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HARVEST DINNER

TIGERS TOP HORNETS IN RENEWAL OF RIVALRY

Booster Night at Molson Grange Saturday, Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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Oroville’s mayor names Todd Hill new police chief Marchand reports 4244 visitors to Depot Museum, Visitor Information Center the building. He answered that it could be done as a public convenience for law enforcement,” OROVILLE – Mayor Chuck said Jones. “The city would have Spieth has named Sgt. Todd Hill to give the GSA a letter of intent to step into the shoes of retiring no later than Nov. 19,” said Jones. Mayor Spieth said, “There police chief R. Clay Warnstaff at may be too much cost involved the end of this month. “It’s time to break the news,” in the end, we don’t know at said Mayor Spieth, at the this point, but I think we should pursue it.” Tuesday, Oct. The coun7 city coun“This decision has the cil seemed cil meetagreeing. “With full agreement of the in ment, with the retirecouncil and has the C ou n c i l m an ment of Chief Jon Neal sayWa r n s t a f f recommendation of ing, “yes we effective Oct. the existing chief.” should” and 31, the deciC ou n c i l m an sion has been Mayor Chuck Spieth, City of Oroville Ed Naillon made to prosaying, “absomote Officer lutely.” Todd Hill to the position of chief of police.” Spieth continued, “This deci- OROVILLE DEPOT MUSEUM Arnie Marchand, with the sion has the full agreement of the council and has the recom- Borderlands Historical Society, mendation of the existing chief. reported on what is happening The swearing in will take place at the museum, as well as the Visitors Information Center at upon the chief ’s last day.” Hill, who grew up in Okanogan the Old Depot. “The museum theme was County, has been with the ‘The Salmon People: Stories department tell the Past’ about a taste of for seven life before the European conyears, hav- tact of the Okanagan People,” ing worked said Marchand, adding that the in Warden, Depot Museum and Visitors Wash., before Information Center were open coming to Monday through Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm, May to Todd Hill Oroville. City Clerk September. Marchand said there were Kathy Jones reported that she had been visitors from every province in contact with the General in Canada and the Northern Services Administration about Territories, and many states in when the old U.S. Border Patrol the United States. “They came from Norway; Station at 1105 Main Street would be surplussed, now that South Africa; Sydney, Australia; the new station has been com- England; Saranda, Albania; Switzerland; Israel; Vienna, pleted north of town. Noholk, United “We contacted Mr. Schwan Austria; about what kind of possibility the city would have of getting SEE MUSEUM | PG A2 BY GARY A. DE VON

EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Above, the princesses and queen of the Tonasket Homecoming Court were aglow under the lights during halftime of Tonasket’s homecoming contest against Oroville. Pictured are (l-r) freshman princess Morgan Tyus, sophomore princess Chelsea Vasquez, queen Jensen Sackman, junior princess Kasey Silverthorn, and senior princess Aspen Verhasselt. Left, the homecoming parade moved through downtown Tonasket on Friday afternoon. Brent Baker/staff photos.

State panel meets in Republic over Buckhorn mine closure BY GARY A. DE VON EDITOR@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

REPUBLIC – Lt. Governor Brad Owen headed up a legislative panel in Republic on Thursday, Oct. 9 to discuss “what’s next” as Kinross Gold plans to close the Buckhorn Mountain Gold Mine in 2015. The mine is reaching the end of its life cycle and is expected to close when its reserves are depleted sometime in late 2015. A separate Kinross operation, the Kettle River Mill, processes ore from the mine. The mill is about 47 miles from the mine near Republic. The closure Lt. Gov. Brad Owen of Buckhorn means the potential loss of about 230 jobs in Ferry and Okanogan County between the two facilities, plus another 130 contractor jobs. Lt. Gov. Owen gave a short introduction of the members on the Legislative Committee on Economic Development and International Relations followed by a few opening remarks. “We had a similar situation where I’m from in Shelton in the timber industry and Sen. Hatfield had it in the fishing industry,” said Owen, who served in the legislature before becoming Lt. Governor. Owen focused on what assistance the state was able to provide in the late 1980s and early 1990s during the decline of the timber

industry in Southwest Washington by passing worker assistance bills and other economic development measures to help displaced loggers and lumber mill workers in timber communities. Owen served in the Senate at the time, representing parts of Mason and Grays Harbor counties. “I’d like to thank Rep. Shelly Short and Joel Kretz and Sen. Brian Dansel for joining us today and to thank Kinross for helping us out setting up this meeting,” said Owen. Seventh District Senator Brian Dansel, a former Ferry County Commissioner, made some welcoming remarks. “I appreciate your efforts,” said Dansel to the panel. “Today is pretty bittersweet. We have a situation in the place where I was born. The entire economy of Ferry County and North Okanogan County benefits from the Buckhorn mine. It represents not only jobs and revenue to the county, but more.” Dansel added, “For Ferry County Kinross helps to pay for one sheriff ’s position and miles and miles of roads. After a double levy failure Kinross picked up the cost for all school sports.” Kinross showed a video about their plans for closure and how they are working to place employees at other company locations and will be offering training to learn other skills in the mining industry. Mark Ioli, Vice President and General Manager of the Kettle River-Buckhorn Operation, expressed his frustration that Kinross was not able to get the explora-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 42

tion permits from the U.S. Forest Service to expand the current mine, near Chesaw, and to provide more ore to the mill in Republic. “Ferry and Okanogan County have had more gold extraction if you add it up than Alaska and California combined,” said Ioli. The Kettle River Operation not only helps with taxes and schools, but with the entire community, according to Ioli. He said mining had played an important part for 150 years in the history and economy of he Northeastern Washington. “I think we are going to continue to mine here, maybe not right after 2015, but one day,” he said, adding that the mine employs 230 workers and the mill 45. “We will try to keep going in this area as long as possible, because we want to live here too.” Citing a 2012 study using 2011 data, Kinross puts its direct payroll at $19 million with a total direct and indirect payroll of $27 million in Okanogan and Ferry counties and a payroll of $38 million and a total of 845 jobs statewide. The average wage of a Kettle River –Buckhorn employee is $82,559 a year, surpassing the average Ferry County wage of $35,290 a year by 134 percent. In addition, the mining and milling operation receives goods and services from 354 Washingtonbased businesses. The lietenant governor asked why Kinross wasn’t moving forward with more exploration. Ioli said that the company had begun

SEE GOLD MINE | PG A2

Reimbursements emphasis of talk with Murray’s rep. BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - It’s unusual for a government agency to be working ahead of schedule. Thankfully for North Valley Hospital, Administrator Linda Michel reported at the Thursday, Oct. 9, Board of Commissioners meeting, an early survey by the Department of Health found the hospital ready despite having the agency arrive more than a month ahead of schedule. “We were ready,” Michel said. “We had a great survey.” She said that a number of maintenance issues were noted and that most had already been addressed. “I was extremely proud because I was in Cle Elum at a meeting (when DOH showed up unannounced),” she said. “This

team took our surveyors and ripped right through the survey. Tina Smith especially stepped up to the plate for me. “When they reviewed the closed records - (records for) people who have been discharged - and open records (those still admitted) - they found no nursing documentation out of place. You usually don’t find that and we’re very proud of that.”

POLITICS NVH administrators met with John Culton, a member of Sen. Patty Murray’s administrative staff, who was in Tonasket to visit with various entities last week. Michel said they discussed a number of issues, but that she stressed to him that inadequate reimbursement rates for Extended Care patients was a top priority that needed to be addressed. “I think he went away with a good understanding of what

SEE NVH | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

NVH found ready by Dept. of Health

Cancer Awareness A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Cops & Courts Valley Life Homecoming

A8 A8-9 B1

Sports Classifieds Real Estate

B2-3 B4-5 B5


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16 2014

LOCAL NEWS

MUSEUM | FROM A1

the hospital regarding the dumpster issue, and Cariker said the hospital hoped to address the council at one of the regular City Council meetings. “We are going to talk to the city council about what we can do. We’ve asked them for a franchise, like leasing the space from the city. They turned that down at their last meeting so we’ve asked them to look at that again. We also have some Department of Health issues as well, and drainage (depending on location). “If there has been a long standing grudge, we’re not here to propagate that. We’re here to be good neighbors and work in a partnership and see if we can come up with something mutually agreeable.” That was at Thursday’s meeting; Friday morning, a car hit one of the dumpsters parked on Western Ave., tipping it over. As of Monday, the two dumpsters that had been parked against the curb have been moved into a pair of diagonal parking spots in front of the Extended Care on First Street, while the third is next to the portable generator, slightly encroaching onto the sidewalk along Western Ave. “NVH will present a letter asking the council’s permission (for that as a permanent solution),” Cariker said.

Patrick Plumb/submitted photo

Police Chief Rob Burks and North Valley Hospital District CIO Kelly Cariker look over a dumpster that was overturned by a car accident on Friday, Oct. 10. The placement of three hospital dumpsters is an issue that the hospital and the City of Tonasket are trying to resolve. we’re up against sometimes,” Michel said. “I asked that any committees set up in health care in Washington, especially, I wanted to make sure rurals were represented equally to the larger tertiary centers.” “He asked our permission to call on us to testify to tell our story of being a Critical Access Hospital,” said Business Development Coordinator Terri Orford. “In this community, the school district, the Chamber of Commerce ... if we go away because of the (Affordable Care Act) the impact is not just on health care, but on employment, the industry in this area, enrollment in our schools. “He got a good understanding of how interconnected we all are in keeping these small communities viable.”

DUMPSTER The city and hospital district appeared by Friday to be inching toward a resolution of the

placement of the hospital’s dumpsters, which have been parked on Western Avenue for the past several months. The city council has asked that the hospital keep the dumpsters out of the sidewalk right-of-way, as well as off the street. City Council member Dennis Brown visited with Chief Information Officer Kelly Cariker. “Apparently it’s been a longstanding issue, which I’ve been unaware of,” Cariker said. “(Brown) stopped by and we toured the entire facility. There wasn’t an overly good place to put them.” One area, near where the dumpsters had once been stored, was rejected by the garbage company itself. “The garbage company declined to move the garbage to that area because of risk (to the building),” Cariker said. “They didn’t want the liability.” The city had written a letter to

ALSO The hospital district continues its slow rise out of warrants, with about $55,000 of cash on hand on Thursday. CFO Helen Verhasselt said before paying off a run of bills the district had as much as $250,000 on hand, and had briefly dipped back into warrants (debt to the county). The Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, Oct. 30.

Oroville Chamber inviting you to ‘Meet the Candidates’ Business Trick or Treating, costume & decoration contest planned

will be delivered next week to all the businesses. Those businesses that want to take part are asked to just put the sign in your window or door and hand out treats to the kids from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Friends and Family of

Vern Ritter Please come join us

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a Meet The Candidates session on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. The meeting will take place at the High School Commons (just south of 12th on Ironwood). Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. and some candidates may arrive early so voters can personally meet them before and after. “This will not be in the form of a debate, but rather each candidate will be given a limited time to present (10 - 15 minutes) with an opportunity to speak briefly after a contender has presented. Expect the session to last up to two hours,” said Clyde Andrews, president of the chamber of commerce. “We invited only those candidates in contested races.” The following candidates have indicated they will be there: Clint Didier (Representative in Congress), Brian Dansel (State Senator) Shelly Short (State Representative, Position 1), Joel Kretz (State Representative, Position 2), Scott Furman (County Assessor), Dave Rodriguez (County Coroner), Gary Reams (County Coroner), David Womack (PUD Commissioner) and Scott Vejraska (PUD Commissioner), according to Andrews. The following regretted that they could not attend due to scheduling conflicts: Eddie Yoon (Supreme Court Justice, Position 3), Charles Johnson (Supreme Court Justice, Position 3), James Apker (State Representative, Position 1) and Ronnie Rae (State Representative, Position 2) The following did not respond to the chamber’s attempts to contact them: Dan Newhouse (Representative in Congress) Les Stokes (County Assessor), Debra Stephens (Supreme Court Justice, Position 7) and John Scannell (Supreme Court Justice, Position 7).

OROVILLE BUSINESS HALLOWEEN The Oroville Businesses Trick or Treat for the kids is on Friday, Oct. 31 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Flyers and the Trick or Treat signs

Those businesses that would liked to be judged on best costumes and best decorations are asked to call the Camaray at (509) 476-3684 and ask to be put on the list to be judged.

to JOYFULLY celebrate

Vern’s 90th Birthday!

Sun., October 26th at 12:05 p.m. Oroville Free Methodist Church 1516 Fir St.

Hope to see you there!

RE-ELECT

DAVID

WOMACK

England; Saranda, Albania; Switzerland; Israel; Vienna, Austria; Noholk, United Kingdom; Brisbane, Australia and a great many from Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Washington State. As of Friday, Sept. 12 there were 4244 visitors.” The staff gave four more separate classes the next week Arnie Marchand after closing for the season just because a teacher wanted her students to have an opportunity to see and hear about the exhibit. “This was the most important factor in continuing the exhibit next year. The number of school children that visited our museum. We did outreach to Chelan, Okanogan, and Penticton, B.C. schools giving classes on our exhibit, the Okanagan Indians,” said Marchand. The requests from other schools were so great that the museum’s Board of Directors decided to continue the exhibit and expand upon it, according to Marchand. The museum will be including “First Contact” and how the People of the region interacted and the region changed. “We have had experts from the Enowkin Center from the Penticton Indian Band and the Colville Tribal Museum advise us on how to display our message. We are going to get help from the Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center, Chelan Museum, and the Okanogan Historical Society,” said Marchand. “This will focus on the region and what happened here after contact was made with the first white people. It will have to do with the transition that took place from about 1810 to the turn of the last century,” said Marchand. The museum is also getting about 100 pieces of railroad related items, including the original typewriter used a the Depot dating from 1903. The original long bench that sat at the front of the depot, as well as a “speeder” are among the items that the museum will be obtaining. Plans are underway for a display to be built for the

speeder, which is a small motorized car, with trucks, used for maintenance to the track. Marchand was asked where the railroad related items were coming from. “When it went from the Great Northern to Burlington Northern a lot of these items were stored... many of them by Dick Wisener,” he said. In addition to the exhibits, there have been changes in the building, as well. The Historical Society has completed the insulation, electrical, and heating of the out building, where exhibit items not on display can now be stored in a climate controlled environment. The Society has also begun restoration of the kitchen area to transform it into a multi-use area for office, and research area. In addition, the steps have been

completed and painted. The Wenatchee Valley College North Campus at Omak and the Society will be presenting a “Magic Lantern Show” in February 2015 as a fund raiser for both organizations. The Omak show will be at the Performing Arts Center and the Oroville show will be at Vicki’s on Main Street. “These will include about 45 minutes of slides, some that have never been seen before. They will be related to the pioneer photographer Matsura,” said Marchand. “The Magic Lantern Show will take place on Feb. 6, 7 or 20, 21, it hasn’t been confirmed yet,” he said. The next meeting of the city council will be Tuesday, Oct. 21 at 7 p.m. in the city council chambers located at 1308 Ironwood.

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Miles Hefker, 9, Oroville, was one of over 4000 visitors, including many school children, to the museum and VIC this summer. Here he examines a pit hut display this past summer from The Salmon People: Stories Tell the Past, was the exhibit.

Did you know? Think Green!

NVH | FROM A1

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I have always kept in mind how rates will affect my friends and family as well as your friends and family. VOTE David Womack Okanogan PUD Commissioner Paid for by the committee to re-elect David Womack, 727 Kenwood St N Omak, WA 98841

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

LOCAL NEWS

GOLD MINE | FROM A1 approaching the state and federal government to expand exploration in the area. “That process took 18 months to do nine drill holes. We’d rather do a whole block,” he said, adding that it costs the company about $3 million annually in the permitting process - something Kinross has decided isn’t worth the cost at this time. “We just need permission to drill... we have abandoned the federal process and are still exploring at the five to 10 hole level and concentrating on state and private land. The federal process is to cumbersome,” said Ioli. The bi-partisan study committee heard from presenters from the state Department of Commerce, the Office of Regulatory Innovation and Assistance, the Employment Security Department, the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Department of Social and Health Services, as well as Jim Milner, from the Republic Chamber of Commerce. Milner, who spoke after Owen and Ioli, said there are two reactions to the mine closure – Chicken Little and Ostrich with its head in the sand. “Some people think that the moment Kinross closes the mine the area is going to die. The other extreme is we’ve survived closures before.... Of course then we had the cattle and timber industries to fall back on,” said Milner. “It’s going to take significant effort to survive this time,” said Milner, who went on to describe

Two Tonasket area ballot measures put before voters Criminal Justice and EMS levy funds sought BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Legislative Committee on Economic Development and International Relations, as well as Seventh District legislators, met in Republic last Thursday to discuss the economic impact of the 2015 closure of the Buckhorn Gold Mine on Ferry County and North Okanogan County. Those at the committee table are Rep. Shelly Short, Sen. Bob Hasegawa, Sen. Brian Hatfield, Sen. Randi Becker, Lt. Gov. Brad Owen, Rep. J.T. Wilcox, Rep. Norma Smith, Sen. Brian Dansel and Rep. Joel Kretz..

TONASKET - Tonasket-area voters will have a pair of local ballot measures to decide on during the upcoming Nov. 4 election - one of them specific to city residents, the other involving everyone in the EMS district (which covers the same footprint as the Tonasket School District).

some of the efforts that have been made, including events focused on bringing in tourists, as well as a marketing video for YouTube. “All of this is pretty much aimed at tourism and small business. We still need industry an to revitalize the three industries we have,” he told the panel. “We are not asking for handouts, but do require partnerships to get the ball rolling.” Jesus Sanchez, from the Governor’s Office of Regulatory Innovation and Assistance, talked about how the state is making strides in making sure state agencies work together to make regulations work, not to create roadblocks. These kids of agency

roadblocks and delays were something Ioli talked about regarding permits on the federal level. Sanchez’ duties require his involvement in developing innovative approaches to streamline governmental regulatory processes for retaining and bringing new business into Washington. He said he had the full backing of Governor Jay Inslee and that the office has been successful in streamlining processes for things like getting the new Skagit River Bridge built. The session was recorded by TVW for later broadcast. Following the meeting and lunch the legislative committee went on a tour Kinross’s Kettle River facility.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE TAX The City of Tonasket is asking voters to approve an increase of 0.1 percent to the city’s sales and use tax, to take effect April 1, 2015. One third of that amount is required by law to be dedicated to public safety expenses. The remaining would go into the general fund, which includes police, fire, parks, the airport and administrative costs.

town and the visitors,” Black said. “As a team, our volunteers are becoming really adept as tourist consultants. My goodness, I feel so honored to work with these people They keep coming back even though I keep giving them homework.” Highlights this year included the art shows, which gave local artisans the opportunity to sell their works; a new Tonasket brochure; and the growing reputation of the bicycle camp behind the TVBRC building. “The brochure was wellreceived,” Black said. “James Moore put most of it together and it shows a lot of the small roads in the county. He’s a Buddhist and I’m a maniac, so we worked well together.” Additionally, she said Martha Gibeaut has been working to significantly upgrade the TVBRC website. “It’s almost finished and it’s beautiful,” she said. Art show curator Sue Kramer said that the shows brought in

over $2,000 for local artists. “We moved a lot of stuff out,” she said. “That’s pretty exciting. Every year it’s just gotten better and better. We have a lot of amazing talent in this valley.” Black also coordinated a meeting between directors of the various Okanogan County visitors centers. “We’re getting a lot of Canadians stepping over for the first time wanting to explore the area,” Black said. “People like to visit different places in the area. If people want to see the Grand Coulee Dam, Winthrop, or Conconully, we want to be able to direct them properly. We are getting a lot of people heading up to Republic or down to (the south end of the county). We learned a lot from each other. It was a good exchange; they’d never had one before.” The TVBRC will open part time Thursdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., in order for artists to bring in holiday-oriented works to sell.

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

The city is attempting to cover budget shortfalls from the past few years that have occurred due to stagnant sales tax revenue, while criminal justice fees in particular have been rising. Sales tax is collected from all customers doing business within the City of Tonasket. Transactions not effected include edible groceries and utilities. The one tenth of one percent amounts to a $1.00 tax increase per $1,000 spent.

EMERGENCY SERVICES RENEWAL The Tonasket EMS district is running a 10-year levy that will cover about 60 percent of the EMS budget. The current levy is expiring; the new levy will replace expiring levy at the same rate that the old levy was passed. The levy amounts to 40 cents per $1,000 of assessed property valuation. Annual increases are limited to one percent a year. “It will renew the levy that allows us to continue our service,” said EMS director Michael Greene. “It’s pretty much and essential part of our budget; I’m really can’t provide reliable ser-

vice without it.” The EMS district covers an area larger than the size of Rhode Island with three 4-Wheel Drive ambulances, purchased used, and a team of EMTs who are paid $3.00 per hour shift coverage. Greene added that without the levy, the district could not make up the shortfall by increasing transportation fees. “Those are capped,” he said. “If we doubled our ambulance rates, Medicare would say, ‘Fine, this is still how much we pay.’ And most insurance follows suit with what Medicare pays.” Greene said in reviewing former EMS Director Jeff Cravy’s records from the initial levy 10 years ago, he’s found that the district either lived up to or exceeded promises made at that time to the voters. “They bought the facility, purchased the ambulances, trained local people to do it - even exceeded the commitments we made to the community as far as training and the number of EMTs,” Greene said. “The first time was to start the district. Now, it is to maintain the district.”

Red Cross looking for TVBRC closes after solid year volunteers in Tonasket TVBRC closes after solid year BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket Visitor and Business Resource Center closed out its 2014 summer season on Wednesday, Oct. 8, with a luncheon to honor the 27 volunteers who kept the center hopping through the area’s busy tourist season. TVBRC board members Julie Alley, Alice Attwood, Cathy Olson and Black helped serve up lunch for the volunteers while a number of local speakers shared goings-on in their particular spheres of influence. Volunteer coordinator Linda Black said that while the overall number of visitors was down (1,342, compared to over 1,500 last year), most of that could be attributed to a dip in regional tourism brought about by the Carlton Complex fire. “It’s a blessing to have this many community members to offer their time and service to the

The American Red Cross in Tonasket needs great people like you to give their time and service, according to Sally Sherwood,with the ARC’s Pacific Northwest Blood Services Region. “Volunteering with the Red Cross allows you to be part of a life changing mission, share your talents, meet new people, and give back to your own community,” she said. The Red Cross currently holds about five community blood drives in Tonasket each year Since

2004 the Tonasket community blood drives have collected 1,420 pints of blood; that much blood has the potential to help save over 4,000 lives. The Red Cross often times has others going on too throughout the community and surrounding areas. “We are in need of people to help us operate our drives and coordinate volunteers. These opportunities range from welcoming, serving, and thanking our blood donors, calling donors and volunteers (this can be done from home!), to arranging volunteers for upcoming drives,” said

Sherwood. “You can decide how often and when you serve. This is a wonderful opportunity for teens to earn school credit, churches and businesses to host a volunteer event, and you to give back to your community.” Sherwood asks people in the Tonasket area to consider joining a team of over five million volunteers and blood donors worldwide. For more information about volunteer opportunities, contact JayAnn Merkle, Donor Recruitment Representative at (509) 834-2606 or by email at JayAnn.Merkle@redcross.org.

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OKANOGAN PUD SCHEDULES BUDGET WORKSHOPS The Board of Commissioners of Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County will hold the following 2015 Budget Workshops in the PUD Auditorium located at 1331 2nd Avenue North in Okanogan:

October 20, 2014

November 3, 2014

Budget Workshop will commence at 6:30 p.m.

Budget Workshop will commence at 6:30 p.m.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16, 2014

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month We have all been touched in some way or know someone who has been affected by breast cancer. Because of this, it is important to offer support to those in every stage of this disease as well as those who are beating the odds and now stand as survivors.

Survivor

Linda Holden Tonasket Survivor: 4 years Interests / Hobbies: Grandchildren, Gardening and Reading.

Cancer Survivor’s Tips (NAPS)—While being diagnosed with cancer can make you feel vulnerable, surviving cancer can make you feel invincible. So says Melanie Young, host of the weekly radio show “Fearless Fabulous Youâ€? on W4WN, in her book “Getting Things Off My Chest: A Survivor’s Guide to Staying Fearless and Fabulous in the Face of Breast Cancer.â€? The 10 things she learned from having cancer are no different from those healthy people should live by, she says. They are: ‡ %HSK\VLFDOO\DFWLYHZLWKGDLO\DHURELF exercise. ‡ 0DLQWDLQDKHDOWK\ZHLJKW ‡ 0DNHVPDUWIRRGFKRLFHV ‡ /RZHUDOFRKROLQWDNH ‡ 8VHVXQVFUHHQGDLO\ ‡ 5HGXFHPDQDJHVWUHVV ‡ *HWHQRXJKVOHHS ‡ 'RQ¡WVPRNHRUXVHUHFUHDWLRQDOGUXJV ‡ %HYLJLODQWDERXW\RXUKHDOWKFDUHLQFOXGLQJ annual exams, screenings and vaccinations. ‡ )RFXVRQSRVLWLYHHQHUJ\DQGPDNHTXDOLW\  time for yourself and loved ones. 7KHERRNLVDYDLODEOHDWKWWSZZZPHODQLH\RXQJFRP

Understanding Breast Cancer Breast cancer is an issue that extends beyond the month of October, and many people might be surprised to learn of breast cancer’s prevalence. In the United States alone, breast cancer incidence in women is 1 in 8, or roughly 13 percent. In fact, among women in the U.S., breast cancer rates are higher than those of any cancer besides lung cancer.

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With such staggering figures, it’s important for both women and men (who can also suffer from breast cancer) to gain a greater understanding of this deadly disease.

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What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is an uncontrolled growth of breast cells. Any type of cancer is the result of mutations in genes responsible for regulating the growth of cells and keeping them healthy. In a healthy body, the cells replace them-

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selves in an orderly fashion, as healthy new cells take over as old ones die out. When mutations occur, changed cells gain the ability to keep dividing without control or order, producing more similar cells and forming a tumor. In the case of breast cancer, cancerous cells gradually invade nearby healthy breast tissue and make their way into the underarm lymph nodes, which are small organs that filter out foreign substances in the body. If the cancer reaches the lymph nodes, it then has a pathway into other parts of the body. Upon diagnosis, a patient will be told what stage of breast cancer they are in, which tells how far the cancer has spread beyond the original tumor. Is Breast Cancer Hereditary? According to BreastCancer.org, a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing reliable, complete and current information about breast cancer, only 5 to 10 percent of cancers are due to an abnormality inherited from a parent. While all breast cancers are caused by a genetic abnormality, roughly 90 percent of breast cancer cases are the result of genetic abnormalities that are a result of the aging process and the wear and tear of everyday life. Can Breast Cancer Be Prevented? Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is always an ideal approach, but breast cancer is never the fault of the individual. A balanced diet, a lifestyle that includes abstaining from smoking and drinking alcohol in excess and regular exercise are all ways to stay healthy, but none will guarantee a woman or man will not get breast cancer.

* Diet. Many cancers are linked to diet, but studies have yet to show for certain which types of foods increase the risk for breast cancer. In general, it’s good to restrict sources of red meat and other animal fats, such as fats from dairy products. Some studies have shown that eating a lot of red and/or processed meats is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer. Eating a diet low in fat and rich in fruits and vegetables is often recommended to reduce cancer risk. * Exercise. The American Cancer Society recommends engaging in 45 to 60 minutes of physical exercise 5 or more days per week, as evidence continues to mount that exercise can reduce breast cancer risk. * Alcohol and smoking. Alcohol limits the liver’s ability to control blood levels of estrogen, which can increase risk of breast cancer. Similarly, smoking has been associated with a small increase in breast cancer risk. BreastCancer.org also notes additional risk factors for breast cancer can include recent oral contraceptive use, stress and anxiety and exposure to estrogen. While all of the mentioned risk factors are within an individual’s control, there are a host of additional factors beyond a person’s control that can increase risk of breast cancer. These factors include age, family history, personal history, and race among others. For more info. on breast cancer, visit www.breastcancer.org.

Are There Risk Factors for Breast Cancer? BreastCancer.org notes that there are factors a woman or man can control that might lessen their risk for breast cancer. Those risks include: * Weight. Post-menopausal women in particular can reduce their risk of breast cancer by maintaining a healthy weight. Fat tissue is the body’s main source of estrogen after menopause, and having more fat tissue means higher estrogen levels, which increases breast cancer risk.

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

What’s next?

Republic and Oroville will feel the effect of mine shut down differently. The ‘boom and bust’ cycle mining can bring to an area has been readily apparent in Republic for years – one could tell just by looking at the number of full or empty businesses on Main Street. That cycle has been a missing component in Oroville’s history at least since the time when gold was first discovered in Washington State - the 1859 gold find near Shanker’s Bend by U.S. Army soldiers doing a boundary survey. It was around that time the town got the dubious monicker of “Rag Town” due to all the tents that served as businesses and homes. That boom lasted until the next big discovery tempted prospectors and they all lit out for richer territory. Last week there was a meeting in Republic about what will happen now that the Buckhorn Gold Mine is closing in 2015 and gold exploration Out of permits in the area have been delayed so much the U.S. Forest Service that Kinross has all but My Mind by given up on expanding in the area. Gary A. DeVon While Republic and Ferry County have relied on gold as a big component of the local economy, Oroville, and Okanogan County have relied on fruit production, timber and cattle as the legs of their three-legged stool. Those at the meeting in Republic informed Lt. Governor Brad Owen, state legislators and agency representatives that not only has the federal government made it hard to explore and continue the life of the mine, their agencies have also thrown up roadblocks to the more traditional industries in both counties. When Owen was a state legislator, he and some of his fellow legislators representing rural counties on the west side shared their stories of the rush to enact legislation to help struggling timber communities being regulated out of business in the 1980s and 90s. They said a similar program needed to be done here. Before the mine, there was talk of boom and bust by opponents and proponents during the 20 some odd years that it took to get the Buckhorn going. Of course like the old saying “it is better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all,” it’s also better to enjoy the fruits of temporarily good economic times than to flounder endlessly in economic hard times. But, unlike love, with mining, or any resource-based industry – you should always be looking ahead to when or if the good times play out. Make hay while the sun shines, so to speak. While Oroville and Okanogan County, particularly the school district, benefited most from the property taxes generated by the mine, Ferry County benefited mostly by the jobs the mine and ore mill created – both directly through employment at the mine and mill and through those who contracted with the company. The meeting had more to do with what the Republic area will do now that the mine is closing and not so much what the Oroville area will do. Yes, job and assistance programs through state agencies can benefit the Oroville and the Republic areas alike. Questions about what happens when Kinross isn’t paying as much in property taxes went unasked. Local taxing districts all benefited from the mine with voters more willing to pass double-sized school levies when they knew a rich mining company was going to have to shoulder most of the increase. What happens when that goes away? We still need to collect the same total amount, but the burden will be loaded on to the backs of the remaining property owners. Why did the school district ask for twice as much money? It wasn’t just because it was known the mine would be paying a big share of the increase, it was because the property value went up so much in the district, the schools lost their Levy Equalization money. We were now too well off to need the help. The big question is will we once again be eligible for LE monies again and what hoops the state will make us jump through to get them. It would be a good thing if we could get the same group to come to a similar meeting in Oroville. This would give Oroville city and school representatives, county commissioners and others who benefited from the boom the mine generated a chance to ask: What’s next?

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Remember earlier 9-11 event as well Dear Editor, Recent memories in regards to the World Trade Center bombings are all well and good, and should not be forgotten. However along the lines of “Remember the Alamo”, “Bombing of Pearl Harbor”, etc., there exists an event that also occurred on “9/11” (1857) and should be remembered. It is a bit mysterious as to why no news media even mentions it, because it took place at the direction of a well known American religious zealot that to this day continues to be remembered by his followers. Yes, the year was 1857. Over 120 American pioneers from Arkansas were headed in a wagon train for California. They were attacked and slaughtered by fellow Americans dressed up as Ute Indians, although later identification would show that most of these “Indians” were in fact white people under direction of the President of the Mormon Church of the time, Brigham Young. Those responsible managed to gain the possession of all firearms of the victims and then confronted those victims point blank and shot them dead, to leave their bodies to lie on the grass and rocks to rot and be consumed by the buzzards, coyotes, and Mother Nature in general, in the American West in southern Utah. No Mormon leadership has ever apologized for this event. In fact the current Mormon President in Salt lake City refuses to say he is “sorry,” even though he has been asked to, several times. The Mormon Church has built memorials at the site, and on at least one occasion has built rock cairns covering bodies of the victims, with various leaders of the Mormon Church destroying some of those rock cairns as if to say that they are ashamed of the event. The Mountain Meadow Massacre is clear-

ly shown in our American History annals. Current Search in Google and other sites on the Internet covers the whole incident quite well. It is quite despicable that no mention is made of it as we remember the events of “9/11” by those in the news media that remind us of such things, and those in scholastic intelligence that should be aware of it “don’t seem to know.” Sincerely, Donald Thomason Moses Lake, Washington

Didier for U.S. House of Representatives Dear Editor, As we get closer to November, I wanted to take an opportunity to encourage my fellow citizens to support Clint Didier, running for the 4th Congressional District seat. You might hear Clint’s opponent is “someone we can work with.” When a politician says this, what they really mean is that “we want someone we can control.” Personally, I don’t want someone the political party feels they can manipulate. The party has one agenda: protect their money and control – it’s not

about the citizens. It is the people’s responsibility to direct their representative. Not the party. Clint will stand up on behalf of OUR directives. You have probably heard Clint’s opponent “is an honest man.” Logic assumes that by stating the opponent is honest, Didier must be dishonest. I know Clint personally. He is honest and forthright –period. He may not be the best public speaker, but he is frank and passionate about his principles. Even though I may not agree with Clint, I have complete trust that he would never manipulate my discretion on an issue. Finally, ask yourself why so much money is being dumped into a Congressional race between two Republicans in Eastern Washington. On the surface it may seem silly, but there is much at stake for the progressives. Who is the threat and why? Research who is financially supporting these candidates. Numbers don’t lie. Check out Clint’s website to learn more: http://www.didier4congress.org/. Join me in supporting someone who shares Okanogan County’s customs and culture this November. Sincerely Pamela Leslie Oroville

Raising awareness to fight breast cancer OPINION BY REP. RICHARD “DOC” HASTINGS 4TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT (WA-R)

Did you know that a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer every three minutes in the United States? Whether it is a friend, colleague, mother, wife or daughter, we all likely know someone who has battled this difficult disease. Sadly, one in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed Doc Hastings with breast cancer over Representative the course of her life(4th District time.  It is a serious ill-

The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago: October 6-13, 1939: Although there has been an outbreak of war in Europe, involving Canada and the British Empire, these hostilities will not affect present regulations regarding tourist travel from the United States to Canada. John Kammers, proprietor of John’s Auto Service and local dealer for Pontiac cars, brought the first of the new 1940 Pontiac Silver Streak auto home from Spokane for display in the show room at his garage in Oroville. The bodies of these vehicles are completely new with more room in every direction. Floors are four inches lower, thus making it easier to step into. Sealed bean headlights and Hi-test safety plate glass are among the most important improvements. The state has been notified that its quarterly quota for enrollment in the Civilian Conservation Corp, will be 1150. Young boys between the ages of 17 and 23 will be given an opportunity to enroll in the Corp. Enrollment is for a six months period with re-enrollment privileges not to exceed a total of two years. Hugh M. Lawrence, of Tonasket, was an Oroville visitor on Wednesday of this week, in connection with his bus lines. Mr. Lawrence, who now has a bus line in operation from Tonasket to Wilbur via Republic, says that he has started a new line from Omak and Okanogan to Coulee Dam. The Methodist Ladies are holding their annual chicken dinner and bazaar, at the Civic League Building on Saturday, Oct. 7, starting at 11 a.m. and lasting as long as there is anything left to ear and customers to buy it. George’s Chevrolet Service invites the public to the first showing of the 1940 Chevrolets; the new 1940 Fords are on display at Scott’s Motors and Economy Motors is presenting the new models of 1940 Oldsmobiles. All of these models promise a multitude of new and better features. Grocery Prices: Giant Post Toasties, 3 pkgs, $.25; Peanut but-

ness that strikes women of all ages regardless of race or socioeconomic background. For more than 25 years, the month of October has been recognized as Breast Cancer Awareness Month. There will be community events throughout Central Washington this month to raise money for, and bring awareness to, the fight against breast cancer. While the causes of breast cancer are still not fully understood, early detection is key to reducing the mortality rate from this disease. Today, with early detection, 90 percent of women diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States will beat the disease – adding to the more than 2.8 million breast cancers survivors across the nation. While Washington state has one of the lowest breast cancer mortality rates in the country, we still have a long way to go to fully defeat this devastating disease.  Both public

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

ter, 2# jar, $.25; Coffee, # 2 cans, $.53; Fancy veal steak, $.15 per #; Cane sugar, 100# for $6.50; Roundup Oysters, 10 oz cans, 2 for $.15.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: October 8-15, 1964: The Okanogan County Public Utility District is attempting to interest the towns of Oroville and Tonasket in developing a public park on its Similkameen River power dam site, Commissioner Irv Woods reported Monday. The old hydro-electric plant, which was obsolete when it was installed in 1921, would make a fine tourist attraction for such a park. The Chelan Goats took advantage of a couple of Oroville defensive errors and scored a second quarter TD that dealt the Hornets their third loss of the season in a Cariboo League game held at Chelan. The enrollment in Oroville Senior High School was 209 and the Junior High, 234 on Oct. 1, 1964. The Elementary School enrollment dropped to 509 from 524 on Oct. 1, 1963. The Oroville Junior-High School faculty conducted a short survey Monday to determine the value of dismissing school for apple harvest. Some rather surprising statistics were complied form the survey. Approximated 320 students worked for pay for an average of 6.8 days and earned $19,418.31 or an average of $60.68 per student. A brand new “SitzLift” is being installed at the Sitzmark Ski

agencies and private health care organizations play a key role in this fight. During my years in Congress, I have supported doubling federal funding for the National Institutes of Health, which helping lead the charge to find a cure for breast cancer. I also supported legislation to make permanent the Research and Development Tax Credit, which encourages U.S. companies to increase investments in research. This bill passed the House of Representatives earlier this year and I encourage the Senate to act quickly on this legislation so valuable research can continue. For more information about breast cancer or how to get involved in the fight against it, I encourage you to visit the websites for The National Cancer Institute  or the  Centers for Disease Control.

Hill near Havillah. This major improvement, designed and built by Melvin Kuhlman, consists of a continuous overhead cable carrying telescoping hangers to pull skiers from the bottom of the hill to any one of several release points up the 1600 foot length of the “hill.” Oroville evened its league record at 2–2 as they ran over Okanogan 19–0 last Friday and in doing so put themselves right back into the picture. Three teams are now tied for the lead with 2–1 records, Tonasket, Chelan, Omak and with Oroville a half game back. Persons attending the Oroville Chamber Tuesday saw Chuck Hulsey’s stereo slides of Washington Pass on the North State Highway now under construction. This road, when completed, will afford a spectacular view of one of America’s most scenic areas. Grocery Prices: Peanut butter, 3 lb. jar, $.99; Chunk Tuna, 3 for $.89’ Cut-up fryers, pan ready, $.39 per lb; Canned milk, 8 for $1.00; Rump Roast, $.69 per lb.; Ground beef, $.39 per lb.; Jonathan apples, 10 lbs $1.00; 10# sugar, $.88. Weather Wise by Marge Frazier, official observer: Oct. 7, 70 degrees maximum and 40 degrees minimum; Oct. 8, 61 and 46; Oct. 9, 57 and 41; Oct. 10, 59 and 40; Oct. 11, 70 and 49; Oct. 12, 74 and 35 and Oct. 13, 71 and 33. Total precipitation for the period, .15”.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: October 5–12, 1989: Ethel Lindauer, soon to be on the Oroville City Council and Dee Patterson were just two of several concerned Oroville residents in attendance at the last Thursday’s meeting with Canadian government officials in Osoyoos over a proposed PCB storage site at a compound at the Canadian Port of Entry. The meeting drew nearly 250 Canadians and Americans to the Osoyoos Community Center, the majority of whom expressed displeasure with the propos-

SEE ITEMS PAST | PG A6


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE The apple harvest is winding down The middle of October, already! I suppose apple harvest is winding down. We’ve had some Asian pears, which are nice to eat fresh. Some folks like to dry them, but not being a fan of dried fruit, I won’t bother. The weather has been very nice, with some breezy times, making the giant flags at the local shopping center, very beautiful as they flutter in the breeze, and sometimes they have to remove them as strong winds can damage them. It was good to see Dean Brazle out and about as he had been confined to the hospital. He told me he’d be moving

down from his “hill country home” on the advice of his doctor’s. Can you imagine Christmas advertising on TV so soon? I heard what sounded like a spray plane last week and was reminded of our neighbor, the late George Ehlers, who was a spray pilot for a lot of years, in the area. This is a quote from him. ‘There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there aren’t too many old, bold pilots.” He figured he’d been at it long enough and one day said, “that’s enough”. I was told by a friend of Peggy Roulet’s

that she hit two deer, at the same time. not to refer to the students as “boys and Don’t hear of that too often. girls.” One suggestion was to call them Congratulations to Menze Pickering, “purple penguins.” being chosen Omak Beverly Storm is home. Stampede Queen. Menze She was at the Senior Center is a freshman at Eastern for lunch one day last week. Washington University, and Being able to burn weeds, was Okanogan County fair trash and other items that queen in 2013. Menze is the have been accumulating durdaughter of Rick and Lisa ing the “burn ban days” has Pickering, Oroville and the put some peculiar aromas in proud grandparents are Perry the air, as folks are doing fall and Hillary Blackler. clean-up, preparing for winThe repairman has us ter days ahead. “back in business” with the THIS & THAT Being able to have a smallailing refrigerator. er water bill is nice but it Joyce Emry I’m told that a new busidoesn’t last long as up goes ness, a thrift store, has opened the heat bill. on the corner of Main and Central, operFall days bring to mind gingerbread ated by Jared Williams. Always good to and pumpkin pie with whipped cream, have an empty building filled! for dessert. And of course apple pie, and Just when I think I’ve heard it all, the Catholic Church had another very along comes something else. In Lincoln, successful “pie day,” making dozens and Nebraska a school has asked the teachers dozens of them.

CONCERT AT CCC OCT. 18

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Honoring SGT Jarred Palmier SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Lindsay Street Band from Seattle will perform at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket with Roots Music From Ireland, England, Quebec, Scandinavia and France as well as original compositions on Saturday, Oct. 18. Wonderful music comes from a variety of instruments and blend of voices. There will be dinner catered by La Ultima at 6:00, and the concert begins at 7:00. Cost for the concert will be $7.00 for members, and $8.00 for the general public. Children 10 and under enter free.

A rollback of bylaw changes is needed SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Years ago legal material I produced warned of unlawful process used by the banking industry. Those unlawful processes later resulted in the financial crisis of 2008. Some applauded my warning, but others slandered me unmercifully while never disputing my claim. Fast forward to today the United States Justice Department was recently awarded a multibillion dollar claim against the Bank of America and others, for criminal fraud in their mortgage process. My warning was correct. My process of 1994 was later affirmed by the United States District Court. You can access this and sordid slander trash and

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS lies on the Internet. Today my warning has to do with the bylaw changes, these past few years at OCSCA, OCTN and IHCCW. These changes separated these entities from each other in a manner that adversely affects oversight, and us. Those corporate cash cows, OCTN and IHCCW, are now effectively severed from OCSCA who originally owned them. Yes, they were owned by you. The sever is now to the point that their boards are thumbing their noses at us and claim we have no say in their operations. With no oversight, this puts our meals, transportation and in-home healthcare in jeopardy. If it’s not checked I predict an inevitable future crisis

in those services. The fact that you, the members, were never included in those bylaws changes makes them void on their face. Serving your ownership without your knowledge or consent is void. Rolling back those bylaws changes would restore the necessary accountability and ownership. With your help we can change this. Let’s move forward together. Your servant, tell next time. And, remember, anything you say can and will be used against you. By the way, Tillie Porter is teaching a computer class on the fourth Tuesday of each month at our Senior Center thanks to Tillie and Raleigh Chinn (and my prompting) we have a grant in process to provide computers for that class. Pinochle results from last Saturday: Door Prize: Barbara Cline. Most pinochles: Danny Wieterick. High man: Jim Fry. High woman: Barbara Cline. More next week.

ITEMS PAST | FROM A5 al. In an effort to enhance the likelihood of receiving a grant for improvement to the Tonasket Municipal Pool from the IAC, the town council agreed to narrow the scope of their grant request at the Tuesday, September 26 council meeting. April Noel, 17, of Oroville, was a state finalist in the 4-H Fashion Revue held in Puyallup Sunday dur-ing the Western Washington Fair. She made and modeled a strapless velvet dinner dress and jacket. The dress featured lace around the top and extended to the shoulders. April is the daughter of Rod and Kathy Noel of Oroville and attends Oroville High School. The summer tourist season is over here and the Visitor Information Center closed after Labor Day weekend, but the knowledge that

was gained about the numbers of and types of tourists that visited the area are in. The total from the United States covering 28 states with Washington posting 333 and California, 96. The total from neighboring Canada is 2,294 of which 1,594 were from British Columbia, while Alberta, Manitoba, N.W. Territories, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec and Saskatchewan contributed several. Other Foreign Countries added an additional 86 with most coming from the United Kingdom. It is also noted from Molson that during the same period, they had 4,700 sign their Museum book. The longtime rivalry continues as the Oroville Hornets take on the Tonasket Tigers in the 27th annual battle over the Liberty Bell. The “bell” games in actuality www.edwardjones.com

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www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC

were going on in a different forum prior to 1962. Before the addition of the Victory Bell, the two teams met on the playing field every Armistice Day, which of course is now Veteran’s Day. The highest scoring games, as well as the lowest, were both Oroville victories. In November 1971, the Hornets stung the Tiger in a shut-out 44-0. In then next year, 1972, the Tigers and Hornets were locked until the Oroville squad downed a Tiger ball carrier in the end zone for a safety and Oroville went home with a scant 2-0 win.

Good job, employees at the GazetteTribune. Recognition for a job well done makes things so much easier. Having a broken arm didn’t stop young Noah Hilderbrand from getting his deer. He just shot it left-handed, and his grandpa, Gary Roberts has the photo to prove it. A sizable group from the Free Methodist Church met at a local eating place last Sunday, as they frequently do, and they were enjoying the fellowship so much, I’m not sure if they knew what they had been served. So nice to see! Ardith Law and her son were at the First Methodist Church last Sunday. For many years she played the organ/piano at church before moving to Tonasket. She reported that her husband, Noble, is very happy and content in a Veteran’s care center in Port Orchard, Wash. She doing very well, in spite of the many health issues she has had along the way.

For the month of October we are honoring Black Hawk Helicopter Mechanic Jarred Palmier based at U.S. Army Garrison (USAG) Ansbach Germany. His Blue Star Mother Tracy and father Greg live in Republic. The Palmiers are a military family and Jarred and his brother were both born in abroad at Wuerzburg West Germany. This last spring, Tracy and Greg went to visit Germany where Jarred is currently based. It was an emotional trip for them to return to the place where they themselves were assigned by the military years ago. Jarred joined the Army in 2009 and was deployed shortly thereafter to Afghanistan for a year. In November 2013 Jarred and his wife Taylor welcomed their daughter into military life!

Gaggles of geese are now heading south SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Here we are in the middle of October and still having beautiful days. Yes, some nights have been real cold and many neighbors have had their fires going. It is a sure sign of fall when you go down the grade to town and see all the the beautiful trees and bushes that have changed to their fall colors. Fall is truly beautiful. On our recent trips to Wenatchee for appointments we were lucky enough to see gaggles of geese heading south. How magnificent they are. On the second trip we not only saw the great “V” formation of their flight, but an entire field covered with the geese. Must have been resting or having lunch. It was something to see. Speaking of

As a helicopter repairer, Jarred is primarily responsible for the maintenance of the UH-60 Helicopters (also known as the “Black Hawk”). With hundreds of missions depending on these helicopters, he must ensure that they are safe and ready to fly at all times. To qualify for this job he had to show an aptitude in both math and mechanics. USAG Ansbach is located in Bavaria, a German state in the southeast. Ansbach is a beautiful city with a population of about 40,000. The garrison houses an attack helicopter battalion with several aviation and maintenance support units. Back in 1935, the German Luftwaffe built this air base and used it during the invasion of Poland, France, England, and Russia. Ansbach Airfield was attacked by Allied bombers in early 1945 and was seized by the United States Third Army. By 1949, it became a NATO (North Atlantic

HILLTOP COMMENTS seeing a not so familiar sight... we had two moose walk through the neighborhood last week. Talk about a big animal. Pinochle started on Oct. 13th. So will have winners for you next week. Come to the Grange Hall on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend and bring a friend. You can bring a snack to share. The next Bingo night in Molson will be on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. The buy in is $10 for 10 games. It’s time for the best Harvest Supper on the Hill. Come to the Havillah Lutheran Church in Havillah on Oct. 25. Fellowship will begin at 4:30 p.m. and they will be serving from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Please bring your favorite salad or dessert to add to the meal. All are welcome.

Submitted photo

Sgt. Jarred Palmier Treaty Organization)†facility of which the U.S. Army has occupied it as a helicopter airfield since. Your hometown and the entire valley thank you and your family for your service, Jarred! We would like to learn more about our areaís service men and women. Please contact us with details 509-485-2906 or ncw. bluestars@yahoo.com. The Chesaw Christmas Bazaar will be held at the Chesaw Community Building on Nov. 8 starting at 9 a.m. Tables are available for $10 each. Lots of crafters and homemade items and baked goods. The Country Kitchen will be open for lunch.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. SAT: 7:00 & 9:00PM (unless otherwise stated)

THE EQUALIZER

G 131 min

THURS.-FRI. OCT 16-17

THE JUDGE SAT. - SUN. - MON.-TUES., THURS.-FRI. OCT. 25-26-27-28, 30-31 ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY AT 7:30 PM

PG

141 min

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Should I or Shouldn’t I

PENDULUMS NOW HERE!

Notice of Public Meeting International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control The International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control is holding its annual public meeting regarding the regulation of Osoyoos Lake water levels and the related operation of Zosel Dam by the State of Washington under the International Joint Commission’s Orders of Approval. The Board will provide an overview of 2014 lake levels to date and invite comments, concerns and questions from the public.

Please plan to attend Tuesday, October 28, 2014, 7:00 PM Oroville High School Commons 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA

ALEXANDER & THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY FRI. 6:30. SAT. *2:00,4:15,6:30. SUN. *4:00, 6:15. WKDYS: 6:30 FAMILY/COMEDY STARRING STEVE CARELL, JENNIFER PG GARNER, ED OXENBOULD 141 min The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

THE JUDGE

R

141 min

DRAMA STARRING ROBERT DOWNEY JR., ROBERT DUVALL, VERA FARMIGA FRI.: 6:30, 9:45. SAT: *1:15, 4:30, 7:45. SUN: *3:00, 6:15. WKDYS: 6:30

THE EQUALIZER

R

131 min

ACTION/CRIME/THRILLER STARRING DENZEL WASHINGTON, MARTON CSOKAS, CHLOE GRACE FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *1:30, 4:30, 8:00. SUN.*3:15, 6:30. WEEKDAYS: 6:30

DRACULA UNTOLD

PG-13

92min

DRAMA/ACTION/FANTASY STARRING LUKE EVANS, DOMINIC COOPER, SARAH GADON. FRI. 7:00, 9:45. SAT.*1:45, 4:45, 8:15. SUN.*3:30, 6:45. WKDAYS: 6:45 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVÀOPLV*UDWHG 1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGÀOPVZLWKRXWWKHLU own parent. Photo ID required.

Subscribe to the... Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE www.gazette-tribune.com

International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control Bruno Tassone Chair, Canadian Section For further information, please contact: in Canada: Gwyn Graham (604) 664-4052 http://www.ijc.org/en_/

Cynthia Barton, Ph.D. Chair, United States Section in United States: Marijke van Heeswijk (253) 552-1625

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION SERIES.

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital’s Childbirth Education Series, a series of four classes to prepare expectant families are held Monday evenings every other month – February, April, June, August and December. These free classes are held in the orientation room (Hospital receptionist will direct attendees) from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The remaining October sessions are Oct. 20 and 27. The classes are being presented by RenÊ Todd, RN, MSN, OB Nurse; Pamela Thacker, RN, NVH OB Department Coordinator; Jackie Daniels, EMT, Car Seat Safety Educator and Amber Hall, registered dietitian. For more information contact: Childbirth Education Coordinator Todd at 509-486-3140 (leave a message) or at home at 509-486-1377 or email renetodd@nvhospital.org or ob@ nvhospital.org.

DEMOCRATS TO MEET

TONASKET - Okanogan County Democrats and 7th Legislative District Democrats are holding a joint meeting on Oct. 18. Meeting will be held at at the home of Peter James, 31562 Hwy. 97. Starting with potluck lunch at 1 p.m. they will hold their quarterly meetings following lunch. All Democrats are welcome. For further information, call 7th LD Secretary Flo Moore at 509-991-7351.

OAKES, CHAMPAGNE AND WHEATLY TO PERFORM

OROVILLE –- Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include Chuck Oakes and Ron Champagne along with drummer Wheatly on Thursday, Oct. 16, followed by Denny Richardson, Steve Pollard and Steve Bell on Thursday, Oct 23; music begins

around 6:30 p.m. For more information, please call the winery at 509-4762861 or visit the Events page at www. estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road.

OROVILLE GRANGE FLEA MARKET

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange will be hosting their inside flea market on Saturday, Oct. 18 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Watch for posters and a sign on Hwy. 97 on the south end of town. All new items. The grange will also rent a table for people to sell their own items. For more information call 509-476-3878.

HARVEST DINNER & BOOSTER NIGHT

MOLSON - The Molson Grange’s annual harvest supper and booster night will be on Saturday Oct. 18 at 6:30 p.m. The Grange will furnish the meat and potatoes, so bring a side dish. Come and visit with old friends and meet new ones. Everyone is invited. Remember bingo on the first and third Friday of every month.

COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING MALOTT - The annual membership meeting of the Okanogan County Historical Society is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 18 at 10 a.m. at the Malott Grange Hall. The agenda includes discussion of how to best utilize the original water colors by Sally Ward donated by her daughter, Susan. Ward was a prolific artist who lived in Omak for a time. She died in 2010 at the age of 101 in Tucson, Ariz. Following the meeting, guest speaker, Scott Krieter from Wells Dam will talk about the upcoming remodeling slated for the summer of 2015 at the Wells Dam Overlook. Plans include expansion of the overlook to include interpretive trails with informative signage. Kre-

iter’s talk will be followed by a potluck luncheon. All members and those interested in becoming members are invited to attend.

FREE RETIREMENT SEMINAR

OKANOGAN - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association is sponsoring a free Retirement Seminar for all public school employees on Tuesday, October 21, at 4 p.m. in the Okanogan High School library. For more information call Carol at 509-826-5068.

FILM LOOKS AT DAM BUILDING ERA

TONASKET - Cascade Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group is sponsoring a free screening of DamNation, a film that explores the era of dam building in our nation that left nearly no stream free from damming, as well as the current movement towards the removal of dams that are derelict, provide no public benefit, or are barriers to fish passage. The screening is at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Wednesday, Oct. 22 starting at 7 p.m. The film will be followed by a panel discussion bringing some of the concepts from the movie into more of a local perspective.Check out ccfeg. org for more info.

VETERANS TOWN HALL MEETING

TONASKET - The Governor’s Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee will be holding a Veterans Town Hall on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave, Tonasket. Community partners and service providers will be sharing how they are serving Veterans and their families from the area. The VAAC – under the leadership of 2014/15 Chair Richard Marcelynas – is composed of 17 members and advises the Governor and the director of the

OVOC Fall Concert Oct. 19 THE GAZETTE TRIBUNE

OMAK - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus return to the stage for the Fall Season Premier Concert on Sunday, Oct. 19, at 3:00 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center, Omak. The Orchestra will feature Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D, Opus 1 with special guest solo-

ist Tara Kaiyala Weaver. They will also be performing Loes Janacek’s “Lachian Dances�. The chorus will feature “Your Voices Tune� by George F. Handel and “It’s Only A Paper Moon� by Billy Rose. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, $8 for kids 13 and older, and free for kids 12 and under. Tickets are available at Rawson’s in Okanogan; Corner Shelf in Omak;

Brewster Drug, Brewster; Roy’s Pharmacy, Tonasket; Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville; at the door; or at www.brownpapertickets.com. Season tickets can be purchased at the door or by emailing ovocinfo@ gmail.com or calling Lynn Hoover, OVOC Coordinator, at 509-322-0261. Coulee Dam Federal Credit Union is the proud sponsor of this concert.

Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs (WDVA) on issues and programs concerning veterans. Call 1-800-562-0132 option 1 for additional information.

COLON HEALTH CLASS CANCELED

The North Valley Hospital class scheduled for Oct. 23 has been canceled due to an unexpected scheduling conflict with instructor Dr. Donald Sebesta.

CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS THE BILLS OSOYOOS - The Osoyoos Concert series presents The Bills on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Bills are a high impact, acoustic folk music quintet from the West Coast. The concert is at the Osoyoos Secondary School Mini Theatre located at 115 Street, Osoyoos, BC. Tickets available at Imperial Office in Osoyoos or Sundance Video in Oliver. $23 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information see: www.thebills.ca.

FIRE AND FORESTS

Oct. 24th at 6:00, there will be a Humanities Washington presentation at the Community Cultural Center in Tonasket. “Fire and Forests, East of the Cascade Divide� presented by John Marshall, Fire ecology photographer for the U.S. Forest Service. This will be a conversation about the past philosophies and future policies of forest fire management in Eastern Washington. This is a FREE event. Refreshments will be served by donation to the CCC. Call

TONASKET - This months Free Community Meal will be Sunday, Oct. 26, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Donations are always welcome. Dinner will be served from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. These meals are held the last Sunday of every month, and prepared by Val Welles and a crew of volunteers.

OSOYOOS LAKE MEETING

SCHOOL RETIREES ASSOC. MEETING

OMAK - The Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association will hold a no-host luncheon meeting at 11 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 28, at Koala Street Grill, 914 Koala St, Omak. State Rep. Joel Kretz, 7th Legislative District, will speak. Information: 509-422-2954.

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Call us . . . Se Habla EspaĂąol

OMAK: 6$VK6W2PDN 2IÂżFH+RXUV7KXUVGD\V Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.�

(509) 826-6191

(509) 826-5093

TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Coagulation Clinic

„ Radiology

OPTICAL

10

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

ACROSS the region

1.800.660.2129

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

Emergency VA Clinic „ Surgical Center „ Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket) „ Obstetrical Services „ Imaging „ Full-Service Laboratory „ Extended Care „ Swing Bed Program „ „

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

Su Ianniello

We would be honored to work with you!

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket WA Lic#MA21586

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOH‡ Worship on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Pastor Randy McAllister 10 6th East and Whitcomb‡509-429-2948 (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ Pastor Stephen Williams‡www.tonasketbiblechurch.org ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am‡Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! WORD IS TRUTH.â€? JOHN 17:17 Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Trinity Episcopal

OXYGEN SERVICE

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

TONASKET FOOD BANK

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

MASSAGE

suinlo@yahoo.com

.RDOD‡2PDN:$‡ZYPHGLFDOFRP

Locations

& growing

Licensed Massage Practitioner

826-7919

Toll Free (866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

„ Ophthalmology

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

(509) 826-6191

www.wvmedical.com

Healthcare Services

509-826-1800

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Health In Clinic „ Family Practice „ Laboratory „ Surgery Center „ Chemo Infusion

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville

Physician-owned and patient-centered

„ Walk

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

CLINIC

„ Behavioral

(509) 826-5600

Psychiatric Services

OMAK

„ Anti

(509) 826-6191

Chemical Dependency

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. 2IÂżFH+RXUV7XHV:HG Tel: 509-476-2151

Mental Health

TONASKET - Saturday, Nov. 1 is the annual Community Cultural Center Auction. Rich Fewkes and Trygve Culp will work together for the live auction; silent auction begins at 4:30 p.m. Dinner for $10 will be at 6 p.m.. Live auction begins at 7:00. The proceeds will benefit the CCC’s general fund for winter expenses; there will be a special appeal for the front of building remodel. Credit Cards will be accepted as well as cash and checks. Call 509-486-2061 to donate items or for more info.

OkanoganValley

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church HEALTH CARE

TONASKET CCC AUCTION

OROVILLE - The International Osoyoos Lake Board of Control is holding its annual public meeting regarding the regulation of Osoyoos Lake water levels and the related operation of Zosel Dam by the State of Washington under the International Joint Commission’s Orders of Approval. The meeting will take place on on Tuesday, Oct. 28 at the Oroville High School Commons from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Board will provide an overview of 2014 lake levels to date and invite comments, concerns and questions from the public. For more information see http:// www.ijc.org/en_/.

WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

FAMILY PRACTICE

OROVILLE - The Oroville Businesses Trick or Treat for the Kids is on Friday, Oct. 31 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Flyers and the Trick or Treat signs will be in windows or doors of those businesses that will be handing out treats to the kids.

FREE COMMUNITY MEAL

Faith Lutheran Church

DENTISTRY

OROVILLE BUSINESS TRICK OR TREAT

486-1328 for additional information.

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist 1516 Fir Street‡476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ 3DVWRU5RG%URZQ

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

z Your

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center z Oxygen Concentrators z Portable Concentrators z Sleep Apnea Equipment z Nebulizers z Home Sleep Tests Open:0RQGD\)ULGD\

2IÂżFH509-826-1688 2NRPD'ULYH6XLWH'2PDN

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI#\PDLOFRP Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

LOOMIS

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.� -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2192

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16, 2014

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Justine C. Belgarde, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to four counts of delivery of a controlled substance (two for heroin and one each for oxycodone and hydrocodone). Belgarde was sentenced to 20-plus months in prison and ÀQHGIRUWKH$SULO 21 and May 30 crimes. Shimika Rosita Havier, 19, Plummer, Idaho, pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to attempting to elude a pursing police vehicle, minor driving after consumption of alcohol and MIP/C. Havier ZDVVHQWHQFHGWRGD\VLQ MDLOZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHG DQGÀQHG7KH FULPHVRFFXUUHG$XJQHDU Omak. 7\VRQ,VDDF$QGUHZ2PDN pleaded guilty Oct. 7 to failure to register as a sex RIIHQGHU IHORQ\ $QGUHZ was sentenced to four months LQMDLODQGÀQHGIRU the Oct. 29, 2013 crime. 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVH to charge Sean Lee Dahlquist, 23, Oroville, with POCS (methamphetamine) and making a false or misleading VWDWHPHQW7KHFULPHVDOOHJedly occurred Sept. 30. 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVH to charge David Leslie Louis, 33, Omak, with intimidating witness and fourth-degree DVVDXOW7KHFULPHVDOOHJHGO\ occurred Oct. 2.

DISTRICT COURT -DPHV7KHR+HQULNVHQ-U Okanogan, guilty of DUI. Henriksen was sentenced to GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\V VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG Jerry Samuel Herrera, 27, Okanogan, had two charges dismissed: of fourth-degree assault and interfering with reporting (DV). Kyleah Mae Marie M. Holland, 7RQDVNHWKDGDIRXUWKGHgree assault charge dismissed. +ROODQGZDVĂ€QHG Nikki Natasha Hunt, 26, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Hunt received a 90-day VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGĂ€QHG  :LOOLDP-DPHV,QQHV2URville, had a charge dismissed: hit-and-run (unattended vehicle). -DPHV(GZDUG.LHVHFNHU-U Omak, had two charges disPLVVHGĂ€UVWGHJUHH':/6 and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device.

-HUHP\-RKQ/DYHQGHU Omak, guilty of violation of a temporary restraining order. Lavender was sentenced to GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\V VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG -RVH5RVDULR/RSH]7RQDVNHW had two charges dismissed: resisting arrest and seconddegree criminal trespassing. /RSH]ZDVĂ€QHG 'HORUHV1DQF\/RYH2URville, had a charge dismissed: outdoor burning of prohibited VXEVWDQFHV/RYHZDVĂ€QHG  'HDQ5H\QROGV0DQULQJ 7RQDVNHWJXLOW\RI'8, Manring was sentenced to GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\V VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG

911 CALLS & JAIL BOOKINGS MONDAY, OCT. 6, 2014

7KHIWRQ7\HH6WLQ2NDQRJDQ Storm drain cover reported missing. 7ZRYHKLFOHFUDVKRQ6LZDVK &UHHN5GQHDU7RQDVNHW Injuries reported. Harassment on Old Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. 7KHIWRQ&D\XVH0RXQWDLQ5G QHDU7RQDVNHW&HOOSKRQH reported missing. Domestic dispute on W. River Rd. near Omak. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ17KLUG $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ Disorderly conduct on Omache Dr. in Omak. 7KHIWRQ('HZEHUU\$YHLQ Omak. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. +DUDVVPHQWRQ(-RQDWKDQ$YH in Omak. Burglary on N. State Frontage 5GQHDU7RQDVNHW Harassment on E. Seventh St. in 7RQDVNHW 6KDXQ$QWKRQ\%DNHU'2& detainer. &KDUOHV$QGUHZ(QJEHUJ booked for obstruction of a public servant and disorderly conduct. $VKOH\&DUROLQD+XQHU booked on three Omak Police 'HSDUWPHQW)7$ZDUUDQWV ÀUVWGHJUHHFULPLQDOWUHVpassing, forgery and seconddegree burglary.

TUESDAY, OCT. 7, 2014

9HKLFOHSURZORQ66HFRQG$YH in Okanogan. 7KUHDWVRQ16HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. Fraud on Engh Rd. in Omak. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ+XEEDUG5GQHDU Riverside.

Vehicle prowl on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Second $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ Disorderly conduct on Jasmine St. in Omak. Drugs on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. 6WUXFWXUHĂ€UHRQ1LQWK$YHLQ Oroville. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ,URQZRRG6WLQ Oroville. 7DPDQWKD$$QGHUVRQ booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 8, 2014

Sex offender registry on Monroe St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Bridge View 5GQHDU7RQDVNHW Violation of a no-contact order on 6DQGĂ DW5GQHDU2PDN 7KHIWRQ1RUPDQ6WLQ2NDQRgan. Bicycle reported missing. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ6*UDQLWH6WLQ Omak. Harassment on N. Douglas St. in Omak. $VVDXOWRQ1$VK6WLQ2PDN 7ZRYHKLFOHFUDVKRQ10DLQ St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on East Side Park in Omak. Burglary on Main St. in Oroville. $XWRPRELOHWKHIWRQ+Z\ near Oroville. 7KHIWRQ+Z\QHDU2URYLOOH 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ(6HFRQG6WLQ 7RQDVNHW -RKQ5REHUW0\URQ'2& detainer. 'DYLG5RVV0F+HQHUH\ booked for fourth-degree assault.

THURSDAY, OCT. 9, 2014

9HKLFOHSURZORQ67KLUG$YHLQ Okanogan. 7ZRYHKLFOHFUDVKRQ16HFRQG $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ1RLQMXries reported. Harassment on Hi-View Lane QHDU7RQDVNHW Fraud on Million St. near Omak. 7KUHDWVRQ)DLUYLHZ'UQHDU Okanogan. Found property on Pine St. in Okanogan. Bicycle recovered.

7KHIWRQ6DZWHOO5GQHDU2URville. Fuel reported missing. 'UXJVRQ17KLUG$YHLQ Okanogan. 7KHIWRQ(QJK5GLQ2PDN 7KHIWRQ60DLQ6WLQ2PDN 7KHIWRQ(QJK5GLQ2PDN 7KUHDWVRQ6KXPZD\5GLQ Omak. 7KHIWRQ+LJKODQG'UQHDU Oroville. Disorderly conduct on S. Western $YHLQ7RQDVNHW 5RQDOG+DUU\:ROIIERRNHG for DUI and three counts of reckless endangerment. 7LPRWK\-DPHV6DUJHQW ERRNHGRQD6WDWH3DWURO)7$ warrant for DUI. %MDUQH0DWWKHZ2OVRQ-U ERRNHGRQD6WDWH3DWURO)7& warrant for DUI. 7RUHH$QWKRQ\&OHPHQWV DOC detainer. 7ULFLD/\QQ'H]HOOHP booked for false reporting and tampering with physical evidence. 6KDQQRQ7RQQLH6LPSVRQ booked for DUI and thirddegree DWLS.

FRIDAY, OCT. 10, 2014

Domestic dispute on S. Second $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Clarkson Mill Rd. near 7RQDVNHW DWLS on W. Fourth St. in 7RQDVNHW /RLWHULQJRQ17KLUG$YHLQ Okanogan. 7KHIWRQ:5LYHU5GQHDU Omak. $VVDXOWRQ2OG+LJKODQG/DQH near Loomis. 7KHIWRQ2PDFKH'ULQ2PDN Violation of a no-contact order on 6$VK6WLQ2PDN Road rage on Engh Rd. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on S. Western $YHLQ7RQDVNHW1RLQMXULHV reported. Harassment on E. Seventh St. in 7RQDVNHW 7KHIWRQ(6HYHQWK6WLQ7RQDVket. Joshua Roberts Munsey, 21, booked for second-degree assault (DV) and unlawful imprisonment. Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 27, booked on a DOC secretary’s

warrant.

SATURDAY, OCT. 11, 2014

$XWRPRELOHWKHIWRQ$SSOH:D\ Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Freedom Rd. QHDU7RQDVNHW 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ/RRPLV2URYLOOH 5GQHDU7RQDVNHW +DUDVVPHQWRQ6DQGĂ DW5GQHDU Omak. 'UXJVRQ+Z\QHDU7RQDVNHW Harassment on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Vehicle prowl on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. '8,RQ+DYLOODK5GQHDU7RQDVket. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ3LQH&UHHN5G QHDU7RQDVNHW One-vehicle roll-over crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ:$SSOH$YHLQ Omak. Vehicle prowl on Omache Dr. in Omak. $VVDXOWRQ6KXPZD\5GLQ Omak. $VVDXOWRQ60DLQ6WLQ2PDN $OFRKRORIIHQVHRQ60DLQ6WLQ Omak. Moises Machorro Morales, 27, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and a USBP hold. 0LFKDHO3DWULFN&RQQRUV ERRNHGRQDQ2&62)7$ warrant for third-degree DWLS. Brent McNeil Bleakney, 33, booked for second-degree theft (DV) and six counts of third-degree theft (DV). James Palmer, no middle name OLVWHGERRNHGIRUVHFRQG degree criminal trespassing and disorderly conduct.

SUNDAY, OCT. 12, 2014

Burglary on No Name St. in Okanogan. 7ZRYHKLFOHKLWDQGUXQFUDVK on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near 7RQDVNHW $XWRPRELOHWKHIWRQ/RRPLV 2URYLOOH5GQHDU7RQDVNHW 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ6DZWHOO5GLQ Oroville. Harassment on Summit Lake Rd. QHDU7RQDVNHW 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ%DZOI5GQHDU Okanogan. $XWRPRELOHWKHIWRQ2PDN Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. 7KUHDWVRQ(YDQV/DNH5GQHDU

Riverside. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ1LFKROV5GQHDU Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Broadway St. in Conconully. Violation of a no-contact order on 6L[*XQ:D\QHDU2URYLOOH 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ$HQHDV9DOOH\5G QHDU7RQDVNHW Custodial interference on S. )RXUWK$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ %XUJODU\RQ('HZEHUU\$YHLQ Omak. 7ZRUHSRUWVRIGRPHVWLFGLVSXWHV RQ*ROGHQ6WLQ2URYLOOH 7UHVSDVVLQJRQUG$YHLQ Oroville. %XUJODU\RQWK$YHLQ2URville. $OFRKRORIIHQVHRQ0DLQ6WLQ Oroville. $QWRQLR5DIHDO)XHQWHV booked for disorderly conduct. Raul Rosas Mancilla, 31, booked for DUI and a USBP detainer. Dennis Jacob Box, 33, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV) and harassment (DV). Jesus Castenada, no middle name listed, 20, booked on an Omak Police Department )7$ZDUUDQWIRUWKLUGGHJUHH WKHIWD7ULEDO)7$ZDUUDQW for third-degree theft, a DOC detainer and a Superior Court )7$ZDUUDQWIRU32&6

KEY:

DUI'ULYLQJ8QGHUWKH,Qà Xence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP7DNLQJD0RWRU Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C)DLOXUHWR$SSHDU&RPply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County SherLII¡V2IÀFHU DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Collision with deer results in injuries 6WDWH 3DWURO 7URRSHU 7 6KRRN Lawver, who was wearing her %5(:67(5 ² $ 7RQDVNHW seatbelt at the time of the acciwoman was sent to the hospi- dent was transported by ambutal after colliding with a deer ODQFH WR 7KUHH 5LYHUV +RVSLWDO two miles south of Brewster last in Brewster for treatment of her Friday evening. LQMXULHVZULWHV7URRSHU6KRRNLQ %DUEDUD - /DZYHU  ZDV GULYLQJ KHU  7R\RWD 0DWUL[ the incident report. Her car was northbound on SR97 when she impounded and towed to Shulls struck a deer in the roadway, 7RZLQJ No charges are being levied coming to rest in the northbound lane, according to Washington against the driver. THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Riverside man rolls car of the Washington State Patrol. Holz, who was wearing his seat5,9(56,'( ² $ 5LYHUVLGH belt at the time of the accident, driver was driving near Riverside was transported to Mid Valley when his vehicle left the road and Hospital in Omak by ambulance rolled over sending him to the for treatment of his injuries. His KRVSLWDOWKHHYHQLQJRI7KXUVGD\ black 3000 Volkswagon Jetta was Oct. 2. listed as totalled and impounded *DEULHO'+RO]ZDVGULYing northbound about a mile south by Pete’s tow. 7URRSHU /XOO¡V LQFLGHQW UHSRUW of Riverside on SR97 when his lists the cause of the accident as car left the roadway to the right, rolled and came to a rest on its top fatigue and charges as Negligent LQWKHGLWFKVDLG7URRSHU1/XOO Driving 2. THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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A public safety message from your Okanogan County PUD Public Utility District No. 1 of Okanogan County 1331 2nd N., Okanogan, 422-3310 18 W. 1st Ave., Omak, 422-8380 101 S. Bridge, Brewster, 689-2502

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Police chief ‘s love of tattoos grows into business “It didn’t go well.” A couple of attempts later, and he was posting his work on Facebook. Next thing he knew he was getting requests. “I’m really my worst critic,” he says. “I just didn’t feel like I was good enough to have my own shop. One of my reserve officers does security for the NHRA races in Kent. I went over, working security for the money booth, watching these people walk by with tattoos all day. Almost all of them, I saw that I could do that. I may not be doing portraits or works of art, but there’s a lot I can do.” Because of his other full-time job, Burks only tattoos by appointment. He can be reached by phone at 509322-3735, or his Facebook page (which includes images of his work) Big Pink Ink. “I’m at about 260 tattoos now,” he says. “That’s not much for three years; if it was all I did I would be up to about 800. I have that other job.” He says possibly the best part of his second job is the fact that he knows nearly everyone he tattoos on some level. “It’s actually like coming out here and hanging out with my friends for two to four hours,” Burks says. He said most of the planning (size and design) he does with the customer via email. For first-time tattoo-ees, he tries to make them comfortable with the feel of the needle before they’ve fully committed. “Before I put ink on the needle, I’ll run it so they can see how it feels,” he says. “Most of the time they’re like, really? That’s what I was worried about?” He runs the occasional special as well. “I’ll have a drawing for a free ‘anniversary’ tattoo in December,” he says. “I can do that because I don’t need to make $1,200 just to pay rent.... I do this because I love doing it and I still can’t believe that people want to pay me for it.” As for the name, Big Pink Ink? “I have a buddy who sent me this picture with this pig, with a vest and badge, and it kind of stuck” he says. “It’s a play on the cop/pig thing. And I’m big. “So it’s just poking fun at myself.”

‘Big Pink Ink’ nears 300th customer BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - What kind of person in their right mind would venture into a buddy’s Man Cave and come out with a tattoo? If tattoo artist is the local police chief, it might make a difference. If the police chief has converted his Man Cave into a licensed tattoo parlor, perhaps venturing in isn’t such a bad bet after all. Rob Burks, best known in the area as Tonasket’s Police Chief, is also the proprietor of Big Pink Ink, which he operates out of a refinished outbuilding behind his home about a half-mile north of the city limits. “There’s different things I don’t like that I see with tattoos, so I figured when I started my own business I would try to fix those things,” Burks says. “I started out just with family and close friends, and eventually ventured out into people I don’t know. I had a shop like this in the house but I got tired of people I didn’t know very well coming into the house.” Burks’ wife Wendy suggested his Man Cave in the back yard be converted into his tattoo shop. To run his business, Burks needed to get licenses both for the shop and for himself as a tattoo artist. “You have to have all the signs, hot and cold water, a sink for me, a sink for the public, bathroom, health-related type requirements,” Burks says. “If I was working in someone else’s shop, I would only need an artists’ license. “Being an EMT, too, taught me how to be clean and sanitary. I probably go beyond what I have to. I just don’t want to go half-assed on that.” Burks himself sports an impressive array of tattoos - 26 in total, nine of which he gave himself. “I’ve gotten a few here and there over the years,” he says. “But they’re expensive. Me and some buddies had a submission grappling club, worked out every week. My buddy from Okanogan came in and had tattoos all over his legs. A few weeks he had some more. I found out he started

Above, Rob Burks concentrates as he begins work on the back of Melody Webb, one of his return customers at his tattoo shop, Big Pink Ink. Left, Burks wipes down Webb’s back as they chat. “It’s like ... hanging out with my friends for two to four hours,” he says.

Brent Baker/staff photos

to learn how to do tattoos, and I figured if he could do it I could do it. “So unbeknownst to my wife I bought myself a tattoo kit for Christmas. I got one of those $65 starter kits out of China

- the kind with ink you shouldn’t buy.” After practicing on some fake skin that came with the kit - “It kind of sucks -” he branched out to tattooing oranges and bananas, and finally himself.

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“Wendy was the first person other than me,” he says of his longsuffering wife. “If you saw that tattoo you wouldn’t want me touching you. It was some frilly heart thing, and I freehanded my initials.

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16, 2014

SCHOOLS

Submitted photos

Oroville students use their iPads to work with Dreambox, an online program that uses visuals to teach math in a different way. The Oroville School District has teamed up with the Rural School Alliance which secured the funding for the Oroville students to participate in a pilot program using Dreambox.

Oroville K-8 students use Dreambox on iPads SUBMITTED BY SUPT. STEVE QUICK

Tony Kindred/submittedphoto

Oroville students attending AWSL last week included (l-r) Sydney Thorndike, Bailey Griffin, Kambe Ripley, Tori Kindred, Yessica Nemcio, Dakota Haney, Nahum Garfias and Katie Egerton.

OROVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT

OROVILLE - The Oroville School District has teamed with The Rural School Alliance to prepare our students for college and career readiness. The Alliance has been working with rural high schools for many years to bring programs such as College in the High School, Avid, and other programs to help students succeed in high school and beyond. Last year, the Alliance began looking at how to improve algebra scores in rural areas. The K-8 Algebra Team was formed to increase readiness for algebra at the elementary level with a heavy focus on the algebraic strands of the Common Core State Standards. To reach this goal, the K-8 Algebra team looked at several online programs for elementary students to use. The team selected Dreambox. The Rural Alliance secured grant funding to provide this pilot opportunity for several schools in Eastern Washington. Luckily, Oroville Elementary was one of the chosen schools! The Alliance is collecting data from this pilot to determine if the use of online programs will increase students’ proficiency in algebra. Dreambox is an online program that uses virtual manipulatives to provide students an opportunity to see math in a different way. All the lessons are aligned to The Common Core Standards. The program is individualized to each student. It adapts to the needs of the students and provides teachers feedback on what standards the students have mastered and what standards the students need

Oroville students attend AWSL conference SUBMITTED BY TONY KINDRED OROVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

OLYMPIA - Oroville students attended the Association of Washington Student leaders Conference (AWSL) leadership conference in Olympia last week. Leadership students from all over the state came together at Capital High School for the annual student leadership conference. The conference is very popular amongst leadership students, who come together to attend multiple workshops, attend motivational speaker sessions and work together to share ideas that can help them make a difference in their schools, for one another and for their communities. Students are housed by parents and community members with students from the sponsoring area and learn networking skills all the while meeting

Subscribe to the... support to master. This gives students an opportunity to work on standards at their own pace. Dreambox is also highly engaging. The students feel like they are playing a game while they are learning important math skills. Dreambox is available to all Oroville Elementary K-5 students. Students can access Dreambox

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more.

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

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new friends from all over the state. The conference is exceptional and is sponsored in part by the Association of Washington School Principals and has received this support for over 30 years. This year all of the students were treated to a tour of the capital and enjoyed a surprise visit from Governor Jay Inslee, who spoke to them about how pleased he was to see such a group of young leaders. He stated that it is so important and that they were needed for a future of helping to make choices that would assist changes in our climate as well as finding funding to insure that education is fully funded and teachers receive support the support they so deserve. For more information about AWSL or AWSP you can check their site at: http://www.awsp.org/ resources/studentleadership/studentprograms

from school or at home. Letters were sent home recently with login information for students. Dreambox also has a parent login portion that allows parents to see how their children are doing.

www.gazette-tribune.com

W

e Would like to thank all of our friends and family for their thoughtful cards, calls, food and prayers.

Your acts of kindness

was so appreciated.

~

Jack, Betty, Joe, Jenny, Emily, Olivia, Jill Finsen, Casey Martin and Monte Dahlke

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING

Tonasket High School celebrated its annual homecoming, as well as taking on Oroville in the renewal of the Bell Game football rivalry that had been dormant since 2008. Above, the Tonasket cheerleaders wave to onlookers during the Friday afternoon parade through downtowon; left, “Mr. T.,” Chad Edwards, hugs mom Sally Hutton as homecoming queen Jensen Sackman looks on; below left, Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb enjoys the spoils of victory after Gazette-Tribune Managing Editor Gary DeVon presented him with the G-T’s Mayor’s Challenge bell; below, Ashlynn Willis’s leaping fingertip catch in the second overtime gave the sophomore girls a victory over the freshmen in last Wednesday’s championship Powderpuff contest.

Photos by Brent Baker

Above, 2013 homecoming queen Amber Monroe crowns 2014 queen Jensen Sackman during halftime of Friday’s football game; right, top Tiger fan Mike Mills leads the Tonasket football team on the field prior to Friday night’s game; lower right, the sophomore girls claim the Powderpuff football trophy after beating the freshmen 6-0 in double overtime; queen Jensen Sackman and “Mr. T.’ Chad Edwards during Friday’s halftime.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16, 2014

SPORTS

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Tonasket nears

Tigers ring Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bell playoff berth

FOOTBALL

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League Overall W L W L + Okanogan 4 0 6 1 Brewster 3 0 7 0 Tonasket 3 1 4 2 Oroville 1 2 1 5 Manson 1 2 1 4 Bridgeport 0 3 1 5 Liberty Bell 0 4 1 5 + Clinched playoff spot * Oct 10, Bridgeport forfeited to Brewster and Liberty Bell forfeited to Okanogan. WIAA rules allow for teams receiving a forfeit win to replace the game on their schedule; Brewster and Okanogan played a non-league replacement game that night, accounting for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extraâ&#x20AC;? game in their win/loss record.

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) White Swan Kittitas Warden Mabton Soap Lake Lk Roosevelt

League Overall W L W L 2 0 4 2 2 0 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 2 1 5 0 3 1 4

GIRLS SOCCER CENTRAL WASHINIGTON LGE (B)

League Overall Pts W L W L T +Okanogan27 9 0 10 2 0 +Tonasket 24 8 1 10 1 0 Liberty Bell 21 7 2 8 2 0 Brewster 14 5 4 6 5 0 Entiat 10 3 6 3 8 0 Bridgeport 9 3 6 4 7 0 Oroville 3 1 8 1 8 0 Manson 0 0 9 0 9 0 + Clinched playoff spot * Manson likely will not play any games on its schedule this season; there have been conflicting reports as to whether their opponents will gain forfeit wins from their scheduled games, so win-loss records may shift depending on how that is resolved. Manson did not play any games on the field, so standings and playoff qualification will not be affected. Teams that received forfeit wins may replace those games on their schedule if they choose.

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tournament matches, including split sets)

TONASKET - The Victory Bell trophy, for this year at least, will stay in Tonasket. The Tigers continued to ride the play of their offensive line, which hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really been slowed by anyone this year, as they built a big lead over rival Oroville during last Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homecoming game and posted a 46-20 victory over the Hornets. The win moves the Tigers to within a game of clinching their first playoff spot since 2007. But Friday, the focus was on winning a game in front of an overflow Homecoming crowd and retaining possession of the rivalry trophy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think you could tell through the course of the week there was that little something extra,â&#x20AC;? said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could feel it, all week and in the locker room.â&#x20AC;? The Tigers know what they do well, and their road-grading offensive line punished the smaller, younger Hornets through the first quarter and a half of play as Tonasket built a 33-0 lead to settle things well before halftime. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really gaining confidence,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen it on the practice field. We know what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re good at. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done it in a stretch of games; weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re confident we can move the ball against people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Confidence was going to be a big thing for us this year, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re starting to see it shine through a bit.â&#x20AC;? The Tigers pounded away on the ground with Isaiah YaussyAlbright and Jorge Juarez through most of the first quarter, and Jesse Ramon and Jesse Manring getting most of the second quarter carries. Juarez scored on a 4-yard run in the first quarter and took a screen pass 41 yards for a touchdown for the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final score of the first half. Albright had scoring runs of 21 yards and 6 yards, and Ramon added a 2-yard run in the second

Submitted photo

The Tonasket girls cross country team shows off its championship trophy from the Omak Invitational on Oct. 7. Pictured are (l-r) Jenna Valentine, Camille Wilson, Katie Henneman, Haley Larson, Johnna Terris and Baillie Hirst.

Tonasket XC girls claim Omak crown

Overall W L Sp 13 3 2 9 5 0 8 6 0 6 6 0 4 6 0 4 10 0 2 11 0 1 9 0

Brent Baker/staff photos

Top, Tonasket reclaimed the Victory Bell trophy after a six-year hiatus to the rivalry; above, Jorge Juarez gets pressure on Hornet quarterback Nathan Hugus, leading to a David Moreno interception on the play. quarter. By the time the Hornets picked up a first down, they trailed by 33 points and had been outgained 246 yards to 23. Oroville finally got things going on its final drive of the first half, moving 42 yards before a 41-yard field goal attempt by Dustin Nigg was blocked with under a minute to go in the half. The teams traded scores through the late-going, with Albright scoring on 23-yard screen pass from Colton Leep for a 40-0 lead. Nathan Hugus and Dustin Nigg got the Hornets on the scoreboard on the first play of the fourth quarter, with Nigg racing 91 yards on a pass play for the score. Juarez returned the favor

with a 75-yard kickoff return, and Oroville capped the scoring on a 1-yard Hugus run that was set up by a 37-yard reception by Joe Sarmiento. Albright finished with 138 yards on 16 carries, with Juarez adding 81 yards on nine carries to lead the Tigers. Logan Mills ran for 60 yards on 11 carries to lead Oroville on the ground, with Hugus completing 7-of-14 passes for 198 yards, including his long touchdown to Nigg and a pair of passes to Sarmiento that totaled 70 yards. The Tigers (4-2, 3-1 CWL North) can wrap up a playoff spot with a win at Manson this Friday. The Hornets (1-5, 1-2) host unbeaten Brewster on Friday, Oct. 17.

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League Overall W L W L Sp White Swan 5 0 10 3 0 Warden 4 1 11 7 0 Waterville 2 2 4 3 0 Soap Lake 2 3 3 6 0 Kittitas 1 3 3 7 1 Mabton 0 5 2 15 0 + Clinched playoff spot

SCHEDULES OCT. 16-25 Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Oct. 16 GSC - Bridgeport at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Manson, ppd. VB (JV/Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 5:00/6:30 pm Friday, Oct. 17 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Manson, 7:00 pm FB (Var) - Brewster at Oroville, 7:00 pm Saturday, Oct. 18 XC - Oroville Invitational (Incl. Tonasket), 12:00 pm Monday, Oct. 20 FB (JV) - Manson at Tonasket, 5:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 21 GSC - Tonasket at Oroville, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt, 5:30-7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 5:30/7:00 pm Thursday, Oct. 23 VB - Oroville at Tonasket, 5:30/7:00 pm GSC - Oroville at Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm GSC - Okanogan at Tonasket, 4:30 pm

Hornets improve in losses BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Moral victories are tough to quantify. But when you turn in a nine-goal improvement in a matter of weeks, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a better way to put it despite losing the game. Orovilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls soccer teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-1 loss at league-leading Okanogan on Thursday, Oct. 9, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t reasonably be seen any other way, considering the Hornets suffered a 12-0 defeat to the Bulldogs a few weeks ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls showed up to the play with the goal of shutting Okanogan down after the (first ) contest,â&#x20AC;? said Oroville coach Tony Kindred. The Hornets picked up an early goal from Katie Egerton off an assist from Kali Peters to get off on the right foot. Kambe Ripley made 19 saves in goal in the first half - her first goalkeeping stint of the year - to keep the Hornets in the game, and Xochil Rangel shut

21:18), Adam Halvorsen (44th, 22:20) and Keeton Hoines (55th, 23:32).

OMAK - Cascade may have the defending state 1A cross country champion, but Tonasketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls proved to have more depth as the Tigers edged the Kodiaks and Omak for the Pioneersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; cross country invitational title on Tuesday, Oct. 7. Erin Mullins dominated the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; race with a time of 18:17, but the Tigers, with five of the top 15 runners, edged Cascade 38-42, with Omak just behind with 43 points. Johnna Terris led Tonasket with a third place finish in 21:23. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls are really running well as a team,â&#x20AC;? said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are getting closer as a pack every race. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haley Larson ran her best race of the season, closing the gap on our top girls and helping the team run as a pack.â&#x20AC;? Others finishing for the Tigers were Katie Henneman (8th, 22:53), Camille Wilson (9th, 23:02), Jenna Valentine (11th, 23:30), Haley Larson (15th, 24:30) and Bailie Hirst (20th, 26:38). For the boys, Hunter Swanson finished the 3-mile course in 17:36 to lead Tonasket to a third place finish. Cascade dominated (eight of the top 13 runners), followed by Lake Roosevelt (76), Tonasket (91) and Omak (99). â&#x20AC;&#x153;The boys ran a nice race as well,â&#x20AC;? Thornton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Both Bryden Hires and Rade Pilkinton ran great races to help the team.â&#x20AC;? Hires was the second Tonasket finisher, taking 14th in 18:57. He was followed by Abe Podkranic (23rd, 20:10), Pilkinton (27th, 20:21), Smith Condon (32nd, 20:37), Justin McDonald (36th,

TIGERS RUN WITH THE BIG DOGS LEAVENWORTH - Tonasketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boys finished 11th and the girls took third at the Leavenworth Invitational on Saturday, Oct. 11. The meet included a number of Class 2A and 3A schools, led by Franklin of Seattle, which dominated the boys meet (5 of the top 13 runners), while host Cascade was dominant on the girls side (4 of the top 13). Five teams had a legitimate shot at second place in the girls race; Tonasket placed four of the to 26 finishers in a race with 90 competitors. Johnna Terris led the way with an 8th place finish on the 2.8-mile course in 21:06. Other Tigers included Katie Henneman (15th, 22:07), Camille Wilson (20th, 22:37), Jenna Valentine (26th, 23:04), Haley Larons (37th, 24:42) and Baillie Hirst (40th 25:12). Cascadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Erin Mullins won the race in 17:29, more than three minutes faster than the runnerup. Hunter Swanson led the boys, taking 15th in 17:29. He was fifth among Central Washington 2B runners, including Ben Klemmeck (2nd) and Josiah Klemmeck (10th) of Liberty Bell, and Oren Cox of Bridgeport (8th). Other Tigers included Bryden Hires (46th, 18:29); Adrian McCarthy (66th, 19:05); Samuel Strandberg (87th, 20:01); Smith Condon (90th, 20:03); Rade Pilkinton (104th, 21:24) and Adam Halvorsen (111th, 23:38). The Tigers race at Oroville on Saturday, Oct. 18.

BY BRENT BAKER

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) League W L + Okanogan 9 0 Brewster 8 1 Bridgeport 5 4 Liberty Bell 5 5 Manson 4 5 Lk Roosevelt 3 6 Tonasket 2 7 Oroville 1 9

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Okanogan out in the second half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We played tough defense with Marissa Aubin, Paz Lopez, Tylynne Watkins and Tamera Verellin working together to keep Okanogan out,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the long trip to Entiat (two days earlier) and some great play there, the girls played very well against the tough Okanogan team on their home field. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls continue to grow together as a team, Coach Whitney Massart and I are proud of their efforts.â&#x20AC;? The Hornets host Tonasket on Tuesday, Oct. 21.

ENTIAT 4, OROVILLE 0 ENTIAT - The Hornets absorbed a 4-0 loss at Entiat on Tuesday, Oct. 7, an improvement on their season-opening 7-0 defeat to the same team in September. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls again improved their level of play, especially on passing and defense,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Xochil Rangel continues to

play well (19 saves in goal) and Tylynne Watkins added a couple of saves.â&#x20AC;? Kindred said the Hornets have seen a dramatic improvement in their ability to attack on offense. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tori Kindred and Kambe Ripley continue to move the ball well at forward as well as Kali Peters at midfield,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All three continue to make good shots on goal. Midfielder Katie Egerton came alive against the Tigers with an increased intensity attacking the ball and had several key passes down the field. Marissa Aubin, Paz Lopez and Tylynne Watkins continue to improve at defense.â&#x20AC;? He added that the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice habits have stayed solid despite the steep learning curve of his young team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are dedicated to each other on the road to improvement,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said.

Two Hornets crack top 25 THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OMAK - Brandon Baugher and Ryan Marcolin led the Oroville boys cross country team at Omak with finishes in the top 25 of the 75-athlete race. Baugher finished 24th with a time of 20:14, with Marcolin right behind in 20:16. Other Hornets included Luis Vazquez (41st, 22:09), Nahum Garfias (45th, 22:31), newcom-

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er Benjamin Cug in his first race (50th, 22:55), Emmanuel Castrejon (52nd, 23:09); Daniel Castrejon (58th, 23:57); and Dakota Haney (74th, 32:54). No Hornet girls ran in the high school race. Seventh grader Sheridan Blasey finished third in the junior high girls race. The Hornets host their home invitational on Saturday, Oct. 18, at Oroville Veterans Memorial Park beginning at noon.

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS Tiger soccer positions for playoffs

Hornets lose two BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Oroville’s volleyball team seemed on track to pick up its first win of the season last Thursday when Lake Roosevelt came to visit. But the “hangover” effect after getting thumped by league-leading Okanogan two days earlier seemed to slow the Hornets down against the Raiders, according to coach Nicole Hugus. LR defeated the Hornets in four sets, 25-15, 23-25, 25-23, 25-14. “We had a hard start to the week,” she said. “We are still struggling to recover. We need to work on moving our feet. We were getting burned in the same spot all night long.” The Hornets (0-9 overall and in Central Washington League

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The season is just past its midpoint, but the Tonasket girls soccer team has already assured itself a spot in the District 5/6/7 tournament in a few weeks. The top five teams in the Central Washington League will move on to the postseason, and even if the Tigers lose the rest of their games, they’ve done enough already this season to ensure they won’t be left out of the playoff party. That doesn’t mean they are satisfied with where they’re at so far. The Tigers beat Entiat 3-0 on Thursday, Oct. 9, to wrap up a playoff spot but after a scoreless first half, no one in blue and white was particularly happy. Whether there were lingering effects from the previous night’s Powderpuff football games that were plenty competitive or something else was hard to say, but Tigers coach Darren Collins pulled no punches in trying to get things right. “It was a disappointing first half in just about every way,” said Tonasket coach Darren Collins. “The Powderpuff football team played the first half, then the soccer team came out and played the second half. I’m glad they figured that out because I couldn’t sit them all.” Collins had made his displeasure known in a number of ways, from imploring his team to “play some soccer” throughout the first half, to sitting twin sisters Ashlynn and Kayla Willis for the final 20 minutes before halftime, to challenging the team during the break. “I just tried to get them riled up,” he said. “They knew how disappointed I was. The twins sitting out made about as big a statement as I could, and they sure didn’t want to be taken out again. It was like two totally different games.” Where there had been no offensive flow at all in the first half, the Tigers consistently threatened to score in the second with crisp passing and plenty of possession on Entiat’s half of the field. It didn’t take long to break the scoreless tie once the Tigers recovered their mojo. Jaden Vugteveen put Tonasket ahead with a penalty kick. Both Willis twins figured in the Tigers’ final two goals, as Ashlynn assisted on Morgyne Hjaltason’s goal, and Kayla scored off Hjaltason’s assist.

North Division play) travel to Bridgeport on Thursday and host Manson on Tuesday, Oct. 21. Oroville stats: Jessica Galvan 13/14 serving, 4 aces; Andrea Perez 15/19 serving, 5 aces; Hannah Hilderbrand 10/11 serving, 1 ace, 10/12 hitting, 2 kills, 4 tips, 17/22 passing; Monica Herrera 11/11 serving, 1 ace; Rachelle Nutt 10/12 hitting, 2 kills, 3 tips, 22/25 hitting; Mikayla Scott 15/22 hitting.

OKANOGAN 3, OROVILLE 0 OKANOGAN - Okanogan, which has yet to lose a set in league play, spiked the Hornets 25-5, 25-9, 25-13 on Tuesday, Oct. 7. Oroville stats: Hannah Hilderbrand 5/6 serving, 1 ace, 5/6 hitting, 1 kill, 11/13 passing; Rachelle Nutt 4/5 serving, 16/19 passing; Andrea Perez 4/5 serving; Mikayla Scott 5/6 hitting.

Tigers fall to Manson BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Rose Walts just misses heading in a goal off a corner kick during the Tigers’ 3-0 victory last Thursday that clinched a district playoff berth. The Tigers had several other opportunities in the second half, including several nearmisses by Rose Walts, while Entiat wasn’t able to mount much of an offensive threat. Entiat also had three players carried off the field with injuries throughout the game. The Tigers (10-1 overall after defeating Chelan 5-1 on Saturday, 8-1 in Central Washington League play) host Bridgeport on Thursday and travel to Oroville on Tuesday, Oct. 21.

OKANOGAN 4, TONASKET 2 OKANOGAN - In the battle of Central Washington League unbeatens, Okanogan emerged as the last team undefeated in league play as the Bulldogs came from behind to defeat the Tigers, 4-2, on Sept. 30. Tonasket got goals from Kayla Willis and Jaden Vugteveen to take an early 2-0 lead. Okanogan cut that margin in half before the break. “We played about as well as we can in the

first half,” Collins said. “I’m not sure what we were doing in the second half, but weren’t the same team at all.” Okanogan scored three unanswered goals in the second half. Madison Gariano had 14 saves for the Tigers.

TONASKET 4, BREWSTER 1 TONASKET - Tonasket spotted Brewster an early goal, but dominated most of the way thereafter while defeating the Bears 4-1 on Thursday, Oct. 2. Jaden Vugteveen, Morgyne Hjaltason and Ashlynn Willis each scored for the Tigers, with Brewster knocking in an own goal as well. “We controlled the ball most of the game,” Collins said. “Their goal bounced off the ‘ugly turf ’ and hopped over my goalie, who was in position and had it take a really bad bounce. We played a really good game.” Gariano had nine saves.

TONASKET - Tonasket’s volleyball team wasn’t at full strength on Tuesday, Oct. 7, and was unable to cope with the front line attacking of Manson sophomore Maddee Ward in a four set loss. The Tigers were without Faith Lofthus, lost Alissa Young to injury during the match, and had setters Vanessa Pershing and Taylon Pilkinton not at full strength while recovering from injuries of their own. Manson took the match 25-13, 19-25, 25-19, 25-17. Ward, taking most of her sets from twin sister Baylee, showed off her prodigious leaping ability and powerful hits against the makeshift Tonasket lineup on numerous occasions to key the Manson win.

LIBERTY BELL 3, TONASKET 1 TWISP - The Tigers, still dealing with injuries, lost in four set at Liberty Bell on Thursday, Oct. 9, as each was decided by three or fewer points. Tonasket had plenty of chances despite losing 22-25, 25-23, 25-23, 31-29. Coach Pam Leslie

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Rachael Sawyer blocks a hit by Manson’s Maddee Ward during last Tuesday’s loss. said she hopes that Alissa Young and Faith Lofthus, both out with injuries, would be back in the lineup this week. Rachael Sawyer had seven kills and on ace; and Alexa Sutton had seven kills and two aces. The Tigers (2-11, 2-7 CWL North) host league-leading Okanogan on Thursday and travel to Lake Roosevelt on Tuesday, Oct. 21.

The Market Stock Sale at the Okanogan County Fair... was a BIG SUCCESS due to all the businesses and individuals who purchased the animals brought to the Fair by our Okanogan County Youth. A big Thank You to all of you who loaned equipment and the volunteers. Thank you to Double R Ranch for your support of the carcass contest for the steers and Omak Feed & Supply for the loan of the panels for the ring.

Market Stock Sale Buyers 2014 Gebbers Farms Hank’s Harvest Foods Homilton Youth Foundation Brewster Fair Fund Okanogan FFA Alumni Chelan Fresh Marketing Brewster Kiwanis Ag Technology Clifton Larson Allen Alpine Veterinary Clinic Baines Title Company Beltrami Plumbing Best Deals Auto Brewster Drug & True Value Bob McDaniel Logging Bright Start Dean Buzzard CJC Farms Chesaw Rodeo Club Superior Auto Choice Auto Group Colville Confederated Tribes D & D Body Shop Damskov Auto Sales Jack Groeneveld Jim Dixon Double R Ranch Erlandson & Associates

Evergreen IGA Estate of Bud Myers/Nora Sheridan Bob Fately Giddyup Salon El & Dorothy Heindselman Sharon Holmdahl Hubbard Well Drilling Inland Professionla Title Lees & Duke Excavation Les Schwab Tires, Brewster Tonasket Comancheros Grant’s Market Kuhler Bar & Grill NCW Land Surveying North County Distributing Tonasket FFA Alumni Ogborn Plumbing OK Chevrolet, Tonasket OK Tire Factory Okanogan County Cattlemen 2NDQRJDQ&RXQW\(OHFWHG2I¿FLDOV Okanogan Valley Concrete Omak Feed & Supply Overland Fence Para Livestock Pete Peterson Plumbing Putin on the Ritz Rawsons

ReMax Real Estate & Kory Heindselman Rooster’s Expresso Doug & Kathleen Sapp Sawyer & Sawyer Scholz Ranch Silver Nickel Logging Heidi Smith & Bess Derting Sunny Okanogan Angus Ranch & Lou Vejraska Tonasket Feed & Supply Tonasket Kiwanis Tonasket Teachers Toppenish Livestock Market Ulrich Drug Store US Bank Jerry Utt Honey Bees Weber’s Dirt Works Wahl Ranch Westwind Farms Bill & Sue Ellen White White Logging Whitestone Cattle Co. Sandra Rasmussen Wilbur Ellis, Brewster Animal Hospital The Farm Shed Beyers Market Cannasol Farms

&RQÀXHQFH+HDOWK Hughes Department Store The Junction Kinross Gold Les Schwab Tires, Omak Okanogan Truck & Tractor Ty Olson Pine Creek Services / Paul Bolich RDL Auto / Ray Laurie Steve Richey Shoeing Sunrise Chevrolet Tech Industrial Whitley Fuel Xtreme Power Sports


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 16 2014

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SATURDAY, OCT. 18, 2014 - 10:00 a.m

*PARTIAL * * * *LISTING * * *BELOW * * * -*We* have * * additional * * * * items * * *consigned * * * *that* were * * too **

late to get on the Handbill - EQUIPMENT, SHOP, TOOLS - * Ford 3600 Tractor w/ Loader, Bucket, Forks, Diesel, Good Condition * 2003 Saturn VUE vehicle, Good Cond * ATV Snowplow w/Elec Winch * 14,000# Rotary 4-post Auto Lift * 3500 Champion Generator, Never Used * 7-ton Wood Splitter, New * Car trailer, 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x16â&#x20AC;&#x2122; w/14â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ramps * 2 FA50 Suzuki Bikes * Miller Portable Welder * Power Mate Pressure Washer * Hydraulic Press * Engine Stand * Oxy-Acet Set on Cart * 5-ton Floor Jack * Engine Lift * 3 Large Rollover Toolboxes, Various Tools * 4-Cylinder Motor Block * Various Power & Hand Tools * LOTS of Car Parts * MORE * MISC - Craftsman Snow Blower * Mantis Garden Tiller * Merry Packer * Tillsmith Rototiller * Water Heat Exchanger * Various Tractor Parts * 6-unit Metal Dog Cage * 3 Dog Houses * Sheep Panels * Sheep Feeder * Sheep Birthing Box * Sheep Clippers, Stewart * Saddle * Misc Horse Tack * 12-ft Alum Row Boat * New Bicycle w/Car Rack * 3 Guns * MORE * HOUSEHOLD - Small Freezer * New Hot Water Tank * Composter * BarBQ * Can Crusher * 2 Accordions * 35-gal Octagon Fish Tank * MORE * COLLECT - Old Windup Toys - Trains, Tractors, etc (Marks & Lionel) * Collectible Animal Figurines * Brass Train Engine * Grind Wheel * Old Well Pump * Old Ouija Board * Roseville Vase * Red Wagon * Cement Horses Yard Art * Collectible Cups & Saucers * MORE * NO BUYERS PREMIUM * SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME UP TO SALE TIME

D & D AUCTION SALES LLC LICENSE NO. 2241

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

Crosswords

Across

ANSWERS 1. Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dozen?

Announcements Our family would like to thank all that have given so much during this difficult time. The Oroville ambulance crew for your wonderful care and response. You are all amazing people. North Valley Hospital, Dr. Jenkins and staff for your quick response and professionalism. We are blessed to have had you that day. Tonasket ambulance crew. Med Star team that was so wonderful and caring. Central Washington Hospital. Mom & Dad and Pastors Randy, Cindi and Amanda, Michelle Verser, & Justine Salazar for being there with us through the most difficult time. Bob Ellis, Jan & Cheryll Lewis, Cheryl Roloff, Jim Loudon, Oroville School staff and our amazing church family for all of your prayers and love. And for all the people that have shown how much you care. We have been so blessed with prayers, love and support. Thank you all so much.

The Loudon & Glover families

25. Without previous examination (2 wds)

8. Big ___ Conference

29. Not yet dry

10. Leaves

32. Doing nothing

11. Hair colorer

33. Fail to see

12. Aquatic plant

34. Kidney waste product

13. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ we forgetâ&#x20AC;?

36. Approaches

18. Attack

38. Brown-capped mushroom

19. Certain surgeonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;patientâ&#x20AC;?

39. Blends

23. Core

40. Art able to

24. Evening bell

41. Experienced

25. Because

43. Sean Connery, for one

26. Archetype

44. Antiquity, in antiquity

27. Pituitary, e.g.

45. Expressions of loathing

28. Neigh softly

48. Wilkes-___, Pa. 49. Elephantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight, maybe

29. Expression that radio message will be acted upon

50. Stanley Kowalksiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife

30. ___ a high note (2 wds)

53. Rat

31. Exams

57. Respect of one nation for anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s laws (3 wds)

35. Plastics containing organic material

60. Gorillalike

37. Furtive

61. Old Glory

42. Power

62. Clothing

46. Inside shot? (hyphenated)

63. Airheaded

47. Barflyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s binge

64. Sort

48. Seventh heaven

65. Eye affliction

50. Bunch

9. Yearly (2 wds)

51. Pith helmet

5. Bed board

52. Give off, as light

9. Corolla part 14. Withdraw gradually

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7EĂĽ AREĂĽ DEDICATEDĂĽ TOĂĽ OURĂĽ EM ĂĽ PLOYEESĂĽ JOBĂĽ SATISFACTIONĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ TAKEĂĽ PRIDEĂĽ INĂĽ PROVIDINGĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ PLACEĂĽ TOĂĽ WORKĂĽ THATĂĽ ENCOURAG ĂĽ ESĂĽ GROWTH ĂĽ TEAMWORK ĂĽ COM ĂĽ MUNICATIONĂĽANDĂĽPOSITIVE EMPLOYEESUPERVISORĂĽ RELATION ĂĽ SHIPSĂĽ &(#ĂĽ ISĂĽ AĂĽ NOTĂĽ FORĂĽ PROlTĂĽĂĽ #OMMUNITYĂĽ (EALTHĂĽ #ENTERĂĽĂĽ DEDICATEDĂĽTOĂĽPROVIDINGĂĽQUALITYĂĽ HEALTHĂĽ CAREĂĽ REGARDLESSĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ABILITYĂĽ TOĂĽ PAYĂĽ %6%29/.%ĂĽ ISĂĽĂĽ WELCOME ĂĽĂĽ

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Down

53. Become unhinged 54. Boor

15. Container weight 16. Deposed leader, perhaps

1. The Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cup trophy, e.g.

55. May racing event, for short

17. Betrothal gifts (2 wds)

2. Characteristic carrier

20. Do museum work

3. Comedianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stock

56. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ quam videriâ&#x20AC;? (North Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto)

21. Short, sharp drum sound (hyphenated)

4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Invasion of the Body ___,â&#x20AC;? film

22. Jail, slangily

6. Flimsy, as an excuse

23. Balances

7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ we having fun yet?â&#x20AC;?

5. Chest protector

58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How ___ Has the Banshee Criedâ&#x20AC;? (Thomas Moore poem) 59. Bug out

WIC Peer Counselor 10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & Brewster - English/Spanish bilingual required

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Omak Campus: MA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C Full time RN Nurse Case Mgr. Full time. Travel between sites as needed. Behavioral Health Interpreter Care Coordinator 3 Full time positions. English/Spanish bilingual required

Found $)$ĂĽ9/5ĂĽ&).$ĂĽ!.ĂĽ)4%!.$ĂĽ7!.4ĂĽ4/ĂĽ&).$ 4(%ĂĽ/7.%2 &OUNDĂĽITEMSĂĽCANĂĽBEĂĽPLACED INĂĽTHEĂĽNEWSPAPERĂĽFORĂĽONE WEEKĂĽFORĂĽ&2%%ĂĽ,IMITĂĽ WORDS ĂĽORĂĽPREPAYĂĽFORĂĽWORDS OVERĂĽTHEĂĽĂĽWORDĂĽLIMITĂĽ#ALL   ĂĽBEFOREĂĽNOON ONĂĽ4UESDAYS

Okanogan, Brewster & Oroville Dental: Dental Assistants Per Diem

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%XECUTIVEĂĽ#HEF ĂĽ!TĂĽ.ORTHĂĽ6ALLEYĂĽ(OSPITAL 2ESPONSIBILITIESĂĽ INCLUDEĂĽ PREP ĂĽ PINGĂĽ FOOD ĂĽ ANDĂĽ COOKINGĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ SERVINGĂĽ MEALSĂĽ TOĂĽ HOSPITALĂĽ PA ĂĽ TIENTSĂĽ ANDĂĽ %XTENDEDĂĽ #AREĂĽĂĽ RESIDENTSĂĽ 0REVIOUSĂĽ COOKINGĂĽĂĽ EXPERIENCEĂĽ PREFERRED ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ SOMEĂĽ SORTĂĽ OFĂĽ HOSPITALITYĂĽ EXPE ĂĽ RIENCEĂĽ4HISĂĽ ISĂĽ AĂĽ 0ERĂĽ $IEMĂĽ PO ĂĽ SITION ĂĽ BUTĂĽ WOULDĂĽ BEĂĽ WORKINGĂĽĂĽ APPROXIMATELYĂĽ ĂĽ HOURSĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ WEEKĂĽ FORĂĽ  ĂĽ MONTHSĂĽ 0AYĂĽĂĽ SCALEĂĽ ISĂĽ  ĂĽ DE ĂĽ PENDINGĂĽ ONĂĽ EXPERIENCEĂĽ 0O ĂĽ TENTIALĂĽ TOĂĽ WORKĂĽ INTOĂĽ AĂĽ FULL TIMEĂĽĂĽ POSITION ĂĽ&ORĂĽMOREĂĽINFORMATIONĂĽORĂĽTOĂĽĂĽ APPLYĂĽONLINEĂĽGOĂĽTOĂĽOURĂĽ ĂĽWEBSITEĂĽATĂĽ WWWNVHOSPITALORG ĂĽORĂĽYOUĂĽCANĂĽCALLĂĽ (UMANĂĽ2ESOURCEĂĽAT ĂĽ  ĂĽ .ORTHĂĽ6ALLEYĂĽ(OSPITALĂĽISĂĽANĂĽĂĽ %QUALĂĽ/PPORTUNITYĂĽ%MPLOYER

www.gazette-tribune.com 4(%ĂĽ4/.!3+%4ĂĽ%!',%3 ISĂĽLOOKINGĂĽTOĂĽHIREĂĽANOTHER "!24%.$%2 TOĂĽJOINĂĽOURĂĽTEAM 7EĂĽ AREĂĽ SEEKINGĂĽ AĂĽ DEDICATEDĂĽĂĽ INDIVIDUALĂĽ WHOĂĽ WORKSĂĽ WELLĂĽĂĽ WITHĂĽ THEĂĽ PUBLICĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽ FASTĂĽ PACEĂĽĂĽ ENVIRONMENTĂĽ 4HEĂĽ ABILITYĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ MULTIĂĽ TASKĂĽ ISĂĽ AĂĽ MUSTĂĽ &ORĂĽ INFOR ĂĽ MATIONĂĽPLEASEĂĽCONTACTĂĽ 4HERESAĂĽORĂĽ.ICHOLEĂĽATĂĽĂĽ    AM PMĂĽ- &

Twisp Dental (Coming soon): Dental Assistants 3 Part time Patient Registration Rep. Part time "REWSTERĂĽ*AYĂĽ!VE MA-C or LPN Full time Clinic Custodian Full time

Help Wanted %XCITINGĂĽOPPORTUNITYĂĽTOĂĽWORKĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽTRAINĂĽUNDERĂĽANĂĽ

ĂĽ7EĂĽHAVEĂĽTHEĂĽFOLLOWINGĂĽ OPPORTUNITIESĂĽAVAILABLE /+!./'!. Clinical Informatics SpecialistĂĽĂĽ Full time

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

*******************************

PARTIAL LISTING BELOW: 1989 JD 410C Backhoe w/Extendahoe * 1988 Interstate 20TDT Tilt Trailer * 4 Ford Dump Trucks, 1988-1993 * 1998 Chev Pickup 2WD * 2005 Chev 4x4 PU, Dual * 1990 Ford Van, needs work * 2006 Ford Explorer, needs work * 1997 Ford Explorer, needs brakes * 1998 Ford Taurus, needs work * 1967 Kieser Jeep * JD 935 Lawnmower * Generator * 225 Wire Feed Welder * Fuel Pumps * /276RI&RPSXWHUV $FFHVVRULHV 2IÂżFH(TXLSPHQW 08&+025( /22.)25+$1'%,//6 6DOHV7D[:LOO%H&KDUJHG )RRG$YDLODEOH

Thank you,

3)-),+!-%%.ĂĽ0!2+ !0!24-%.43 /ROVILLE ĂĽ7!

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OKANOGAN COUNTY SURPLUS

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

#%.42/3ĂĽ$%ĂĽ3!,5$ĂĽ&!-),)!2

  

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DAL DAGNON 486-2570

wants to thank all who have expressed their love and respect for Dale.

It is gratifying to be reminded of the many lives /2/6),,% he touched while living (/53%ĂĽ &/2ĂĽ 2%.4ĂĽ ĂĽ BED ĂĽ ROOM ĂĽ ĂĽ BATHĂĽ ĂĽ MONTH ĂĽĂĽ and teaching in Tonasket ĂĽ SECURITYĂĽ DEPOSITĂĽ #ALLĂĽĂĽ for so many years.

ĂĽĂĽĂĽ

/2/6),,%ĂĽ2%4!),/&&)#%ĂĽĂĽ 30!#%ĂĽ&/2ĂĽ2%.4 3PACEĂĽ  ĂĽ APPROXĂĽ ĂĽ SQFTĂĽĂĽ 3PACEĂĽ ĂĽ APPROXĂĽ ĂĽ SQFTĂĽĂĽ ,OCATIONĂĽ ĂĽ -AINĂĽ 3TĂĽ 3OUTHĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ 0RINCESĂĽ ,OTSĂĽ OFĂĽ PARKINGĂĽĂĽ #ALLĂĽ  

The Family of

Dale E. Johnson

#ALL   

ĂĽĂĽ

For Rent

/2/6),,%ĂĽ'!2$%. !0!24-%.43 3ENIORĂĽORĂĽ$ISABLEĂĽ(OUSINGĂĽĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ"EDROOMĂĽ 3UBSIDIZEDĂĽ5NITĂĽIFĂĽELIGIBLE ,OCATEDĂĽDOWNTOWN !PPLICATIONSĂĽAVAILABLEĂĽAT ĂĽ&IRĂĽ3T ĂĽ/ROVILLE

Health General

Announcements

ĂĽĂĽ

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Firewood ./4)#% 7ASHINGTONĂĽ 3TATEĂĽ LAWĂĽ REQUIRESĂĽ WOODĂĽ SELL ĂĽ ERSĂĽ TOĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ ANĂĽ INVOICEĂĽ RECEIPT ĂĽ THATĂĽĂĽ SHOWSĂĽ THEĂĽ SELLERSĂĽ ANDĂĽ BUYERSĂĽ NAMEĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ ADDRESSĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ DATEĂĽ DELIVEREDĂĽ 4HEĂĽ IN ĂĽ VOICEĂĽ SHOULDĂĽ ALSOĂĽ STATEĂĽ THEĂĽ PRICE ĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ QUANTITYĂĽ DELIVEREDĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ QUANTITYĂĽ UPONĂĽĂĽ WHICHĂĽ THEĂĽ PRICEĂĽ ISĂĽ BASEDĂĽ 4HEREĂĽ SHOULDĂĽ BEĂĽĂĽ AĂĽ STATEMENTĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ TYPEĂĽ ANDĂĽ QUALITYĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ WOOD 7HENĂĽ YOUĂĽ BUYĂĽ lREWOODĂĽ WRITEĂĽ THEĂĽ SELLERSĂĽĂĽ PHONEĂĽ NUMBERĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ LICENSEĂĽ PLATEĂĽ NUM ĂĽ BERĂĽOFĂĽTHEĂĽDELIVERYĂĽVEHICLE 4HEĂĽ LEGALĂĽ MEASUREĂĽ FORĂĽ lREWOODĂĽ INĂĽ 7ASH ĂĽ INGTONĂĽ ISĂĽ THEĂĽ CORDĂĽ ORĂĽ AĂĽ FRACTIONĂĽ OFĂĽ AĂĽ CORDĂĽĂĽ %STIMATEĂĽ AĂĽ CORDĂĽ BYĂĽ VISUALIZINGĂĽ AĂĽ FOUR FOOTĂĽĂĽ BYĂĽ EIGHT FOOTĂĽ SPACEĂĽ lLLEDĂĽ WITHĂĽ WOODĂĽ TOĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ HEIGHTĂĽ OFĂĽ FOURĂĽ FEETĂĽ ĂĽ -OSTĂĽ LONGĂĽ BEDĂĽ PICKUPĂĽĂĽ TRUCKSĂĽ HAVEĂĽ BEDSĂĽ THATĂĽ AREĂĽ CLOSEĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ FOUR FOOTĂĽBYĂĽ FOOTĂĽDIMENSION 4OĂĽ MAKEĂĽ AĂĽ lREWOODĂĽ COMPLAINT ĂĽ CALLĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ AGRWAGOVINSPECTION 7EIGHTS-EASURES&IRE WOODINFORMATIONASPX AGRWAGOVINSPECTION7EIGHTS-EASURES&IREWOODINFORMATIONASPX

Feed Hay & Grain &EEDERĂĽ 'RASSĂĽ (AYĂĽ FORĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ XĂĽ ĂĽ BALES ĂĽ ĂĽ PERĂĽ TONĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ CANĂĽ DELIVERĂĽĂĽ $AN Subscribe to the...

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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124 Main St., Oroville-Priced to sell, this newly remodeled 2 bedroom 2 bath home is ready to PRYHLQWR7KLVKRXVHKDVQHZÀRRUFRYHULQJV FRXQWHUWRSVEDWKURRPV¿[WXUHVZLQGRZVDQG other amenities. Just a short distance to town and schools. NWML# 654006 $86,000

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7RS3URGXFHU2I¿FHLQ1RUWK&RXQW\ SUN 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA LAKES 509-476-2121 REALTY 7DPDUD3RUWHU-RDQ&RRO .HLWK.LVWOHU Warmest, most inviting family home w/3 bedrooms up; Master bedroom w/private bath & one bedroom & adjacent bath downstairs, next to open rec room. Beautiful home, Perfect, lovely Landscaping. Garage, fenced, City View. $207,900


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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Insulation

MIDWAY

RENTAL

Contracting

Concrete

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket 509-486-2888

All of your Automotive & Upholstery needs

Â&#x201E; Family

Equipment Rental

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Building Supplies Quality Supplies Since 1957

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

Engineering %'.

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Attorney

OKANOGAN VALLEY

www.gazette-tribune.com

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Installed Insulation & Garage Doors

Installed Fiberglass Insulation / Blown & Batt Ask about our spray foam Â? Residential & Commercial Â? *UHHQ*XDUG,QGRRU$LU4XDOLW\&HUWLÂżHG Â? Experienced, Professional Service

Land Surveying: Boundary Surveys Boundary line adjustments Short Plats Construction Staking Civil Engineering: Utility & Roadway Design Grading Plans Flood Elevation Certificates

Timothy R. Pecha, PE PLS 1105 Koala Drive Omak, WA 98841 (509) 826-2800

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Excavators Â&#x201E; Paint Sprayers Â&#x201E; All Contractor Â&#x201E; Scissor Lifts Equipment Â&#x201E; Z Booms Â&#x201E; Call Today! Â&#x201E; Reach Forklift PARTY RENTALS: Tents, Tables, Chairs & More! Â&#x201E; Bobcat

509-486-2888

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

OFFICE:

509-486-2624

Service & Trades Professionals Advertise /Affordable Full Color ads /Weekly exposure in newspaper and online

Call Charlene Helm For Rates & More Info

476-3602

809 14th Ave., Oroville 509-476-3200

CELL:

509-429-0417 Call today for a

FREE

509-486-2888

Email: avi_john@hotmail.com

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

Well Drilling

Wow

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Water Professionalsâ&#x20AC;?

Looking for something?

509-782-5071 Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

z Water Well Drilling z Pump Systems z Water Treatment z Full Service Store z Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

z Free Water Analysis z Zimmatic Pivots z Hydrofracturing z Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville z Spokane z Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Storage units are fully fenced, easy 24 Hr. access, close to town. 132 Clarkson Mill Rd.

Tonasket

Estimate!

Service & Trades

Advertise where the

Â&#x2122; Special gift items Â&#x2122; Locally handcrafted quilts Â&#x2122; Kitchen gadgets galore Â&#x2122; Woodwick candles Â&#x2122; Many made in USA items

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To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 16, 2014  

October 16, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 16, 2014  

October 16, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune