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GROUND TO GLASS WINE TOUR

OKANOGAN FAMILY FAIRE

Sunday, Oct. 12, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Esther Bricques Winery

See Page A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S

SINCE 1905

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Methow, Tonasket, lead in new construction Oroville drops from top spot to third on list THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – A total of all the new construction in Okanogan County has taken place putting the Methow Valley School District at the top and knocking Oroville down the list for 2014, according to Scott Furman, Okanogan County Assessor. Rather than falling to second, however, Tonasket claims that spot and Oroville was in with third highest. The Okanogan County Assessor’s

Office recently completed physically inspecting and valuing for property tax purposes, new construction that has occurred throughout the County in the past 12 months, according to Furman. The $41,727,500 in new assessed value was picked up for assessment year 2014, taxes payable 2015. This amount is seven percent less than the $45,057,200 that was valued in 2013. A total of $41,328,500 in new construction was valued in 2012. The most new construction occurred in 2007 and amounted to $80.7 million. This process involves the office’s four real estate appraisers going out and physically inspecting the improvements and

determining the value of the improvements based upon a number of criteria including square footage, quality of construction, quality of materials used and architectural design. Some 87 percent of this new construction can be attributed to Scott Furman residential construction with the remaining 13 percent commercial construction. This compares to 71 percent residential new construction and 29 percent commercial new con-

struction in 2013. • The Methow Valley School District accounted for $13,208,200 of new construction or 32 percent of the total. • The Tonasket School District came in next with $6,508,600 or 16 percent of the total. • The Oroville School District had $5,701,200 or 14 percent of the total. • The Brewster School District had $3,656,300 or nine percent of the total. The Omak School District had $3,511,700 or eight percent of the total.

The Okanogan School District total was $1,994,600 or five percent of the total. The Pateros School District had $1,028,900 or 2.5 percent of the total. Methow has led in new construction for several years, however Oroville has taken the top spots a couple times over the past decade due to several factors, including the Buckhorn Mine, a boom in vacation home and resort development and expansion of Oroville Reman and Reload. However, Oroville has dropped to third and Tonasket has moved up to

SEE CONSTRUCTION | PG A3

Egerton joins school board

HORNET HOMECOMING

TSD to put bond on February ballot Facility groups recommendations to be put forth in survey before finalizing

BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Michael “Mike” Egerton was chosen as Oroville School District’s newest School Director, bringing the board up to a full compliment of five directors, something that the district has been struggling with since resignation of David Nutt more than two years ago. Egerton was selected from a slate of three candidates for Mike Egerton the at large position, which had been filled by Brad Scott, who resigned after only a few months to take a coaching job with the district. The other candidates were Chris Allen and Eric Griffin and they appeared before the board at a special board meeting held last Monday, Oct. 6 in the district board room. “After short interviews with each of the candidates at the previous meeting, the board chose Michael Egerton last Monday and thanked all the candidates for their interest. They are very excited to have Mike come on board,” said Steve Quick, school district superintendent. “I’m excited to have five board members again after going so long without one. Brad was only on the board for a few meetings,” he added. In his letter of interest, Egerton said that he was a graduate of Oroville High School in 1987 and that he had two children currently attending school at Oroville.

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board voted at its Monday, Sept. 29, meeting to proceed with running a facilities bond measure on the Feb. 10, 2015, special election ballot. A $6 million bond narrowly failed in Feb. 2014. Since then, the school board has reached out to various portions of the community that had communicated that they hadn’t had enough input in the original bond measure. Over the summer, Superintendent Paul Turner met with a community-based facilities committee that included interested parties both with and without direct connection to the school. The bond package, including dollar amount, has yet to be finalized. However, the board needed to make a decision as to how to proceed if it is to have time to have the bond measure ready in time. Michael Greene and Rob Inlow presented the committee’s work to the board at the meeting. “What we did was identify themes consistent with what’s going at the school,” Greene said. “Maximize student learning, identify needs, cost effective utilization of existing space and infrastructure. “One of the important messages to come up early is the 30 year cycle to get state money; it’s 10 more years until you’ll be eligible for that. So this can be looked at as a stopgap until there is bigger program that’s done. Also (making sure) it aligns with the district’s strategic plan, and safety became a theme in our discussions.” In about half a dozen meetings the committee reviewed and tweaked the needs and outcomes that were included in the measure that failed last winter. After a facilities walk-through, the committee assessed the needs in each area of the district plant, including the high school, middle school, elementary school, alternative/outreach building, agricultural shop and sports facilities. A consistent them amongst building needs, Greene and Inlow said, was additional classroom space for students; additional work space for staff (i.e. offices); and various safety upgrades. More specific needs included expansion of the agricultural shop including a “wet” laboratory, storage, and more space for machinery to ensure safety. Athletic facilities need to be upgraded, they said, in order to meet safety stan-

SEE BOND | PG A9

Above, Oroville High School students enjoy the traditional homecoming bonfire (with the obligatory burning of the opposing school’s mascot, here a representation of the Chelan Mountain Goat) last Thursday at Gold Digger’s bin lot on the south end of town. Right, Homecoming Queen Kylee Davis and Ray Davis are all smiles during halftime of Friday’s homecoming game. More homecoming week photos are on page A14. Gary DeVon & Ellamae Burnell photos

SEE EGERTON | PG A9

Gazette-Tribune receives WNPA ‘General Excellence’ Award Baker, DeVon and Helm receive several individual awards THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

CHELAN - The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune added a second-place to it’s growing collection of General Excellence Awards from the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association’s

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 41

annual Better Newspaper Contest. The newspaper was awarded the second place finish at the WNPA’s awards dinner held last Friday, Oct. 3 at Campbell’s Resort in Chelan. This is the newspaper’s fourth general excellence award in the past 10 years, bringing the tally to a first, a second and two thirds. “Front page packages showed strong news judgement and made good use of images,” commented the judges, pooled from their counterparts from Arizona in making the award to Gary DeVon, Brent

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Baker and Charlene Helm. The three also shared a first place for in the Special Events/Festivals Special Sections category for their Okanogan County Fair special: Traditions Ride On. “Focusing on the entrants (the kids, mostly) makes this section sail. ...this section is a compelling tribute to the event and its’s importance to north Okanogan Valley residents. Great advertising support makes the point even more ‘compelling.’ Good local focus, good ads, very good color shows a section that reflects

SEE AWARDS | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION Family Faire A2 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Cops & Courts A8 Schools A9 Classifieds/Legals A10

Real Estate A11 Sports A11-13 Homecoming A14


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 9, 2014

OKANOGAN FAMILY FAIRE The Okanogan Family Fair, which takes place in the highlands above Tonasket each October is full of music, food, fun and wonder. There are lots of good things for sale and barter. While many go to buy, it is also fun just to go and people watch and discover the many faces of the faire. The faire also attracts its fair share of artisans like Adrian Miller who was using his skill to sculpt a face in clay last Sunday afternoon. Whether you’re there to buy, eat, dance or just look around, you’ll be wished a “good faire” by most of the people you meet.

Faces of the Faire

Gary DeVon/ staff photos


OCTOBER 9, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

LOCAL NEWS CONSTRUCTION | FROM A1

Left & right, the two issues that were judged for the General Excellence Award and center, the photo essay that won a second place in this year’s Better Newspaper Awards from the Washington Newspaper Publisher’s Association. The group held their annual convention in Chelan last week. Below, Brent Baker’s award winning photo of father and daughter at the Wauconda Sock Hop and the cover of the first place winning County Fair Special.

AWARDS | FROM A1 Okanogan County Assessor’s Office/submitted illustration

A bar graph showing the peak years for new construction going back to 1993. The highest new construction years were in 2008 and in 2007.

a community that cares about its fair,” write the judges. Reporter/Photographer Baker also garnered a first place for Best Comprehensive Coverage for his Half Baked column on the plan to reconfigure WIAA sports. “An incredibly well-thought out solution/proposal to a problem that affects parents, students and fans of high school sports. This sort of smart stuff doesn’t always make it into the paper, but it should,” said the judges. He also won a first place for Color Feature photo, a picture of father and daughter, Dale and Elizabeth Olson, dancing in natural light up at the Wauconda Sock Hop. “… not an easy feature moment to catch. Well done,” the judges said. In addition Baker won a second places for best editorial “Don’t hedge on alternative school” and for Best Comprehensive Coverage “What does it take to build a swimming pool?” His Oroville football sports story “One Wild Finish” took second in the Best Sports News Story category.

second, following the Methow. Regarding the change in new construction numbers in north county over the previous years, Okanogan County Assessor Scott Furman said, “I can’t tell you the why as far as what is driving new construction in Okanogan County. It’s a mix of current residents building as well as folks new to the area building. Furman, who says the assessors office doesn’t track whether residential building is for vacation property or not, added that people are attracted to the Okanogan for a variety of reasons. “Valuation of new construction in a timely manner by the Assessor’s Office is important

“Valuation of new construction is important to all property taxpayers as well as the 64 different taxing districts....” Scott Furman, Assessor Okanogan County

tricts within Okanogan County,” said Okanogan County Assessor Scott Furman. “The addition of these new values to the property tax roll of Okanogan County helps lessen the property tax burden on everyone with existing value while at the same time

giving the taxing districts where the new construction is located a small revenue boost.” All property owners who have had new construction valued by the Okanogan County Assessor’s Office this year had a notice of value change mailed to them earlier this year. These notices of value change will affect property taxes paid in 2015. Furman, encourages anyone who has questions regarding their new construction assessment to contact the office at 509-422-7190 or stop by the at 149 3rd North, Room 202, in Okanogan and talk with them. The Assessor’s Office is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on holidays.

CANDIDATES’ FORUM, OCT. 16 OROVILLE - Ballots for the Nov. 4 election are being mailed out on Friday, Oct. 17 and the Oroville Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a Candidate Forum on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. The public is encouraged to attend and listen to the candidates discuss why they feel they should be elected to the various offices on the General Election Ballot. Each candidate will be given 10 minutes to speak, with candidates with opponents getting an additional two minutes for rebutal

information.” DeVon, Managing Editor, was awarded a second place for his Color Photo Essay on the

Baker also won third place honors for the 2014 Spring Sports Special Section and for his story on Tonasket FFA’s national runner-up team in the Best General Feature Story, Long category. Helm, head of the Advertising Department, took another first place awards, including one for Use of Clip Art in an Ad . “A+ fun, very engaging, humorous. I read every word of the ad. Made me smile. Montage on left is so good, it’s almost art itself,” said the judges. Helm also won a third place for Best Branding Ad, Single Ad for Single Advertiser. The ad, “Irrigation Irritation?” garnered the comment “Great ad, full of

to all property taxpayers as well as the 64 different taxing dis-

Conscious Culture Festival. “Good variety, interesting crops and subjects. A great community photo essay,” said the judges.


PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 9, 2014

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month The American Cancer Society (ACS) shares the following statistics: z z z z z

1 in 8 women will get breast cancer. Every 3 minutes an American is diagnosed with breast cancer Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women 35-50. With diagnosis, the 5 year survival rate is over 90%. Every 12 minutes a woman dies from breast cancer; many because breast cancer was not detected in time..

WHY WAIT? SET A DATE. Women ages 40-65 should get annual mammograms because breast cancer incidence increases with age. 8 TIPS FOR A GOOD MAMMOGRAM by the ACS: 1. Facilities that meet the highest standards of safety and quality for mammography have an FDA certificate. 2. Use a facility that benefits from the experience of doing many mammograms. 3. If you are satisfied with the quality of the facility, use the same faculty annually so that the mammograms can be compared from year to year. 4. If you change facilities, ask for your old mammograms so they can be compared with the new ones. 5. If you have sensitive breasts, have mammograms at a time of the month when your breasts are less tender, such as after your period. Avoid the week before your period. 6. Avoid underarm deodorant or cream as they may interfere with the quality of the exam. 7. Bring a list of places and dates for previous mammograms biopsies or other breast treatments you’ve had before. 8. If you do not hear from your provider in 10 days from the date of your mammogram, call them for results. Do not assume that hearing nothing is equal to a negative mammogram.

Cancer Survivor’s Tips (NAPS)—While being diagnosed with cancer can make you feel vulnerable, surviving cancer can make you feel invincible. So says Melanie Young, host of the weekly radio show “Fearless Fabulous Youâ€? on W4WN, in her book “Getting Things Off My Chest: A Survivor’s Guide to Staying Fearless and Fabulous in the Face of Breast Cancer.â€? The 10 things she learned from having cancer are no different from those healthy people should live by, she says. They are: ‡ %HSK\VLFDOO\DFWLYHZLWKGDLO\DHURELFH[HUFLVH ‡ 0DLQWDLQDKHDOWK\ZHLJKW ‡ 0DNHVPDUWIRRGFKRLFHV ‡ /RZHUDOFRKROLQWDNH ‡ 8VHVXQVFUHHQGDLO\ ‡ 5HGXFHPDQDJHVWUHVV ‡ *HWHQRXJKVOHHS ‡ 'RQ¡WVPRNHRUXVHUHFUHDWLRQDOGUXJV ‡ %HYLJLODQWDERXW\RXUKHDOWKFDUHLQFOXGLQJDQQXDOH[DPVVFUHHQLQJV and vaccinations. ‡ )RFXVRQSRVLWLYHHQHUJ\DQGPDNHTXDOLW\WLPHIRU\RXUVHOIDQGORYHG ones. 7KHERRNLVDYDLODEOHDWKWWSZZZPHODQLH\RXQJFRP

Awareness and knowledge are your friends when fighting breast cancer

W

6#.$,.*'+%**,%.*/ "4/3##('+!0, #. ,+"4.'"4 61.*%'+%#+0#.&/0&#)#"'+%0#!&+,),%4'+ '%'0)**,%.-&4 6#04,1.***, #$,.#!0, #. /0+"4,13')) # #+0#.#"'+0,".3'+%$,.,$ -.'5# /(#0/ ,/!&#"1)#4,1.--,'+0*#+0!))     ,.0&))#4,/-'0)  #/0#.+2#,+/(#0 333+2&,/-'0),.%

Don’t become a statistic. Start annual mammograms at age 40.

It only takes a few moments of your time–moments that could save your life. Our experienced staff is dedicated to creating an environment where patients will receive the highest technical skill coupled with excellent customer service.

To schedule your annual mammogram or for more information, call us at the following locations. Omak Clinic

Tonasket Clinic

Oroville Clinic

Brewster Clinic

916 Koala Dr. Omak, WA 98841

17 S. Western Ave. Tonasket, WA 98855

1617 Main St. Oroville, WA 98844

418 W. Main St. Brewster, WA 98812

509.826.1800

509.486.2174

509.476.3631

509.689.8900

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month.

hen diagnosed with breast cancer, women are often filled with questions. What is the survival rate? Can breast cancer spread to other parts of my body? What does this mean for my family? Such questions are common, and it’s perfectly alright and even beneficial for women diagnosed with breast cancer to ask as many questions as possible to better understand the disease. Though each individual’s experience with breast cancer is unique, upon diagnosis the doctor will determine which stage that cancer is in. Determining the stage of the cancer is based on: * the size of the cancer * if the cancer is invasive or noninvasive * whether or not the cancer is in the lymph nodes * if the cancer has spread to other parts of the body Upon diagnosis, the doctor will also discuss if the cancer is local, regional or distant. Local means the cancer is confined to the breast, while regional means the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, most likely those in the armpit. If the doctor says the cancer is distant, that means it has been found in other parts of the body. If the tumors involve the breast skin, the underlying chest structures, have changed the breast’s shape, and enlarged the lymph nodes, the doctor will then likely determine the cancer is locally advanced or regionally advanced. Survival rates have increased dramatically over the last 30 years. Much of this is thanks to research, but increased awareness of breast cancer has also played a role in the significantly improved survival rates. Part of that awareness includes taking steps as a young woman to reduce risk for breast cancer. Steps such as adopting a healthier diet, learning about family history with breast cancer and undergoing routine checkups can greatly improve a woman’s chances of beating breast cancer. Survival rates depend on a host of factors, including the stage of the cancer at diagnosis. Women who understand the stages of breast cancer and the role they play in surviving the disease might be more inclined to take steps that reduce their risk. * Stage 0: Though the best breast cancer diagnosis is no diagnosis at all, women diagnosed with stage 0 breast cancer can breathe somewhat easy. Stage 0 means the cancer is noninvasive and there is no evidence that the cancer cells or the noncancerous abnormal cells have spread beyond the part of the breast where they originated. * Stage I: A stage 1 diagnosis means the cancer is invasive, and the cancer cells are beginning to invade normal cells around the breast tissue. However, a stage 1 diagnosis means the lymph nodes have not been invaded. * Stage II: Stage II is divided into the

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subcategories of IIA or IIB. A stage IIA diagnosis can mean any of the following: - no tumor has been found in the breast, but cancer cells are in the lymph nodes under the arm; or - the tumor in the breast is 2 cm or smaller and has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm; or - the tumor in the breast is between 2 to 5 cm but has not spread to the lymph nodes under the arm. A stage IIB diagnosis means the cancer is invasive and: - the tumor is between 2 to 5 cm and has spread to the lymph nodes under the arm; or - the tumor is larger than 5 cm but has not spread to the lymph nodes under the arm * Stage III: Similar to stage II, a stage III diagnosis will be divided into subcategories. But stage III breast cancer will be diagnosed as IIIA, IIIB or IIIC. In stage IIIA breast cancer: - no tumor is found, but cancer has been found in the lymph nodes under the arm; these lymph nodes will be clumped together or sticking to other structures or the cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone; or - the cancer is any size and has to spread to the lymph nodes under the arm, which are clumped together and sticking to other structures A stage IIIB diagnosis means: - the cancer may be any size and has spread to the skin of breast and/or the chest wall; and - the cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes under the arm, where they will be clumped together or sticking to other structures; or the cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes near the breastbone. Symptoms of stage IIIB breast cancer can include reddening of a significant portion of the breast skin, swelling of the breast and a warm feeling at the touch. A stage IIIC diagnosis means: - there may be no sign of cancer in the breast - if the there is a tumor, it can be any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast; and - the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes above or below the collarbone; and - the cancer may have spread to the lymph nodes under the arm or near the breastbone. * Stage IV: A stage IV diagnosis means the cancer has spread beyond the breast and local lymph nodes to other organs of the body. This can include the skin, bones, liver, lungs, distant lymph nodes, or even the brain. A stage IV diagnosis might be a recurrence of a previous breast cancer, but it’s also possible to get a stage IV diagnosis at first diagnosis. More information is available at www.nationalbreastcancer.org. Visit www.nationalbreastcancer.org

through self-exams and mammograms, is your best chance in overcoming the disease. Do yourself and those you love a favor. Make an appointment with your doctor to have a mammogram and find out what you can do to decrease your risk factors.


OCTOBER 9 , 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Lucky to have such a talented staff at the G-T While most were enjoying - well watching - the Oroville Homecoming game last Friday, I was trekking down to Chelan to attend the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association awards banquet. From the final score of the game, I might have gotten the better assignment. We were fortunate to win a second place General Excellence award in our division and that says a lot for a newspaper that basically has a staff of three – myself, Charlene and Brent. I can’t tell you how proud I am of the people who work with me and the many awards that they brought home that reflect so well on the Gazette-Tribune. Of course I thought they should have won a lot more – I’m biased, but they really did have a lot of great entries – but I’m sure all of the other editors at the banquet think the same way about their staffs. Brent Baker and Charlene Helm bring a great Out of talent to the newspaper and I don’t know what I’d ever do if they decided to move on. Charlene My Mind has been here a long time and perhaps I take her Gary A. DeVon for granted, but she is such an integral part of what makes the newspaper work that I couldn’t do without her. And she does much more than sell and create advertising – she helps to keep the office finances straight and subtly reminds me when I’m forgetting something I should be paying more attention to. She also is so well connected to our communities that she is a great source for many of our story leads. Brent is without a doubt the best sports writer and photographer the newspaper has ever had. He deserves all the awards he won and more. I also don’t know what I do without him – in addition to his talents for sports reporting and photography he is my right hand man when it comes to newspaper page design. I came from the cut and paste era where we literally cut out (with long scissors) columns of type and pasted (with wax) the articles and ads on to a dummy sheet. Brent has scads more knowledge about laying out the newspaper electronically than I have, but it is starting to rub off on me. I guess what I am saying is that Charlene and Brent help to make putting the newspaper together each week a lot more fun and less stressful that it has been in the past. Staff no longer works into the into the wee hours of the morning to put the paper together. That alone has probably added years to my life. I think with the staff we have now we will continue to get nominations for the General Excellence award and hopefully earn some more plaques to go along with the ones we now have. I know that Brent and Charlene will continue to do good work and have it recognized by both our communities and the WNPA. I hope to see everyone at the upcoming Victory Bell Game this Friday between Oroville and Tonasket. Tonasket gets the home field advantage this year and it’s also Homecoming for the Tigers. The Hornets are definitely the underdogs in this renewed rivalry. This year we also have a mayor’s challenge between Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb and Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth. While the mayors have a box of locally grown apples on the line, the Gazette-Tribune is providing a bell as travelling trophy for the respective City Halls to mark the occasion.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dansel not the same candidate he was Dear Editor, Since Brian Dansel won the special Senate election less than a year ago and now has all the advantages of an incumbent politician, it appears he has become a vastly different candidate with a vastly different method and message. I will illustrate this by using quotes from Dansel and his supporters. As the saying goes, actions speak louder than words. Let’s start with funding his campaign locally. One supporter stated “I want a Senator who doesn’t owe favors to special interest groups”. Dansel himself stated in an interview “There’s not many genuine folks out there running for office, and it needs to be brought back to the people”. The person writing the story added “That’s a subtle jab at Smith, whom Dansel criticizes for having too many big-monied corporate backers”. Another supporter of Dansel wrote that after research, 61 percent of Dansel’s contributions came from his own county, only 5.5% from outside his district and 0% from outside the state. In this election so far, less than a year later, Brian Dansel’s contributions are a whopping 95 percent out of district with 14 percent of that out of state! Which means only five percent of his contributions, including personal ones, are even from his own district! Talk about the pot calling the kettle black. One of out of state contributors is PHRMA, as in BIG PHARMA, based in Washington, D.C. , the manufacturers of the expensive prescription drugs we take. Others are in Washington D.C., Richmond, Virg., Phoenix, Ariz., Portland, Ore., and Fort Worth, Texas. To paraphrase the person that presented

Dansel’s last election contribution statistics, why would outside corporate interests be pouring money into a little old Washington state Senate race between two Republicans? To quote this person, “I want a candidate who thinks for himself, and votes on my behalf, not the lobbyists”. Incidentally, Tony Booth, his opponent, is totally funding his own campaign, so he will have no one to answer to, except the voters of his district. Concerning the question of Dansel running a dirty campaign in the last election, a supporter stated “The integrity and past accomplishments of any political candidate’s background should always be revealed to the public eye”. I use this quote because regarding campaign funds, two sworn complaints were filed with the Public Disclosure Commission, PDC, in the last election against Brian Dansel, Case No. 14-015. The sworn complaints basically state Dansel NEVER filed a contribution report on time, and would not disclose the source of funds during a publicity spree of radio, mail, newspaper and sign postings. Also, there was a double contribution of $900 from the Washington Education Association, clearly a violation of the rules. The investigation began Jan. 14, 2014. The Commission’s motto is “Shining Light on Washington Politics”. I will urge the Commission to come to a conclusion in this matter before the election so as a voter I can make a more informed decision and urge you to do the same. Dansel made an agreement of no mud slinging with Tony Booth. Then within 10 minutes in a public debate in Colville, insinuated that putting up a few balloons in a car lot won’t get results in Olympia. Exactly what did he mean? It sure sounded like an insult. So much for no mud slinging! The way I

DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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take it is by being a successful businessman, by being straight and honest with people and listening to them is not something that works in Olympia among politicians. Someone who knows how to make a payroll and comply with numerous state and federal regulations and knows which ones need abolished would be lost in Olympia. I vehemently disagree. That is EXACTLY the kind person I want representing me in Olympia! Concerning business, Brian Dansel has stated he was a contractor, which means to me that he was a self employed businessman with a license registered with the state. Curiously, no such thing exists. So what was that all about? I think voters deserve an answer. In contrast, Tony Booth is a REAL businessman. Of the two candidates, who would logically understand what it is like to be in business, and would not berate people who tried and unfortunately failed, especially in this depressed economy. At least they tried, as opposed to others. In fact, Tony Booth has a jobs plan, and is willing to help fund it with his first years salary as a Senator. Supporters of Brian Dansel are already saying we don’ t need a change. One supporter, in one letter, says “Does anyone really believe one senator is going to change Olympia”? Then goes on in the same letter to say that if you return Brian Dansel to Olympia, “you will be glad you did when the legislative session begins in January, and ends on schedule without an expensive extended session”. Seriously, which one is it? It can’t be both. In the last election, Dansel supporters message was we needed someone who wouldn’t have to answer to special interest groups. We need someone who will be straight with you. That person is certainly not Brian Dansel. As I stated, actions speak louder than words, and changing 180 degrees in less than a year is certainly disturbing. The Founders never intended career politicians. They intended people to serve a short time and go back to their private life, instead of getting comfortable learning the ropes. That is EXACTLY what is wrong with politics in Washington state and across the country. Apparently, Brian Dansel is an exceptionally fast learner! So I guess the decision is do you want to rehire a budding career politician, who when asked what he thought of Obamacare blurted out “if you have something better, bring it to the table”? Someone who was the sole Republican co-sponsor among 15 Democrats to Senate Bill 6161, which among other things will help implement Common Core, which according to one educator, will put kids back two grade levels and give total control of your schools to the federal government? And could not even give a straight answer to a constituent why he did it. Or someone who is not part of the system and has a fresh perspective like Tony Booth? David Wolosik Oroville

An opportunity for students to apply for military academy nominations BY CONGRESSMAN DOC HASTINGS FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT - WA

Our nation owes a debt of gratitude to all of those who choose to serve in the armed services. It’s the sacrifices of our veterans and active duty military that have kept Americans safe – and preserved our freedoms – since our nation was founded. One of the keys to maintaining the best military in the world is attracting the highest caliber individuals to enroll in our nation’s military academies each year. As your U.S. Representative in Congress, I am honored to have the opportunity each year to nominate Central Washington students to the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, the U.S. Military Academy at West

Point in New York and the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York. Students also have the option to apply to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy without a Congressional nomination. The military academies offer students a top quality education and the opportunity to graduate with a Bachelor of Science degree. Admission to these highly selective academies also includes a full four-year scholarship, which covers tuition, room and board, medical care and a monthly salary. Students graduating from the academies will do so as officers, and must agree to serve our country in the military for at least five years after graduation. Not only are military academies a tremendous chance to earn a four year degree, but the career opportunities provided are

second to none. In addition to countless distinguished military careers, notable alumni have gone on to win Olympic gold medals, become Congressmen and Presidents, and even reach beyond earth’s outer limits as astronauts. All high school students who are interested in learning more about applying to attend a Service Academy are encouraged to visit the constituent service section of my website atwww.hastings.house.gov to review requirements and download an online application. For further information, or to have an application mailed to you, please call Peter Godlewski of my staff at (509) 452-3243. All congressional applications must be received in my Pasco office by Nov. 1 to be considered.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 9, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Who will take on the Christmas Bazaar this year? Lovely fall days and cool evenings, that’s the order of the day and as the flowers and other foliage change colors, and die, in some cases, it is a reminder of what’s to come. Thanks to good neighbors (relatives, really) whose fishing skills have been paying off, we have been the recipient of some wonderful trout. Big dudes! I’m sure they must have been real fun to catch, and I know they’ll be great to eat. Was surprised to see Oroville’s Chief of Police is retiring. He looks so young. Good for him. Being a cop these days is a stressful job, I’m sure.

When I get old, I’m gonna move in with my kids, hog the computer, pay no bills, eat all the food, trash the house and when asked to clean, pitch a fit like it’s killing me. If you’ve ever read one of Effie Lee Wilder’s books, you’ll look for the others, as they are so humorous, especially for us older folks. A brain is like the Bermuda triangle. Information goes in then it’s never found again. (I can relate to that.) A note of thanks was received last week from a reader, who hasn’t lived here for over 50 years and still takes the paper because she likes to read my col-

umn and the Items from the Past. Thank you Sandra (Stiener Haack). This past weekend was filled with the laughter (and sometimes tears) of some of our great grandchildren from the Seattle area, as they come here each fall for their supply of apples. It is always a fun time for all of us as we work in some pinochle and other games and lots of good food. The Asian pears are so big this year. I don’t believe they are as popular as they once were, but they’re still juicy and good. As the days begin to get cooler it’s time to get out your favorite soup recipes

TEDDY BEARS HAVE THEIR PICNIC

or maybe even try some new ones. No dren to use their pool for swimming matter what, I still like plain ole’ potato lessons. soup best, with some hot buttered cornIt is said that a cougar has been sighted bread. Yum! in the Osoyoos area. They do Lloyd and Beverly get around! Curtis recently returned Bob Hirst is still in the hosfrom Hawaii, where they pital at this writing, having enjoyed some R and R in therapy and treatments, and the sunshine of the Islands. hopefully will be home by Beverly’s daughter, Penny, the time of the printing of this accompanied. article. Dennis Loudon who has The annual Christmas had some serious health Bazaar, last year, was the issues, was stricken with senior project of one of the yet some more problems, students. Of course that dealing with brain tumors, THIS & THAT student has graduated and which doctors were able to so far, no one is doing it, Joyce Emry remove and he is home for according to my grandson, recovery. May he’ll have who is a student. So, the better days ahead! question is, will there be a community Only a bit longer and the very “shop- bazaar this year? The United Methodist worn� flowers will need to be removed Church will hold theirs Nov. 8 and also from the outdoor pots. will have the usual spaghetti dinner that How nice that Veranda Beach is allow- same day. ing some of the elementary school chilUntil next time.

Learn about the Bill of Rights, tour an ore mill

THE LEARNING TREE

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

October is rolling along and North Valley Community Schools along with it. Coming up on Monday Oct. 20, check out the Bill of Rights. What’s in the Bill of Rights? What is it anyway? What were America’s founders thinking when they came up with this? Why do you need to know this stuff? As the saying goes, “If you don’t know your rights you don’t have any!� Learn all about the Bill of Rights and how it was meant to regulate how the federal

OSD/submitted photo

The first graders from Oroville Elementary School enjoyed their Teddy Bear picnic day on Friday Oct. 3. Students brought their favorite Teddy Bears from home and did many activities including measuring, sorting by size and color, and graphing. They also read stories to their bears, sang songs and chants and some writing activities. The favorite part of the day was the picnic outside with their friends and bears enjoying the sunshine.

Senior Center members will serve on Senior Association SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

In special session, the Okanogan County Senior Citizens Association elected Betty Steg, Treasurer, and James Gutschmidt, President. (Me?) Both of us represent our Center. The meeting went smoothly, and we are now working on certifying the results. This coming Saturday, Oct. 11, between 8 and 10 a.m., our Center is hosting a Breakfast Buffet, all you can eat, the works,

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS including beverage, eight dollars, cheep. All are invited. Its time to prepare for the Christmas Bazaar. Look for items to sell or donate, and plan to be there. For answers to questions, talk to Betty Hall, our Bazaar chair. I was told that I’m not perfect, the other day. Well, being an imperfect crafter I’m still looking forward to meeting that Master Craftsman, someday. He promised. There’s something in a name, like Steg, or Emry, or Gutschmidt. Gutschmidt? Actually, I was once told that

my name, with the “d� added, means good steward, as in someone one can trust. So, I thank you for that trust, and pray that I can now, earn it. I think, also, that a steward is a servant, which is what I promise to aspire to. You, still, are the kings. But, remember to say please, and thank you, and be polite at all times, please. (Me, president? I’m still in shock!) And the canary that swallowed the cat said, Meow, and that’s no bull. Pinochle door prize, Jim Fry; Pinochles, Evelyn Dull; High man, Leonard Paulson; High Woman, Myrtle Wood, Beverly Holden.

TONASKET LIBRARY NEWS

SUBMITTED BY MARIAM CADDY TONASKET LIBRARY BOARD

The Tonasket Library summer reading program was a great success. Our children read 2,400 hours this summer. We are so proud of their reading accomplishments. North Central Regional Library provided five programs and the Library Board provided for two additional programs, Scott the Reptile Man and Paul the Magician and Juggler. This year there were five craft programs in addition to the other programs and numerous creative things were made. Julie Pratt, a weaver and Lindsey from Bell, Book and Spindle helped with crafts and teen volunteers were Jamie Wilson, Amaya Norrell, Emily Nissen, and Becca Peterson. Tonasket City Hall is always supportive of the library and its programs and local businesses donate prizes for readers. Prizes were contributed by Highlandia Jewelry, Lee Frank’s Mercantile, All Perked Up Espresso, Shannon’s Restaurant, Tonasket Pizza Company and Grant’s Market. The Tonasket Eagles Ladies Auxiliary donated

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bicycles as grand prizes. The boy’s bike winner was Ethan Laurent and the girl’s bike winner was Rebecka Ornelas. What a wonderfully supportive and literate community. A big thank you also to the Gazette Tribune and other media for getting the word out about all the Tonasket Library programs. On Friday, Sept. 19 the Tonasket Library Board and the friends of the library put on a dessert and music program at the Community Culture Center to raise money for the storage shed that has been placed at the north end of the library. We listened to wonderful music by Steve Kinzie and Reed Engel, who gracially donated their time and were served delicious desserts that were provided by friends of the library. Beyers Market donated a beautiful decorated cake. James Moore, President of the Library Board served as Master of Ceremonies and read a poem. Our next fundraiser will be the book sale held in conjunction with the Tonasket Winterfest celebration in December.

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

Benefit dinner for Bonnie Hickman Oct. 11 SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN OROVILLE EAGLES

Steak Night is on every Friday through May. Come out and support your club and have a great meal. Remember all of our cooks, preppers and wait staff are volunteers and love what they do. This Saturday, Oct. 11 there will be a benefit dinner and auction for Bonnie (Stell) Hickman. Bonnie has had several surgeries and needs help with medical and travel expenses. Please come out and support one of our own. Our State Worthy President will be visiting on Tuesday, Oct. 21. All members are invited to attend. These meetings are very informative and enjoyable. Dinner always follows after the meeting. Our Joker Poker is doing well. Every Friday, right after meat draw, we draw for a cash prize of $25 or half the total pot if you draw the Joker. You must be a member in

good standing and have your membership card in your possession at the time of the drawing. We have a lot of members who have paid their dues but have not picked up their cards. Come in, pick up your card, and see what’s going on. Cards will be mailed after Wednesday, Oct. 15 if not picked up. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on

the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Friday and Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what is happening at your club and join in. We would like to thank all of the people and businesses in the community for support of our benefits and fund raisers for our local area. As always, We Are People Helping People.

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government interacts with We the People. Coming up in November we have a two part class, Processing of Gold Ores with Gold Pour (Tour). Now that we’ve figured out which rocks contain gold, how the heck to we get it out of those rocks? Learn about the fundamentals of crushing, grinding, particle sizing and flotation, and the role of cyanide

in gold leaching. This is one of our most popular classes so be sure to sign up early! You must sign up by Tuesday, Oct. 21 to allow time for background checks! The first session, on Thursday Nov. 6, will be held at the Legacy Center in Tonasket. The second session, on Monday, Nov. 10, will be a tour of the Kettle River mill and a gold pour, located in Republic. To sign up for these classes and more, call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or check out our website at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. North Valley Community Schools has an opening on the board of directors. Have you enjoyed NVCS classes and want to contribute? Do you have fresh ideas? Just want to hassle Ellen? If you would like to join the NVCS board of directors call Ellen at (509) 476-2011.

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OCTOBER 9, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR Swanson and Engel to Perform at Winery OROVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Harvey Swanson and Reed Engel will pool their musical talents to perform together at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, Oct. 9. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861.

CCC Rummage Sale Huge Fall rummage sale Thursday - Saturday, Oct. 9-11 at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, 411 Western Ave., with proceeds going toward the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Front of the Building Renovation.â&#x20AC;? Come support the CCC. Call 509-486-1328 for more information.

Oroville Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market will be Saturday, Oct. 11 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. For more info call 509476-2096.

Wonderful music comes from a variety of instruments and blend of voices. There will be dinner catered by La Ultima at 6:00 p.m., and the concert begins at 7:00. Cost for the concert will be $7.00 for members, and $8.00 for the general public. Children 10 and under enter free.

Childbirth Education Series TONASKET - North Valley Hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childbirth Education Series, a series of four classes to prepare expectant families are held Monday evenings every other month â&#x20AC;&#x201C; February, April, June, August and December. These free classes are held in the orientation room (Hospital receptionist will direct attendees) from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The remaining October sessions are Oct. 13, 20 and 27. The classes are being presented by RenĂŠ Todd, RN, MSN, OB Nurse; Pamela Thacker, RN, NVH OB Department Coordinator; Jackie Daniels, EMT, Car Seat Safety Educator and Amber Hall, registered dietitian. For more information contact: Childbirth Education Coordinator Todd at 509-486-3140 (leave a message) or at home at 509-486-1377 or email renetodd@nvhospital.org or ob@nvhospital.org.

Oakes, Champagne and Wheatly to Oroville Seniors Pancake Breakfast perform OROVILLE - The public is invited to a fabulous pancake breakfast on, Saturday, Oct. 11 from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. at the Oroville Senior Center (16th & Golden Streets). Oroville. A buffet style breakfast will include pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, fruit, juice, milk, coffee & tea all for just $8 (U.S.). For more information call 509-476-2412 or email oroseniors@gmail.com or visit our website at: http://orovillewaseniorcntr.blogspot.com/

Catch the Crush OROVILLE - Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to make wine. Tour Esther Bricques Winery and let Linda and Steve Colvin show you how wine is made, starting from the ground up on Sunday, Oct. 12 from 11 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2 p.m. in one session. Esther Bricques is a â&#x20AC;&#x153;ground to glassâ&#x20AC;? winery located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. Sample grapes right off the vine, participate in harvest, crushing and fermenting, maybe even sample a few wines in the works. To register call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011.

Health Fair at North Valley Hospital North Valley Hospital in Tonasket will be hosting a health fair Oct. 12 to 18. During this time the public is encouraged to come in and take advantage of the $5 Lipids and Glucose lab testing that is available. These are fasting labs, which means only water after midnight prior to your blood draw. No physician orders are required and results will be sent to your primary care physician. For more information you can go to www.nvhospital.org or call 509-486-2151.

CCC Concert Lindsay Street Band from Seattle will perform Saturday, Oct. 18, with Roots Music From Ireland, England, Quebec, Scandinavia and France as well as original compositions.

OROVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;- Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include Chuck Oakes and Ron Champagne along with drummer Wheatly on Thursday, Oct. 16, followed by Denny Richardson, Steve Pollard and Steve Bell on Thursday, Oct 23; music begins around 6:30 p.m. For more information, please call the winery at 509-476-2861 or visit the Events page at www. estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road.

Film Looks at Dam Building Era TONASKET Cascade Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group is sponsoring a free screening of DamNation, a film that explores the era of dam building in our nation that left nearly no stream free from damming, as well as the current movement towards the removal of dams that are derelict, provide no public benefit, or are barriers to fish passage. The screening is at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Wednesday, Oct. 22 starting at 7 p.m. The film will be followed by a panel discussion bringing some of the concepts from the movie into more of a local perspective.Check out ccfeg.org for more info.

Community Wellness Course North Valley Hospital will be hosting its next community health course on Thursday, Oct. 23, 6:00-7:00 p.m. Colon Health and Cancer Prevention will be presented by General Surgeon Dr. Don Sebesta. This course is focused on preventing colon cancer with screening colonoscopies. Understand the difference between screening colonoscopies and diagnostic colonoscopies. Learn what you can do to prevent colon cancer, and find out what makes you at higher risk for colon cancer. The course is free, but registration is required. To register go online to at www. nvhospital.org or call 509-486-

3163.

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER

Concert Series presents The Bills

TONASKET EAGLES #3002

OSOYOOS - The Osoyoos Concert series presents The Bills on Thursday, Oct. 23 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. The Bills are a high impact, acoustic folk music quintet from the West Coast. The concert is at the Osoyoos Secondary School Mini Theatre located at 115 Street, Osoyoos, BC. Tickets available at Imperial Office in Osoyoos or Sundance Video in Oliver. $23 in advance or $25 at the door. For more information see: www.thebills.ca.

Free Community Meal This months Free Community Meal will be Sunday, Oct. 26, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Donations are always welcome. Dinner will be served from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. These meals are held the last Sunday of every month, and prepared by Val Welles and a crew of volunteers.

CCC Auction Saturday, Nov. 1 is the annual Community Cultural Center Auction. Rich Fewkes and Trygve Culp will work together for the live auction; silent auction begins at 4:30 p.m. Dinner for $10.00 will be at 6:00. Live auction begins at 7:00. The proceeds will benefit the CCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general fund for winter expenses; there will be a special appeal for the front of building remodel. Credit Cards will be accepted as well as cash and checks. Call 509486-2061 to donate items or for more info.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sargeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Add an Eventâ&#x20AC;? button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

TONASKET EAGLES

Aerie President welcomed

Sunday are as follows: first place: Cindy Jones, second place: Joann

Fall is here but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel like it, the leaves are starting to fall so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to get out your rakes as the leaves will be hitting the ground soon. Happy hunting and be safe. We would like to welcome back our President Ron Wisener from Fall Conference that was in Auburn, Wash. where he received a standing ovation for his speech on things going on in District #10. On Saturday, Oct. 18 we will be having a spaghetti dinner and dessert auction starting at 5 p.m. All you can eat for $7.00. We are in need of desserts. All proceeds will be going for the propane fund. Please contact Val at 509-557-8666. There will also be Karaoke by Linda Wood. For all you hunters and everyone our breakfast will be starting this Sunday, Oct. 12 from 9-11 a.m. On Saturday, Oct. 25 we will be having a kids Halloween party. More info to follow. Pinochle scores from last

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OkanoganValley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOHÂ&#x2021; Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;O taste and see that the Lord is good!â&#x20AC;? Pastor Dan KunkelÂ&#x2021;'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose MaldonadoÂ&#x2021;476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOHÂ&#x2021; Worship on Sunday at 10:00 a.m. Visit us on the web: www.OrovilleUMC.org Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Valley Christian Fellowship

BY MARIANNE KNIGHT

HILLTOP COMMENTS

HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

The Pancake Breakfast that was held in Molson on Sept. 29 was well attended with serving 151 adults and six children. The weather was good for the outing, sunny yet crisp air like fall days are. A good day for visiting with friends. At the Ladies Auxiliary meeting last Thursday, the Ladies spent some time planning ahead for the upcoming events to be held at the Grange Hall. The things in the basement have been cleaned and sorted for the next

garage sale. The first Pinochle night will be on Monday, Oct. 13 at 7 p.m. The next Ice Fishing Derby will be held on Saturday, Jan. 17th (details to come). The next BINGO night will be on Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. and then again on Nov. 7 and 21. We have had good attendance with good prize paybacks. There will be a Free Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday, Nov 27 in Chesaw. Bring your friends and family and even your neighbors. Details

to come. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Bazaar in Chesaw will be held in the Community Building on Saturday, Nov. 8. Tables are available for $10 each. There will be a good assortment of craft items and home made articles. There will be a good assortment of baked goods for the holidays. The Country Kitchen will be open and serving bratwursts and other goodies. The Lutheran Church in Havillah will be hosting their Harvest Supper on Saturday, Oct. 25 starting with Fellowship at 4:30 p.m. and serving from 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7 p.m. Please bring your favorite salad or dessert to share. This is a very good free dinner for all. Everyone is welcome. Until next week.

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church NondenominationalÂ&#x2021;Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane ScheidemantleÂ&#x2021;485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;For by grace are ye saved through faith...â&#x20AC;? Eph. 2:8-9 â&#x20AC;&#x153;...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

Pastor Randy McAllister 10 6th East and WhitcombÂ&#x2021;509-429-2948 (DVW2URYLOOH5GÂ&#x2021; Pastor Stephen WilliamsÂ&#x2021;www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Â&#x2021;6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDPÂ&#x2021;6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 amÂ&#x2021;Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm Sunday School & Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church K-6 â&#x20AC;&#x153;SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! WORD IS TRUTH.â&#x20AC;? JOHN 17:17 Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville Â&#x2021;:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Holy Rosary Catholic Church

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5thÂ&#x2021;Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQÂ&#x2021;

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, OrovilleÂ&#x2021;476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.Â&#x2021;Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDPÂ&#x2021;Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony RiveraÂ&#x2021;509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

Pancake breakfast was well attended

Michels, low score went to Dale Byers and last pinochle of the day to Ken Cook and Gibb McDougal. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

1516 Fir StreetÂ&#x2021;476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am RIÂżFH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ 3DVWRU5RG%URZQ

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose MaldonadoÂ&#x2021;476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., TonasketÂ&#x2021;509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDPÂ&#x2021;%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO â&#x20AC;&#x153;For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.â&#x20AC;? -Eph. 2:8-9

â&#x20AC;&#x153;To every generation.â&#x20AC;? Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.Â&#x2021;Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000Â&#x2021;cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, TonasketÂ&#x2021;486-2181

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian Peopleâ&#x20AC;?

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service â&#x20AC;&#x153;Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, togetherâ&#x20AC;?

509-486-2192

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 9, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Gailin Tara Olsen, 27, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 30 to third-degree asVDXOW ODZHQIRUFHPHQWRIĂ&#x20AC;FHU UH sisting arrest, fourth-degree assault '9 DQGIRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW Those crimes occurred Feb. 14. In a separate case, Olsen pleaded guilty Sept. 30 to second-degree theft. Olsen was sentenced to a total of WKUHHPRQWKVLQMDLODQGĂ&#x20AC;QHGDWRWDO of $3,001.76 including $1,290.26 in restitution. The second crime occurred Dec. 18, 2013. Alyssa Ann Descoteaux, 20, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 30 to delivery RIDFRQWUROOHGVXEVWDQFH KHURLQ  The crime occurred Feb. 11. In a separate case, Descoteaux pleaded JXLOW\6HSWWR32&6 FRFDLQH  32&6 KHURLQ SRVVHVVLRQRIPDUL MXDQD OHVVWKDQJUDPV DQGXVH of drug paraphernalia. Those crimes occurred April 25. Descoteaux was sentenced to a total of 14 months in SULVRQDQGĂ&#x20AC;QHGDWRWDORI Kevin Michale Dixon, 25, Oroville, SOHDGHGJXLOW\6HSWWRĂ&#x20AC;UVWGH gree animal cruelty, second-degree criminal trespassing and thirddegree theft. Dixon was sentenced WRVL[PRQWKVLQMDLODQGĂ&#x20AC;QHG $1,110.50 for the May 26 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 17. The court found probable cause to charge Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, 2PDNZLWK32&6 KHURLQ DQG resisting arrest. The crimes occurred Sept. 24. In a separate case, the court found probable cause to charge Hayes with three counts of distribution of a controlled subVWDQFH KHURLQ  ZLWKLQIHHWRI DVFKRRO]RQH  The court found probable cause to charge Jared Wendell Chaney, 20, Omak, with residential burglary and second-degree malicious mischief. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 26. The court found probable cause to charge Jeremy James Monnin, 34, Omak, with assault in violation of a QRFRQWDFWRUGHU '9 LQWHUIHULQJ ZLWKUHSRUWLQJ '9 DQGWKLUGGH JUHHPDOLFLRXVPLVFKLHI '9  JUVENILE A 16-year-old Okanogan girl pleaded guilty Oct. 1 to second-degree rendering criminal assistance. The girl was sentenced to 20 days in detention with credit for nine days VHUYHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QHGIRUWKH6HSW 22 crime. DISTRICT COURT John Cameron Blake, 21, Okanogan, guilty of a burn ban violation. Blake received a 60-day suspended senWHQFHDQGĂ&#x20AC;QHG Brian Kristopher Boyd, 33, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and Ă&#x20AC;UVWGHJUHHQHJOLJHQWGULYLQJ%R\G was sentenced to 90 days in jail ZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QHG $783. Joseph Clay Bridges, 52, Riverside, had a fourth-degree assault charge GLVPLVVHG%ULGJHVZDVĂ&#x20AC;QHG Amber Rae Erks, 23, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Erks received a 90-day suspended sentence DQGĂ&#x20AC;QHG Crystal Gail Fletcher, 34, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Alicia Lynn Flores, 35, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Silas Leo Gardipee, 27, Omak, guilty of DUI. Gardipee was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;QHG Jason Leroy George, 49, Omak, had a violation of a no-contact order charge dismissed. Robert Wendell George, 45, Omak, KDGWZRFKDUJHVGLVPLVVHGĂ&#x20AC;UVW degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. George was Ă&#x20AC;QHG Debra Sue Gillespie, 52, Okanogan, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Gillespie received a 180-day suspendHGVHQWHQFHDQGĂ&#x20AC;QHG Gabriela Rocio P. Gonzales, 47, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge GLVPLVVHG*RQ]DOHVZDVĂ&#x20AC;QHG $200. 911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Sept. 29, 2014 Burglary on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Overdose on Million St. near Omak. DWLS on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Drugs on Main St. in Oroville. Laura Ann Balderas, 23, court commit-

ment for DUI. Shelly Rae Jones, 34, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for third-degree theft. Derin Welden Darlington, 43, booked on three Superior Court warrants: third-degree assault, unlawful imprisonment and third-degree theft. Jason Paul Martins, 44, DOC detainer. Donald Joe Sutton, 33, booked for Ă&#x20AC;UVWGHJUHHQHJOLJHQWGULYLQJ obstruction, and a King County ZDUUDQWIRUKLWDQGUXQ DWWHQGHG  Vickie Ann Hall, 47, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: DUI and hit-and-run (unatWHQGHG  Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014 Theft on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Vehicle-vs.-deer crash on Kermal Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Property damage on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Stop sign reported damaged. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Theft on Bolster Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Railroad St. in Omak. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Locust St. in Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on Jasmine St. in Omak. Harassment on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. near Omak. Fraud on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Theft on Kay St. in Oroville. Hit-and-run crash on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on E. First St. in Tonasket. DWLS on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. Drugs on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Locust St. in Tonasket. Brandon Matthew Herz, 28, booked IRUIRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW '9  Joshua Michael Barnes, 28, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Brandon Lee Parks, 22, booked for Ă&#x20AC;UVWGHJUHH':/6 Stephen Dale Moses Jr., 54, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014 Theft on Old Hwy. 97 near Okanogan.

Power tools reported missing. Automobile theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Drugs on S. Ferry St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. near Omak. Automobile theft on Fir St. in Oroville. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Fir St. in Oroville. Sean Lee Dahlquist, 23, booked for 32&6 PHWKDPSKHWDPLQH DQG making a false statement. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 20, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS, an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft, and a Tribal FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Briana Lynn Carrothers, 24, DOC detainer. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 29, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree malicious mischief and a tribal FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014 Public intoxication on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Tonasket Shop Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Two Horse Rd. near Wauconda. Mailbox reported damaged. Harassment on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on Elmway in Okanogan. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Darkmoon Way near Wauconda. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Locust St. in Omak. Vehicle reportedly struck house. Burglary on W. First Ave. in Omak. Drugs on S. Birch St. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on Omak Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. Drugs on Golden St. in Oroville. Burglary on Cherry St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Juniper St. in Oroville. Harassment on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on N. Western Ave.

in Tonasket. No injuries reported. David Leslie Louis, 33, booked for fourth-degree assault and intimidating a witness. Brandon Scott Thomas, 22, booked for '8,DQGKLWDQGUXQ DWWHQGHG  Bradley Lear, no middle name listed, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Marc Alan Layne Jefferson, 23, ERRNHGRQĂ&#x20AC;YHFRXQWVRISRVVHVVLRQ of an explosive device, two counts RI32&6 PHWKDPSKHWDPLQH DQG RQHFRXQWRI32&6 KHURLQ  Friday, Oct. 3, 2014 Assault on River Loop Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Main St. in Riverside. Assault on Pine St. in Okanogan. Assault on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Threats on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. near Omak. Drugs on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fraud on Apple Lane in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Fir St. in Omak. Theft on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on N. State Frontage Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on S. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Drugs on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Larry Gene Visger, 67, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of a protection order. Shyanna Kristine Lanni, 27, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA ZDUUDQWIRUĂ&#x20AC;UVWGHJUHHFULPLQDO trespassing. Robert Karl Johnson, 58, booked for IRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW '9  Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014 Disorderly conduct on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on E. Sixth Ave. in Omak. Drugs on Epley Rd. near Omak. Recovered vehicle on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan.

Domestic dispute on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Granite St. in Omak. Reckless endangerment on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Garret Lee Bruce, 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS and a Pond Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Oreille County FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Sandra Rose Moses, 27, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and second-degree DWLS. Gustavo Guzman Trujillo, 25, booked IRUVHFRQGGHJUHHDVVDXOW '9 DQG a USBP hold. Johannes Robert Lappin, 42, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Martin Farias Sanchez, 49, USBP hold. Arturo Moreno Mendoza, 35, USBP hold. Heriberto Hernandez Garcia, 20, booked for possession of a stolen vehicle and second-degree DWLS. Sunday, Oct. 5, 2014 Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on Six Gun Way near Oroville. Theft on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Weapons offense on Copple Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Okoma Dr. in Omak. DUI on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on Omak Ave. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Jeremey Rhyne Schnecker, 36, booked IRUĂ&#x20AC;UVWGHJUHH':/6 Jonathan C. Gray, 27, booked for IRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW '9  Richard Kirk Heindselman, 53, booked for DUI. Kyle Anthony Nicholson, 28, booked on three prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s FTA warrants: POCS, unlawful possession of a Ă&#x20AC;UHDUPDQGSRVVHVVLRQRIDVKRUW EDUUHOĂ&#x20AC;UHDUP Michael Winston Kinzebach, 19, ERRNHGIRU32&6 /6'  Leroy Edwin Brenneman, 56, booked for third-degree DWLS.


OCTOBER 9, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

LOCAL NEWS Death of Riverside man thought to be homicide

BOND | FROM A1

Two teens found in Oregon with stolen pickup THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

RIVERSIDE – The Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office is investigating the death of a Riverside man and questioning two teenage suspects arrested in Oregon driving the dead man’s stolen pickup. The sheriff ’s office is investigating the death of Patrick M. Alltus, 39, Riverside, as a possible homicide. On the evening of Sunday, Oct. 5 county deputies responded to a call at 151 Hosheit Road in the Tunk area regarding a death. When they arrived on the scene they contacted a friend of Alltus who said he had found the victim in his residence, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. “At this time we are treating it as a murder investigation. We are not putting out what we found at the scene at this time so that investigators have time to process the scene. It is evident that there was a lot of violence at the scene but we are not sure of exact cause of death for Alltus,” said Sheriff Rogers on Monday. The two 16-year-old teenagers living at the residence were not on the scene and Alltus’ pickup was missing, so authorities listed the pickup as stolen and put out an alert saying the teens were wanted for questioning. The

Parker Bachtold

Shalin Alltus

sheriff ’s office also warned that the two might be armed with a shotgun and pistol. The teens were contacted by Oregon authorities on Oct. 1, but were not arrested at that time and it was still being determined where the teens were headed. Oregon authorities notified the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office on Monday, Oct. 6 that they had located the stolen 2004 Ford pickup from the homicide scene and had also located the two missing teenagers, Parker M. Bachtold and Shalin E. Alltus, in Douglas County, Oregon. “Both of the teenagers have been taken into custody at this time for the stolen vehicle. Detectives from Okanogan Sheriff ’s Office are en route to Oregon to make contact with

law enforcement there. Bachtold and Alltus were located south of Eugene Oregon,” said Rogers. Okanogan County Deputies and members of the Washington State Patrol Crime Lab went to the scene to investigate. The Crime Lab finished processing the crime scene late Monday night. The only information the sheriff ’s office is releasing at this time regarding the scene is that the victim was shot several times, according to Rogers. “Detectives believe that the two teenagers are the suspects in the homicide case and will be trying to determine what happened at the scene and a possible motive,” said Rogers, who added, an autopsy will be scheduled for Patrick Alltus.

Legislative committee to look at economic impact of gold mine closure THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

REPUBLIC - A legislative panel chaired by Lt. Governor Brad Owen meets near Republic on Thursday, Oct. 9 to take a look at what the state might do to help soften an economic blow to the local economy expected after a major employer in Northeast Washington, Kinross Gold, closes its mining operation next year. The Legislative Committee on Economic Development and International Relations convenes at 9 a.m. Thursday at the Ferry County Fairgrounds. The Buckhorn Gold mine under Buckhorn Mountain near Chesaw in Okanogan County, operated since 2008 by the Kinross Corporation, is reaching the end of its life cycle and is expected to close when its reserves are depleted sometime in late 2015. A separate Kinross operation, the Kettle River Mill, processes ore from the mine. The mill is about 47 miles from the mine near Republic. The closure of Buckhorn means the potential loss of about 230 jobs in Ferry and Okanogan

County between the two facilities, plus another 130 contractor jobs. Citing a 2012 study using 2011 data, Kinross puts its direct payroll at $19 million with a total direct and indirect payroll of $27 million in Okanogan and Ferry counties and a payroll of $38 million and a total of 845 jobs statewide. The average wage of a Kettle River – Buckhorn employee is $82,559 a year, surpassing the average Ferry County wage of $35,290 a year by 134 percent. In addition, the mining and milling operation receives goods and services from 354 Washingtonbased businesses. “The closure of the mine and supporting operations will obviously have a major impact on the Northeast Washington area,” said Lt. Governor Owen, who toured the Kinross operation in April. “On a comparative local scale it would be as if the Boeing Company were to leave the Puget Sound area or Microsoft were to leave Redmond.” The lieutenant governor will be among the presenters during the meeting, focusing on what assistance the state was able to

provide in the late 1980s and early 1990s during the decline of the timber industry in Southwest Washington by passing worker assistance bills and other economic development measures to help displaced loggers and lumber mill workers in timber communities. Owen served in the Senate at the time, representing parts of Mason and Grays Harbor counties. The bi-partisan study committee will hear from company officials at Kinross as well as presenters from the state Department of Commerce, the Office of Regulatory Innovation and Assistance, the Employment Security Department, the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Department of Social and Health Services. The list of presenters is on the meeting agenda http://www.ltgov. wa.gov/wp-content/uploads/201 4/10/1009LCEDIRCompanyClos ures.pdf. The session, expected into early afternoon, will be recorded by TVW for later broadcast. Following the meeting and lunch the committee will tour Kinross’s Kettle River facility.

Dawn Miller, who heads up the Gear Up program, explained what Gear Up was about and how it helps low income students prepare to enter and succeed in post secondary education. Gear up has funded the Aleks program, a computer math program that works with students to help them master various math concepts, according to Miller. It is being used a the high school and may be used as a model for other schools. Miller also announced that Oroville received a grant this year for students in the sixth and seventh grade. In addition, she shared photographs of various Gear Up events and trips that took place last year, including Science Boot Camp, college tours, hikes and overnight adventures. She also played an iMovie about summer events that featured Oroville students. “Gear Up went on a couple of hikes this summer with Ed Booker and Miller serving as chaperones, including a hike in the Olympics,” said Supt. Quick, who added that much of the pro-

WHAT DO YOU THINK? On behalf of the students we serve across Tonasket School District, we would like to invite you to please contribute your thoughts about our school facilities. We want to know what you think about two scenarios containing a list of potential school construction projects to be included in our district’s next construction bond. You’ll be asked to share your thoughts about the challenges and benefits of each scenario. This activity does not require a login or password and can take as little or as much time as you’d like to complete it. There are three steps that you will be invited to participate in: 1. Share - answer open-ended questions about education in our schools 2. Star - review ideas from other stakeholders and star the ideas you like best 3. Discover -learn what is important to the community as a whole To self-register in this Thoughtexchange process please visit the Tonasket School District website at:www.tonasket.wednet.edu Your time spent engaged in this process is very much appreciated. - Tonasket School District

and become a theme that need to be communicated to the community... Plus there is (communicating) the difference between the operations levy (which passed last winter) and the construction bond (which failed).”

OBITUARIES ALICE FAY GREEN Surrounded by children and grandchildren, on October 1, 2014, Alice Fay Green departed this life for her heavenly home during her last stay at Valley General Hospital. Alice succumbed after a long and courageous battle with multiple medical issues. Her most recent residence was Spokane Valley, Wash., where she resided the last few years. Alice was born to Walter and Dorothy Miller on August 23, 1936 in Clarkston, Wash. From childhood, Alice lived a modest and humble life. She graduated from Oroville High School in 1954. In 1967, Alice married Thomas Green, the love of her life; they remained married for 40 years, until his death in 2007. Alice and Tom lived on a rural piece of land in Chewelah, Wash. for approximately 30 years. Most of her life, Alice was a homemaker, although she did occasionally hold an outside job. She lived and breathed for her family. Alice is a member of Opportunity Christian Church in Spokane Valley. Alice is survived by her children, Lynnette Day (Scott), Deanna Barnes (Bill), Melanie Caldwell (Marc), Wayne Green;

Alice Green her step-daughter, Wanda Littrell; and her brother, Roy Miller. Surviving grandchildren include Derek Lemaster, Christopher Oliver, Brianne Sons (Glen), Christopher Robertson, Tangi Metlow, Willy Metlow, Lauren Green, Aidan Green, David Woods-Green (Rhiana), Levi Caldwell and Landon Caldwell. Alice is survived by 10 greatgrandchildren. Alice was preceded in death by her parents, Walter Miller and Dorothy Miller, her sons Calvin Steele and Adis Steele and her sister, Doris Campbell. Alice’s funeral will be held at Bergh Funeral Chapel in

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EGERTON | FROM A1 “I have no particular agenda; I am very pleased with the efforts of the current board members and would like to be a part of your forward thinking and progressive strategy to educate our children and prepare them for the future,” writes Egerton, an agent with 17 years experience with the U.S. Border Patrol. The new school director has also served on the Okanogan County Fair Advisory Board, co-owns Eastlake Produce and Catering LLC and has a Masters of Education, with emphasis on psychological counseling and a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. “As a stakeholder in our school, I have a vested interest in our children being as prepared as humanly possible for their future success,” said Egerton. While this was a special meeting of the board with a limited agenda, the board met the previous Monday for their regular meeting. Under good news and announcements, Supt. Quick stated that the year was off to a good start.

dards (particularly baseball / softball / soccer fields), provide access to restrooms, make the facilities ADA compliant and maintain the track (which needs to be resurfaced before it suffers permanent damage). As to the alternative/outreach facility, which needs to be replaced, the committee left two options to be considered: a standalone building (similar to the setup that is now in effect), or utilizing the proposed lower level of the middle school expansion project for the school, with dedicated entrance and exit points so as to keep it functional as a separate facility. Board member Catherine Stangland asked whether Alternative/Outreach staff had been involved with the committee. “They were invited,” Turner said. “I have talked with them since about what we discussed and they understand what we’ve landed at. “The Thoughtstream (internet survey) language, we’ve been looking at that too. This question will be put out to the community, how to address that. We want to get some more data before we make a recommendation.” Greene said one of the things discussed was how to best communicate the needs to the community. “It was an eye-opener to me, when we talked about the ‘clock,’ of 30 years (between eligibility for state matching funds to help with construction costs). ... At the same time we don’t want to cobble something together for 10 years and then start over. You have to build on what you accomplish now that will be useful for the 10 years, as well as moving forward... “Another theme was understanding some of the issues that came up during the bond. How many students do we have now, and how many did we have 15 years ago. The number may not have changed but your mandates, demands, types of programs, utilization of space, all (have changed)

gram’s success can be credited to Miller. “It takes a lot of energy and excitement to make the program better, and Miller has that,” said Quick. The superintendent said that the elementary school was prepping for the Leader in Me program. “It actually gets kick started next Monday,” he said. “I think it is going to keep adding energy to that building, the principal and teachers are pretty excited about the program.” At their Monday, Sept. 29 meeting the board approved several consent items, including the resignation of Cenah Whiteaker as junior high ASB advisor. Several coaches were approved, including Julie Charles as junior high volleyball coach, Whitney Massart as high school girls soccer assistant and Brian Martin as softball assistant coach. Brett Fancher was approved as eighth grade boys basketball coach and Ellen Rogers as Veranda Beach Swim Instructor, replacing previous instructor Brooklyn Bauer.

Oroville, Wash. on Saturday, October 11, 2014 at 11 a.m. Following the service, interment will be at Oroville Riverview Cemetery, with a reception to follow at the Assembly of God Church in Oroville. Officiating will be Pastor Dwayne Turner. A Celebration of Life Service will be held in Spokane at a later date. Memorials should be made to the American Cancer Society and The National Kidney Foundation. The family wishes to thank the following for their outstanding care of Alice over the last few years: Dr. Danko Martincic of Cancer Care Northwest, Dr. Vijayakumar Reddy of Spokane Nephrology, Dr. Steven Murray of Providence Vascular Institute, and the wonderful care providers at Sunshine Gardens, Davita Spokane Valley Renal Center, Sacred Heart Medical Center and Valley General Hospital, and inhome care providers, Glen and Steve. You all served to make Alice’s last days more enjoyable and comfortable. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville is in charge of arrangements.

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61. Decree Across

ANSWERS

62. Not mixed with water 63. Piers

1. Weather map curves

64. Writers of literary works

10. Ring

40. Balaam’s mount 41. Dash lengths 42. Made a loud noise 43. Heads off 47. Any Time 48. Increases, e.g. weight

15. At once, esp. payments (3 wds) 16. Accept

38. ___-tzu

Down

17. Land bordering a lake

49. Demands 51. Dearth 53. Bank

18. Prefix with red

1. “Field of Dreams” setting

19. Past

2. Catch

20. “For shame!”

3. “Beetle Bailey” dog

21. Animal hides

4. Accordingly

56. “Not on ___!” (“No way!”) (2 wds)

22. Corners of the eye

5. “Catch!”

57. Resting places

24. “Act your ___!”

6. “Star Trek” rank: Abbr.

60. ___ Appia

54. Small ornamental ladies’ bag 55. Makeshift shelters

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OCTOBER 9, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SPORTS Tigers bounce Hornets in volleyball thriller BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - It took six years for Tonasket to win a league volleyball match; it took the Tigers just five days to win another. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t easy, though, as Oroville and Tonasket kept things interesting for nearly two hours as the Tigers pulled out a fiveset thriller, 11-25, 25-19, 24-26, 25-14, 17-15, before a rowdy Hornet crowd on Tuesday, Sept. 30. A topsy-turvy match with whiplashinducing momentum shifts ended in riveting style as the Tigers claimed the decisive fifth set after letting an 11-3 lead get away. The Tigers built their lead behind nine straight serves by Faith Lofthus, aided by three kills by Alexa Sutton, that broke them away from a 3-3 tie. The Hornets stormed back as Mikayla Scott and Hannah Hilderbrand took control of the net. Scott also reeled off six consecutive pressure-packed serves, taking over with Tonasket at match point, 14-9. By the time she was done, the Hornets held match point themselves with a 15-14 lead after Monica Herreraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tip put them at the brink of victory. Tonasket recovered to score the final three points, including a decisive kill by Rachael Sawyer, to claim the match. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a very hard-fought match,â&#x20AC;? said Oroville coach Nicole Hugus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel our team is improving every day. We get another chance to play these teams, and I think there will be some very exciting matches.â&#x20AC;? The Hornets, winless at 0-7, looked anything like a team that hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet reached the win column as they rolled to a 25-11 first set win. The Hornets, who

have struggled with injuries all season, were at nearly full strength for the first time. Scott and Rachelle Nutt consistently finished off sets near the net that kept the Tigers from getting any momentum. That shifted quickly in the second set, in which the Tigers cruised to a 25-19 win. Oroville led 20-10 in the third set before the Tigers, behind Kasey Nelson and Alexa Sutton, roared back to tie it at 24-24 before a couple of errors gave Oroville a 26-24 win. Loftusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; servering and Alissa Youngâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front line play led Tonasket to a 25-14 win that was as dominant as the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opening set. That set the stage for the riveting fifth set that finally tilted the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; way. Tonasket stats: Rachael Sawyer 6 kills; Taylor Pilkinton 4 aces; Alexa Sutton 5 kills, 3 aces; Kasey Nelson 7 kills. Oroville stats: Andrea Perez 19/24 serving, 5 aces; Rachelle Nutt 16/19 serving, 4 aces, 10/12 passing, 16/23 hitting, 3 kills; Monica Herrera 17/19 serving, 2 aces, 2/5 passing; Jessica Galvan 12/14 serving, 4 aces, 5/6 passing, 11/16 hitting, 2 kills; Hannah Hilderbrand 4/5 serving, 1 ace, 8/10 passing; Mikayla Scott 8/12 passing, 17/24 hitting, 5 kills; Courtnee Kallstrom 4/6 passing.

TIGERS IN QUINCY TOURNEY QUINCY - The Tigers traveled to Quincy to play in their first tournament in several years. The timing may not have been the best as Tonasket, playing without setters Vanessa Pershing and Taylon Pilkinton, suffered two-game sweeps to Chelan, Cashmereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JV, Othello and Warden. All four were likely stronger than all but Okanogan on the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; schedule. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls did pretty well considering we were without our usual setters and

running a different offense,â&#x20AC;? Leslie said. She added that Olivia Sutton, usually on the JV squad, came up for the tournament and contributed some solid serving. The Tigers travel to Liberty Bell on Thursday and to Brewster on Tuesday, Oct. 14.

BREWSTER 3, OROVILLE 1 BREWSTER - The Hornets may have finished the first half of the season with an 0-7 mark in CWL North Division play, but Hugus said after her teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 23-25, 25-11, 25-14, 27-25 loss to Brewster that she was looking forward to the second half of the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We came out playing very well,â&#x20AC;? Hugus said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were working as a team, but again we struggled with inconsistency. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we came back well and came back fighting at the end. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m glad weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a second chance to play these teams; I think it will be a different outcome.â&#x20AC;? The Hornets host Lake Roosevelt on Thursday and Liberty Bell on Tuesday, Oct. 14. BRIDGEPORT 3, TONASKET 1 TONASKET - The Tigers hung with a solid Bridgeport squad despite playing their first game without injured setters Pershing and Pilkinton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team played well in spite of everything,â&#x20AC;? Leslie said. Bridgeport won in four competitive sets, 25-23, 23-25, 25-19, 25-21. Alexa Sutton had three aces and a kill, and Rachael Sawyer had seven kills to lead Tonasket, which fell to 2-5 in CWL North Division play. Bridgeport improved to 5-2.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Orovilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mikayla Scott goes up for the kill as Tonasketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vanessa Pershing looks to defend last Tuesday. Tonasket came from behind to beat the Hornets in five sets.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 9, 2014

TIGERS BOUNCE BACK

SPORTS Rolling with the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tigers solid at CanAm against like-sized schools THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COLVILLE - Tonasketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cross country team competed at the 20-team CanAm Invitational on Saturday, Oct. 4, with the girls finishing eighth overall and the boys 11th. Tonasket coach Bob Thornton was looking more toward their response to running in a big meet, as well as the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance against other schools in the 1B/2B ranks. The girls were second amongst the B schools, while the boys were third. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team responded well to the challenge of running against

Tonasketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls soccer team bounced back from its first loss of the season, defeating Brewster on Thursday, Oct. 2, 4-1. Two days earlier, in a battle of Central Washington League unbeatens, Okanogan defended its home turf with a 4-2 victory over the Tigers. Above, Morgyne Hjaltason responds to the cheers of Tonasket fans during Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s win over the Bears.

OCT. 9-18 Schedules subject to change FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

COLVILLE - Orovilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cross country teams ran Saturday at the CanAm Invitational, hosted by Colville. The boys finished 14th of the teams recording a team score.

Finishing were freshman Brandon Baugher (73rd, 20:34); Ryan Marcolin (85th, 21:39); Luis Vazquez (89th, 22:42); Emmanuel Castrejon (90th, 22:49); Nahum Garfias (91st, 22:57); Daniel Castrejon (95th, 23:52); and Dakota Haney (96th, 30:11).

Phoebe Poynter was the lone Hornet girl running, finishing 85th in 27:27. Sheridan Blasey finished sixth in the middle school race (11:50). The Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; next race their home invitational on Saturday, Oct. 18, at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Park.

Condon (77th, 20:59), Justin McDonald (79th, 21:03) and Rade Pilkinton (82nd, 21:14). Adam Halvorsen placed 75th in the JV race (23:14). Skylar Ovnicek of West Valley (Spokane) won the 5k race in 16:28. Republicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duncan Forsman (2nd, 16:48) and Liberty Bellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ben Klemmeck (3rd, 17:06) led NCW runners. Middle School Tigers also had solid finishes. For the boys, Steven Zandell was 19th out of 73 runners, followed by Eric Owsley (26th) and Caeleb Hardesty (35th). Kaylee Bobadilla was 24th out of 79 girls, with Noni Alley 34th. Tonasket runs in Leavenworth Invitational on Saturday, Oct. 11.

SCHEDULES

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Baugher leads Hornets at CanAm

some very good runners from bigger schools,â&#x20AC;? Thornton said. Johnna Terris led the girls with a run of 21:51, good for 20th place overall. Katie Henneman ran her best race of the year (38th, 22:48), followed by Jenna Valentine (40th, 22:52), Camille Wilson (47th, 23:11) and Haley Larson (75th, 25:43). There were 108 girls running, led by McCall Skay of West Valley (Spokane), who finished in 18:41. Shania Graham of Republic (10th, 20:38) led North Central Washington runners For the boys, Hunter Swanson led the way with a 23rd-place time of 18:03. Other finishers included Adrian McCarthy (52nd, 19:22), Bryden Hires (67th, 20:02), Abe Podkranic (68th, 20:07), Smith

Thursday, Oct. 9 GSC - Entiat at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Okanogan, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville, 5:30/7:00 pm Friday, Oct. 10 FB (Var) - Oroville at Tonasket, 7:00 pm

Saturday, Oct. 11 GSC - Chelan at Tonasket, 1:00 pm XC - Cascade Invitational (Tonasket), 12:00 pm Monday, Oct. 13 FB (JV) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 5:30 pm Tuesday, Oct. 14 GSC - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm GSC - Brewster at Oroville, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Liberty Bell at Oroville, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Brewster, 5:30/7:00 pm

Thursday, Oct. 16 GSC - Bridgeport at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Manson, ppd. VB (JV/Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 5:00/6:30 pm Friday, Oct. 17 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Manson, 7:00 pm FB (Var) - Brewster at Oroville, 7:00 pm Saturday, Oct. 18 XC - Oroville Invitational (Incl. Tonasket), 12:00 pm

Directory BUSINESS & SERVICES Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

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To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602


OCTOBER 9, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A13

SPORTS Tigers blow past Bridgeport Renew Bell Game rivalry with Oroville for homecoming BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Orovilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Logan Mills tries to break a tackle during the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homecoming contest against Chelan on Oct. 3.

Chelan hands Hornets big homecoming loss BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - This one, at least, wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a league game. The Oroville football teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gauntlet run through four straight Caribou Trail League squads continued on Friday, Oct. 3, as the Hornets dropped their homecoming contest to Chelan 48-6. The Hornets are halfway through a four week stretch in which they play teams that last year played in the Class 1A CTL. Several of those squads (Brewster, Tonasket, Okanogan) dropped down to the 2B ranks this year, which hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been a positive for the holdovers. The Hornets have outscored teams that were 2B schools last year 57-56; the former or current 1A schools (including another non-league opponent, Mt. Baker) have run up a 173-12 scoring edge in three

Terry Mills/submitted photo

Andrew Mieirs gets wide open to score the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only points of the night on a touchdown pass from Nathan Hugus. Official statistics werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t available at press time. The Hornets (1-4) resume Central Washington League North Division play - and the sixyear dormant Bell Game rivalry - at Tonasket on Friday, Oct. 10.

Oroville snaps scoreless streak BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OROVILLE - Orovilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls soccer team has had trouble getting the ball into the net so far this season. Until Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-1 loss to Bridgeport, they hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t scored a goal all season. But as they hit the seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s midpoint, the Hornets not only broke the scoreless run, but held a lead into the second half before the Fillies pulled away late. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls played their best yet as a team, making exceptional passes and dominating the field on defense,â&#x20AC;? said Oroville coach Tony Kindred. Kambe Ripley tallied the Hornetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first goal of the year and Oroville took a 1-0 lead into the second half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls played an excep-

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Health Alliance is an HMO plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Health Alliance Medicare depends on contract renewal. BeneďŹ ts, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or copayments/ coinsurance may change on January 1 of each year. The beneďŹ t information provided is a brief summary, not a complete description of beneďŹ ts. For more information, contact the plan. Limitations, copayments and restrictions may apply. Other providers are available in our network. * Low copayments available at other pharmacies. ** You must continue to pay your Part B premium. â&#x20AC; A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 1-877-561-8385 (TTY: 711). Y0034_15_22660 Accepted med-cypWAROP1-0814

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LIBERTY BELL 7, OROVILLE 0 OROVILLE - Xochil Rangel turned in 15 saves, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough for the Hornets as they fell to the Mountain Lions 7-0 on Tuesday, Sept. 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m proud of the girls as they continue to progress in team play and individual skills,â&#x20AC;? Kindred

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our defensive line held the Lady Lions with some aggressive play as well as improved shots on goal.â&#x20AC;? Tori Kindred got off four shots and the Hornets totaled nine in the game, a vast improvement over earlier in the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The girls continue to work out some kinks (and) gain experience against some great teams,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With our second half being our better half of play the girls were able to slow them down, but not shut down their attack. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Liberty Bell combines a great passing game with quality teamwork.â&#x20AC;? He added that Rangelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work in goal kept the game closer that it might have been. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She had some very impressive blocks,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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tional first half,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But they recognize they need to keep up the intensity for the entire game.â&#x20AC;? Jenny Salazar and Viridiana Santana each scored two goals in the second half, aided by Oroville defensive breakdowns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were so intent on keeping Bridgeport out,â&#x20AC;? Kindred said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;that (mistakes) led to two scores, allowing it to seem rather easy.â&#x20AC;? Xochil Rangel had 20 saves in goal for the Hornets.

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Ramon added 97 yards on 12 carries. Ramon had touchdown runs of 8 and 34 yards in the second half, while Rycki Cruz added a 25-yard touchdown run and had 50 yards rushing. Leep completed 2-of-4 passes for 45 yards. Brock Henneman scored two points with a safety and added a sack and a fumble recovery to his defensive resume. Cruz also picked off a Bridgeport pass. The Tigers (3-2, 2-1 Central Washington League North Division) host Oroville in the first varsity football game between the rivals since 2008. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homecoming game and marks the renewal of the Bell Game rivalry. Also, the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; final game of the season, originally scheduled for Halloween night, has been moved to Thursday, Oct. 30.

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Renew rivalry with Tonasket this Friday

games. Chelan is still in whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s left in the CTL and may not have been a traditional homecoming opponent. The Goats didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem too inclined to care; they ran up a 35-0 halftime lead to quickly put a damper on any upset hopes the Hornets might have entertained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They threw the ball around a lot,â&#x20AC;? said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as good a team as Okanogan, but we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come out and play very well in the first half, either.â&#x20AC;? Hutchinson, though, was happier with the way the Hornets responded in the second half. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We did a lot better, even though they had a lot of their first team in,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They may have been coasting a little bit, too, but our younger kids especially came out and played hard. They kept trying, and that was encouraging.â&#x20AC;? Two of those younger players - both sophomores - combined for Orovilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only score of the game, a 30-yard pass from Nathan Hugus to Andrew Mieirs.

BRIDGEPORT - Tonasket has at times struggled to get its offense rolling early in games this season. That wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a problem Friday at Bridgeport, where the Tigers rushed for nearly 600 yards while building a big early lead on the way to a 55-20 victory. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got out of the gate early and never looked back,â&#x20AC;? said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought the team played with a nice edge.â&#x20AC;?

Anytime you rush for that many yards, coming within three yards of boasting three 100-yard running backs, the play up front has to be good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They continue to play great,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;593 yards rushing with a lot of different (running) backs. We were able to get all our guys some good playing time.â&#x20AC;? Jorge Juarez scored the Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; first five touchdowns, including all four in the first half as they built a 29-6 lead. Juarez finished with 294 yards on just 13 rushes, including scoring runs of 9 and 70 yards in the first quarter, 62 yards in the second and 44 yards in the third quarter. He also hauled in a 27-yard scoring pass from Colton Leep. Jesse Manring added 131 yards on 16 carries and ran for a 2-point conversion, while Jesse

Emergency VA Clinic Â&#x201E; Surgical Center Â&#x201E; Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket) Â&#x201E; Obstetrical Services Â&#x201E; Imaging Â&#x201E; Full-Service Laboratory Â&#x201E; Extended Care Â&#x201E; Swing Bed Program Â&#x201E; Â&#x201E;

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PAGE A14

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 9, 2014

OROVILLE HIGH SCHOOL HOMECOMING

Oroville celebrated its homecoming week Sept. 29-Oct. 3 with a variety of events throughout the week, some of which were pictured here. Above, Kylee Davis is crowned homecoming queen during halftime of Friday’s football game against Chelan (photo by Ellamae Burnell). Left, Oroville cheerleaders (l-r) Bailey Griffin, Zoe Whittaker, Pie Todd, Faith Martin, Kendal Miller, Kylee Davis and Bethany Roley “zombied up” for a performance to Michael Jackson’s classic, “Thriller” (photo by Ellamae Burnell). Below left, nothing says “homecoming” quite like a Tug-o-War contest between classes (photo by Terry Mills) Below, Joe Sarmiento (airborne) and the seniors celebrate during BuffPuff volleyball (photo by Maddy Scott).

Above, senior Powderpuff football players (l-r) Jessica Galvan, Sarai Camacho, Bethany Roley, Kali Peters, Monica Herrera, Serena Finley and Lily Hilderbrand celebrate their winning ways (photo by Keyla Layata). Above left, Chuck Ricevuto leaves no doubt: he was the toughest judge to please during Friday’s homecoming assembly (photo by Terry Mills). Below left, Jay Thacker was no joke as a Powderpuff football referee (photo by Andrea Perez).

Dining & Entertainment

Out on the Town...

ADULT FLU CLINIC

No appointment needed.

Confluence Health is offering seasonal flu vaccination* clinics during these special hours: October 16, 2014 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. October 22, 2014 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. Confluence Health | Oroville Clinic 1617 Main St., Oroville, WA No appointment or invitation necessary - open to all adults Seasonal flu vaccinations are $28 - we can bill your insurance. *While supplies last.

Bonaparte

Lake Resort & Restaurant Prime Rib every Fri. & Sat.

HOURS: Thur.-Sun. 8am - 8pm

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here!

EVERY WEEK Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 ext 3050

Main St., Tonasket z 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 09, 2014  

October 09, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 09, 2014  

October 09, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune