Page 1

2014 WHIDBEY ISLAND

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS

A SUPPLEMENT TO THE SOUTH WHIDBEY RECORD, WHIDBEY NEWS-TIMES & THE WHIDBEY EXAMINER


What you should know about Smoke Alarms Save Lives

The most important things you need to know are smoke alarms save lives and they should be in every home. Follow these important smoke alarm safety measures:

SPONSORED BY Oak Harbor Fire Department

• Make sure your smoke alarms are working. This means testing smoke alarms monthly, replacing batteries once a year or when a low-battery alarm chirps and performing other maintenance as NFPA and your smoke alarm manufacturers recommend. And of course, a smoke alarm disabled because of nuisance alarms provides no protection at all. • It is important to have not just one smoke alarm but smoke alarms in every location required by NFPA standards. (On each level of your home, outside each sleeping area and inside each bedroom.) Tens of millions of U.S. homes are estimated to have smoke alarms but not enough smoke alarms to meet the standards and protect their homes.

and

• Interconnect your smoke alarms so that a fire detected by any smoke alarm will sound an alarm at every location where a smoke alarm is installed. Interconnection can be done using hard-wiring or wireless broadcast technology. Interconnected smoke alarms provide early warning of fires that are still far away or are located on the other side of a door or wall that may block sound. • Develop and practice an escape plan so that everyone in the home knows what to do if the smoke alarm sounds. That includes planning a second way out from every room in your home. Every household that develops and practices an escape plan with two ways out from every location improves its time to escape in every type of fire.

North Whidbey Fire and Rescue

There Are Different Types of Smoke Alarm Technologies—Ionization and Photoelectric

The two most commonly recognized smoke detection technologies are ionization smoke detection and photoelectric smoke detection. Ionization smoke detection is generally more responsive to flaming fires and photoelectric smoke detection is generally more responsive to fires that begin with a long period of smoldering (called “smoldering fires”). For each type of smoke alarm, the advantage it provides may be critical to life safety in some fire situations. Home fatal fires, day or night, include a large number of smoldering fires and a large number of flaming fires. You can not predict the type of fire you may have in your home or when it will occur. Any smoke alarm technology, to be acceptable, must perform acceptably for both types of fires in order to provide early warning of fire at all times of the day or night and whether you are asleep or awake.

The best evidence has always indicated that either type of smoke alarm will provide sufficient time for escape for most people for most fires of either smoldering or flaming type. However, research is ongoing, and standards are living documents. If at any time, research points to a different conclusion, then that will lead to proposals for changes in the NFPA standard or the closely related Underwriters Laboratories standard for testing and approving smoke alarms. Both organizations currently have task groups looking at smoke alarm performance in the current home environment.

For Best Protection Use Both Types of Smoke Alarm Technologies

For best protection, it is recommended both (ionization and photoelectric) technologies be in homes. In addition to individual ionization and photoelectric alarms, combination alarms that include both technologies in a single device are available.

Nuisance Alarms Can Be Minimized

Ionization type smoke alarms are more susceptible to nuisance alarms due to cooking, the leading cause of nuisance alarms, but both types have some susceptibility to nuisance alarms from cooking fumes, and both have susceptibility to nuisance alarms from the steam from a hot shower. In the past decade or so, a number of steps have been taken to reduce the likelihood of nuisance alarms, including hush features and refinements to installation rules that include guidance on safe distances from nuisance sources.

TV Demonstrations of Smoke Alarm Performance Can Be Misleading

Informal demonstrations, such as ones done for TV news shows, of smoke alarm performance can seriously mislead the viewer and do not provide a sound basis to assess performance. These demonstration tests are not performed in a controlled or scientific way that compares the time of smoke alarm operation to the time when occupants would be incapacitated. The selected fire scenarios may not be representative of real fatal home fires. Passing or failing a “test” of this sort may have nothing to do with performing well or badly in the wide range of real fires. A valid engineering analysis must select fires that are realistic and analyze them accordingly. In an informal demonstration, the eye reacts to conditions that look dangerous, mostly visible smoke and visible flame. However, most people are killed by invisible gases, which do not necessarily spread at the same rate as smoke or flame. A valid engineering analysis must measure conditions caused by fires and assess them according to their real danger. For more information go to www.nfpa.org/smokealarms


OCTOBER 2014

Page 3

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – NORTH WHIDBEY FIRE AND RESCUE

North Whidbey Fire and Rescue Fire Chief: Marvin Koorn

two of our stations with two firefighters in each of the two stations. NWFR has 70 volunteers that respond with the part time employees to the calls within our district.

Years of Service: 36 Number of Employees: 103 Demographics: 55 square miles, 18,000 population

What makes your department special? The number and dedication of the volunteers that continue to volunteer their time and energy to protect our community.

How does your department balance volunteer/paid employees? North Whidbey Fire and Rescue has 30 part time employees who volunteer for 12 hour shifts to staff

What is your favorite thing about being in the fire service? Being able to help people in their time of need and be part of an ever changing and growing department.

Number of Stations: 7

Fire Chief Marvin Koorn

Comm. Bruce Carman

Comm. Jerry Goen

Comm. Larry Wall

Deputy Chief Mike Brown

Battalion Chief Lyle Zimmerman

Captain Gerald Smith

Captain Jeff Amidon

Captain Jim Anema

Captain Jim O’Connor

Captain Matt VanGiesen

Captain Steve Lacy

Lt. Bill McArthur

SALUTES OUR FIRST RESPONDERS 15 Coveland St • Coupeville lavenderwind.com 360.544.4132

Thank you to our Whidbey Firefighters and EMS Responders

Call us or stop by today for a free quote! Tricia Bozin

Cheryl Keefe Whidbey Island South

Broker/Owner 206-930-7316

5595 So. Harbor Ave. Freeland, WA 98249 Porterwhidbey.com 360-331-1500

Jessica Marshall

A big THANK YOU to all the South Whidbey Fire and EMS Volunteers


Page 4

OCTOBER 2014

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – NORTH WHIDBEY FIRE AND RESCUE

Lt. Ed Klaszky

Lt. Sherri Brown

Albert Treiber

Andrea Simmons

Andrew Schmal

Ann Conto

Ben Deschepper

Bill Brooks

Bill Cooper

Brandon Bailey

Brett Lopes

Brian Casey

Catherine Martin

Chris Chastain

Chris Hernandez

Chris Turner

Christopher Avance

Cliff Horr

To our local South Whidbey Firefighters and EMS Volunteers.

With Appreciation

Thank you for your bravery, hard work and commitment. We appreciate your dedication to keeping us safe

Island Assessment & Counseling Amy Hofeditz, Administrator

Christina Parker

Visser Funeral Home

432 Third Street, Langley, WA 360-221-6600

Thank You to our Firefighters

South Whidbey Fire & EMS

Realtor, Broker

360-331-0383 christina@cbwhidbey.com

520 E Whidbey Avenie. Ste 205 Oak Harbor, WA 98277

Phone (360) 675-5782

Fax (360) 675 9115

Cell (206) 409-1101

amyosthof@yahoo.com | www.islandaccinc.com


OCTOBER 2014

Page 5

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – NORTH WHIDBEY FIRE AND RESCUE

Dale Esperum

Dan Horton

Daniel Bova

Dave Hanson

David Nelson

Deborah Rogers

Demi Westendorf

Dillon Sather

Dustin Amundson

Dylan Dahl

Frank Valencic

George Lawson

Gregg Alonzo

Guy Fealey

Ian Eby

James Goguen

James Middleton

James Zimmerman

Local Service, Measurable Savings

CALL ME FOR A FREE, NO-OBLIGATION QUOTE!

We salute our Whidbey Island Firefighters & EMS responders (360) 678-5611

408 S Main St, Coupeville, WA 98239

Thank you for your service!

360-331-4440 RANDY ENBERG INSURANCE

Your Local Agent

5589 S Harbor Ave Freeland, WA 98249 renberg@farmersinsurance.com

150 SE Pioneer Way, Oak Harbor, WA 98277 (360) 679-3533


Page 6

OCTOBER 2014

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – NORTH WHIDBEY FIRE AND RESCUE

Jon Pollock

Johnathan Walker

Josh Fikse

Josh Koorn

Josh Richards

Lauren Powers

Logan Williams

Mark Boberg

Mathew Sypert

Maurice Elder

Neil Loose

Noah Hetzel

Ricardo Otero

Robert Dorr

Ron Rogers

Ryan McCarthy

Ryan Nowicki

Scott Jackson

Thank you to our firefighters

Thank you for your bravery T I R E S • W H E E L S • B AT T E R I E S • A L I G N M E N T • S H O C K S • B R A K E S

11038 WASHINGTON 525, CLINTON, WA 98236 (360) 341-3313 WWW.LESSCHWAB.COM


OCTOBER 2014

Page 7

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – NORTH WHIDBEY FIRE AND RESCUE

Steve Cope

Tim Schulz

Tim Walstad

TJ Kelsey

Tom Hoctor

Tom Mohlsick

Travis O’Connor

Ty Welshans

Tyler Rico

Walter Krytcha

Wayne Russell

Yi Qin

NOT PICTURED: Aaron Marek

Codi Bittner

Justin Bates

Arlinda Glass

David Egli

Paul Schroer

Brody DeDobbelaere

Hannah Tripp

Phillip Evans

Jeff Cobb

Richard Hoover

Cameron Hopkins

Johnathan Karlburg

Robert Crane

Christian Hendrix Amber W

Sarah P

ur brave Fir o e

r ghte S eFi

Thank You

Jessie R

We Salu t

Zac Skilbeck

1796 Main Street, Suite 102 Freeland (360) 331-5619 www.tigermartialarts.info

We thank you for your bravery 715 SE Fidalgo Ave. #202, Oak Harbor (360)679-9227 www.gallerysalonspa.net


Page 8

City of Oak Harbor Fire Department Fire Chief: Ray Merrill Years of Service: 38 Number of Employees: 10 career staff / 36 paid on call Number of Stations: 1

Chief Ray Merrill, 24 years

OCTOBER 2014

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – CITY OF OAK HARBOR FIRE DEPARTMENT

Demographics: 9.45 square miles / 22,300 population

What is your favorite thing about being in the fire service? There are so many it’s too hard to pick just one. I just enjoy every aspects of the fire department and what we stand for. Editors Note: Chief Merrill served 24 years with the Oak Harbor Fire Department, one year with North Whidbey Fire & Rescue, and 13 years with other agencies, for a total of 38 years.

How does your department balance volunteer/paid employees? Oak Harbor enjoys a very good working relationship with the career and paid on call personnel. They all meet the same standards, requirements and training. Each group provides a special ingredient to the department. They all understand the importance of our fire department and how we can best serve the community. They are a fantastic group of individuals working for a common goal — public safety. What makes your department special? No. 1 the people; the amount of energy, dedication, self-sacrifice, and hard work they put forth to provide for a safe community. It is honor and a pleasure to come to work every morning – knowing the people I get to work with, and the job that we do. It can’t be any better.

Thank you for your service

Chris Garden, 28 years

Steve McCalmont, 24 years

Deputy Chief Buxton, 22 years

Ron Hancock, 41 years

Rich Rodgers, 39 years

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE & BRAVERY

1685 Main Street (360) 331-5211 freelandfamilydental@gmail.com www.freelandfamilydental.com

THANK YOU

www.whidbeygen.org

Dwayne Jansen, 34 years

www.wiws.org

We can always count on you in times of need, thank you Whidbey Firefighters & EMS Crew Nichols Brothers Boat Builders 5400 South Cameron Rd Freeland, WA 98249 sales@nicholsboats.com www.nicholsboats.com


OCTOBER 2014

Page 9

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – CITY OF OAK HARBOR FIRE DEPARTMENT

Craig Anderson, 23 years

Dennis Wright, 21 years

Paul Schroer, 20 years

Jon Roberts, 18 years

Mike Engle, 17 years

Daniel Martin, 12 years

Andrew Carroll, 11 years

Tom Cross, 11 years

Don Baer, 11 years

Jeff Heiserman, 9 years

Shannon Holcomb, 9 years

Robert Mirabal, 9 years

Angela Braunstein, 9 years

Ryan Lange, 6 years

Conor Ching, 5 years

Ed Klaszky, 5 years

Grant Bull, 5 years

Otto Haffner, 4 years

nk You Tha R SERV for ICE YOU www.caseyscrafts.net 360-321-0577 Full range of art and craft supplies and more!!

“Sending heartfelt thanks for all you to everyday to save our lives”

WE THANK YOU WHIDBEY ISLAND FIREFIGHTERS AND EMS RESPONDERS

Mother Mentors

Nurturing the caregivers of young children

www.whidbeymothermentors.org 360-321-1484 P.O. Box 92, Langley, WA 98260

5438 S Woodard Ave. Freeland, WA 98249 www.gordonsonblueberryhill.com Phone: 360.331.7515 • E-mail: gordonsonblueberryhill@gmail.com


Page 10

OCTOBER 2014

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – CITY OF OAK HARBOR FIRE DEPARTMENT

Jake Hammond, 4 years

Cameron Hopkins, 4 years

Jake Jansen, 4 years

Jason Russell, 4 years

Tim Walstad, 4 years

Genevieve Cox, 2 years

Josh Fikse, 2 years

Andrew Moon, 2 years

Travis Stanford, 2 years

Laura Titherington, 2 years

Valentin Orellano, 1 year

Mike Fletcher, 1 year

Kevin Frondozo, 1 year

Zack Gifford, 1 year

Josh Jansen, 1 year

Andy Kiesel, 1 year

Ed-Paul Macapinlac, 1 year

Gerrit Nagel, 1 year

Thank you to our firefighters

Thank You Whidbey Firefighters

Bayview Embroidery N’Print “HIGH QUALITY - NOT HIGH PRICES”

(360)679-7900

bayview-embroidery-n-print.com

890 SE Bayshore Drive, Ste. 101 Oak Harbor, WA. 98277

THANK YOU

5826 Kramer Rd Langley, WA 98260

360-321-7799


OCTOBER 2014

Page 11

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – SOUTH WHIDBEY FIRE/EMS

South Whidbey Fire/EMS Fire Chief: H.L. “Rusty” Palmer Years of Service: 38+ Number of Employees: 11 paid, 74 volunteer Number of Stations: 6

Demographics: 66 square miles with 57 miles of shoreline, (the largest in the county), ~15,000 residents with a daily effective population of 25,000. The department provides fire suppression, fire prevention, disaster preparedness training, first aid/CPR training, medical first response, marine firefighting/rescue, and technical rope rescue services. Our annual call volume is more than 2,000 calls, of which 78 percent are medical.

H.L. “Rusty” Palmer

How does your department balance volunteer/paid employees? South Whidbey Fire/EMS has been predominately volunteer since its beginning in 1952. Career staff fill the administrative and maintenance divisions, while emergency responders are volunteer. A deputy chief serves as a duty office on a rotating basis. Like most volunteer organizations, we gain and lose members at a regular rate. Overall, we have lost approximately 5 percent of total members in the last 5 years. The community depends upon our volunteers to respond and take care of their emergency. Recruiting and retaining qualified volunteers is an ongoing and sometimes difficult task. Firefighting and EMS are physically demanding. South Whidbey’s population is aging, and the population pool of younger members is limited. Younger members may stay with the organization for a short time and then move on to make fire/EMS a career. That said, individuals of most ages, in good physical condition, can find fulfillment and reward as a member of the department. The department suffered the loss of numerous volunteers during the economic crisis. Many members were forced to leave the island

Thanks for your service!

What makes your department special? Our members! We are very much a family. We provide service to Freeland, Saratoga, Bayview, Maxwelton, Langley and Clinton and view the district as one large community. Our members are very dedicated to our community. Our organizations are made up of individuals from all walks of life, with an incredible breadth of knowledge. We use the expertise and life experience of our members in just about everything we do. We recognize the trust our community puts in us, and we take it very seriously. We have the highest call volume of all fire departments in the County, which means our members practice their skills regularly. What is your favorite thing about being in the fire service? I have one of the best jobs in the world. I have seen a tremendous amount of change in the fire service and have participated in it on a local, state and national level. My experiences and learning have been some of the most fulfilling moments of my life. I have experienced the fire service with some of the most altruistic people I have ever met. The self-sacrifice and dedication among my brothers and sisters in the fire service is humbling. The fire department is one of the critical threads that holds a community together. Being a part of it binds us to every person we serve in a way most people do not get to experience their work.

~est 1974~ WhidbeyTV • Voice Services WhidbeyTV Voice• Services Services& High Speed Internet Security WhidbeyTV • Voice Alarms • Computer Solutions •& High Speed Internet • Security High Speed Internet • Security & Alarms Cloud Services Alarms •Solutions Computer Solutions • Computer • Cloud Services

Cloud Services

360-341-3504

to find work. Many member have also retired from the organization with many years of experience. Those members are particularly difficult to replace. The department has had part-time firefighters in the past, and is considering restarting the program to cover daytime response. Many members work out of the district or off island during the day. Hiring of part-time members will ensure a minimum response to each call. Volunteers will still play a critical role in responding to provide an adequate number of members to handle the emergency.

www.whidbey.com

www.whidbey.com 360 321 1122 360 321 1122

Our family serving yours for 40 years

Thank you to our brave fire fighters for your service!

Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner 7 Days a Week For Food “To Go” Call 360-331-9945 1642 Main St., Freeland


Page 12

OCTOBER 2014

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – SOUTH WHIDBEY FIRE/EMS

Robert Armstrong

Chuck Baker

Eldon Baker

Heidi Beck

Jerry Beck

Jon Beck

Chris Blasko

Kim Boenish

Jennifer Buchholz

Paul Busch

Dareld Chittim

Cameron Clark

Anne Collins

Adam Conley

Melissa Conley

Mike Cotton

Jeff Cravy

Brent Davison

Lisa Dilwicius

James Dobberfuhl

Bob Elliot

Katherine Eyth

Bill Fredrick

Robert Frey


OCTOBER 2014

Page 13

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – SOUTH WHIDBEY FIRE/EMS

Gary Gabelein

Jon Gabelein

Tom Gideon

Mike Helland

Daniel Husom

Robert Husom

Vicki Lange

R. Leckey

Ken Lindenstein

Don Mason

Sean McDougald

Alex McMahon

Pat McMahon

Rick Neal

Andy O’Keefe

Michael Oyola

Christina Parker

Jeff Parker

The team at Freeland

The team at Freeland

"Thank you to all Whidbey Island Firefighters"

Open 7 days a week.

thanks you all! thanks you all! -7pm Mon-Sat Mon–Sat 8am-7pm 8•am Sun 9am-6pm Sun 9am-6pm 331-6799 • 331-6799 1609 E. Main, Freeland 1609 E. Main, Freeland

Cozy’s Roadhouse 8872 Hwy 525 Clinton WA 98236 360-341-2838 • www.cozysroadhouse.com


Page 14

OCTOBER 2014

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – SOUTH WHIDBEY FIRE/EMS

Tom Peterson

Will Piepenbrink

Tony Price

Paul Rempa

Kevin Rookstool

Herschel Rostov

Connie Shields

Paul Shimada

Jeff Simmons

Kenon Simmons

Kevin Simmons

Melissa Simmons

Liz Smith

Mari St Amand

Ken Starkweather

Bill Stolcis

Will Suarez

Marc Swenson

Ashley Taylor

Jim Towers

Brian Vick

We’d like to recognize of one of our servers, Ms. Alexandra McMahon who is a volunteer EMT and a fantastic part of our wait staff. Village Pizzeria is the only waterfront restaurant In Langley. Serving delicious hand-tossed NY style pizza, we also serve pasta dishes, sandwiches, variety of salads and appetizers. Come in and enjoy the gorgeous view of the sound and full bar service next to a warm fireplace. Voting now open for “King 5 Best of Western Washington” vote for us best pizza; we were top 5 last year!

106 1st Street, Langley, WA 98260 ▶ 360-221-3363


OCTOBER 2014

Page 15

SALUTE TO FIREFIGHTERS – SOUTH WHIDBEY FIRE/EMS

Tips to Keep Your Family Safe Know the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning

Source: Portable Generator Manufacturers Association

Terry Welch

Eric Westphal

James Wrightson

NOT PICTURED: Andrew “AJ” Agnew Brian Boyd Kay Butler Kelly Cammermeyer Drew Gardner Robyn Hagglund Kelly McDonald

Antonio “Tony” Nissen Joann Oyola Dena Peel Rebekah Pomeroy Delia Tapp Pamela Uhlig

Kelly Wrightson

Central Whidbey Island Fire & Rescue Fire Chief: Ed Hartin Number of Stations: 3 Demographics: 50 square miles / 8,264 population What makes the department special? Unlike the north and south ends of Whidbey Island, Central Whidbey is predominantly a retirement community with a median age of 51 (US Census, 2011). In the last 13 years, the median age in our community has increased by eight years. Increasing median

age points to a significantly aging population within the District which has a significant impact on fire and health risk, demand for emergency services, and an adverse impact on the District’s ability to recruit community based emergency service volunteers. Editors Note: Information was obtained from department website. Central Whidbey Island Fire & Rescue did not respond for requests for employee photos or department information.

Portable generators are useful when temporary or remote electric power is needed, but if used incorrectly, they can cause harm to you and your family. Generator exhaust contains high levels of carbon monoxide, a deadly gas that is tasteless, colorless and odorless. Careful consideration should be taken while operating portable generators or carbon monoxide poisoning can become a deadly risk.

experts at PGMA offer these tips for the safe operation of portable generators: • Do not run portable generators inside homes, garages, basements, crawlspaces, sheds or other partially-enclosed spaces, even if using fans or opening doors and windows. Carbon monoxide can quickly build up and linger for hours in these places, even after the generator has been turned off. • Only operate a portable generator outside, far away from windows, doors and vents, to reduce the risk of carbon monoxide gas accumulating and potentially being drawn toward occupied spaces. • Install battery-operated carbon monoxide alarms or plug-in alarms with battery backup according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Smoke alarms cannot detect carbon monoxide gas.

Portable Generators emit Carbon Monoxide (CO) exhaust that is: COLORLESS, ORDORLESS & DEADLY! EXHAUST (CO) Direct exhaust AWAY from windows, doors, and vents.

KEEP FAR AWAY!

Only use OUTSIDE and FAR AWAY from windows, doors and vents.

Put Carbon Monoxide (CO) detectors in living areas

Image Courtesy of Portable Generator Manufacturers’ Association

“Generators can be very dangerous if not operated properly,” said Joe Harding, representative for the Portable Generator Manufacturers’ Association (PGMA). “However, with proper selection and safe usage, the potential dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning caused by portable generators can be greatly reduced. The PGMA Safety First program is focused on educating the public to prevent unnecessary deaths.” Protect your family, know the warning signs To minimize tragedies associated with carbon monoxide poisoning, the

• Always place your portable generator downwind and point the engine exhaust away from occupied spaces. • The symptoms of low-level carbon monoxide poisoning can be similar to those caused by other illness such as cold, flu or food poisoning. If you suspect you or a family member are experiencing any of these symptoms due to carbon monoxide poisoning, get outside to fresh air immediately and call 911 for emergency medical attention. For more information about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning, visit www.pgmaonline.com


FIRE PREVENTION OCTOBER FIRE PREVENTIONIS MONTH MONTH OCTOBER IS FIRE PREVENTION MONTH FIRE PREVENTION FIRE PREVENTION MONTH

OCTOBER IS MONTH FIRE PREVENTION MONTH

FIRE PREVENTION

FIRE PREVENTION MONTH FIRE PREVENTION MONTH FIRE PREVENTION MONTH This page sponsored This page is sponsored by: FIREby: DISTRICT #7 SouthMONTH Whidbey Fire & EMS FIRE PREVENTION FIRE PREVENTION JOIN US!MONTH JOIN US! FIRE PREVENTION MONTH Volunteer to be aaFirefighter! This page sponsored by: This page is sponsored FIRE DISTRICT #7 Volunteer to beby: Firefighter!

MONTH FIRE PREVENTION MONTH page sponsored by: South Whidbey This page This is sponsored by: FIRE DISTRICT #7 Fire

South Whidbey Fire &JOIN EMS

& EMS

US! JOIN US! PREVENTION MONTH

FIREPREVENTION MONTH FIRE FIREPREVENTION PREVENTIONMONTH MONTH FIRE This page is sponsored by: FIRE DISTRICT #7 FIRE PREVENTION MONTH South Whidbey Fire & EMS JOIN US! JOIN US! Volunteer to be Volunteer to be Volunteer to be aaFirefighter! Firefighter! Volunteer to be aaFirefighter! Firefighter!

This page sponsored by:

JOIN US! JOIN US! This page sponsored This page is sponsored by: FIREby: DISTRICT #7 Volunteer to be a Firefighter! Volunteer to be a Firefighter! South Whidbey Fire & EMS

JOIN US! JOIN US! Volunteer to be Volunteer to be aaFirefighter! Firefighter!

It’s very important that you take precautions when it comes to fire.Always practice these safety tips:

If your clothes catch fire . . .

If your clothes catch fire . . .

Safety Fire

It’s very important that you take precautions when it not comes to fire.Always these safety STOP tips: where you are. Do handle gasoline or other liquids thatpractice burn Be Never careful around and open DROP to the ground playstoves, withheaters matches or fires lighters IfSTOP yourwhere clothes Do not cook unless an adult is present youcatch are. Do not handle gasoline or other liquids that burn ROLL over and over until the If smoke is around, stay low to the ground It’s very important that you take precautions when flames are out, covering your Be careful around stoves, heaters and REMEMBER, if something catches on fire, get help. Call 9-1-1open fires DROP to the ground it comes fire.Always these safety tips: Kids and adults to should work together to practice form an emergency face and mouth with your hands Do not cook unless an adult is present Never play with matches or lighters

Safety Fire

fire . . .

Safety Fire

plan, including an escape route. Don’t forget to practice the plan. Never play with matches or lighters

If smoke is around, stay low to the ground Do not handle gasoline or other liquids that burn REMEMBER, if something catches on fire, get help. Call 9-1-1 Be careful around stoves, heaters and open fires Kids and adults should work together to form an emergency Do not cook unless an adult is present plan, including an escape route. Don’t forget to practice the plan. If smoke is around, stay low to the ground REMEMBER, if something catches on fire, get help. Call 9-1-1

ROLL over and over until the STOP where youcovering are. flames are out, your DROP to the ground face and mouth with your hands ROLL over and over until the flames out, covering If yourare clothes catch your fire . . .

Salute Firefighters - Salute to Whidbey Island Firefighters  

i20141020124357565.pdf

Salute Firefighters - Salute to Whidbey Island Firefighters  

i20141020124357565.pdf