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Tigers win a playoff thriller,

FABULOUS 50’S DANCE

Hornets go down fighting

Saturday, Nov. 15, 6-10 p.m. Vicki’s Backdoor Club, Oroville

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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Tonasket ballot measure failing

ACCEPTING THE CHALLENGE

Vejraska leads Womack, Rodriguez new coroner and Furman still assessor BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN – It looks like a measure increasing the sales tax by 0.1 percent to raise revenue for the criminal justice and fire protection costs is failing again, according to the early ballot counts. The measure, which would go into effect on April 1 of next year received 40 votes for and 52 against in the vote count on election day. Those numbers changed somewhat in the second vote count held last Friday, however it still trailed with 59 votes (47.2 Scott Vejraska percent) in favor and 66 (52.8 percent) against. The election won’t be certified until Tuesday, Nov. 25. The Tonasket EMS was passed, easily gathering nearly 70 percent of the ballots cast in favor of the 10-year levy. The Tuesday night ballot count shows challenger Scott Vejraska with a 327 vote lead over incumbent David Womack for Okanogan County PUD Commissioner.

Oroville Elementary School students were rewarded with some outdoor activities last Thursday after meeting some of the goals of the Principal’s Challenge, reading thousands of books. Above, Principal Joan Hoehn agreed to camp outside if her students met the challenge. Right, a look through a telescope was another reward as students learn about constellations. Cloud cover made for less than optimum observances that evening. Below, right, Principal Hoehn shows students some of the hides in her collection. Another award will be a talk given by a Mountain Man. Below, a drawing of an autumn leaf is a continuance of the outdoor theme.

That number had nearly doubled to 614 in the second vote count held Friday. The early results in the general election also show David Rodriguez far outpacing Gary V. Reams for the newly created elective position of county coroner. An elected coroner was David Rodriguez required when county population numbers reached 41,000. Scott Furman, who was in the only other local candidate with a challenger, had a healthy lead over would-be assessor Les V. Stokes. Furman was leading in his bid for a return to the assessor’s position on Tuesday. The Friday vote count had Scott D. Furman Furman with 5,366 votes compared to challenger Les V. Stokes with 3,301. Despite a big win statewide, Okanogan

SEE ELECTIONS | PG A3

Osoyoos water levels lowered Lake level will remain between 909.5 feet until spring of 2015 THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

YAKIMA – Operators are lowering the water on Lake Osoyoos to its winter level to provide more storage for rain and melting snow, and to prevent shoreline damage from freezing and flooding. The Washington Department of Ecology will gradually lower the water level over the coming weeks, and expects to have the lake lowered to 909.5 feet by Dec. 1. It will remain at this level until spring.

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

Ecology manages lake levels at Zosel Dam at Oroville in Okanogan County in Washington state. Between March 1 and about May 1, dam operators maintain the lake at between 911.5 to 912 feet for normal summer operations. Lake levels are mandated under orders put in place by the International Joint Commission, a board made up of representatives from the United States and Canada. For more information on the operation of Zosel Dam or Lake Osoyoos, contact Al Josephy at Ecology, 360-4076456. To track the progress of lake levels in “real-time,” as well as find additional information, go to the U.S. Geological Survey Web page http://waterdata.usgs. gov/wa/nwis/uv?site_no=12439000 for Osoyoos Lake.

Oroville approves increase of 1% in Ad Valorem tax Railroad collector makes donations, including ‘speeder’ to Depot Museum BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council sprinted through their Tuesday, Oct. 4 meeting with the main accomplishment of the night passing a one

percent increase in the ad valorem taxes for the 2015 property tax revenues for the city and the EMS Levy. One percent is the most the city can increase the tax they collect without going to a vote of the people, as set by state law. The measure would allow the city to collect the money to add to the city’s and the EMS District’s coffers. This revenue excludes additional revenue resulting from new construction, improvements to property, any annexations and refunds. The motion to approve the measure was made by Councilman Jon Neal and received a second from Councilwoman Neysa Roley before being approved unanimously. Under old business the council heard

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 46

A new speeder is part of nearly 100 items donated to the Borderlands Historical Society for the Depot Museum. The speeder is on the front deck at the Depot and is inside a wood and glass enclosure. More of the items will be placed on display inside and outside the museum, according to Arnie Marchand, a member of the historical society. Marchand was at the Nov. 4 Oroville Council meeting to discuss happenings at the museum.

a short report on the city’s efforts to secure the old U.S. Border Patrol Station on Main Street. The station has been unoccupied ever since the federal agency moved into their new expanded station north of town. “We’re still working on the application and hope to have it done as soon as possible,” said City Clerk JoAnn Denney. Rod Noel, city superintendent of public works, said he was still working with the city’s engineer to close out the North End Water Reservoir that was constructed in order to both serve the new border patrol station and the north end water system. “We may need to possibly contact our

Gary DeVon/staff photo

SEE COUNCIL | PG A3

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Veterans Day A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Cops & Courts Sports Schools

A8 B1-3 B4

Home Improvement B5

Classifieds Real Estate

B6-7 B7


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 13, 2014

VETERANS DAY ASSEMBLIES

Top right, Oroville student Pie Todd performs “Pray” by Justin Bieber at the Veterans Assembly at Oroville’s Coulton Auditorium. Above, Army veteran Walt Hart speaks to the Tonasket Elementary School assembly about his grandfather’s World War I experiences and his own deployment to the Middle East.

Photos by Brent Baker and Gary DeVon Top, Tonasket High School students present the American Flag at their Veterans Day assembly on Monday, Nov. 10; middle left, K-5 students at Oroville Elementary perform “You’re A Grand Old Flag. The performance included dance and hand motions; middle right, local veterans from Oroville’s Hodge’s Post #84 were honored with music from the OHS Band and Chorus, as well as speeches and video slide shows; lower left, Tonasket graduate C.J. Ayers shares some stories of his deployment (as well as how to apply math to Army sniper training); below right, Tonasket Elementary students wave flags as they sing patriotic songs at their assembly on Friday, Nov. 7.

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NOVEMBER 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

Serenity now! In an old Seinfeld episode, Goerge Costanza’s dad Frank is advised to say “Serenity Now” aloud every time his blood pressure is in danger of going up, but he yells it instead. We can relate with the mid-term elections having come and gone and the Republicans securing control of the Senate and now controlling both Houses of Congress. Will this result in the oft promised “end to gridlock” we heard so much about during the run up to the General Election? We doubt it, now instead of the Republican House of Representatives blocking everything the president asks for, the Democratic president will just block everything congress passes. Situation Normal.... Are you ready for 50 more attempts at repealing the American Health Care Act? No amount of shouting about Republicans running against Obama and not for something, anything, will make up for the fact there was lots of positives the Democrats could have run on, but didn’t. We have a feeling there’s going to be a lot of Serenity Prayers spoken under the Democrats’ breaths for the next couple of years. Perhaps it would be easier to just shout Serenity Now! instead. Locally we didn’t see a lot of changes, while most of our county officials ran unopposed, again – like our county commissioner, treasurer, attorney, sheriff, auditor, etc., we did see a few real races. Incumbent Scott Furman was reelected and well he should have been. When his opponent, Les Stokes, ran on throwing out state law and placing his own formula on assessing real Out of property – that offered voters little choice. My Mind It appears as of last Friday’s count that David Gary A. DeVon Womack has lost his job as Okanogan County PUD Commissioner and Scott Verjaska will be taking over his position. I don’t envy him the task. But something has to be done about the fact that we used to have the third lowest electric rates in the nation and although we are still within the top ten, we’ve seen electric rates climb in a rural county where they were once one of our biggest selling points for living and running a business here. Can the new gun law make a difference while maintaining a quality of service we’ve come to rely on? That’s certainly still to be seen. Lastly, we chose Dave Rodriguez over Gary Reams for the county’s first elected coroner. The position used to be held by the county prosecutor or one of his assistants. While Reams was an especially personable fellow – making sure to stop at the newspaper office whenever he was in town - he just couldn’t overcome the fact that Rodriguez had law enforcement experience on his side. No real shockers in our votes seventh district legislators – the county voters stuck with the hometown boy, Wauconda’s own Joel Kretz the state House of Representatives. Shelly Short was reelected to the other House seat and Brian Dansel to the Senate. County voters bucked the state trend and were for I-591 and against I-594 - no real surprises there either. And while Dan Newhouse won for U.S. House of Representatives, District 4, over Clint Didier, Didier was the odds on favorite for local voters. Although in the past we’ve had several centrist Democrats in local offices, even some in state Seventh District offices, their numbers are dwindling. Heck there was a time we even had a former Speaker of the House, the late Tom Foley, a Democrat, as our representative. Nowadays Okanogan County remains a tough place to be a Democrat. The days of voting for anyone just right or just left of center seem to be over, no matter what party you chose to be affiliated with. For local voters, call it Tea Party or whatever you chose to, extreme right is the fashion of the day, whether running for county commissioner or for the U.S. House of Representatives. --- Serenity Now! Oh well, that’s what blood pressure pills are for right?

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Look for ways to make planet serene, peaceful Dear Editor, Last month you ran a column by William Slusher entitled, “Why I admire Muslims that I found rather sad. It was filled with so much fear and distrust. I felt that I needed to respond. Earlier this year, three explorers returned home from a five month mission abroad the International Space Station. During this mission, Commander Chris Hadfield posted hundreds of photos of the earth. The beauty of these photos is indescribable. Earth is a gorgeous gem of unsurpassed value. Everywhere you look, the natural wonders of the planet display a beauty and serenity. The situation on the ground is vastly different. Our society, whether locally, nationally or internationally is completely fragmented. We seem to judge our place not so much by who we accept, rather by who we oppose. We divide along political beliefs, religion, sexual orientation, race, economic class... Rather than looking for common ground our ‘leaders’ fight for their different views and block each other at every turn. The news media bombards us with stories of wars, epidemics, mass shootings, natural disasters as well as other terrible events that are occurring more and more frequently all over the planet. How are we as citizens of a great republic supposed to react and handle the chaos all around us? The current ebola epidemic in Africa, with the report of the first American death in Texas is raising new fears. Calls, to close our borders, are becoming more frequent. The shooting of the young man in Ferguson, Missouri with the resulting charges of racial bias is indicative of another fracture in our national unity. How do concerned citizens view the underlying tensions that case illustrates? If this was an isolated occurrence, it would be easy to dismiss. However, incidents such as Ferguson are happening all too often. Could something similar happen here? The war in the Syria-Iraq region demonstrates tensions arising on the international level. These are examples of the disintegration besetting our troubled planet. It is too easy to react in fear and anger, as the world around us seems to be dissolving. But, will such reactions produce the beneficial results for which we hope? It is naive to believe peace in Iraq will arrive on it’s own. Yet will rushing to confront ‘evil’ with harsh military actions achieve peace? After all, it was only a decade or so ago that we conducted a massive war in the region to remove a despotic regime. As bad as Saddam Husayn’s rule was, did our effort to overthrow him and remake Iraq produced the peace we longed for? As a person of faith I would like to suggest that I need to step back and rethink how I view my role in society. How do I view my fellowman? Do I look for ways to understand other perspectives? I cannot always be looking out for my own self-interests if I expect to achieve a peaceful society. The ebola scare brings to mind an historical example of a community of people who changed this world for the better. During the third century, an episode that became known as the Plague of Cyprian occurred in the Roman Empire. At its height, so many people were dying that most Romans abandoned their cities and fled in terror. In stark contrast, the Christian community responded

The Oroville Gazette 75 Years Ago: November 3-17, 1939: According to information given out by Ivan Corbin, director of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation project, it is believed that a WPA (Work Progress Administration) crew will soon be allotted to the rehabilitation project of the local district. The crew is being sought to replace men called off the job recently and sent to the Columbia River clearing camp, preparing for the backwater from Coulee Dam. Halloween was duly observed in Oroville by the youngsters, with the usual soaping of windows, tipping over wood piles, garbage cans and privies as well as filling the streets with all kinds of debris. A noisy crowd of little folks and some not so little made things lively with their howls and laughter, but by 10 o’clock things were pretty well back to normal. The Molson Falcons are now getting down to real work, as they are preparing for the grudge fight with the down river teams. There will be a basketball game, November 10. All those interested in basketball are invited to come. Several of Oroville’s air minded young men have banded together and have formed a club to further their own personal education and interest in aviation. They have named their organization, The Oroville Aero Club and members already joined are: Knox Pittman, Herb Wall, Ralph Reinning, Leonard Tedrow, Robert Irwin, and Dick Burnham. Theo Neal will be the instructor. While on a visit to Oroville during the past weekend, State Highway Patrolman Huber, of Okanogan, called on the Gazette office to have us issue a little friendly warning to those driving cars with only one headlight. They will be issued a traffic ticket whenever intercepted by him. He stated further that they should also check that the dim lights are also working. Grocery Prices: Fine granulated sugar, 100 lbs. $5.99; Raisins, 4 lb. pkg., $.33; Ground beef, 2 lb. $.25; IGA corn flakes, 5 pkgs. $.25; C & H Catsup, 14 oz. bottle, $ .11; Pork steaks, 2 lb. $.25.

very differently. Instead of fear and despondency, they expended themselves in works of mercy that simply dumbfounded the pagans. Christians believed, God loved humanity; in order to love God back, they were to love others. Perhaps those early Christians could teach us something. While remaining in the middle of a plaque, ministering to others was not safe, many believers willingly gave their lives. For them, their fellow man was more important than their own safety. The result of their sacrifices helped transform society, healing it both physically and spiritually based on Jesus’ vision of a new world. Similarly, we need to rethink our response to all the various problems that beset our daily lives. A recent issue of Scientific American contained a number of articles on the benefits of diversity in any enterprise we tackle. While a diverse collection of individuals can make arriving at consensus more difficult, it compels us to express ourselves more clearly, to think through our perspectives more completely and to work diligently to accomplish our goals. A more homogenous group of people with a common view of the situation, tends to overlook or overly simplify tasks and the resulting solutions are not nearly as robust. While the world obviously contains many individuals who are intent on inflicting harm on their fellowman, we can’t simply identify these individuals by external marks. ‘Bad people’ are NOT color-coded. We cannot proclaim everyone in a particular religion or political party is ‘evil.’ To do so only helps to fragment society more than it already is, and makes us part of the problem rather than a part of the solution. As a believer in a better world, I want to ask each person to examine his or her life. Ask yourself: • ‘Are there any prejudices that I need to work on to relate t my fellowman?’ • ‘Do I react in anger whenever I hear the news?’ • ‘Am I open to other people’s point of view?’ • ‘Do I look for other view points?’ • ‘Can I put personal fears behind me and do what’s best for others?’ A great teacher once stated that “So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth,” but unity is not easy. It takes hard

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: November 1964: Vic Swanson, local contractor, began tearing down and hauling away the old rock building which has stood on 14th Avenue since 1908. Early reports are that the building was used as an attorney’s office, to store vegetables for an early grocery store, was used for some time as a powder house for the irrigation company, housed a shoe repair shop, a liquor store, a taxi stand and a pool hall. All of this to make way for a new building which will house Bob Monroe’s Building Supply. Mobile homes were the main topic for discussion at the City Council meeting, on Monday night. It is thought that trailer houses should not be used as living quarters inside the city limits. These homes, which are not permanent on their lots, do not increase the property value of the lot on which it rests or the surrounding property. Ben Prince Shopping Center, the largest shopping center north of Wenatchee, is holding their Grand Opening today through Sunday, Nov. 5, 6, 7 and 8. The grocery unit was put into operation the first of October in their new quarters with approximately 12,000 sq. ft. of floor space. (NOTE: This is presently Prince Warehouse Store). Included in this space will be a bakery using the brand name of Dainty Maid. In observance of American Education Week, the Music Department of the Oroville will present its Fall Concert on Friday, Nov. 13 in the Coulton Auditorium. In addition to the Junior High School Bands and Choruses, the group of students representing Oroville in the Okanogan County Honor Choir will also participate. Grocery Prices: Mixed nuts, 13 oz. tins, $.69; gal. ice cream, $49; Medium AA eggs, $.39 per doz.; Ground beef, 3 lb. pkg., $.99; bananas, $.10

work and personal sacrifice. With so much hate, anger, fear and chaos surrounding us on a daily basis, we should look at changing our own attitudes, which will thereby contribute to changing the world? Let us look for ways to make this planet’s society as peaceful and serene up close as it appeared to Commander Chris Hadfield as he orbited the planet at the beginning of this year. Stan Somers Oroville

Walk N Roll for Medical Cannabis Nov. 16 Dear Editor, Are you or your animals benefiting from the use of medical cannabis? Please unite with the people for medical cannabis on Nov. 16, 2014 at 12 p.m. in Tonasket and Bellingham. Together we will walk and roll with our pets to educate the public about our right to choose our medication. Some of our state legislators intend to blend medical cannabis with recreational marijuana. This could raise prices and stop medical cannabis patients from growing their own medication. We need to raise money to pay the way for Our Walk N Roll participants that want to go to Olympia. Session starts Jan. 2015 and we need to be seen and heard by our state representatives. Our state representatives need to see us and hear our personal stories of success with cannabis as medication. Join us on Nov. 16 and share your story. The people for medical cannabis in Washington State will be hosting an event in two cities. Bellingham and Tonasket will be home to the Walk N Roll with our Pets event. Nov. 16, we will be coming out at noon in support of medical cannabis patients across the state. This state is choosing to put recreational above medical cannabis and we believe that both markets can co-exist. This event is to bring awareness that medical cannabis is very much real and in jeopardy in this state. Gina Garcia Tonasket

per lb.; Turkey Hindquarters, $.29 per lb. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier, official observer; Oct. 28, 52 degrees maximum and 25 minimum; Oct. 29, 56 and 33; Oct. 30, 54 and 33; Oct. 31, 57 and 41; Nov. 1, 60 and 53; Nov. 2, 59 and 41 and Nov. 3, 44 and 20. Total precipitation for the period, .33 “of rain.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: November 2-9, 1989: The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) District, which was voted into being two years ago, has purchased a piece of land directly across from the city hall, with the intent to build a $100,000 ambulance facility, reported EMS Commissioner Web Hallauer. The proposed facility will have two ambulance bays, a garage, an office and a kitchen and meeting room. Miss Allison Stucker, daughter of Rod and Julie Stucker, was crowned Miss Tonasket Rodeo for 1990 at the school cafeteria on Saturday night. The crown was passed to her from 1989’s Queen, Tiffany Wilson. The Tonasket Tiger Football Team, beat Quincy last Friday 13 to 6 and this win will put the Tigers into the State High School playoffs. In Volleyball, it was a close Caribou League game when the Tonasket Tigers lost to Quincy’s Jackrabbits. The scores were, Quincy 15-13, 16-14 and 15-13. Though it was a 3-match straight win for Quincy, Tiger play was hard and furious and only two points behind at each match. The election results for Tonasket, Oroville and Hospital District #4 as follows: Oroville Mayor: Ed King, with 164 votes and Mick Munson, 157: Council Position #1, Susan Christensen, 243 and Position #2, Ethel Eva Lindauer, 209. School District #410: Director #2 Gary Nearly, 253 and Mary Lou Peterson, #4, Connie Galley, 545. Cemetery District #4; Elmer Bruns, 545. Special Levy for $11,000: Yes - 467 and No - 174. Tonasket Mayor: Thomas Fancher, 181; Council #1, Roy G. Stotts; Council #2, R. Levi Jones, 180 and Fred J. Richardson, 4. School District #404: Director #1, Maryann Williams, 732; #4, Joyce Fancher, 494 and #2, Marilyn Neal, 568 and Katy Tibbs, 384; Hospital Position #1: Dick Larson, 1303 and #5, Dale R. Clarkson, 591 and Linda Walker, 964.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 13, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Still little in way of frost Still no killing frost at out house, yet. Bits of moisture and the days are dreary and sometimes the rain at Molson is kinda thick, but so far, no real snow on the Monday nights, when we go for pinochle. It is official! There will be Thanksgiving dinner at the Oroville Senior Center. Time for eating is 1 p.m. Turkey, dressing, potatoes and gravy will be prepared and for those coming, a vegetable, salad or dessert is suggested, or if you can’t do that, come anyway and you won’t go away hungry. Family and friends gathered at the Riverview Cemetery last Tuesday afternoon, to bid farewell to Glen Hauenstein, longtime resident, retired teacher and builder and “fixer� of many things for many people. The gray clouds threatened but the rain stayed away, while a

Seed Library Comes Full Circle SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE

short and simple message was given, with grandchildren taking part, which was very touching, keeping it within his guidelines. Kathy Hennig, resident of the Chesaw area and secretary at the Oroville Senior Center, had by-pass surgery, and is reported to be recuperating very nicely. Her infectious laugh has been missed at the dinner tables and we wish her well. It is reported that Bob and Geneva Irwin are having some serious health issues. Life isn’t the way it’s supposed to be. But, it’s the way it is. And, I will say here that, Kay, daughter of Ed and Harriett Walker coped superbly, with cancer for about eight years. Kay, the way we cope with it is what makes the difference, used to be at our house a lot, during swimming

OROVILLE SEED LIBRARY

Oroville’s Seed Library, housed at the Oroville Community Library, has entered its first seed collection season, coming full circle from the seeds that were given out last spring. The spring time open dates brought eager gardeners to the library, where they were able to flip through the seed “albums� and take new vegetable and flower seeds home to grow. Now is the time for gardeners to return to the library with saved seed for the Seed Library, which will help the collection become more and more locally adapted to our region’s growing conditions. The success of the Seed Library will depend on community members contributing seed over time. It has been an exciting first year for the Seed Library, and one of the highlights has been the “Grow-a-Row for the Oroville Food Bank� program. Dawn McClure, Oroville Food Bank board member and event organizer, has been very pleased with the Seed Library’s contributions. “We received several donations from the Grow-a-Row program,� McClure said. “Fresh local vegetables are a great addition to the Oroville Food Bank’s food supply, and the fresh produce helps

provide healthy eating options for people in need. Great work, gardeners!� If gardeners need someone to pick up their fresh produce donations, Dawn McClure can find willing volunteers to help with that. She can be reached at 476-2309. Now is the time to donate seed! Seed collection boxes are available in the Oroville Library, with forms to write information about the seeds being donated.†It is particularly helpful if community members can donate seeds that are already taken out of their husks, as it makes storage more feasible for the Seed Library. Project Coordinator, LaVonne Hammelman, is especially excited about a new series coming up this winter. Based on suggestions from participants, the Seed Library will be hosting some informal talks with Master Gardeners and other experienced gardeners and cooks on topics such as dryland gardening, seed saving methods, and food preservation.†Community members can watch for flyers at the library and the Prince’s bulletin board for details about these upcoming “Lunch’n’Learn� sessions, as well as the local newspa-

Thanksgiving Dinner Nov. 27

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT, PRESIDENT OROVILLE SENIOR CITIZENS

Don’t forget our coming events: We’re planning a partial potluck Thanksgiving Day lunch. We will provide turkey, dressing, potatoes and gravy. Bring a dessert, salad, vegetable or fruit, or come empty handed. All will be served on Thursday, Nov. 27, at 1 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1521 Golden Street. Then, Saturday Dec. 13 is our annual Christmas Bazaar. To reserve a table, or donate

Lots of shoppers and vendors SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Chesaw Community Building and parking lot were full of vendors and shoppers last Saturday for this year’s annual Christmas Bazaar. You could purchase baked goods of all kinds to fill your freezer for the holidays. Jams and jellies, chutneys of all kinds filled a large table and looked yummy. One of our new vendors this year was the winter squash and home made pastries and bread. The dried flowers and homegrown fruit went fast. There were books, jewelry, coins, raffle tickets for a quilt. a rifle, a knife and a pair of binoculars. For more information on the Rifle you can call Mike at 509-4852397. Another new vendor for us this year was the Treasures from Mexico, handmade knit items and Antler Flowers and key rings, more jewelry, and much, much more. Many have said they will plan on being a part of our Bazaar next year. We hope you were able to get to the Chesaw Mercantile last Tuesday to help honor our veterans. Goodies and free coffee were available for all. The Chesaw Community Bible

items, see Betty Hall, or call her at 509-476-2788. Better hurry, as Betty has already reserved several bazaar tables. We’re presently considering providing a lunch of beef stew and biscuits for that event. We’ll still be having our computer class 11 a.m. on Tuesday. Nov. 25, taught by Tilly Porter. Our annual election of Officers will be held at our business meeting on Dec. 15 at 11 a.m. Present your nominees to Betty Steg, or Raleigh Chinn, our nominating

HILLTOP COMMENTS Church is getting ready to provide a free Thanksgiving, turkey dinner with all of the trimmings to one and all. Again, the dinner is free. Please come and enjoy the afternoon. Dinner will be served, starting at noon until 3 p.m. (or later if necessary). See you on Thanksgiving, Nov 27. It seems that last week was so busy I forgot to give you the pinochle scores for the last two

season, especially, as she was a classmate of our daughter Vicki, class of ’65 and a group of the “girls� gathered there I sorta lost track of her and then a couple of years ago when I was at the hospital in Wenatchee, we met again, with her being manager of the gift shop at Central Washington Hospital. It was so refreshing seeing someone I knew and she was just as sweet as she was as a little girl, although she had endured a lot. I’m sorry I don’t recall her married name, but she will be remembered as Walker and related to the Swanson families. Another successful blood drive was held at the United Methodist Church, last Wednesday, going well over their quota. Sincere thanks to those who participate, both by giving blood as well as those who are on hand working in other

per Community Calendars. New for next year: The Seed Library received the generous donation of a water bath canner!†Next summer, watch for availability for your preservation needs. The Oroville Seed Library is part of a movement across the continent for communities to develop their own seed banks of locally adapted seed. Community members are encouraged to grow seed from the library and then save seed to be returned to the library at the end of the growing season. The Seed Library would like to thank community members who have generously donated vegetable and flower seeds, photo albums for seed display, starting pots and potting soil, and volunteer time. The Mission of the North Central Regional Library is to promote reading and lifelong learning. The Oroville Community Library supports this mission by providing a place for community members to come together, where literacy, storytelling, technology and cultural programs foster community spirit. The Seed Library is just one of many library programs that support the vitality of our small, rural community. For more information about the Oroville Seed Library, contact LaVonne Hammelman at lavomsn@hotmail.com or 509833-5788.

committee. Jim Fry should be finished moving. We hope his new digs are satisfactory. He promises to be back smashing cans shortly. Many thanks to him for his hard work. Our Pancake breakfast last Saturday went well. Thank you is in order to our crew: Mary Lou, Raleigh, Betty, Marilyn, Darlene, Barbie, Betty, Ruth, Doris and I. Job well done. Also, thanks to all who came. Because of these, and all the generous support from our members, and the public, our financial bleeding has stopped. We are doing much better financially. Thank you, thank you all. Our website is http:/orovillewaseniorcntr.blogspot.com/.

weeks. So here they are: On Oct. 27 High’s went to Ray Visser and Boots Emry. The Low’s went to Evert Turner and Sally Eder and George Penner took the Traveling Award. There were 34 Players. On Nov. 3 with 37 players the High’s went to Ray Visser (again) and Beverly Holden. The Low’s went to Harold Harper and Penny Cole. Carl Cole took the Traveling. We have been having a good number of players, so bring your friends, relatives,and neighbors and fill the empty spots. The Players say they are having a good time. Don’t forget the treats to share.

Honoring LtCmdr Allen E. Willey SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Lieutenant Commander Willey was born May 1967 in Spokane, raised in Tonasket, and is a 1985 Tonasket graduate. He has been serving the US Navy for 28 years. In 1986 he enlisted in the Navy and completed Utilitiesman “A� training. In 1988 he was selected to attend specialized training in Prime Power Production. Upon graduation, Willey transferred to the Mobile Utilities Support Equipment (MUSE) Program. While with the MUSE program, he married Shereen and had their first child. For the next seven years he traveled worldwide deploying to numerous naval facilities providing power, transformation, and steam production assets and expertise. In 1996 Willey was selected for the Civil Engineer Corps Enlisted Commissioning Program. While studying at the University of Idaho, Allen and Shereen welcomed their second child and finished up his time in Moscow with a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering earning a commission in the US Navy. Ensign Willey packed up the family and reported to the Seabee Logistics Center becoming the first MUSE Division Officer to have previously served in the unit as an enlisted member! As Lieutenant Junior Grade, he

NVCS Fabulous 50’s Dance this Saturday, Nov. 15 SUBMITTED BY ELLEN BARTTELS NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Save the date - Coming up on Saturday, Nov. 15 at Vicki’s Back Door Club, 1415 Main St Oroville (off the alley) is the NVCS annual 50’s dance. Enjoy live music by Project 3:16, as well as hamburgers, floats, prizes and a rockin’ good time! Don’t forget to bring the kids! North Valley Community Schools is offering several classes in the upcoming week for your consideration: Email Essentials 102 Tuesday, Nov. 18, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Electronic communication has become the norm in our society. If you feel like you could stand to brush up on your

Sandra Rasmussen 32 N Main St Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638

THE LEARNING TREE skills in this area, this is the class for you! This class focuses on using email. You will learn the basics about how the most common email programs work, such as sending files, attaching photos, using filters, and accessing your email from other places and devices. U.F.O. - Three sessions starting on Monday, Nov. 17 at 6:30 p.m. This class will discuss UFO’s, ancient history and prophesies. To register for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011.

Sponsored by: Wenatchee Valley College at Omak

for Information Contact Livia Millard 509.422.7814 lmillard@wvc.edu FOOD DRIVE ADMISSION: 1 ITEM OF NON-PERISHABLE FOOD 312 S. Whitcomb

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Regiment in Port Hueneme, CA. Over the last year, he has planned various engineering engagements and exercises in the Pacific and deployed as the Operations Officer of Task Force Forager conducting Civil Military Operations in Indonesia and Timor. LCDR Willey has recently been selected for promotion to Commander and will be officially promoted in May 2015. LtCmdr Willey’s decorations include the Bronze Star, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Commendation Medal, Joint Achievement Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (4 awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal, Combat Action Ribbon and various unit and personal awards. He is a Seabee Combat Warfare Officer, a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and American Military Engineers, Tau Beta Pi National Engineering Honor Society, and is a registered Professional Engineer in the State of Washington. Your hometown and the entire valley thank you and your family for your service, Allen! We would like to learn more about our area’s service men and women. Please contact us with details 509-485-2906 or ncw. bluestars@yahoo.com.

North Valley Community Schools is also seeking a board member to serve on the board of directors.

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

call or visit today. Call today to schedule your ďŹ nancial review.

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was assigned as Alfa Company Commander (Construction Equipment Maintenance and Transportation Officer) completing deployments in Rota, Spain and Okinawa, Japan. In 2003 Lieutenant Willey was the last Officer-in-Charge of the Construction Battalion Unit in Everett, WA and served as the Assistant Public Works Officer there. While at Everett, he redeployed to Basra, Iraq where he was the Resident Engineer managing the construction of a $150M children’s hospital in an austere combat zone. When he promoted to Lieutenant Commander, he transferred to Naples, Italy where he planned for and managed 700 Seabees within two Combatant Commander Area of Responsibilities. In 2011, upon completion of his Europe and Africa overseas tour, he reported as the Facilities Director for Naval Special Warfare Development Group in Virginia Beach supporting the training and readiness of Navy Seals. In 2013 Willey accepted the future Operations Officer position within the Thirtieth Naval Construction

Run Time: 69 min November 18th 5:30pm-7:15pm at the Omak Theater 108 N. Main St.

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capacities. Peggy Cope has been a happy grandLast Saturday one could have eaten mother as she enjoyed the company their way around town, by starting at the of a granddaughter all the way from Senior Center for breakfast, then spa- Memphis, Tenn. ghetti luncheon at the United Methodist Remember from last year how good Church and I believe there was some- peanut brittle and peanut butter peanut thing in the evening at the Eagles. brittle was? A bazaar is a good place to And remember Wednesday night ham- buy some if you don’t like to make it burgers at the Legion, starting at 5 p.m. yourself. And of course, it is fudge time! The election is over and I tried the banana thing, the candidates should remove of pulling them apart off their signing but that usually the bunch, and they turned doesn’t happen. Some were brown and I wasted one, just very pleased with the results like all the other “fads� I’ve and some weren’t, and that’s read and tried and nothing the way it goes. works. Now, on to other happenWe were pleased to have ings: The Community Bazaar Larry and Lynn Eder visit us is to be held Friday and last week. And we are extra Saturday, Nov. 21 and 22, in pleased with the wonderful the elementary gym. frozen corn they shared with THIS & THAT And on Saturday, Dec. 13 us. It’s so good and “just like the Oroville Senior Center Joyce Emry mama used to make.� I like will be hosting another to make potato soup and put bazaar at the center. a package of corn in. It’s so Jack Frost is nipping at our heels yummy with hot buttered corn bread, on and the prediction is for much cooler a cold winter’s eve. weather.

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NOVEMBER 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY MEETING

The November meeting of the Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity will be held Tuesday, Nov. 11 at 7 p.m. at the home of Mike and Peggy McDaniel,170 Hubbard Rd., Riverside. Call 509-429-8369 for further information.

MAKING HEALTHY CHOICES

TONASKET - Dr. Paula Silha, ER Physician will be conducting a free course about making healthy choices in regards to diet, exercise, and leisure activities as well as how to have a healthy balance in your life on Tuesday, Nov. 11 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at North Valley Hospital. To register go to nvhospital.org and click on wellness courses, or call 509-486-3163.

FIREWISE WORKSHOP

TONASKET - North Valley Community Schools has teamed up with Okanogan County Conservation District to offer this class free of charge. Come get the details on the FireWise fire protection method on Wednesday, Nov. 12.

PRACTICE SESSIONS OROVILLE - On Thursday mornings, Nov. 13, 20 and 27 at 10:30 a.m. there is an hour long program called Practice Sessions offered by the Oroville Community Library. Allene Halliday shares information about American musical standards from the 1920s through the 1960s. Steve Pollard accompanies Halliday. The presentations include performances along with learning and rehearsal techniques plus history of a style of music many people are unfamiliar withy. This ongoing series is free and open to all ages.

KAY SIBLEY AT OROVILLE CHAMBER

OROVILLE - The public is invited to attend the general meeting of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, Nov. 13 at 1 p.m. at The Plaza Restaurant (come a bit early if you want to order a meal). The featured

presenter will be Kay Sibley from the Visitors Information Center run by the Okanogan Borderlands Historical Society.

rent tables to sell your items. Coffee any time. For more information, call 476-3878.

SPIRITUAL MOVIE NIGHT

BELL & POLLARD PERFORM

OROVILLE - Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include Steve Bell and Steve Pollard on Thursday, Nov. 13. Music begins at 6:30. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or visit the Events page at www.estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville, WA. There will be no performances on Nov. 20 and Nov. 27, as Esther Bricques Winery will be closed on those two dates.

FORUM ON H-2A GUEST-WORKERS

WENATCHEE – The U.S. Department of Labor is hosting a forum on Friday, Nov. 14 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Wenatchee to provide Washington growers and farmlabor association representatives with information on how to successfully navigate the federal H-2A foreign guest-worker program. The forum will cover the H-2A application process, federal regulations and enforcement, and self-monitoring and outreach. It also will feature a session on H-2A best practices and a question and answer period with a panel of federal and state experts. Participating federal and state agencies are the U.S Department of Labor’s Hour and Wage Division and the state departments of Agriculture and Employment Security. The forum will be held at the Wenatchee Convention Center, 121 N. Wenatchee Ave. The Registration is free to the public, however, seating is limited. To register email wcddh2a@esd.wa.gov or call 360-902-9685.

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Nov. 15, at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200.

NVCS ANNUAL 50’S DANCE

OROVILLE - Coming up on Saturday, Nov. 15th at Vicki’s Back Door Club, 1415 Main St Oroville (in the alley) is the North Valley Community School’s annual 50’s dance! Enjoy live music by Project 3:16, hamburgers, floats, prizes and a rockin’ good time! Tickets at the door, adults $10, children $5, the whole family $25. To promote a family friendly environment, alcohol will not be served at this event. This event is part of NVCS’s annual fund raising drive. Your support keeps us alive. Don’t forget to bring the kids.

MAY FESTIVAL ROYALTY

OROVILLE - Girls interested in running for 2015 May Festival Royalty are asked to attend the next May Festival Committee Meeting on Nov. 19 at 6 p.m. with a parent at the Plaza Restaurant (1412 Main). Candidates must be a junior in high school or home school equivalent. Information about requirements and availability of money through the committee and fundraisers to help with royalty costs will be provided at the meeting. More info: www. orovillemayfestival.com.

WEST MY FRIEND CONCERT

OROVILLE GRANGE FLEA MARKET

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange Flea Market will be inside on Saturday, Nov. 15, from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at 622 Fir. Watch for posters and a sign on Highway 97 south of town. Featuring Christmas, we

TONASKET - West My Friend will be performing Friday, Nov. 21, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Described as everything from indie-roots to chamber-folk, their acoustic blend of instruments and four-part harmonies

Ski patrol hosts ‘Pretty Faces: the Story of a Skier Girl’ SUBMITTED BY KURT DANISON LOUP LOUP SKI PATROL

The Loup Loup Ski Patrol is hosting the Eastern Washington premier of the film “Pretty Faces: the Story of a Skier Girlâ€? by Unicorn Picnic on Saturday, Dec. 6 at noon at the Omak Theater. Doors open at 12 p.m., Raffle and Unicorn costume contest at 12:30 p.m. and the show starts at 1 p.m. Pretty Faces, the first-ever crowd-sourced, crowd-funded all-women’s ski movie, is a film celebrating women who thrive in the snow. The concept for the film was originated by professional big mountain skier and SheJumps cofounder, Lynsey Dyer with the objective of giving women and girls, young and old, a source of inspiration through a unique look at what is possible when boundaries are broken, dreams captured and friendships cultivated. In Lynsey’s words “I wanted to give young girls something positive to look up to‌I wanted to give them their Blizzard of Ahhs, Ski Movie or High Life, but done in a way that also shows the elegance, grace, community and style that is unique to women in the mountains.â€? “We are on a mission to make skiing and the outdoors look so fun that no girl will ever want to stay inside,â€? said Dyer. “Through this project and my nonprofit SheJumps, we want young girls to see positive, strong, and courageous women pursuing their

passions and finding success. We want to show females everywhere: ‘if she can do it, so can I.’� What began as a Kickstarter campaign to test the interest for such a project has become something much larger. With help from presenting sponsor Eddie Bauer, “Pretty Faces� is the most successful action sports Kickstarter campaign to date. A project that is sure to shatter the status-quo of women in ski movies, this film is a first of what is hopefully a revolution across the board in action sports. Since its premier in Boulder, Colo. on Sept. 30, the movie has been playing to sell out crowds throughout the western U.S. and Canada and has received excellent reviews, check out unicornpicnic. com. The event includes a raffle with lots of great shwag including lift tickets, ski wear, discount coupons and related items, and the highlight, a unicorn costume contest with a grand prize! Tickets, available online at brownpapertickets.com, are $7

students, $10 adults. Ticket prices will be $1 more at the door (if there are any left!). Sponsors include: Omak and Mirage Theaters, North Cascades Broadcasting, Loup Loup Ski Bowl, 49 Degrees North, North Cascades Heli, Sports Creel, Cascades Outdoor Store, Rawson’s, D&R Glass, Goats Beard, Mountain Gear, Stevens Pass, Mission Ridge, Freebird Espresso, Winthrop Ice and Sports Rink, Arlbergs, Loup Loup Ski Rental shop and Breadline CafÊ. The Breadline will offer a 10 percent discount the day of the show for all ticket holders. The event is a fundraiser for the volunteer patrol with proceeds to be used for acquiring and enhancing emergency medical supplies, equipment, training and facilities at the Loup Loup Ski Bowl. The Patrol will also donate a portion of the proceeds to the ski bus programs in Coulee Dam/ Nespelem, Omak/Okanogan and Pateros.

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1RYHPEHUWK—Open Enrollment Begins. Apply for, keep or change your Qualified Health Plan. 'HFHPEHUWK—Last day to enroll or renew for coverage beginning January 1, 2015. 'HFHPEHUVW—Coverage ends for 2014 plans. Coverage for 2015 plans can start as soon as January 1st. )HEUXDU\WK—Last day to apply for 2015 coverage, unless you have a qualifying life event.

OROVILLE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

OROVILLE - Get a head start to your Christmas celebrations at the Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar on Friday Nov. 21, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s bazaar is hosted by the OHS Future Business Leaders of America in the Oroville Grade School Gymnasium. Artisans, crafters and other vendors are encouraged to contact Susan at 509-476-2427 for more information. Registrations forms are available at the Oroville Public Library, Oroville Elementary School, Oroville High School, Oroville City Hall and Hughes Department Store.

SANTA AT THE BAZAAR

OROVILLE - Bring the kids to see Santa at the Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar in the Oroville Elementary School Gymnasium Friday, Nov. 21 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is hosted by Oroville High School Future Business Leaders of America. For vendor information

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TONASKET FOOD BANK

and please contact Susan at 509476-2427.

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

SCHOOL RETIREES TO TOUR PAC

OMAK - Members of Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will tour the Omak Performing Arts Center at 11 a.m., Tuesday, November 25, followed by a luncheon at the home of Marcelle LaGrou, 608 W 1st Ave, Omak. For more information call Jennie Hedington at 509-422-2954.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

THANKSGIVING AT SENIOR CENTER

OROVILLE - The Oroville Seniors are planning a Thanksgiving dinner for Thursday, Nov. 27, at 1 p.m. at the Center. We will provide the turkey, dressing and potatoes with potluck vegetables and dessert. All are invited at no charge.

SING-ALONG MESSIAH

ELLESFORDE - The annual community “Sing-Along Messiah� will be held at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, at the Ellisforde Church of the Brethren. Anyone who enjoys selections from the traditional “Christmas� portion of Handel’s masterpiece is invited to sing along, or simply sit and listen. The informal singalong will feature musicians from the Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus under the direction of Don Pearce. Mary Koch will play the church’s pipe organ. Soloists are not required to audition, but if you are interested in performing a solo aria, you’re asked to advise Autumn Martin, (509) 322-0495, or Mary Koch, (509) 322-0177. Admission is free. Free-will donations to the pipe organ maintenance fund will be appreciated.

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

LISTING YOUR ITEM

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event� button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOH‡ Worship on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb‡509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams‡www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am‡Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.â€? JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church :DUGHQ‡ 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.â€? -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146 “To every generation.â€? Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

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challenges the conventions of popular music to create a performance that is both engaging and innovative. Well-crafted and clever lyrics, acrobatic mandolin riffs, flawless bass lines, and richly textured accordion combine as every member brings forward their own ideas and experiences. How lucky we are to have them grace our stage! Schedule - 6 p.m. Dinner ($7.50 for CCC members/$8.50 non-members); 7 p.m. Concert ($10). Beverages and desserts will be available by donation .

1516 Fir Street‡476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ 3DVWRU5RG%URZQ

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI#\PDLOFRP Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God 1012 Fir Street, Oroville‡476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 9:30 - 10:10 a.m. L.I.F.E. - Duck Dynasty Faith Commander all November 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey-Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 13, 2014

COPS & COURTS COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Jerry Ray Mears Jr., 26, Riverside, pleaded guilty Nov. 4 to fourth-degree assault (DV). Mears was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 310 days suspended and credit for 54 days served. Mears was fined $1,110.50 for the Sept. 11 crime. Moises Machorro Morales, 27, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Nov. 4 to tampering with a witness. Machorro Morales was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the Oct. 13 crime. ` Aaron Lee Dick, 26, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Nov. 5 to attempting to elude a pursuing law enforcement vehicle and third-degree DWLS. Dick was sentenced to 12 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the March 23 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge Brent McNeil Bleakney, 32, Omak, with residential burglary, seconddegree TMVWOP, seconddegree theft (access device) and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 13. In a separate case, the court found probable cause to charge Bleakney with seconddegree theft (access device), second-degree ID theft and third-degree theft. Those crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 2, 2012. The court found probable cause to charge David George Vanvekoven, 43, Oroville, with first-degree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 31. The court found probable cause to charge Carl Allen Snyder, 50, Omak, with three counts of harassment (threats to kill). The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 3. The court found probable cause to charge Lyle Zachary Long, 29, Omak, with residential burglary, third-degree theft and bail jumping. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 28 and 29.

JUVENILE A 17-year-old Tonasket boy pleaded guilty Nov. 5 to four counts of second-degree rape of a child. The boy was sentenced to 108 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration, and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Jan. 28, 2015. The crimes occurred June 15. A 14-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Nov. 5 to first-degree child molestation. The girl was sentenced to 36 weeks in the state Department of Social and Health Services Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration, and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Jan. 28, 2015. The crime occurred Jan. 1, 2013. DISTRICT COURT Erica Arabelli Godina, 27, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Godina received a 90-day suspended sentence and was fined $818. Devon Lee Goodrich, 21, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: second-degree rendering criminal assistance. Francis Cody Herman, 27, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Alexandra Elise Hockman, 25, Tonasket, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Ashley Huner, no middle name listed, 26, Okanogan, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Huner was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $808.

Kailey Marie Huner-Brown, 19, Omak, had a second-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Blake Forrest Lannoye, 29, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Lannoye was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $658. Lannoye had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Deena Jean Lazard, 26, Omak, guilty of possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Lazard was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined $608. Iris Gail Marroquin, 20, Okanogan, guilty of reckless driving. Marroquin received a 180-day suspended sentence and was fined $1,283. Marcus William McCoy, 25, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. McCoy was fined $200. Misty Dawn McCuan, 22, Omak, had a charge dismissed: violation of a protection order. David Ross McHenry, 51, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Biatriz Montalvo Montes, 20, Okanogan, had a thirddegree theft charge dismissed. Montalvo Montes was fined $500. Stephen Dale Moses Jr., 54, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Moses was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Cyril Narcisse, no middle name listed, 74, Omak, guilty of reckless driving. Narcisse was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $1,258.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, NOV. 3, 2014 Recovered vehicle on Bridge St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Weapons offense on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. Motorcycle theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Harassment on Jackson St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. First Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Sixth St. in Omak. Connor Robert Trevino, 19, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing and thirddegree malicious mischief. Monte Louis Nicholson, 47, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for obstruction. Carl Allen Snyder, 50, booked on three counts of felony harassment. TUESDAY, NOV. 4, 2014 Domestic dispute on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Fraud on Pine Crest Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. One-vehicle crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Theft on Less Way near Wauconda. DWLS on Del Rosario Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Road rage on Wagon Wheel Loop Rd. near Oroville. Theft on W. First Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on the Central Street Bridge in Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in

Omak. Wallet reported missing. Burglary on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. Road rage on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on N. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Tyler Scott Fife, 20, booked for third-degree theft and a State Patrol FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Jamie Lynn Pakootas, 31, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Terry Lee Zoller, 63, court commitment for first-degree negligent driving. Jeremiah Van Tachell, 23, booked for second-degree possession of stolen property. Blake Forrest Lannoye, booked for second-degree possession of stolen property.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 5, 2014 Harassment on Mule Deer Ridge Rd. near Oroville. Drugs on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on River Ave. in Okanogan. Cable reported missing. Trespassing on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on W. First St. in Tonasket. Harassment on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Threats on Hanford St. in Omak. Assault on Dayton Ave. in Omak. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Wallet reported missing. Automobile theft on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Wesley Paul Wirth, 37, booked on an FTA bench warrant for second-degree retail theft. Kevin Anthony Baker, 48, booked for DUI, seconddegree DWLS and hit-and-run (attended). Michael Anthony McClure, 37, booked on a DOC warrant. Rebecca Lynn Cabrera, 54, booked on a DOC warrant. Ian Michael Houck, 26, court commitment for first-degree negligent driving.

PATEROS – A semi truck heading southbound on SR97 failed to negotiate a curve about five miles south of Pateros and left the roadway coming to rest on the guardrail and in a pond. On Thursday, Nov. 6 at about 11:40 p.m. the truck left the roadway to right into the gravel shoulder. After re-entering the roadway the tractor and trailer tipped and the container separated from the trailer and came to rest in a pond. The tractor and trailer came to rest on the guardrail, reports Trooper M. Goodall with

the Washington State Patrol. The driver, Daniel J. Knight Jr., 56, Everett, was transported to Three Rivers Hospital in Brewster. His 2003 Freightliner was declared as totalled and towed by Randy’s towing, according to Trooper Goodall in his incident report. Knight was charged with “Driving with Wheels off the Roadway.�

Collision closes highway near Riverside RIVERSIDE – A collision on SR97 on Oct. 30 sent two to the

FRIDAY, NOV. 7, 2014 Drugs on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Pine Chee Rd. near Oroville. Forgery on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Lost property on S. Higher Ground Rd. near Tonasket. Firearm reported missing. Alcohol offense on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Granite St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Injuries reported. Illegal burning on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Golden Rd. in Oroville. James Clair Chevalier, 68, booked on two counts of unlawful possession of a firearm. Victor Gutierrez Nunez, 38, booked for first-degree assault (DV), first-degree malicious mischief (DV), reckless driving and a USBP hold. David Edgar Carlson Jr., 52, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Rodney Wayne Cowan, 55, booked for DUI. Adam Charles Luntsford, 40, booked for first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Dana Ray Wilson, 62, booked on two counts of first-degree child molestation. Andrea Candice Orlando, 39, DOC detainer. SATURDAY, NOV. 8, 2014

Harassment on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Riverside. Assault on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Hector Oswaldo Tevalan Lopez, 24, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and a USBP hold. Matthew Douglas Jacobs, 28, booked for third-degree DWLS, carrying a loaded weapon in a vehicle, use or possession of a loaded weapon in a vehicle, refusing to cooperate with law enforcement and a Snohomish County FTA warrant for DUI. Francisco Javier Ayala, 27, booked on a probable cause warrant for second-degree rape and a USBP hold. Larry Gene Visger, 67, booked for forgery and third-degree theft. Lincoln McBean, no middle name listed, 37, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Stuart Leslie, no middle name listed, 30, booked for seconddegree possession of stolen property and second-degree vehicle prowl.

SUNDAY, NOV. 9, 2014

Burglary on Hwy. 7 near Oroville.

Custodial interference on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Custodial interference on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Queen St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on OmakRiverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Theft on S. Birch St. in Omak. Battery reported missing. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Pine St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Juniper St. in Oroville.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

Burglary on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Timothy Charles Lewis, 44, booked for third-degree possession of stolen property and third-degree theft. Ronald Dean Friedlander Jr., 44, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Mark Allen KinKade, 43, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Elizabeth Ann KinKade, 38, booked for violation of a nocontact order. Christy Leigh Ekenbarger, 33, booked for harassment (threats to kill). Laura Sue Walker Sifagaloa, 30, booked for POCS (heroin) and POCS (methamphetamine). Enrique Anthony Castillo, 22, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: second-degree theft, second-degree vehicle prowl and second-degree ID theft.

KEY: DUI - Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C - Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

THURSDAY, NOV. 6, 2014 Utility problem on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Power outage reported. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Sex offense of S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Hwy. 7 near Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-pedestrian wreck on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Weapons offense on Box Spring Dr. near Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on Elmway in Okanogan. Assault on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Hazardous materials on Hanford St. in Omak. Fuel leak reported. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. Franklin John Raschka, 34, court commitment for possession of drug paraphernalia. Briana Lynn Carrothers, 24, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS, vehicular assault and first-degree TMVWOP. Tamitha Marie Davidson, 42, booked on six probable cause warrants, all for third-degree theft. Salvador Dominguez Cirino, 23, booked for fourth-degree assault, no valid operator’s

Washington State Patrol Semi leaves SR97 near Pateros

license without ID and a USBP hold. Brandon Shea Marchand, 40, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Michaella Jean Flores, 31, DOC detainer. James Corwin Hoben, 39, DOC detainer.

hospital for injuries, according to the Washington State Patrol. Paulette Quiroga-Jacklin, 59, Riverside, was westbound on Kendall Street in Riverside when she attempted a left turn onto the southbound lane of SR97 and was struck by a a vehicle driven by Brandon W. Boulger, 32, Omak. The collission caused Boulger’s 1988 Dodge Pickup to burst into flames, according to Trooper T. Shook of the WSP. The highway was blocked for an hour and a half and traffic was detoured through Riverside. Jacklin-Quiroga was charged with Failure to Yield the Right of Way, according to Shook’s incident report.

HEALTH CARE

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NOVEMBER 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Comeback propels Tonasket to State Victory earns first state tourney berth since 2005 trip to Tacoma Dome

Tonasket takes on seasoned Cards TONASKET (6-4) VS. W-P (7-3) Friday, Nov. 14, 7:00 p.m. Location: Chiawana High, Pasco

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

WARDEN - Warden’s speedy Orlando Alba was tackled as the final seconds ticked off the clock, and Tonasket’s football team began to celebrate its victory over the Cougars that would propel the Tigers to the state tournament... Not so fast. A flag on the final play for a facemask penalty gave Warden 15 more yards, to midfield, and forced the Tigers to end their celebration and hold on for one more play. “That was a scary moment,” said twoway lineman Chad Edwards, a key part of the offensive and defensive lines that have spearheaded the Tigers’ first playoff run in seven seasons, and its first state tournament berth since the 2005 trip to the state finals. “It was, ‘Oh no, they get another chance. There’s no time left; anything could happen.’ “As a defensive end I could get pressure on the quarterback, but once the ball was in the air, all I could do was watch. Definitely a scary moment.” The Cougar miracle wasn’t meant to be, and the Tigers again celebrated, this time for real, a riveting 40-35 victory at Warden that propelled Tonasket to a state tournament round-of-16 matchup with Waitsburg-Prescott. That game will be played this Friday at 7:00 p.m. at Chiawana High School in Pasco. “It’s great to be back to State,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “We’ve had some really tough years, but the kids are really what do it for me. They just keep plugging away, and to experience this with them is just great. “I could care less where we play. They could move it to Bellingham if they wanted and we’d go.” Isaiah Yaussy-Albright’s 1-yard plunge with eight seconds to play capped the Tigers’ own last gasp drive in the final minutes to overcome a 35-34 deficit. The drive was set up by a defensive stop that kept Warden from running out the clock but left the Tigers 60 yards from victory. The Cougars had fourth and less than a yard to go, but Jesse Ramon stopped Warden quarterback Jerry Reyes short of the first down. “Jesse made just a huge play,” Hawkins said. “Without that, we’re in a lot of trouble.” With under five minutes to play the Tigers’ run-oriented offense chewed up both yardage and the clock as it made its way down field. Jorge Juarez made one of the game’s critical plays when he broke several tackles to gain a first down on a 4th-and-7 run.

Waitsburg-Prescott Cardinals WP 42 at McLoughlin, OR WP 42 White Swan WP 46 Orofino, ID WP 7 at Heppner, OR WP 38 Kiona-Benton WP 26 at Burbank WP 45 Tri Cities Prep WP 31 DeSales WP 21 at Asotin WP 62 Liberty

20 18 48 45 26 23 28 6 24 24

W W L L W W W W L W

Tonasket Tigers TON 35 Warden TON 37 at Lk Roosevelt TON 41 at Liberty Bell TON 15 Brewster TON 55 at Bridgeport TON 46 Oroville TOn 48 at Manson TON 20 Okanogan TON 7 Omak TON 40 at Warden

39 6 6 35 20 20 6 35 19 35

L W W L W W W L L W

PASCO - One area Tonasket will not have the advantage in Friday’s matchup with Waitsburg-Prescott: playoff experience. The Cardinals are making their sixth straight trip to state, their fourth as the W-P cooperative after two in a row as Waitsburg High.

Above, Jesse Ramon (43) tries to get a handle on Warden’s Trey Kilmer during the Tigers’ 40-35 district playoff victory on Friday, Nov. 7. Ramon made a big fourth down stop to set up Tonasket’s game-winning drive late in the fourth quarter. Left, Jorge Juarez (28) scored a touchdown and made a critical fourth down run that keyed the Tigers final, game-winning drive, while Isaiah Yaussy-Albright (24) scored four touchdowns and passed for another on a halfback option play.

And they’ve had success: a state championship in 2011 and two runner-up finishes. This year’s team doesn’t appear to be quite at that same level as they’ve run to a 7-3 record after last Friday’s 62-24 crossover victory over Liberty. The centerpiece of an offense that can do damage both on the ground and through the air is quarterback Jacob Dunn. He often throws the ball 20-25 times for 250-300 yards. Against Liberty he needed only seven completions to rack up 270 yards and three touchdowns. Chance Leroue was a big-play tight end/linebacker when the Cardinals played Oroville two years ago; he is still wreaking havoc today on both sides of the ball. He’s both a threat rushing the ball out of the backfield and as a receiver. Luke Alexenko has also proven to be a big play receiver.

Terry Mills/submitted photos

“That was a great, great run,” Hawkins said. “He got hit after about five yards and just dragged guys the rest of the way. He would not go down.” “It was one of those things where we’ve practiced those scenarios where we have to score to win the game,” Edwards said. “I just kept trying to think, it’s not a huge game, it’s just practice, nothing crazy. It was all slow motion - every play was a

long moment, not just six seconds. But each play was something special.” With time running down, the Tigers pushed the ball inside the five yard line. “We were one play away from having to try a field goal,” Hawkins said. “But we were down to our backup kicker (due to injury), so scoring the touchdown worked out well for us.” Albright finished with 232 yards rush-

ing on 27 carries, but none were bigger than the last yard, following Edwards block, that gave the Tigers the lead. “We ran a dive right to my spot and it worked out pretty well,” Edwards said. “We punched it in; that’s history, I guess.” The final drive capped a fourth quarter comeback from a 35-26 deficit. The

SEE TONASKET | PG B2

W-P did have its issues with its passing game in a loss to Asotin a couple of weeks ago For the Tigers there will be two keys: finding a way to slow down the Cardinals’ passing game, and continuing the dominance of their offensive line. Long, grinding drives that end in scores will be the Tigers’ best chance at pulling off an upset against a seasoned playoff squad.

Hornets go down, but not without a battle Oroville proves to be a dangerous underdog in 8-point loss BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

WHITE SWAN - The underdog Oroville football team had a few surprises up its sleeve when it took on White Swan last Friday in a district state-qualifying football contest. Despite entering the playoffs as the fourth and final team from the CWL North Division, and playing the South Division champion Cougars, the Hornets came tantalizingly close to pulling off the upset in a season-ending 28-20 loss. The Hornets stayed in the running until the final minutes, when they could not stop White Swan’s rushing attack as the Cougars ran out the clock following a failed Oroville onside kick attempt. That proved to be a major issue all night as White Swan held a 374 to minus-5 yard edge in rushing over the Hornets. “Our kids put up a good battle,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson. “But we were just outmuscled up front.” The Hornets never managed to stop White Swan’s rushing attack, but after giving up several big plays in the first half were able to slow it down somewhat. The Cougars bunched all 11 players within 10 yards of the ball on most plays, with no receivers split wide, and dared the smaller Hornets to stop them. Most plays that meant just plowing forward up the middle for five or six yards. Giovanni Rojas, as big as some

of the White Swan linemen, broke loose for a 39-run early in teh first quarter, and Brian Walker had a 35-yard run that helped set up is 8-yard run later in the opening frame. A 27-yard pass play set up Walker’s second touchdown of the first half. Walker finished with 171 yards on 30 carries and Rojas had added another 143 yards on 16 carries. The Hornets stayed in the game, though, thanks to a passing attack that evolved significantly over the course of the season. Nathan Hugus connected with Andrew Mieirs for a 62-yard touchdown pass in the first quarter and with Brian Wise for an 18-yard strike in the second as the Hornets were within 22-12 at the half. “I’m just so pleased with how Hugus has come along,” Hutchinson said of his sophomore quarterback. “Talking to (White Swan coach) Andy Bush, I’ve known him a long time and really respect him, and he was saying that coming into the game the one thing they were certain of was that we couldn’t throw the ball,” Hutchinson said. “He was extremely complimentary of how much Nathan grew during the season.” The Hornets had one last chance to score before the half after Joe Sarmiento picked off a White Swan pass. Oroville had 30 seconds and only one time out to try to go 80 yards. Hugus hit Lane Tietje for a 40-yard gain and Dustin Nigg for 15 more before throwing an interception on the final play of the half. The Hornets also had a golden opportunity for another score in the second quarter after White Swan failed on a fake punt attempt from its own 20.

Left, Cody Tibbs (52) tries to bring down White Swan running back Giovanni Rojas in the first half of last Friday’s playoff loss to the Cougars. Above, Lane Tietje had 79 receiving yards in his final football game as a Hornet. Brent Baker/staff photos

Two running plays went nowhere and two incompletions ended that opportunity. “We should have scored there,” Hutchinson said. “We needed to score there. I think we made the right play calls there but didn’t quite execute them the way we needed.” White Swan seemed poised to run away with the game after

intercepting Hugus twice in the third quarter. Hutchinson faulted himself for the picks. “We’ve got a bunch of sophomores playing and they were telling us what was going on out there but we didn’t always listen very well to what it was they were really saying,” he said. “That’s just bad coaching on my part. “At the end of the half we knew

they were doubling up Dustin so we told Nathan to look more for the underneath routes,” Hutchinson explained. “So when he switched a play up and had Dustin running the underneath route, we could see what was coming from the moment the ball was snapped. The White Swan kid (Ki Castilleja) jumped the route and made a nice play. The

idea was to look for Wise and Tietje, but we didn’t make that very clear and with a young team you get those kinds of things happening.” The first interception set up a 2-yard Rojas run at the end of a six minute drive. And while the Cougars never scored again, the

SEE HORNETS | PG B2


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 13, 2014

SPORTS Swanson, Terris lead Tigers at state cross country meet Boys take 12th, girls place 7th in Pasco BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

PASCO - For some, nothing short of winning the state cross country championship would make for a good day at Sun Willows Golf Course in Pasco. For others, the experience of being there and proving you belonged in the state’s top class of cross country runners was a more realistic goal. The Tonasket cross country team was in the latter group after garnering their first team state qualification in several years. The boys finished 12th out of 16 full teams, while the girls finished seventh out of eight. “We had a great day,� said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “They were seom very competitive races.� Two male and two female Tigers each recorded personal bests in their biggest races of the year. Johnna Terris led the girls with a 30th place finish with a 29 second PR of 21:29, while Hunter Swanson had a 22 second PR (17:25) to finish 26th. Swanson had hoped to crack into the medals (top 16) but overall was pleased with his run. “I just wanted to prove to myself and to my team that I earned my way here,� Swanson said. “I started off trying to stick with Spencer Reiss (Republic, who finished 19th in 17:13), but when he picked it up I was afraid I was going to die off.� Swanson and Terris both had run at the previous week’s regionals after getting off a plane from Kentucky the night before, where they’d competed at the FFA national convention (see page B8). “It was good to get more practices in this week,� Swanson said. “I got more sleep, that’s for sure.� Terris wasn’t sure where she would place but was determined to run her best race. “I just wanted to push as hard as I could,� she said. “I felt more prepared (than last week) coming into this. It felt good just to get out and run. It was a good experience and a lot of fun.� Also running for the girls were Jenna Valentine (36th, 22:01), Katie Henneman (37th, 22:06), Camille Wilson (39th, 22:11), Baillie Hirst (26:18, a 75 second PR) and Hayley Larson (62nd, 26:29). “Hayley showed a lot of heart while running hurt for her team,� Thornton said. “The other girls also ran well and all gained the great experience of running int he state meet. We’re already looking forward to being here again next year.� Bryden Hires ran a 21 second PR to finish 87th in 19:12. Also running were Adrian McCarthy (89th, 19:19), Abe Podkranic (98th, 19:41), Smith Condon (105th, 19:59), Rade Pilkinton (108th, 20:28) and Justin McDonald (109th, 20:29). “Hunter was impressive in running his best race,� Thornton said. “The experience everyone gained this year is going to be a big help in getting us back to State next year.� “I’m definitely feeling pretty motivat-

Clockwise from above, Jenna Valentine (front) and Katie Henneman outrace opponents in the final kick to the finish line at the state 2B cross country championships on Saturday in Pasco; Johnna Terris finished 30th to lead the Tonasket girls cross country team; Hunter Swanson’s 26th place finish led the boys team. Both Terris and Swanson cut significant time off their career bests in the biggest meet of the season; Tonasket cross country coaches Chad Portwood (left) and Bob Thornton do some studying between races at Saturday’s state meet. Brent Baker/staff photos

ed, looking at next year,� Swanson said. “I can’t wait to get back,� Terris said. “Plus we’ll be adding (current middle schooler) Kaylee Bobadilla, and she’s already really good.� The boys overall race had plenty of drama as the two Northwest Christian

schools - Lacey and Colbert - tied atop the leaderboard with 52 team points apiece. NWC won the state title by virtue of its sixth runner finishing five spots in front of Colbert’s. Chandler Teigen of Asotin defended his state title with a run of 15:41.

TONASKET | FROM B1 Tigers at one point held a 26-14 lead, but two things not characteristic of this team - penalties and turnovers - aided Warden as the Cougars scored 21 straight points in the second and third quarters. An interception with under two minutes left in the half led to a Warden score that put the Tigers down 28-26. That was a tough way to go in at the half,� Hawkins said. The Tigers turned the ball over after starting off with a solid drive in third quarter after Juarez was ruled to have fumbled in the middle of a scrum pile. “The whistle blew and the Warden kid came out of it,� Hawkins said. “I didn’t see what

Liberty Bell finished on the medal podium with a fourth place finish, beating out fifth place Republic. Ben Klemmeck finished fourth for the Mountain Lions (16:33.93), with Republic’s Duncan Forsman (7th, 16:46.82) and Bridgeport’s Oren Cox (7th, 16:45.53) joining him on

the individual medal stand among other area runners. Northwest Christian (Lacey) also won the girls state title, edging St. George’s by four points. Shania Graham of Republic finished sixth in 19:29.39 as the only area girls runner to reach the podium.

HORNETS | FROM B1

happened, but there was a lot of weird stuff like that all game. Lots of penalties that hurt both teams.� The Tigers took control early as Albright hit Elias Abrego with a 37-yard touchdown pass on a halfbak option play that caught Warden off-guard. Albright scored the first of his four rushing touchdowns on a 1-yard run later in the quarter, but Warden cut it to 14-7 heading to the second. The Tigers had rushing touchdowns of 4 yards from Albright and 6 yards by Juarez in building their 12-point lead before Warden came back to score three straight touchdowns. Albright’s third touchdown and a 2-point run by Colton Leep

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cut Warden’s lead to 35-34 early in the fourth quarter. Juarez finished with 125 yards rushing on 12 carries and Leep completed 2-of-6 passes for 29 yards. “This was definitely in the top 10, maybe the top five,� Hawkins said of the wild finish. “I can’t think of a time when we scored a touchdown in the last eight seconds to win a game. “Hard to beat that when it sends you to State.�

Hornets didn’t see much of the ball until late in the game. A White Swan punt for minusone yard set the Hornets up for a 44-yard drive - most of which consisted of Hugus’ 38-yard swing pass to Nigg for a touchdown with 2:32 left in the game. Hugus and Nigg connected again on the 2-point conversion to make it a one-possession game. That possession never game as White Swan recovered the Hornets’ onside kick attempt and

2

ran out the clock. Hugus finished 11-of-27 passing for 239 yards and three touchdowns. Tietje caught five passes for 79 yards, Nigg had three catches for 75 yards and Mieirs had the one 63-yard touchdown grab. Hutchinson said nose tackle Logan Mills, a potential key to stopping the Cougar rushing attack, was at far from 100 percent after spending most of the previous two weeks sick. “He missed the previous

game and still wasn’t real well,� Hutchinson said. “We really asked too much of him given how he was feeling. Losing (running back) Caleb Mills (injured the previous week)really hurt us back there too.� The Hornets finish the season at 3-7 overall, but Hutchinson said that despite some significant graduation losses, the overall youth of the team has him looking forward to the next couple of years.

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NOVEMBER 13, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS Tigers split district matches, head to Adna BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

WENATCHEE - Okanogan brought its “A” game to Saturday’s Class B Tri-District 5/6/7 championship game. Tonasket did not, and the result was a 4-0 victory for the Bulldogs that earned Okanogan the district title trophy and a top seed into the state tournament, which begins this Friday. The Tigers, with the loss, will have to hit the road for their state quarterfinal game against Adna, which will be played Saturday in Centralia. “We just came out slow,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. We weren’t feeling it. Our passing wasn’t sharp; we didn’t play the long ball like we usually do.” The teams traded scoring opportunities through the first 20 minutes. Okanogan put a pair of shots just wide of the Tonasket goal, while Ashlynn Willis and Jaden Vugteveen each narrowly missed in the same manner. Okanogan’s Emmy Engle opened the scoring midway through the half with a long shot over the top to the back post. The Tigers narrowly missed on a free kick opportunity moments later, but from there, the Bulldogs took control of the game. Jill Townsend scored off a corner kick with 10 minutes left in the half to put the Tigers in a 2-0 hole. Facing that kind of deficit, as well as the threat of Okanogan pulling their defense back to protect the lead, Collins shuffled his lineup in an attempt to ignite the Tigers’ attack. The few shots of the Tigers got off in the middle 40 minutes of the contest were snuffed out by some stellar goalkeeping by the Bulldogs’ Cameron Moses. Townsend assisted on a cross to Katherine Stone to make it 3-0 moments after the second half started. A fourth goal that hit the crossbar would not have withstood instant replay if high school rules

State Quarterfinal Matchup TONASKET (16-3) VS. ADNA (15-2-1) Saturday, Nov. 15, 12:00 p.m. Location: Centralia High School Goals Scored: Tonasket 67 (19 games); Adna 72 (18 games) Goals Allowed: Tonasket 22, Adna 13 Adna, from just outside of Chehalis (south of Olympia), is no stranger to the state tournament. The Tigers will take on the Pirates, a third year program which last year advanced to the state final four before losing a pair of one-goal games. Liberty Bell beat the Pirates 1-0 to claim the third place trophy last year. Adna finished last year 10-8 but this year has improved its record considerably. Midfielder Kendra Stadjhuar and forward Regyn Gaffney are two of the main cogs of an offense that has averaged more than four goals a game. Goalkeeper Ashley Pardue has allowed fewer than one goal per game. Adna won a three-way battle with Napavine and Life Christian Acadamy for the Central 2B League title. The Pirates’ two losses both came to Life Christian, but they bounced back to avenge those defeats with a 1-0 victory on Saturday. allowed for goal line camera technology; as it was, it didn’t really matter. “Nothing the referees did made it 4-0,” Collins said. “That was just how we played. We spent a lot of time standing around, watching the other team pass the ball.” He pointed out defender Myra Gaytan, icing her ankle after the game. “Myra can barely walk out of here, but she was hustling out there pretty much on one leg,” he said. “We needed everyone playing like that. “Hopefully we get our energy back, or whatever it was, next week.”

TONASKET 2, BREWSTER 1 TONASKET - The playoffs are a brand new season, and the Tigers found out quickly that there is nothing guaranteed, even against a team they swept during regular season play. The Tigers dominated play for much of the contest but needed Jaden Vugteveen’s goal with about eight minutes to play to edge Brewster 2-1 in Tuesday’s district semifinal, clinching Saturday’s championship berth.

The Tigers outshot Brewster 25-3 in the first half but the teams entered the break tied at 0-0 as many shots skirted just wide and high. “It was so frustrating,” Collins said. “We had so many shots, but we didn’t put very many of them on goal, and when we did they made some nice saves.” Early in the second half, things got more than frustrating as Brewster punched in the game’s opening goal. The Tigers, caught flat-footed, took awhile to mount much offense. But that changed after Ashlynn Willis tied the score about 15 minutes later. The domination, at least in terms of possession, resumed. “Once we tied it,” Collins said, “you could feel our energy pick up again.” Vugteveen has scored a number of goals this season from about 25 yard range, just off the corner of the box. Jensen Sackman battled for the ball along the sideline, touched it Vugteveen’s way. Vugteveen launched a low liner that took a tricky hop just in front of the Brewster keeper and slipped just inside the right post

Above, Jaden Vugteveen launches her gamewinning shot against Brewster in last Tuesday’s district semifinal, won by Tonasket 2-1. Left, the Tigers’ Jensen Sackman tangles with Okanogan’s Megan Patrick during Saturday’s district championship loss to the Bulldogs. Both teams will move on to the state tournament this weekend.

Brent Baker/staff photos

glanced off the Tonasket post with about three minutes left. “I thought that was going in,” Collins said. “But the post is a keeper’s best friend.”

for what proved to be the winning score. The Tigers held a 32-6 shooting edge for the game. One of those Brewster shots

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 13, 2014

SCHOOLS

Silver linings Tonasket FFA forced to recalibrate expectations BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

LOUISVILLE, KY - When the expectation is to win a national title, the best you can do is meet them. The Tonasket FFA Rituals team found out that sometimes, that isn’t going to work out. Adjusting those expectations helped the group of seven Tonasket High School sophomores gain more from their trip to the FFA national convention than they had expected. It wasn’t that the team performed poorly. Their silver medal meant that they placed in a tier between seventh and 15th in the nation (only the top six get actual rankings). But what would have been cause for wild celebration the first time Tonasket had a team make a national convention experience was more difficult to swallow. Seth Smith, Bonnie Siegfried, Johnna Terris, Hunter Swanson, Serenity Poletti, Brendan Asmussen and Lexi Wahl said they enjoyed the experience, but are already working toward winning a state title in Parliamentary Procedure (Rituals is the freshman level of parli pro) and making a return trip. “It was disappointing for sure,” said FFA adviser Matt Deebach. “But it shows the kids how difficult it really is. “I was in a seminar to become an accredited parliamentarian, so I took a four hour test while I was there too. There were 14 teachers in there and I was the only one with any national placers. So when you think about what the expectations were and what we’ve accomplished, it just doesn’t happen very often where you get to place in the nation.” “We learned that just because we went down there to compete, there are consequences for not maybe doing everything we could have,” Siegfried said. “We studied hard but looking back could have studied harder. No matter how confident we are, we can still always find someone better than us. That just gives us more room to grow. “We were (upset) about it but we grew together and got over it. We became closer, and were happy we went together.” Deebach said the toughest feeling for all of them to process was the thought that they may have let people in the community down by not matching the finish of previous teams. “I know by the emotions they felt and everything else, they were really invested,” he said. “They didn’t want to let the community down, the school down. When they didn’t make the finals, that happened even though the kids had worked hard and really wanted to accomplish their goal. Sometimes that’s a good lesson in life; sometimes you have to recalibrate your goal when things don’t work out. “I hope everyone in the chapter learned that there is some little school somewhere that is doing everything they can because they want to accomplish their goals too. It’s hard to be on top and keep being on top.” The week at the national convention was about more than just the competition. The Tonasket crew spent time at a lot of unique area attractions, including the Indianapolis 500 Speedway, the Louisville Slugger baseball bat museum, Mammoth Caves, Shadwell Farm, and more. “It was wonderful,” Terris said. “We went to a bunch of different spots. I think my favorite was the Louisville Slugger museum. AS far as the competition, we met a whole bunch of new people. We unfortunately didn’t get to see how other people did it because we were the last ones to go in our flight. We weren’t able to see the variations, which was sad.” Meeting people from different parts of the country was a highlight for the whole team. “The experience itself was great, especially meeting new people,” Smith said. “Not many people get to compete at the national level and fly to Kentucky for a week with their friends. I think it was a great experience.” “They opened things up so you could go around and talked to the other (FFA competitors),” Asmussen said. “We hung out with pretty much everyone but the people in the first couple

Submitted photo

Above left, the Tonasket FFA Rituals team (plus Washington State Star Agribusiness winner John Symonds, far right) toured a number of tourist attractions during their trip to the FFA national convention last week. Left, Serenity Poletti, Lexi Wahl, Brendan Asmussen, adviser Matt Deebach, Hunter Swanson, Johnna Terris, Seth Smith and Bonnie Siegfried earned silver medal honors in Rituals; above, the FFA group kisses the bricks at the Indianpolis Speedway; top right, Wahl and Smith make a point.

flights.” “I really liked meeting all those different people from different states,” Siegfried said. “All the accents, they were fun. They taught me how to say ‘Louisiana’ the way they do. “And Shadwell Farm was my favorite place to visit. It’s a breeding facility for retired race horses. Their stud fees were up to $8 or 10 million.” “I liked Mammoth Caves,” Wahl said. “It’s the biggest underground cave in the world, and we got to go inside of it. That was really cool. “That and Joe’s Crab Shack (which catered especially to the 60,000 attendees).” They even had an experience no one had bargained for: while touring the Indy 500 track, someone broke into the team van and stole a number of items. It turned out to be the beginning of a car theft epidemic as 11 other vans also were broken into during the week. “Deebach warned us that we were going to be in the big city and we needed to be careful with our things,” Poletti said. “We were thinking nothing would happen but then at the Indy 500, all our stuff got stolen out of our van.” The team also said that the squad the most feared, California (which ended up winning its third consecutive national title) turned out to be composed of kids that they liked. “The people who thought of as our biggest competition,

California, were really nice,” Poletti said. “It was sad we didn’t make it to the finals, but we got to see what the national level was like.” California and national runner-up Texas were in Tonasket’s flight, making the competition tough from the get-go. “We got a little unlucky with our flight,” Deebach said. “I don’t know if we would have gotten through (in another flight), because we did make some mistakes. It might have been close, but you have to beat you’ve got to beat. “The kids were a little intimidated by them. Yet Washington has been doing well the past few years and other teams were intimidated by us a little bit too.” In the end, it became about more than just winning a very difficult competition. We went in focused on winning,” Smith said. “After the competition we realized we were there to experience it, all not just win.” “The kids were (floored) about the support from the FFA alumni, local business and community members,” Deebach said. “They were going to send us back to Kentucky and we were going to represent them. The let down wasn’t just for themselves, but what would people think that supported them. Even I felt that a little bit for the first time, too. “But taking a step back and looking at it, it really was an accomplishment, it was good. Our own expectations were the thing that made it hard.”

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PAGE B5

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(MS) -- Before the holidays bring family celebrations and visiting friends to your home, give your home a new look and improve its comfort level. Check out the suggestions below, make your project list, and then go to Woodcraft for the tools and accessories to get the job done. Put safety first, before you begin your first project, make sure you have eye, ear and breathing protection available and then follow the manufacturer’s directions for all the tools and products you use. Have a first-aid kit and a phone handy, and enlist help for the heavy-duty work.� Entrance, Windows & Floors -- Give your entrance an easy update with a new door or add color and new hardware to your existing one. Install new windows that are attractive, reduce heating and cooling costs, and are easy to maintain. And consider installing a hardwood floor in at least one of your rooms -- pos-

Ready your lawn for winter Though spring and summer are often seen as the primary seasons for lawn care, fall is a great time to ready a lawn for winter weather. The following tips can help a lawn withstand winter weather and might even make spring lawn care that much easier once the warm weather returns. * Fertilize. Fertilizing in the fall actually helps the lawn

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come the early spring. Nutrients remain in the soil throughout the winter months, and the lawn will utilize those nutrients once the snow melts and the sun and warmer weather return. * Aerate. Lawns typically become compacted by late summer, making it difficult for the grass to thrive. When fall arrives, aerating the lawn can relieve that compaction by removing plugs or cores of soil from the lawn. Once a law is aerated, the grass roots can spread out and thicken the lawn. It’s good to aerate in the fall when grass roots grow. * Edge the property. Homeowners who live in areas that experience heavy snowfall in

the winter might want to edge their lawns in the fall. Edging can eliminate the risk of damaging grass that hangs over curbs and sidewalks when shoveling snow. What’s more, an edged lawn adds aesthetic appeal to the property. * Seed. Fall can be a great time to seed a lawn as well. Overseeding a warm season lawn in the fall can help a lawn resist diseases throughout the winter. * Rake the leaves promptly. Don’t allow leaves to accumulate on the grass before finally dusting off the rake. If you allow leaves to sit on the lawn too long, they can smother the grass. Don’t allow leaves to reach ankle length.

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brighten your “home cafe.� If your cabinets have seen better days, install new ones -either store-bought or ones you build. For a wood table and chairs, consider using a stain or topcoat to enhance the wood’s appearance or to match the color of your cabinets. Shelving & Lighting -- Adding shelving anywhere you have unused space (bedroom/ bathroom closets) will help control clutter and provide display space for your favorite photos and collectibles in living room, family room, and kitchen. Enhance cabinets and furniture with new decorative LED lighting. Living/Family Room -- Arranging furniture into “areas� will allow for varied activities simultaneously, such as conversation and watching events on television or playing games. Use plants, a bookcase or a divider to separate areas. Paint walls, hang pictures or stain wood furniture to add color.

Reducing ambient noise in the home Reducing the sound level in a home benefits every member of the family. Whether it’s a baby’s cries, a teen’s music, or a loud TV after the kids’ bedtime, unwanted noise in the home is like an invasion of privacy that can make a person crazy. By using panels, drapes, or blinds covered with soundproofing materials, it is possible to eradicate or lessen noise from both inside and outside the home without too much work. Acoustic panels are a good choice for soundproofing a room in a house or apartment. They are easy to install in all types of spaces, particularly on walls adjoining other rooms and on the ceiling. Available in square or rectangular tiles of different sizes, these panels are installed on rails that can be positioned in a variety of ways, depending on the surface to be covered. Acoustic blinds may also be a solution. These can be installed in patio doors and windows and are very useful in reducing the sound of traffic if you live in a city or if you are a shift worker and sleep during the day. These blinds reflect sound, muffle noise and filter light. Some acoustic fabrics are available that can be stretched or glued on walls. These textiles are made from sound-absorbing foam, which is very malleable and suitable for rooms with curves or complicated angles. Before gluing this flexible covering, ensure that the surface of the wall or partition is perfectly smooth and clean, and be sure to allow for wall fixtures, such as outlets and light switches.


PAGE B6

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Okanogan, Brewster & Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem

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7. Guts

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37. Peacock tail marking

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13. At no time, poetically

41. Blanched

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23. Jawbones

44. Flowering

25. Zen enlightenment

45. Covet

27. Hasenpfeffer, e.g.

47. Biases

28. Georgetown athlete

48. “Out of the question” (contraction)

29. Corrective

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64. Eye affliction 65. Cold shower? 66. Bolted

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Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

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PAGE B8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 13, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE North Valley Hospital preps for Ebola SUBMITTED BY TERRI ORFORD NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT

TONASKET - With the arrival of Ebola Viral Disease to the United States, North Valley Hospital District is responding quickly with a mandatory education and training session for our nearly 230 member staff. Although the chance of Ebola reaching Okanogan County is unlikely, we feel that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very important to circumvent the problems that the Texas hospital incurred with staff being unprepared to handle patients with Ebola and want to mitigate any risk there may be to our staff and community. North Valley Hospital is in constant contact with the Okanogan County Public Health Department who have been in regular communication with and receiving updates from the CDC. While this situation requires extensive preparation, there is no reason to believe that there will be widespread Ebola transmission in the United States. Here are some of the ways that NVHD is preparing for the Ebola Viral Disease: â&#x20AC;˘ Coordination and regular communication with the County Public Health Department and ongoing preparations â&#x20AC;˘ Coordination with local primary care physicians â&#x20AC;˘ Training with our intake staff on triage and screening to ensure any individual presenting with symptoms that are similar to Ebola are properly screened â&#x20AC;˘ Staff training of the proper use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) â&#x20AC;˘ We have an on-site Infection Preventionist Nurse (Marcia Naillon, RN) who is knowledgeable and dedicated to ensuring the safety of our staff and community â&#x20AC;˘ We have a committee comprised of our CEO, Lab Manager, Director of Nursing, Infection Preventionist and Safety Officer meeting frequently to ensure our facility is prepared.

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Thank you, 7th District!

North Valley Hospital/submitted photo

While Ebola is not at this point anticipated to reach Okanogan County, North Valley Hospital District has been taking steps to make certain its staff is prepared should the need arise. Ebola is not being spread from person to person in the United States and it is not likely in the future. The strong infrastructure of our Public Health and Health Care System in the U.S. is highly qualified to stop the transmission of Ebola, just as it stops the transmission of many other

It is my honor to serve you in Olympia.

communicable diseases. We are absolutely confident that Ebola will not spread as it has in West Africa because of our sophisticated health care system and we want our community to know that we are working closely with our regional health care system to be prepared.

Paid for by the Committee to Elect Joel Kretz 114 Toroda Creek Road, Wauconda, WA 98859

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 13, 2014  

November 13, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 13, 2014  

November 13, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune