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HAUNTED HAY RIDE COUGAR KILLED IN OROVILLE

Saturday, Oct. 25, 6:00-9:00 p.m. Taber’s Fruit Barn

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Dumpster debate cools for now Council approves hospital trash location on temporary basis BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tensions didn’t boil over, but they certainly were simmering as the Tonasket City Council and two representatives of the North Valley Hospital District engaged in some verbal sparring over the placement of garbage dumpsters that had taken up residence along the curb on Western Avenue. Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb, a hospital employee, recused himself as mayor for the discussion, handing the gavel to Mayor Pro Tem Jill Vugteveen, but was permitted to participate. After a lengthy back and forth the council approved a motion to allow the hospital to keep the dumpsters in a pair of parking spaces near the North Valley Extended Care while researching how to properly charge the hospital for a franchise agreement for semi-permanent use of city property. It also requires the hospital to present a permanent plan for the location of its dumpsters within a year (though the plan may not be able to be executed at that time). From the council’s perspective, the issue of dumpsters blocking the right of way on either the sidewalk west of the hospital or taking up space on the side of the road has been problematic for some time. Director of Ancillary Services Noreen Olma and Plant Engineer John Sanchez echoed what CIO Kelly Cariker said at a recent hospital board meeting, that the

issue was a new one to them. A number of hospital administrative staff, including Cariker and Sanchez, have been with NVH for less than two years. The two largest of three dumpsters have been moved to two parking spaces on First Street in front of North Valley Extended Care, which met with the council’s approval albeit on a temporary basis. “There was some mention that we should have planned better,” Sanchez said. “Most of us in the game now haven’t been here (since the new hospital building was planned). Originally with the first bond issue the dumpsters were supposed to be in the parking area by the Eagles. That fell through, and we’re out of land. “Now we have a quandary. Beyers Market has a franchise (to pay the city for the use of public space for a dumpster)... We’d like to move them back (to Western) if possible.” Olma said that the location by the nursing home was not central for the majority of staff on campus. Council member Dennis Brown, who had visited with Cariker and toured the facility, had his own recommendation for alternate homes for the dumpsters, but Sanchez said the garbage company had rejected Brown’s suggestion due to its proximity to the building. “We ran a survey through with two different trucks and they said, no, we’re not taking the liability,” Sanchez said. “We started looking at other options. We don’t have a lot.” Brown said part of his concern was for public safety. “You want to put them out where they can cause a safety hazard, and there have

An Oroville Police Officer, Okanogan County Sheriff’s Deputies, Agents from the U.S. Border Patrol and Troopers from the Washington State Patrol all converged at high speed on Balmes Road, just north of the Cherry Street Bridge in Oroville last Monday morning. They were in pursuit of Kenneth Wesley Clark, 35 Clark who was tracked by the sheriff’s K9 Basco, and was located hiding in a house near the end of the road. He was arrested on a state Department of Corrections Felony Warrant for Possession of a Controlled Substance with Intent and booked into County Jail.

SEE DUMPSTERS | PG A3

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Candidates attend forum in Oroville BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE – Candidates seeking local county, state and federal offices were invited to Oroville last Thursday, Oct. 16, to introduce themselves and tell voters why they should cast a ballot in their favor. Invited to talk were candidates for office where more than one person was seeking the office. Locally that meant Scott D. Furman and Les V. Stokes, both looking to win the County Assessor position; Dave Rodriguez and Gary V. Reams who would like to be the county’s first elected coroner; and David Womack and Scott Vejraska vying for PUD Commissioner in District 1. Candidates seeking state offices are incumbent Brain Dansel for Senate, who appeared without his challenger, as did Joel Kretz, who wishes a return to the House of Representatives. While Clint Didier, candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives was on hand, their was no sign of fellow Republican Dan Newhouse who also seeks the Fourth Congressional District seat. Rep. Kretz, however, read a statement from Newhouse who was unable to attend. In the case of the three offices where two candidates were present, the first at the podium was given 10 minutes, while the opponent was given 12. The first speaker was then given an extra two minutes for rebuttal. Incumbent Furman said he started with the assessor’s office in 1984 under then assessor Bain Crowfoot and continued to serve under Jim Hand. When Hand got sick Furman took his place as County Assessor. “We have 51 thousand parcels to appraise each year and over $41 billion in total property values in the county,” said Furman, who adds that the assessors office completes that task each year with 12 employees. Furman said that since he has been in

office information has gone from paper to online availability. “You used to have to trek down to Okanogan to get the information, now it can all be done online,” said Furman. “Electronically we have also made many improvements in efficiency.” He served as president of the Washington State Association of Assessors in 2005-2006, the first president of the association in 40 years, he said. “Politics don’t get involved in how property is assessed. It is all done by WAC and spelled out by the state legislature,” he said. Scott D. Furman Furman is proud of how quickly his office was able to assess the damage done to the 243 houses and 50 cabins that were burned in the Carlton Complex Fire. He said by doing a quick assessment it will help people to begin the recovery process. “There were some 250,000 acres involved and of the 4600 parcels, 3800 were privately owned,” he said. “It involved a tremendous amount of work for my office and the staff worked hard... we just about have it wrapped up. I’m proud of my staff.” The taxing dis- Les V. Stokes trict hardest hit he said was the Pateros School District which lost 20 percent of its taxable value. “Next year that will have to be picked up by the remaining property owners because the bond has to be paid back,” he said. “We’re hoping that maybe some will be gotten back from the federal or state government. There was a two percent

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 43

overall loss to the county in property value.” Stokes, a general contractor for over 20 years, said he first considered running for Assessor in 1991 because he feels that property should be assessed at the value it can be sold at within 120 days. “The original laws on property values are 100 years old,” he said. Stokes said he was on the Twisp City Council in the 1990s when the town lost its sawmill, leaving Twisp without 40 percent of its revenue. “By the time I left we had balance our budget. That’s one of the proudest things I Gary Reams was ever involved in,” he said. “And when it comes to running a tight ship you can’t get more experience having been on a volunteer fire department.” Stokes said he has done a lot of refitting of homes so that they qualify for loans. “I have a good eye and real experience at dating structures.” Stokes said he applauded Furman for being “right on top of things” regarding the fires. “If you don’t want to change ships I don’t blame you,” he David Rodriguez said. Furman was then given two minutes to address anything that was brought up by Stokes. “Of the 51,000 real properties we assess we do mass appraisals,” Furman said. “I’ll be the first one to admit we can’t get every one right. I encourage anyone to come in and talk to staff who will show them the appraisal info we used to assess the property. If that is not enough we

welcome you to appeal to the local board of adjustment,. Reams said after graduating from Omak High School in 1970 he went on to college to become a Licensed Practical Nurse. He was drafted and stationed with a MASH unit in Germany from 1970-72. After the Army he started working at Brewster Hospital as an LPN and then became a Respiratory Care Practitioner. He worked in that field at Mid-Valley Hospital for 21 years. From there he worked in home health care, as well as Respiratory Care at Three Rivers Hospital in Brewster and Valley Care Scott Vejraska Center as an LPN. He has also worked at Legacy Funeral Home in body removal and transport. He said it was while working there he was encouraged to run for the newly formed Coroner’s position. “I’m coming at the job strictly from the medical end. If elected I think I can work alongside law enforcement to establish the cause of death,” he said. The new coroner will be expected to set up a budget, according to Reams. “Anyone that has raised a family knows how to look at resources to do a David Womak budget properly,” he said. He said he believes he will be expected to hire a staff, but doesn’t know how many. “What I don’t know about the job... what I do know I know well,” said Reams, adding that one thing the job will take is compassion. Rodriguez said that while most elected

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positions are issue driven, when it comes to county coroner all you hear are crickets. “What we basically have here is an extended job interview,” he said. “On January 1 the new coroner will walk into his office and it will be one man show.” Since there are only two candidates to chose from he said you have to ask yourselves who will do the best job “right out of the gate” that first date at the stroke of midnight. Rodriguez said he had 25 years in law enforcement, 23 with the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office. He also has 13 years experience with emergency medical training and experience as an EMT. “Plus I have direct training as a death investigator,” he said. “I have the training and can hit the ground running on day one.” Rodriguez said before the county reached a population of 41,000 - where an elected coroner was required - the prosecutor or someone from the prosecutor’s office usually served as coroner. “The bulk of the investigating was handled by law enforcement then,” he said. “They were the first at the scene and then the prosecutor would show up with a clip board and go back to the office to do the paperwork. I’ve done all the first part already. So now I am uniquely qualified to do the rest of the job.” Rodriguez said by law the coroner is the first one to examine the body, even before law enforcement. “If you don’t know what you’re doing you could screw up a crime scene. I’ve been to hundreds of thousands of crime scenes. I’m experience in the role of giving death notices,” he said, adding that the position comes with no budget for staff. “My intent is to reduce law enforcements work load,” he concluded. Scott Vejraska said he was a third generation rancher who graduated from

Cancer Awareness A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

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Classifieds Real Estate Obituaries

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

LOCAL NEWS William Clark descendent to demonstrate work Canoe carving, flags, tax approved, road project fund suggested BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council gave its blessing to Churchill Clark to station his canoe carving project in Founders Day Park next to the visitor’s center until early December during its meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 14. Clark, a descendent of William Clark (of Lewis and Clark fame), attended the Okanogan Family Faire, where he met Ephraim Brown, the faire’s arts coordinator that also spoke to the council on Clark’s behalf. Clark will be in the area for a couple of months and is carving a 15 foot canoe from Ponderosa Pine and wanted a venue to continue his work. “My canoe camps, wherever they are, end up public,� Clark said. “It’s the nature of the beast and I encourage it. If we go ahead with this I will let the school know I am set up and they can come down. I like it to be hands-on. In Inchelium I was camped out for a month and a half behind their school working on five canoes.� He said kids are especially attracted to his work. “I’ve worked with a lot of kids,� he said. “They always come back. Even in school, the troubled kids, the tough guys who say they won’t touch it, in the end I can’t keep them off the canoe. Canoes are magic.� After answering a few questions from the council, they approved his project’s presence in the park, pending the completion of a hold harmless agreement to absolve the city of liability. Clark plans on working on the canoe through Dec. 1, with the possibility of having it available for display at Winterfest, Dec. 5-6.

LEGION TO PROVIDE FLAGS The city council, at a previous meeting, had rebuffed an American Legion proposal to provide and maintain American flags at the city’s expense on its downtown utility poles. But after representatives of American Legion Post 32 presented an alternate plan, the council unanimously backed Post Commander Jeff Bergh’s proposal. “We’ll buy the flags, put them up and maintain them,� Bergh said, adding that representatives from the Armed Forces Legacy, the Sons of the American Legion and the Legion Auxiliary had also indicated a willingness to par-

CCC auction on Nov. 1 SUBMITTED BY JANET CULP CCC OF TONASKET

TONASKET - The Community Cultural Center’s annual auction will be held on Saturday Nov. 1. Doors open at 5:00 p.m., silent auction will be from 5:00-7:00; dinner will be served at 6:00. The live auction will begin at 7:00. This event will support the CCC’s winter operating expenses including heat, electricity, and insurance. Dinner will be meat and vegetarian enchiladas, green salad, homemade rolls, and a veggie medley all for $10.00. Desserts and beverages will be available by donation. Just a few of the items that have been donated by our community for this auction are: handmade quilt, Mariners baseball package and dinner at Pike Brewery (Seattle), beautiful art prints, airplane flight, wheel barrow with gardening tools, wooden wall art, a car detail, overnight stays, a variety of desserts and gift certificates, and much, much more. Master of Ceremonies Tryg Culp and pro auctioneer Rich Fewkes will conduct the Live auction. This annual auction in the big back room of the CCC is always entertaining and fun. Please come support our community center. Donations are being accepted. Please call 486-1328 for more information.

ticipate. It’s impressive to people coming through town when you have flags; it would definitely be an enhancement.� Mayor Patrick Plumb noted that, other than not having the finances to purchase new flags, the council had been concerned about what would happen once the flags began to show evidence of wear. “We’d like to have some form of quick release on the flags so when they show any kind of problem, we can go up, take it down and over the laundromat to wash it, or to replace it,� Bergh said. Bergh proposed putting them flags at a height of 14 feet so as not to impede visibility in traffic. The council approved the Legion proposal contingent on City Permit Administrator Christian Johnson, City Manager Hugh Jensen and City Clerk Alice Attwood fine-tuning the details. “I appreciate your responding to the issues we brought up,� Council Member Scott Olson said. “I hope you understand our concern about taking it on. You’ve done that by the way you responded. We were worried about taking on something as our responsibility.�

TVBRC RESTROOMS ABUSED Plumb informed the council that the exterior doors to the restrooms at the Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center would be closed other than for special events or specific requests. “Other times we’ve closed them, we’ve gotten complaints,� Plumb said. “But as soon as we open them, within two weeks we have people living in there.� Attwood said that vandalism related costs - including haing to replace the bathroom door, and dealing with vandals turning the heater up to 100 degrees and leaving it - have far exceeded what was budgeted for bathroom maintenance. The bathroom will still be available to anyone using the building. Council member Jill Vugteveen asked if there might be consequences due to a grant that the city received to put the bathroom in. “We fulfilled the grant by building it and having it accessible,� Plumb said. What happens at a public rest stop when you blow it up with an M-80, they close it even though they say they are open all the time.� The council voiced no objections to the move. MAYOR PROPOSES SURCHARGE FOR STREET PROJECT

It’s not news to anyone that Whitcomb Avenue (US-97) running through Tonasket’s downtown core is in dire need of major work, ranging from the condition of the pavement itself to the

inability of the stormwater system to handle anything but the lightest rain. Plumb said that, after attending a recent conference, that the only way such a project will happen is if the city can raise enough money of its own to qualify for a matching grant. “Point blank, we will need to make some sort of contribution toward it,� Plumb said. “There are not any 100 percent funded grants for planning or construction. And it’s not just downtown; that’s just the visible part we’re aware of.� Plumb proposed adding a $4.00 per month surcharge to each utility bill the city sends out to be put aside for the type of grant that would require a 15 percent contribution from the city. “We would create a stormwater fund that would strictly be used for stormwater control payments, and matching money for grants from the Department of Ecology or Rural Development.� Because the city has more than 1,000 residents, he said, it needs to come up with a comprehensive stormwater plan - itself a significant project. “It opens up an interesting can of worms,� he said. “It’s for the good of the city that we have one.... (City engineer Varela & Associates) are working on a preliminary stormwater plan. They’ve mostly completed a program for downtown based on the planning only grant that we got. But we need to have an overall, overarching city stormwater plan, as well as sediment control.� He also cited drainage issues in the recently-annexed Mill Drive area, as well as stormwater discharges that flow unfiltered into Bonaparte Creek and the Okanogan River. “The state is not going to do a full road project,� he said. “They’re just not. At some point they may grind and fill in our best scenario, but they’re not going to replace stormwater and sewer along 97. “We are going to have to come up with a plan ourselves and right now we don’t even have a full map or inventory of what our stormwater system is. To do that it needs to be part of a plan, which would make us part of a Phase I community as far as DOE is concerned which would open us up for funding possibilities.�

AD VALOREM TAX HIKE Along with approving a preliminary budget, the council approved an ordinance hiking the ad valorem property tax by one percent. That will amount to a total revenue increase of $1,463. The council next meets on Tuesday, Oct. 28, at 7:00 p.m.

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ELECT DAVE RODRIGUEZ for County Coroner ence i r e Exp assion m p s Com ssionali e Prof WA Coroner’s and Medial Examiner’s Association Death Investigator 24 years law enforcement Endorsed by: Frank Rogers, Sheriff * Karl Sloan, Prosecutor/Coroner * Cindy Button, Paramedic * WA State Farm Bureau * and many others... Paid for by the Committee to Elect Dave Rodriguez

NUISANCE COUGAR KILLED

Dave Alloway/submitted photo

Dave Sharpe hunted and killed this female cougar believed to be responsible for killing pets in the Westlake area north of Oroville. Sharpe, who used dogs to tree the big cat on Kruger Mountain, was hired by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. He is seen here in David and Naomi Alloway’s yard where their dog was killed by a cougar in August.

Hunter kills cougar believed to have killed local pets OROVILLE - Dave Sharpe shot a cougar on Kruger Mountain last week. The big cat is believed to be the same one that has been hunting and killing pets in the Westlake area. Sharpe was hired to hunt the nuisance cougar by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife. Sightings of the cougar last month led to warnings sent out by the Oroville School District about parents watching their children in the area north of Oroville near Lake Osoyoos. “I went out on Aug. 31 about 1:30 p.m. and saw a female cougar on top of our dog, who was about 10 pounds. The cat took off with our dead dog in his mouth,� said David Alloway who lives in the area. He added that only the dog’s skull and collar have been found.

According to Alloway, Sharpe used dogs to tree the cougar on Kruger Mountain. “We’re really glad... our grandkids are with us full time and we’ve seen the cougar as close

as eight feet from the sandbox. Naomi has been packing a pistol every time she goes out. We haven’t been able to let the kids play outside because of our concerns,� Alloway said.

 

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LOCAL NEWS CANDIDATES | FROM A1 Omak High School. He is also a trained lineman Nespelem Valley Electric Co-op. “When I look at how the PUD is doing I can tell from my bills it is not doing good,� he said. “We’ve spent an extra $12,000 this year just on irrigation. If I’m elected the PUD will not spend one dollar if it will not do the ratepayers any good.� Vejraska said that the Bonneville Power Administration, where Okanogan County PUD buys most of its power, has talked about rate increase from eight to 14 percent next year. “I would call the BPA and talk to them. This is one agency that is wasting money hand over fist,� he said. The candidate said he though that the Enloe Dam project was “a good project that has been done wrong.� “We should have found a partner a long time ago. Can we afford another $30 to $40 million. I think we can if it is managed properly. I think in 20 years the project could be worth $150 million. In 10 years someone may want to partner with us just for the carbon tax credit,� he said, adding that he thought taking out the dam was not an option the PUD or anyone could afford. He also felt that a second transmission line into the Methow could be valuable.

MEETING ON U.S. NAVY ELECTRONICS EXERCISE

“We are already sitting on all the materials. It is a rarity that two lines burn,� he said. Vejraska, like many detractors of the current PUD Commissioners, said that too much was paid for the new PUD building in Okanogan. Womack, the incumbent, said he had been on the commission for 12 years. Prior to that he was on the Omak City Council and that he is a retired firefighter. He currently is the Meat Department manager at Gene’s Harvest Foods. About a second transmission line into the Methow, something he says the court will soon rule in favor of the PUD doing. “Even with a second line I think it would have burned, but I believe power could have been restored faster,� he said. “We need safe, reliable power.� He said reenergizing Enloe would be the least overall expense to the ratepayers of Okanogan County and give the Oroville area power independence and not have to rely on the transmission line coming out of Tonasket. Womack said many people believe that the PUD will get another 22 percent of the power from Wells Dam, but the district still has to work to protect its access to BPA power. The district also has to work to stabilize power rates for the next 40 to 50 years. In answer to Vejraska’s criti-

cism of the new PUD headquarters, he said, “The building was old, we had to have buckets out when it rained and we had three portable buildings outside. We did all the necessary studies first.’ Womack said that facility, equipment and labor costs continue to increase. “Poll costs, transformer costs, they’re all up by over 100 percent,� he said. “The cost of living is only up by 30 percent. And, we’ve experienced an $8 million drop in power sales.� The incumbent said that in hindsight the commissioners should have made slow, incremental increases, rather than keeping rates the same for several years. “I believe in leaving the money in the ratepayers’ pockets as long as we can,� he said. Womack also predicted that if Vejraska was elected he would have to abstain from voting on issues regarding labor costs because he belonged to the lineman’s union and the Nespelem Valley Electric Co-op agreement is tied to the one for Okanogan County PUD. At the end of the forum, Oroville Chamber President Clyde Andrews reminded those present that all the candidates were “honorable people� and thanked them for their time.

Open House allows look at proposed Bonaparte project Meet the new District Ranger Matt Reidy SUBMITTED BY SHANNON O’BRIEN PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIALIST

TONASKET - Tonasket Ranger District will host an open house from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014 to discuss a proposal in the Bonaparte Mountain area and meet the new District Ranger. The purpose of the Open House is twofold. First, it will be an opportunity to learn more about a proposal for restoration work in the Bonaparte Mountain area. The Open House will also serve as an opportunity to meet Matt Reidy, the new Tonasket District Ranger. The proposal for the Light Restoration project includes approximately 8,600 acres of land in the Upper Bonaparte

watershed, north of Highway 20. So far, the proposal includes restoration work to promote ponderosa pine, western larch, aspen, Engelmann spruce, lodgepole pine and subalpine fir while maintaining Large Tree and Old Forest stands and reducing canopy density. It also includes ladder fuel reduction. A road analysis for the project area will include identification of unneeded roads, which may be closed or obliterated, and inadequate culverts that would be repaired as funding allows. Activities to protect riparian areas are also being considered.

Reidy, who started as Tonasket’s District Ranger on October 20, will be on hand to meet with visitors and discuss Forest management. He hails from New Mexico, where he has been District Ranger on the Mount Taylor Ranger District of the Cibola National Forest. Matt succeeds Dale Olson who left in late April for a District Ranger Position in Montana. For more information about the Open House, the Light Restoration Project, or to schedule a meeting with the new District Ranger, please call 509486-2186.

OROVILLE – The popular Haunted Hay Ride will take place on Saturday, Oct. 25 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Taber’s Taste of Summer Fruit Barn two miles north Oroville on the west side of Highway 97. Sponsored by RE/MAX Lake and Country Realty and Taber’s Taste of Summer, the event features a wagon ride through an orchard populated with scary ghouls and monsters. This “spooktacular� event is free, but participants are asked to bring a non-perishable food item to donate to the local food bank.

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well. We want it to be successful. But as we sit in these chairs we have to be protective of the city’s sidewalks and parking spaces.� “We have had a hard time because we haven’t gotten much response. We have had to get to the point of getting threatening to get someone to talk with us about this.� Vugteveen, who brought up the issue of dumpsters on the sidewalks on more than one occasion over the past couple of years, expressed her frustration as well. “As Scott alluded to, there are raw nerves because no one has come to us and asked permission,� she said. “They’ve just taken it upon themselves to use the sidewalks. The ordinance states we must provide a five foot right of way for pedestrians. That was being impeded a lot just by the dumpsters just being placed wherever, even if it was by the garbage company. “But we have made a couple different requests to remove them from the sidewalks, with no results. We’ve also dealt with issues in the city with residents and the cleanliness of their property. It would be tough for us to approve allowing dumpsters in a high visibility corridor when we expect people to keep their yards fairly clean and picked up.� Vugteveen said that finding a solution to the hospital’s lack of space wasn’t the city’s responsibility. “There clearly wasn’t good

enough planning,� she said. “We gave franchise for the MRI trailer because in the original plans you guys forgot to include that. The fear in the council is what’s next. Why should we continue to have to give up more space because of someone’s lack of planning years ago?� “I will work with in the parameters, but I didn’t know about this until a month ago.� Sanchez said. “We’re searching for places to put these things and also meeting Department of Health regulations we have to go through... I am more than willing to work with you all, but I’m kind of stuck with the area I have to work with.� “I don’t envy you,� Vugteveen said. “You have inherited quite a mess.� Plumb clarified that the nursing home parking spaces partially encroached on city rightof-way and should be subject to a franchise agreement, as well as space taken up by the MRI trailer on Western. The council directed City Manager Hugh Jensen to measure the affected spaces before the next council meeting to help determine what to charge. Olson said he approved the hospital’s solution as a temporary move and said it would be acceptable to him if the hospital presented a long-term plan within a couple of years that included a permanent solution. “If they come up with a solution in a year, I can go for that,� Brown said. “But it has to be different than what it is.�

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been people who have come close to running into them because they slip out into the street,� Brown said, adding that the previous Friday a driver actually had hit one of the dumpsters. “You have a dumpster sitting on the sidewalk, which is unsecured. It’s not on the rules that go with our ordinances. And we don’t know what’s going into those. It could be hazardous materials, it could be a lot of things.� Olma addressed Brown’s concern about the contents of the trash. “Medical waste is red bagged and picked up by Steri-cycle,� she said. “There is no biohazard that goes into the regular trash. Our confidential information, our patient information ... goes into a shred bin. A contractor from Spokane comes in once a month and shreds it. “The only waste going into the dumpster on the street is basic garbage, like household garbage.� “I appreciate you’re new to this,� said Council Member Scott Olson, noting that Sanchez had only been on NVH staff since February. “But this has been an ongoing issue, one to two years... From our perspective it has been a long time ... dealing with parking spaces, it’s been since before the remodel. “When we talk about loss of city parking, it’s a hard issue for us to deal with. You’re dealing with raw nerves. We are all members of the hospital district as

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WENATCHEE - There will be an open house on Nov. 4 from 3:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Okanogan County PUD to discuss the proposed actions U.S. Navy Electronics Exercise Special Use Permit. U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Navy personnel will be present to answer questions from interested parties. The U.S. Navy has applied for a special use permit on the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest to perform training exercises with a special electronic emitter to communicate directly with Navy aircraft flying overhead above 9,000 feet. These exercises would take place on the Tonasket Ranger District intermittently, that is, a few to several days at a time per year, over the course of the permit life of five years. This communication exercise would take place between aircraft and ground based trucks driven on identified forest roads on the Ranger District. The U.S. Navy already completed an Environmental Assessment in August 2014 and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact. http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/nepa_project_exp.php?project=45621 The U.S. Forest Service will begin a 30 day scoping period for public comment for the issuance of a special use permit for the use on National Forest System lands. The 30 day period begins with the publication of the legal notice in the Wenatchee World, the paper of record. Those with questions on scoping, the comment process, the special use permit or on the public meeting should contact: Sara J. White, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, Forest Environmental Coordinator, phone (509)-664-9232, Email sarajwhite@fs.fed.us, Office hours are 7:30 am to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

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• 62 yr Resident Okanogan County • 30 yr Medical Background • 21 Yr Mid Valley Hospital Respiratory Therapy • Licensed Practical Nurse • Medic - Clinical Specialist • US Army 72-74 & Eagle Scout • Member - Free & Accepted Masons - Omak, Okanogan, Methow Valley • Royal Arch Mason

• Married 39 years, 2 Grown Children, 5 Grandchildren Ad Paid For By Gary V. Reams, POB 497, Omak, WA 98841

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month North Valley Hospital 1306%-:8&"341*/,(-07&4 '03#3&"45$"/$&3

The American Cancer Society shares the following statistics: z z z z z

1 in 8 women will get breast cancer. Every 3 minutes an American is diagnosed with breast cancer Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women 35-50. With diagnosis, the 5 year survival rate is over 90%. Every 12 minutes a woman dies from breast cancer; many because breast cancer was not detected in time..

WHY WAIT? SET A DATE. Women ages 40-65 should get annual mammograms because breast cancer incidence increases with age. 8 TIPS FOR A GOOD MAMMOGRAM by the ACS: 1. Facilities that meet the highest standards of safety and quality for mammography have an FDA certificate. 2. Use a facility that benefits from the experience of doing many mammograms. 3. If you are satisfied with the quality of the facility, use the same faculty annually so that the mammograms can be compared from year to year. 4. If you change facilities, ask for your old mammograms so they can be compared with the new ones. 5. If you have sensitive breasts, have mammograms at a time of the month when your breasts are less tender, such as after your period. Avoid the week before your period. 6. Avoid underarm deodorant or cream as they may interfere with the quality of the exam. 7. Bring a list of places and dates for previous mammograms biopsies or other breast treatments you’ve had before. 8. If you do not hear from your provider in 10 days from the date of your mammogram, call them for results. Do not assume that hearing nothing is equal to a negative mammogram.

3BJTJOHBXBSFOFTTGPSCSFBTUDBODFSOFWFSMPPLFETPHPPE TONASKET, WA, October 20th, 2014 – For the third year in a row, North Valley Hospital is making an important statement using pink exam gloves: A World without Breast Cancer is in Our HandsŽ. Not only does wearing these gloves increase awareness for breast cancer during National Breast Cancer Awareness month (October), but a portion of the sales of these gloves is donated to the National Breast Cancer FoundationŽ (NBCF) to help support mammograms, educational and essential services for underserved women. According to the NBCF, breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in women and approximately one in every eight women will be diagnosed in their lifetime. Fortunately, these numbers have continued to decrease in recent years due to education and ealry detection, improvements in treatment options and better

methods of screening. “Early detection is critical to receive proper treatment, which is why we chose to wear these pink gloves. In addition, the pink glove phenomenon serves as a support system for all those affected by breast cancer, � says Terri Orford, Business Development Coordinator. By wearing pink gloves, NVH shows its support for extending both research and awareness efforts in order to eliminate this disease. In 2009, Medline Industries, Inc. began manufacturing and distributing Generation PinkŽ Gloves to support its partnership with the National Breast Cancer Foundation and ease the conversation about breast cancer between patient and clinician. The primary goals of the NBCF are to provide free mammograms and diagnostic breast care services to women throughout the country and to increase awareness through

Cancer Survivor’s Tips (NAPS)—While being diagnosed with cancer can make you feel vulnerable, surviving cancer can make you feel invincible. So says Melanie Young, host of the weekly radio show “Fearless Fabulous You� on W4WN, in her book “Getting Things Off My Chest: A Survivor’s Guide to Staying Fearless and Fabulous in the Face of Breast Cancer.� The 10 things she learned from having cancer are no different from those healthy people should live by, she says. They are: t #FQIZTJDBMMZBDUJWFXJUIEBJMZBFSPCJD exercise. t .BJOUBJOBIFBMUIZXFJHIU t .BLFTNBSUGPPEDIPJDFT t -PXFSBMDPIPMJOUBLF t 6TFTVOTDSFFOEBJMZ t 3FEVDFNBOBHFTUSFTT t (FUFOPVHITMFFQ t %POUTNPLFPSVTFSFDSFBUJPOBMESVHT t #FWJHJMBOUBCPVUZPVSIFBMUIDBSF JODMVEJOH annual exams, screenings and vaccinations. t 'PDVTPOQPTJUJWFFOFSHZBOENBLFRVBMJUZ  time for yourself and loved ones. ć  FCPPLJTBWBJMBCMFBUIUUQXXXNFMBOJFZPVOHDPN

education. For each case of their pink gloves sold, Medline makes a contribution to help fund free mammograms and sponsor prevention and national awareness efforts. To date, Medline has donated $1.5 million to the NBCF to fund breast cancer screenings and diagnostic procedures.

6#.$,.*'+%**,%.*/ "4/3##('+!0, #. ,+"4.'"4 61.*%'+%#+0#.&/0&#)#"'+%0#!&+,),%4'+ '%'0)**,%.-&4 6#04,1.***, #$,.#!0, #. /0+"4,13')) # #+0#.#"'+0,".3'+%$,.,$ -.'5# /(#0/ ,/!&#"1)#4,1.--,'+0*#+0!))     ,.0&))#4,/-'0)  #/0#.+2#,+/(#0 333+2&,/-'0),.%

Don’t become a statistic. Start annual mammograms at age 40.

It only takes a few moments of your time–moments that could save your life. Our experienced staff is dedicated to creating an environment where patients will receive the highest technical skill coupled with excellent customer service.

To schedule your annual mammogram or for more information, call us at the following locations. Omak Clinic

Tonasket Clinic

Oroville Clinic

Brewster Clinic

916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA 98841

17 S. Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855

1617 Main St. Oroville, WA 98844

418 W. Main St. Brewster, WA 98812

509.826.1800

509.486.2174

509.476.3631

509.689.8900

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

Schedule your mammogram today. (1) Mammograms can detect lumps in the breast long before they are discernible any other way. (2) Properly performed by trained technicians, it takes only minutes from your day. (3),W¡VFRYHUHGE\PRVWLQVXUDQFHSODQVEXWLI\RXUV GRHVQ¡WVSHFLDOILQDQFLDODUUDQJHPHQWVFDQXVXDOO\EH made.

An affiliation between Central Washington Hospital & Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

(4),WFDQVDYH\RXUOLIH :HFDQWKLQNRIVHYHUDOPRUHUHDVRQVZK\ ZRPHQVKRXOGKDYHUHJXODUPDPPRJUDPV %XWZHFDQ¡WWKLQNRIDVLQJOHUHDVRQQRWWR Can you?

confluencehealth.org


OCTOBER 23, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Who we’d chose LETTERS TO THE for local office Like many of you out there we are struggling with the question of who to vote for in the upcoming General Election, especially for local offices. This go around many of the decisions have been taken away from us because there is only one candidate running, usually the incumbent. In those cases we have to choose between filling in the square next to the sole candidate or writing in a serious or not-serious candidate like “Bart Simpson” or “None of the Above.” A competitor for office brings about more chances to hear why we should or shouldn’t return the same person to the job for another four years. That’s what we got when the Oroville Chamber of Commerce presented a candidates’ forum last week at the OHS Commons. It wasn’t a debate; most candidates who shared the ballot, did offer a chance for the public to ask questions and for the challenger to rebut what was said. From what we saw on Thursday night, the most controversial race appears to be for Okanogan County PUD Commissioner Dist. 1. Incumbent Out of David Womack is facing Scott Vejraska and while My Mind we couldn’t see a whole lot they disagreed on our most local issue – the rehabilitaGary A. DeVon regarding tion of Enloe Dam (they both would like to see it happen), they did differ on whether the new office should have been built. Of course, that’s water over the dam, so to speak. They both agree redundancy in the transmission to the Methow is a good thing, although it wouldn’t have helped during the recent outages because of the Carlton Complex fires. Womack justifies the increases in utility rates and points fingers at labor cost increases - a jab aimed at lineman Vejraska - but he doesn’t offer a scenario where our rates go down as facilities, equipment and labor costs increase. Vejraska says he won’t vote for any increase that can’t be justified. Isn’t that what they all say? So, if you are anti-Enloe and went to hear a candidate who was against spending more money on rehabilitation you were disappointed. If you’re like us and think Enloe is part of the river now and should stay whether it generates power or not, either candidate will suffice. It basically comes down to voting for or against the candidate you know or going for the new guy. We’ll let you decide. In the Assessor race it’s incumbent Scott Furman or challenger Les V. Stokes. Stokes basically said he wouldn’t have anything against someone voting for his opponent. We’ll take him at his word and recommend returning Furman. The incumbent explained that properties are assessed using a formula set out in state law. Stokes would like to change assessments to represent what he describes as true market value – what he could sell his own house for in 120 days. That’s great, but to do so state law would have to be changed. Perhaps Stokes is running for the wrong office and should consider a run at state legislature instead. That’s where laws are made. Then there is the race for the new position of County Coroner. Candidate Gary V. Reams brings his experience in the medical field, while Dave Rodriguez brings his in law enforcement. While both could be valuable, in our opinion Rodriguez trumps Reams as he has been dealing with crime scenes for years and has taken courses relating to the job of county coroner. As Todd Hill, Oroville’s soon-to-be police chief told us after the forum, “I was glad to hear Rodriguez say he was going to make my job easier.” Hill was talking about how a coroner takes charge of the dead body even before law enforcement, something that has been reversed in Okanogan County with the former system of unelected coroners. Rodriguez wins our vote.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

EDITOR

Response to ‘Remember earlier 9-11’ Dear Editor, I was surprised at how Mr. Thomason dragged Brigham Young, former President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (nicknamed Mormons), into a 150-someyear-old controversy about a horrible incident that occurred in our American History. When one studies American history it is easy to find many examples of injustice and prejudice that could be classified as an earlier 9-11. Some that come to mind are the injustices committed against the Chinese when they were helping build the railroad, or the Irish, Italians, Polish, or Germans. We mustn’t forget the Native Americans and the slaves. There isn’t enough room to describe all the injustices that have been committed in our country as it grew, but for this letter I will briefly describe why I believe Mr. Thomason is wrong in his assertion that Brigham Young had any involvement in the Mountain Meadows Massacre. First, there is the problem of communication. There were no phones in Cedar City where the leaders lived. In order to communicate with Brigham Young they had to send messages by horseback, 300 miles away. At the time, Brigham Young was not only President of the Church but also Governor of Utah Territory. He and his people were preparing for an invasion by the United States Army. President Buchanan had heard lies and inflammatory accusations about Brigham Young and the Mormons and sent the army to squash the Mormon rebellion. President Buchanan didn’t bother to learn whether or not the accusations were true. The whole territory was in a state of alert for war and unwilling to share or sell their supplies – after all, the Mormons knew what it was to be attacked and driven out of their homes. For example, in Missouri, the Governor Lilburn Boggs. had issued an extermination order for all Mormons. They lost their homes, livestock, food, and in many cases their lives. Then, again in Illinois, they were attacked by mobbers and driven out, without any redress from the government. Yet while out on the plains moving to a safe haven in order to live their religion free from persecution, the U.S. Army approached them and asked for 500 volunteers to help fight in the Mexican war, and Brigham Young encouraged the men to sign up, which they did. Back to the Mountain Meadows Massacre… Stake President Haight sent an express rider to seek counsel about what to do about the tension with the Arkansas Wagon Train. Brigham Young counseled and I quote, “In regard to emigration trains passing through our settlements, we must not interfere with them until they are first notified to keep away. You must not meddle with them. The Indians we expect will do as they please, but you should try and preserve good feelings with them. There are no other trains going south that I know of. [I]f those who are there will leave, let them go in peace. While we should be on the alert, on hand and always ready, we should also possess ourselves in patience, preserving ourselves and property ever remembering that God rules.” There was/is no reason for Brigham Young

or any other Church leader to apologize for what happened at Mountain Meadows, since they didn’t order it, didn’t condone it, and were appalled by it, but they have tried to bring peace to those who had hard feelings because it happened. The internet is full of anti-Mormon literature. Anti-Mormon web sites aren’t interested in truth, unless it can be used for their purpose, which is to tear down and discredit the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Sincerely, Mike O’Leary Oroville

Need public meeting on Navy tests Dear Editor, A recent “Guest Column” in another paper is titled “Navy tests explained.” Near the end of this piece, the author, Capt. Mike Nortier, the commanding officer of Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, says that an assessment was completed by the Navy in August and the Navy “notified the public about the assessment and received no public comment prior to the August 15th deadline.” To my knowledge neither radio stations nor newspapers had been notified. Also, I have not heard of anyone in Okanogan County receiving a notice in the mail or otherwise. Personally, I would like to hear what its all about and ask a few questions. I believe there are many people around the Okanogan and Colville National Forests who have questions and comments. We need a local meeting and the comment period needs to start when those notices are made public (published). A tenent of public participation is to have the information before we can make an informed decision. I dont believe the Navy has done this up to this point. If you, as an editor think this is important, I would encourage your readers to contact Sarah White, Okanogan/Wenatchee National Forest, 215 Melody Lane, Wenatchee, WA 98801 (swhite@fs.fed.us) or call 509-6649232. Thanks, Buffalo Mazzetti Tonasket Editor’s Note: There will be an open house held on Nov. 4, 2014 from 3:30 – 7:30 p.m. at the Okanogan County PUD auditorium to discuss the proposed actions. U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Navy personnel will be present to answer questions from interested parties. G.A.D.

I-594 takes away our rights Dear Editor Most everyone knows the old saying that “unless we learn from history we’re doomed to repeat it.” Initiative I-594 is a very serious issue dealing with our 2nd amendment rights and there is nothing in it that protects or defends these rights, only takes away. We should be suspicious when you see it is being pushed by three socialist leaning billionaires, two from Washington and the other from New York, who have put up many millions of dollars to pass this. Everyone should go on line to www.dakotavoice.com/2011/06/werthmann-warnsagainst-socialism-on-shad-olson-show/ and listen to Kitty Werthmann, who survived seven years living under Hitler 1938-1945. Growing up in Austria, she tells how they voluntarily voted by 98 percent to come under the authority of Hitler in 1938 before WWII started. By 1943 they had lost all their rights, including their right to own a gun. They had been convinced by Hitler that the way to stop crime was for everyone to come in and register all their guns. Guess what came next? Your right. Government confiscation once they knew where every gun in Austria was. Then they were unable to defend themselves or their families. This initiative looks like its right out of Hitler’s Nationalist Socialist Party handbook. As she goes all across America speaking, she always starts her presentation by saying “ \What I’m about to tell you is something your’ve probably never heard or read in your history books.” It’s a powerful message. In the last six years we have seen so many of our rights taken away that America had better wake up before it’s too late…freedom of speech is gone, freedom of religion is gone, separation of Church and State is gone, property rights have been taken away. Let’s not vote to take another bite out of the 2nd amendment also. This initiative does not stop mentally disturbed people or criminals from stealing a gun or buying one on the black market and committing mass murder. The only ones hurt with this initiative is law abiding citizens, not criminals. I encourage you to protect your rights, vote NO on I=-594. Don’t let the radical socialist left from Seattle, Tacoma, King or Pierce Counties rule the State on this issue. Dick Sass Arlington, Washington

The enigma with a stigma Dylan (Google him kids) sang it decades show a known cop the huge marijuana growago: “... the tiiimes, they are a changin’....” ing op where they work and of which they are I had to be dreaming. It was a police clearly quite proud. career launching gold mine I’d discovered. Listen and learn, fossil, I think. Dylan was A faint odor of skunk scented the air. There right. were rows of greenhouses of marijuana plants I am sincerely impressed with what I see, chest high. There were entire buildings where but remnants of culture war tug at me still. machines separated the buds, there All my training and experience has were irrigation systems, fans, lights, told me for decades that marijuana drying sheds hung with hundreds of is the stuff of skulking dopers, and marijuana plants, marijuana everycriminals, or fat-cat high-rollers where in all the stages of production with more money than sense or from seedlings to packaged retail character. We’re not talking Reefer product. Madness voo-doo here – all that was It was what helicopters with infrabefore even me – but we are talking red surveillance scoured the forests a mindset trained for decades to see Bill Slusher for. Undercover agents spent weeks marijuana traffickers as ‘drug dealbuilding the confidence to be seen ers’, dangerous peddlers of crime as buyer-whales big enough to be invited to and addiction. see this op, but only if blindfolded in and out I’m still trying to get my mind wrapped from an hour away. around strolling through a huge, legal marIt was the sort of large marijuana growing ijuana growing operation that’s clean and op where the indigenous humans were surly open, a professionally run, legitimate busiand scowled at you with a suspicion that was ness, the employer of about 25 decidedly of necessity never ending in their career- unthuggy young Americans who are breaking criminal lives. You looked for Glock shaped no laws ever likely to be enforced. lumps in their shirts. You might be the whale Herewith resides a sizable part of the new from LA who was going to buy a truckload, legal marijuana industry’s dilemma. The same but there was always the paranoid anxiety that culture war stigma conflicting me also curyou were the narc from hell or the scout for a rently conflicts the bulk of mayors, townrival op come to scope a hit. council folk, city attorneys, and other ‘decent’ It was the major pot production operation citizens of the community. Ergo the stout that cops dreamt of finding, the great bust in resistance to legalized marijuana production the sky that law enforcement from country sites and retail stores. Call it NIMBY to the sheriffs to the DEA spent collective millions tenth power. trying to find, bust, and stage photo ops of. It is this mentality that insists on visual And I found it! barrier fences to ‘hide’ marijuana grows as But wait ... though the sight renders beholders addicted. This isn’t only a few years ago, this is now It is this fear-based superstition that demands in Okanogan County. The surly, gimlet-eyed distances from schools, like the plants are Glock slingers are unarmed, smiling, pleasant something out of Rocky Horror Picture Show young women and men happily anxious to that are going to slurp youngsters off the side-

walks as they walk home. But this isn’t as laughable as I’m hinting. At the root of it is fear, fear that the standards, and thus the quality of life, of one’s home community may be corroding. At the core of this is the gripping concern that our kids may be negatively affected. Herewith, thus, also resides a major challenge for the legal marijuana industry. It is an issue that self-superior derision, denigration and anger are only going to make worse. A faster, smoother transition of America to legal marijuana, to faster community acceptance, less headaches, less operational costs, is going to require significant, broadly applied, public relations finesse. Living in Louisiana years ago I saw TV ads for earthworms as a food product. A June Cleaver (Google her too, kids) looking housewife was seen puzzled as to “what nutritious, delicious meal to serve her family tonight, yet not the same ole thing.” Ah, says she, as the light comes on, earthworms! Cut to the wriggling delights on the kitchen counter. Hell no I didn’t eat any, but I remember thinking, wow, if I ever hire an ad firm to promote anything it’s gonna be the one with the boldness to take on pushing earthworms as food. My point is even less appetizing. Stigma remains a fact of the current marijuana business, and it will take public relations power to fix it. Otherwise it’s going to drag on far longer than necessary. The times ...they are a changin’. People’s attitudes... not so much. William Slusher is a retired police pilot, a ‘rotorpig’. His latest novel is a bipartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or, How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse. williamslusher@live.com


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Remember all the old varieties of apples? Good News! One less cougar is in the neighborhood, as one was shot in the area of the Swanson Mill Rd. (South of Oroville on the East Mountain Rd.) where it was trying to feast on sheep. Since this is the season of the apple, here are some names kinda forgotten today, with all the new fancy ones. We still hear the word “McIntosh� and “Winesap,� but how about “Transparent�, “Duchess� and “Whitney Crab,� and where I came from we had “Ben Davis.� Some were real good and some were not and when Mr. Starks came along with the “Red Delicious� and the “Golden� just about all else fell by the wayside. And believe me there is a BIG difference between irrigated and dry land apples.

It never ceases to amaze me the folks that enjoy reading my weekly “prattle� and claim that is all they read in the paper. So, here’s to you, mother of Mrs. Sass, who was at lunch at the Senior Center last Tuesday. Mr. Sass, the rhubarb man, has supplied many with his good rhubarb, from Arlington, when they come over to spend time in their Oroville home. If you go to Sonia’s beauty shop, which has been located across the street from City Hall for quite a few years, you won’t find Sonia there, as she has moved away to help care for her father, who has health issues, so I’m told by another operator. The shop is still open, but under the ownership of another. Finally, it rained! It was predicted for

days and days on our little weather sta- about what they’re going to do for tion and now it has recorded a quarter Thanksgiving dinner. They’ve already of an inch. Maybe it was a good thing it had it, on the 13th. came after harvest was pretty The Ebola epidemic is a much over. terrible thing, but is overkill Maple trees in our neighbeing done on it through the bor’s yard are so beautiful, media? with the reds and yellow It’s hamburger time at the leaves intermingled. American Legion building, I have been told, by famiwith the two Marilyn’s on ly, that Roy Curtis, Tonasket, deck to cook for you from had the misfortune of break5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday ing a hip from a fall. So nights, starting Wednesday often, pneumonia takes over evening, Oct. 22. They were at that point, but his brother, slow in telling me, but THIS & THAT ayoubit can Lloyd, says he has a lot of use this for next other issues and is seriously Joyce Emry week, if you don’t get your ill. The brothers served many paper in time. folks from their pharmacy, On Nov. 8 the United for a lot of years. A word of cheer would Methodist Church will hold their annual be welcomed, I’m sure. Christmas bazaar and spaghetti feed, with Have you noticed that the price of gas the special sauce, as it has been for many is much cheaper? That’s good news! years, ever since the late Ralph Patterson Just who was it that wanted wolves started making it. His family has chosen brought back into the locale? Seems to to continue the tradition, using the recipe, be plenty now and they are killing cattle. keeping his memory alive. Ranchers aren’t real happy about that. Sunday, Oct. 26, there will be special Canadians don’t have to worry music from Brock and Adeena Hires, at

Still two market days left in Tonasket

ROYALLY HONORED

SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD

the above church, giving the praise band a rest. Church now begins at 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome! Saturday, Oct. 25, there will be a community work party in Pateros for helping people get necessary things done before winter. One of the projects is the rebuilding of the many miles of deer fencing that protects the orchards. Last Saturday evening Jack and Mary Hughes had an appreciation party for the many workers that help to make their fireworks business successful. They have almost 50 trailers situated in various parts of the state and Idaho. I saw ye ol’ editor there and I presume he will give details, if not I’ll do it next week. We were honored and to have been on his list of invitations. Just got word, The Community Christmas Bazaar will be held in the Elementary School gym on Nov. 21 and 22. To register for a space, please contact Susan Smith at 509-476-2427. Pinochle has started in Molson on Monday nights, 7 p.m. and bring a snack. We car pool, as do some others, meeting at the Oroville Seniors building.

TONASKET MARKET REPORT

TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

Trick or Treat; that is the question! With Halloween right around the corner, there are still two chances on Thursdays to pick up treats at Tonasket Farmers’ Market in Triangle Park, October 23 and October 30, from 2-6 pm. Firm, ripe, red apples, such as the organic varieties available from Morningstar make scrumptious caramel apples. Does anyone in the age of germ phobia still bob for apples? It was always a fun

Submitted photo

Linda Heagy (left), founder of the local Stroke Support Group, was surprised with a check for $500 presented by Mary Lou Barnett, president of the Oroville Chapter of Royal Neighbors of America. SUBMITTED BY JOANNE MORRIS ROYAL NEIGHBORS OF AMERICA

The monthly meeting of the Oroville Chapter Of Royal Neighbors Of America was held last Wednesday at the Plaza Restaurant. At that meeting Linda Heagy, founder of the Oroville Stroke Support Group, was surprised with a check in the amount

Great turn out for propane fund fundraiser SUBMITTED BY SUSAN WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

The modern rifle deer season is over for now, good luck to all that got their deer. We would like to thank Val and all her help for the great turn out for the spaghetti dinner and des-

ROYAL NEIGHBORS of $500. The check was presented by chapter president, Mary Lou Barnett and made possible through the Royal Neighbors Of America’s Nation Of Neighbors Program. The Nation of Neighbors

TONASKET EAGLES sert auction for the propane fund. (Great Job). This Saturday Oct 25 we are having the Kids Halloween party from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. with lots of fun for the kids. Dress up and have a great time, you might be surprised. Saturday, Nov. 1 will be the Adult Halloween party with priz-

NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

North Valley Community Schools has a busy week scheduled! Coming up on Monday, Oct. 27 and Tuesday, Oct. 28 we have a special treat! Debbie Payne, Licensed Massage Practitioner and Certified Aromatouch Therapist, is traveling from Vancouver, Wash. to teach us about Essential Oils and Pain Management. Beginning Essential Oils: on Monday Oct. 27 Payne will be teaching us about therapeutic essential oils and how they can be used to improve health. Come learn about essential oils as a complimentary and/or alternative medicine. Pain Management: On Tuesday, Oct. 28 let her teach you how to manage your chronic pain using organic, all natural essential oils. This class will discuss the causes of chronic pain and how we often treat only the symptoms, and not the cause. Get in on this pain management class before Debbie leaves for home and we become Payneless once again! Beginning Acrylic Painting: On Thursday, Oct. 23 and Thursday, Oct. 30 learn the basics of Acrylic Painting. There is no right or wrong in painting, only

es and a live band, Mike Chappel and the Harley Hunks. Think ahead for the annual chili cook off, get out your meat, beans and spices. This event will be Saturday, Nov. 8. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Gib McDougal, second place Gene Michels and low score to Wanda Sutherland. The last pinochle went to Cindy Jones and Coral Ross. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all from The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

support your community? Call Ellen Barttels at 476-2011. Save the Date! Coming up on Saturday, Nov 15 is the NVCS (hopefully) annual 50’s dance!

Essential oils and pain management SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND

Program awards financial grants to empower women who work to improve their life, the lives others and enrich their community. Linda was nominated by a member of the the Oroville Chapter. The Oroville Stroke Support Group meets once a month to provide knowledge and support to those who have experienced stroke as well as to their families who care and love them.

THE LEARNING TREE your creativity! Earn Your U.S. Citizenship: This is a four session class beginning Tuesday, Oct. 28. Prepare for the citizenship test and interview with materials provided from Immigration and Naturalization Services as well as online resources. Firewise Fire Protection: After a summer of wildfires North Valley Community Schools has teamed up with Okanogan County Conservation District to provide this class free of charge to all interested persons. Come learn how the FireWise system can help you assess the hazards in your area and remove or manage them, better help emergency personnel, and find resources that are available to help. Homes whose owners followed the FireWise system are still standing. This class takes place on Wednesday, Oct. 29. To sign up for these classes and more call Ellen at 476-2011. NVCS is seeking a member for the board of directors! Do you have fresh ideas? Opinions? A little spare time and a desire to

Monday night pinochle started back up in Molson SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Pinochle has started on Monday nights in Molson at 7 p.m. in the Grange Hall. Here are the winners for the first week. The high’s went to Clayton Emry and Judy Ripley. The Low’s went to Harold Harper and Evelyn Dull. There was not a Traveling award this week. There were 32 players for this first week. Get your friends together and join in the fun. The next Bingo night at the Molson Grange will be on Friday, Nov. 7 at 7 p.m. Bingo is always on the first and third Fridays of the month. We had a little trouble getting it right last week. We hope that no one was inconvenienced. The Harvest Supper in Havillah Reach

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part of fall parties when I was younger, and a great occasion to make a good clean mess. Other fall treats include a variety of winter squash; acorn, Hubbard, and spaghetti to name a few. And don’t forget the pumpkins! A jolly jack-o-lantern gives a true seasonal flair to any porch or entryway. These and other late produce can be found at the booths of market regulars; Dharma Farms; Leaping Sheep, Capote Family Farm, etc. Baked

HILLTOP COMMENTS will be on Saturday, Oct. 25 with Fellowship starting at 4:30 p.m. and dinner will be served from p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your favorite salad or dessert to share. This is a good potluck so don’t miss it. There will be a Fiber Class at the Molson Grange. This is the first time in the State of Washington. The North American Wool Co-op (N.A.W.C ) is hoping to help restart the fiber Industry in Washington. For more information check out www.fibersorting.com. Classes are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Nov. 1,2,3 and 4. On Nov. 2 there will be a shearing demonstration and the class will be grading fleeces that day also. For answers to your questions please call Sally Facer at 509485- 3262. The Molson Grange had their Harvest Potluck on Oct 18. It was a traditional Thanksgiving

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Financial Advisor 32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

You won’t see it on the calendar, and it doesn’t inspire any greeting cards, but National Save for Retirement Week is here again. The goal of this week is self-explanatory, but what does it mean to you? Are you vulnerable to the possibility of reaching retirement without VXI¿FLHQW¿QDQFLDOUHVRXUFHV",IVRKRZFDQ you ease this risk? /HWœVORRNDWWKH³YXOQHUDELOLW\´LVVXH¿UVW+RZ prepared you’ll be for retirement — or at least how prepared you think you’ll be — seems to depend, not surprisingly, on whether you are currently participating in a retirement SODQ VXFK DV D  N  RU DQ ,5$ &RQVLGHU these statistics, taken from the Employee %HQH¿W5HVHDUFK,QVWLWXWHœV5HWLUHPHQW &RQ¿GHQFH6XUYH\ • Nearly half of workers without a retirement

dinner. It was very good. There were 48 in attendance. Don’t forget to get your Flu shots. Winter germs are going to all around soon. The Chesaw Community Bible Church will be hosting a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 27. This will be a complete dinner, so get your friends and family together and have dinner in Chesaw, with us. Turkey and all the trimmings. Are you ready for the Christmas Bazaar in Chesaw on Nov 8, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.? Tables are available for $10. Until next week.

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goods, preserves, and crafts are always in season. So come enjoy the outdoor market and the crisp fall weather. This is where we part company until next May, right? Not so! Margie, Tonasket Farmers Market manager still has a few tricks up her sleeve. For the first time ever, the market is moving indoors. There are four dates planned, November 6 and 20 and December 4 and 18, from 2:006:00 at The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. There are still openings for vendors, so if you have produce or artistic talent consider giving us all a treat by sharing it at the indoor market. For the best of treats, indoors or out, come to the market. See you there!

SODQ ZHUH ³QRW DW DOO FRQ¿GHQW´ DERXW WKHLU you’re like the vast majority of people, you ¿QDQFLDOVHFXULW\LQUHWLUHPHQWFRPSDUHGZLWK don’t have unlimited resources — so working WRZDUGWZRPDMRU¿QDQFLDOJRDOVDWWKHVDPH only about one in 10 with a plan. time can certainly be challenging. Nonetheless, • 36% of workers say they have less than a college education can still be a springboard to $1,000 in savings and investments. Of this a successful career, so you may well feel that group, 73% said they and their spouse did not you should do everything within your power to have a retirement plan, compared to just 11% help your kids through school. of those with a plan. +RZFDQ\RXEDODQFHWKHWZRLPSRUWDQWJRDOV &OHDUO\ LW SD\V WR FRQWULEXWH WR \RXU  N  of investing for your retirement and for your or other employer-sponsored plan, such as children’s college expenses? Your best move a 403(b) or 457(b). And, even if you do have may be to start saving for college just as soon a 401(k) or similar plan, you may want to as possible — even when your children are FRQVLGHUIXQGLQJD5RWKRUWUDGLWLRQDO,5$ quite young. By starting early, you’ll put time Besides contributing as much as you can afford on your side, so you can put away smaller to your retirement plans, what else can you do amounts each year than if you waited until the years right before your kids head off to school. to help boost your retirement savings? &RQVLGHULQYHVWLQJDQQXDOO\ZKDWHYHUDPRXQWV )RU RQH WKLQJ WU\ WR FRQWURO \RXU GHEWV ,WœV you can afford to a tax-advantaged college not always easy, but try to consistently live VDYLQJVYHKLFOHVXFKDVDSODQ within your means and make wise spending decisions. Every dollar you don’t spend on By investing as much as much as possible in debt payments could be going toward your your retirement plan, managing your debt load and balancing your retirement goals with other retirement savings. key objectives, you’ll be honoring the message While it’s essential that you save and invest of National Save for Retirement Week. for retirement, you can’t forget other objectives you may have, such as helping pay for your This article was written by Edward Jones for children’s college education. Of course, if use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

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OCTOBER 23, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR RICHARDSON, POLLARD AND BELL PERFORM AT ESTHER BRICQUES

OROVILLE - Thursday evening, Oct. 23 brings Denny Richardson, Steve Pollard and Steve Bell live to the stage at Esther Bricques Winery with tunes, lyrics, and instrumentals. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

VETERANS TOWN HALL MEETING

TONASKET - The Governor’s Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee will be holding a Veterans Town Hall on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket. Community partners and service providers will be sharing how they are serving Veterans and their families from the area. The VAAC – under the leadership of 2014/15 Chair Richard Marcelynas – is composed of 17 members and advises the Governor and the director of the Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs (WDVA) on issues and programs concerning veterans. Call 1-800-562-0132 option 1 for additional information.

CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS THE BILLS

OSOYOOS - The Osoyoos Concert series presents The Bills on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Bills are a high impact, acoustic folk music quintet from the West Coast. The concert is at the Osoyoos Secondary School Mini Theatre located at 115 Street, Osoyoos, BC. Tickets available at Imperial Office in Osoyoos or Sundance Video in Oliver. $23 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information see: www.thebills.ca.

FIRE AND FORESTS

TONASKET - There will be a Humanities Washington presentation at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket on Oct. 24 at 6 p.m. “Fire and Forests, East of the Cascade Divide� presented by John Marshall, Fire ecology photographer for the U.S. Forest Service. This will be a conversation about the past philosophies and future policies of forest fire management in Eastern

Two Marilyns offer up burgers and French fries SUBMITTED BY VICKI HART OROVILLE AMERICAN LEGION

A sincere thank you to those volunteers who make our lounge such a wonderful success! Marilyn Finsen has been the lounge manager for many years now and her services are greatly appreciated! Marilyn Finsen and Marilyn Oliver have started up the Hamburger and French Fries sales from 5 p.m.

Oven incident doesn’t end in disaster SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT – OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

It is Friday morning, the air is crisp and the sky is another shade of blue. The aspens are yellowing with fall‌ But? What is that black cloud on the horizon? It’s the phone. RRRing! It’s Ken Zimmerly calling from the center in a panic. “The oven’s blowing black smoke. I can’t cook the chicken.â€? “Are you going to shut it down?â€? I asked. “No we’ll figure it out.â€? he answers, his voice trailing off‌ Surely enough, he managed, but had to cook at low, low temps.

Washington. This is a FREE event. Refreshments will be served by donation to the CCC. Call 486-1328 for additional information.

LAST OROVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET OF 2014 SEASON

OROVILLE - The final Oroville Farmers’ Market for 2014 will be Saturday, Oct. 25 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee will benefit the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2096.

TUNK VALLEY GRANGE HALLOWEEN PARTY

RIVERSIDE - A potluck and children’s Halloween party will be held on Sunday, Oct. 26 at 6 p.m. at Tunk Valley Grange, 106 Knox Road, Riverside.

FREE COMMUNITY MEAL

TONASKET - This months Free Community Meal will be Sunday, Oct. 26, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Donations are always welcome. Dinner will be served from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. These meals are held the last Sunday of every month, and prepared by Val Welles and a crew of volunteers.

FIRST AID & CPR CLASS

OROVille - There will be a First Aid and CPR Class on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 27, 28 and 29 from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow the first night. For more information call Ben Hylton at 509-223-3412.

LAKE OSOYOOS WATER LEVEL MEETING WITH IJC

OROVILLE - The International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control is holding its annual public meeting regarding the regulation of Osoyoos Lake water levels and the related operation of Zosel Dam by the State of Washington under the International Joint Commission’s Orders of Approval. The meeting will take place on on Tuesday, Oct. 28 at the Oroville High School Commons from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Board will provide an overview of 2014 lake levels to date and invite comments, concerns and questions from the

AT THE LEGION POST to 7 p.m. on Wednesdays only. They do a great job. Bring friends or come down and make new ones. This activity is open to the public. Saturday evenings the lounge hosts meat draw fund raiser games. Please arrive a few minutes early as they start promptly at 6 p.m. Our lounge has three televisions and subscribe to the sports channel to accommodate our sports fans and frequent-

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS They were delightfully delicious, as usual. Saturday morning, my expert repair friend from Tacoma, Dan, told me what to do. (He just happened to drop by.) I cleaned the burners with a wire, and then thoroughly washing them in the dishwasher to clean the grease and soot. The other day, slithering on toes and elbows, in the crawl space, braving snakes and spiders, and waving away webs with a stick, I opened the sewer connection for the water softener. Much dirt and grime later. Oh, the life of the president. What adventure.

public. For more information see http://www.ijc.org/en_/.

all day on Friday, Oct. 31 at Oroville City Hall.

SCHOOL RETIREES ASSOC. MEETING

OROVILLE BOOSTER CLUB AUCTION

OMAK - The Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will hold a no-host luncheon meeting at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 28, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. State Rep. Joel Kretz, 7th Legislative District, will speak. Information at 509-422-2954.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP OPEN HOUSE

OROVILLE - There will be a Stroke Support Group Open House on World Stroke Day, Wednesday, Oct 29 at 10:30 a.m. at the Youth Center at 607 Central Ave. in Oroville (adjacent to the Free Methodist Church). World Stroke Day is observed on Oct. 29 to underscore the serious nature and high rates of stroke, to raise awareness of the prevention and treatment of the condition, and ensure better care and support for survivors. Everyone is invited. Materials will be available. There will be refreshments.

RANDY BATTLE BLUZ BAND ON FOR HALLOWEEN

OROVILLE - Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include The Randy Battle Bluz Band in a Halloween Edition on Thursday, Oct. 30, followed by Sandy Vaughn and Reed Engle slated for Thursday, Nov. 6, music begins at 6:30 p.m. For more information, please call the winery at 509 476-2861 or visit the Events page at www.estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Rd., Oroville.

OROVILLE BUSINESS TRICK OR TREAT

OROVILLE - The Oroville Businesses Trick or Treat for the Kids is on Friday, Oct. 31 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Flyers and the Trick or Treat signs will be in windows or doors of those businesses that will be handing out treats to the kids.

RETIREMENT PARTY FOR OROVILLE CLERK KATHY JONES

OROVILLE - The City of Oroville is inviting people to help celebrate City Clerk Kathy Jones’ retirement

ly have indoor tailgate parties. Check with the lounge for details 509-476-2761. There is also free Wi Fi within the Post. The lounge will be hosting a costume Halloween Party on Friday, Oct. 31 from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Potluck will start at 6 p.m. and costume judging will take place at 9:30 p.m. Our legion building got a new roof installed and lots of fixer-up projects done. Thanks to Louie Wilson, Rolly and Kerry Clark and family for all the work they did taking off the old roof. That saved the post a lot of money. See you at the Post! You should all try it. That reminds me. Down at the County Association, we are progressing prudently, and most everything is going, somewhat, well. Please, prayers. Daly Zita, playing piano last Friday, was well appreciated. Also, Joy Lawson and company from Canada entertained us in the afternoon. What a joy. By the way, if anyone would like to donate a well tuned piano, let us know. Then, I watched one golden Aspen leaf wishfully fluttering, gently to the ground, to gracefully wither away in October. Pinochle results from last Saturday: Door Prize: Danny Wieterick. Most pinochles: Joe Van Sant. High man: Ed Craig. High woman: Danny Wieterick. More next week.

OROVILLE - The Oroville Booster Club live and silent auction will take place Saturday, Nov. 1 at the American Legion Hall in Oroville. The silent auction starts at 5 p.m. and the live auction starts at 6 p.m. There are several items to bid on again this year, including an autographed Russell Wilson jersey in shadow box, load of firewood, crushed rock, concrete/stamped patio and more. The money from the auction goes to support extracurricular academic and athletic youth programs within the Oroville schools.

COMMUNITY COAT CLOSET

OROVILLE - The Sixth annual Community Coat Closet sponsored by the Oroville Royal Neighbors Of America will be help on Saturday, Nov. 1 from 9:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m. at the Depot Museum. Warm winter coats for those in need will be available for children and adult - inventory is limited. If you have gently used winter jackets to donate please call Joanne Morris at 509-476-3882 for further information.

TONASKET CCC AUCTION

TONASKET - Saturday, Nov. 1 is the annual Community Cultural Center

Auction. Rich Fewkes and Trygve Culp will work together for the live auction; silent auction begins at 4:30 p.m. Dinner for $10 will be at 6 p.m. Live auction begins at 7 p.m. The proceeds will benefit the CCC’s general fund for winter expenses; there will be a special appeal for the front of building remodel. Credit Cards will be accepted as well as cash and checks. Call 509-486-2061 to donate items or for more info.

ADULT FLU CLINIC

Confluence Health is offering seasonal flu vaccination* clinics during these special hours:

October 25, 2014 9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Confluence Health | Tonasket Clinic 17 S. Western Ave., Tonasket, WA No appointment or invitation necessary - open to all adults Seasonal flu vaccinations are $28 - we can bill your insurance. *While supplies last.

OROVILLE COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

OROVILLE - The Borderlands Historical Society will meet on Tuesday, Nov. 11 for a Membership Meeting night at 7 p.m. at the Oroville Depot. Contact obhistsoc@gmail.com for more info.

OROVILLE - Get a head start to your Christmas celebrations at the Oroville Community Christmas Bazaar on Friday Nov. 21, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s bazaar is hosted by the OHS Future Business Leaders of America in the Oroville Grade School Gymnasium. Artisans, crafters and other vendors are encouraged to contact Susan at 509-476-2427 for more information. Registrations forms are available at the Oroville Public Library, Oroville Elementary School, Oroville High School, Oroville City Hall and Hughes Department Store.

MORE TO LIFE FUNDRAISER

TONASKET FOOD BANK

BORDERLANDS HISTORICAL SOCIETY

More to Life, a local non-profit dedicated to serving the area’s youth, is holding its third annual fundraiser in the Tonasket High School Commons on Friday, Nov. 14, 6:00-8:00 p.m. Best known for its Friday night 5th Quarter events, the organization is working toward building a youth center in the Tonasket area to provide social, athletic and educational opportunities as well as combat some of the issues teens face. The program will include entertainment provided by area youth, a catered dinner and a dessert auction. Cost is $10 at the door ($5 for children 10 and under). Contact Darin or Elaina Halvorsen at

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOH‡ Worship on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Pastor Randy McAllister 10 6th East and Whitcomb‡509-429-2948 (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ Pastor Stephen Williams‡www.tonasketbiblechurch.org ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am‡Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! WORD IS TRUTH.â€? JOHN 17:17 Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

Church of Christ No appointment needed.

509-557-9352 for more information.

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist 1516 Fir Street‡476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ 3DVWRU5RG%URZQ

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI#\PDLOFRP Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

LOOMIS

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.� -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2192

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

COPS & COURTS CRIMINAL

Jesse Leander Abrahamson, 19, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to delivery of a controlled substance (heroin). Abrahamson was sentenced to 12-plus months LQSULVRQDQGÀQHGIRU the Jan. 27 crime. Eric Allen Harbin, 24, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Oct. 14 to seconddegree burglary and third-degree theft. Harbin was sentenced to PRQWKVLQSULVRQDQGÀQHG IRUWKH$XJFULPHV 5DFKHO'DZQ0RUDOHV2URYLOOH pleaded guilty Oct. 14 to tampering with a witness. The court dismissed a charge of seconddegree assault (strangulation) (DV). Morales was sentenced WRWZRPRQWKVLQMDLODQGÀQHG IRUWKH-XQHFULPH $VKOH\&DUROLQH+XQHU2NDQRgan, pleaded guilty Oct. 14 to ÀUVWGHJUHHFULPLQDOWUHVSDVVLQJ and forgery. Huner was senWHQFHGWRGD\VLQMDLOZLWK GD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGÀHQG IRUWKH0D\FULPHV 6DPXHO&RUPLHU'XEH/DYDO Quebec, pleaded guilty Oct. 14 to three counts of POCS (one each of heroin, cocaine and phencyclidine) and one count of attempted POCS (with intent) (MDMA). Dube was sentenced to nine PRQWKVLQMDLODQGÀQHG The crimes occurred July 28 at the Oroville Port of Entry. 7KHFRXUWGLVPLVVHG2FWDKDUDVVment (threats to kill) charge against Getulio Hernandez GarFLD2NDQRJDQ7KHFKDUJH was dismissed without prejudice. The court found probable cause to FKDUJH'DYLG/HVOLH/RXLV Omak, with intimidating a witness and fourth-degree assault. The crimes allegedly occurred Oct. 2. The court found probable cause to FKDUJH6KDOLQ($OOWXV5LYHUVLGHZLWKÀUVWGHJUHHDJJUDYDWHG PXUGHUÀUVWGHJUHHUREEHU\WKHIW of a motor vehicle, two counts of WKHIWRIDÀUHDUPDQGWZRFRXQWV RIXQODZIXOSRVVHVVLRQRIDÀUHarm (juvenile in possession). The crimes allegedly occurred between 6HSWDQG2FW The court found probable cause to charge Parker M. Bachtold, 5LYHUVLGHZLWKÀUVWGHJUHH DJJUDYDWHGPXUGHUÀUVWGHJUHH robbery, theft of a motor vehicle, WZRFRXQWVRIWKHIWRIDÀUHDUP and two counts of unlawful SRVVHVVLRQRIDÀUHDUP MXYHQLOH in possession). The crimes allegHGO\RFFXUUHGEHWZHHQ6HSW and Oct. 1. The court found probable cause to charge Brent McNeil BleakQH\2PDNZLWKVHFRQG degree theft (access device), three counts of second-degree ID theft, and six counts of third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred between Oct. DQG The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Robert Munsey, 21, Okanogan, with seconddegree assault (strangulation). The crime allegedly occurred 2FW

21 years of age. The girl was sentenced to two days in detenWLRQDQGÀQHGIRUWKH$SULO 12 crime. $\HDUROG2URYLOOHJLUOSOHDGHG JXLOW\2FWWRKDUDVVPHQW ÀUVWRIIHQVH 7KHJLUOZDVVHQtenced to eight days in detention with credit for eight days served, DQGÀQHGIRUWKH6HSW crime. A 12-year-old Omak girl pleaded JXLOW\2FWWRUHVLGHQWLDO burglary and third-degree theft. 7KHJLUOZDVVHQWHQFHGWR days in detention with credit for GD\VVHUYHGDQGÀQHG for the Aug. 7 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Dec. 17.

CIVIL

The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes, penalties DQGĂ€QHV0F&XHQDQG-RQHV Construction LLC, Okanogan, )LGGOHU)HQFLQJ//& 2PDN/DZUHQFH&RQstruction Services of Washington //& The state Department of Revenue assessed Badger Excavating and Construction Inc., Tonasket, IRUXQSDLGWD[HV SHQDOWLHVDQGĂ€QHV The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following individuals for overpayment of XQHPSOR\PHQWEHQHĂ€WVSHQDOWLHVDQGĂ€QHV7\OHU%XFKDQDQ 2NDQRJDQ-DVRQ5 $GNLQV2PDN'DYLG &6XOOLYDQ2PDN

DISTRICT COURT %UDQGRQ6KHD0DUFKDQG Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Marchand was senWHQFHGWRGD\VLQMDLOZLWK GD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGÀQHG Joseph Edward McEthmar, 49, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. McEthmar received a GD\VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQG ÀQHG -HUU\5D\0HDUV-U5LYHUVLGH guilty of third-degree theft. 0HDUVUHFHLYHGDGD\VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGÀQHG 5DFKHO'DZQ0RUDOHV2URYLOOH guilty of third-degree DWLS. 0RUDOHVUHFHLYHGDGD\VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGÀQHG /DUU\-RH1HZVRPH-U2PDN had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Newsome was ÀQHG 0LVW\)UDQFLQH2UQHODV2URYLOOH guilty of second-degree DWLS. 2UQHODVUHFHLYHGDGD\ VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGÀQHG  5RVDOLR5DPLUH](]TXLYHOKDG DFKDUJHGLVPLVVHGQRYDOLG operator’s license without ID. Nathan Shane Rayburn, 28, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Rayburn was ÀQHG Nicolas Renteria, no middle name listed, 18, Okanogan, had an obstruction charge dismissed.

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS

JUVENILE

$\HDUROG2PDNER\SOHDGHG guilty Sept. 24 to third-degree theft. He was sentenced Oct. 8 to GD\VLQGHWHQWLRQDQGĂ€QHG IRUWKH6HSWFULPH$ restitution hearing was scheduled for Dec. 17. A 17-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to MIP/C and minor frequenting an off-limits area. The boy was sentenced to two days in detention with credit IRUWZRGD\VVHUYHGDQGĂ€QHG IRUWKH$XJFULPHV,Q a separate case, the same boy pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to minor in a public place exhibiting effects of liquor. For that crime, he was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for one GD\VHUYHGDQGĂ€QHG7KDW FULPHRFFXUUHG-XO\ A 14-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Oct. 8 to fourth-degree assault. He was sentenced to 14 days in detention with credit for GD\VVHUYHGDQGĂ€QHG IRUWKH$XJFULPH $\HDUROG2PDNER\SOHDGHG guilty Oct. 8 to disorderly conduct. The boy was sentenced to GD\VLQGHWHQWLRQZLWKFUHGLW IRUGD\VVHUYHGDQGĂ€QHG IRUWKH6HSWFULPH $\HDUROG2NDQRJDQJLUOSOHDGHG guilty Oct. 8 to possession of marijuana by a person under

MONDAY, OCT. 13, 2014

DWLS on N. Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Evans Lake Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Bide-a-Wee Rd. near Omak. Air compressor reported missing. Littering on Bentham Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Skyview Dr. near Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Oak St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Ash St. in Omak. Harassment on Apple Lane near Omak. Burglary on Elm St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. -HQQLIHU/RXLVH%DOOHVWHURV booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for delivery of a controlled substance. &KHUU\O$QQ*UDQWERRNHGIRU violation of release conditions. 'DQDLO-RVHSK1HZERRNHGIRU fourth-degree assault (DV), third-degree malicious mischief (DV), and unlawful imprisonment (DV).

TUESDAY, OCT. 14, 2014

Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan.

Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Loitering on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on W. River Rd. near Omak. Assault on Old Highland Lane near Loomis. Assault on Bighorn Dr. near Loomis. Automobile theft on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Central Ave. in Oroville. Theft on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on Bide-A-Wee Rd. near Omak. Bicycle recovered. Burglary on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Laptop reported missing. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Ash St. in Omak. Road rage on Engh Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Oak St. in Omak. Theft on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Tablet computer reported missing. Fraud on Main St. in Oroville. Fraud on Cherry St. in Oroville. One-vehicle crash on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Harassment on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Theft on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Blake Forrest Lannoye, 29, booked for third-degree DWLS and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Brandon Lee Parks, 22, booked on DQ2&62)7$ZDUUDQWIRUĂ€UVW degree DWLS. Jesse Leander Abrahamson, 19, court commitment for distribution of a controlled substance (heroin). Darryle Leeann George, 22, booked for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Juan Medina Manuel, 19, booked on a warrant for contempt of drug court.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15, 2014

One-vehicle crash on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Vehicle prowl on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Mudslide on Larsen Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on Broser Way near Tonasket. Custodial interference on Skyview Dr. near Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Fir St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Assault on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Fraud on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.

BREWSTER – A Wenatchee man who had slowed to make a turn off SR97 was struck by another vehicle resulting in injuries that sent him to Three Rivers Hospital by ambulance. Johnnie L. Brooks, 21, was GULYLQJ KLV  &KHYUROHW 6 pickup northbound about four miles north of Brewster on 6XQGD\ 2FW  DW  DP He had slowed to make a legal left turn when Michael M. Wolff, /DQJOH\:DVKDOVRKHDGLQJ northbound, attempted to pass Brooks and struck his vehicle, according to Washington State Patrol Trooper Brett Lovell. Wolff, who was driving a  'RGJH  SLFNXS ZDV uninjured. He was charged by Trooper Lovell with “following to close.� Both vehicles had reportable

damage and were towed from the accident scene.

Omak woman charged with DUI NESPELEM – An Omak woman who rolled her vehicle about five miles north of Nespelem on Saturday, Oct. 18 was later charged with Driving Under the Influence.

312 S. Whitcomb

FRIDAY, OCT. 17, 2014

Harassment on Hoss Dr. near Tonasket. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Building reported damaged. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Vehicle struck guard rail. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on River Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Fraud on Duck Lake Rd. near Omak. Weapons offense on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Burglary on Omak Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Dayton St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Granite St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Central Ave. in Oroville. Theft on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. &KDUOHV'DYLG&R[ERRNHGRQ an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. %LOO&HSKDV%HGDUGERRNHGRQ a DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS. Devon Lee Goodrich, 21, booked with POCS with intent to deliver (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia and second-degree rendering criminal assistance (bond revoked). -DPHV&RUZLQ+REHQERRNHGRQ a DOC secretary’s warrant.

Sex offender registry on Oak St. in Omak. Fraud on Box Spring Dr. near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Kimberly Ln. near Omak. DWLS on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Dayton St. in Omak. 6WUXFWXUHÀUHRQ('HZEHUU\$YH in Omak. Assault on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. 0HUFHGHV$QQH2¡'HOOERRNHG for violation of a no-contact order. 0LVWLD$OLFLD&ODUNERRNHGRQDQ Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Eduardo Miguel Lara, 24, DOC detainer. (UQHVWR(GZDUGR0HQGH]/HRQ DOC detainer. Benjamin Chavez Delacruz, 29, court commitment for DUI. Alexandra Hockman, no middle QDPHOLVWHGERRNHGIRU

DENTISTRY

FAMILY PRACTICE

BRACELETS by Diva Designs Wear Your Intention!

KEY: DUI'ULYLQJ8QGHUWKH,Qà XHQFH DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C - Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff’s 2IÀFHU DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

HEALTH CARE

Call us . . . Se Habla EspaĂąol

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. 2IÂżFH+RXUV7XHV:HG Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 6$VK6W2PDN 2IÂżFH+RXUV7KXUVGD\V Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

(509) 826-5093

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

„ Ophthalmology „ Radiology

10

Locations

ACROSS the region

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1.800.660.2129

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

OPTICAL

YOUR AD HERE

.RDOD‡2PDN:$‡ZYPHGLFDOFRP

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Healthcare Services

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

826-7919

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

CLINIC

Health In Clinic „ Family Practice „ Laboratory „ Surgery Center „ Chemo Infusion

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Psychiatric Services

Physician-owned and patient-centered

„ Anti

Mental Health

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.�

OMAK

509-486-0615

INTENTION

near Okanogan. Public intoxication on Elmway in Okanogan. Burglary on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Summit Dr. near Oroville. -RVH*XDGDOXSH3DWLQR0HMLD booked for POCS (methamphetamine). John Andrew Hilderbrand, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for MIP/C. (GZDUG$OOHQ.HOOHUERRNHGIRU second-degree DWLS. David John Smith, 42, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). -XVWLQ0LNHO3HDUVRQERRNHGIRU violation of a no-contact order (DV). 7HUU\/HH=ROOHUERRNHGRQDQ 2&62)7$ZDUUDQWIRUĂ€UVW degree negligent driving. .DULVVD0DULH=DPXGLRERRNHG for fourth-degree assault (DV). 0RQJR-HUU\/RGL5HQLRQ booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Shelby Larissa Gorr, 21, booked on two Omak Police Department )7$ZDUUDQWVWKLUGGHJUHHWKHIW and hit-and-run.

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

„ Walk

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

SUNDAY, OCT. 19, 2014

Violation of a no-contact order on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Queen St. on Okanogan. Burglary on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Railroad St. in Omak.

SATURDAY, OCT. 18, 2014

„ Behavioral

$QJHOD'*DWHVZDVGULYLQJVRXWKERXQGRQ65DW a.m. when she left the roadway WR WKH ULJKW DQG UROOHG KHU  Toyota Highlander, which came to a rest on its top in the roadway, according to Washington State Patrol Trooper Ted Shook. Gates was transported by ambulance to Coulee Community Hospital where she was treated for her injuries and the SUV was impounded to Jackson Towing.

Recovered vehicle on Hubbert Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl at Sweat Creek Campground near Tonasket. Violation of a no-contact order on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. 7KHIWRQ+Z\QHDU7RQDVNHW Malicious mischief on N. Fir St. in 2PDN*UDIĂ€WLUHSRUWHG Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Golden St. in Oroville. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ+Z\QHDU Tonasket. ':/6RQ+Z\QHDU7RQDVNHW Jodi Ann Nanamkin, 28, booked for POCS (heroin) and POCS (methamphetamine). Joseph Enery Dagnon, 48, booked on three counts of violation of a no-contact order. Gail Alice Sheena-Garnica, 49, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Cheyenne Rochelle Lezard, 19, booked on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants, all for third-degree theft. -RVKXD0LFDHO&KDSD'2& detainer, a Tribal warrant for theft and a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS. 0HOYLQ)D\5DQFNERRNHGIRU POCS (methamphetamine) and a DOC warrant. Tyler Lee Shelton, 24, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS. Lacey Ann Picard, 24, booked for second-degree burglary and third-degree theft.

Assault on Apple Way Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Sour Dough Creek Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Cameron Lake Loop Rd.

THURSDAY, OCT. 16, 2014

Washington State Patrol Collision sends driver to hospital

fourth-degree assault (DV). Lynn Michelle Stanley, 44, booked for second-degree DWLS. Falina Storm, no middle name listed, 28, booked for violation of a nocontact order.

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

SUPERIOR COURT

Emergency VA Clinic „ Surgical Center „ Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket) „ Obstetrical Services „ Imaging „ Full-Service Laboratory „ Extended Care „ Swing Bed Program „ „

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

OXYGEN SERVICE

We would be honored to work with you!

z Your

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center z Oxygen Concentrators z Portable Concentrators z Sleep Apnea Equipment z Nebulizers z Home Sleep Tests Open:0RQGD\)ULGD\

2IÂżFH509-826-1688 2NRPD'ULYH6XLWH'2PDN


OCTOBER 23, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS RUNNERS HIT THEIR STRIDE AT LAKE OSOYOOS

Tigers set for showdown Tonasket victory over sets stage for Okanogan game with title implications In the event of a three-way, since all three teams are advancing to the playoffs, seeding MANSON - Tonasket contin- would be determined by the preued its road-grading ways, rush- season number draw (rather than ing for more than 400 yards to by a mini-playoff). In that event, key a 48-6 victory at Manson on Tonasket would take the No. 2 seed. Friday, Oct. 17. To get to this point, the Tigers The victory set the stage for had to take care the Tigers’ of business on final Central Friday, which Wa s h i n g t o n they did in the League North first half as Division game “(Okanogan is) really they rolled to a of the season. good. They can score 34-0 lead at the Okanogan break. comes to quickly and we need “We domiTonasket, and to limit their explosive nated the first the Bulldogs, half,” Hawkins Tigers and plays.” said. “We made Brewster all Jay Hawkins, a few mistakes still have Tonasket Football Coach in the third league title quarter. But we aspirations ridhave made a ing on the conlot of progress test. “They are really good, “said mentally in the last few weeks.” At Manson, Jorge Juarez rushed Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “They can score quickly and for 189 yards on 14 carries and a we need to limit their explosive touchdown, with Isaiah YaussyAlbright adding 133 yards and a plays.” Okanogan lost a non-league touchdown on 11 carries. Jesse contest to Brewster last week Manring had two touchdowns that was set up after both teams and 57 yards on 11 carries and received forfeits from Liberty Jesse Ramon added 34 yards on Bell and Bridgeport, respectively. four carries. Colton Leep ran for Okanogan and Brewster are each a 10-yard touchdown and com4-0 in league play and meet on pleted 2-of-3 passes for 23 yards, Oct. 31; the Tigers are 4-1, having including a 28-yard scoring strike lost to the Bears a few weeks ago. to Brock Henneman. Freshman kicker Alex Tonasket has already wrapped up at least the No. 3 seed from Palomares hit 6-of-7 extra point the North. A victory would leave kicks while the defense held them with a shot at a three-way Manson to 76 yards of offense as tie for the title if Okanogan were well as recovering three fumbles. Tonasket (5-2 overall) and to turn around and beat Brewster next week, or the No. 2 spot if Okanogan (7-1) kick off at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 24. Brewster beats Okanogan. BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s cross country team is off an running during the girls race Saturday at Veterans Memorial Park along the shore of Lake Osoyoos in Oroville. Left to right, Camille Wilson, Katie Henneman, Haley Larson, Johnna Terris (obscured), Jenna Valentine and Baillie Hirst combined to give the girls a second place finish at Oroville’s home cross country invitational on Saturday, Oct. 18.

Hornets, Tigers warm up for post-season meets BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Oroville hosted its lone home cross country meet of the season as athletes representing about a dozen area schools enjoyed perfect running weather at Osoyoos Veterans Memorial Park on Saturday, Oct. 18. With league and regional meets coming up over the next two weeks, teams had a chance to complete their final shakedown cruise of the regular season, and for those with large rosters, settle on a top seven to include in those races. Liberty Bell reinforced its position as the District 5/6 favorite on the boys side, defeating Class 1A Chelan by 30 points. Tonasket was fifth, and the second 1B/2B squad, defeating Lake Roosevelt, Manson, Bridgeport and Oroville among those that fielded full teams. For the girls, Chelan dominated the team scoring while Tonasket edged Republic for second place. Duncan Forsman of Republic won the boys race with a time of 16:11 on the 3-mile course. Tonasket was led by Hunter Swanson (9th, 17:24) and Adrian McCarthy (19th, 18:20). Oroville’s Brandon Baugher was 41st in 19:37, with Ryan Marcolin (54th, 20:26) leading a tightly bunched pack of the rest of the Hornet squad. For the girls, Shania Graham made it a sweep for Republic, winning in 19:32. Johnna Terris (9th, 21:01) topped the Tiger runners, followed by Jenna Valentine (11th, 21:26). Phoebe Poynter was the lone girls running for Oroville (42nd, 27:28). The Central Washington League North will be holding its league finals at Liberty Bell High School on Saturday, Oct. 25, beginning at 11:00 a.m. Regionals are the following week at Walla Walla State Park in Wenatchee, with three boys teams (along with any individual in the top 15) and one girls team (and top five individuals) advancing to the state meet.

BOYS Team Scoring - Liberty Bell 40, Chelan 70, Cashmere 105, Omak 110, Tonasket 116, Lake Roosevelt 121, Manson 155, Bridgeport 192, Oroville 233 Top 10 and Oroville / Tonasket finishers (3-mile course) - 1. Duncan Forsman, REPU, 16:11; 2. Ben Klemmeck, LBEL, 16:28; 3. Oren Cox, BPRT, 16:42; 4. Mereck Palazzo, CHEL, 16:46; 5. Josiah Klemmeck, LBEL, 16:54; 6. Eli Phillips, CASH, 17:01; 7. Spencer Reiss, REPU, 17:03; 8. Eli Nielson, LBEL, 17:09; 9. Hunter Swanson, TONA, 17:24; 10. Willy Duguay, LBEL, 17:24; 19. Adrian McCarthy, TONA, 18:20; 27.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Yessica Nemecio tangles with a Brewster player during the Hornets’ 5-1 loss to the Bears last week. The Hornets finished the game playing 10-on-11 thanks to the flu and an in-game injury.

Bears, flu strike down Hornet soccer team BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photos

Top, Oroville’s Emmanual Castrejon turns on the afterburners to beat a Manson runner at the finish of Saturday’s Oroville Invitational; above, Tonasket’s Abe Podkranic and Omak’s Alfonso Medina hit the stretch run. Bryden Hires, TONA, 18:43; 37. Abe Podkranic, TONA, 19:19; 41. Brandon Baugher, OROV, 19:37; 43. Smith Condon, TONA, 19:42; 45. Justin McDonald, TONA, 19:46; 52. Samuel Strandberg, TONA, 20:21; 54. Ryan Marcolin, OROV, 20:26; 55. Nahum Garfias, OROV, 20:27; 56. Luis Vasquez, OROV, 20:41; 57. Emmanuel Castrejon, OROV, 20:59; 63. Daniel Castrejon, OROV, 21:57;

65. Benjamin Cuq, OROV, 22:32.

GIRLS Team Scoring - Chelan 23, Tonasket 65, Republic 67, Omak 86, Cashmere 117 Top 10 and Oroville / Tonasket finishers (3-mile course) - 1. Shania Graham, REPU, 19:32; 2. Addison Ivory, CHEL, 20:23; Allie Barnes, CHEL, 20:31; 4. Katie Emerson, ACH, 20:43; 5.

Olivia Nygreen, CHEL, 20:45; 6. Tiffany Byington, REP, 20:55; 7. Loryn Moore, LROS, 20:59; 8. Jessica Oules, CHEL, 21:01; 9. Johnna Terris, TONA, 21:01; 10. Daisey Campos, CHEL, 21:05; 11. Jenna Valentine, TONA, 21:26; 13. Katie Henneman, TONA, 21:28; 27. Haley Larson, TONA, 23:30; 38. Baillie Hirst, TONA, 25:59; 42. Phoebe Poynter, OROV, 27:28.

OROVILLE - Oroville’s girls soccer team hung with Brewster for awhile. But with no bench whatsoever - several players missed the game with the flu, leaving the Hornets with 11 players - Brewster worked its way to a 5-1 victory on Tuesday, Oct. 14. As has happened for the Hornets through the second half of the season, they narrowed the gap between themselves and their opponents after having lost 7-0 to the Bears in their first meeting. “The girls played a great game under the circumstances,” said Oroville coach Tony Kindred. “Kambe Ripley was everywhere, it seemed. She played an excep-

tional game bouncing back from several Brewster tackles, one in which Brewster received a yellow card.” Eventually Ripley was injured by a Brewster tackle and left the game, leaving the Hornets to finish the game out 10-on-11. Kali Peters scored in the first half on a penalty kick. Trailing 3-1 early in the second half, Peters’ shot from the top of the box took a leaping save from the Brewster keeper to keep the Hornets from pulling to within 3-2. “The girls continue to build their level of play,” Kindred said. “They’re stepping up to the challenge and we are excited to see them improve each game.” The Hornets play at Liberty Bell on Thursday and close out the season at Bridgeport on Tuesday, Oct. 28.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

SPORTS STANDINGS & SCHEDULES

Oroville spikers pick up first win

FOOTBALL

BY BRENT BAKER

van 5/7 hitting, 2 aces; Mikayla Scott 12/17 hitting, 5 kills.

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B)

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

League W + Okanogan 4 + Brewster 4 + Tonasket 4 Oroville 1 Bridgeport 1 Manson 1 Liberty Bell 0

OROVILLE- After com- BRIDGEPORT 3, OROVILLE 1 BRIDGEPORT - The Hornets ing close on several occasions, Oroville’s volleyball team left lit- were unable to pull out a second tle to doubt in picking up its first straight victory, falling 25-11, victory of the season on Monday, 25-15, 23-25, 25-18 at Bridgeport Oct. 13, sweeping Liberty Bell on Thursday, Oct. 16. Hugus noted that Bridgeport aside in straight sets. The Hornets took the match (10-6, 7-4 CWL North) had an advantage both in 25-23, 25-23, 25-18. height and the number “We had a really of available players. good game and just “We were back to our clicked as a team,� said old struggles of consisOroville coach Nicole tency and communicaHugus. “The energy tion,� she said. “We had was good and we had our moments; I think home court advantage, the girls played, maybe so the crowd kept us Rachelle Nutt not their best, but pretty pumped up.� well overall.� The Mountain Lions The Hornets (1-10 overall and came into the match with a 5-4 mark in CWL North Division in league) will finish their season out at Tonasket on Thursday play. “Liberty Bell is a good team,� and at home against Brewster, Hugus said. “These were some Tuesday, Oct. 28. very hard-fought sets. I’m glad the girl’ hard work is starting to Oroville stats: Hannah Hilderbrand play off. We have some tough 14/16 serving, 1 ace, 20/24 passing; games ahead of us and I would Mikayla Scott 9/11 serving, 1 ace, passing; Jessica Galvan 10/11 like to se us continue to play like 14/16 serving, 2 aces, 17/19 passing; Anthis.� drea Perez 12/13 serving, 5/9 pass-

Overall L W 0 7 0 8 1 5 3 1 3 2 3 1 5 1

L 1 0 2 6 5 5 6

+Clinched playoff spot * Oct 10, Bridgeport forfeited to Brewster and Liberty Bell forfeited to Okanogan. WIAA rules allow for teams receiving a forfeit win to replace the game on their schedule; Brewster and Okanogan played a non-league replacement game that night, accounting for the “Extra� game in their win/loss record.

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League Overall W L W + White Swan 3 0 5 + Kittitas 2 1 3 + Mabton 2 1 4 Warden 2 1 4 Soap Lake 1 3 1 Lk Roosevelt 0 4 1 +Clinched playoff spot

L 2 4 3 3 6 5

GIRLS SOCCER Overall W L T 13 2 0 11 2 0 11 2 0 7 6 0 5 8 0 3 10 0 2 9 0 0 11 0

* Manson likely will not play any games on its schedule this season; there have been conflicting reports as to whether their opponents will gain forfeit wins from their scheduled games, so win-loss records may shift depending on how that is resolved. Manson did not play any games on the field, so standings and playoff qualification will not be affected. Teams that received forfeit wins may replace those games on their schedule if they choose.

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tournament matches, including split sets)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W L + Okan’gn 11 0 + Brewster 10 1 Bridgeport 7 4 Liberty Bell 5 6 Manson 4 7 Lk Roosevelt 4 7 Tonasket 2 9 Oroville 1 10

Overall W L Sp 15 3 2 11 5 0 10 6 0 6 7 0 4 8 0 5 11 0 2 13 0 1 10 0

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W + White Swan7 + Warden 6 Waterville 3 Kittitas 2 Soap Lake 2 Mabton 0

Overall L W L 0 12 3 1 13 7 3 5 4 4 4 8 5 3 8 7 2 17

Still in the running Despite big loss to Brewster, Oroville can make still make playoffs BY BRENT BAKER

CENTRAL WASHINIGTON LGE (B)

League Pts W L + Okan’gn 33 11 0 + Tonasket28 9 2 + Lib. Bell 26 9 2 Brewster 17 6 5 Bridgeport 12 4 7 Entiat 10 3 8 Oroville 6 2 9 * Manson 0 0 11 +Clinched playoff spot

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Hornets’ EZ Delgado (left) and Lane Tietje wrap up Brewster’s Cade Smith during Friday’s loss to the Bears.

Sp 0 0 0 1 0 0

+ Clinched playoff spot

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Despite a very difficult month of football, the Oroville football team still has a decent shot of making the postseason. The Hornets, playing four straight teams that last season were all in the Class 1A Caribou Trail League, lost those games by an average score of 51-6. With three of those four - Brewster, Tonasket and Okanogan - playing with the Hornets in the Class 2B Central Washington League this year, it’s made for tough sledding for Oroville and the other smaller schools in the division. (Add in non-league matchups with Chelan and Mt. Rainier both Class 1A state powers in recent years, as well as South Division leader White Swan, and the Hornets have had the toughest schedule in North Central Washington to this point in the season). But after the Big Three, the Hornets, Bridgeport and Manson are still in the running for the fourth and final playoff spot. The Hornets, who have already beaten Manson this year, play one-win Bridgeport this Friday and finish the season at Liberty Bell (winless in league play) on Halloween night. “The kids are excited,� said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson after Monday’s practice. “It’s the best I’ve seen them in about a month. Monday’s have been

pretty hard, but today they were pumped. They know these last games are teams they feel they have a chance to beat. It won’t be easy, but for the first time in awhile they feel like they have a better than even chance.� The Hornets fell 40-0 at home to Brewster on Friday, Oct. 17. The score notwithstanding, they were far more competitive than in the previous week’s 46-20 loss to Tonasket (a team that Brewster beat earlier in the year). The Hornets struggled to move the ball on offense, but defensively held up well against the Bears’ no huddle offense out of which they pass and run with equal effectiveness. Though starting quarterback Timbo Taylor was held out with injuries, backup Mitch Boesel didn’t represent much of a dropoff: he was the Bears’ starter last year. Early in the fourth quarter, the Hornets trailed 18-0, having given up one touchdown on an interception returned for a touchdown. Despite all that, the Hornets could have had the lead at that point if they had taken advantage of the opportunities they created for themselves by recovering two fumbles and picking off two passes themselves. “I was impressed with our defense, for the most part,� Hutchinson said. “Even without Taylor, Mitch is a great athlete. They ran the ball well, and they have speed all over the field that is tough to deal with.� Especially frustrating was a 12-play drive that came up short at the Brewster 5-yard line early in the second quarter when Oroville had a chance to cut the

Tigers looking to playoffs BY BRENT BAKER

SCHEDULES OCT. 23 - NOV. 3

Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Oct. 23 VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Tonasket, 5:30/7:00 pm GSC - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 5:00 pm GSC - Okanogan at Tonasket, 4:00 pm Friday, Oct. 24 FB (Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 7:00 pm FB (Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Saturday, Oct. 25 XC - Tonasket and Oroville at CWL North Championships, at Liberty Bell, 11:00 am Monday, Oct. 27 FB (JV) - Tonasket at Okanogan, 5:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 28 GSC - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Bridgeport, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Brewster, 5:30/7:00 pm Thursday, Oct. 30 FB (Var) - Omak at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Friday, Oct. 31 FB (Var) - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 7:00 pm Saturday, Nov. 1 XC - Tonasket & Oroville at District 5/6 Regionals, Walla Walla Point Park, Wenatchee, 11:00 am GSC - Tonasket hosts district soccer playoff, opponent TBA, 1:00 pm Monday, Nov. 3 FB (JV) - Tonasket at Omak, 5:30 pm

Bears’ lead to 12-7. “Their defense was just too good for us,� Hutchinson said. “We knew we would have a hard time running against them. We wanted to pass a lot, but when you have a sophomore quarterback sometimes you’re going to get bad decisions. But that’s how you learn.� Fatigue finally caught up with the Hornets in the fourth quarter as Brewster put together a four-play 80 yard drive for one score, returned a punt 75 yards for another and chewed up the rest of the fourth quarter with a long drive executed mostly by its reserves. “After the punt return, you could see the air go out of their balloon,� Hutchinson said. “They played well, but they were pretty tired by the fourth quarter.� The Bears held Oroville to 76 yards rushing on 41 carries. The Hornets went to the air 28 times to try to counteract that, but on a rainy night sophomore quarterback Nathan Hugus, often under duress, completed eight passes for 66 yards. Dustin Nigg played an outstanding all-around game, rushing for 46 yards, catching a pass for 21 yards, averaging nearly 40 yards a punt, and covering virtually the entire field on defense while making 10 solo tackles, assisting on three others and intercepting two Brewster passes. EZ Delgado added six solo tackles. Oroville was outgained 436-136 for the game, though Brewster ran up 170 of those yards during their fourth quarter explosion. The Hornets (1-6, 1-3 CWL) are at Bridgeport (2-5, 1-3) this Friday.

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - It took a half to get going, but the Tonasket girls soccer team rediscovered its mojo in the second half on Thursday, Oct. 16, to defeat Bridgeport 6-0. The Tigers, bouncing back from their second loss of the season, led just 1-0 at the half after Jaden Vugteveen scored on a pass from Rose Walts. The game had started half an hour late thanks to mechanical problems with Bridgeport’s bus. “It’s been a pattern with us,� said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “We’ve had a lot of games where we’ve had slow starts and didn’t start playing until after halftime. Then against Okanogan we started well and stopped playing after halftime. “This time, we played our slow game in the first half, then our fast team took over in the second half.� The Tigers quickly put the game away as they got two goals from Kayla Willis and one each from Walts, Morgyne Hjaltason and Megan Bolich. Ashlynn Willis had three assists. The Tigers improved to 11-2 (9-2 CWL) and face league-leading Okanogan Thursday in their final regular-season home game. They also travel to Brewster on Tuesday, Oct. 28. The Tigers are assured of at least the league’s No. 3 spot to the district playoffs and depending on how the last three games play out for the Tigers, Okanogan and Liberty Bell, can finish anywhere from first to third in the league race. All three teams will have a home game for their first round, winner-to-state/loser out playoff

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Myra Gaytan clears the ball out of the defensive end. game on Saturday, Nov. 1.

TIGERS FALL IN SHOOTOUT TWISP - The Tigers lost in a penalty kick shootout to their closest pursuers, Liberty Bell on Tuesday, Oct. 14, but by forcing the game past two overtime periods the Tigers ensured they have the tiebreak edge over the Mountain Lions should they finish deadlocked in the league standings. Kayla Willis drilled in a long shot early in the game to give the Tonasket a 1-0 lead. “That was one tough game,� Collins said. “There was a lot of back and forth, and some good defense on both sides. We had some shots; they had some shots. We just couldn’t find the back of the net.� Sally Thornton-White’s goal late in the first half tied the game and was the last score of the contest in open play. Once the game got into overtime, Collins said, he set the team up to play for the tie and get to the shootout three in order to help the Tigers maintain their

tiebreak edge in the season series. Liberty Bell goalkeeper Lauren Ochoa, who had been injured in the teams’ first meeting of the year, made three stops of Tonasket penalty kicks in the shootout as the Mountain Lions outscored the Tigers 3-1 to take the win. “Their keeper made a couple of great saves,� Collins said. “It would have been nice to get the win, but we got done what we needed to (by getting through to the shootout).�

Oroville stats: Andrea Perez 12/14 serving, 2 aces; Hannah Hilderbrand 9/11 serving, 3 aces, 8/9 hitting, 3 kills; Rachelle Nutt 7/8 serving, 2 aces, 5/7 hitting, 2 kills; Jessica Gal-

ing; Rachelle Nutt 8/10 serving, 1 ace, 9/10 serving, 2 kills, 2 tips, 27/29 passing; Monica Herrera 5/5 serving, 6/7 hitting, 1 kill, 2 tips, 13/17 passing; Courtnee Kallstrom 2/4 serving, 2 hits, 6/8 passing.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Kasey Nelson wins a tip battle at the against Okanogan as teammate Taylon Pilkinton (right) stands ready to assist.

Tigers push Bears to fifth set BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

BREWSTER - Brewster had lost only a handful of sets in Central Washington League play heading into last Tuesday’s match with Tonasket. The Tigers pushed the Bears, the league’s second place team, to the brink before losing in five sets, 25-17, 25-27, 24-12, 20-25, 15-9. Tonasket coach Pam Leslie said that Alexa Sutton’s serving was a big factor in both of the Tigers’ set victories. “She served nine straight points for the win in the second game,� she said. “And her serving was also key in the other game we won.� The Tigers had been swept in the teams’ first meeting in September.

“We played much better against them this time around,� Leslie said. “Our setters are almost back to 100 percent, and we have added freshman Olivia Sutton as our libero.� Tonasket stat leaders: Alissa Young 3 aces, 5 kills; Alexa Sutton 4 aces, 3 kills; Kasey Nelson 6 kills.

OKANOGAN 3, TONASKET 0 TONASKET - Okanogan has yet to lose a set in league play this season, and Thursday was no exception as the Bulldogs took down the Tigers 25-16, 25-12, 25-11. Alissa Young had two kills and one ace. Tonasket (2-13, 2-9 CWL North) hosts Oroville on Thursday and travels to Bridgeport on Tuesday, Oct. 28.

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★



 

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★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★


OCTOBER 23, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SCHOOLS FFA HITS THE GROUND RUNNING

Submitted photo

Submitted photo

Tonasket Middle School students from Nathan White’s class worked with the Tonasket Ranger District on a field trip to Bonaparte Lake two weeks ago.

Tonasket FFA’s Horse Judging team of (l-r) Katie Henneman, Mady Clark, Camille Wilson, Vanessa Pershing and Lexee Howell took seventh at the Adams County Fair in Othello.

TMS students collect Tonasket FFA preps data at Bonaparte Lake

for Nationals

SUBMITTED BY DAVE TOBEY

John Symonds won at state last Dairy Judging and finished in the year, they think that’s attainable middle of the pack in Livestock and they’re going the extra mile Judging. The state horse team to try to attain that for them- finished seventh, something selves. It’s impressive that they Deebach was highly pleased with. BY BRENT BAKER “There were two upperclasscan come out, set their goals, BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM men and three freshmen,” he learn to work real hard. “Even if they don’t get it, in life said. “So that was really good for TONASKET - Tonasket’s FFA that’s a lesson that they’ll take rebuilding, in a year with all new program has already competed in several events in the young with them for life. That’s more kids.” The Yakima Fair, Deebach said, school year, but much attention important than anything I can probably was the best one he’d teach them in the classroom is is focused on the big event in a couple of weeks: the freshman that work ethic and that sense to attended as far as Tonasket’s performance went. succeed.” (now sophoTonasket took first in both Terris and more) Rituals Livestock Judging and Horse Swanson will team heading Judging and was fifth in Dairy have to return to Louisville, “It’s quite an honor to from the con- Judging. Additionally, Brock Kentucky for Henneman took first and Rade vention a day be selected, get into a the national Pilkinton took third as livestock early as they convention. room with competitors are also run- judgers. The team that are all state cham- ning in the “We came home with a total will be leaving cross country of nine banners, which is subfor Kentucky pions, it makes you regional meet stantially more than most everythis weekend in Wenatchee body, maybe even the highest,” realize you’re playing at and attending Deebach said. “We took 50-plus on Nov. 8. the convention a very high level. ” kids to Yakima, which is a big Portions of all next week, turnout. It shows great participathe convention Matt Deebach, competing Tonasket FFA Adviser can be watched tion.” in the novice Deebach said that they also live on RFD parliamentelevision, or attended the Blue and Gold tary procedure National Office in Manson. online at FFA.org. event on Tuesday. “The state officers were there,” Johnna Terris, Lexi Wahl, he said. “Jenna Valentine and Serenity Poletti, Bonnie Siegfried, SO FAR FFA teams attended the Adams Dallas Tyus were our district repHunter Swanson, Seth Smith and County Fair in Othello and the resentatives, for all the chapters Brenden Asmussen have been preparing for national compe- Yakima Fair, bringing home a from Wenatchee north. They put on a one day leadership class for tition since winning the state number of team awards. In Othello, Tonasket won the all the chapters in our district.” Rituals title at the state convention in May. “The kids have been working real hard,” said FFA adviser Matt Deebach. “Even getting to go is a big accomplishment in itself. It’s the third time (Tonasket has sent a team to nationals) in four years. You never know how it will go back there. But it’s quite an honor Doors Open 5:00 p.m. (silent auction) to be selected, get into a room Live Auction begins 6:00 p.m. with competitors that are all state champions, it makes you realize Oroville Booster Club you’re playing at a very high level. Win lose or draw, I’m proud of how hard they’ve worked.” Deebach said the competition is, for him, essentially icing on z Crushed Rock z Autographed Russell Wilson the cake. z Concrete / Stamped Patio Jersey in Shadow Box! “It’s really fun to watch them as z Much, Much More z Load of Firewood they mature,” he said. “The whole group of FFA kids in Tonasket To DONATE items: Call Daphne at 509-322-6492 has set the bar a lot higher. Even American Legion - 305 14th Ave., Oroville watching these kids working on their proficiency awards after Ken Neal - Auctioneer

Teams earn awards at downstate fairs

he t t e

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in d id

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Notice of Public Meeting International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control The International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control is holding its annual public meeting regarding the regulation of Osoyoos Lake water levels and the related operation of Zosel Dam by the State of Washington under the International Joint Commission’s Orders of Approval. The Board will provide an overview of 2014 lake levels to date and invite comments, concerns and questions from the public.

Please plan to attend Tuesday, October 28, 2014, 7:00 PM Oroville High School Commons 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA

International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control For further information, please contact: in Canada: Gwyn Graham (604) 664-4052 http://www.ijc.org/en_/

TONASKET - On Tuesday, Oct. 7, Mr. Nathan White’s middle school science class, Natural History of Okanogan County, worked with Tonasket Ranger District staff and volunteers at Bonaparte Lake. During the day students conducted experiments, made observations, and recorded data relating to our forest. Areas studied by students included water, vegetation, wildlife, fire and weather, and soil.

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Cynthia Barton, Ph.D. Chair, United States Section in United States: Marijke van Heeswijk (253) 552-1625

The goal of the field trip was to give students a clearer understanding of their connection and responsibilities to the natural world so that they may become better informed citizens, commu-

nity leaders, and stewards of the fragile and unique environment. The data collected will be used in the class to develop student projects during the remainder of the year.

OROVILLE

A spooktacular

Haunted Hayride

Sat., Oct. 25 z 6 to 9 p.m. brought to you by

Lake and Country For info. call Cindy DeVon at 476-4444

and 509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Location: Hwy 97 N., OROVILLE 2 mi from Canadian Border

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Please bring a non-perishable food item for our local food bank.

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

This Ad brought to you by the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Out on the Town...

Dining

Nov. 1, 2014

AUCTION

Bruno Tassone Chair, Canadian Section

TONASKET RANGER DISTRICT

& Entertainment UPCOMING EVENTS Haunted Hayride: OROVILLE - A Spooktacular Haunted Hayride Sat., Oct. 25 from 6 to 9 p.m. Location Hwy 97 N., 2 miles from Canadian border. Brought to you by ReMax Lake and Country and Taber’s Taste of Summer. Please bring a non-perishable food item for our local food bank Members and Guests

Halloween Party:

Oroville Eagles:

Oroville - The Plaza Restaurant & Lounge annual Halloween Party on Fri., Oct. 31 9 p.m. to closing. Prizes for best costume. Live music with North Half.

OROVILLE - Annual Oroville Eagles Harvest Dinner Sat., Oct. 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. Live music with North Half.

Bonaparte

Lake Resort & Restaurant Prime Rib every Fri. & Sat.

HOURS: Thur.-Sun. 8am - 8pm

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2828

Oroville Eagles

#3865

Harvest Dinner Sat., Oct. 25th

Dinner 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

~ Turkey & Ham ~

Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Corn, French Bread Salad & Dessert

Dinner: $10.00

Kids 6 & under eat FREE

Live Music

North Half

Main St., Tonasket z 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Advertise your specials & events here: Call 476-3602 ext 3050


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

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WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required

Firewood

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DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

23. Ratio of sinh to cosh

thin sheets

24. “___ the season ...”

7. Certain exams

27. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir.

8. ___ a one

28. Pluck

9. Potato bud

31. Aces, sometimes

10. Convict population

33. Napery (2 wds)

11. Sudden revelations

35. Found a new tenant for

12. Associations

37. “___ bad!”

13. Bad marks

38. Angler’s gear

18. Abnormal respiratory sound

39. Leads

21. Embryonic membranes

42. Appear

23. “For shame!”

43. Causing one to scratch more

24. They may have abs of stone

44. Alter, in a way

25. All thumbs

46. Chester White’s home

26. Suited to being chosen

47. Warner Bros. creation

28. Bumpkin

48. Column bases

29. “The Maids” playwright

50. Wrangles

30. Foe

52. Belittle

32. Small fish that swim upright

56. Priestly garb

34. ___ constrictor

57. Fellow countryman

36. Chamber groups

58. Lady Macbeth, e.g.

40. Biddy

59. Lab tube

41. Notched

60. “I had no ___!”

45. Convene

61. Bad day for Caesar

48. Bait

62. Cavern, in poetry

49. Curtain fabric

63. Bungle, with “up”

5. Past

50. Indian woman’s traditional dress

10. Greek cheese

51. Slog

Crosswords

Across

ANSWERS 1. Come together

14. “... there is no ___ angel but Love”: Shakespeare 15. A sudden raid 16. “Beowulf,” e.g. 17. Sun’s radiation eruption (2 wds) 19. Bank claim 20. In a clumsy manner 21. Small woods 22. Coarse, obnoxious people

Down

52. “Whatcha ___?” (slang) 53. Assistant

1. ___ Verde National Park

54. “Little piggies”

2. Acknowledge

55. Flight data, briefly

3. Scarf material

57. Bean counter, for short

4. Shredded cabbage salads 5. Put down 6. Artisan who hammers metal into

å7EåHAVEåTHEåFOLLOWINGå OPPORTUNITIESåAVAILABLE /+!./'!. Clinical Informatics Specialiståå Full time

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Okanogan County Fairgrounds SATURDAY, OCT. 25, 2014 - 9:00 a.m / NOTE START TIME

Statewides

Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time Patient Registration Rep. Part time. English/Spanish Bilingual preferred. "REWSTERå*AYå!VE MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time

åå

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OCTOBER 23, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Public Notices

Public Notices

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Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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ANSWERS

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Quality Built in 2000. Very Nice 3-bdrm, 2-bath. Approx 1670 sqft. One Level. Beautiful Kitchen w/Breakfast Nook. Appliances. Open to Dining Area w/China Cabinet. Big Living Room w/Door to Front Yard. Mstr Bdrm has Walk-in Closet. Cyclone Fenced Yard. Perm Set Sprinklers. 2-car Garage. Edge of Town. Can’t Begin to Build this Home Today for this Price. Need to Settle Estate. $205,000.00 Pictures & Addn Info on Website

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

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Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Well-kept manufactured home with beautiful lake views of Wannacut Lake! 1 lot off the water with nearby public access! This 1456 sqft, 3 bedroom/ 2 bathroom home features an expansive deck and large detached garage. MLS#622078 REDUCED! $118,000

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 23, 2014

OBITUARIES

Yukie Mirecle

YUKIE MERICLE Yukie Mericle, 80, of Oroville, Washington died October 13, 2014 in Oroville. She was born February 22, 1934 in Sasebo, Japan. Yukie met Harold while he was stationed in Sasebo, Japan in the Navy and they married in 1961. They came to Washington from New Mexico after he separated from the service. She gave birth to two daughters, Tina and Vicky, in 1963 and 1964. Yukie was a homemaker until her daughters were in junior high school; then

she worked as a seamstress for the Eddie Bauer Co. for 10 years and for the Boeing Co. for 15 years. When she retired in 2000, they moved to Oroville, to a homesite in Nine Mile Ranch. Yukie enjoyed sewing, quilting, knitting and her grandchildren. She was a member of the human race. She is survived by her husband Harold, children Tina Mericle (Dana Marcus) and Vicky (Paul) Houghton, two brothers, one sister, grandchildren Christina Harris, Kyle Harris, Kristina Freytag, TJ Houghton, Shannon Moehrle, Sean Houghton, Sean Marcus & Anthony Marcus, and 5 great grandchildren She was preceded in death by her parents and two brothers. Graveside services were held Friday, October 17, 2014 at 11 a.m. at the Molson Cemetery with Chaplain Marcia Butchart officiating. A celebration of life will followed at noon at the Molson Grange Hall. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

on September 26, 2014. Private family services were held on Sunday, October 19th. Pat was born in St. Helens, Oregon on October 18, 1929. She married Robert Krell on May 14, 1949. They were happily married for 65 years. Pat worked as an assistant administrator for North Valley Hospital in Tonasket, Wash. for over 30 years. In her spare time and retirement years, she enjoyed gardening, walking, numerous crafts, family activities and especially her grandchildren. Pat is survived by her husband, Robert, and four children: Ken, Rick, Kathy and Randy. She had eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren and many dear friends. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations may be given to Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association, Western and Central Washington State Chapters. 206-529-3869

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 23, 2014  

October 23, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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October 23, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune