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Tonasket Cross Country,

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Soccer Qualify for State

CCC of Tonasket Friday, Nov. 7, 6:30 p.m.

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Concerns addressed

CHANGING OF THE GUARD

Tonasket adopts resolution after Scott Miller visit BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket city council member Scott Olson had had questions about Okanogan County’s Emergency Management Plan that he wanted answered before the city signed off on a resolution that would include Tonasket as part of the plan. That was in early September; Emergency Management’s Homeland Security Coordinator, Scott Miller, addressed Olson’s concerns at the Tuesday, Oct. 28, city council meeting to the point where it was Olson who himself moved to approve the resolution that declared the city’s adoption of the county’s multi-hazard mitigation plan, which included a terrorism and civil unrest mitigation plan. Miller, who characterized himself as the “Darth Vader of Emergency Management,” said that the plan dealt with preparation, response, recovery and mitigation. The recovery phase, which he said characterized the current status of last summer’s Carlton Complex firestorm disaster, he said could be spelled “FEMA and paperwork.” “The key here is that every political jurisdiction ... is required to have an emergency management function,” he said. “It’s law ... You have two options. You can do it by yourself, or you can join everybody else... We have 13 cities in the county. We have a joint local organization.” The cities pay in proportion to their population relative to that of the entire county. Tonasket, at 2.46 percent of the county population, paid $2,943 for the service last year; Oroville paid $5,256 and Omak paid nearly $15,000, he said. Miller went through a list of about 25 state requirements that every political jurisdiction must meet to be legally prepared for a disaster. “The good news is,” Miller said, “with a couple of exceptions, we do everything on this list for you. We are in compliance; you don’t have to do them yourself.” Miller covered more specifics, and related them to how the county responded to the fire disaster, from which he himself is still physically recovering. The city has been part of the joint local organization since 1997, Miller said. “My concern,” Olson said, “has to do with mitigation. What happened during the fire ... great, that’s good. Even in the (plan), it mentions a bunch of hazards we know about. What are we doing about

Above, Clay Warnstaff, outgoing Oroville Police Chief, is among those to congratulate incoming chief, Todd Hill, after he is sworn in by City Clerk Kathy Jones last Friday, Oct. 31. Hill was selected as chief by Mayor Chuck Spieth (also pictured) and approved by the council. Right, Jones swears in new City Clerk/Treasurer JoAnn Denney as one of her last official acts as clerk after 40 years with the City of Oroville. The two were dressed up for Halloween, a long running tradition for the staff at City Hall. The staff used the occasion to throw Jones a retirement party as well. Clerk Jones and Chief Warnstaff each chose Oct. 31 as their last days with the city. Gary DeVon/staff photos

them?” “That’s up to you,” Miller said. “It comes down to, who wants to do something about these things, and is there money for it.” “What I hear,” Olson said later, “you take care when there’s an emergency and you rush in. What I want is, you look at what could happen, let you know what can be done to mitigate it. I’m not hearing that being spoken at planning, told to the county commissioners. I just see the list of problems; what can we do?” He cited, as examples, the vulnerability of the city in the event the Janis Bridge and/or Fourth Street bridge were damaged. “Is there a cache of food? Like if there were an earthquake that cut us off from our food supply?” Miller said that the hurdles to apply for the kind of money it would take to get funding for that kind of mitigation involved competing with jurisdictions of all sizes nationwide. “The system is necessarily intimidating,” Miller said. “Right now we have an advantage because of the fire. So for generators, or fixing the tanks by Pateros, they score all these as a competitive process, and they’ll give it to us because of the fire. But Richland (for example) could also apply for those funds.” “My concern ... I just wish there was more ‘plan’ to the plan,” Olson said. “Not so much how we’ll react. I want things to be in place and ready.” Miller also discussed Olson’s concerns about the city ceding control during an emergency situation. “First of all, you need to understand (Incident Command),” Miller said. “Part of that training for the IC, is seeing you’re not in trouble yet, but in two hours you’ll be in over your head. You get on the phone and call the county. “We only come when we’re called. The county does not show up and say, ‘Get out of the way, we’re taking charge.’ We’ll come and ask how we can help.” Miller added that, as part of the organization, the city would not be charged for response to a specific event. He also said that, due to the magnitude of the 2014 disaster, funds had been depleted and the the rate would be going up to help replenish those funds. Miller also asked if the city felt it could fulfill all of the state requirements and provide the Emergency Management services at the cost that the city pays for its membership in the coalition. Near the end of the meeting, it was

SEE EMERGENCY | PG A3

Enrollment up at Oroville schools Students transforming into zombies

STAFF REPORTS At the meeting the board heard reports from the principals, as well as superintendent, before passing a lengthy number

BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – The Oroville School District, which receives basic education monies from the state based on the number of students enrolled, had good news at the Oct. 27 board meeting: the numbers are up. District Business Manager Shay Shaw said the number of FTEs, Full Time Equivalents, had risen. “We actually went up 12 kids from September to October. That’s almost 27 students over budget,” she said. At the end of each year the school board budgets based on their best guess for how many students will be enrolled in the upcoming year. Traditionally the school directors estimate on the conservative side. By doing so, when the numbers are higher, the district gets more funds than budgeted for. If the numbers fall short, then the board needs to look at cuts.

“We actually went up 12 students from September to October. That’ almost 27 students over budget” Shay Shaw, Businss Manager Oroville School District

of motions by consent. Elementary Principal Joan Hoehn gave her report first. She said Lisa Lindsay from the Okanogan Wildlife League, or OWL, came by and gave a presentation. “That was great,” she said. “We also had students from the pre-school and Life Skills classes go to the Pumpkin Patch on the twentieth. The kindergartners went the next day.” Principal Hoehn said November is Disability Month. “The fourth, fifth and sixth grades are

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 45

doing activities in the gym, doing during PE, to see what it would be like to have a disability.... like being in a wheelchair. Some of the sixth graders have been making positive posters for the walls,” she said. She also gave an update on the Principal’s Challenge, a contest where the students try to read a set number of books and get rewards based on reaching goals. “We are a little behind where we would normally be at this point because we started sooner. We usually do it in February and by then the kindergartners know how to read,” she said. “As of Friday we had 4558 books read, which is about 1141 below goal.” The kids have reached three of their goals so far. One reward included building log cabins out pretzels covered in chocolate. Another is to have a “mountain man” come by. “Some of the kids have been kind of scared for me to be outside (as part of the reward). The say they are scared of the cougar. One kid said he wouldn’t read any more cause he didn’t want me to be

SEE ENROLLMENT | PG A3

Gary DeVon/staff photo

An Oroville High School student is zombiefied in the Zombie Transformation room as part of “Zombie Apocalypse Day.” The learning event took place on Halloween and was sponsored by Central Washington University and Gear Up.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Cops & Courts A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Obituaries Sports Veterans Day

A8 B1-3 B4-5

Classifieds Real Estate Local News

B6-7 B7 B8


All out for Oroville Hallowen

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 6, 2014

Orovillians went all out for last Friday’s Halloween with businesses participating in the Trick or Treat and in the costume and decoration contests sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. Clockwise from left, The Oroville School District office took Best Costumes with their Alice and Wonderland themed attire and Superintendent Steve “Mad Hatter” Quick took a Best Individual Costume award. Kids were encouraged to dress up (even as Legos) and Trick or Treat the local businesses and at one point the sidewalks were filled with costumed kids going door to door. Oroville City Hall said goodbye to Clerk Kathy Jones after 40 years and dressed in costumes from past Halloweens. Sun Lakes Realty, another annual participant in the business contests, won Best Decorations, and Joan Cool’s Mummy outfit earned her an individual “Best Dressed” too.

Photos by Gary DeVon & Leah Palmer

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Opportunity is Knocking: Business Development Training As part of a program to assist the local communities with upcoming change as closure of the Buckhorn Mine approaches, Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn (KRB) is hosting a series of trainings and workshops designed specifically for Ferry and Okanogan county residents and businesses. This series is aimed at helping budding entrepreneurs to create new business ventures, as well as help existing businesses add value to their current business model. The series of trainings was a result of discussions between KRB, the Washington State Department of Commerce, the Republic Chamber of Commerce Business and Tourism Committee, the Tri County Economic Development District, the Okanogan Economic Alliance and Washington State University Ferry County Extension. Each year, Commerce puts on a fantastic economic development course in Ellensburg called the NW Economic Development Games. Deana Zakar, Community Relations Specialist with KRB, attended the Games nearly 10 years ago and they were so inspiring that she still remembers them today. She thought, “Why not do something like that here, but tailored specifically to our communities?” As a result of that idea and many stimulating discussions with the aforementioned partners, Maury Forman and Terry Lawhead have agreed to take the lead on putting together a series of five highly practical, engaging, and valuable business development training courses throughout the winter. Maury Forman, Senior Manager for Rural Initiatives, Innovations and Entrepreneurship with the Washington State Department of Commerce and Terry Lawhead, Business Development Manager

specializing in Retention and Expansion, are skilled at delivering inspiration and education on discovering new business ideas and starting a business. Maury is an expert at teaching people how to think creatively when starting and growing your business, especially in rural communities. Terry is passionate about business retention and expansion, which means taking existing businesses and helping them with methods and ideas to become more sustainable or to grow. The first training of the series, “Opportunity is Knocking: Business Development,” is an ideation exercise that encourages creativity, brainstorming and idea generation for use in creating successful business endeavors and to help add value to an existing business. Maury and Terry will share their perspective on the role of economic development and owning a business in rural communities, including discussions on targeting, customer service, product uniqueness, and economic impacts. During this session, participants will create a fictional business and think about key aspects of their business, such as “What problem will it solve?” or “Who would buy this product?” This session will also be valuable even if you already own an existing business. It may provide you with some ideas to help improve your market, or identify technology/skills that could help sell your product that hadn’t been considered before. We also highly encourage high school and college students with aspirations of starting their own business to attend these trainings. Don’t miss out on this fantastic opportunity to proactively prepare our communities for economic challenges that may be realized upon the closure of the Buckhorn Mine.

Upcoming Opportunities… The following sessions will take place throughout the winter (dates to be determined). It is NOT necessary to attend each training in the series. Participants should feel free to choose the sessions that will be most valuable to them, although if you want to attend them all, that is encouraged. • Session 2. Business Planning • Session 3. Marketing in the 21st Century for Rural Businesses • Session 4. Accessing Capital • Session 5. “What’s Left” Session In between the series of five trainings, we plan to host a number of “mini-sessions” that will try to address other training requests brought forth by the community, such as Direct/Indirect Marketing, Web Design, Social Networking Skills, How Legitimizing a Business Will Save You Money, Hospitality Industry Classes, Business Recruitment, Importance of Spending Locally, Traditional Lending Sources – Dos and Don’ts, and more.

Join us at the Republic School Cafeteria, 30306 E Hwy 21, Republic WA 99166, on November 5th, 5:30-7:30, for “Opportunity is Knocking: Business Development.” Contact Deana Zakar @ 509-775-3157 or go to www.krbcommunity.com for more information and to register. Trainings are fully sponsored by Kinross, so there is no cost to participants. Food and childcare will be provided. Take a moment to check out our new Facebook page: www.facebook.com/KinrossKRB


NOVEMBER 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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LOCAL NEWS PREPARING FOR POST-MINE ERA

EMERGENCY| FROM A1 Olson who moved the council adopt the resolution, which was passed unanimously.

DUMPSTERS, CONT’D The board received an assessment of the North Valley Hospital dumpster locations from City Superintendent Hugh Jensen and Permit Administrator Christian Johnson, which was also presented to hospital representative Noreen Olma at the meeting. Johnson and Jensen will meet with NVH staff to work out an agreement that will include a franchise fee paid to the city for the use of some of the city sidewalk space. “What’s been confusing to us,” Mayor Patrick Plumb said, “is that we don’t know exactly who we’re talking to on this from week to week. It would be really nice to have one person to discuss the overall issues with.” Olma, attending the meeting on behalf of CEO Linda Michel, who was out of town on hospital business, apologized. “I do apologize that you get me, but I want you to know that we’re taking this very seriously,” Olma said. “Now that we have this, I’ll take it back to the team and we can work on a plan.” She added that she shocked at the what she felt was the feeling of ill will from the council toward the hospital that came out of the issue.

Above, Kinross Gold held a meeting last week to discuss the 2015 closure of the Buckhorn Mine and how the company could help communities in Okanogan and Ferry county weather the economic impacts which may follow. According to Deana Zakar, Community Relations Specialist with Kinross, the gold mine is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2015. In addition to retraining employees, the company is sponsoring business development classes to be held in Republic. Right, attendees were asked to share their ideas on how to best meet the economic challenge the mine closure will bring.

PARK TRAFFIC A lengthy discussion was had regarding the traffic flow at Chief Tonasket Park, particularly in the area where the Tonasket Water Ranch splash park is being installed. Tom Black, who has guided the engineering on the project, was on hand to propose a shift in the traffic near the water park to keep vehicles away from the picnic area portion of the park.

There was some confusion over who on the council and in the committee overseeing the city’s limited role in the project was in favor of which route. In the end, the council approved the proposal to allow the splash park to design the footprint in such a way as to prevent a roadway along the west side of the park, and “move” the road as long as it did not incur cost to the city.

BUDGET HEARING A public budget workshop hearing primarily involved a debate regarding raising utility taxes. Plumb had proposed adding a tax to the water/sewer bill to begin putting money away for matching grant funds to apply toward funding the city’s stormwater drainage issues. There was also discussion about whether or not to add a tax to garbage pickup, and how to fully account with the public regarding where any tax increases would be dedicated. “I think if we’re going to add a new tax,” Olson said, “we need to be pretty unanimous on that. That is a tough thing to be a split council on. If it’s not really important, we need to wait until it’s something where we can all be fully behind it.” The council next meets on Wednesday, Nov. 12, a day later than usual due to Veterans Day.

No jail time for former librarian

Gary DeVon/staff photos

ENROLLMENT | FROM A1 outside,” she said. The principal also reported on progress of the Leader in Me program which began implementation on Oct. 13. She said the staff was getting better acquainted with the program and using the training. “How does everyone feel about the program are they still excited about it,” asked Rocky DeVon, chairman of the school board. “They’re excited and have to remember it’s still work. I feel like they’re positive about it,” she replied. Hoehn showed a five-minute video of the seven habits the students will be developing. These include: 1. Be proactive, 2. Begin with the end in mind, 3. Put first things first; 4. Thing win-win, 5. Seek first to understand, then to be understood, 4. Synergize, 7. Sharpen the saw. Kristin Sarmiento, the junior/ senior high school principal, gave her report next. “At the very end of September we attended the College Fair in Tonasket. It was a small one, not huge like the ones we used to have here, but it gives the student an idea of what’s out there,” she said. “There is also a National College Fair being held in Spokane. Dawn Miller and Steve Gunderson working to have a group from Oroville attend.” Sarmiento said the Leadership Class focused on three things during the month of October – Cancer, Domestic Violence and Disability Awareness. “We had a surprise visit from Cal Poly that was really exciting. They were up here visiting schools for a research project. They wanted to see the science teacher because they have some equipment to donate,” she said. The project would have 40

“That was our fault,” she said. “We haven’t done a good job of letting you the changes we’ve made in our senior leadership staff ... I’m here to offer an olive branch and invite you to have a tour of the hospital, sit down and start the healing process... We want this relationship to work.” “I’m sorry you felt ill will,” Olson said. “I don’t feel ill will; it’s our hospital, we’re proud of it and it’s one of the great things about the city. I wish you would use the word frustration; I think that’s more what the council is feeling, is frustrated. “We have talked a number of times about this. I like the hospital but as being a good neighbor it’s left some to be desired.” “Your candor and respect has been appreciated,” Plumb said. “We want to be accountable,” Olma said. “We want to make this good.”

teams studying the ice on Neptune and would entail the use of digital telescopes to record data points, according to Sarmiento. Sarmiento also talked about the “Zombie Apocalypse Day” scheduled for Halloween. The fun program was put on by Central Washington University and included a Lab, Quarantine Area and Transformation Room. From there the students would participate in Zombie Tag in the gym. “It sounds like there is very high interest. I’ve heard good things about it,” said Sarmiento. She said there would be a Veterans Day Assembly in Coulton Auditorium on Monday, Nov. 10. Sarmiento also described changes in the expectations for the Senior Project, including the students no longer required to do a research paper. “The state has changed things... it’s not a lot different. It is not less work there is still a requirement of 30 hours of community service, either on an ongoing project that needs to be maintained or on new projects that are along the career path,” she said. Superintendent Steve Quick said he had attended the Leader in Me training with the Elementary Staff. “It looks really good over there. I also went to TPEP training,” he said. Quick talked about the Bright Bytes technology survey that not only measures the technology skills available at the school, but the kind of technology the students have at home. “Collective bargaining with the coaches is getting really close,” he said. “It has come down to one item on which I thought we had an agreement.”

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The classified staff has changed insurance from Premera to Lifestyles, said Quick, adding that Premera had goine up 17 percent this year, on top of an increase by eight percent last year. “Certain people with families are seeing an $800 or more a month difference in their pay checks, because of the change,” added Shaw. “It is a lot less than they were paying before and they are able to get dental and vision as well.” Quick said the staff said that the benefits appear to be comparable. “Lots of school districts have been looking at changing their health insurance coverage,” said Quick. Quick said the district had sent out a couple of alerts about cougars in the area. “I know one has been taken by a hunter,” said Quick. School Director Todd Hill, an Oroville Police Department, said there were reports of two cougar sightings in town, but there has so far been no confirmation.

CONSENT AGENDA The consent agenda, included approval of HVAC Water Treatment proposals for the high school and elementary buildings. The board also approved teacher Linda Colvin getting a $2600 stipend and the resignation of Cynthia Porter as a sixth grade teacher. DeHaven Hill will be the junior high boys basketball coach and the board approved the EWU Running Start in the High School memorandum of understanding. Director DeVon also thanked the Oroville Scholarship Foundation for the donation of $300 to the schools’ music program.

OKANOGAN – A former Tonasket High School librarian accused of having sex with an 18-year-old student will not serve jail time after an Okanogan County Superior Court Judge accepted a plea agreement. Under the deal approved by Judge Christopher Culp, Elizabeth KinKade, 37, will serve nine months on electronic home monitoring. Culp approved the agreement because he said the 18-year-old boy did not want to pursue charges. On May 19, Tonasket admin-

istration received evidence of misconduct by KinKade, a classified librarian at Tonasket Middle/ High School. She was put on administrative leave and a special board meeting was convened on May 21 to address the issue. The board voted unanimously to terminate her employment. On May 20, Tonasket police had questioned the student at the police station and he admitted to the affair, saying KinKade and he had intercourse five times, all off school grounds. KinKade was also called to the police station

where she made a statement, and admitted to the affair, which she said had been going on for one to two months. At her arraignment in June she pleaded not guilty to all five counts. In August she pleaded guilty to one count of sexual misconduct with a minor and the court dismissed the other four charges. She was originally arrested in May after telling deputies her husband fired a gun outside of their home when she told him about the affair with the student.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | November 6, 2014

Cops & Courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt Courthouse Correspondent

Superior Court

Criminal

Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 20, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Oct. 21 to POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. Castaneda was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the Feb. 18 crime. The court issued an arrest warrant Oct. 23 for Bryan James St. Peter, 18, Omak, for second-degree burglary, thirddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred July 23 and 24. The court issued an arrest warrant Oct. 24 for Dana Ray Wilson, 62, Oroville, for two counts of first-degree child molestation. The crimes allegedly occurred between March and July of 2013. Mariah Kirsten Todd, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 28 to POCS (heroin). Todd was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the Aug. 25 crime. In a separate case, Todd pleaded guilty Oct. 28 to second-degree burglary, first-degree trafficking in stolen property, and four counts of third-degree theft. Todd was sentenced to 13 months in prison and fined $600. Those crimes occurred between April and August. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 21, Okanogan, pleaded guilty Oct. 28 to second-degree assault (strangulation). The court dismissed an unlawful imprisonment charge. Munsey was sentenced to three months in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the Oct. 10 crime. Lawrence Gregory Kruger, 37, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 28 to failure to register as a sex offender. Kruger was sentenced to 14 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 The court found probable cause to charge Lacey Ann Picard, 24, Omak, with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 18. In a separate case, the court found probable cause to charge Picard with seconddegree burglary and thirddegree theft. Those crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 15. The court found probable cause to charge Wesley Paul Wirth, 27, Okanogan, with seconddegree organized retail theft. The crime allegedly occurred between September and October. The court found probable cause to charge Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 27, Omak, with POCS with intent (methamphetamine). The crime allegedly occurred Oct. 10. The court found probable cause to charge Madison Leigh Louie,

28, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin), second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 29. In a separate case, the court found probable cause to charge Louie with second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Those crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 20. The court found probable cause to charge Stacy Levon Adrian, 46, Omak, with POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (psilocybin mushrooms) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct.27.

District Court Ronald Jerome Allard, 52, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: hit-and-run (unattended property). Allard was fined $400. Kelly Jean Anderson, 27, Tonasket, had a harassment charge dismissed. Alicia L. Anfeldt, 35, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Anfeldt was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. Kristen Ann Bob, 32, Omak, had two third-degree malicious mischief charges dismissed. Dennis Jacob Box, 33, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: harassment (gross misdemeanor). Lucy Lynn Broken Rope, 51, Omak, had a charge dismissed: making a false statement to a public servant. Odilon Casarrubias Torres, 36, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Tricia Lynn Dezellem, 41, Omak, guilty of tampering with physical evidence. Dezellem was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 168 days suspended, and fined $808. The court also dismissed a false reporting charge. Shannon Dawn Edwards, 41, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Edwards received a 364day suspended sentence and fined $768. The court also dismissed a third-degree DWLS charge. Charles A. Engberg, 33, Omak, had two charges dismissed: obstruction and disorderly conduct. Randy Kevin Erwin, 57, Riverside, had a trip permit violation charge dismissed. Erwin was fined $200. Lisandra May Finley, 20, Okanogan, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Finley was fined $500. Crystal Gail Fletcher, 34, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Antonio Rafael Fuentes, 40, Omak, had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. Gail Alice Garnica, 49, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Garnica was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $858. Juaqine Cash Garnica, 20, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: second-degree rec-

reational fishing without a license or catch card.

911 Calls & Jail Bookings Monday, Oct. 27, 2014 Warrant arrest on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Weapons offense on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. DUI on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on Columbia St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Columbia St. in Omak. Theft on Index Rd. in Omak. License plates reported missing. Theft on Kay St. in Oroville. Fuel reported missing. Stacy Levon Adrian, 46, booked for on two counts of POCS, possession of drug paraphernalia, an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for DUI and a Tribal FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. Cheryl Eileen Michel, 49, court commitment for DUI. Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014 Recovered vehicle on Greenaway Rd. near Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on Pine St. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ferry St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. in Omak. Found property on Cherry St. in Oroville. Bicycle recovered. Jamie Lee Gendron, 26, booked for making a false statement, third-degree DWLS and two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. James Corwin Hoben, 38, DOC detainer. Joshua Dean Allen, 33, DOC detainer. Dario Orozco Zacarias, 53, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Erik Castillo Gonzalez, 23, court commitment for DUI. Bernardino Adan Trinidad, 43, booked on four counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and a USBP hold. Donald Bryce Sylvester, 28, booked for second-degree assault (DV) and intimidating a witness.

Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Terry Joseph Hubbard, 34, booked on an FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV) and a DOC warrant for thirddegree assault. Madison Leigh Louie, 28, booked on two counts each of second-degree burglary, thirddegree theft and POCS. Heather Dee Anne Day, 51, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV).

Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014 Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle rollover crash on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Birch St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Jackson St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Riverside. Injuries reported. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Golden St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on W. Sixth St. in Tonasket. Tyler Lee Shelton, 24, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Molly Condon, no middle name listed, 42, booked on an FTA warrant for first-degree assault. Timothy J. Sprague, 59, court commitment for DUI. Patrick Dale Bilby, 22, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV).

Friday, Oct. 31, 2014 DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. DWLS on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Tyee St. in Okanogan.

Assault on Buckhorn Rd. near Oroville. Automobile theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Drugs on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Alyssa Kay Lynne Bray, 18, booked for second-degree DWLS and MIP/C. James Davis, no middle name listed, 57, DOC detainer. Lyle Zachary Long, 29, booked on an FTA warrant for delivery of a controlled substance; violation of a protection order (DV), second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Marsha Leona Pakootas, 30, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Saturday, Nov. 1, 2014 Drugs on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Drugs on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Hwy.97 near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Apple Lane in Omak. DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Golden Rd. in Oroville. Hazardous materials on Main St. in Oroville. Fuel pump leak reported. Angela Maria Olivares, 30, booked for DUI. David George Vanvekoven, 43, booked for first-degree assault. Jonathan Lee Aron, 20, booked for making a false statement to a public servant and possession of marijuana (less than 40

grams). Jeremy John Lavender, 28, booked for violation of a nocontact order (DV). Frank Alexander Paul, 28, booked for attempted firstdegree assault, attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and DUI. Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 37, booked on a DOC warrant and on three bench warrants: POCS, use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS.

Sunday, Nov. 2, 2014 Malicious mischief on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Mailbox reported missing. Found property on W. River Rd. near Omak. Purse recovered. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Golden Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Michelle Lynn Hester, 45, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Charles Andrew Engberg, 33, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Marlon Josue Garcia Pineda, 25, booked for DUI.

Key: DUI - Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C - Failure to Appear/ Comply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014 Vehicle prowl on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Woods Rd. near Omak. Window reported smashed. Threats on Frosty Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Trespassing on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Juniper Place in Omak. Two reports of burglary on Engh

Recovery Support Still Available for Carlton Complex Fire Victims

Does Your Hand Shake When You… Drink a glass of water? Write a note? Dial a phone number? If so, you may be suffering from Essential Tremor. Our team from the Swedish Radiosurgery Center has successfully treated patients for over 15 years — using Gamma Knife, a non-surgical approach to treat Essential Tremor.

Affected families encouraged to reach out to the American Red Cross, Okanogan County Community Action Council

WENATCHEE - As winter weather start making its way to North Central Washington, the American Red Cross wants to ensure that those impacted by this summer’s Carlton Complex Wildfire continue to have the support they need to meet their recovery needs. Recovery assistance such as moving and storage expenses, rental/security deposit assistance, utility repair and hook-up, and even minor repairs/ renovations towards winterizing temporary housing are still available through the Red Cross. Carlton Complex Wildfire victims are encouraged to contact the Red Cross as soon as possible to access available support.

DRAWING SAMPLE BEFORE TREATMENT

WHO: Recovery assistance is available to those with disaster-caused needs due to the Carlton Complex Wildfire. WHAT: Recovery assistance includes moving and storage expenses, rental/security deposit assistance, utility repair and hook-up, and even minor repairs/renovations towards winterizing temporary housing.

DRAWING SAMPLE AFTER TREATMENT

HOW: Contact a Red Cross caseworker at 509-670-5331 or 509-663-3907. WHEN: Individuals should contact Red Cross caseworkers as soon as possible. The Red Cross expects to complete its relief and early recovery support work with individuals by Dec. 1. The Red Cross is also partnering with Long-Term Recovery Groups in the area to ensure a smooth transition of casework for the long-term unmet needs of disaster victims. All Carlton Complex Fire victims are encouraged to set up an appointment with a disaster recovery Family Advocate coordinating support for long-term recovery groups in the area. Family Advocates are affiliated with the Okanogan Community Action Council and are available at 509-422-4041 or toll free at 1-877-641-0101 For more information, call the American Red Cross at (509) 663-3907.

Learn more about Essential Tremor and find out if Gamma Knife treatment is right for you. 1-206-320-7187 Swedish.org/essentialtremor Seattle, Washington, USA


NOVEMBER 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

On just one day in Washington State •

2,082 domestic violence victims and children received services from domestic violence programs. • 837 calls to domestic violence hotlines were answered. • 391 individuals were educated on domestic violence by local programs • 382 requests from domestic violence victims were turned down because programs did not have the resources to provide them, including requests for emergency shelter, housing, transportation, childcare, and legal representation. The vast majority of unmet needs were for shelter or housing advocacy to help victims get or keep safe housing. Source: National Network to End Domestic Violence

End Domestic Violence OPINION BY BOB FERGUSON

WASHINGTON STATE ATTORNEY GENERAL

I am the father of six-year-old twins. My wife, Colleen, and I want to raise a son who respects women and a daughter who lives in a world where she is respected and free from violence. In September 2014, NFL football star Ray Rice’s assault on his then-fiancée, captured on video, received significant media attention and brought to national awareness the unfortunate prevalence of domestic violence in our society. The statistics are sobering. An estimated onein-four women experience rape, physical assault or stalking in the context of a relationship or a date. The Washington State Coalition Against Bob Ferguson, AG Domestic Violence reports that 35 people were killed in Washington State last year as a result of domestic violence. Overwhelmingly, these tragedies are the result of men’s violence against women. They include the woman strangled and beaten by her boyfriend and the mother murdered by her daughter’s ex-boyfriend. These are our mothers, sisters, daughters and friends. When violence against women makes the headlines, people often ask: “Why does she stay?” But this question wrongly places the burden on the victim. It is time to stop asking “why does she stay?” and instead ask “why is he violent?” October was Domestic Violence Awareness Month. I am committed to leading an office that works to eliminate violence against women. Our work with stakeholders has helped pass legislation to punish offenders and empower survivors. We dedicate grant dollars to local advocacy organizations that provide services to survivors in rural communities. Our work will continue. We can all do our part. Speak up when someone tells inappropriate jokes or stories. If you learn your female friends or family members are experiencing violence, let them know you are there to help. Teach your children to respect themselves and others. Do not tolerate domestic violence. Together we can make a difference for the women in our lives. When women live without fear, our whole society benefits.

Resigning the OCSA President ‘under duress’ Dear Editor, In the last three years and almost nine months I have served as your Board President of the Okanogan County Senior Citizens Association. I have had a Board and 13 delegates that have served the Association with a great deal of interest and support, all for the good of Okanogan County Transportation & Nutrition(OCTN) and In-Home Care of Central Washington (IHCCW). We’ve had challenges but we have also had some wonderful things happen in the area of support. We as a Board and delegates learned a lot, as the Executive Directors for the two entities above, both worked with us and tutored us in their non-profit businesses. We learned what “living on a budget” in business really means. IHCCW runs on a budget and derives most of their funds from state and federal funds and a wide variety of regulations. Their Exec. Director, Cathy Wood runs a ‘tight ship’ as she works with Aging and Adult Care, who also keeps tabs on the regulations. OCTN retired Exec. Director Leanne Whitener in many ways, with the help of her long term Bus Manager, Deanne Konsack have been with OCTN about 23 years and have virtually built this business. Jennifer Fitzthum, a seven year employee moved to the position of Exec. Director the first of March 2014 and will continue building the business. Both entities have audits twice a year by an auditing firm and minutes are required from the Board to be given to the auditing firm for this meeting. I can’t say enough about the job these two women are doing. OCTN runs on a very

strict budget, accounting for every penny and as I have found these past years, sends them and the Board to solicit funds to stay within the budget. No “Cash Cows” in these non-profit businesses. On our OCTN office building and property we have had the Sheriff and his Department who helped us with needed advise on a security system; PUD, with information and help, donated help by private citizens on covering buildings when damage has occurred. Volunteers to fix “maintenance” problems inside and outside, to save money. An electrician who donated time for a job. It goes on and on, the tide of people who have volunteered. If I have missed anyone, you know who you are and you have to be greatly blessed because we have been. Thank you! We want our Seniors to continue their meal program and having the advantage of their personal trips on the buses and soon, longer ones through Okanogan County Transit Authority. We can only do this through the ability of a strong Okanogan County Senior Citizen Association (OCSCA) Board working well with IHCCW and OCTN. We still have the same board we’ve had before the Sept. 25 meeting this year. We are in compliance with our By-Laws and we will be having our annual elections Nov. 21, 2014. IHCCW and OCTN are both operating with the original OCSCA Board in place. ‘Dolly’ Engelbretson, President; Wayne Adams, First VP; Jerry Beeman, Second VP; Karen Dahl, Treasurer and Sharron Kenniston, Secretary. Nov 21 will be an election meeting at Okanogan Senior Center, starting at 10 a.m. I ask that all delegates for 2014 be present as well as all members of all the Senior Citizens Center in Okanogan

County. We want our services to continue in Okanogan County and it’s imperative to vote in a Board that’s conscientious and willing to learn and serve. I want to Thank every person who supported the OCSCA Board and me as Board President from 2011 to 2014. I resigned under duress, the 25th of September. Sally R. Alexander Omak

Obama Care not a failure for Progressive/Liberals Dear Editor, The Affordable Health Care Act is designed to fulfill the Progressive/Liberal dream, to redistribute wealth, wipe out the Middle Class, so more people depend on government hand outs, eliminate all of the decent jobs, leaving only minimum wage employment. Bankrupt small business with overbearing regulations and unaffordable insurance premiums. It will unionize $15 million health care workers whose dues of approximately $15 billion will elect more Progressive/Liberal candidates who will vote for more regulations and hand outs. It also allows the IRS to hire thousands more employees to become more powerful, and by signign up you give up your right to privacy of your personal information. Obama Care is not a failure because it is doing exactly what the Progressive/Liberals want for our country. But why is it called health insurance. Tom Bretz Tonasket

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Laws with claws to secure guns OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER GUEST COLUMNIST

Some noble posse is always declaring itself ‘Mom’s Against Gun Violence!’ or ‘Doctors Against Gun Violence’, or ‘Vegan LGBT Wiccan Skinheads Against Gun Violence!’ There’s some new crop of such illuminati every week or every shooting, whichever occurs first. No, I’m not making light of tragedy. I’m ridiculing these groups’ selfawarded exclusivity of concern for gun violence. Like, who ... isn’t ... against gun violence? Bill Slusher The NRA! anti-gunrights bigots will cry, gun makers! Sure, that makes sense. There’s so much profit to be had from criminals who overwhelmingly steal already bought guns, MIs (mentally ill) who usually get registered and background-checked guns from family, and suicide and accident victims who somehow buy more guns, so suggest anti-Second Amendment jihadis. I was trained on guns by my father and his, NRA youth programs, the U.S. Army and three excellent police departments, yet no anti-gun-rights bigot on earth deplores or regrets gun violence more than me. A retired cop, I’ve been hands-on in gun tragedies. I’m as disgusted and saddened as any gun rights haters, but I have far more to lose than them. How’s that? Because whenever there’s an illegal shooting, especially involving kids, anti-2A bigots in and out of the media hasten gleefully to use these events, not to take guns from criminals or MIs, but to try to inhibit or revoke the lawful civil right to armed defense of citizens who’ve broken... no... laws. Somehow, the ‘solution’ from anti-gun-rights zealots is to place me and my loved ones at the same defense disadvantage to criminal and MI shooters as the victims the anti-2A

crusaders claim to lament. Go figure. Registration facade scheme Initiative-594 has probably passed by the time this appears in print but it cannot deter illegal shootings, contrived proponent propaganda notwithstanding. These scams aren’t about limiting ‘availability of guns’ to the criminal and mentally ill because neither gives a damn. It’s all just control-freak political maneuvering to incrementally defeat the lawful citizen’s civil right to effective self-defense. Please, try to appreciate the inherent invalidity of such perfumed anti-Second Amendment pretexts. Criminals will get guns on the black market, steal them, or make them at machine shops if indeed they can’t soon run them off on emerging 3-D copiers. Accidents and suicides are almost always committed with ‘registered’ guns bought lawfully by ‘background checked’ owners. MI-shooters couldn’t care less about gun laws than criminals. Own it. Anyone who thinks gun registration and background check laws significantly reduce criminal, suicidal/accidental or MI shootings is witlessly ignorant of the obvious or, more likely, consciously playing omnicontrol politics. Both have the blood of slain children on their hands. Want something that actually saves kids’ lives? Is that your real thrust? Or do you just want to use dead children to lend faux validation to your anti-gun-rights agenda? Make up your mind. Kids are dying. How do we... legitimately and constitutionally... reduce gun violence, Americans? Here’s how: By far, most shots fired illegally in America are by drug thugs and urban gangs. Think Chicago. Short of managed drug legalization and urban minority communities taking responsibility for the actions of their own, both unlikely, only more aggressive, raceneutral law enforcement is going to have any effect here. Lotsa luck enacting that in a PC whipped society.

But... there is one gun law that would reduce many criminal shootings and hugely reduce accidental, suicidal, and MI-shootings, including school killings. Here, I regret, my NRA has failed America egregiously. We need immediate legislation that provides stout fines and jail time for gun owners who fail to secure their guns not under direct supervision. I’m sick and tired of seeing kids shot and having my Second Amendment rights threatened by clueless political bigots because of careless gun owners who fail to responsibly secure their firearms. The NRA should assertively push this security emphasis to its membership and congress, but it correctly fears that anti-2A bigots will lever the effort to further threaten 2A rights. Regardless, we must secure America’s guns... now. Save the blather about ‘not being able to reach your locked gun in a home invasion!’ I’m on board here. I said ‘secure’, which means locking up all our guns except the ones we have under our continuous, direct supervision. The point is to achieve whatever is necessary to secure our guns from theft and other unauthorized access. You can still blaze away at any home invaders, but the MI neighbor kid won’t be able to pack your guns to school. Secure your non-carry guns, please, fellow gunners. Action locks, quick-access vaults, not to mention common chains and padlocks, are affordable. Then lobby your legislators and the NRA to bring about fanged laws to secure unsupervised guns soonest. Kids’ lives, and our constitutional gun rights, depend on it. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his newly reprinted down-and-dirty Southern murder mystery Shepherd of the Wolves. (Amazon, cmppg. com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@live.com.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 6, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Harts appreciated for providing a stage for entertainment Much appreciation should go to Vicky and Walt Hart for providing space for music groups in a nice atmosphere in which families can even bring their children, if they choose. Such was the case a couple of Saturdays ago, when Brock Hires entertained for a few hours, letting some of the folks dance, and also some line dancing. So, the baseball World Series is over. My team didn’t win. I’m pretty good at picking losers, I think. Soon, we’ll be into Gonzaga U basketball, and I sure hope they continue to put the player’s names on their uniforms so I know who is who. So many teams aren’t doing that, these days. Why is it a phone call from far away, makes the ole’ heart skip a beat and I wonder, “Who died?” But this time the call from Nebraska was just to say, “Hi” and how are you? A real treat! Roy Curtis, of Tonasket, did die, after suffering a fall, a broken hip and the inevitable pneumonia. A Memorial was

held at the Tonasket Senior Center, with memories shared by many from incidents through the years, bringing many smiles and happy thoughts. Glen Hauenstein also, passed away, mid-week, after also having pneumonia and some other health issues. Condolences go out to both of the above families. A graveside service was held Tuesday for Glen. He was a kinda private person, avoiding crowds and I imagine it was his desire, to keep his final arrangements on a small scale. John Leslie suffered severe dizziness, with signs of a stroke, and was flown to Spokane, where he was diagnosed. Getting help quickly is always good and they found that the air medical Insurance they have, is very beneficial. He did have a stroke, which left no side affects, and he is doing very well, according to his wife. It’s getting colder, but still no killing frost as of this writing, and the geese are making a big V and headin’ out !

Not only the geese are leaving, ager, Laura Sorenson, I saw in their ad “Wally” Ocawa, who summers in her last week. They say she has wonderful home on Lake Osoyoos has gone to her biscuits and gravy along with some new other home in Hawaii. She dishes. has the best of two worlds, Brock Hires added to the wouldn’t you say? usual church service last Hawaii has some problems Sunday by playing the guitoo tho, with the hot lava that tar, singing and playing the has been flowing hither and piano. Lessons that were yon, even destroying some given him by the late Audrey homes. (Kelly) Curtis, come through We are enjoying our little in his music. She’d be so fireplace, and gas is cheaper proud of him, as are many than last year, and we can’t folks. I’ve watched Brock say that for many things. from just a little tyke, THIS & THAT mature, Another breakfast will be with a big guitar and cowboy served at the Oroville Senior Joyce Emry hat, and have been one of Center, Nov. 8, 8 a.m. to 10 his “cheer leaders”, along the a.m. – $8 for a big breakfast. way. It was his birthday and Dec. 13 will be the bazaar date, we had cake and ice cream, provided by changed from 6th. See Betty Hall to rent his family and his lovely wife, Adeena. a table, 509-476-2788. He’s also doing a great job, as correKaty Tibbs has retired from the O spondent writer and photographer for the K Chevrolet (formerly Hedlunds) after Omak Chronicle. 15 years, as the bookkeeper. Have fun, Do you ever buy canned frosting? I Katy! read that if you’d put it in a bowl and Monday, Nov. 10 there will be a whip it fast and furiously, it will double program in the Commons at the High in size and frost more cupcakes and genSchool, with part of the entertainment erously frost a cake. being presented by the elementary We played cards with Bob and school, honoring the Veterans. Margaret Hirst last week. The gals won And the 14th and 15th will be the and we don’t give Bob any handicaps, Missoula Children’s Theatre, at the same just because he’s not quite up to par. He’s location. lucky enough, anyway. Will Rogers says, “Lettin’ the cat Didn’t have many trick or treater’s. outta’ the bag is lots easier than puttin’ Now, I’ll have to eat all the good leftit back in!” He was such a funny man. overs but those calories won’t count, The Plaza Restaurant has a new man- will they?

Busy Highlands calendar in November

TERRIFIC KIDS (TIMES TWO)

SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

It is just the beginning of November and the days on my calendar are filling fast. This week alone there are only two open days with “Ladies meeting”on Tuesday. Grange Auxiliary Meeting at the home of Mary Louise Loe with a potluck at noon on Thursday. All are welcome to attend. On Friday there will be Bingo at 7 p.m. in the Grange Hall in Molson. The buy in is $10 for 10 games. Saturday brings the Christmas Bazaar in Chesaw, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be lots of items on the sale tables, like jams and jellies and chutney, dried flowers and wreaths, books, hats, jewelry, fabric, winter vegetables, antler flowers, home made crochet

Many prizes were given at the celebration hosted by Jack and Mary Hughes, of Discount Fireworks. I received a new coffee maker. They treat their correspondent workers well and they do so much in the community in many facets. And the big check they gave to the Independence Fund, (like the Wounded Warrior project) to provide track style wheelchairs, for outside use for veteran’s was another bonus. Good coverage and photos were in the Oct. 30 issue of the G-T. I’ve been trying to dress a couple of Raggedy Ann dolls, for the bazaar. In the past, I have made quite a few of them, but this has been a real production. There has been more ripping than sewing it would seem, because I didn’t have any instructions, except my memory, and that can’t be counted on for too much, these days. If I got paid by the hour, no one could afford to buy them, so we’ll keep the price, as before. If enough interest is shown, there will be Thanksgiving dinner at the Senior Center, spearheaded by the president. More details next week, concerning time and details. Our first great-granddaughter is a cute “little pumpkin” as seen in the photo we received (also on face book) as at sevenmonths-old, finally wearing newborn clothes, she sits inside a real pumpkin, with chubby little legs sticking out through holes that have been cut in the pumpkin, laughing as though she is really happy being there.

HILLTOP COMMENTS items, old coins, treasures from Mexico, Pop’s Pickled Garlic and lots of yummy baked goods. The Country Kitchen will be open and serving chili with the works and corn bread. you can get your raffle tickets for the Ruger 10/22 and 500 rounds of ammunition provided by Al’s Sporting Goods. Second prize will be a pair of binoculars and third place, a Columbia River Knife. The tickets will sell for $5 each or 5 tickets for $20. Need not be present to win. The drawing will be held at the 4th of July Rodeo 2015. The Annual 4th of July Rodeo quilt will also have tickets available $1 per ticket or six tickets for $5 for more information call Mike Bricker at 509-485-2397 on the raffle. get a start on your Christmas shopping. On Nov. 11 at the Mercantile in Chesaw the members of the Chesaw Community Church will

be honoring our veterans from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come and enjoy a Free cup of coffee, some goodies, and a good visit. Later in the month, the Knob Hill Club will have it’s monthly meeting on the 20th, as they will be hosting a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 27. This dinner is open to everyone and will include turkey and the works, with dressing, potatoes and gravy, veggies and dessert. Come one, come all. Serving will begin at noon. On Halloween the members of the Stand in the Gap Believers hosted a Halloween Alternative Fall Festival for Kids. Six children were represented by four families. There was an assortment of tricks and lots of treats, including home made cider, cookies, popcorn balls and caramel apples. There were games, trick or treat bags and a Bible story from Ezekial Chapter 3 about the dry bones. It was agreed the children had a good time and there is a possibility they will do it again next year. Until next week

TONASKET MARKET REPORT Market moving inside CCC SUBMITTED BY M. CLARE PARIS TONASKET MARKET Submitted photos

The Tonasket Kiwanis honored Tonasket Elementary School’s Terrific Kids for September (top) and October (above).

Halloween OROVILLE highlighted October SENIOR NEWS SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER PRESIDENT

I do believe Halloween dress up was the highlight of October. Third prize went to Betty Steg, as a Bedouin nomad. That WalMart beard that she found, transformed her into another place, another time, and another unrecognizable person. Roberta and Howard Cole won second place. She was the purple people eater and Howard, well, I’ll tell you that wig shaved off 30 years and turned him into some handsome dude. But, the creative juices really flowed when Evelyn Dull and Doris Hughes created their number one prize costume, two peas in a pod. Seeing is believing. Then there was Barbie as a

cat, Betty Hall as the most convincing witch with a broom, and many more, including some guy with a spider as big as his face. He must have found it under the building, or in Ken’s soup? Don’t forget our coming events: Pancake Breakfast this Saturday, Nov. 8. It’s all you can eat, cheap for $8 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. The public is invited. Then December 13 is our annual Christmas Bazaar. To reserve a table, or donate, see Betty Hall, or call her at 509-476-2788. We’ll still be having our computer class at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 25, taught by Tilly Porter. We’re also planning a Thanksgiving Day feed, including turkey, dressing, potatoes and

BENEFIT

Dinner for

Ardith Fitzthum’s Family (to help with Funeral Expenses)

Saturday, November 8, 2014 at the Oroville Eagles

Indian Taco Dinner & Auction $5.00 per person / Dinner at 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Auction starts at 6 p.m.

Please donate Auction items: Pies, cakes or miscellaneous items... any and all donations can be dropped off at the Oroville Eagles.

gravy. Bring a dessert, salad, vegetable or fruit, or come empty handed. All will be served on the Thursday, Nov. 27 at 1 p.m. Pinochle door prize Eunice Godwin, Pinochle Barb, high woman Eunice. And check out our website at: http:/orovillewaseniorccntr. blogspot.com/

Shoppers who still want to find those late-season vegetables to store for winter or all those wonderful crafts and baked goods that our farmers market is famous for can now come to the Tonasket Farmers Fall Markets! †Four markets are planned through the next two months.† These will take place at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket, at 411 Western Avenue. The doors will open at 2 p.m., with each market day ending at 6 p.m. This is a slightly earlier

block of time than the summer markets, geared for daylight. The markets will be on Thursdays, just like we are all used to.† he dates for the planned markets are Nov. 6 and 20, and Dec. 4 and 18. Vendors are welcome to join the market and set up at these fall markets. Call market manager Margie Miller for info on how to join up, or just any info about these markets that you need, 846-9902 or 429-0887, or email info@tonasketfarmersmarket.com or see our website at†tonasketfarmersmarket. com. Come and enjoy this opportunity for late season crops, winter vegetables, baked goods and lots of crafts for those up-coming giftgiving occasions!

FINANCIAL FOCUS Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

November is Long-Term Care Awareness Month – a month dedicated to educating the public about the need to prepare for the potentially devastating costs of long-term care. And the more you know about these expenses, the better prepared you will be to deal with them. To begin with, just how expensive is long-term care? Consider this: The average cost for a private room in a nursing home is more than $87,000 per year, according to the 2014 Cost of Care Survey produced by Genworth, a financialservices company. And the average cost of an assisted living facility, which provides a level of care that is not as extensive as that offered by a nursing home, is $42,000 per year, according to the same Genworth study. All long-term care costs have risen steadily over the past several years, with no

Many people, when they think about long-term care at all, believe that Medicare will pay these costs — but that’s just not the case. Typically, Medicare only covers a small percentage of long-term care expenses, which means you will have to take responsibility. Of course, if you are fortunate, you may go through life without ever needing to enter a nursing home or an assisted living facility, or even needing help from a home health-care aide. But given the costs involved, can you afford to jeopardize your financial independence — or, even worse, impose a potential burden on your grown children?

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As an alternative, you could transfer the risk of paying for long-term care to an insurance company. Many plans are available these days, so, to find the choice that is appropriate for your needs, you will want to consult with a professional financial advisor. Here’s a word of caution, though: The premiums for this type of protection rise pretty rapidly as you get older, so, if you are considering adding this coverage, you may be better off by To prevent these events, you will need to create acting sooner, rather than later. a strategy to pay for long-term care expenses — even if you never incur them. Basically, you have None of us can know with certainty what the future two options: You could self-insure or you could holds for us. Ideally, you will always remain in good shape, both mentally and physically, with the ability “transfer the risk” to an insurer. to take care of yourself. But, as you’ve heard, it’s If you were going to self-insure, you would need best to “hope for the best, but plan for the worst.” to set aside a considerable sum of money, as So, take the lessons of Long-Term Care Awareness indicated by the costs mentioned above. And Month to heart and start preparing yourself for you would likely need to invest a reasonably every scenario. high percentage of this money in growth-oriented investments. If you chose this self-insurance route, This article was written by Edward Jones for use by but you never really needed a significant amount your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

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November 6, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life COMMUNITY CALENDAR Practice Sessions

OROVILLE - On Thursday mornings, Nov. 6, 13, 20 and 27 at 10:30 a.m. there is an hour long program called Practice Sessions offered by the Oroville Community Library. Allene Halliday shares information about American musical standards from the 1920s through the 1960s. Steve Pollard accompanies Halliday. The presentations include performances along with learning and rehearsal techniques plus history of a style of music many people are unfamiliar withy. This ongoing series is free and open to all ages.

Tonasket Indoor Market

TONASKET - The Tonasket Farmers Market will be open indoors at the CCC, 411 Western Avenue, 2 p.m.-6 p.m. Nov. 6 and 20, and Dec. 4 and 18. Come and enjoy this opportunity for late season crops, winter vegetable and lots of crafts for those up-coming gift-giving occasions. Also, vendors are welcome to join the market and set up at these fall markets. Call market manager Margie Miller at 509-846-9902 or 509-429-0887.

Reed Engel & Sandy Vaughn Perform

OROVILLE - Thursday evening, Nov. 6 brings Reed Engel and Sandy Vaughn together live on stage at Esther Bricques Winery with original works, vocals and instrumentals. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

Highlands Wonders: Great White Owl

TONASKET - Okanogan Highlands Association will be presenting “Phantom of the North: The Elusive Great White Owl,” featuring wildlife biologist Matt Marsh on Friday, Nov. 7, 6:30 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, 411 Western Ave. Not only are Great Gray Owls the largest owl in North America with the largest wingspan, their stature and countenance spark a sense of wonder. With alternate names such as “Great Grey Ghost,” and “Phantom of the North,” they inspire awe and pique our curiosity. The presentation will be preceded by a dinner benefiting the CCC at 5:15 p.m.

Christmas Bazaar

OROVILLE - The Oroville United Methodist Church will hold their annual Christmas Bazaar and Country Kitchen on Saturday, Nov. 8 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Also, the popular

Annual Chili Cook Off next Saturday Submitted by Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

The mice are looking for a good warm place to stay, mouse traps with peanut butter works great if you have pests. Our Halloween party went well with winners of first place to our own bartender Kassie McCann as a fairy hippy, second place went to Judi Wallace as a red witch and

Wildfire Preparedness class offered in November Submitted by Ellen Barttels North Valley Community Schools

In July 2014 the biggest wildfire in Washington State history raced through Okanogan County, consuming 300 or more homes, numerous outbuildings and fences, and killing countless livestock, pets and wildlife. Our climate in North Central Washington is becoming drier. Beetle killed and fire killed forests wait like a box of matches to be lit. A century of fire suppression has left forest debris that further contributes to fire danger. These conditions mean that wildfires are likely to increase

“Ralph’s” Spaghetti will be served at the church from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Come and browse and enjoy a wonderful spaghetti lunch.

Veterans Event in Chesaw

CHESAW - The public is invited to come to the Mercantile in Chesaw on Tuesday, Nov. 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. to Honor some of the local Veterans. Free Coffee and goodies will be available.

Borderlands Historical Society

OROVILLE - The Borderlands Historical Society will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 11 for a Membership Meeting night at 7 p.m. at the Oroville Depot. Contact obhistsoc@gmail.com for more info.

Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar

OROVILLE - Get a head start to your Christmas celebrations at the Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar on Friday Nov. 21, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s bazaar is hosted by the OHS Future Business Leaders of America in the Oroville Grade School Gymnasium. Artisans, crafters and other vendors are encouraged to contact Susan at 509-476-2427 for more information. Registrations forms are available at the Oroville Public Library, Oroville Elementary School, Oroville High School, Oroville City Hall and Hughes Department Store.

Habitat meeting

The November meeting of the Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity will be held Tuesday, Nov. 11 at 7 p.m. at the home of Mike and Peggy McDaniel,170 Hubbard Rd., Riverside. Call 509-429-8369 for further information.

Making Healthy Choices

TONASKET - Dr. Paula Silha, ER Physician will be conducting a free course about making healthy choices in regards to diet, exercise, and leisure activities as well as how to have a healthy balance in your life on Tuesday, Nov. 11 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at North Valley Hospital. To register go to nvhospital.org and click on wellness courses, or call 509-486-3163.

FireWise Workshop

TONASKET - North Valley Community Schools has teamed up with Okanogan County Conservation District to offer this class free of charge. Come get the details on the FireWise fire protection method on Wednesday, Nov. 12.

TONASKET EAGLES third place to Tina Swanson as a belly dancer. Congregation to everyone. On Saturday, Nov. 8 we will be having our fourth annual chili cook off. Come in and sign up your hot or mild chili. It needs to be here by 4 p.m. for the judges and after that there will be chili eating by donation. You need to come see this event great prizes good food and lots of fun. All

Bell & Pollard Perform at Winery

OROVILLE - Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include Steve Bell and Steve Pollard on Thursday, Nov. 13. Music begins at 6:30. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or visit the Events page at www. estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville, WA. There will be no performances on Nov. 20 and Nov. 27, as Esther Bricques Winery will be closed on those two dates.

Forum on H-2A Guest-workers

WENATCHEE – The U.S. Department of Labor is hosting a forum on Friday, Nov. 14 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Wenatchee to provide Washington growers and farm-labor association representatives with information on how to successfully navigate the federal H-2A foreign guest-worker program. The forum will cover the H-2A application process, federal regulations and enforcement, and self-monitoring and outreach. It also will feature a session on H-2A best practices and a question and answer period with a panel of federal and state experts. Participating federal and state agencies are the U.S Department of Labor’s Hour and Wage Division and the state departments of Agriculture and Employment Security. The forum will be held at the Wenatchee Convention Center, 121 N. Wenatchee Ave. The Registration is free to the public, however, seating is limited. To register email wcddh2a@esd.wa.gov or call 360902-9685.

Fabulous Fifties Dance

OROVILLE - Coming up on Saturday, Nov. 15 at Vicki’s Back Door Club is the North Valley Community School’s annual 50’s dance! Enjoy live music by Project 3:16, hamburgers, floats, prizes and a rockin good time! Tickets at the door, adults $10, children $5, the whole family $25. To promote a family friendly environment, alcohol will not be served at this event. This event is part of North Valley Community School’s annual fund raising drive. Your support keeps us alive. Don’t forget to bring the kids.

May Festival Royalty

OROVILLE - Girls interested in running for 2015 May Festival Royalty are asked to attend the next May Festival Committee Meeting on Nov. 19 at 6 p.m. with a parent at the Plaza Restaurant (1412 Main). Candidates must be a junior in high school or home school equivalent. Information about requirements and availability of money through the committee and fundraisers

proceeds will go to our new reader board. Bingo is every Friday night at 7 p.m. and on Nov. 21 will be the Turkey Bingo. Get out your dobbers and win a great turkey, also the kitchen is open at 5:30 p.m. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Ron Wisener, second place Neil Fifer, last pinochle to Gladys and Neil Fifer, last but not least low score went to Sue Wisener. We wish all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

TONASKET - The national Health Mart Healthy Living Tour will be stopping at a couple of the area’s pharmacies, Roys Pharmacy

THE LEARNING TREE in frequency and intensity in the coming years. Are you prepared? Can your home withstand the onslaught of a raging wildfire pushed by 50+ mph winds? During the Carlton Complex wildfire, homes whose owners followed the FireWise fire prevention method consistently survived the fire. North Valley Community Schools has teamed up with Okanogan County Conservation District to offer a class on this method free

and Okanogan Valley Pharmacy on Tuesday, Nov. 11 to offer free health screenings for risks associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, cholesterol and obesity aboard a 40-foot mobile health screening unit.

The tour is designed to celebrate local community pharmacists who go above and beyond to serve their communities and is making more than 170 stops across the country this year.

Oroville High School to host Veterans Day assembly The Gazette-Tribune

OROVILLE - Oroville High School will host its annual Veterans

West My Friend Concert

TONASKET - West My Friend will be performing Friday, Nov. 21, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Described as everything from indie-roots to chamber-folk, their acoustic blend of instruments and four-part harmonies challenges the conventions of popular music to create a performance that is both engaging and innovative. Wellcrafted and clever lyrics, acrobatic mandolin riffs, flawless bass lines, and richly textured accordion combine as every member brings forward their own ideas and experiences. How lucky we are to have them grace our stage! Schedule - 6 p.m. Dinner ($7.50 for CCC members/$8.50 non-members); 7 p.m. Concert ($10). Beverages and desserts will be available by donation .

your Christmas celebrations at the Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar on Friday Nov. 21, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s bazaar is hosted by the OHS Future Business Leaders of America in the Oroville Grade School Gymnasium. Artisans, crafters and other vendors are encouraged to contact Susan at 509-476-2427 for more information. Registrations forms are available at the Oroville Public Library, Oroville Elementary School, Oroville High School, Oroville City Hall and Hughes Department Store.

Tonasket Food Bank

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the

Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar OROVILLE - Get a head start to

Day assembly on Monday, Nov. 10, beginning at 10:00 a.m. Veterans of the Armed Forces will be honored at this event at

which community members are also invited to attend. The assembly will be held in Coulton Auditorium.

Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com or at GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA.

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

On Sat., Nov. 8th the Oroville United Methodist Church will hold their annual Christmas Bazaar & Country Kitchen from 10 to 2 p.m. Also, the popular “Ralphs” Spaghetti Dinner will be served at the church from 11 to 1:30. Come and browse and enjoy a wonderful spaghetti lunch.

OROVILLE

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Worship on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship of charge. This is the second offering of this class as we would like to reach as many people as possible. This class will take place in Tonasket on Wednesday, Nov. 12. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-4762011 to RSVP. We need enough people signed up by Nov. 10 to let the instructor know that class is on. Facial Scrub/Cleanser: On Thursday, Nov. 13 turn your favorite lotion into a facial scrub! Let this fun class show you how to make a personalized and useful product that you will enjoy. To sign up for these classes and more call Barttels at 509-4762011. Save the date! Coming up on Saturday, Nov. 15 at Vickie’s Back Door Club is the NVCS annual 50’s dance. Enjoy live music by Project 3:16, hamburgers, floats, prizes and a rockin’ good time! Don’t forget to bring the kids.

Health screening in Tonasket The Gazette-Tribune

to help with royalty costs will be provided at the meeting. More info: www.orovillemayfestival.com.

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET

Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb • 509-429-2948 Pastor Stephen Williams • www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Trinity Episcopal Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am • Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th WORD IS TRUTH.” JOHN 17:17 Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Holy Rosary Catholic Church Warden • 476-2022 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Church of Christ Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110 Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m. Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15 Seventh-Day Adventist “For it is by grace you have been saved, through 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9 Pastor Tony Rivera • 509-557-6146 “To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • 509-476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am office@orovillefmc.org Pastor Rod Brown

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Bible Faith Family Church Pentacostal Church of God

1012 Fir Street, Oroville • 476-3063 Pastor Claude Roberts SUNDAY: 9 - 9:30 a.m. Prayer & Fellowship 9:30 - 10:10 a.m. L.I.F.E. - Duck Dynasty Faith Commander all November 10:10 - 10:30 Coffee & Visiting 10:30 - 11:30 Church Service with Project 3:16 Band 6 - 7:30 p.m. Pursuit

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages Pastor Jim Yassey-Albright 509-846-4278

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Debbie Roberts 509-486-2192


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 6, 2014

OBITUARIES

ROY CURTIS Elvin Roy Curtis, 87, passed away on Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014, at Regency House in Omak. He was born in Oroville on October 8, 1927, to E. H. Bill and Ada Curtis. Roy graduated Oroville High School in 1945 and joined the Navy that year. Later he attended Washington State College and received a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmacy in 1954. In 1955, he purchased Jerry’s Pharmacy in Tonasket, hanging the name to Roy’s Pharmacy. In 1958, brother Lloyd became a full partner and they operated Roy’s Pharmacy until the fall of 1992, when they sold it. Roy and Lloyd had an unique partnership, being brothers, partners and best friends forever. Roy married Beryl Zabreznik Hamilton on Nov. 12, 1968. They bought a motorhome and traveled all over, including a long trip to Florida. Roy loved to hunt and fish. Roy was always cheerful and full of mischief as he delighted in doing pranks on friends. He is survived by children, Bruce (Wanda) Curtis of Rancho Cordova, Calif.; Dennis (Rebecca) Curtis of Lynnwood; Janice Truax of Omak; Lori (Mike) Nick of Omak; and Bill (Linda) Hamilton of Kent and 12 grandchildren and 12 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his loving, wife, Beryl and daughter, Susan Gorges. Services were held at the Tonasket Senior Center on Saturday, Nov. 1 at 2 p.m. Bergh Funeral Service was in charge of arrangements.

Esther Applegate

MARY ESTHER APPLEGATE Glenn Hauenstein

GLENN MERLE HAUENSTEIN

Mary Esther Applegate, 71, passed away on Wednesday, October 8, 2014, at Alive Hospice Residence in Nashville, TN. She was born on September 14, 1943, in Tonasket, Wash., daughter of

the late Amos and Mary (Beale) Teas. Esther grew up in Chesaw, Wash. and graduated from Concordia High School. She later moved to Valparaiso, Ind. to attend Valparaiso University, where she studied to be a deaconess; she spent the rest of her life in the Midwest. Esther was an avid gardener and talented quilter, who will be remembered for her dedication to pursuing her faith. She was a member of Christian Roots Assembly Home Fellowship Group of Williamsport, Ind. Esther was preceded in death by four brothers, John, Robert, Tom, and Roy Teas. She is survived by her husband, Ron Applegate of Covington, Ind.; two brothers, Frank Teas of Spokane, Wash. and Herb Teas of East Wenatchee, Wash.; five children, Andrew Selking of Columbia, South Carolina, Rachel Selking of Lake Geneva, Wisc., John Selking of Roundrock, Texas, Hannah ltzin of Nashville, Tenn. and Joel Selking of Chicago, Ill.; eight grandchildren, Alison, Nathan, Ryan, Ethan, Robyn, Evangeline, Magdalene, and Joseph and one great-grandchild, Elizabeth.

Tonasket Bible Church as well as their mid-week Bible study. Even as Paul began to decline physically, he continued to press on with his wonderful sense of humor and love of life. Paul’s family would like to thank his faithful and selfless care givers Dorothy Leidig and Dawn Nogales for their expression of true Christlike love and service. The family would also like to thank Dr. Richard Welton for the extraordinary medical care given to Paul during his time in Tonasket. Dr. Welton served Paul far above and beyond the medical status quo. Paul is survived by his parents, George and Marilyn Williams of Des Moines and many siblings: (listed oldest to youngest) Jeorjia Gooch (Mark), Ravensdale, Wash.; sister-inlaw Mitzann Williams, Milton, Wash.; Carolyn Oldright (Ken), Des Moines; John Williams (Jeanie), Tukwila, Wash.; Martin Williams, North Bend, Wash.; Mary Dyck (Phil), Puyallup, Wash.; George Williams (Lorna), Des Moines; David Williams (Krista), Auburn, Wash.; Danny Williams

(Shelly), Auburn Wash.; Tommy Williams (Danielle), Eatonville, Wash.,; Jimmy Williams (Tina), Graham, WA; Donald Williams (Madeline), Tacoma, Wash.; Sharon Lofthus (Craig), Tonasket; Stephen Williams (Angie), Tonasket; Debbie Dunkle (Mike), Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Paul also has 48 nieces and nephews and

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Paul Williams

PAUL BENJAMIN WILLIAMS Paul Benjamin Williams was born September 3, 1954, in Seattle, Wash. and went home to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, on October 26, 2014. Paul grew up in Des Moines, Wash. and was the fifth-born of 16 children. He attended Mt. Rainier High School and graduated in 1972. A few years later, doctors discovered a tumor on his optic nerve that required surgery. The procedure left Paul completely and permanently blind at the age of 21. Having the map of Des Moines firmly imprinted on his mind, Paul enjoyed many years of independence, walking around the town, attending the different sporting events at the local Field House as well as the weekly Bible study at Des Moines Gospel Chapel. Paul was known by many as “the blind man who gets around all by himself.” If you honked your horn while driving by, he would raise his cane high in the air so as to acknowledge your “hello.” He brought so much joy to children, especially his many nieces and nephews. He always had a treat for them in his pocket and often times would pull shiny quarters out of their ears! Paul enjoyed sharing jokes with anyone who would listen. His blind jokes were always a big hit, putting at ease the many strangers he would meet on his daily walks. Paul continued to live with his parents, George and Marilyn Williams, who faithfully cared for him for over 58 years. Paul made his way to The Father’s Ranch (Tonasket, Wash.) in February of 2013, to live with his sister Sharon’s family. Paul’s days at the ranch were spent working alongside Craig (his brother-in-law), enjoying the animals, and sometimes a fishing trip to Bonaparte Lake. Paul attended Sunday morning worship services at

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35 grand nieces and nephews that will all miss him. Paul was preceded in death by his birth mother, Esther Williams in 1956, and his oldest brother Chris Williams in 2013. A public memorial will be held in Paul’s honor at 1:00 p.m., November 15, at Des Moines Gospel Chapel in Des Moines, Wash.

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Mount Vernon, Wash. He was the fifth of six sons born to Pearl and Marion Hauenstein. The family farm required lots of work from all the boys, and they were instilled with a strong work ethic. At various times, they milked cows; had turkeys and chickens, and raised alfalfa and corn. Glenn went to Baker Heights School located across the road from the farm; then to Clear Lake. He participated in boxing while at Sedro Woolley High School. Glenn graduated from Washington State University in 1953 with a BS in Poultry Science. Later he worked as a field service man for grain companies and had a turkey farm. In the mid 1960s, Glenn got his teaching certification from Western Washington University. He taught math and science classes in the Oroville School District for 31 years, as well as, advising the Science Club and teaching driver’s ed to many students and local citizens. He retired in 1996. Glenn met his future wife, Glenna Jacob, in McMinnville, Ore. in 1951. They married Aug. 10, 1952, and were best friends for 62 years. They always tried to help each other with work and projects. Glenn enjoyed bowling and curling when first in Oroville. Later, he was active with the Kiwanis Club, and served as President for a number of years. Glenn enjoyed working with his hands. He volunteered at the Oroville Depot Museum and United Methodist Church making repairs. He spent many hours remodeling and expanding the family home. Glenn died October 30, 2014 after a short illness. He is survived by his wife, Glenna, his four children, Roger, Marjory (Brandon), Philip and Susan; and six grandchildren, Scott (his wife, Tairra), Eric, Ashley, Kelsey, Shawn and Alexander. Private graveside services were held at the Oroville Cemetery on Tuesday, November 4. A private celebration of Glenn’s life will be held at a future date. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to the Oroville Scholarship Foundation.

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NOVEMBER 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Opportunity is there for both Tigers, Hornets in playoffs

Champs are State-bound

It’s November, and both Tonasket and Oroville have qualified for the Class 2B football playoffs. It’s been quite awhile since both teams have made the playoffs at the same time; in fact, the Tigers are making their first HALF-BAKED appearance Brent Baker since 2007. Both will take to the road this Friday: Tonasket travels to Warden, while the Hornets make their way even further, to White Swan. Coincidentally, for both squads it’s a rematch of their season-openers two months ago. And while both lost in Week 1, each feels they have a legitimate shot at winning this win-or-gohome affair.

CAT FIGHT The Tigers and Warden Cougars will kick off at 7 p.m. Friday, and Tonasket will be hoping for a similar offensive explosion that had them on the verge of toppling the Cougars in that first game. They rushed for more than 400 yards and had a 16-point lead in the third quarter. But one costly turnover, and their inability to account for Orlando Alba, whose speed they hadn’t really been aware of and hadn’t been able to replicate in practice, turned the game in the Cougars’ favor down the stretch. Working in the Tigers’ favor this time around: they know about Alba, running back Jerry Reyes and tight end Peter Manville, who were effective as receivers as well. And Warden has continued to give up 400yard rushing nights most of the season, including nearly 500 to White Swan. However, the Tigers also had the services of Austin Knowlton, who rushed for more than 100 yards that night (along with 215 by Isaiah Yaussy-Albright and 71 from Jorge Juarez). Knowlton, of course, was injured during that game and likely will even miss all of the upcoming wrestling season. White Swan, which is a physical team like the Tigers, found a way to limit Alba to under 40 yards of total offense; if they can do that, the Tigers, who finished third in the CWL North, have an excellent shot at what would be a mild upset over the South runners-up. SPEAKING OF WHITE SWAN... Over the first seven weeks of the season, the Hornets played six teams that finished with a combined record of 42-14, including White Swan (7-2). However, the Cougars may be the least intimidating of their murderers’ row schedule that included state powers Okanogan, Brewster, Mt. Rainier and a solid Chelan squad. White Swan took a big early lead but held on for a 28-16 victory over a Hornet team that was as inexperienced as any they have fielded for awhile. They also kick off at 7 p.m. on Friday. The Cougars are a physical team in the mold of Tonasket, which prefers to pound the ball at opponents with running backs Brian Walker and Albert Picard, with a few passes sprinkled in to keep things honest. But Oroville doesn’t resemble the team it was in Week 1. Battle tested to the extreme, with nose tackle Logan Mills proving he could clog the middle against even state-ranked 1A teams, the Hornets match up well with the Cougars’ strengths. Sophomore quarterback Nathan Hugus has steadily grown into the position; Hugus found a big-play receiver in Andrew Mieirs; and a healthier Dustin Nigg has shown what he can do when he gets the ball in open space, scoring 10 touchdowns in the last two weeks on offense, defense and special teams. Any time a No. 4 seed like the Hornets (3-6) travels to a top seed like White Swan, the odds of an upset would seem remote.

SEE PLAYOFFS | PG A3

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kayla Willis (19) collides with St. George’s goalkeeper Erin Armitage in the second half of the Tigers’ 5-1 victory over the Dragons in Saturday’s district tournament opener. Neither player was injured on the play, which resulted in a free kick for the Tigers.

Tigers share league title with Okanogan, Liberty Bell; defeat St. George’s to clinch state playoff berth BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The first round of the Class B District 5/6/7 tournament presents a perilous reality to all the teams involved: win, or turn the uniforms in for the season. Tonasket took care of business in efficient fashion on Saturday, Nov. 1, dispatching St. George’s 5-1. The victory clinches a berth in the 1B/2B state tournament (final eight), but first the Tigers face two more district tournament games that will determine both a district champ and state seeding for the four survivors. Okanogan, Brewster and Liberty Bell also won on Saturday to clinch state berths, sweeping out Bridgeport, Mabton and Warden. Thus the center of small school soccer power rests firmly in North Central Washington. “The first 10 to 15 minutes, we were a little slow,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins, who guided a young team to its first state berth since 2004. “But after that we started hitting our passes, picking it up.” The Tigers got all the scoring they needed in the first half. Rose Walts put tue Tigers on the board at the midway point of the opening half, taking a pass from Jaden Vugteveen and punching it past St. George’s keeper Erin Armitage. Ashlynn Willis scored minutes later, ripping a close range rocket shot off Armitage, then following to put away the deflection herself. Walts finished with a hat trick, scoring her next two goals off of Ashlynn Willis shots that were too hot to handle. “Rose has been sick all week, so that game out of her was pretty remarkable,” Collins said. “Even less than 100 percent when she crashes the goal she’s faster than the defenders.” Willis scored the final Tonasket goal midway through the second half, with Kayla Willis picking up the assist. That said, it was a nearly impenetrable defense that keyed much of what the Tigers accomplished. St. George’s managed just two shots on goal for the game - the second of which came on a free kick in the final minutes that caught the wind and knuckled into the low corner of the goal. The Tigers put 16 shots on goal and missed just wide on several other opportunities. “Our defense was real strong,” Collins said. “My seniors back there have been great all season, but never more than today.” He acknowledged it was hard

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket coach Darren Collins said the defense provided by Hilda Celestino (above) and Fernanda Abrego has been a big key to the Tigers’ run to the state tournament. for defenders to get much attention when their job is essentially to make sure their keeper has a boring day. “Fernanda Abrego had a great game today,” Collins said. “She just hustled a lot. And she’s been great off the field too, keeping after some of the girls to make sure their grades stay up. “Hilda Celestino has been strong through her whole career. I don’t know if she’s missed a game in two years, and I can only think of once that I’ve subbed for her. She’s real consistent, doesn’t get hurt, plays hard, uses her body well.” The Tigers (15-2) were set to

host Brewster in a district semifinal on Tuesday. The winner of that game plays for the district championship against the Okanogan-Liberty Bell winner on Saturday, Nov. 8, at 3:00 p.m. in the Wenatchee Apple Bowl. The Tuesday losers play in the third and fourth place game at 1:00 p.m.

TIGERS SNAG SHARE OF CWL BREWSTER - The Tigers defeated Brewster 3-1 on Tuesday, Oct. 28, and with the help of Liberty Bell were able to claim a share of the Central Washington League title. The Mountain Lions edged

Okanogan in a penalty kick shootout (after playing to a 1-1 tie), and all three teams finished the season with 12-2 records in league play. Unlike in the CTL, the CWL does not use the points system (3 for a win, 2 for a shootout win, etc.) for tiebreak purposes. District tournament seeding was determined by random draw. “With teams like Okanogan and Liberty Bell, we had some real quality in this league,” Collins said. “We don’t have a big team, and with such a young team with so many freshmen and eighth graders, it’s both an accomplishment and a reason to be excited

about the future.” Rose Walts had two goals and Megan Bolich scored one. “Megan’s was a real nice shot from outside the 18-yard box,” Collins said. “She just smashed a great shot right over the top.” Collins said the team was fully aware of the implications of Tuesday’s game. Just a few days earlier, the Tigers had trailed Okanogan by two games in the standings, but after beating the Bulldogs themselves knew they suddenly had a shot at the league title. “It was definitely on their minds,” he said. “We knew after beating Okanogan, if Liberty Bell could win, we’d be there.”


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 6, 2014

SPORTS Tonasket cross country teams head to state Girls win regional title BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

WENATCHEE - Tonasket’s cross country teams ensured their transition to the Class B level was a successful one as both the boys and girls squads advanced to this weekend’s state finals meet. Nothing was a given, however. The girls won the regional title, claiming the lone team spot to state and eating up four of the five individual spots in the process; the boys took second and claimed one of three team regional berths. Lake Roosevelt eighth grader Loryn Moore, running at the varsity level since her school doesn’t have a middle school / junior high team, won the individual title with a 21:42 finish on the 5-kilometer course. The top four Tigers all finished within six seconds of one another. Camille Wilson was runner-up (21:56), followed by Katie Henneman (21:57), Johnna Terris (21:58) and Jenna Valentine (22:02). Baillie Hirst was 14th in 27:33. “The girls ran some of their fastest times of the year,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “We are peaking at the right time and are excited about racing at the state finals this Saturday.” Running as the lone full team was hardly a guarantee for the Tigers, however. Terris, the Tigers’ No. 1 runner most of the year and boys No. 1 Hunter Swanson were in Kentucky all week competing at the FFA national convention. Thornton gave them workouts to complete during the week to stay in shape, and the two left the convention a day early, flying back Friday afternoon in order to get to Wenatchee by Saturday morning for the race. Thornton also had to have a contingency plan for the girls, who had no margin for error with just five healthy runners. Haley

Bruce Thornton/submitted photos

Above, the Tonasket cross country teams were a happy bunch Saturday after both squads qualified for this week’s state finals meet in Pasco. The girls won the regional title (Camille Wilson, center, has the trophy) while the boys were runners-up to Liberty Bell. Above right, (l-r) Jenna Valentine, Johnna Terris, Camille Wilson, Lake Roosevelt’s Loryn Moore and Katie Henneman comprised the lead pack of the girls race. Below right, the boys take off at the start of Saturday’s regional race. Larson, with an injured knee, jogged/walked part of the course until she was assured that her five teammates (the minimum for team qualifying) had finished the race, then dropped out. The boys faced a more competitive situation, with nine full teams competing. Liberty Bell won the meet with 71 points to the runner-up Tigers’ 92. Lake Roosevelt (102) edged Manson (103) for the final spot. The heavily-favored Mountain Lions made it to their fifth straight state finals as a team,

but only after some hand-wringing of their own. Having already lost two of their eight runners to injury, two more were declared academically ineligible during the week, leaving them with just four healthy runners - not enough to qualify as a team. One of the injured runners, Carter Dornfeld, jogged the course, finishing last but adding the fifth score to his teammates’ to keep the Mountain Lions’ streak alive. Otherwise Liberty Bell would not have qualified as a team despite boasting four of the top seven finishes.

Liberty Bell’s Ben Klemmeck (17:14) avenged last week’s defeat to Bridgeport’s Oren Cox (17:20) to claim the individual regional title. Breaking into that top seven was the Tigers’ Swanson, who despite his own case of jet lag took sixth in 17:47, beating his 5k personal best by 16 seconds. He was the only Tiger to qualify as an individual (in other words, earn a state spot regardless of team finish). “The boys overcame both sickness and jetlag,” Thornton said. “Hunter ran a good, smart race and showed good focus in lead-

ing the team to the state meet.” Adrian McCarthy finished 16th in 18:52, followed by Abe Podkranic (21st, 19:33), Smith Condon (25th, 20:05), Justin McDonald (34th, 20:36) and Rade Pilkinton (42nd, 21:26). Adam Halvorsen finished second in the JV race (22:55). The state finals are hosted by Sun Willows Golf Course of Pasco on Saturday, Nov. 8. The girls race at 10:00 a.m. and the boys at 11:30.

BAUGHER 24TH FOR HORNETS Oroville’s boys finished ninth

as a team, led by freshman Brandon Baugher’s 24th place finish in 20:01. Also running were Ryan Marcolin (37th, 20:43), Luis Vazquez (41st, 21:18), Nahum Garfias (43rd, 21:29), Emmanuel Castrejon (54th, 22:40), Daniel Castrejon (58th, 23:25) and Dakota Haney (62nd, 28:02). All of the Hornets ran their season-best at the 5k distance. Phoebe Poynter was the lone Hornet girl to run, placing 13th (25:48), her 5k personal best by more than two minutes.

Hornets blast Lions to reach .500 in league BY BRENT BAKER

Nigg is Player of Week

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

WINTHROP - The tough earlyseason schedule is paying off for the Oroville football team, which used a second straight explosive performance from Dustin Nigg to overwhelm Liberty Bell 54-6 on Friday, Oct. 31. The Hornets evened their CWL North Division record at 3-3 (3-6 overall), and with the league’s fourth and last playoff spot nailed down will be traveling to White Swan this Friday for a district crossover game. Nigg followed up his six touchdown performance at Bridgeport with four more against the Mountain Lions and nearly had one more. “We’ve been working to get him the ball in open areas,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson. “Early in the season we tried to run him inside more, but that didn’t work very well.” Nigg scored rushing touchdowns on runs of eight and 40 yards in the first half and on a 10-yard run in the second half, finishing with 132 yards rushing on just eight carries. He also returned the second half kick off (for the second straight week) for a 90-yard touchdown. Defensively he picked off two Liberty Bell passes - one to prevent a score in the Hornets’ end zone, and the other he returned 50 yards to the Mountain Lions’ 1-yard line. He’s scored 10 touchdowns in the last two weeks. Liberty Bell caught the Hornets off guard to open the game, running a no huddle offense that resulted in an 80-yard scoring drive that gave the Mountain Lions a quick 6-0 lead. “It did catch us off guard a little bit,” Hutchinson said. “We were a little flat-footed. But we’d seen on tape that their kids weren’t

Dustin Nigg became the first Oroville Hornet of the school year to be named WIAA Athlete of the Week for Class 2B after his performance during Oroville’s 63-7 victory over Bridgeport. As noted on the WIAA website, Nigg scored 45 points, including rushing touchdown runs of 36, 19, and 25 yards, as he rushed for 105 yards on five carries. Nigg also added two punt return touchdowns of 83 and 55 yards, to along with a 91 yard kickoff return for another score. He capped his scoring off with nine PATs. Andrew Mieirs beats the Liberty Bell defense for a 25-yard touchdown pass in the second quarter of the Hornets’ 54-6 victory to close out the regular season on Friday, Oct. 31. Oroville heads to White Swan for a district playoff game this Friday. Brent Baker/staff photo

in great shape and didn’t think they’d be able to keep up that kind of pace. So we were able to adjust.” Other than elusive quarterback Chip Jones, the Hornets had little trouble stifling Liberty Bell from there. Jones finished with 117 yards rushing on 19 carries and completed 8-of-19 passes for 142 yards, though 55 of those yards came on the opening drive. “Jones is a good kid, a good player, a good quarterback,” Hutchinson said. “Last year when he had those senior receivers he really hurt us.”

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The Hornets’ offense also showed it had more than Nigg going for it. The sophomore connection of quarterback Nathan Hugus and receiver Andrew Mieirs continued to click. Hugus connected with Mieirs twice for 69 yards, including an over-theshoulder 25-yard touchdown catch in the second quarter. Nigg’s third touchdown sent the Hornets into the half with a 27-6 lead. Caleb Mills rushed for 66 yards on 11 carries before seeing his season end with a fractured leg after he was hit by a Liberty Bell helmet on a run

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late in the second half. The play so incensed Hutchinson, who felt that the tackler was leading with his helmet, that he and Liberty Bell coaches engaged in a shouting match across the field before referees calmed the situation. Lane Tietje, who has played tight end most of the season, stepped up to run for 40 yards and his first career touchdown on four carries in the second half. Stetson Spears scored on a 1-yard run after Nigg’s fourth quarter interception and return, and Hugus ran for a 1-yard score

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in the third quarter. Cody Tibbs, EZ Delgado, Leo Curiel and Charlie Arrigoni led

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NOVEMBER 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS PLAYOFFS | FROM A1 But if White Swan expects to win this game simply by showing up, the Hornets have matured enough over the course of the season to make it a very interesting night.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Christian Garcia follows through on an extra point in the rain Thursday as Omak’s Dustin Thorp belatedly flies in to try to block it. Garcia’s PAT came after the Tigers’ lone score in a 19-7 non-league loss to the Pioneers.

Tigers head to playoffs after tough loss BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - In the grand scheme of things, Thursday’s regular season finale meant little to the Tonasket football team. It meant everything to Omak, and the difference was readily apparent throughout the Tigers’ 19-7 loss to the Pioneers. Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins said that legendary Nebraska coach Tom Osborne would have recognized the type of game the Tigers played that dropped their regular-season record to 5-4. “He said that over the course of 10, 11, 12 games, there will be that game where you just can’t get up to that level,” Hawkins said. “That really made sense to me. The game is so emotional. And I can look back at every season, and there will always be that one time. “Tonight was that night.” It wasn’t that Omak didn’t play well. The Tigers struggled with the first offensive line they’ve played against all year that had the edge on them in size, and had trouble sustaining drives. But the lack of focus was evident in the nine penalties - seven of which were of the pre-snap variety. “Penalties are bad,” Hawkins said. “But for us, they’re bad-bad. We can’t get into situations where it’s 2nd-and-15, 3rd-and-10.” After a scoreless first half, the Tigers came out in the third quarter wanting to take the lead. Trying to get some energy injected into the team, Hawkins elected to go for it on 4th-and-1 from the Tigers’ 31. That backfired when the Pioneers stopped the Tigers short of the first down, and Omak’s Dustin Thorp went the distance on Omak’s next play to put the Pioneers ahead. “They have a bunch of big bodies,” Hawkins said of the Pioneers’ line. “We had trouble moving them around and sustaining anything. We jsut didn’t have the energy level on us. And give them credit, too. They played well from start to finish.” Over the next 12 minutes, Omak tacked on two more touchdowns - including a 55-yard pass play to a wide-open Thorp on a broken coverage by the Tigers - to lead 19-0. The Tigers avoided the shutout by driving 70 yards in the final minutes, with Colton Leep hitting Isaiah Yaussy-

PLAYOFF CRAZINESS I’ve made no secret that my opinion of the state’s playoff system isn’t very high. In past years the Hornets have been a No. 2 seed playing on the road in a state playoff game against a lower seed; their league has been shortchanged playoff spots relative to the numbers other leagues have gotten; and there was the volleyball fiasco last year that had Oroville traveling to White Swan (about six hours by bus) for a weeknight playoff game. (Technically the volleyball issue was at the district level, but that’s just another berry in the same pie.) What goes around could come around: if Oroville should pull off the upset at White Swan, the Hornets would host at least one state tournament game. That’s because the Hornets - who lost games to the top three league teams by a combined score of 15720 - would receive the top seed coming out of the CWL South, in essence, gaining the rights of a champion of a league they don’t even play in with a 3-6 record. Hey, it’s not their fault; the tournament is set up the way it is and they should embrace the opportunity. Teams knew before the season .... oh, wait, those decisions didn’t get finalized until after the season was nearly a month old. Still.

It would please me on multiple levels to see the Hornets pull off this upset. Partly because it would be a great story of a team that endured an impossible early schedule to finish the season on a very high note. And because that’s the sort of thing that could shake things up enough with the WIAA and be the catalyst for some meaningful change in how these tournaments are set up. Or maybe not. But one can hope. Back up in Class 1A, from whence Okanogan, Tonasket and Brewster came, the Caribou Trail League is having its own state allocation blues. With only four teams, the league was assigned just one spot to the state tournament, and without a crossover game with another district, that is all they are going to get. Cascade won the league’s lone state spot. Cashmere - 5-2 after Cascade eliminated them from playoff contention (and before a meaningless-to-them loss to Chelan) - was good enough to hand Royal its only loss (Royal turned around and beat Cascade by 30) but is not good enough to get into the state playoffs. No one is shedding any tears for Cashmere. But you can’t convince me there are 16 teams better than they are. Speaking of volleyball, Cascade and Chelan last year met in the state title match and both are as strong as ever. Despite that, only one will even get to the state tournament this year. Who gets served by this mess? Not the kids, that’s for sure.

Hornet soccer scores season high THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Oroville’s girls soccer team pushed playoff-bound Bridgeport to the brink Tuesday, scoring a season-high three goals and keeping the game tied deep into the second half before the Fillies were able to pull away to a 5-3 victory over the Hornets. The Hornets hadn’t scored more than one goal in a game all year. But with Bridgeport needing a victory to advance to the district playoffs, Oroville made sure they weren’t an automatic win for the Fillies by taking the early lead and exchanging goals until the late-going. “What an incredible game,” said Oroville coach Tony Kindred. “(The girls) showed incredible intensity for the final game of the saeason.” Katie Egerton scored off a Tori Kindred assist to give the Hornets and early lead. Kindred

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Frank Holfeltz pulls down Omak quarterback Russell Daffern during Thursday’s loss to the Pioneers. Albright with a 28-yard touchdown pass. Between the penalties, lack of energy and inability to sustain drives, it was far from the Tigers’ best night. Albright finished with 73 yards rushing on 17 carries and Jorge Juarez had 88 yards on 16

carries. Considering the Tigers scored 20 and 15 points, respectively, against Okanogan and Brewster - who have lost only to each other this year - the seven points against Omak wasn’t what the Tigers expected. Hawkins took it in stride.

“It was a meaningless game for us, but it meant a lot to them,” he said. “Now we put it behind us and move on. We have a great opportunity next week. “Tonight, it was Tom Osborne all the way. We have played at an emotional level pretty consistently, and we didn’t tonight.”

later added a second assist on Kambe Ripley’s goal, and Yessica Nemecio added a goal with Kali Peters assisting. “This was a great game for the ladies and a great improvement on the season,” Kindred said. “These girls are set to come back next year taking up where they left off.” Kindred said defense by Marissa Aubin, Paz Lopez, Tylynne Watkins and Alexia Garcia kept a lot of pressure off keeper Xochil Rangel, who made six saves. “That greatly reduced the 20-plus saves that she typically needed to take care of,” Kindred said. Bridgeports Rose Luna scored twice in the final minutes to snap a 3-3 tie. “Their level of play and overall commitment makes it exciting to see what next year will bring,” Kindred said.

Speiker is top frosh THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

GRAND FORKS, N.D. Idaho’s Sierra Speiker, a freshman from Oroville, was the top freshman finisher at the Big Sky Conference cross country championships in North Dakota on Saturday, Nov. 1. Speiker was also the top finisher for the Vandals, taking 15th place overall out of 89 competi-

tors, running the 5k course in 17:45.1. Winning the race was Sarah Reiter of Eastern Washington University in 17:05 Speiker and her Idaho teammates will run at the NCAA West Regional meet at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif., on Nov. 14. The NCAA Division 1 finals are Nov. 22.

Dining & Entertainment

Out on the Town...

azaar & Country Kitche B s a m t n Chris

Sat., Nov. 8th 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

at the Oroville United Methodist Church Don’t Miss the popular

“Ralphs” Spaghetti Dinner to be served at the church from 11am to 1:30pm Come and browse and enjoy a wonderful spaghetti lunch.

Bonaparte

Lake Resort & Restaurant Prime Rib every Fri. & Sat.

Call for New Fall Hours!

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here!

EVERY WEEK Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close


OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 7, 2013

Page B4

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | November 6, 2014

Gold Stars for Special Vets

Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck of Marquis Lewis, Robert Everett, President, NCW Blue Star Mothers George Dragnich, Wilmer Fankhanel, John Eatmon, George Jmaeff, TONASKET - Each fall the US Ivan Corbin, Roy Karner, Lee Roy Armed Forces Legacy Memorial in Weitman, Gilbert Rise, Dorothy Tonasket flies the Blue Star Mothers Scott, Jesse Devore, Robert CastelService Banner, and the Blue Star da, Andrew Castelda, Donald JohnMothers place gold stars upon the son, John Anderson, Stanley Bricht, plaques of those Killed in Action Alvin Smith, Herman Schmeling, and Missing in Action. A mother’s Jeremy Wright, Leo McCormack, star turns from blue to gold if their Emerald Clay Coil, Theodore Olchild is killed while serving our sen, Norman Peden, John Oldencountry. Fifty-three stars will adorn burg, Ray Wiseman, Francis Still, the walls this year from Gold Star Arthur Olsen, Kenneth McKeen, Mother’s day, the last Sunday of Richard Oldenburg, Martha Betts, Lewis Albanese, Louis Wandler, September, to Veterans Day. As you drive by the memorial Matthew Mitchell, Chester Appel, along the west side of Highway 97 Carroll Tollett, Kenneth Eighme, just south of Tonasket you see the Matt “Snoop” Snyder, Earl Browne, gold stars contrasted against the Carl Lamberson, Glen Barnhill, Roy black walls of granite. Say a prayer Robert, Merle “Jim” Martin, George for each one our community has Fox, Louis Fuhrman, John Washsent to war. And remember the ington, Charles Henry, Alexander mother and the family who gave Goode, Clark Poling, Robert Van so much towards the freedoms we Klinken, and Orval Bretthauer. “… because every soldier has a have today. This year we honor the mothers mother.”

Christopher Haddad

George Frank

Branch of Service: Army (1986 - 1994) From your Wife - Thank you!

From: Tonasket Branch of Service: U.S. Air Force

Vernon J. Hills

Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Korea Love from your family

Don Thorndike

Roy Pucket Branch of Service: US Navy Love from Carol Pucket & Kids

Ron McDougall

From: Oroville Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Korea Love from your family

From: Oroville Branch of Service: U.S. Army Served in Vietnam Love from your family

From Roberta Scholz

G RANT’S

MARKE T

Home Owned • One Stop Grocery Shopping

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127

Rachel Marringer From: Oroville Branch of Service: Navy Love from Mom

Andrew (Andy) Robinson

James U. Bridges

Branch of Service: US Navy USS Camden (Persian Gulf & Iraqi Freedom) Love from your family

Branch of Service: US Army 1967 - 1968 Vietnam From wife Kitty Bridges

Tonasket VA Clinic Open House November 7th from 11AM to 2PM

• VA I.D. pictures will be taken from 9AM to 1PM

(you will need 1 primary ID documentation which could be State issued drivers license, social security card, or certificate of birth for example)

• Vets who would like to enroll in our clinic can get their Vesting Exam the same day they come for the Open House. • Flu shots available • Resources from Tonasket and Spokane VAMC will be available: • Eligibilities • Women’s veterans Support • My Health Vet • Vet Center • Shane Barton, VSO

203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket PH: 509-486-3107

Ryn Lee Rollins

Jay R. LaMonte

Tyler J. Johnson

From: Republic Branch of Service: Airborne Ranger Love from Family

From: Okanogan, WA / US Navy Deceased We Miss You! Love, Velma, Rob & Wendy

From: Tonasket, WA / US Marine Corps Currently stationed in North Carolina With Love from All of Your Family!

ROY’S PHARMACY November 11, 2014 1220 Ironwood OROVILLE (509) 476-3646

We salute our nation’s Veterans

Known for its friendly service & unique gift items! 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

Ph. 509-486-2149


November 6, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Roy A. Frazier U.S.S Pocono (AGC -16). RM-2 US Navy (Korean War)

J. Vincent Bretz

From: Tonasket / Service: Army Stationed in Hawaii during WWII. Believed to be sargent. Father of Patti Hill

Carl D. Graham

Thomas Even Sr.

US Navy (WWII From Roberta Scholz

USMC (1952 - 1955) From Travis Even & Roberta Scholz

Thomas Even III

US Army / 2004 - Present Afghanistan & Iraq Tours From Travis Even & Roberta Scholz

Jerry Lee Hilderbrand “Zeke” From: Oroville, WA / SP 3C US Army Thank you! Love, Sis & Family

Thomas Even Jr.

USMC (1980 - 1989) From Travis Even & Roberta Scholz

Billie J. Hilderbrand

From: Oroville, WA / US Army Thank you! Love, Sis & Family

Page B5

John Mike Pershing

Major Mark Warder

Son-in-law of Patti and George Hill Currently in Las Vegas, NV

Currently in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Randal Even

USMC (1977 - 1985) From Travis Even & Roberta Scholz

Rachael Even

USMC (1978 - 1982) From Travis Even & Roberta Scholz

Jeffery L. Hilderbrand From: Oroville / US Navy - Master Chief Thank you! Love, Aunt Pat & Family

Leslie Warder Hill Currently in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

Gerald E Scholz

Ricci Even USMC (1976 - 1980) From Travis Even & Roberta Scholz

US Army (1952- 1953) From your children

Edward W. Figlenski

Frank Anthony Presto

US Army (WWI) From Roberta Scholz

Uncles to Allene Halliday Great Uncles served in Canadian forces during World War I. 1916

PFC USMC MP (WWII Marine Corps Base) San Diego, CA (1944 - 1945) From Roberta Scholz

Art Waters

Served in the Pacific during World War II. 1943. Love you Uncle Art, Allene Halliday

at VIP Insurance Agency, we are

OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917 OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

Phil O. Lofthus “Poppa”

Kenneth A. Freese

From: Tonasket US Navy From Mom and Dad

From: Des Moines, WA Served: 39th Transportation Co., Specialist 4th Class, Stuttgart, Germany From: Craig, Sharon, Joshua, Lauren, Jeremiah, Caleb, Zachariah, Faith Lofthus Thank you for being a part of our freedom! We are proud of your service!

George H. Williams “Buddy”

From: Des Moines, WA 17th Airborne Div., 513th parachute Infantry, WWII “Operation Varsity” From: Craig, Sharon, Joshua, Lauren, Jeremiah, Caleb, Zachariah, Faith Lofthus We thank God for your bravery and willingness to serve our country! We are proud to be in your family!

hOnOring ThOse WhO FOughT TO KeeP Our FreeDOm alive

OrOville Pharmacy 1416 Main St., Oroville 509-476-3411


Page B6 6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | November 6, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 6, 2014

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication.

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

For Rent

Announcements

SIMILKAMEEN PARK APARTMENTS Oroville, WA.

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

4 Bedroom Starting at $475 per month + security deposit. Includes: • Water. Sewer. Garbage • Washer and Dryer • Air conditioning • Play area • Storage Space For more information contact Nanette at Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

Found

For Rent Subscribe to the...

LOVELY 3 BR HOME on the River. Lg fenced yard. $875. BEAUTIFUL WATERFRONT 2 BR Apartments $795- $850 Call Sun Lakes Realty today for information 509-476-2121.

www.gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE HOUSE FOR RENT. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. $675 month, $675 security deposit. Call 509-560-3781

Waterfront home $1200/ mo Waterfront apt $795/ month Select Charming Apt $495. Call Sun Lakes Realty today for information 509-476-2121.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 45 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

3

4

2

3

1

9

4

8

3 5

9

6

6

7

6 9

3 8

1 7 4

6

5 8 1 9

3

6 8 4

2 4

5 7

7 5 2 1

9 1 6 2

4

2

5

7

9

6

3

4

3

7

9

1

5 4

6

8

2

4 7

2

9 1 3

1

6

8

5

7

7 1 8 5

3 6 9 2

4

9 6 3 8 7

4 5 1 2

1 4

7 2 5 9

6 8 3

2 8 5

6 1 3 7 4

9

8

7 9 3

4 5 2 6 1

6 5

2 1 9

8 4 3 7

4 3 1

7 6 2

8 9 5

Puzzle 43 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

3

6

5

4

11. .0000001 joule

3

6 2 7

4 5

5 4 7 6

7 5 2 8

1 3

9 2

1

4

7

15. Seafood entree

3

1

12. “It’s no ___!�

2

9

8

3

6

17. Party bowlful (2 wds)

1

9

1

5

7 6

2

6

8

21. Approach

5

8

20. “Welcome� site

4

3

9

4

8 5 9 1 2 3

7

2 9

6 4 7 1 8

4 6

1 7 8

2

9

22. One who pulls something apart

1

4

25. Staying power?

2

9

1

5

3

6

26. Rodent-catching dog or cat 1

8

6

7

5

29. Mature male red deer

3

6

8

5

4

9

1

7

6

1

5

3

35. Acne scar

4

2

32. The “p� in m.p.g.

7

3

30. Pistol, slangily

9

8

4

2

36. Drug to remedy grief

5

2

9

8

7

2 9 6

9 2

7 4

8

9 5

7 5

8

6 7

2 3

1 4

6

5

7 3

4 2

4

3 1

6 8

9 7

8

5

9

3 9 5

6

6

4

3

2

8

4 5

6 2

3

3 4

9 1

2 7

8 5

5 8

2

9

2

5

3

6

7 4

1

9

7

6

5

1

7

4 9

3

8

1

3

4

6

8

2

3 4

8

1 2 6

9

5 7

4

7

5

1

3 6

6

2

7

2

8

9

4

5

1

9 8

3

1

5 9

6 8

3

3 6

7 9

4 2

4

2 8 1

7

5

7

9

5 8 3

1

8 3

6

4 2 9

1 4

5

6 7

Puzzle 44 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.43)

7

4

Puzzle 40 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

2

6

7

6

6

2 5

4 8

3 1

7 9

7 1

9

3 4

8

7

6

9

5

2

4

3

2 1

8

5

6

4

5

3 7

1 2

6 9

8

2

6 1

8 9

4 7

3 5

8 7

9 3

5 6

4

2

1

5

8

2

1

3

7

9

6

4

3

9

7

6

4

8

1

4

6

5

2

5

1

2

9

3

8 7

Puzzle 48 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59)

4 8

7

2 1

6

8

1

6

7

5

1

1

9 3

3

9

4 5

9 5

3 6

4

7

2

1 8

8

6 5

7 3

4 1

2 9

1 7

4 9

2 8

3 5 6

2

3 9

5 6

1

8

7 4

3

1

8

4

9

2

5

6 7

6

4

7

1

5

3

9

8 2

5

9

2

8

7

6

4 3 1

Puzzle 45 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

2

1

9 8 2

7 3

5 4

6

5

4 6

8 9

1 2

7 3

2

7

3 4

6 5 9

8

1

9

1 5 7

3

8 4 6

2

7

6

2 5 1

4

3 9 8

3

8

4

9 2 6

1

5 7

Puzzle 41 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

5 7 8

2 4 3 6 9

1

3

8 7 4

5 2 9 1 6

2 5

6

5

1

9

4 9

9

3

3

1

1

6 8 7 3

7

8

8 7

2 4

9 6

3

54. Some Bach pieces

1

3

4

50. First-place winner

3

8 5

5

3

9

2

9

1

3

5

1

2

5

47. The Boston Strangler, e.g.

7

6

46. After-dinner drink

24. Bumper sticker word 9

7

44. When doubled, a dance

4

3

41. Close-fitting tartan trousers

6

2

4

9

23. Rodeo ring? 8

1 2

8

1

Puzzle 47 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.46)

8

7

8

38. Same old, same old

34. Human-centered

10. Certain digital watch face, for short 9

1

31. End

8

3

6

Puzzle 46 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.61)

9

8

29. Hot-air blower

8

6 5

1 3

9 4

2 7

3 7

9 2

5

4

8

6

1

2

1 4

7 8

6

3

5

9

5

4

3 9

6 7

2 1

8

6

9 2

8 1

3 5

7 4

7 8

1 4

2 5

9

3

6

9

5

6

3

7

8

1

4

2

4

2

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5

9

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6

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3

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9 5

Puzzle 42 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.51)

39. Elmer, to Bugs

3

4

5

5

8

7

8

5

1

9

3

6

3 2

8

2

2

28. Appropriate

33. “___ we having fun yet?�

8

2

2 5

4

5 7

3 9

5

7

Puzzle 37 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

6 2

4

4

1

1

6

8

2

1 8 6

3 9

5 7

4

4

5 6

8 1

7 3

9 2

7 3

9 2

4 5 8

6

1

6

4 5 9

2

8 7 1

3

9

2

7 3 6

1

4 5 8

3 8

1

7 5 4

9

2 6

Puzzle 38 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

59. One who curses

37. God with a hammer

60. Argument

42. Benevolent, nature-oriented witchcraft

5

2 6

3 4

1 7

8 9

8 9

3 7

2

6

4

5

1

1

7 4

5 9

8

3

2

6

7

3

1 6

5 4

2 9

8

9

5 8

1 3

2 6

7 4

6 4

2 8

7 9

1

3

5

4

1

9

2

8

3

5

6

7

2

8

5

4

6

7

9

1

3

3

6

7

9

1

5

8

4 2

Puzzle 39 (Very hard, difficulty rating 0.86)

61. Dash 62. “Raiders of the Lost ___� 63. Sun god Across 1. Desk item

1

CAREGIVER/MED-AIDE

40. Fix, as leftovers

ANSWERS

5

9

7

27. Cap

57. Clothing

2

Help Wanted Healthcare

Come join our experienced team! Caring, easy going work environment. Must be willing to work any shift. Experienced, dependable, CNA or equivalent. Mental Health, Dementia Specialty Certification and Nurse Delegation required after hire. Paid CE’s and training. Rosegarden Care Center 509-826-4628

25. Cafeteria carrier

51. ___ power

8

4

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

7

2

509-476-3602

Crosswords

4

Sponsored by

1

Hard, difficulty rating 0.61

5

ANSWERS

9

8

8

1

7

9

6

7

6

7

3

7

9

8

1

9

SPRING LAMBS for sale. Grass & grain fed. 1/2 or whole, $3.35 a pound. Cut & wrapped. No charge for hear & liver. Call Alfred Robinson, (509)486-4373 3

6

6

6

8

2

4

Food & Farmer’s Market

4

7

1

9

2

5

4

7

6

2

agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

6

1

2

9

9

7

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx

3

4

Firewood

5

APT. FOR RENT: Oroville, Henderson apts. On Lake, Seniors only, 55+. 2 BR, 1 BA. furnished or unfurnished, clean. No smoking or pets. $700/mo, first & last. 509476-2449 or 509-560-9095

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

1

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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5. Boss

18. Big ___ Conference

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Statewides

Health General

CENTROS DE SALUD FAMILIAR

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: OKANOGAN: Clinical Informatics Specialist Full time WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required Omak Campus: Enrollment Assist. Spec. Full time Temporary. Travel between Brewster and Omak. MA– C Full time. RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time. Travel between sites as needed. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 3 Full time positions. English/Spanish bilingual required Okanogan, Brewster & Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Brewster Jay Ave: MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time Brewster (Indian Ave): Roomer Full Time MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Bridgeport Med/Dental: Hygienist Full time. Travel between Brewster and Bridgeport. MA-C or LPN Full time Dental Assistant Full time Tonasket RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time MA-R, MA-C or LPN Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. Roomer 1 per diem position. English/Spanish bilingual required. MA-C or LPN 1 per diem position. English/Spanish bilingual required due to business need. See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Help Wanted

Washington State Department of Corrections is seeking a qualified individual to fill a full-time, bilingual (English/Spanish)

Community Corrections Officer opening This position is located at the DOC field office in Okanogan, WA and involves supervising a caseload of adult, felony offenders who reside in Okanogan County. The Department of Corrections is leading the nation with our innovative and research proven practices that are aimed at reducing recidivism and improving public safety. Our employees find this profession to be both challenging and rewarding as they work together with law enforcement officers, treatment providers, and community members to facilitate change in offender’s lives. We offer a full benefit package to include medical, dental, and life insurance, sick, vacation, and paid holiday leave, and a public employees retirement system. Typical working hours are Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm. Depending on qualifications and experience, this position may start as a CCO1, $2,724 - $3,549 per month. Upon successful completion of a twelve-month in-training program, the CCO1 incumbent may promote to a CCO2, $3,459 $4,542 per month. To be hired directly at the CCO2 level, one year of caseload management experience is required. A Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited school is required for either CCO1 or CCO2. To review the job posting and apply, please visit: www.doc.wa.gov/jobs

Journeyman Electritian Journeyman Millwright Needed for Metaline Falls area. Please send resume ASAP janice@knightconst.com

School Bus Driver Training Class The Tonasket School District is providing a School Bus Driver Training Class. Upon completing the class, employment as a substitute bus driver in the district is available. Persons interested in becoming school bus drivers, should contact Jeff Yeckel at 486-2665 or 486-2126, for additional information. An Equal Opportunity Employer

Estate Sales TONASKET, 98855. ESTATE SALE INDOORS! Fri & Sat, November 7th & 8th from 9 am to 5 pm. 115 East 5th, Apt 1. Rain or shine.

Statewides WNPA STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS – WEEK OF NOVEMBER 3, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $275 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be

EVENTS-FESTIVALS PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT for only pennies. Reach 2.7 million readers in newspapers statewide for $275 classified or $1,350 display ad. Call this newspaper or (206) 634-3838 for details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED ROCKY MOUNTAIN SUPPLY of Belgrade, MT is seeking a qualified CEO/General Manager. This is a very successful bulk & retail energy, C Stores, agronomy, and life style retail, cooperative with sales of $100 million with multiple retail locations. Financial and personal management experience is required. Email: larry.fuller@chsinc.com or fax (888-653-5527) resume to: Larry Fuller, 5213 Shoal Drive, Bismark, ND 58503. DRIVERS – No experience? Some or LOTS of experience? Let’s Talk! No matter what stage in your career, its time, call Central Refrigerated Home. (888) 793-6503. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com WANT TO DRIVE A TRUCK...No Experience. Company sponsored CDL training. In 3 Weeks Learn To Drive A Truck & Earn $45,000+. Full Benefits 1-888-686-0899. NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Classâ€? training. • New Academy Classes Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor) • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package. Please Call: (602) 730-7709. LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com MISCELLANEOUS HEARING AID SALE Phonax Beltone $239.95 – All digital brands discounted. Repairs $99.95, FREE Loaner. Hearing loss testing trail. Call to speak with Hearing Technician 1-800-249-4163.

Public Notices BUDGET ADOPTION HEARING The City of Oroville 2015 Budget Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 2, 2014 in the City Council Chambers. The formal Adoption Hearing will be held at 7:00 pm, Tuesday, December 16, 2014. Copies of the proposed budget will be available November 18, 2014 for any concerned citizens and may be obtained from the office of the City Clerk during normal business hours until the adoption hearing date. Citizens attending the hearings shall have the right to provide comments and ask questions concerning the entire budget. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 6, 13, 2014. #OVG598487 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH JUVENILE COURT SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION DEPENDENCY THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN AND TO: 1. Michaelang Leo Jones, aka Mickey Jones, aka Michael L. Jones, alleged father of Veyda Rice, d.o.b.03/03/02, Dependency Petition 14-7-00610-8 filed 06/18/14. 2. Unknown biological father of Veyda Rice, d.o.b.03/03/02, Dependency Petition 14-7-00610-8 filed 06/18/14. A Preliminary Hearing on January 6, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. and a Fact Finding hearing on January 22, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. will be held on this matter at Snohomish County Juvenile Justice Center, 2801 10th Street, Everett, Washington 98201. These hearings will determine if your child is dependent as defined in RCW 13.34.050(5). This begins a judicial process which could result in permanent loss of your parental rights. THE ABOVE NAMED INDIVIDUALS ARE SUMMONED TO APPEAR at both of said hearings regarding your child. If you do not appear at the first (preliminary) hearing, the court may cancel the second hearing and take evidence and enter an order without further notice to you. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, and/or to view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. SONYA KRASKI, Clerk of the Superior Court; T. BROWN, Deputy Clerk Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 30, November 6, 13, 2014. #OVG597258 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: AMOS E. COFFELT, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00104-4 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against

Legals Continued On Next Page


November 6, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune November 6, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Page B7 7

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Legals Continued From Previous Page

Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Coffelt P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 23, 30 and November 6, 2014. #OVG595873

which is scheduled for 7:00 pm. The regular meeting is being held on Wednesday due to the fact that November 11th is a holiday. Anyone interested is invited to attend and those with special language, hearing or access needs should contact City Hall, 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the hearing. Alice Attwood Clerk Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 30 and November 6, 2014. #OVG597202

OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT DIRECTOR POSITION OPEN The Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District has one (1) director positions open for election. Currently these position is held by Director Robert Peterson. Persons interested in running for this position may pick up a Declaration of Candidacy or Petition of Nomination from the District office located at 516 Eleventh Street, Oroville WA. These forms must be completed and returned no later than 4:30P.M. Monday, November 17, 2014. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 30 and November 6, 2014. #OVG597205

be held at the American Legion Hall, 314 14th Ave, Oroville, Washington. Persons wishing to comment may attend the hearing or submit their comments in writing to the Cemetery District 4, PO Box 764, Oroville, Washington. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on October 30th and November 6th, 2014. #OVG596532

(North Valley Hospital) /s/ Helen Casey President of the Commission Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 6, 13, 2014. #OVG598528

the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: October 14, 2014. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: October 23, 2014. /s/Judith L. Coffelt JUDITH L. COFFELT

Notice of the Intent to Adopt an Election Resolution The Okanogan Conservation District Board of Supervisors will hold a meeting at 5:00 PM on November 6, 2014 at the USDA Service Center, 1251 S. 2nd Ave, Okanogan, WA to adopt a resolution setting the date, time, location and manner of an election to fill a Conservation District Supervisor’s expiring term. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on October 30th & Nov 6th, 2014 #596529 October 27, 2014 City of Tonasket Final Budget Hearing The City Council of the City of Tonasket will be holding the Final Budget Hearing on the 2015 Budget during the regular Council meeting on Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICE Preliminary Budget Hearing The City of Oroville will hold a public hearing to consider the Preliminary 2015 Budget during the November 18, 2014 regular council meeting. Citizens attending shall have the right to provide oral and written comments and suggestions. ATTEST: JoAnn L. Denney, ClerkTreasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 6, 13, 2014. #OVG598483

Public Hearing Notice NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Okanogan County Cemetery District 4 Board that a Public Hearing is set for 1:30 pm on November 10th at the American Legion Hall 314 14th Ave, in Oroville, WA to consider a Budget Adjustment within the Reserve Endowment Investment Fund 308.10 to the Building Fund 594.36.62.00 in the amount of 25,000. The funds are from the Endowment Investment Reserve and will be used for two building Capitol Projects. The hearing will

PUBLIC HOSPITAL DISTRICT NO. 4, OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON (North Valley Hospital) NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held pursuant to RCW 70.44.060(6) on the 13th day of November, 2014, for the purpose of receiving public comment on the 2015 Budget Any interested person may present their comments by making oral comments at the time of the public hearing or by submitting their comments in writing prior to or at the time of the public hearing. The hearing shall be held at the Commissioner’s Board Room at North Valley Hospital located at 203 South Western, Tonasket, Washington, commencing at 7:00 p.m. on the date set forth above. PUBLIC HOSPITAL DISTRICT NO. 4 OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON

PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville City Council has set their schedule for the 2015 Budget Workshops. All Budget Workshops will be held in the City Council Chambers. Budget Workshop dates and times are: Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 at 8:30 a.m. (all day workshop) Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 28, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 25, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, December 9, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. The public has a right to attend any workshop and make comments. Publish Sept. 18 and 25, Oct. 9 and 23, Nov. 6, and 20, 2014 ATTEST: Kathy M. Jones Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on September 18, 25, October 9, 23, November 6, 20, 2014. #OVG588284

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Page B8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | November 6, 2014

Local News TSD nears decisions on bond By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.

TONASKET - The Tonasket School District’s Thoughtstream internet survey regarding the proposed school expansion bond measure continued through last week in its second stage, which involved prioritizing ideas gleaned from the survey’s first stage. Superintendent Paul Turner shared progress on the survey and the bond project at the Monday, Oct. 28, school board meeting. The goal has been to accumulate ideas from throughout the community and in the second stage, have those ideas ranked (in a form similar to a multiplechoice test) to give the board a feel for where the community’s priorities lie. “We received a lot of really good comments,” Turner said. “There were a couple things that came out that we had to send some clarifying information on. So we sent some statements out that clarified those.” Turner said that the architect’s initial estimate for a dollar amount fell between $6 and $7 million. “We’re trying to see if there is a way to stay at the same rate, perhaps over a different period of time,” Turner said. “We’ll see if we can address that or not, and bring that back to the board for a recommendation.” Turner added that the community-based facilities committee had done a thorough job of “turn-

the way the students are included in the process. It’s great to see that work in action.” • Middle School Principal Jay Tyus said that the districts migrant/ bilingual program is drawing a lot of positive attention. Plan approved “It just amazes me what the With a minimum of debate and a few corrections, the board parents are doing in that group,” approved its strategic plan on he said. “OSPI has asked us to put together a its second readproposal for ing. national The board “We may be coming to the migrant conmet on sevthe forefront nation- ference proeral occagram for parent sions through ally (for migrant and involvement. the summer, And our ESD including sevEnglish Language has asked us to eral sessions Learner programs).” put together one with a consulJay Tyus, for our innovatant, to formuTonasket Middle School Principal tive program late the majorthat Liz inventity of the plan. ed for summer Monday’s vote finalized the fine-tuning that had school. So we may be coming to the forefront nationally.” been done in the interim. In a separate report, Tyus also shared details about the College Admins resport The evening was filled with Readiness Math Initiative, which reports from the administrative is a two-tiered grant that he said the district is applying for. If team. Some highlights included: • Special Education Director Tonasket wins the grant, it would Liz Stucker said that enrollment require the board to adopt changwas going to be about 127 for the es to the curriculum. “The idea is that with the new November count, two higher than 11th grade tests coming down the what was budgeted for. • Elementary Principal Jeremy pike, one of the tiers is college Clark said that his staff is work- readiness ability,” he said. “The ing to adjust to the new stan- trajectory we’ve been on is a bit low. Since we’re in the middle dards-based grading system. “It’s really been monumental and have a chance to change the in terms of the changes,” Clark course, we’re looking at how to said. “Not only in terms of the do that.” • High School Principal Jeff way we assess the students, but in over over every rock we can find. “We’re anxious to get the information back from the Thoughtstream, and try to roll out something next month.”

Hardesty talked about the first round of TPEP profile meetings that had just been completed. “I want you to know that I had a conversation with the high school staff about how astonished and humbled and proud I was of their work, as far as profile meetings and just rolling up their shirtsleeves and immersing themselves in the work that’s taking place. It’s one of the more enlightening experiences I’ve had in education.... There is so much good work out there, it’s really impressive.” He added that a trainer from the ESD, while going over student growth goals, gave him positive reviews on several occasions about Tonasket’s proactive approach to building structures for teachers that would help them be successful. • Turner reported on the completion of the 2013-14 fiscal year and the school’s transition into using the ESD for budgeting and transitions in the district office. He added that eight staff received a total of $2,200 in teacher classroom grants from the North Central ESD Educational Foundation. The board also observed a moment of silence for the victims of the shooting at Marysville High School and approved the sending of a letter to that district expressing sympathy and support. The school board next meets on Monday, Nov. 10, with the meeting time returning to its Standard Time schedule of 7:00 p.m.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 06, 2014  

November 06, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 06, 2014  

November 06, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune