years on the road and two albums, CBC is bolstered by a tight brotherhood and bravely presents innovative music with honest, well-crafted lyrics. The band members are Cody Beebe, lead vocals and guitar; Skyler Mehal, guitar and vocals; Eric Miller, bass and vocals; Aaron Myers, keys, organ and vocals; and Brian Paxton, drums and vocals. Having recently performed at The Gorge’s Watershed Music Festival and having shared stages with acts as diverse and accomplished as Buddy Guy, Stevie Nicks, Austin Jenckes and Allen Stone, CBC is on the precipice of making a lasting national impact. The Company Band consists of Casey Martin, lead guitar and vocals; Kirk Gildroy, drummer; and Randy Statler, bass guitar. The Company Band is based out of the Omak area and has been rocking the Okanogan Valley for twenty-six years. They have opened up for Tom T. Hall, Dottie West and Freddy Fender. This is a drug and alcohol free event. For more information, call Livia Millard, WVC at Omak Multicultural Affairs Coordinator, at (509) 422-7814 or Combs at (509) 422-7890.

OKMTA student recital Nov. 23 TONASKET - students of Okanogan County Music Teachers Association (OKMTA) will perform Sunday, November 23, 3:00 p.m. at the Tonasket High School Auditorium. The public is invited to hear a variety of styles on piano and strings. Admission is by donation. Teachers and their students are: Roz Nau, Tonasket: students

include Leo Chen, Brennon Ramsey, Max and Sami Turner, and Second Strings (an ensemble with Bethany, Gloria, Mark, Sarah and Teresa Fast, Brennon Ramsey, and Jen Weddle). Sandy Sheets, Omak: students include Stephanie and Joshua Maeda, Madison Gariano, Sarah Dixon, Marisa Grillo, Taleah

Danielson. Elizabeth Grunst, Oroville: students include Elijah Sylvester andGloria Fast. Lois Rhoads, Tonasket: students include Mandi Wilson and Abby Steinshouer. Kathleen Christensen, Omak: students include Grace, Worden, Karina Baum.

Ski auction Nov. 22 TONASKET - Sitzmark Ski Club’s annual dinner auction will be held Saturday, Nov. 22, at The Kuhler Bar & Grill in Tonasket. The silent auction and prime rib or chicken dinner begins at 5:00 p.m., with the live auction starting at 7:00. Advance tickets are available at Lee Franks in Tonasket.

Proceeds from the auction help to offset the cost of providing the mid-week ski school program that is offered to local public and private schools. For more information about the auction - or if you would like to donate items - call Sandra Sutton (509-485-2223), Irene Kuhlmann (509-485-3343) or Brock Sutton (509-322-8980).

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. - SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

THE BEST OF ME

THURS.-FRI. NOV. 20-21 PG SHOWTIMES ON FRI. AT 7&9:15 PM INTERSTELLAR SAT.-SUN.-MON.TUES- PG THURS.-FRI. NOV.22-25, 27-28. 1 SHOW NIGHTLY AT 7:30PM

THE HUNGER GAMES - MOCKING JAY

Charitable Giving Pays Off....for Everyone FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638

Here’s how the charitable tax deduction works: If \RXJLYHWRDTXDOLÂżHGFKDULW\DQG\RXÂśUHLQ the 25% tax bracket, you can deduct $200, with a WD[EHQHÂżWRIZKHQ\RXÂżOH\RXUWD[HV Consequently, the net “costâ€? of your donation is MXVW PLQXVWKHWD[VDYLQJV 

trust. Under this arrangement, you’d place some assets, such as stocks or real estate, into a trust, which could then use these assets to pay you a lifetime income stream. When you establish the trust, you may be able to receive an immediate tax deduction based on the charitable group’s “remainder interestâ€? — the amount the charity LV OLNHO\ WR XOWLPDWHO\ UHFHLYH 7KLV ÂżJXUH LV determined by an IRS formula.) Upon your death, the trust would relinquish the remaining assets to the charitable organization you’ve named. This type of trust can be complex, so to create one, you’ll need to work with your tax and legal advisors.

2I FRXUVH \RX DUH QRW FRQÂżQHG WR PDNLQJ cash gifts. In fact, if you donate certain types of noncash assets, you may be able to increase Reported by Edward Jones Americans are pretty generous — in fact, 83% \RXU WD[ EHQHÂżWV 6XSSRVH \RX JLYH  of us donated money to charitable organizations worth of stock in ABC Company to a charitable last year, according to a Gallup survey. And now group. If you’re in the 25% bracket, you’ll be able that we’re entering the holiday season, charitable WRGHGXFWZKHQ\RXÂżOH\RXUWD[HV$QGE\ giving well may be on your mind. Your key donating the ABC stock, you can avoid paying the :KLOHWKHWD[EHQHÂżWVDVVRFLDWHGZLWKFKDULWDEOH motivation for making charitable gifts, of course, capital gains taxes that would be due if you had JLYLQJDUHVLJQLÂżFDQWWKH\VKRXOGQRWXOWLPDWHO\ eventually sold the stock yourself. is to help those organizations whose work is drive your gifting decisions. You should also meaningful to you. However, by supporting these Keep in mind that if you want to deduct your consider the effect your gift will have on the other groups, you can also make life less “taxingâ€? for FRQWULEXWLRQVIRUWKHWD[\HDU\RXÂśOOQHHGWR areas of your estate considerations — so make yourself. PDNH\RXUJLIWVE\'HF2QHPRUHUHPLQGHU sure you communicate your plans to your family 6SHFLÂżFDOO\ E\ PDNLQJ FKDULWDEOH FRQWULEXWLRQV Retain your paperwork. If you made gifts totaling members. you may be able to receive some valuable tax over $250 to any single charity — or noncash In any case, though, be as generous as you can breaks. To claim a deduction, though, you need contributions of any items worth over $500 — the this holiday season and in the years to come. Your IRS requires written acknowledgments for your to itemize your taxes, and you need to make sure generosity will be a rewarding experience — for contributions. WKDWWKHRUJDQL]DWLRQ\RXÂśUHVXSSRUWLQJLVTXDOLÂżHG everyone. from a tax-deductibility standpoint. If you’re unsure If you want to take a longer-term approach to ZKHWKHU D JURXS LV TXDOLÂżHG MXVW DVN WR VHH LWV charitable giving, while incorporating your gifts This article was written by Edward Jones for use letter from the IRS. (Many organizations now post in planning for your estate, you might want to by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor. these letters on their websites.) consider establishing a charitable remainder www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

SAT.–SUN.–MON.–TUES.,THURS. –FRI. NOV. 29–30, DEC. 1-2,4-5.

PG

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

THE HUNGER GAMES - MOCKING 123 min PG13

JAY CH. 1 ADVENTURE/SCI-FI STARRING JENNIFER LAWRENCE, JOSH HUTCHERSON, LIAM HEMSWORTH.SNEAK PREVIEW THURS., NOV 20, 8PM. FRI. 6:30,9:30. SAT.*3:30,6:30, 9:30. SUN.*3:30,6:30,9:30. WKDYS.6:30,9:30 The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

BIG HERO 6

PG

108 min

ANIMATION/ACTION/COMEDY STARRING RYAN POTTER, SCOTT ADSIT, JAMIE CHUNG FRI.: 6:30, 9:15. SAT: *3:45, 6:30, 9:15. SUN: *3:45,6:30,9:15. WKDYS: 6:30, 9:15

INTERSTELLAR

PG13

ST. VINCENT

PG13

169 min

MYSTERY/ADVENTURE/SCI-FI STARRING MATTHEW MCCONAUGHEY, ANNE HATHAWAY, JESSICA CHASTAIN. FRI.: 7:00. SAT: *3:00, 7:00. SUN: *3:00,7:00. WKDYS: 7:00 103 min

COMEDY STARRING BILL MURRAY, MELISSA MCCARTHY, NAOMI WATTS. FRI.: 6:45, 9:45. SAT: *4:00, 6:45, 9:45. SUN: *4:00, 6:45, 9:45. MON.-TUES.: 6:45, 9:45.

PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR 92 min

PG ANIMATION/ADVENTURE/COMEDY STARRING TOM MCGRATH, CHRIS MILLER, CHRISTOPHER KNIGHTS. STARTS WED. NOV. 26. WED.: 6:45, 9:15. THURS.: 6:45, 9:15.

Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVĂ€OPLV*UDWHG 1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGĂ€OPVZLWKRXWWKHLU own parent. Photo ID required.

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NOVEMBER 20, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR May Festival Royalty OROVILLE - Girls interested in running for 2015 May Festival Royalty are asked to attend the next May Festival Committee Meeting on Nov. 19 at 6 p.m. with a parent at the Plaza Restaurant (1412 Main). Candidates must be a junior in high school or home school equivalent. Information about requirements and availability of money through the committee and fundraisers to help with royalty costs will be provided at the meeting. More info: www.orovillemayfestival.com.

West My Friend Concert TONASKET - West My Friend will be performing Friday, Nov. 21, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Described as everything from indie-roots to chamber-folk, their acoustic blend of instruments and fourpart harmonies challenges the conventions of popular music to create a performance that is both engaging and innovative. Wellcrafted and clever lyrics, acrobatic mandolin riffs, flawless bass lines, and richly textured accordion combine as every member brings forward their own ideas and experiences. How lucky we are to have them grace our stage! Schedule - 6 p.m. Dinner ($7.50 for CCC members/$8.50 nonmembers); 7 p.m. Concert ($10). Beverages and desserts will be available by donation .

Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar OROVILLE - Get a head start to your Christmas celebrations at the Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar on Friday Nov. 21, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s bazaar is hosted by the OHS Future Business Leaders of America in the Oroville Grade School Gymnasium. Artisans, crafters and other vendors are encouraged to contact Susan at 509-476-2427 for more information. Registrations forms are available at the Oroville Public Library, Oroville Elementary School, Oroville High School, Oroville City Hall and Hughes Department Store.

Community Christmas Bazaar in the Oroville Elementary School Gymnasium Friday, Nov. 21 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is hosted by Oroville High School Future Business Leaders of America. For vendor information and please contact Susan at 509-476-2427.

Masons Annual Officer Installation OROVILLE - Aurora Lodge #201 Free and Accepted Masons of Washington will be holding their 101st Annual Installation of Officers on Saturday, Nov. 22 starting at 2 p.m. at the Oroville Grange Hall. The public is invited to come on down and see what the group is about. There will be desert and coffee to follow. The Grange Hall is located at 622 Fir St. in Oroville. For more information call 509-476-2566.

School Retirees to tour PAC OMAK - Members of Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will tour the Omak Performing Arts Center at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Nov. 25, followed by a luncheon at the home of Marcelle LaGrou, 608 W 1st Ave, Omak. For more information call Jennie Hedington at 509422-2954.

Thanksgiving Dinner in Chesaw CHESAW - The Chesaw Community Church will be serving a complete free Turkey Dinner starting at noon on Thursday, Nov. 27. Come and share this dinner with your friends, relatives and neighbors, everyone is welcome to attend.

Thanksgiving at Senior Center OROVILLE - The Oroville Seniors are planning a Thanksgiving dinner for Thursday, Nov. 27, at 1 p.m. at the Center. We will provide the turkey, dressing and potatoes with potluck vegetables and dessert. All are invited at no charge.

Santa at the Bazaar

Sing-Along Messiah

OROVILLE - Bring the kids to see Santa at the Oroville

al

ELLISFORDE - The annucommunity “Sing-Along

Messiah” will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren. Anyone who enjoys selections from the traditional “Christmas” portion of Handel’s masterpiece is invited to sing along, or simply sit and listen. The informal sing-along will feature musicians from the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus under the direction of Don Pearce. Mary Koch will play the church’s pipe organ. Soloists are not required to audition, but if you are interested in performing a solo aria, you’re asked to advise Autumn Martin, (509) 322-0495, or Mary Koch, (509) 322-0177. Admission is free. Free-will donations to the pipe organ maintenance fund will be appreciated.

Holiday Bazaar and Gift Show TONASKET - The 19th Annual Holiday Bazaar and Gift Show will be held at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Friday, Dec. 5 and Saturday, Dec. 6. Friday hours are 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday hours are: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. With over 30 vendors, everyone is sure to find something for each person on their gift list. Food will be served all day and there will be live entertainment. Come shop for some of the most unique gifts in the area and Shop Local! For more information check the CCC website at: www.communityculturalcenter.org or call 509-4861328. The Community Cultural Center, a nonprofit organization, is located at 411 Western Ave in Tonasket.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386.

Coloring contest deadline soon SUBMITTED BY CONNIE MADEN TONASKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce is hosting a Christmas Coloring Contest as part of the 2015 Winterfest activities Friday, Dec. 5. Entries will be accepted from Tonasket School District children K-5th grade, including local homeschool and religious Schools. Tonasket Chamber Christmas Coloring Contest pages (printed this year by Wells Fargo Bank in Tonasket) were distributed to Tonasket Schools on Nov. 14 and entries may be turned in to participating businesses (Lee Franks, Roys Pharmacy, US Bank, Wells Fargo Bank, Napa Parts, La Ultima Diner, Tonasket Interiors, Wild Rose Floral, Tonasket City Hall, II Sisters Video, OK Chevrolet, Tonasket Feed, VIP, Rancho

Chicos Restaurant, & Okanogan Properties) before the deadline of Monday, Nov. 24. Businesses have agreed to display the artwork until the judging. The Christmas Coloring Contest will be collected from the businesses on Dec. 3 by the local Lions Club who will be conducting the judging for the Chamber. Winners will be announced, prizes awarded, and

winners pictures taken during Story Time at the Tonasket Library. Story Time starts at 5:00 p.m. with a Christmas Ornament craft included - so make sure you get there early! Santa will arrive at 6:00 p.m. Homeschoolers and religious schools may contact Connie Maden by email (conniemaden@yahoo.com) to receive the Christmas Coloring Contest packet by email.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Listing Your Item O ur C ommunit y Bulletin Board generally allows li sting y our e v e nt for up two weeks pr ior to the day it o cc ur s . If sp ace all ow s it m ay b e in clu d e d pr i or t o t h e t w o w e e k l i mi t . How e v e r, o ur o n lin e c al e nd ar at w w w. g a z et te - tr i bune.com allows the event

to be li sted for much long e r per iod s. Pleas e include day, date, time and location, as well as a for f ur the r information phone numbe r. You may place an e v e nt on the online cale ndar by g oing to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on t h e h om e p ag e . P l e a s e , li st your event only for the day or days of its occur-

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE Faith Lutheran Church 11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist 908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

Valley Christian Fellowship Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist 1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf#\PDLOFRP Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

BEARS & ELEPHANTS, Oh My!

re nce . O nce your request i s submit ted , it can take up to 4 8 hours for the e v e nt to appear on the cale ndar. O n l i n e s u b mi s s i o n s d o n’ t always go into the hardcopy editi on , s o it helps if the y are al s o submit ted to u s at gdevon@gazet te-tr ibune . com or at G a z et te - Tr ibune , P. O. B ox 2 5 0 , O rov i l l e , WA. 98844.

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 9:30 - 10:10 a.m. L.I.F.E. - Duck Dynasty Faith Commander all November 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15 am Praise Singing. 9:30 am Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 11 am Sunday School. 11 am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 20, 2014

COPS & COURTS CRIMINAL

The court dismissed Nov. 10 two charges against Joseph Michael Foreman, 23, Okanogan: possession of a stolen motor vehicle and third-degree possession of stolen property. The charges were dismissed with prejudice. &KULVWLDQ.ZDNX*\DPÀ Okanogan, pleaded guilty Nov. 12 to violation of a no-contact, protection or restraining order (third RIIHQVH  '9 *\DPÀZDV sentenced to 60 months ÀYH\HDUV LQSULVRQDQG ÀQHGIRUWKH$XJ 8 crime. The court found probable FDXVHWRFKDUJH&DUO$OOHQ 6Q\GHU2PDNZLWK three counts of harassment (threats to kill). The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 3. The court found probable cause to charge Jeremiah Van Tachell, 23, Omak, with second-degree possession of stolen property. The crime allegedly occurred 1RY The court found probable cause to charge Blake Forrest Lannoye, 29, Omak, with second-degree possession of stolen property. The crime allegedly occurred 1RY The court found probable cause to charge James Clair Chevalier, 68, Tonasket, with WZRFRXQWVRIÀUVWGHJUHH unlawful possession of a ÀUHDUP7KHFULPHVDOOHJedly occurred Nov. 6. The court found probable cause to charge Larry Gene Visger, 67, Oroville, with forgery and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 7.

DISTRICT COURT &OLQWRQ-RKQ1LFKROVRQ Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Nicholson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHGDWRWDO RI %MDUQH0DWWKHZ2OVRQ-U Omak, guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI. Olson was sentenced WRGD\VLQMDLOZLWK GD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG  Misty Francine Ornelas, 33, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Ornelas was sentenced to GD\VLQMDLOZLWK GD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG  9LFNLH-RUMHDQ2ZHQ Tonasket, had two charges dismissed: non-emergency use of the 911 system and third-degree malicious PLVFKLHI2ZHQZDVĂ€QHG  Jason Lee Parten, 27, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Kenneth Taylor Pillow, 21, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: possession of mariMXDQD OHVVWKDQJUDPV  3LOORZZDVĂ€QHG 5LFKDUG'$3RLWUDV Omak, guilty of thirddegree DWLS. Poitras was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, DQGĂ€QHG Cesar Ivan Rangel Duarte, 31, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Rangel Duarte was senWHQFHGWRGD\VLQMDLO with 363 days suspended, DQGĂ€QHG )UDQNOLQ-RKQ5DVFKND Oroville, guilty of use of drug paraphernalia. Raschka was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG Fletcher Clay Rickabaugh, 18, Okanogan, had a fourthdegree assault charge

dismissed. $OLVKD$QQ5XVVHOO2PDN had a charge dismissed: violation of a temporary order of protection. $QWRQLR5RGULJXH]6DQFKH] 2URYLOOHJXLOW\RIĂ€UVW degree negligent driving. 6DQFKH]ZDVVHQWHQFHGWR 90 days in jail with 89 days VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG )HUPLQ6DQFKH]2UR]FR Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: non-emergency use of the 911 system. 6DQFKH]2UR]FRZDVĂ€QHG  Eduardo Sandoval Rivera, 18, Omak, guilty of DUI. Sandoval Rivera was sentenced WRGD\VLQMDLOZLWK GD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG +HDOVRKDGDKLW and-run (attended vehicle) charge dismissed. $QGUHZ&KDUOHV6ODWRQ Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. 0LFKDHO7RGG6WRUP Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Nov. 10, 2014 Malicious mischief on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Malicious mischief on S. SecRQG$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ 7KHIWRQ6)RXUWK$YHLQ Okanogan. Debit card reported missing. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Found property on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. iPhone recovered. )RXQGSURSHUW\RQ$HQHDV9DOley Rd. near Tonasket. Cell phone recovered. $XWRPRELOHWKHIWRQ0LOOHU5G near Omak. Burglary on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on S. Fifth $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ1RLQMXries reported. Violation of a no-contact order RQ:)RXUWK$YHLQ2PDN Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Recovered vehicle on Engh Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Threats on Oak St. in Omak. +DUDVVPHQWRQ6$VK6WLQ Omak. $XWRPRELOHWKHIWRQWK$YH in Oroville. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. 7KHIWRQ$SSOH:D\$YHLQ Oroville. Trespassing on W. Second St. in Tonasket. (QULTXH$QWKRQ\&DVWLOOR ERRNHGRQWKUHH)7$ warrants: second-degree theft, second-degree vehicle prowl and second-degree ID theft. 5LFKDUG$OOHQ0DWWKHZ%XVK 27, DOC detainer. Manuel Cabrera Jr., no middle QDPHOLVWHGERRNHGRQ DQ2&62)7$ZDUUDQWIRU third-degree DWLS. Jeremy Thomas Shelton, 28, booked on a DOC warrant. %LOO\'DOH$QGHUVRQ booked for third-degree DWLS and failure to regisWHUDYHKLFOHZLWKLQGD\V Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014 ':/6RQ66HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. 'UXJVRQ17KLUG$YHLQ Okanogan. 9HKLFOHĂ€UHRQ&KHURNHH5G near Omak.

$VVDXOWRQ*ROGHQ5GLQ Oroville. DWLS on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden Rd. in Oroville. Custodial interference on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ.RDOD$YHLQ Omak. Littering on Maple St. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. 'UXJVRQWK$YHLQ2URYLOOH 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQWK$YH in Oroville. $VVDXOWRQ0DLQ6WLQ2URYLOOH 6FRWW/HVOLH5HLHUVRQ booked for felony harassment and third-degree malicious mischief. 5REHUW7UHYRU5LFKDUGVRQ ERRNHGRQWZR)7$EHQFK warrants: both for POCS with intent to deliver. Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014 %XUJODU\RQ66HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. TMVWOP on Engh Rd. near Omak. +DUDVVPHQWRQ2NRPD'ULQ Omak. $VVDXOWRQ&DQG\/DQHQHDU Tonasket. Burglary on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Recovered vehicle on S. SecRQG$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ 7KHIWRQ*UDLQJHU$YHLQ 2PDN$VKWUD\DQGWRROV reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. %XUJODU\RQ$SSOH:D\$YHLQ Oroville. Burglary on Fir St. in Oroville. Christopher Dale Brockmiller, ERRNHGIRUYLRODWLRQRI a protection order, intimidating a witness and two counts of felony harassment. Enrique Rick Ruis Jr., 30, DOC hold. 5\DQ:LOOLDP$GROSK/RXLH 32, DOC detainer. *LOEHUWR9DOHQ]XHOD$FDVLWR ERRNHGIRUĂ€UVWGHJUHH assault (with a deadly ZHDSRQ Ă€UVWGHJUHHFULPLnal trespassing and a USBP hold. Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014 Warrant arrest on Dry Coulee Rd. near Okanogan. 7KHIWRQ6)LIWK$YHLQ Okanogan. Tennis shoes reported missing. 7KHIWRQ6)LUVW$YHLQ2NDQogan. Prescription medicine reported missing. ':/6RQ+Z\QHDU7RQDVket. Theft on Main St. in Riverside. Fuel reported stolen. ':/6RQ+Z\QHDU7RQDVket. :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ+Z\QHDU Tonasket. Theft on Queen St. in Okanogan. iPhone reported missing. %XUJODU\RQ6)LUVW$YHLQ Okanogan. ,OOHJDOEXUQLQJRQ+DJRRG&XWoff Rd. near Tonasket. 7KUHDWVRQ*OHQZRRG$YHLQ Riverside. Domestic dispute on S. Second $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ %XUJODU\RQ(%DUWOHWW$YHLQ Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. )RXUWK$YHLQ2PDN 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ:+DOH $YHLQ2PDN $OH[DQGHU-RVHSK-RKQOH\ ERRNHGRQWZR2PDN 3ROLFH'HSDUWPHQW)7$ warrants: DUI and seconddegree DWLS. &KDUOHV(GZDUG+DQNLQV booked on an Omak Police 'HSDUWPHQW)7$ZDUUDQW for fourth-degree assault.

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(]UD7KRPDV&KDSPDQ booked on three OCSO )7$ZDUUDQWVDOOIRU second-degree unlawful SRVVHVVLRQRIDĂ€UHDUP Friday, Nov. 14, 2014 $VVDXOWRQ10DLQ6WLQ Omak. ':/6RQ+Z\QHDU Okanogan. %XUJODU\RQ1)LUVW$YHLQ Okanogan. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Two-vehicle crash on Conconully St. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. +LWDQGUXQFUDVKRQ66HYHQWK$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ %XUJODU\RQ%LGH$:HH Rd. near Omak. Jewelry reported missing. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ$SSOH Way Rd. in Okanogan. Vehicle window reported smashed. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on Oak St. in Omak. Burglary on Bob Neil Rd. near Oroville. Martin Lee Scranton, 22, ERRNHGRQD7ULEDO)7$ warrant for third-degree DWLS. 'DYLG$OOHQ*RUU'2& hold. David Condon Soderberg, 20, DOC hold. 6KHOE\-RUHHQ*HRUJH booked on two State Patrol )7$ZDUUDQWVSRVVHVVLRQ RIPDULMXDQD OHVVWKDQ grams) and use of drug paraphernalia. 7KRPDV(GZDUG,VDNVRQ ERRNHGRQDQ)7$ZDUUDQW for third-degree theft.

DENTISTRY

7RUHH$QWKRQ\&OHPHQWV booked on DOC secretary’s warrant and a Superior &RXUW)7$EHQFKZDUUDQW for residential burglary -DFRE1LFKRODV:LOVRQ booked for residential burglary, third-degree theft, second-degree possession of stolen property and second-degree vehicle prowl. +DUODQ&XUWLV7KRPSVRQ booked on a Superior Court warrant for second-degree theft. Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014 Theft on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. Mail reported missing. :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ6)LIWK$YH in Okanogan. Theft on McLaughlin Canyon Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Tyee St. in Okanogan. +DUDVVPHQWRQ6DQGĂ DW5G near Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. $OFRKRORIIHQVHRQ(*UDSH $YHLQ2PDN Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Custodial interference on ElGHUEHUU\$YHLQ2PDN Burglary on Ironwood St. in Oroville. %XUJODU\RQWK$YHLQ2URville. Robert Daniel Burris, 28, ERRNHGRQWZR)7$ZDUrants: third-degree DWLS and hit-and-run (unattended). Michael Paul Utigard, 61, court FRPPLWPHQWVIRUĂ€UVW degree DWLS and physical control. 7HUU\'HUULFN.UXJHU booked for DUI.

Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014 Burglary on Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on N. Siwash Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Greeting card and cash reported missing. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. $VVDXOWRQ6XPPLW/DNH5G near Tonasket. $VVDXOWRQ*UHHQDFUHV5GQHDU Riverside. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ(OGHUEHUU\$YH in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Bartlett $YHLQ2PDN Clarence Marcel Desautel Jr., ERRNHGRQD6XSHULRU &RXUW)7$ZDUUDQWIRULQtimidating a public servant. Dale Edward McGowan, 63, ERRNHGIRUĂ€UVWGHJUHHDVsault (DV).

KEY:

'8,²'ULYLQJ8QGHUWKH,Qà Xence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence )7$&²)DLOXUHWR$SSHDU Comply (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County 6KHULII¡V2IÀFHU DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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NOVEMBER 20, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS W-P tips way to state tourney victory over Tigers BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

PASCO - It wouldn’t be fair to attribute the play of Waitsburg-Prescott’s receiving corps to good fortune or luck. But the ability of the Cardinals to track down balls tipped by Tonasket defenders who did everything right on at least four occasions may well have been the difference as W-P ended the Tigers’ season Friday in the first round of Class 2B state football tournament action, 27-6, in Pasco. Those plays weren’t the only reasons the W-P team, making its sixth straight tournament appearance, ousted the Tigers. But instead of getting anywhere from one to four interceptions on those plays, those turned into four W-P catches for a total of 60 yards and a touchdown. The Tigers also dropped a potential interception on the Cards’ 9-yard line that could well have turned into a Tonasket touchdown.

“It’s difficult when you get to this position because if you don’t play for the state title, you never know when your season is going to end. You can never really prepare for it.” Jay Hawkins, Tonasket Football Coach

Chalk one (or four) up to whatever tip drills W-P runs in practice as they refused to let those plays die, even in sub20 degree weather that made holding onto the ball difficult for both squads. “We had a couple of opportunities to get interceptions,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “We did a relatively good job of getting pressure on the quarterback, especially in the first half. “We needed a big play to happen to give us some momentum and some confidence. It seemed like there were opportunities here and there. (Offensively) we got inside the 25 a couple of time a couple of times and we just couldn’t make that one play.” W-P did make those plays on a number of occasions. While the Tigers couldn’t hold onto potential interceptions, the Cardinals took advantage of field position afforded them by Tonasket miscues as three of their four scoring drives covered just 29, 29 and 20 yards,

SEE FOOTBALL | PG A2

Top, the Tigers’ all-senior offensive line of (l-r) Christian Garcia, Frank Holfeltz, Dallas Tyus, Chad Edwards and Jimmy Coleman proved to be an imposing force as Tonasket qualified for the state playoffs for the first time in nearly a decade; left, teammates console senior receiver/defensive back Elias Abrego (85) after the Tigers’ loss ended their season; top, Isaiah Yaussy-Albright nearly hauls in a one-handed grab on 4th-and-25 late in the game. Brent Baker/staff photos

Soccer squad bows out in quarterfinals Adna’s lone tally decides evenlyplayed match BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CENTRALIA - As soccer advances into the state tournament, the games get closer and lower-scoring, and the margin of error is very thin. The Tonasket girls lived that out Saturday, Nov. 15, in a 1-0 Class 2B state quarterfinal loss to Adna that ended the Tigers’ best tournament run since 2005. Last year’s fourth-place team used a goal by speedster Regyn Gaffney in the 31st minute of the first half to provide all the scoring the Pirates needed to end what turned out to be a dream season for Darren Collins’ Tigers. And, unlike last week’s district championship loss to Okanogan, Collins had nothing but praise for his team’s effort. “We played a really good game,” he said. “Everyone showed up and worked hard for the full 80 minutes. It took us a while to get used to the field, but fortunately we had a couple of hours to practice on it the night before. “It was a good, physical battle. Of course it seemed like all of their players were 5-8 or 5-9. And Gaffney, she’s as fast as anyone I’ve seen.” Gaffney is likely looking at an NCAA Division 1 scholarship ... in track. She’s won eight state titles in her career, including the 100, 200 and 400-meter dashes and long jump last spring. And it was Gaffney that claimed an errant Tonasket clearance that took a bad hop and gave her a clear path to the goal and the eventual game-winner. “They wanted to get Gaffney

SEE SOCCER | PG A2

Terry Mills/submitted photos

Left, Tonasket senior defender Fernanda Abrego takes an elbow from Adna star Regyn Gaffney during Saturday’s quarterfinal loss to the Pirates. The Tigers managed to shut down Gaffney for most of the game, but not all, as she scored the game’s lone goal late in the first half. Above right, Jaden Vugteveen applies some pressure defense of her own. Bottom right, Rose Walts tries to control a ball on at midfield.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 20, 2014

SPORTS

FOOTBALL | FROM A1

HOOPS AMBASSADORS

The Harlem Ambassadors paid a visit to the Okanogan Valley last week, with members of their team visiting area schools (including Tonasket Elementary School on Thursday). The group as a whole played a Harlem Globetrotterstype game at Okanogan High School on Thursday evening. Three members of the Ambassadors Nicholas Simpson, Lade Majic and Andre Rivers - shared their stories with TES students and talked about the importance of staying off drugs, not bullying others, keeping grades up and staying around people who are positive influences. The Tonasket Kiwanis and other Kiwanis groups helped coordinate the Ambassadors’ appearances. Above, Simpson, Majic and Rivers hammed it up with a number of students during the assembly. Right, Simpson demonstrates his deft ballhandling skills. Brent Baker/staff photos

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Tonasket’s girls soccer team gathered for a team photo after falling 1-0 to Adna on Saturday, Nov. 15.

SOCCER | FROM A1 the ball and just let the rest of the team hang back on defense,” Collins said. “When she gets away on the edge, she’s just really strong. I haven’t seen anyone that fast and strong in a long time. “But I know we frustrated her. Morgyne Hjaltason marked her the whole game and shut her down pretty well. The last 25-30 minutes she really wasn’t a factor at all. Our plan was to slow her speed, and we stuck to that.” Neither team had a lot of scoring chances, with both teams putting about a half dozen shots on goal. The Tigers best chances can on a couple of near-breakaways by Rose Walts, who wasn’t able to get off a clean shot, and a pair of Kayla Willis shots - one that went right to the Adna keeper, and one that went just wide. “The last 10 minutes or so, we threw everyone forward whenever we could, but we just couldn’t get one,” Collins said. “The team is a little disappointed that we didn’t come out with the win, but they know they played well and played tough.” The Tigers (16-4) may have met their goal of making the state tournament, but Collins said in most other ways the season surpassed his expectations. “At the start I didn’t think we’d be as good as we ended up being, with three eighth graders, four freshmen and three sophomores,” he said. “It is a really, really young team. I thought it might be a building year but they came together quick, meshed well and made it easy for me.” They meshed well enough that they pulled off their first win over Okanogan in memory

respectively. Those were set up by a fumble on game’s first play from scrimmage, a botched punt, and the Tigers’ attempt to go for it on 4th-and-20 in the final two minutes that set up W-P’s final score of the night. “You see 27 points up there, but the defense really played great tonight,” Hawkins said. “They got put in some bad situations but other than a couple of explosive plays they gave us possessions and gave us opportunities.” It didn’t get much tougher, or less fortunate, than that first “bad situation.” W-P recovered a fumble on the Tigers’ 29 yard line. Two tipped passes later - including one that receiver Devin Acevedo caught while backing into the end zone - and the Cardinals had a 7-0 lead. The Cardinals had their only lengthy scoring drive of the game in the second quarter. There were no tipped passes to aid what was an 84-yard drive, and quarterback Jacob Dunn completed it with a perfect 29-yard pass to Acevedo just over the fingertips of defensive back Rycki Cruz, who had perfect position on the play. Tonasket had three promising drives in the first half. The first one stalled at midfield after quarterback Colton Leep took a hit at the end of a 4-yard gain, damaging his helmet. The Tigers took a penalty while trying to get that straightened out, and Isaiah Yaussy-Albright was thrown for a six-yard loss on the next play while Leep was out of the game. The next two drives each advanced inside the W-P 25, but the Tigers came up empty and trailed 14-0 at the half. Credit the Waitsburg-Prescott defense for some of that as well; the Cardinals held the vaunted Tonasket rushing attack to just 89 yards on 43 carries, including 38 yards for Yaussy-Albright and 43 for Jorge Juarez. “They stacked a bunch of guys in the box,” Hawkins said “Our running game, at the line of scrimmage we had some seams to run through, but they always seemed to always have that one extra guy there to make a stop. But our passing game was pretty decent tonight. They are a really strong team. Other teams can stack the box, but these guys, their (linebackers) are just so good.” In fact, the Tigers threw as many times - 20 - as did W-P, which in itself is a sign that things had moved away from the game plan. But Leep completed seven passes to six different receivers for 139 yards, including deep throws to Elias Abrego for 35 yards on David Moreno for 31. Trailing 21-0 the Tigers had yet another drive stall inside W-P’s 25 in the third quarter. Tonasket finally broke the ice in the fourth quarter. After driving 50 yards inside the Cardinal 30 yet again - W-P’s Luke Alexenko picked off a pass intended for Albright in the end zone. But on the next play, the Cardinals fumbled the ball back to the Tigers, and four plays later, Albright scored on a 3-yard run to cut the lead to 21-6 with 5:47 left. Tonasket couldn’t recover the ensuing onside kick, and after

Brent Baker/staff photo

Top, Elias Abrego hauls in a 35-yard pass during the first half that put the Tigers inside the Waitsburg-Prescott 25-yard line. Above, quarterback Colton Leep threw for a career-high 20 times, completing passes to six different receivers. stopping W-P’s next possession, were unable to move the ball with the running game no longer in play at all. Shifty running back Travis Crockett scored his second touchdown of the second half on a 25-yard run with 52 seconds left to complete the scoring. Hawkins talked about the improvement he saw in the Tigers through the season as he and his coaching staff tried to rebuild the confidence of their players after several difficult years in the Caribou Trail League. The finished this year 6-5 overall, 4-2 in the Central Washington 2B League’s North Division. “Early in the season we talked

Out on the Town...

about how every play becomes more important, and as we progressed through the year I think we kind of got that,” Hawkins said. “This was a great year. I think getting an opportunity to play in a nice facility, it helps make for some great memories. It’s difficult when you get to this position because if you don’t play for the state title, you never know when your season is going to end. You can never really prepare for it. We had a lot of guys that made a lot of strides. The whole group, mentally, with the confidence they developed as the season went on, they got it. And I’m proud of that.”

Dining & Entertainment

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Jensen Sackman (4) goes airborne to knock down a ball during Saturday’s state quarterfinal contest as Ashlynn Willis looks on. and finished the season sharing the Central Washington League championship with the Bulldogs and Liberty Bell. It also meant getting a favorable opening playoff game, rather than slipping in with one of the last seeds and facing a tough first round opponent. “Last year at this time I was worried,” Collins said. “This year I’ve got a goalkeeper (Madison Gariano) I should have for three more years, a lot of girls coming back and some new additions that will help us. We should be stronger, with another year under the young players’ belts. We have another good group of young girls com-

ing up, good athletes who are good soccer players, and a couple of that were hurt and missed this year.” The biggest issue will be rebuilding the back line in front of Gariano, where Hilda Celestino, Fernanda Abrego and Jensen Sackman all graduate. But otherwise, he said, the team should return intact next season with even higher goals. “There’s no regrets,” Collins said. “They put it all on the field and had nothing left in the tank. When we got on the bus and left the field, we didn’t really leave feeling like we could have done more than we did.”

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NOVEMBER 20, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SCHOOLS Oroville students make their mark at FBLA conference Tori Kindred presides over North Central Region Leadership Conference THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

WENATCHEE North Central Region Fall Leadership Conference was recently held in Wenatchee, Washington at the Wenatchee Convention Center. Tori Kindred presided over the leadership conference as the current Washington State Future Business Leaders of America Vice President over the North Central Region including schools from Oroville to as far south as Thorp, Ellensburg and Moses Lake. Kindred is a freshman at Oroville High School who campaigned last spring at state competition as a junior high student, for region vice president successfully winning office. She worked extensively with Wenatchee businessman Braden Draggoo and Region adviser/Dad, Tony Kindred to arrange the FBLA fall leadership conference. Over 350 students and their advisers attended the conference which included multiple speakers from all over Washington State, including James Guadino, president of Central Washington University; Larry Gibson an internationally renowned motivational speaker; as well as “Mama Drill Motivational Speaker”, each of whom the students thoroughly enjoyed. Included in the conference this year was a Presidents breakfast arranged by Kindred. The breakfast included a presentation to local business professionals about FBLA and encouraged partnerships between FBLA member students and the business professionals. The fall leadership conference brings students together from all over North Central Washington. Students listen to business professionals who present on topics of motivation, goal setting, entrepreneurship and the importance of professionalism and education. Included in the conference this year were vendors from local college and entertainment by JMG Entertainment, owned and operated by Jed Gossman. Oroville High School students who attended included high schoolers Kindred, Ellamae Burnell, Bailey Griffin, Kali Peters, Yessica Nemecio, Dakota Haney, Phoebe Poynter, Courtnee Kallstrom as well as junior high schoolers Jennifer Cisneros, Kaytie Miller, Jerry Milholland, Hunter DeVon, Gwen Hankins and Katie Rawley.

Submitted photos

Clockwise from top left, Dakota Haney of Oroville High School listens to a presentation by “Mama Drill,” a motivational speaker at the FBLA regional conference in Wenatchee; Oroville High School FBLA members await the start of a session at the FBLA conference; Tori Kindred (second from right) presided over the FBLA North Central Regional Conference and gathers with other regional vice presidents who were on hand to observe; Yessica Nemecio reports roll call.

“Making a difference in student peers lives as well as promoting leadership is very important to me” Kindred said. “The goal for this conference was to provide amazing speakers that have done amazing things. It is so impor-

tant for the future of students to learn from those individuals who have worked so hard to be successful and who care about the success of others. “It is with sincere thanks to Braden Dragoo, who also has

local roots (Omak), that I was able to work with so many important business people and make this conference a success. “Future Business Leaders of America is a great association that provides leadership oppor-

tunities at both the high school and collegiate levels (Phi Beta Lambda),” she added. “It has been my pleasure to be a part of a leadership association that promotes leadership to our youth, opening options to network with other

student leaders as well as meet and build a resume with local, state and national business.” Kindred will fill her office of vice president until after state competition held in Spokane, Washington in April of 2014.

EARLY DEADLINES Due to the Thanksgiving Holiday we will have the following deadlines: Our will Come come Out out On on Ourpaper Paper Will Wed., Nov.Wed., 27 before Nov.Thanksgiving 26 before Classified Thanksgiving Display Ads Display Classified Friday, Nov. 22 at 5Ads pm Friday, Nov. 21 at 5 p.m. Legals Fri., Nov.22 at 5 pm Legals Ads *Classified Friday, Nov. 21 at 5 p.m. Mon., Nov. 25 at noon Classified Ads *Display Mon., Nov.Advertising 24 at noon Friday, Nov. 22 at 5 p.m. Display Advertising *Editorial Friday, Nov. & 21 Community at 5 p.m. Editorial Bulletin & Community Bulletin Friday, Nov. 21 at at 5:30 Friday, Nov. 22 5:30p.m. p.m.

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22. Replace the insides of a coat

6. Rub away

24. Capture

7. “Cold one”

25. Deodorant type

8. “Malcolm X” director

26. Government workers (2 wds)

9. Beseech

30. Cassandra, e.g.

10. Feral feline

31. Have the ___ for

11. Motor-driven spit

32. “Chicago” lyricist

12. ___ Mars, singer

35. Kind of store

13. Pitch

36. Copy cats?

18. Perfect, e.g.

37. Get-up-and-go

23. Coastal raptors

38. Death on the Nile cause, perhaps

24. Vermin

39. Bridges of Los Angeles County

26. Conclusion

41. Consecrate

27. Western blue flag, e.g.

43. Not having life 46. Bravery

28. Blood-feeding nocturnal flyer (2 wds)

48. Catch, in a way

29. Eye’s watery discharge

49. “Mourning Becomes Electra” playwright

33. Containers

50. Bowed

36. Wing, say

51. Hale

37. Cram, with “up”

54. Fellows (slang)

39. Get-out-of-jail money

55. Lacking professional skill

40. Subjugate

58. Highlands hillside

41. Agreeing (with)

59. Barn topper

42. Roman sea god

60. African antelope

44. “___ Off,” film

61. Adjusts, as a clock

45. Sharp, narrow mountain ridges

1. Hindu female principle

62. Units of work

6. ___-bodied

63. Consumed

46. ___ Angel of Death, Australian metal band

Crosswords

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10. Eyes, poetically 14. Infectious protein causing scrapie

17. Financial security (2 wds) 19. Small ornamental ladies’ bag 20. “60 Minutes” network 21. Binge

34. Horses’ digestive disease

47. Accustom 50. [Just like that!] Down

15. “___ here long?” 16. Military rank below sergeant (abbrev.)

25. Acknowledge

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52. “Cast Away” setting 53. Comparative word

2. Kuwaiti, e.g.

56. Fold, spindle or mutilate

3. Smooch

57. Swedish shag rug

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NOVEMBER 20, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Campaign continues to raise funds for Tonasket pool More than $430,000 in pledges raised for $1 million-plus project SUBMITTED BY TONASKET SWIMMING POOL ASSOCIATION

TONASKET - Another summer has come and gone without a swimming pool in Tonasket. A committee is working tirelessly so that doesn’t happen again. Even though winter is arriving soon, we can’t forget about the pool. All those in favor of building a pool next spring, make your tax deductible contribution NOW. We CAN do it with everyone’s support. The total cost of the pool is expected to be in excess of $1,000,000 so many more donations are needed. If you have kids, DONATE, if you know someone that has kids, DONATE, if you were a kid, DONATE. Our community needs a pool; our kids need to learn to swim. A special Thank You to the supporters who have kicked off this campaign with cash and pledges totaling more than $430,000, including: Sandra and Grant Leavell, George Frank, Pam and Lawrence Rubert, Scott and Patricia Furman, Sharon Danley, Bob and Jane Thompson, Ed and Evie Pariseau, Mc Daniel Properties, Ron and Gabriela Potter, Lee Ann Peterson, Franklin and Betty Holmes, Jerry and Elaine Beeman, Dennis Brothers, Upper Valley Realty, Tacos Jalisco, Gloria Jones,

Richard and Jessica McNamara, Betty Barnes, Joyce Pier, Thom Speidel, Laura Jones-Edwards, Marilyn Brown, Donna and Leonard Hedlund, Confluence Health, Marija and Rick Welton, Coleman Oil, Tony and Sharon Walter, Matt and Bobby Lorz, McDaniel Logging, Martha and Robert Gibeaut, Richard and Loretta Beaughan, Scott and Montie Smith, Wayne Asmussen, JJ Orchards, RoosterĂ­s Espresso and Ice Cream, Jack and Eleanor Lorz, Gerald and Pat Green, Mike Buchert, Al Biggs, Gordon and Harriet Stangland, Joan Cool, Dale and Kathy Swedberg, Dealey Ann Leggett, Roger and Suzanne Castelda, Levine Plumbing, Richard and Ruth Temby, Diane MacFarland, Herbert and Bertha Wandler, LaMoyne and Cheri Wahl, Judy Stalder, Tonasket Garden Club. If you are planning to make year-end tax deductible donations, please consider a donation to the pool this year. It will represent a long term investment in a great civic asset, a recreational facility for our community, especially for the benefit of our children. We have been approved by the IRS as a 501C3 organization. Donations and pledges can be mailed to: Tonasket Swimming Pool Association, P.O. Box 1217, Tonasket, WA, 98855. Anonymous donations can be deposited directly at U S Bank, Account #153566406168. We are also able to accept donations of appreciated shares of stock. Please call Karen Stangland at 486-2517 or visit our website www.tonasketpool.com for more information.

Brent Baker/file photo

The condemned Tonasket swimming pool still sits empty, but the Tonasket Pool Committee has raised more than $430,000 in cash pledges to provide hope that a new pool could happen in the not-so-distant future.

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 20, 2014

OBITUARIES

RELAXING ALONG THE TRAIL

JOHN WEBSTER MYRICK

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Several deer took advantage of a cool fall day to relax in Taberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Copper Mountain Vineyard along the Similkameen Trail near the upper traillhead. The vineyard, in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fall foliage both along the trail and in the vineyard, is spectacular and proved hard to resist for both the deer and hikers.

Oh! dear John, we will miss you. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville is in charge of arrangements.

John Webster Myrick, 94 passed away peacefully at home with his devoted wife, Juanita, of 73 years and their number five son Kevin, on November 15th, 2014. He is also survived by four grandchildren. John was a civil servant for the Corps of Engineers for 20 years and survived five years in the jungles of New Guinea. He also worked for Metro in the Seattle area for more than 20 years. John and Nita moved to our Hill Top in 1981 and owned and operated a Hunting and Fishing Camp, where he tended the aerator at the Sidley Lake for many years. John loved to garden and grew some of the most beautiful gladiolas and the biggest tomatoes you have ever seen. You were a lucky person if you received a basket from one of his gardens. Whenever John started a project he finished it and, just recently he finished his wood piles for this year and next. That is 11 cords of wood.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 20, 2014  

November 20, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 20, 2014  

November 20, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune