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Budget season begins for city

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Budget season has begun, a usually painful necessity for most municipalities. City Clerk/Treasurer Alice Attwood said during a public hearing at the Tuesday, Sept. 23, city council meeting that the city’s sales tax income has remained level. “We’re fortunate that we do have pretty fair, consistent sales tax,” Attwood said. Property tax numbers won’t be received from the county assessor until October. She reminded the council of its plan to raise water and sewer rates by three and two percent, respectively, on an annual

basis. “Instead of doing none, none, none, then 15 percent,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “That’s going to be typical for our city processes to keep up with our incurred costs.” Council member Scott Olson said he wanted to look at adjusting other city fees according to the Consumer Price Index, since that was how city employees’ salaries are adjusted. “I suggest we include that in rates we set by resolution,” Olson said. “So if we charge $25 for someone to check a meter on a weekend - I’m making the number up (for discussion purposes) - we would charge $25.50 next year. Across the board, we have our fees we charge for

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

Local candidates invited to speak

Northwest Medstar, a critical care transport service, conducted Landing Zone training with Oroville EMS at Dorothy Scott Airport. The training included information regarding air transport, choosing, setting up and marking a safety landing zone, as well as communication with the helicopter pilot and assisting with loading. Above, firefighter Jarrod Koepke checks out the Brewster-based helicopter from the pilot’s seat. (right and below) Kaylee Morgan, RRT-EMT and Suzy Beck, RN-EMT, show how the volunteer patient, firefighter Jeff Rounds, is loaded onto the helicopter. (Below, right) In addition to Oroville EMS, Oroville Police and Fire departments Molson-Chesaw Fire Department and US Cusoms and Border Protection personnel took part in the training.

Oroville Chamber sponsors forum on Thursday, Oct. 16 at the High School Commons BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE - The Oroville Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a Candidate Forum on Thursday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. at the Oroville High School Commons. Each candidate will get a minimum of 10 minutes to present (more depending on total presenters). Every candidate of every contested race for county has been invited to attend. “Of course, not every candidate may be physically able to come, but is being invited to officially appoint a presenter on his or her behalf. If you have a favorite candidate, be sure to contact that candidate to make sure they received the invite and will have someone there to represent them,” said Clyde Andrews, president of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. Due to time limitations, the chamber cannot invite candidates for uncontested positions, nor have presenters on the issues on the ballot, according to Andrews. “This will be a time for candidates to personally introduce themselves to us and their issues. This will not be in the format of a debate, though each candidate will have an opportunity to speak after his or her contender,” said Andrews. The forum will be the organization’s

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

second membership meeting since starting back up after a summer break. The public is invited to attend and listen to the candidates speak. Ballots for the Nov. 4 General Election are being mailed out on Friday, Oct. 17. This election there are three countywide positions up for election with two candidates on the ballot -- the newly formed county coroner’s office, county assessor and Okanogan County PUD Commissioner Position 1. Seeking the office of County Coroner are Gary Reams (no party preference) and David Rodriguez (prefers Republican). Incumbent Scott Furman, a Democrat, is appearing on ballot with Les V. Stokes of the Conservative Party. Running for the non-partisan PUD Commissioner position are incumbent David Womack and Scott Vejraska. All three state legislative positions in the Seventh District are contested as well. Incumbent Brian Dansel faces off against fellow Republican Tony Booth for a four year term in the Senate. For the House of Representatives, incumbent Shelly Short, a Republican, faces a challenge for a two year term in Position 1 from James R. Apker, a Libertarian and incumbent Joel Kretz is seeking a return to a two year year for Position 2, but is challenged by Ronnie Rae, a Centralist.

Oroville Police Chief Clay Warnstaff will retire Last day set for Oct. 31 BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – After seven years as Oroville’s Police Chief, R. Clay Warnstaff announced his intention of retiring as of Oct. 31. Chief Warnstaff made the announcement in a short letter to Mayor Chuck Spieth and at the last city council meeting. “You’ve done so much for the city, what can I say, when you’ve gotta move on, you’ve gotta move on,” said Mayor Spieth.

Warnstaff had nothing but praise for the mayor and council’s support of his efforts over the years. “It is good to have a mayor and council that doesn’t try to second guess you. And having Chuck for mayor, as he was former police chief, that was great,” said the police chief. He went on to thank the council for making his time “really easy” and giving him the freedom to do what he wanted to make things work. “The cooperation between the mayor and city council is outstanding... everyone worked well together,” he said. Mayor Spieth had appointed Warnstaff the police chief in August of 2008. He had been serving as interim police chief

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 40

Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth congratulating Clay Warnstaff after he was appointed Oroville Chief of Police in 2008. Warnstaff, who has since served seven years as chief, announced his intention to retire at the end of October. His replacement has not been named as of yet.

after then Chief, Randy Wheat, was diagnosed with cancer and while he was undergoing treatment. Wheat later succumbed to the disease and the mayor asked Warnstaff to remain in the interim position until a final decision was made on who would be chief. Warnstaff will be retiring at the same time as City Clerk/Treasurer Kathy Jones, who has worked for the city for 40 years. While Jones’ position has been filled by JoAnn Denney, Warnstaff said he did not know yet who would be taking his place. Warnstaff said he would be remaining in the area and plans to continue working for US Customs and Border Protection at the Oroville Port of Entry at least one day a week.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Gary DeVon /file photo

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Cops & Courts A8

Schools Hunting Sports

A9 A10-11 B1-3

Classifieds/Legals B4-5 Real Estate B5 Half-baked B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

COUNCIL | FROM A1

JUST REWARD

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket Elementary School staff get hosed down with Silly String by a group of students that were the top readers in their grade over the summer. TES students were honored for a variety of achievements at the first of the school’s monthly assemblies.

Carlton Complex Fire: Public meeting to review results of burned area analysis SUBMITTED BY KIRSTEN COOK OCD EDUCATION AND OUTREACH COORDINATOR

PATEROS Okanogan Conservation District will present the results of the analysis conducted by the Interagency Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) team on Monday, Sept. 29 at 6 p.m. The meeting will be at Pateros City Hall, 113 Lakeshore Dr., Pateros.. The Interagency BAER Team is the first of its kind and was tasked with assessing the erosion threat on state and private lands impacted by the Carlton Complex Fire. Given the size and severity of the Carlton Complex fires on Washington State and private lands, the Okanogan Conservation District asked Governor Inslee to include a request for a multi-jurisdiction assessment team for the Washington State and private lands. After President Obama signed

the Disaster Declaration on Aug. 11, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) began coordinating with the Okanogan Conservation District and the Forest Service to staff the Interagency BAER team. The team worked in coordination with the Forest Service BAER Teams that evaluated the impacts to US Forest Service lands in order to create a seamless evaluation of all lands burned in the Carlton Complex Fire. Monday’s meeting will explain the process used by the Interagency BAER team, the conditions the team documented on the land within the burn area, and the recommended actions to reduce risk of additional loss of life and property from rainfall and snowmelt on the landscape. The complete report of the Interagency BAER Team is available at www.okanogancd. org/Carlton Agencies participating in this process include the Federal Emergency Management Agency,

U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, National Weather Service, Washington Department of Agriculture, National Resource Conservation Service, Farm Service Agency, Bureau of Reclamation, Yakama Nation, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Okanogan, Spokane, Kittitas, Skagit, Underwood, Cascadia and Whatcom Conservation Districts, County Government and others. The mission of the Okanogan Conservation District is to help cooperators achieve their conservation goals. The Okanogan Conservation District is a local governmental entity formed as a sub-division of Washington State under RCW 89.08. We provide voluntary, non-regulatory services to landowners and lessees in Okanogan County to address natural resource concerns. All District services are provided free of charge without discrimination.

the staff to do things, those fees need to rise along with what we pay staff to do them. “If we don’t have interest in it, I don’t want to do it. But it’s a way to fairly increase revenues to balance expenses.” Plumb said he would include that as part of his budget proposal. He also asked Attwood to look into whether $500 was a hard limit on fines for violating city ordinances, or if that something the city could change. “The $500 limit has been in place for as long as I can remember,” Plumb said. “I don’t think it’s the same kind of deterrent that it used to be. We should look at that rate too; people that are not following our ordinances might need to be a little more motivated.”

FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS After a separate public hearing, the council approved revised language that brings its flood hazard code in line with state and federal mandates. “FEMA, through the Department of Ecology, reviews all flood hazard ordinances throughout the state to ensure consistency with the state regulations,” said permit administrator Christian Johnson. “The state has imposed itself as the supreme authority on flood management for flood insurance purposes. How the state has chosen to implement that is by having local jurisdictions adopt rules that are consistent, or not less restrictive, than the state’s.” These affect both city management and insurance issues. The changes in the current regulation were mostly to provide clarity, but Johnson pointed out one change “It did provide provisions for non-farm houses in the flood way,” Johnson said. “Before we had no allowance for houses in the flood way that was not a farm house on a farm. Now, there is a process where an owner, for reconstruction, can request of the city, and the city can seek concurrence with Ecology for that. “There is a difference between farm houses and non-farm houses because they are in different parts of the statues ... if they are on active farms.” “My only concern was the impact on homeowners in the

different flood plains,” Olson said. “Does this take away anything they can currently do?” “Currently with our current regulations, if a home was to be substantially damaged (in a flood plain), they would be prohibited from rebuilding,” Johnson said. “With the inclusion of this language, there is a process where they would have the opportunity to rebuild or replace a substantially damaged house that is already in the flood plain.” Olson asked if that process would be an expensive or onerous one to a homeowner. “It requires a lot of planning,” Johnson said, citing examples such as raising the level of the ground floor. “It is a lot more technical than a normal residential construction... There are additional costs and less options (on foundation design). So it’s more expensive.” The council unanimously approved the modified regulations (council member Jill Vugteveen was absence - excused - from the meeting).

MAYOR’S CHALLENGE To celebrate the renewal of the football rivalry between Tonasket and Oroville high schools on Oct. 10, Plumb read a proclamation that included a challenge to Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth. “The mayor challenges the Oroville mayor to a friendly wager of two boxes of apples from respective companies that are in their cities to the winning football team’s city,” he read as part of the proclamation. If accepted, the winning mayor would also receive a brass bell donated by the Gazette-Tribune, representing the traditional Oroville-Tonasket “Bell Game,” to be housed in the winning city’s City Hall for the year. REPORTS • Olson discussed a meeting with representatives of the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy park that included he, Plumb, City Planner Kurt Danison and an engineer from Varela and Associates that he said went better than he had anticipated. The meeting was set up to discuss the upcoming combination project that will build a new sidewalk on Whitcomb Avenue from Sixth Street in town all the way to the park, including a pedestrian

bridge across Bonaparte Creek. That will end the necessity of having to cross the creek on the busy US-97 bridge, which only has a narrow shoulder for pedestrians to use. “I was expecting a committee of seven,” Olson said. “There were easily 20 plus people. It was a very positive reaction from the Legacy group. Their support, the ideas were wonderful. “Varela did a nice job of laying things out. I look forward to the way it’s moving forward.” He added that he was also pleased with the willingness of the two affected businesses on that route, Shannon’s and Whistler’s restaurants, to participate. • Police Chief Rob Burks said that the city of Liberty Lake is going to donate a two used police cars to Tonasket. “They got the OK to get some new cars,” Burks said. “They’re going to give us two Crown Vics, 2008, 80,000 or less miles, fully decked out except for radio. They even said they would put new tires on them before sending them. “They felt sorry for us. We’ll find out for sure what’s going on in October after they are able to surplus them. They will be better than two of the cars we have right now.”

AUCTION RESULTS Attwood said that the city brought in more than $13,000 at its surplus auction the previous weekend. That included more than $10,500 for items offloaded by Public Works; $3,000 for three old police cars; and $10 City Hall surplus. The council next meets on Tuesday, Oct. 14, at 7:00 p.m.

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OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

Juvenile escapes detention facility

APPLE BINS TELL A STORY

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Not only do these apple bins tell a story that apple harvest is in full swing in the valley, but the various names on the bins remind us of the many growers’ cooperatives that once dominated the Oroville economy. Now Appleway and Oro are part of Gold Digger Apples Inc., one of the biggest employers in the area, especially at harvest time.

Thompson teaching kick boxing to those wanting to stay fit THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – Nathan Thompson, a professional kick boxer and MMA fighter, is putting his knowledge to use training those who want to get in shape at the Oroville Fitness Center, located at at 811 Appleway St. Thompson, a graduate of Oroville High School, has been training in his sport for six years to become a professional athlete. He says kick boxing is a great cardio exercise. “I’m really flexible and can make adjustments to the program to fit my client’s needs. It’s great for keeping everybody working and

sweating,” he said, adding that he is giving the community a new look at fitness through his program. Thompson is putting together his classes at Oroville Fitness, but would like to start his own exercise studio some day. Thompson said he can have classes of six to eight people. “The goal is to have classes every hour. “Contact me at 509-5603054 or come on in and we will find a program that works for you,” he said. Thompson’s next professional fight is scheduled for Nov. 15 at Northern Quest Casino on Spokane.

OKANOGAN - A 15-yearold Brewster boy escaped from the Juvenile Detention Center in Okanogan on Monday, Sept. 22, and was on the loose for about 10 hours before being re-apprehended, according to the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Offfice. At around 1:35 p.m. the Juvenile Detention Center reported that they just had an escape from their facility. The 15-year-old suspect was being led to the court in the Juvenile Center when he pulled away from one of the Juvenile staff before he could handcuff him. He ran down the stairs and was able to exit the building. Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said that Juvenile staff chased the suspect towards town but lost sight of him as he was running towards the Okanogan Chevron on Main Street. A search of the area was done by several law enforcement officers in the area but they were unable to locate him. Rogers said that dispatch received a call from an Okanogan Postal Employee that she was getting into her vehicle when the

suspect came up to the vehicle and attempted to get in on the other side, offering to pay her $500. She refused and the suspect ran off. Rogers said that Dispatch received a call at about 6:15 p.m. from an employee at the Okanogan Pharmacy who reported that she had gone out to her vehicle to leave and a 15 or 16 year old Hispanic male was hiding in her vehicle. He had a green shirt over his face and told her he would hurt her if she didn’t drive him to the casino. That suspect was later identified to be the escapee, Rogers said. The employee drove towards the Sheriff ’s Office and as she pulled into the church parking lot the suspect jumped out of the vehicle and ran down towards the Okanogan High School. Deputies continued their search and at around 11:00 p.m. they received a report of a black Chevrolet Tahoe driving back and forth from the Casino and the Okanogan Inn. Deputies went to the Okanogan Inn and found the vehicle. Rogers said they

received permission to search the room but did not find the suspect there. The owner of the vehicle then gave Deputies permission to search her vehicle and when they did they located the suspect hiding on the floor in the back seat. He resisted arrest but was taken into custody. Deputies learned that the owner of the vehicle did not know anyone was in it. Apparently the owner’s daughter had gone out and met with the suspect and brought him back to the apartment and let him hide in the vehicle. The suspect was arrested and transported back to Juvenile and booked. Rogers said he will be facing additional charges for the escape and possible charges for threatening the driver at the Okanogan Pharmacy. Also arrested at the scene was the owner’s daughter, a 16-yearold Okanogan girl who said she had helped the suspect and let him hide in the vehicle. She was arrested for Rendering Criminal Assistance 2nd Degree. She was also transported to Juvenile and booked.

Two injured in rollover accident THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET – Two north county residents were injured when a tire blew on their pickup truck and caused the vehicle to rollover about four miles south of Tonasket on SR97. On Wednesday, Sept. 24 around 6: 30 p.m. the truck,

driven by Thomas J. Silverthorn, 19, Tonasket, was heading northbound when the tire blew out and the vehicle lost control. The truck hit the guardrail, rolled over and landed at the bottom of an embankment, according to the report filed by Washington State Patrol Trooper Lovell. Silverthorn and his passenger,

Tyler J. Armstrong, 21, Oroville, were both wearing seat belts at the time. They were also transported by ambulance to North Valley Hospital in Tonasket for treatment of their injuries, according to Lovell. Lovell listed the cause of the accident as defective equipment. No charges are being filed.

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OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Selecting a new police chief is critical to a community It’s surprising how quiet it has been in Oroville and Tonasket the last few years – no major controversies between the police department, the council or the public. In Oroville, much of the credit for that goes to Clay Warnstaff who has been chief of police since being appointed by the mayor in 2008, and in Tonasket to Chief Rob Burks. In the past Oroville has had temporary chiefs, who didn’t really seem to want to be chiefs and chiefs that seemed to generate controversy and an “us versus them” attitude. In Tonasket one of the first stories I covered 27 years ago required a trip down to Okanogan to get a comment from a former police chief who had been on trial for misdeeds. Talk about being thrown into the fire – I knew nothing about him and expected him to tell me to take a hike (or worse). Fortunately for me he was ready and willing to make a few comments and made things a lot easier on a green reporter. Then, again in Tonasket, at one time it seemed like the then chief was more concerned about amassing SWAT gear than good old-fashioned community policing. This chief was well before his time – buying up surplus military gear for his police Out of department. My Mind Nowadays it seems like the big municipal Gary A. DeVon forces can’t get enough surplus military gear. In some cities the line between the police force and a paramilitary seems to be getting blurred, especially in those big municipal police forces. But for Tonasket back then and today it didn’t seem necessary for doing the community policing most of us expect from our rural police departments. Clay and his predecessor, the late Randy Wheat, seemed to get the job done without all the added drama. Clay is retiring (how did that happen, didn’t we graduate the same class? Oh right, he already retired from the Marines). Oroville now has the task of finding a new chief, someone who will bring the same steady hand, while keeping his/her sense of humor. While I think Clay was popular in the community and fair, I’m sure not everyone liked him – especially those who tried to break the law. That’s bound to happen in a certain jobs (ask me about it). One where you enforce the law would be especially hard – but it’s not a popularity contest. Let’s hope that whomever Oroville’s mayor chooses for its next chief will bring some of the same qualities shown by our retiring chief and that we can continue to have a relatively quiet and safe community to live in. Even though controversy sells newspapers, just ask some of the former Oroville and Tonasket mayors who used to tell me that all the time. We would truly rather not sit through council meetings where arguing about the police department takes up most of the meeting and accomplishes nothing.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Destination Sales Tax, modification Dear Editor, On July 1, 2008, the destination sales tax went into effect. The destination sales tax was set up so, if a retailer (seller) sold something (purchaser), and the item(s) was to be delivered to the purchaser in a different city or county, the retailer would charge the sales tax applicable to the delivered city/county and then pay that sales tax to that city/county. If the purchaser was to take the item(s) with them (not have it delivered by a third party), then the sales tax would be determined by the tax applicable to the location of the seller

and the sales tax would be paid to the seller’s city/county. This distribution of the sales tax to the destination city/county was long overdue, but it fell short of what should have been in the law. Since each transaction has a buyer and a seller, both of whom bring benefits to the transaction, why is 100% of the sales tax being paid to the destination city/county, when the selling city/county is an equal party to the transaction, but the selling city/county receives none of the applicable sales tax. Right now the destination city/county gets 100% of the sales tax and the selling city/county gets 0%. Is it not more equitable for both the purchasing city/county and the selling city/county to split the sales tax equally, 50/50.

Splitting the sales tax 50/50, as to the purchaser and the seller locations, can easily be accomplished today with computers that are doing the work anyway. We all have 9 digit zip codes for our street, city/county address. (It is on our driver’s license.) I suggest the Washington State Senate and/or House, make this modification to the sales tax distribution without any delay, so that all of the parties, the purchasing city/county and the selling city/county, to the transaction get an equal and equitable share of the sales tax. The sales tax charged should be based upon the seller’s location, to keep it simple. Mike Lantz Retired Tax Attorney Edmonds, Washington

Public power at work

OPINION BY STEVE HUSTON, PRESIDENT; ERNIE BOLTZ, VICE PRESIDENT; DAVID WOMACH, SECRETARY

COMMISSIONERS, PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF OKANOGAN COUNTY

The Carlton Complex Fire, burning more than 256,000 acres (400 square miles) of land and destroying approximately 300 homes, was the worst firestorm in Washington State history. For Okanogan PUD, the fire destroyed 341 miles of distribution infrastructure, 60 miles of fiber and 22 miles of transmission infrastructure. Power outages in the south end of Okanogan included the towns of Pateros, Twisp, Winthrop and surrounding areas. Approximately 3,600 Okanogan PUD customers and 3,500 Okanogan Electric

Cooperative customers were without power. Clearly, this was one of the worst disasters to ever hit Okanogan County. During the first six days, Okanogan County PUD line crews and support personnel, along with line crews from Chelan PUD, Douglas PUD, Ferry PUD, Grant PUD and BPA, reconstructed 12 miles of transmission line and about 100 miles of distribution line in order to restore power to approximately 80 percent of the customers affected by the outage. During the following two weeks, through excellent coordination and the unwavering sense of urgency of all PUD line crews and support personnel, the remaining distribution facilities were reconstructed and power was restored to everyone affected by the outage. Virtually 100 percent of Okanogan PUD employees and 45 employees from our

neighboring Public Power Utilities worked tirelessly to make sure power was restored as fast and as safely as possible. This is Public Power at Work. The commitment to serve, and the dedication and spirit that brought electricity to our farms and rural communities in the 1930s, is alive and well in 2014. It is that same commitment, dedication and spirit that we see demonstrated not just in emergencies but on a daily basis within Okanogan County PUD, and those same values being shared by our neighboring PUDs, that make us proud to be a PUD commissioner. October 6th – 10th is Public Power Week. Please take a moment and reflect on what our lives would be without electricity. Life in Okanogan County is truly better because we are served by Public Power.

Why I admire Muslims OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIOPOLITICAL COMMENTATOR

Ayaan Hirsi Ali said in a recent speech at Yale that criticism of Islam is not Islamophobia, fear of criticizing Islam is Islamophobia. She’s dead right. Ms. Ali should know. She was genitally mutilated and child-married as a young Muslim girl. She endures Muslim death threats. The predatory Muslim/American lobby intimidated disgraceful Brandeis University into revoking her honorary degree for daring to be critical of Islam. Spare me the springloaded ‘peace loving Muslims’ speech. Yea they are many, but nay they’re evidently not enough in Bill Slusher percentage to make any comprehensive hard stand against murderous Muslim terrorist elements. If the ‘nice Muslims’ were so prevalent and dedicated they would have neutralized their terror traders long ago, just as mostly Christian Americans did the Ku Klux Klan. A friend for decades is the grandson of a revered Palestinian leader who fought the British through Partition. Oxford educated and American now, he nonetheless personifies the semi-humorous bromide: Radical Muslims want to kill infidels. Moderate Muslims want radical Muslims to kill infidels. Even my refined friend says Palestinians will out-populate Israelis and force them from Palestine. Where the Jews will be forced to is not clear. Or perhaps, in a macabre sense, it is. Still, I don’t ‘hate’ Muslims, I even admire aspects of them. Indeed... there is much we can learn from them. Witness: Muslims know exactly what they want (Allah-mandated world domination under their theo-political aegis), and they are groupcommitted to achieving that if they have to kill everyone else. Ask them. They’ve been

attempting to do so for at least the last 50 years. Any list of terrorist mass murder incidents in the last half century is smothered with anti-western Muslim perpetrators. Too many Muslims maintain that their god mandates the extermination of anyone not equally blind loyal to that god, moreover that their god will perpetually reward they who kill ‘infidels’. Infidels, here, means everyone who isn’t diving onto a prayer rug five times a day. Too great a preponderance of Muslims will happily kill millions of infidels out of their ignorant religious bigotry. Call it retroactive ideological abortion, for there is little difference in either theme nor scale. Still... don’t underestimate Muslims just because masses of them are propagandized from birth to be mindless, unthinking Allahzombies. While they train their children who their perceived enemy is without doubt, we train ours to be piously tolerant of those who are trying to kill us. How’s that likely to end? While whole nations of Muslims teach their young to fight, we pretend political religious gospel about sensitivity. As a PC-whipped America, we teach that training our youth in skill with guns is somehow bad. They’re teaching their kids AK-47 handling, and we’re teaching ours that a grammar school boy who makes a finger gun must be vilified, criminalized and thrown out of school. What... indefensible... ignorance and bigotry on... both... sides. We fuss about ‘bullies’ and try at every turn to de-masculate America, to reduce it to some assertiveness-void, fairy-tale PC kindergarten where all women, minorities, LGTBs, animals, vegetables and anyone else are not ‘offended’ according to whatever shifting arbitrary standard as may move them. Muslims teach their group young to prevail in what they believe, while our PC public education system preposterously teaches ours not to be ‘judgmental,, that no one is wrong, everyone’s a winner. As a society, we too have been brainwashed for 50 years, but in the deadly, corrosive, corrupting and toxic

religion of political correctness. We have as a society been psychologically child-abused for decades (mostly by sheltered academic noncombatants) to pretend away the core reality that the capacity for and select exercise of superior force is the final arbiter of all things. Muslims... nyeh... they’re not so confused. Love ‘em or loathe ‘em, Muslims know there is a cultural war underway on the planet Earth, virulent, aggressive Islam vs. naive infidels, and never the twain shall meet as Allah forbids same. Muslims are in the fight to win one for their Gipper, whatever that takes. As a pampered, protected, political-correctness-brainwashed society... we’ve forgotten what winning means. We’ve deliberately demonized the whole concept, so, of inevitable course, we’re losing, internationally and domestically. We’re fatally PC-whipped. We are thus destined to collide with reality the hard way, soon. With our moronic border policies, we will see bombings, kidnappings, mass killings and other Muslim invasion in heartland America. It’s already happening from Boston bombings to an Oklahoma beheading. Many will die before we realize and recover from our destructive political-correctness psychosis, and once again become a constitutional society of un-politically whipped, unambiguous, unapologetic... Americans. We can... and we’d bloody well better... make a beginning this November by flushing and replacing every political-correctness ‘mullah’ corrupting our political infrastructure. That’s not all our elected, but it’s too damned many. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his newly reprinted down-and-dirty Southern murder mystery SHEPHERD OF THE WOLVES. (Amazon, cmppg.com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@ live.com.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Need to use extra caution where cougars are spotted The calendar says it is officially fall. Our little weather station says we’ve had about a quarter inch of rain for the month of September and most of it during the three days of light drizzle. I guess it sneaks in during the night. Cougars are becoming very brave, finding their way into neighborhoods that are filled with children, adults and pets. The latest I know of is the area between the county road and Blackler Road near the Jack Hughes residence, at the former Grace Naggy home. Susan Smith lives in the Naggy house and the cougar had one of her dogs in his mouth and killed it. So, use caution in the neighborhood. The animal will most likely return, in search of more prey. Beanblossom’s aren’t happy with the deer that have found bountiful food in their pumpkin patch.

We took a day off and went to Coulee Dam to view the laser light show. It is quite changed from the first showings when it was just colored lights on the dam water. Then it was laser lights on a smaller scale and now it is pretty spectacular, with the water even being turned on to make a better background. We were delighted to receive a phone call from our Brazilian boy, Marco Louback who is in process of making another move back to the Boston area, from Brazil, where he has a business of selling and installing granite counter tops. A second week of yard sales is about a week-end too much. But I repeat, you meet the nicest folks there. Each year a lot of the workers at the United Methodist Church, say “this is too much work for what we get out of it” and when

the next year comes around, here we go again. Nancy (Gadberry) and her husband have moved back to Oroville, after retirement, into what was her parents’ home. Going into the third week of a nonfunctioning refrigerator, but we’re getting closer to having ice in the door again. How deprived can one get? I remember when I didn’t have any water in the house, much less ice. But I can’t say that I liked it. The Halloween decorations and real live pumpkins are reminding us it’s time to buy up a little extra candy for the trick or treater’s . A lot of the apples are huge this year. I should have more free time now, as the Mariner’s are finished losing baseball games for another season but have won a few more this year than last. And

we utter the same words, again. “Maybe on Monday nights at Grange, where she they’ll do better next year.” played a mean game of pinochle. Vivian Emry and some family memThe older we get, the fewer things bers have been at her seem worth waiting in line Molson house, having an for! estate sale, as she is movGood News: Beverly ing to make her home perStorm is home. Resting, getmanently with daughter, ting medications adjusted etc. Joannie, on Vashon Island. With winter coming she will She moved to Molson sevhave more time to rest, as the eral years ago from Oroville, yard work will come to an where she and her husband end. You can come back to opened a restaurant, in their pinochle, Bev, if you promise home and he continued on not to scare us again. publishing the newspaper in Also, Pat Robbins is home, Oroville. On his retirement, THIS & THAT out and about, and will have and much too soon death, more time to just watch the Joyce Emry she has continued on, alone. river flow past her lovely She fit right in with the comhome and get back to some munity, making a multitude of friends, card playing, instead of golf. especially the Grange “doings” and it Young Noah Hilderbrand had the miswas a difficult decision to make, but as fortune of taking a fall, while out in the with many, the years began leaving their wilds, hiking or whatever boys do on a mark and to be alone, in a fairly remote nice fall day, breaking his arm. Surgery area, was out of the question, any longer. was to be done in Omak. It is a most difficult parting with your This is not news, as Bob Hirst has cherished collections of “stuff” and she a habit of taking falls. He didn’t break is doing it most gracefully, saying, “you anything, but had to spend a bit of time have to do what you have to do.” She will in the hospital, again. be sincerely missed, by many, especially Until next week.

NVCS offers diverse lineup of fall classes

HITTING THE TRAIL

SUBMITTED BY CYNTHIA GROUND, D.C. NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Photo by Steffi Fuchs

Paul Fuchs gets a chance to see what things look like atop Richard’s horse during the Pioneer Trail Walk.

Fifth graders enjoy pioneer trail walk and ride SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Here we are at the beginning of October and fall has settled in (we think). We are still having some beautiful sunny days with cool to cold mornings with fog. Some of the Hilltop trees are turning colors and are truly beautiful. Soon they will all be red, orange and yellow. The fifth grade classes of Oroville elementary under the guidance of their teachers Kelly King and John Ragsdale met at the old Bartroff Homestead on Nealey Road last Friday. The classes have been studying about the pioneers and the Oregon Trail. Kay Sibley was a guest speaker to the classes prior

Calendar submission deadline Oct. 12 SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

We are currently working on the fifth HOMETOWN SOLDIER CALENDAR! Throughout these six years there has been much military activity and, now, a third war has begun in that time span. It is our hope that this new calendar will buoy and sustain our area’s military families through this marathon of military action. When businesses in our communities display the calendar, we all celebrate together one of our own throughout the month. It’s a great way to collectively say “Thank you for your service.” What a huge boost to a family’s morale to know that the community is backing them in spirit. “Moms go through so much

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HILLTOP COMMENTS to the walk to Lost Lake. The students were dressed as pioneers wearing clothes made by Mary Ann May, formally of Oroville, now living in Vancouver. It was quite a sight. The horses were hooked up to the covered wagon with Wagon Master, Don Super of the Methow Valley in charge. Laura Super was on horseback escorting the wagon along with Richard, who was dressed like a Union Soldier. The 37 students were divided into groups with some walking and others riding in the wagon. At the Homestead, now owned by David and Maria Covarrubius, the students were given a drink , provided by David and Maria. The entire trip would take all day. This is a trip enjoyed by the adults and children alike. They

BLUE STAR MOTHERS on so many levels having us in the military that this (calendar) is one giant perk for them,” says an soldier who likes knowing that the funds being raised from these calendars go towards helping moms and family in the event of a military oriented need, either in celebration or tribulation. Calendar recognition connects our soldiers with home. An airman says “It’s nice to know you’re thought of while you’re away and it’s interesting to see what other people we grew up with are up to. They’re doing some pretty cool stuff.” It means a great deal knowing people are thinking of them because of the calendar while they are away. Local faces appear on each page as you flip through the calendar. Those faces and family names connect home-

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towns to their family still living in the community. Familiarity makes the conversation about military and support flow more easily to that family. It also underscores the reality that our community has sent many soldiers to serve! 1% of our nation’s population currently serves in the military. Statistically, then, there are 100 serving from the North Valley alone. It’d be great to have 100 photos submitted this year! The deadline for this year’s Hometown Soldier Calendar is Oct. 12. Families should submit 1-3 photos of their active duty soldier (defined as “Receiving a military pay check, deployed or not”). Send photos of your soldier, airman, sailor, marine, or guard in uniform (formal, at work, or play) to ncw.bluestars@ yahoo.com. Photos should be above 640x480 pixels in size. Rank, Name, Job, Base, and Hometown must accompany the photo.

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look forward to the next trip with new fifth graders. I recognized a couple of pioneers and said hello to Jet MCoy and Bowe McKinney. The Friday evening BINGO Nights in October are the Oct. 3 and Oct. 17. All are welcome. Get your game cards for $10 and enjoy the 10 games. You can purchase additional cards each game. Don’t forget to bring snacks to share at break time. Attention all you Pinochle Players the Games will begin on Monday, Oct. 13 at 7p.m. Bring your friends, neighbors, relatives, and snacks and enjoy the evening. Tony, I know you can hardly wait for this to begin. Ha! The Havillah Lutheran Church will be hosting the annual Harvest Supper on Saturday, Oct. 25 starting with Fellowship at 4:30 p.m. and serving from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Bring your favorite salad or dessert to share. This supper is one of the best each, year, don’t miss it. All are welcome. Until next week.

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Brisk, energizing fall mornings have arrived. And with them come more opportunities to get outdoors, explore, and learn something new and interesting. North Valley Community Schools would like to make some suggestions along those lines. Geology and Gold Mine Tour :North Central Washington has a rich history of gold mining, as evidenced by the many aging tunnels and mining structures still visible nearly everywhere. The pioneers didn’t find it all. If prospecting interests you, or geology in general for that matter, this is the class for you. After taking this class looking at rocks will no longer just be looking at rocks. You will learn the geological principles of mineral deposit formation and be able to recognize which are likely to be gold

Transportation and nutrition programs to continue SUBMITTED BY JAMES GUTSCHMIDT PRESIDENT, OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Jennifer, the Executive Directer at OCTN stated unequivocally, “There is no way I’m going to discontinue the transportation and nutrition programs. They will continue.” That was in response to the rumors that they might shut down. I guess when rumors fly, it pays to go to the source. During last Thursday’s meeting of the Okanogan County Senior Citizens Association, the entire Executive Board either resigned, or were determined to be without standing as they were not

NORTH VALLEY POOL LEAGUE Pool league getting organized for November opener SUBMITTED BY GAI WISDOM NORTH VALLEY POOL LEAGUE

Off on yet another year! We did the organizational meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 24 and there were no big surprises, but much information. All officers will remain the same and there was a financial report made. Because of the closures of a couple of business we were worried about not having enough tables for our teams. That problem has been solved thanks

THE LEARNING TREE bearing. Then, you will tour a working underground gold mine. Catch the Crush: Autumn weather brings the grapes to peak ripeness. It’s time to make wine. Tour Esther Bricques Winery and let Linda and Steve show you how wine is made, starting from the ground up. Esther Bricques is a “ground to glass” winery. You will get to see many varieties of grapes being grown right here in the Okanogan Valley. If you’re lucky you may get to sample a few right off the vine. If you are really lucky you’ll get to sample some juice from the freshly crushed grapes. There is simply nothing like the experience of

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS delegates. The proposed bylaw amendments were summarily round filed by a vote of eight to three of the sitting delegates. A special meeting will take place this Thursday at the Okanogan Senior Center at 10 a.m. in order to elect a new Executive Board from the delegates in attendance. All Association meetings are open to the members and the public. So feel free to attend, if you are so inclined. Roberta Cole will be showing pictures and recounting her recent European river cruise next Tuesday at 11 a.m. at the Center. to America’s Family Grill. They are willing to come on board, extend their hours on Wednesday, and accommodate our teams. We appreciate their participation and expect our teams and players to do the same. There has been a committee formed to explore the idea of having our banquet on a weekend night. We want feed-back on this. You can contact Rick Rickerson or Bill Nicholson with your thoughts regarding this. Our next meeting will be at the Oroville American Legion on Wednesday, Oct. 15, at 7 p.m. At that time all team rosters, home tables and monies will be turned in. We start play on the first Wednesday in November. Your league secretary needs time to get tables and teams and a schedule together. This is a real stubby-pencil head-scratcher for her and her staff. Your league invites your thoughts and participation. We need all the help we can get from teams and sponsors. Come on out to the next meeting and let’s get ready to Play Pool!

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juice from freshly crushed wine grapes. Newly harvested grapes will be crushed and the fermentation process started during this tour. Observe how wine is made and see the process ongoing in wines at different points of fermentation. After the tour, sample some of the excellent wines produced at this winery. This class has been one of my all-time personal favorites since I discovered NVCS in 2008. I take it again every chance I get. Because of this I would like to offer a challenge to fellow attendees. To anyone attending this class who can explain the name Esther Bricques (without asking Linda) I will offer a free Chiropractic treatment (at Oroville Chiropractic Clinic). Are you up to the challenge? To sign up for these classes and more call Ellen at (509) 476-2011. NVCS is seeking a board member to fill an open position on the NVCS board of directors. Are you community minded? Have fresh ideas? Would like to contribute to the running of this valuable community resource? Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011.

Saturday, Oct. 11, we will be holding another Breakfast Buffet from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. All proceeds go to support our Senior Citizens. Mark your calendar. We are, not too soon, reminding you to look for items for our Christmas Bazaar, the first week in December. Search your closet, crank up your crafting, look for items to sell or donate, and plan on being there. Questions? Contact Betty Hall, our bazaar chairperson. Pinochle results from last Saturday: Door Prize: Boots Emry. Most pinochles: Betty Hall. High man: Leonard Paulson. High woman: Danny Wieterick More next week.

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BOXTROLLS THURS.-FRI.OCT.16–17.MAT.OCT 18 $6

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GONE GIRL

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A WALK AMONG THE TOMBSTONES

R 114m DRAMA/CRIME/MYSTERY STARRING LIAM NEESON, DAN STEVENS, DAVID HARBOUR. FRI. 6:45,9:45. SAT.*1:30, 4:30, 7:45. SUN.*3:30, 6:45. WKDAYS: 6:45

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1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVÀOPLV*UDWHG 1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGÀOPVZLWKRXWWKHLU own parent. Photo ID required.


OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE HONORING THE FALLEN

OVOC season getting underway BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus is ramping up its 2014-15 season as the date for its first fall concert draws near. The community-based group has already begun rehearsing for the year, but OVOC President Karen Schimpf said those interested in either orchestra or chorus are free to join at any time. “OVOC provides an opportunity to perform,” Schimpf said. “There are no auditions required for orchestra or chorus, which a lot of people don’t realize.” OVOC’s mission is to present fine music to county residents, provide opportunities for county musicians to perform, and to promote music education and appreciation. The Season Premier concert is Sunday, Oct. 19, 3:00 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center (PAC) at Omak High School, 20 South Cedar Street. Other concerts include the Christmas concert on Dec. 7, the Family concert on Feb. 8 and the Spring concert on Mar. 22. Rehearsals for those interested in performing are ongoing. Orchestra rehearsals are on Mondays at 7:15 p.m., with Jonathan McBride conducting.

Chorus rehearsals are at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, conducted by Don Pearce. All meet in the Omak High School band room.

STAGE WORK The OVOC’s largest production is its annual spring musical. This year’s play, scheduled for May, is “Into the Woods.” A film version of the story stars Johnny Depp and Meryl Streep. “We’re tying it into a fundraiser if we pull it together the way we want to,” Schimpf said. “It’s basically a fairy tale, and uses fairy tales. It shows the dark side of things, more true to the original than to a Disney-type film. “It’s about people, their frailties, imperfections, meanness, and kindness.” She said it is more demanding than most past musicals have been. “We won’t be using an orchestra for this one,” Schimpf said. “We’ll be using a combo within the set; the set will actually extend into what’s been the orchestra pit.” Auditions will take place in November. The OVOC will again sponsor a production of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” at the Community Cultural Center of

Tonasket on Saturday, Oct. 25. “There will be audience participation, so we hope that lots of people will come ... dressed up,” Schimpf said. “And of course we have our costume rental at the Courtyard (28 Main Street, Omak) with Susan Graves every Wednesday. “She’ll be there the week before Halloween.”

DONORS Ticket prices, which haven’t been raised since 1999, only cover a portion of the costs of putting shows. The concert series costs about $4,000 per event to put on, while the musicals typically cost in the range of $30,000. “We really appreciate those who support us,” Schimpf said. “Our donors and sponsors are very consistent, which is wonderful.” OVOC has received grants this year from the Okanogan Family Faire, Icicle Fund, Community Foundation, Washington Arts Foundation. Ticket prices are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, $8 for youth and free for children under age 12. They can be purchased online at brownpaperbag.com or at Oroville Pharmacy, Roy’s Pharmacy in Tonasket, Corner Shelf in Omak or Brewster Drug.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Sandy Vaughn to Perform at Esther Bricques OROVILLE –Sandy Vaughn brings her talents along with some of her new songs to her next performance at Esther Bricques Winery’s Tasting Room, Thursday, Oct. 2. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., with music to follow soon after. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Oroville Library Book Sale OROVILLE - The Friends of the Oroville Library will be holding their semi-annual book sale on Friday, Oct. 3 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, Oct. 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come enjoy a large selection of books at great prices in a warm and friendly atmosphere. Hardbacks, 50 cents; paperbacks, 25 cents; movies and books on tape and gift sets available. Located at the Oroville Public Library, 1276 Main St.

Molson Bingo MOLSON - BINGO at the Molson Grange Hall on Friday, Oct. 3 and Friday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. $10 Fee.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Oct. 4 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. For more info call 509-476-2096.

Blessing of the Animals OROVILLE - Trinity Episcopal Church Parish, 604 Central, will hold a Blessings of the Animals on Sunday, Oct. 5 from noon to 3:30 p.m. Bring your fourlegged, feathered or finned special friend for a blessing, a treat and a gift. Bring your children for face painting. You are also

encouraged to bring your musical instrument and join in. Please keep pets on a leash.

Catch the Crush OROVILLE - It’s time to make wine. Tour Esther Bricques Winery and let Linda and Steve Colvin show you how wine is made, starting from the ground up on Sunday, Oct. 5 from 11 a.m.–2 p.m. in one session. Esther Bricques is a “ground to glass” winery. Sample grapes right off the vine, participate in harvest, crushing and fermenting, maybe even sample a few wines in the works. To register call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011.

Childbirth Education Series. TONASKET - North Valley Hospital’s Childbirth Education Series, a series of four classes to prepare expectant families are held Monday evenings every other month – February, April, June, August and December. These free classes are held in the orientation room (Hospital receptionist will direct attendees) from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The October sessions are Oct. 6, 13, 20 and 27. The classes are being presented by René Todd, RN, MSN, OB Nurse; Pamela Thacker, RN, NVH OB Department Coordinator; Jackie Daniels, EMT, Car Seat Safety Educator and Amber Hall, registered dietitian. For more information contact: Childbirth Education Coordinator Todd at 509-486-3140 (leave a message) or at home at 509-486-1377 or email renetodd@nvhospital.org or ob@nvhospital.org.

Film Looks at Dam Building Era TONASKET Cascade Columbia Fisheries Enhancement Group is sponsoring a free screening of DamNation, a film that explores the era of dam building in our nation that left nearly no stream free from damming, as well as the current movement towards the removal of dams that are derelict, provide no public benefit, or are barriers to fish passage. The screening is at the Tonasket Community Cultural Center on Wednesday, Oct. 22

starting at 7 p.m. The film will be followed by a panel discussion bringing some of the concepts from the movie into more of a local perspective.Check out ccfeg. org for more info.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website www.gazette-tribune.com.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Sunday, Sept. 28 was national Gold Star Mother’s Day. A Gold Star Mother is a one who lost a child during service in one of the U.S. Armed Forces. The local chapter of Blue Star Mothers placed 60 gold stars on the plaques of the fallen at the Tonasket Legacy Memorial and hoisted a Blue Star banner flag on Saturday morning. The gold stars and flag will be on display until Veterans Day, Nov. 11. Above, the American flag casts its shadow on a wall at the Legacy Park, where stars memorialize fallen service members.

Moser joins new Family Health Clinic in Omak THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OMAK - Family Health Centers is welcoming Diana Moser, ARNP to their new Omak clinic. Moser studied nursing and graduated with a BSN and practiced for 20 years and then attended the University of Washington to obtain her Masters in Nursing as a Family Nurse Practitioner. After having practiced in both rural and urban cities, she prefers rural health because of the excessive need and strong community spirit. In her spare time, she enjoys gardening, reading, beading, dancing and singing. She loves being in this part of the state and the simple way of life. She also appreciates the family atmosphere between the administration and medical staff at Family Health Centers. “We are very pleased to have Diana Moser as part of our qualified professional staff.

Tonasket lines up homecoming events

We provide a full range of quality medical, dental, and pharmacy services. At family Health Centers, we strive for excellence as shown by our accreditation through the Joint Commission on Accreditation for Healthcare Organization (JCAHO),” reads a recent press release. This accreditation is a rigorous voluntary process in which a facility is evaluated for excellent quality care in compliance with high national standards as set by JCAHO. For more information or to make an appointment, call 509-422-5700.

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THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - Homecoming week at Tonasket High School is Oct. 6-10. Events for the week include: • Monday - Pajamas Day • Tuesday - Neon Day. Noon activity is Tug O’ War on the football field, starting off with 9th graders vs. 11th graders and 10th graders vs. 12th graders. • Wednesday - Twins Day (two or more dress up identically). Powder Puff football, 7:00 p.m. at the THS football field, cost of entry $2.00. • Thursday - Hero Day - Dress up as your favorite character or hero. • Friday - School Spirit all the way - Show your Tiger pride. Activities include homecoming parade through downtown at 1:15 p.m.; Homecoming assembly at 2:15 p.m. Booster Club barbeque begins at 5:30 p.m. Football “Bell Game” vs. Oroville begins at 7:00 p.m. with royalty presented at halftime.

Diana Moser

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PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT SUPERIOR COURT Don Arthur Moore, 67, Riverside, was found guilty Sept. 15 (jury trial) of first-degree murder (premeditated). Moore was sentenced Sept. 25 to 384 months in prison and fined $600 for the April 20, 2013 crime. Robert Wendell George, 45, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to POCS (methamphetamine). George was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1110.50 for the Jan. 30 crime. In a separate case, George pleaded guilty Sept. 16 to attempted third-degree assault and resisting arrest. He was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended and credit for time served. The sentence is to run concurrent with the above. He was fined an additional $500. Michael Daniel Valentine, 46, Omak, pleaded guilty Sept. 23 to two counts of tampering with a witness (DV) and two counts of violation of a no-contact order (DV). The court dismissed seven additional charges of violation of a no-contact order (DV). The crimes occurred between July and August. In a separate case, Valentine pleaded guilty Sept. 23 to intimidating a public servant, harassment (threats to kill) and three counts of harassment (threats to kill) (DV). The court dismissed a fourth-degree assault (DV) charge. Those crimes occurred July 7. Valentine was sentenced to a total of 38 months in prison and fined a total of $1,400. Troy Joshua Collier, 29, Calgary, pleaded guilty Sept. 23 to POCS (cocaine) and POCS (oxycodone) (lesser included of possess with intent to deliver). Collier was sentenced to 58 days in jail and fined $2,110.50. The crimes occurred July 26 at the Oroville Port of Entry. Cassandra Jo Vandeveer, 22, Oroville, pleaded guilty Sept. 23 to two counts of POCS with intent to deliver (methamphetamine and heroin) and one count of bail jumping. The court dismissed a possession of drug paraphernalia charge. Vandeveer was sentenced to 14 months in prison and fined $3,110.50. The crimes occurred on March 8 and July 29. The court found probable cause to charge Oscar Torres Perez, 37, Orondo, with second-degree murder and unauthorized removal or concealment of a body. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 13. The court found probable cause to charge Jose de Jesus Hernandez Jimenez, 42, Pateros, with seconddegree murder and unauthorized removal or concealment of a body. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 13. The court found probable cause to charge Ramon Lopez Arrellano, 45, Pateros, with second-degree murder and unauthorized removal or concealment of a body. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 13. The court found probable cause to charge Jaime M. Gomez Salazar, 38, Orondo, with second-degree murder and unauthorized removal or concealment of a body. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 13. The court found probable cause to charge Michelle Lynn Carden, 26, Omak, with attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and thirddegree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 16. The court found probable cause to charge Fletcher Clay Rickabaugh, 18, Okanogan, with residential burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 16. In a separate case, the court found probable cause to charge Rickabaugh with thirddegree assault (law enforcement officer). That crime allegedly occurred Sept. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Shawn Therese Lassila, 47, Omak, with first-degree theft and first-degree identity theft. The crimes allegedly occurred between Sept. 1 and 11. The court found probable cause to charge Travis James Holcomb, 21, Oroville, with first-degree burglary (DV), assault in violation of a no-contact order, and violation of a no-contact order. The crimes allegedly occurred Sept. 20. The court found probable cause to charge Francisco Javier Ayala, 27, Okanogan, with second-degree rape. The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 5. The court issued an arrest warrant for Ayala on Sept. 22. JUVENILE A 17-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Sept. 17 to MIP/C. The girl was sentenced to nine days in detention with credit for nine days served, and fined $100 for the May 30 crime. A 16-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded

guilty Sept. 23 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21. He was sentenced to eight days in detention with credit for eight days served, and fined $100 for the May 30 crime. A 14-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Sept. 24 to second-degree TMVWOP. The boy was sentenced to 12 days in detention with credit for two days served, 45 hours of community service and seven days confinement in a private residence. He was fined $100 for the Sept. 11 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 18. A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Sept. 24 to third-degree theft and possession of marijuana by a person under 21. She was sentenced to three days in detention with credit for three days served, and fined $100 for the May 3 and 4 crimes. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Sept. 25 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. The boy was sentenced to 20 days in detention with credit for 20 days served, and fined $100 for the July 23 crime. In a separate case, the same boy pleaded guilty Sept. 25 to POCS and possession of drug paraphernalia. The boy was sentenced to seven days in detention with credit for two days served, and fined an additional $100 for the July 25 crime. CIVIL The state Department of Labor and Industry assessed the following businesses for unpaid workers’ compensation taxes and penalties: Strandberg Transport LLC, Omak, $3,752.46; and JAC LLC, Okanogan, $843.62. The state Department of Revenue assessed Northwest Floors and Finishes Co., Oroville, $4,841.11 in unpaid taxes and penalties. DISTRICT COURT Aneesh Babu Ammanathu, 32, Omak, had a reckless driving charge dismissed. Rodney Joseph Buckmeirer, 50, Riverside, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Krystal Lee Carson, 30, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Carson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 81 days suspended, and fined $858. She also had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Quinto Michael Caru, 56, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 20, Omak, innocent of fourth-degree assault. Alvis Lewis Davidson, 39, Omak, had a charge dismissed: harassment (gross misdemeanor). Robert Curtis DeCosta Jr., 28, Omak, guilty of fourth-degree assault. DeCosta was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $783. Kevin Michael Dixon, 25, Oroville, guilty of second-degree criminal trespassing. Dixon was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $608. Monday, Sept. 22, 2014 Assault on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Fence reported cut. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Threats on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Travis James Holcomb, 21, booked for first-degree burglary (DV), fourthdegree assault (DV), violation of a no-contact order (DV) and second-degree assault (DV) (bond surrender). Destanie Talethia Daniel, 31, DOC detainer. Romero Castano Macario, 39, booked for first-degree assault. Tina Marie Caruthers, 47, booked for interfering with reporting (DV). Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014 Vehicle prowl on N. Lottie Ave. in Conconully. Harassment on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on N. Lottie Ave. in Conconully. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication on W. Central Ave.

in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Fir St. in Omak. Residence reported egged. Drugs on Maple St. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Threats on Golden St. in Oroville. One-vehicle crash on Juniper St. in Oroville. No injuries reported. David Kay Thomas, 33, booked on an FTA bench warrant for POCS and a DOC secretary’s warrant. Tifancy Lana Yallup, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Andrew Del Sanchez, 18, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV) and a probation violation. Henry John George III, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014 Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Drugs on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on N. State Frontage Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Suncrest Vue Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Blue Lake Rd. near Oroville. Garbage reported thrown over fence. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Cell phone reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Burglary on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Found property on Fir St. in Oroville. Bicycle recovered. Theft on 11th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Fir St. in Oroville. Burglary on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Joshua Ronald Bergan, 18, booked for residential burglary, seconddegree burglary, second-degree criminal trespassing, third-degree theft and two counts of seconddegree vehicle prowl. Gary Austin Vaughn, 46, booked for third-degree DWLS and obstruction. Jermaine Terron Beaver, 29, booked for third-degree malicious mischief and possession of drug paraphernalia. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 26, booked for POCS (heroin), resisting arrest, three counts of distribution of a controlled substance (heroin) (within 1,000 feet of a school district), an FTA bench warrant for POCS, a DOC detainer and a Lincoln County FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Janet Lynn Charley, 47, booked on three OCSO FTA warrants: DUI, third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation; and a Douglas County FTA warrant for DUI. James Theo Henriksen Jr., 53, court commitment for DUI. Thomas Larry Moore Jr., 46, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Brandon Shea Marchand, 40, booked for third-degree DWLS. Carlos Negrete, no middle name listed, 23, court commitment for DUI. Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 Domestic dispute on Jackson St. in Omak.

Two reports of malicious mischief on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Laser pointer reported at RPs. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Golf and motorcycle equipment reported missing. Trespassing on Haag Rd. near Wauconda. Fraud on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Wallet reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Avon packages reported missing. Harassment on Stage Coach Loop Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Drugs on Main St. in Oroville. Burglary on Elm St. in Oroville. Threats on Central Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Golden St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Steven Joseph Zacherle, 28, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Morgan Lynn Roloff, 22, booked on a DOC violation. Ray Leon Hopkins, 51, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and an ignition interlock violation. Alberto Araujo Paniagua, 59, booked for unlawful imprisonment and fourth-degree assault (with sexual motivation). Jordan Marie St. Peter, 23, booked on an FTA warrant for hit-and-run (injury). Friday, Sept. 26, 2014 Assault on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Found property on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Knife recovered. Theft on Cape Labelle Rd. near Tonasket. Gates reported missing. Automobile theft on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Birch St. in Omak. Assault on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Found property on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Street sign recovered. Burglary on S. Birch St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on 21st Ave. in Oroville. Wallet reported missing. Trespassing on Fir St. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Dario Orozco Zacarias, 53, booked for DUI. Rigoberto Martinez Orosco, 28, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Silas Leo Gardipee, 27, court commitment for DUI. Jarred Wendell Chaney, 20, booked for second-degree burglary. Jacob Nicholas Wilson, 33, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief and an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jeremy James Monnin, 34, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) (felony), violation of a no-contact order (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV).

Adam Charles Luntsford, 40, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). David Leslie Louis, 33, booked for fourth-degree assault. Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014 Burglary on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Trespassing on Hosheit Rd. near Riverside. Violation of a no-contact order on Crowder Rd. near Okanogan. Search and rescue near Crawfish Lake. Trespassing on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Jasmine St. in Omak. Nurse reported assaulted. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Edmonds St. in Omak. Burglary on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Alicia Lynn Flores, 35, booked on a Dept. of Fish and Wildlife FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014 Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Assault on Horizon Dr. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Weapons offense on Fir St. in Oroville. Lost property on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. DWLS on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Thomas Lee Cohen Jr., 44, booked for first-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Lamberto Hernandez Valdovinos, 25, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Francisco Lucas Jr., no middle name listed, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 23, booked for first-degree DWLS. Stacey Lavon Adrian, 45, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for DUI. Justin Mikel Pearson, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Kristopher Alynne Caylor, 21, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). KEY: DUI - Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C - Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement


OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

SCHOOLS

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket Elementary Green Team was honored for earning the school a Level 1 Washington Green School certification, the first Okanogan County school to be so honored. The team included students (front row, l-r) Anthony Salazar, Clay Buchert, Tyler Wirth, Aiden Martinez, Emily Nissan, Leticia Mendoza, Quaid McCormick, (back) Amy Fry of Americorps, teacher adviser Steve Robeck, Sabrina Norrell of VISTA, and teacher adviser/Tonasket School Garden board member Rose Corso.

Tonasket Elementary earns ‘Green School’ cert THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - A group of Tonasket Elementary School students were honored at an allschool assembly on Friday, Sept. 26, for their work that earned the school a Washington Green School certification, the first school in Okanogan County to do so. The certification is Level 1 for Waste Reduction in the school. The students formed a “Green Team,” which was made up of six fourth and fifth grade students, one from each classroom. The students who participated last year are were Clay Buchert, Emily Nissan, Tyler Wirth (now in 6th grade), Quaid McCormick, Leticia Mendoza and Anthony Salazar (now in 5th grade). The team met during lunch

recess and made some goals to help organize students and inform them of the composting program in the cafeteria known as Garbage to Garden to table. They also made posters for Earth and Arbor Day Garden activities. The project goal was to collect organic matter from food waste in the cafeteria that could be composted for the School Garden. Sabrina Norell, VISTA worker, took over this job which had been initiated by previous VISTA volunteer Maggie Gruscka. Rose Corso and Maggie attended the Washington Green Schools conference in Spokane in 2012. The Green Team made signup sheets in each classroom, and students took turns monitoring the food collection. The collected food was weighed and recorded,

then brought up to the garden. Amy Fry, an AmeriCorps worker, also helped with the certification process, as she and Corso worked to satisfy the requirements, including newspaper coverage and an article for the school newsletter, Pride on the Rise, which helped publicize the project. Corso served as the required certificated staff, with Steve Robeck as the back-up. The team had to calculate in cubic feet the amount of school garbage reduced by collecting and “recycling” food waste. Also connected with this is a display in the library of a sample of the compost made and an explanation of how compost is made. Norell will be coordinating education of all elementary students this year about compost.

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TONASKET - With the resurrection of the Oroville-Tonasket Bell Game football rivalry, the mayors of the respective cities issued duelling proclamations in anticipation of the game. Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb offered to wager a crate of apples on the result of the contest, and Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth accepted. The Gazette-Tribune will also be presenting a brass bell to the winning city’s mayor to be kept in City Hall for the year. The text Tonasket Mayor’s proclamation: WHEREAS, the Tonasket School District has been reclassified as a 28 school for sport classification purposes, and WHEREAS, this has allowed the Tonasket Tigers High School Football program to schedule against the Oroville Hornet Football team, and WHEREAS, the date for the 28 High School Football game is

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October 10, 2014, which has been designated the Homecoming Football game, and WHEREAS, the City of Tonasket is eager to see the friendly rivalry restored between our fine cities; THEREFORE, the City of Tonasket would urge all alumni, parents, and supporters of the Tonasket Tigers to participate in the Homecoming events from October 6, 2014 thru October 10, 2014, and also the Mayor challenges the Oroville Mayor to a friendly wager of two boxes of apples from Gold Digger in Oroville or Smith & Nelson in Tonasket to be delivered to the winning football teams City Hall. Signed, Mayor Patrick Plumb from the Mighty Tonasket Tigers Hometown, Tonasket, Washington.

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School Football team; and WHEREAS, there has been an annual football game between the rival teams that has traditionally been called the “Victory Bell Game”, and WHEREAS, the 2014 “Victory Bell Game” has been scheduled to be played at the Tonasket Tigers home field on Friday, Oct. 10, 2014, and WHEREAS Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb has challenged Oroville Mayor Chuck Spieth to a friendly wager of two boxes of apples from Gold Digger in Oroville or Smith & Nelson in Tonasket to be delivered to the winning football team’s City Hall; THEREFORE the City of Oroville Mayor Spieth hereby accepts the challenge made by Tonasket Mayor Plumb, and enthusiastically pronounces “May the best team win.” Signed, Mayor Chuck Spieth from the Rough and Tough Oroville Hornets’ hometown, Oroville, Washington.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

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District Overview District 6 abuts the Canadian border in north-central Washington and encompasses 10 Game Management Units: 203 (Pasayten), 204 (Okanogan East), 209 (Wannacut), 215 (Sinlahekin), 218 (Chewuch), 224 (Perrygin), 231 (Gardner), 233 (Pogue), 239 (Chiliwist), and 242 (Alta). The western two-thirds of the district, stretching from the Okanogan River to the Pacific Crest, lies on the east slope of the Cascade Range and is dominated by mountainous terrain that generally gets more rugged as you move from east to west. Vegetation in this portion of the district ranges from desert/shrub-steppe at the lowest elevations through various types of conifer forests, culminating in alpine tundra on the higher peaks that top out at almost 9,000 feet. More than three-quarters of the land base in this portion of the county is in public ownership, offering extensive hunting access. Game is plentiful and dispersed throughout the area for most of the year, concentrating in the lower elevations in winter when deep snows cover much of the landscape. GMU 204 includes the eastern one-third of the district (from the Okanogan River east to the Okanogan County line) and is moderately rolling terrain, generally rising in elevation as you move east. The vegetation changes from shrub-steppe near the Okanogan River to a mix of tall grass and conifer forest throughout the remainder of the unit. This portion of the district is roughly a 50-50 patchwork of public and private land with the public lands generally being higher in elevation. Again, game is plentiful and dispersed throughout. WEATHER - Weather in the Okanogan District can be quite variable and capable of changing quickly in the fall. Be prepared for everything from warm, sunny days to the possibility of winter temps and significant snow at higher elevations by the second week of October. WDFW asks that hunters please be respectful of private land and treat land owners and their property the way you would want to be treated if roles were reversed. Agency biologists will be running a biological check and information station at the Red Barn in Winthrop both weekends of the modern firearm general deer season. WDFW encourages hunters to stop and provide data to biologists whether you’ve harvested a deer or not; data collected assists in assessing herd health and shaping population management.

ELK

Includes case, chain & hat.

Floyd and Charlotte

*Offer good with purchase of certain saws

We service everything we sell!

560 E. Riverside Dr., OMAK

HUNTING DISTRICT 6:

z

509-826-2321

Offer good through 12/31/14

Elk are few and far between in Okanogan County, particularly west of the Okanogan River. In GMU 204, where the majority of the District’s limited harvest occurs, elk are a bit more abundant and on the increase, but still generally occur only in small groups scattered over the landscape, primarily in the Unit’s eastern half. Hunters are reminded that the elk regulations

have changed in GMU 204 to an “any bull” general season harvest instead of the traditional any-elk season. 2013 District 6 Elk Harvest Summary: Elk are scarce in Okanogan County, and District 6 hunters harvested only 17 in 2013, five more than in 2012. Eight of the 17 came from GMU 204, and all but two were taken by modern firearm hunters.

DEER District 6 supports the largest migratory mule deer herd in the state and Okanogan County has long been prized by hunters for its mule deer hunting. Prospects for mule deer look good again this year. Winter fawn survivorship and associated recruitment have been at or above average four of the last five years and hunters can expect to see moderate numbers of younger bucks. Post-season buck ratios in December of 2013 were down somewhat as compared to the previous year; however, the observed ratio of 25 bucks per 100 does is still excellent and should translate into good carryover or older age-class bucks. During the early general seasons deer will be widely distributed on the landscape and not yet concentrated in migration areas or on winter range. Mature bucks in particular are often at high elevations in remote locations as long as succulent vegetation is available. In general look for deer taking advantage of the rejuvenated summer forage within recent burns including the 2006 Tripod Fire, as well as other areas holding green forage into the fall. Deer are likely to be particularly attracted to more moist environments this year given the especially hot, dry summer. In late August, it was noted that if significant fall green-up materialized in this summer’s burn areas, those areas could attract sizeable numbers of deer. In addition, many areas on private lands adjacent to the fires saw an influx of displaced deer and associated damage. These conditions could make it a good year to seek landowner permission for hunting access in fire affected areas. During the late permit seasons, the majority of deer will have moved to winter range areas at lower elevations on more southerly slopes. In District 6, WDFW Wildlife Areas and immediately adjacent federal lands are good bets for high deer numbers in late fall, although in low snow years, some mature bucks may linger at higher elevations. Most of the winter range in Units 239 and 242, and much of the high density winter range in Unit 224, burned in this summer’s fires. Significant changes to deer distribution and abundance in those units was anticipated; however, as of late August, it was still too early to accurately predict specific effects. Late permit hunt changes were being considered for GMUs heavily impacted by the fires. Individual notifications were planned for permit holders if any permit hunt changes were implemented. For those hunters with second deer permits in Deer areas 2012 -2016, re-

member that those permits are good only on private land. Permit holders are responsible for making contact with private land owners to secure hunting access. Changes to the geographic scope of Deer area 2012 were being considered in late August as a result of fire impacts to surrounding GMUs. Individual notifications were planned for permit holders if any permit hunt changes were implemented. Generally speaking, white-tailed deer are significantly less abundant than mule deer west of the Okanogan River but are found in most all drainages up to mid-elevations, particularly those with significant riparian vegetation. The Sinlahekin Valley and surrounding lands in portions of Unit 215 are the exception, supporting a robust whitetail population. In this area, many white-tailed deer are found on private lands, so prospective hunters wishing to target white-tailed deer may want to seek permission in advance of the season to access individual ownerships. The eastern one-third of the district (GMU 204) holds roughly equal numbers of mule and white-tailed deer and both are widely distributed across the unit on both private and public land. No new regulation changes are on tap for the 2014 general seasons. As noted above, some significant permit hunt adjustments were being considered in late August to help address issues created by this summer’s wildfires. 2013 District 6 Deer Harvest Summary: General season hunters harvested 2,047 deer from the 10 game management units comprising District 6, down slightly as compared to 2012. Similarly, general season success rates fell a bit for most user groups, but improved modestly for muzzleloaders and ended up as follows: Modern – 14%, Muzzleloader – 25%, Archery – 24%, and Mulit – 21%. Special permit holders harvested 337 deer in District 6, 195 antlerless and 142 bucks. Modern firearm hunters accounted for about 68 percent of the general season harvest, and archers took about 53% of the total antlerless harvest. As is typical, GMU 204 (the District’s largest unit) yielded the greatest overall deer harvest (648 animals). GMUs 215, 218, 224, and 233 also produced good tallies. These five units combined accounted for 74% of the total number of deer taken in District 6.

BEAR

Black bears are abundant and well distributed throughout District 6. The population and associated harvest appears to be relatively stable, so hunting prospects in the district should be good. Bears will likely be widely distributed on the landscape and keying in on local berry concentrations where available. This means they will be shifting up in elevation and into moister areas as the season progresses. Berry fields at higher elevations towards the Pacific Crest will ripen latest but will probably peak early this year (possibly starting as early as late August) due to the hot dry weather.

The late August fires likely made bears scarce in the affected areas since natural food availability was extremely limited in those locations. For hunters pursuing black bear in the northern Cascades, it is critical for you to positively identify the bear species, as endangered grizzly bears potentially also inhabit these areas. WDFW have posted on their website some interactive training materials from BeBearAware.org to help you tell the difference between black and grizzly bears. Go to http://wdfw.wa.gov/ hunting/bear_cougar/bear/ then view the Interactive Bear Identification Program and take the Bear Identification Test. 2013 District 6 Black Bear Harvest Summary: District 6 hunters harvested 103 black bear last season in the Okanogan Bear Management Unit (BMU 5), an 11% decrease from the 2012 tally. Last year, bears pursued robust berry crops throughout the district and harvest was spread accordingly across all GMUs. GMU 204 in the Northeastern BMU again led the way with 42 animals taken.

COUGAR District 6 cougar populations are healthy and well distributed. Cougars follow the deer herds, which means they will be spread across the landscape through late October and then start to concentrate more on lower elevations as deer move to winter range. Much cougar foraging activity takes place at night, so the best opportunities to spot the cats on the move are at dawn and dusk. The summer’s fires directly affected deer distribution in the burned areas, which also had an effect on cougar distribution. This occurred particularly as deer began to concentrate for the winter. In District 6, cougars are now managed by a harvest guideline at the individual GMU level to better promote stable population structure and high quality sustainable harvest. Last season’s harvest fell slightly short of the harvest guideline in most GMUs. As a result, cougar hunting opportunities in District 6 should be good in 201415. Remember that after Jan 1, individual GMUs close on short notice once the harvest guideline has been reached, and hunters are responsible for knowing if a unit is open or closed. This information is available on the WDFW hotline (1-866-364-4868) or at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/cougar/. 2013 District 6 Cougar Harvest Summary: During the first year under the new harvest guideline system, hunters harvested eleven cougars in District 6 during the 2012-13 season, and by design the harvest was distributed across several GMUs.

DUCK AND CANADA GOOSE Overall, waterfowl surveys indicate waterfowl brood production is up modestly in the potholes region of Eastern Washington compared to 2013. Locally, water levels are down due to the hot dry summer and the number of potholes retaining water


OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

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BONAPARTE

We will be open Full Time Oct 10 - Oct 20!

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Hunting

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615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket

Gordie Cockle, Oroville. Oregon early archery 2013.

HUNTING

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Now until Oct.11th

Okanogan County during the hunting season will likely be reduced. Overall, however, waterfowl hunting opportunities are mostly dependent on the number of migrants coming from Canada and Alaska and how long water remains ice-free throughout the district. The largest concentrations in District 6 occur at the mouth of the Okanogan River and on the Columbia River. The main stem of the Okanogan River and the larger lakes and potholes in the Okanogan Watershed are good secondary sites. Good public access can be found at the Driscoll Island and Sinlahekin Wildlife areas as well as the Similkameen-Chopaka Unit of the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area. 2013 District 6 Waterfowl Harvest Summary: Duck harvest was down 32% in District 6 in 2013, likely due to mild early winter weather up north and extensive ice coverage locally. Conversely, hunters bagged 1,365 Canada geese in 2013, a 7% increase over the 2012 harvest.

PARTRIDGE (GRAY AND CHUKAR) In general, gray partridge populations are widely distributed and patchy throughout the district’s shrub steppe habitats but appear to be increasing in number and distribution over time. Birds are seen frequently on the Indian Dan, Chiliwist, and Methow Wildlife Areas. Scattered groups of chukars are found in the steeper rocky areas in lower elevations of District 6. The steep hills along the Similkameen River in the north part of the Okanogan Valley hold good numbers of birds. More specifically, dramatically reduced harvest and harvest success without a similar magnitude change in hunter numbers suggests gray partridge and chukar productivity fell sharply in 2013. It appears likely that the cold, wet spring resulted in significant chick mortality. Originally, more moderate weather this spring suggested productivity and associated harvest opportunity would be better in 2014. This is likely still true in areas outside of the summer burns. Unfortunately, the fires consumed a significant portion of the district’s partridge habitat and bird numbers in those areas will likely be spotty and greatly reduced as a result. 2013 District 6 Partridge Harvest Summary: Compared to 2012, both chukar and gray partridge harvest decreased significantly in District 6 last year. Hunters harvested only 137 chukar (a 90% decrease). Similarly, gray partridge declined by 74% with only 370 birds taken.Hunting Season

FOREST GROUSE The Okanogan supports strong populations of ruffed, dusky (blue), and spruce grouse, which are found throughout the forested areas of the district. Ruffed grouse are generally associated with deciduous tree cover at lower to middle elevations, particularly in riparian habitats. Dusky (blue) grouse are found in the mid to upper elevation conifer forests, often on ridge tops. Spruce grouse are located in higher elevation conifer forests

throughout the district. Dusky (blue) and Spruce grouse populations continue to remain below historical norms within the boundaries of recent wildfires including the massive 175,000-acre Tripod Fire, which burned in 2006 in some of the Districts best forest grouse habitat. Grouse habitat within the burns is improving annually, and bird numbers outside of burned areas appear to be relatively stable. Prior to the fires over the summer, we anticipated generally favorable opportunities for Forest Grouse and harvest success rates similar to last year. As a result of the fires, areas adjacent to and outside of this year’s burn perimeters may see an influx of birds. Conversely, areas within the burns likely have very few birds, although sizeable unburned islands surrounded by charred ground could potentially hold locally concentrated populations. In addition, if significant fall green-up presents itself, some birds may return to burned areas to take advantage of sprouting shoots and buds. The best bets for hunting are likely to be USFS lands throughout the district, as well as forested portions of the Sinlahekin and Methow Wildlife Areas outside of this year’s burn perimeters. In the long-term, the extensive burning at lower elevations may well enhance grouse production in the spring of coming seasons; however, the additional loss of winter habitat at middle and upper elevations may decrease over-winter carrying capacity. 2013 District 6 Forest Grouse Harvest Summary: Despite the lingering effects of recent wild fires, sprawling Okanogan County remained the top forest grouse producer in Washington last year, yielding a mixed harvest of 7,017 dusky, ruffed, and spruce grouse. While impressive, that number represents an 8-percent decline from 2012 and a 45-percent drop from the fiveyear average harvest average; however, much of the decline can be attributed to reduced hunter participation.

be attributed to a reduced number of released birds.

Pheasants occur at low densities and in a patchy distribution throughout the Okanogan Watershed portion of District 6, with most wild production coming from private land. Hunters should seek permission in advance of the season to access private land. Game farm-produced roosters will once again be released in the district; however, the Chiliwist release site will not be used this year due to the effects of this summer’s fire at that location. All releases will occur at the traditional Kline and Hegdahl release sites this fall. These sites are mapped on the Go Hunt website. Hunters are reminded that nontoxic shot is required for ALL upland bird hunting on ALL pheasant release sites STATEWIDE. 2013 District 6 Pheasant Harvest Summary: Hunters bagged 520 pheasants last year in Okanogan County, a drop of almost 50% as compared to 2012 and the current fiveyear average. Most of this decline can

MOURNING DOVE

PHEASANT

QUAIL Harvest data suggest Quail numbers may be down a bit compared to long-term averages. However, birds are numerous and widespread in Okanogan County, which remains a good choice for hunters pursuing this species. Quail can be found in the shrub-steppe habitats at lower elevations throughout the district. The Indian Dan, Chiliwist, and the Sinlahekin Wildlife Areas are traditionally good places to start. In general for this season, a mild winter and more favorable spring conditions had set the stage for improved quail prospects as compared to 2013. That may still be true outside of the late August burn areas; however, the fires blackened a significant portion of the district’s quail habitat, including virtually all of the Chiliwist and Indian Dan Canyon portions of the wildlife areas. 2013 District 6 Quail Harvest Summary: Quail harvest dipped slightly from the 2012 tally and is down 18% from the five-year average. Even so, District 6 hunters still bagged about 6,500 birds in 2013.

WILD TURKEY Turkeys are found in scattered groups throughout the district and often concentrate on private land near agriculture areas. Prospective hunters should seek permission in advance of the season to access private land. The fall turkey permit season occurs within GMUs 218231 and 242, with the majority of the birds being located in the latter two units. In recent years, winter conditions and declines in supplemental feeding by private individuals have reduced turkey numbers substantially in the Methow Valley, although most lower-elevation drainages in Unit 242 still harbor birds. The late August fires likely pushed turkeys out of the lower elevations in the SE portion GMU 242 and the southern portion of GMU 224. The 2013 dove call count surveys tallied bird numbers similar to last year, with overall numbers still down slightly from the 10-year survey average. Look for doves in planted food crops in the Sinlahekin and at lower elevations on other public land. Hunting success will depend on warm weather keeping the birds in the area through the season. Much of the dove habitat on the Methow Wildlife Area, as well as the Chiliwist and Indian Dan Canyon Wildlife Area Units, were heavily burned, significantly reducing dove harvest opportunities in District 6 for this season. 2013 District 6 Dove Harvest Summary: Similar to other shrubsteppe upland game birds, dove harvest decreased 19% as compared to 2012, and remained 28% below the five-year average harvest in the district.

HUNTER SPECIAL!

FREEZER Dave’sGun & Pawn

SALE $

667 Upright 21 cu. ft STARTING AT

10% off ammunition, scopes, reloading supplies, used guns (except consignment). 15% off some accessories.

z Buy / Sell / Trade z Money to Loan z New & Used Guns z Reloading Supplies

We sell hunting licenses! davesgp@hotmail.com

Sat., 9:30 - 5 p.m., Tue - Fri. 9:30 - 6 p.m., Closed Sun. & Mon.

112 N. Main, Riverside Ph. 509-826-0544

APPLIANCES z ELECTRONICS

18 E. Riverside Dr., P.O. Box T Omak, WA 98841 826-0880 z 1-800-281-8260 www.ladouxs.com

Be Safe & Enjoy the Hunting Season!

Can’t get enough hunting DQG¿VKLQJDQGORRNLQJ forward to your next trip? 'RQœWJHWVRFDXJKWXSLQ WKHH[FLWHPHQWWKDW\RXIRU JHWWKHUXOHVRIVDIHW\$V \RXSUHSDUHWREDJVRPH JDPHRUFDWFKD¿VKNHHS WKHVHWLSVLQPLQG

+XQWLQJ z Learn how to operate your

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IS HERE! 4.)+5.1+,,+)6)62(+4 56: 6- 

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Coleman Propane

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SS 400W

299

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12999 Crosley 9cft Chest Freezer

WE ALSO FILL PROPANE TANKS

Game Bag

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699

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE SWIM LESSONS

OBITUARY talent with us playing for our services. She brought a spiritual joy with her when she entered a room and she gave from her heart to all in need including every abandon animal that crossed her path. Diana worked around the area

Diana Kennedy Diana Kennedy, born April 11, 1942, passed away on Sept. 24, 2014. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Oroville and we wish to honor her life. She shared her musical

as a Transcare driver taking others to medical appointments. She also worked at the Eagles in Tonasket for several years. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Church, 604 Central Ave. at 6 p.m., Saturday, October 4th.

Stay Healthy this Season!

TONASKET Wed., October 15th 9:30 am -12 noon and 2:00 to 4:00 pm Adult Only

Sat., October 25th MORNING ONLY 9:30 am -12 noon Adult Only

OROVILLE

Thurs., October 16th

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

9 a.m. -12 noon and 2:00 to 4:00 pm Adult Only

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

| Family Medicine

Faith Lutheran Church

17 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 486-2174 1617 Main Street, Oroville 476-3631

WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Out On The Town...

Dining

&

Entertainment Bonaparte

Lake Resort & Restaurant Prime Rib every Fri. & Sat.

HOURS: Thur.-Sun. 8am - 8pm

EVERY WEEK Call Charlene at

509-476-3602

Shbaulonuns oFonod’s! Fa

„ „ „ „

Breakfast Every Morning Steak Night on Wed. & Sat. Spaghetti Thursday Prime Rib Friday — We have WiFi — 626 Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2259

~ Bake Sale ~

Bonaparte Lake Resort Style!

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

starting at 4 p.m. Call ahead for reservation www.bonapartelakeresort.com 615 Bonaparte LK. Rd., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2828

Advertise your specials and events here!

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

Wed., October 22th

— Adult Only —

Okanogan Valley Come join us!

9 a.m. -12 noon and 2:00 to 4:00 pm Adult Only

Cost: $28.00

Submitted photos

Oroville Fourth Graders from Ms. Martin’s (left) and Mr. Monroe’s class (right) have been participating in swimming lessons at the pool at Veranda Beach Resort. The classes have become an annual event at the beginning of the school year at Oroville.

Main St., Tonasket z 486-2996

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Steak Night (8 oz top sirloin)

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

Bonaparte Lake Resort is hosting a bake sale to raise funds for Heather Cruz’s continuing treatment for lyme disease and lyme disease awareness.

Call or email your order 10�Cheesecake (with caramel topping separate) $30 10�Coconut Cream Pie $30 12�x8� Bread Pudding $30 10� Caramel Apple Pie $30 Whole Prime Rib $12.99/LB

Dates available: Monday, September 29 Monday, October 6 Monday, October 13 Monday, October 20

Applewood smoked Bonaparte premium prime rib roast in approximate 5 or 10 lb roast, cooked to rare, wrapped and frozen.

Pick up locations: -Bonaparte Lake Resort – 1PM -Tonasket Junction – 3PM -Riverside Grocery – 4PM

Call or email your orders to the following: Okanoganlyme@gmail.com or 509.322.1868 Include Name, Phone Number, Address, What you are ordering, Date wanted, pick-up location and payment method.

For any special requests on delivery, or larger deliveries, contact Heather at 509.322.1868

Last year I sold all of my possessions and refinanced my house to make the trip to the clinic that saved my life. When I arrived I was barely 90 lbs and unable to care for myself. I was in so much pain every day, I was just wishing it would end. The Hansa Clinic in Kansas was my last chance and God opened the doors for me to get there. Since my treatment one year ago, I have returned to being able to care for myself, my family, work very light duty and drive short distances. It is my goal to regain my life and I continue to pursue the treatment that may restore all my abilities to function and live pain free. I have faith that it will happen! Over the next few weeks you can support my cause by buying desserts and whole prime rib roasts from Bonaparte Lake Resort. If you have never tasted either, be sure to ask for a “free� sample! All funds raised in excess of the remaining funds I need to attend the clinic, will be donated to other Lyme disease warriors who battle this hideous disease daily and go to raising awareness. Yep, it happened right here in Okanogan County! – Faithful to get better, Heather Cruz

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Tonasket Bible Church

10 6th East and Whitcomb‡509-429-2948 /HRQ/$OGHQ3DVWRU‡)LU2URYLOOH‡ Pastor Stephen Williams‡www.tonasketbiblechurch.org Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. Sun. Worship Service 9:30 am Sept. Message Series: Prayer Can Change Your Life Sun. Christian Education Hour 11 am‡Sun. Eve. Service 6 pm www.Orovilleumc.org “SANCTIFY THEM IN TRUTH; YOUR WORD IS TRUTH.â€? JOHN 17:17

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist 1516 Fir Street‡476.2311 Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15am RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ 3DVWRU5RG%URZQ

LOOMIS

Holy Rosary Catholic Church 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.� -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2565

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS Playoffs take shape BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Just out of reach ‘Game of the Week’ lives up to billing, but red zone woes scuttle Tigers BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

RENTON - The Washington Interscholastic Activities Association released its state tournament allocations after its Sept. 21-22 executive committee meeting. Most of them, anyway. Area Class 1B/2B cross country teams won’t know how many spots are available for the state finals until sometime in October. In other sports, coaches and athletes now know where they need to finish in league and district competition in order to be eligible for the post-season.

FOOTBALL The Central Washington 2B League, which is divided into north (eight teams) and south (six) divisions, will garner a total of four out of the 16 state tournament spots. (District 6 - which includes Tonasket and Oroville - and District 5 get a total of four spots, and all of those districts’ 2B teams reside in the CWL.) The first round of the playoffs will feature the top four teams in each division playing a crossover game to determine which four teams will advance to state. Those games, to be played the weekend of Nov. 7-8, will feature matchups of each division’s champion against the opposite division’s fourth place team, as well as games between the second place team from each division against the opposite’s third place team. GIRLS SOCCER There will be four teams advancing out of the district tournament to the eight-team 1B/2B girls soccer tourney (that will be reduced to three teams next season). That state tournament had been pared down to four teams the past few years due to the overall lack of squads at that level, but with this year’s reclassification, a number of teams have joined the small school ranks (Tonasket, Brewster, Okanogan, Mabton, Warden, to name the CWL newcomers). The CWL doesn’t include its southern members in soccer as Mabton and Warden are playing in the 1A SCAC during the regular season. But in the post-season, the district tournament will include the top five of eight District 6 (CWL) teams, both District 5 squads (Mabton and Warden) and St. George’s School (the lone District 7 team). The top three CWL (north) teams will get home games in the all-important loserout opening round of the tournament, as will the top District 5 (south) team. The district championship and third place games will be played at the Wenatchee Bowl on Saturday, Nov. 8. The four state qualifiers will advance to the eight-team state tourney, with the final four being played in Sumner, Nov. 21-22. VOLLEYBALL Volleyball will feature eight district playoff teams vying for four spots in the 16-team state tournament. The top four teams in the eight-team North Division get automatic bids to the district tournament, while the top three teams from the six-team south also get in. The tournament, which will be played on Saturday, Nov. 1 and Saturday, Nov. 8, will open with a pigtail (play-in) game between the North’s fifth-place team and the South’s fourth place finisher to determine the final district qualifier. The four survivors will advance to the state finals in Yakima, Nov. 14-15. CROSS COUNTRY Last year, the WIAA didn’t get an accurate accounting of how many 1B/2B schools were going to field complete teams before setting their allocations. The decision was made to await setting those until October. It appears as though two boys teams and one girls team will advance as a group to the state finals in Pasco, but that could change. The regional meet, which will include 1B and 2B teams from border to border of the central portion of the state, will likely take place in Wenatchee on Saturday, Nov. 1.

TONASKET - There’s a lot more energy on the sidelines and an extra buzz in the stands when a high-stakes league game takes center stage under the Friday night lights. But there’s also an extra sting when one of those games ends in defeat. Tonasket football players haven’t experienced the energy around being legitimate playoff contenders since the current squad was still in elementary school. But with the move out of the Caribou Trail League and into the Central Washington 2B League, league games hold a lot more meaning. The Tigers had their game plan in place and ran it to perfection in the first quarter. But high-powered Brewster, which came into the game averaging more than 50 points a game, pulled away to a 35-15 victory. “It’s really enjoyable to see these kids have the opportunity to play in a game billed as the ‘big game’ in our league tonight,” said Tonasket coach Jay Hawkins. “That’s really neat for our guys that they got to experience that.” With Brewster capable of putting up a lot of points in a hurry - the Bears ran up 83 on Kittitas last week - the Tigers knew they needed to control the ball, limit the Bears’ possessions and take advantage of the opportunities that came their way. Tonasket did manage to chew up the clock in impressive fashion, including an opening quarter in which they held the ball for 10 of the 12 minutes. But in four trips inside Brewster’s 20-yard line, Tonasket managed to score just once. While both teams had their way from time to time, the Tigers’ ability finish in the “red zone” was the difference. “There were multiple times in the red zone that we had opportunities,” Hawkins said. “Hand it to them, too, they made some great plays against us. “As a coaching staff we need to do a better job with the little things. We had substitution issues, we had some misalignments because we were confused, and that comes down to coaching. We just need to do a little better with our guys.” The Tigers opened the game with a nine-minute drive, but came up empty after getting to the Brewster 15-yard line after quarterback Colton Leep was sacked on third down, and had a pass into the end zone on fourth down dropped. But it was Tonasket that scored first, early in the second quarter, on Jorge Juarez’s 13-yard run. Brewster got its offense untracked in the second quarter, running a no-huddle that kept the Tigers from substituting, and

Brent Baker/staff photo

Chad Edwards pressures Brewster quarterback Timbo Taylor in the third quarter of the Tigers’ 35-15 loss to the Bears on Friday. The play resulted in Jesse Ramon’s interception that denied Brewster a touchdown while the game was still in doubt with the Tigers trailing 20-15. effectively mixing Timbo Taylor’s passing with a two-pronged rushing attack that featured Hayden Bayha and Raf Varelas. Bayha scored on a 5-yard run that cut the Tonasket lead to 7-6 (the Tigers blocked the extra point). And while Tonasket’s offense isn’t necessarily set up for the big play, it got one anyway: Isaiah Yaussy-Albright broke four tackles en route to a 65-yard scoring run. He also punched in a 2-point conversion run for a 15-6 Tonasket lead. Brewster answered quickly, finishing a two minute drive with a 13-yard Taylor touchdown run.

The tide turned in the last minutes of the second quarter as the Tigers made their first major mistake, fumbling a punt snap that gave the Bears the ball inside the Tonasket 20. Three plays and a short Varelas run later, Brewster led 20-15. Tonasket had two golden opportunities to regain control, finishing in the first half with a seven minute, 70-yard drive and opening the third quarter with a 15-play, 80-yard drive. But in both cases, a missed block here and a key Brewster defensive play there kept the Tigers off the scoreboard. The

biggest play of the second half was the Bears’ ability to stop Albright short on a 4th-and-goal from the one-yard line. “There probably aren’t too many times we’re going to get that much yardage and only score 15 points,” Hawkins said. “We definitely made some mistakes, like not getting that punt off. “(Defensively) they condensed things, brought a lot of guys up to the line of scrimmage and made it tougher on our running game. The makeup of our team is not on the edge. We have to figure that

SEE GAME OF WEEK | PG B3

Tigers blank Hornets to stay unbeaten BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket’s girls soccer team kept its unbeaten record intact, scoring early and often against Oroville on Thursday, Sept. 25, on the way to an 8-0 victory. The Tigers scored three goals in the first 10 minutes and led 5-0 at the half. It was the first game that Oroville had more than 11 players, giving coach Tony Kindred his first chance to substitute players during the game. Ashlynn Willis scored four goals and assisted on the other four scores to lead the Tigers. Jaden Vugteveen added two goals and three assists, while Kayla Willis had to goals and 1 assist. Madison Gariano recorded the shutout without being forced to make a save. The Tigers (6-0, 5-0 Central Washington League) also picked up a forfeit victory over Manson on Saturday. They host Brewster on Thursday, Oct. 2, and are scheduled to play Manson on Oct. 7, though the Trojans are still struggling to pull together a full team. Oroville (1-4, 1-4) was also awarded a forfeit win over Manson. The Hornets play at Bridgeport on Thursday and at Entiat on Oct. 7.

TONASKET 4, BRIDGEPORT 0 BRIDGEPORT - Tonasket earned a 4-0 victory at Bridgeport on Tuesday, Sept. 23, as Vugteveen scored a pair of goals. Kayla Willis added one goal, and Ashlynn Willis scored a goal that deflected off a Bridgeport defender. Maria Abrego made four saves in goal to record the shutout.

Left, Oroville’s Kambe Ripley moves upfield last Thursday with Tonasket’s Megan Bolich in hot pursuit. Top, the Tigers’ Ashlynn Willis takes a dive over Oroville goalkeeper Xochil Rangel as she watches her first of three goals reach the net. Above, the Hornets’ Kali Peters moves in to challenge Tonasket’s Rose Walts. Brent Baker/staff photo


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

SPORTS STANDINGS & SCHEDULES

Manson edges Hornets in final set BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

FOOTBALL CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B) Okanogan Brewster Tonasket Oroville Manson Bridgeport Liberty Bell

League W L 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2

Overall W L 4 0 4 0 2 2 1 3 1 2 1 3 1 3

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League W L Soap Lake 1 0 White Swan 0 0 Warden 0 0 Mabton 0 0 Kittitas 0 0 Lk Roosevelt 0 1

Overall W L 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 3 1 2

GIRLS SOCCER CENTRAL WA LEAGUE (1B/2B) League Pts W L Tonasket 15 5 0 Okanogan 15 5 0 Liberty Bell 9 3 1 Brewster 8 3 2 Entiat 4 1 4 Oroville 3 1 4 Bridgeport 0 0 4 Manson 0 0 3

Overall W L T 6 0 0 5 1 0 4 1 0 4 3 0 1 5 0 1 4 0 1 4 0 0 3 0

VOLLEYBALL (Overall record includes non-league tournament matches, including split sets)

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B)

League Overall W L W L Sp Okanogan 5 0 9 3 2 Brewster 4 4 5 5 0 Bridgeport 3 2 6 4 0 Manson 3 2 3 3 0 Liberty Bell 2 3 2 4 0 Lk Roosevelt2 3 3 7 0 Tonasket 1 4 1 4 0 Oroville 0 5 0 5 0

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) League Overall W L W L Sp Kittitas 1 0 2 4 1 Warden 1 0 4 5 0 White Swan 1 0 5 3 0 Mabton 0 1 2 10 0 Waterville 0 1 2 1 0 Soap Lake 0 1 1 4 0

SCHEDULES OCT. 2-11 Schedules subject to change

FB = Football; VB = Volleyball; GSC - Girls Soccer; XC = Cross Country Thursday, Oct. 2 GSC - Brewster at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Bridgeport at Oroville, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Brewster, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Bridgeport at Tonasket, 5:30/7:00 pm Friday, Oct. 3 FB (Var) - Tonasket at Bridgeport, 7:00 pm FB (Var) - Chelan at Oroville, 7:00 pm Saturday, Oct. 4 VB (Var) - Tonasket at Quincy Tournament, 9:00 am XC - Tonasket & Oroville at CanAm Invitational at Kettle Falls, 10:40 am (preceided by junior high meet) Tuesday, Oct. 7 GSC - Manson at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Entiat, 7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Manson at Tonasket, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Okanogan, 5:30/7:00 pm XC - Tonasket & Oroville at Omak Invitational, 4:30 p.m. (preceded by middle school meet) Thursday, Oct. 9 GSC - Entiat at Tonasket, 4:30 pm GSC - Oroville at Okanogan, 4:30 pm VB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 5:30/7:00 pm VB (JV/Var) - Lake Roosevet at Oroville, 5:30/7:00 pm Friday, Oct. 10 FB (Var) - Oroville at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Saturday, Oct. 11 GSC - Chelan at Tonasket, 1:00 pm XC - Cascade Invitational (Tonasket), 12:00 pm

Brent Baker/staff photo

Alissa Young and the Tonasket volleyball team spiked Lake Roosevelt on Thursday, Sept. 25.

Long wait ends for Tigers BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Victories have been few and far between for the Tonasket volleyball team. But Thursday, Sept. 25, the Tigers ended a long streak for which most of them bore no responsibility, defeating Lake Roosevelt in four sets for their first league victory of any kind since 2008. It didn’t look like it would be the Tigers’ night at first after an early lead in the opening set vanished in a hurry as LR finished strong for a 25-15 win. But the Tigers bounced back in the second set, building a 10-point lead and holding on to even things up, 25-19. From there a more relaxed Tonasket squad controlled the action, especially from the service line, where the Tigers rarely made errors and forced the Raiders into earning every point. “We had much better serves tonight,” said Tonasket coach Pam Leslie. “That was the kicker. We’re not a very speedy team, and Lake Roosevelt was about the same. A lot of it came down to serving.” Setters Taylon Pilkinton and Vanessa Pershing’s sets were well-positioned for Alissa Young, Rachael Sawyer and Alexa Sutton to put down several key kills. The Tigers built a 17-6 lead in the third set, winning 25-13. In the fourth set, Tonasket led 15-7 but saw the Raiders score eight straight points to tie it up. But instead of buckling, Tonasket earned a 25-19 win in the set to clinch the match. Young got the finally rally with four staight serves, Pershing added a block and an ace, and Sutton’s tip over an LR hitter helped finish things

BY BRENT BAKER

OKANOGAN - Central Washington League favorite Okanogan scored three touchdowns in the first 2:30 of play on Friday against visiting Oroville. It didn’t get much better from there as the Hornets suffered a 71-0 defeat after trailing 57-0 at halftime. “We knew they were good,” said Oroville coach Tam Hutchinson of Okanogan. “But were they that good? Not really, we just played that poorly. “The younger kids tried hard, but were making the kind of mistakes that you make when you’re trying too hard. Some of the older kids, though, they might as well not have gotten off the bus.” The Hornets ran nearly twice as many plays as the Bulldogs -

ALUMNI BATTLE GROUND - Damon Halvorsen (Tonasket 2012) finished 47th out of 70 runners in his first cross country race in two years on Saturday, Sept. 27. Halvorsen, who finished the 8-kilometer course in 26:56, has battled injuries since enrolling at Spokane Damon Halvorsen C om mu n it y College and is healthy for the first time in his collegiate career. He finished one second and one spot behind teammate and former Omak distance runner Michael Goble.

Oroville stats vs. Manson: Mikayla Scott 16/18 serving, 1 ace, 2 kills; Andrea Perez 16/16 serving, 2 aces, 3 hits; Monica Herrera 12/13 serving; Rachelle Nutt 3/6 serving, 6 hits, 5 kills, 9 digs; Jessica Galvan 3/5 serving, 3 aces, 2 hits; Sydney Egerton

BRIDGEPORT 3, OROVILLE 0 OROVILLE - Defending league champion Bridgeport defeated the Hornets on Tuesday, Sept. 23, 25-19, 25-22, 25-18. “We continue to improve,” Hugus said. “Each week is something new we need to work on.” The Hornets have been coping with injuries, and Hugus said she is hoping the team will be back to full strength soon. “Next week we should have all our varsity back,” she said. “We have been trying to adjust to different rotations.” Oroville stats vs. Bridgeport: Monica Herrera 8/10 serving, 2 hits; Andrea Perez 9/10 serving; Rachelle Nutt 4 digs, 9 hits, 1 kill; Mikayla Scott 10 hits, 4 kills, 3 digs; Courtnee Kallstrom 3 digs; Jessica Galvan 2 hits; Sarai Camacho 2 hits.

Freshman leads Oroville XC at Manson Invite BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

MANSON Freshman Brandon Baugher led the way for the Oroville cross country team at the Manson Invitational on Saturday, Sept. 27. Baugher finished 17th with a time of 17:28 on the 2.8mile course and was the third freshman to cross the finish line. Oroville coach Billy Monroe said that the course was about the same length as the Tonasket course and made it obvious how much the Hornets have improved since their first meet of the season. Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket volleyball players (l-r) Vanessa Pershing, Taylon Pilkinton, Kasey Nelson and Allison Glanzer celebrate after the Tigers picked up their first league victory in six years by knocking off Lake Roosevelt last Thursday. off. Leslie said that not only was it good to bet the proverbial monkey off the team’s back, but was pleased to see the team gaining confidence, especially after a discouraging sweep at the hands of league-leading Okanogan two days earlier. “This is nice,” she said. “They girls get along well. They don’t get down on each other, but when

the get down on themselves, it’s a problem.” The Tigers (1-3 overall and in Central Washington League North Division play) host Bridgeport on Thursday and head to Quincy for a tournament on Saturday, Oct. 4. Tonasket stats vs. LR: Alissa Young 2 kills, 2 aces; Rachael Sawyer 4 kills, 1 block; Taylon Pilkinton 6 aces; Alexa Sutton 4 kills, 2 aces.

Hornets slammed by Okanogan BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

MANSON - Oroville’s volleyball team is still seeking its first victory of the season, and came frustratingly close to picking up that elusive victory on Thursday in a five set loss to Manson. The Trojans took the match 25-17, 14-25, 25-16, 26-28, 15-8. “This was a very hard fought contest,” said Oroville coach Nicole Hugus. “We are close, but we really struggled with consistency. We have everyone back this week; we’ll work hard to be a team again.” The Hornets (0-5, 0-5 Central Washington League) travel to Brewster on Thursday and to Okanogan on Tuesday, Oct. 7.

5/6 serving, 1 ace; Sarai Camacho 4/5 serving, 1 ace, 2 hits; Courtnee Kallstrom, 3/3 serving, 2 hits; Lena Fuchs 2/2 serving, 1 ace; Brittany Minarcin 7 digs.

50-27 - but were outgained 45126, with neither team completing a pass in the contest. Logan Mills led the Hornets (1-3, 1-1 CWL North) with 33 yards on 16 carries. Dustin Nigg averaged more than 40 yards on nine punts. “He boomed a few,” Hutchinson said. “You’re happy with that at the college level. They were really coming after him at the start of the game, and there were a couple of snaps that weren’t so great. He buried them pretty deep a couple of times.” Hutchinson said that Mills played exceptionally well, especially in defense. “He was outstanding,” he said. “They couldn’t do anything with him, and they have some physical guys up front. After awhile they just avoided him altogether.” Okanogan improved to 4-0

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(2-0). Hutchinson said it would be interesting to see Okanogan take on Mt. Baker, which the Hornets played a few weeks ago. “Okanogan is big and fast, very physical,” he said. “Mt. Baker is more disciplined and polished, more of a machine. It would be a fun to see a game between those two.” The Hornets host Chelan on Friday, Oct. 3, for their homecoming contest. Hutchinson is hoping for a better effort, regardless of the score. “I told the guys, there are certain things you can control no matter who you are playing,” he said. “If you get physically beat, that’s one thing. But if you’re not getting into a position to even try, that’s inexcusable. That was the biggest disappointment to me; were weren’t snappy at all. A lot of guys were playing at half speed.”

“Everybody has improved their times by at least two minutes, so the hard work is paying off,” he said. Other Hornets who ran were Ryan Marcolin (25th, 18:20), Daniel Castrejon (32nd, 19:19), Nahum Garfias (33rd, 19:26), Emmanuel Castrejon (38th, 20:15) and Dakota Haney (47th, 26:41). Baugher, Daniel Castrejon and Marcolin all ran personal bests. Running for the Oroville girls was Phoebe Poynter (10th, 23:25), a five minute improvement over her Tonasket time. “Attitudes are good,” Monroe said. “Hopefully we keep improving.”

Tiger girls unbeaten against league foes Boys close gap on Liberty Bell BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

MANSON - Ice cream and foursquare are paying off for the Tonasket cross country teams. The Tigers turned in another strong outing against Central Washington B League schools on Saturday, Sept. 27, at Manson, with the girls winning the seven team meet and the boys taking second to Liberty Bell. With a number of new courses being broken in this season, new records are being established at a number of meets. For the second time this year Johnna Terris established a course standard on the 2.8-mile trail, winning the girls race in 19:16. The girls scored perfect 15 in team scoring. Jenna Valentine was second in 19:27, followed by Camille Wilson (3rd, 20:21), Katie Henneman (4th, 20:21), Haley Larson (8th, 22:11) and Baillie Hirst (9th, 23:25). “The girls stayed undefeated

against league schools,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “They get stronger and smarter every week and showed their team strength.” For the boys, Hunter Swanson led the way in 15:28. Other Tiger finishers included Adrian McCarthy (9th, 16:12), Bryden Hires (12th, 16:53), Abe Podkranic (15th, 17:04), Smith Condon (17:42), Justin McDonald (24th, 17:54), Rade Pilkinton (28th, 18:44), Samuel Strandberg (30th, 18:55) and Adam Halvorsen (40th, 20:40). “The boys placed second behind Liberty Bell, but are much closer to them than they were last week,” Thornton said. “Hunter was third behind a couple of state veterans.” The team often plays four square to warm up, and is often rewarded for its efforts with ice cream, which Thornton partially credited for the Tigers’ improvement. “Plus,” he said, “a lot of hard work is paying off.” The Tigers travel to Kettle Falls on Saturday, Oct. 4, for Kettle Falls’ Can-Am Invitational.

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OCTOBER 2, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS

WINE COUNTRY RACING ASSOCIATION

RACE REPORT FOR SEP 28, 2014 83 Race Cars attended the event A record of 287 Drag Races were staged to entertain our Spectators in Osoyoos, B.C.

WINNERS

Sportsman Bracket 10 Cars Competed AJ Wayenberg of Peachland driving a Grey 89 Chevy Sprint defeated Riley Martin of Oliver driving a White 90 Ford Mustang Sportsman Bracket Fast 20 Cars Competed Tim Vogt of West Kelowna driving a Silver 03 Caddy defeated Glenn Taylor of Osoyoos Driving a Black 51 Merc PU Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Rycki Cruz (14) makes a diving tackle of Brewster running back Hayden Bayha.

GAME OF WEEK | FROM B1

Super Pro 13 cars competed Lorne Pearson of Grand Forks driving a White 86 S10 PU defeated Tom Cook of Sicamous driving a Green 75 Valiant Bike/Sled, 9 vehicles competed Duane Hamm (the postman)of Oliver driving an orange 09 Suzuki MC defeated David Madson of Summerland driving a Black 03

Arctic Cat Sled (Kitty Cat) Rumble in the Valley, 22 cars competed Car Club Challenge, overall winner Kelowna Kustom, Dalin Haryett of Red Deer Alberta driving a Black 41 Ford PU defeated Kelowna Kustom, Darren Williams of Kelowna driving a Black 37 Buick. Car Club Challenge, Fast bracket

Winner (all out pinks style completion) Coachmaster, Doug Blatchford of Oliver driving a Maroon 66 Chevelle Conv defeated Coachmaster, Cliff Meeds of Oliver driving a green 69 Fastest Reaction Time Dean Book of Penticton driving a blue 86 Ford PU had a near perfect .501 light

FAMILY PRACTICE

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Tonasket’s Jorge Juarez deliver’s a stiff arm on the way to some of his 100 rushing yards during Friday’s loss to Brewster.

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Dalin Haryett of Red Deer, Alberta, was the Car Club Challenge overall winner.

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out a little bit.� Brewster scored two touchdowns in the fourth quarter to pull away. Despite giving up 35 points, Hawkins said he was pleased overall with the defense, which shut the Bears out in the first and third quarters. “We did a pretty decent job on Cade Smith (who last week had 200 receiving yards),� Hawkins said. “And I thought we forced the into their running game a bit. They are fairly physical - they’re not wimpy - and they’re not just throwing the ball around.� Yaussy-Albright finished with 162 yards on 26 carries and Juarez had 100 yards on 15 carries to lead the Tonasket offense. Bayha rushed for 82 yards and one touchdown and Varelas had 79 yards and three scores on the ground to lead the Bears’ rushing attack, while Taylor completed 11-of-19 for 163 yards and a touchdown. As the season nears its midpoint, the Tigers (2-2, 1-1 CWL) still have their sights set on at least the third of four available playoff spots, and Hawkins is hoping his team can keep its eye on the big picture. “I am really proud of their effort tonight,� he said. “This is a journey. We want to get to that Week 10 game. All indications are we should. Week by week by week, play by play, we need to stay healthy and get better.�

Pro Bracket, 9 cars competed Chad Abougoush of Kelowna driving a Purple 70 Cuda defeated Jim Klemm of Abbotsford driving a Purple 85 Mustang

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

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Saturday, Oct. 4 - 10:00 a.m. Everything from A to Z - Will run 3 Auctioneers

DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

Crosswords

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24. “The ___ Daba Honeymoon”

6. Threadbare clothing

26. Way, way off

7. “___ moment”

29. ___ of the Unknowns

8. People of Wales

31. “My boy”

9. Prepare for winter takeoff

32. Bow

10. Whale lubricant (2 wds)

35. Mosque V.I.P.

11. Decalogue (2 wds)

37. Attribution of human emotions to inanimate objects

12. European language

40. Ancient colonnade

18. As a precaution (2 wds)

41. Forever, poetically

19. Links rental

42. “___ any drop to drink”: Coleridge

23. Lacey openwork in a Gothic window

43. Pie perch

24. Dangerous biters

45. Gift on “The Bachelor”

25. Marina sights

46. Chain letters?

27. Destiny

47. At hand

28. Came down

50. CD follower

30. Breakfast sizzler

52. Even smaller

33. ___-American

54. Base of a triangular truss for a pitched roof (2 wds)

34. Staffs

60. Absolute worst 61. “Don’t get any funny ___!” 62. “Let it stand” 63. Bad day for Caesar

ANSWERS 1. “___ for the poor” 5. Three, they say

64. Gave out 65. “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto)

13. Dock

36. “___ Breckinridge” 38. Robust good health 39. Looked lecherously 44. Animal house 48. Made over 49. Ornamental embroidery 51. Corpulent 52. Conical tent (var. spelling)

10. Increase, with “up”

53. “Idylls of the King” character

14. Acquire

54. Blue hue

15. Hindu queen

Down

20. Acts of gliding on runners 21. ___ than hen’s teeth 22. “Yadda, yadda, yadda” (abbrev.) 23. Prefix with magnetic

55. Acad. 56. Air force heroes

16. “Frasier” actress Gilpin 17. Wedding permit (2 wds)

Wanted

Garage & Yard Sale /ROVILLE

58. Mutual reliance

Across

AGRWAGOVINSPECTION7EIGHTS-EASURES&IREWOODINFORMATIONASPX

#ONTACTå-IKEåATåå åIFåINTERESTED

LICENSE NO. 2241

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

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Feed Hay & Grain

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855

1. Kind of dealer 2. Pipe problem

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Firewood

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D & D AUCTION SALES LLC

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ANNUAL MANSFIELD LIONS CLUB AUCTION

Licensed & Bonded

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57. Allocate, with “out” 59. ___ green

3. Beheaded queen of France 4. Nautical pole 5. Mountain goat’s perch

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ORĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ HOLDERĂĽ OFĂĽ ANYĂĽ RE ĂĽ CORDEDĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ LIENĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUMBRANCEĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ PAYINGĂĽ THEĂĽ PRINCIPALĂĽ ANDĂĽ INTEREST ĂĽĂĽ PLUSĂĽ COSTS ĂĽ FEESĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADVANCES ĂĽ IFĂĽĂĽ ANY ĂĽ MADEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ TERMSĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽ ANDORĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽĂĽ 6)ĂĽ !ĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽ WASĂĽĂĽ TRANSMITTEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ CURRENTĂĽ "ENElCI ĂĽ ARY ĂĽ "!.+ĂĽ /&ĂĽ !-%2)#! ĂĽ .!ĂĽ ĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ ADDRESSES ĂĽ !$ ĂĽ $2%33ĂĽ 2/.!,$ĂĽ "%229ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ 2!.#( ĂĽ -%4( ĂĽ /7 ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 2/.!,$ĂĽ "%229ĂĽĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 2)#(,!.$ ĂĽ 7!ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 2/.!,$ĂĽ "%229ĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ 4!#/-! ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 2/ ĂĽ .!,$ĂĽ "%229ĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 4! ĂĽ #/-! ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ  ĂĽ %,,%.ĂĽĂĽ 4520).ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽĂĽ 2!.#( ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ %, ĂĽ ,%.ĂĽ 4520).ĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 2)#( ĂĽ ,!.$ ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ %,,%.ĂĽ 4520).ĂĽĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 4!#/-! ĂĽ 7!ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ %,,%.ĂĽ 4520).ĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ 4!#/-! ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ 4(%/$/2%ĂĽ .ĂĽ 4520).ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ 2!.#( ĂĽ -%4( ĂĽ /7 ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 4(%/$/2%ĂĽ .ĂĽĂĽ 4520).ĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 2)#(,!.$ ĂĽĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 4(%/$/2%ĂĽ .ĂĽ 4520).ĂĽĂĽ 0/ĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 4!#/-! ĂĽ 7!ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 4(%/$/2%ĂĽ .ĂĽ 4520).ĂĽ 0/ĂĽĂĽ "/8ĂĽ  ĂĽ 4!#/-! ĂĽ 7!ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ BYĂĽ BOTHĂĽ lRSTĂĽ CLASSĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ MAILĂĽ ONĂĽ !PRILĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ PROOFĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ WHICHĂĽ ISĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RAN ĂĽ TORĂĽ WEREĂĽ PERSONALLYĂĽ SERVED ĂĽ IFĂĽ APPLI ĂĽ CABLE ĂĽ WITHĂĽ SAIDĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $E ĂĽ FAULTĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽĂĽ WASĂĽ POSTEDĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽ CONSPICUOUSĂĽ PLACEĂĽ

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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ENFORCEĂĽ AĂĽ GUARANTYĂĽ MUSTĂĽ BEĂĽ COM ĂĽ MENCEDĂĽ WITHINĂĽ ONEĂĽ YEARĂĽ AFTERĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALE ĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ LASTĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ UNDERĂĽ ANYĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ GRANT ĂĽ EDĂĽ TOĂĽ SECUREĂĽ THEĂĽ SAMEĂĽ DEBTĂĽ ANDĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ )NĂĽ ANYĂĽ ACTIONĂĽ FORĂĽ AĂĽ DElCIENCY ĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽ WILLĂĽ HAVEĂĽ THEĂĽ RIGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ ES ĂĽ TABLISHĂĽ THEĂĽ FAIRĂĽ VALUEĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽĂĽ ASĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ DATEĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALE ĂĽĂĽ LESSĂĽ PRIORĂĽ LIENSĂĽ ANDĂĽ ENCUMBRANCES ĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ TOĂĽ LIMITĂĽ ITSĂĽ LIABILITYĂĽ FORĂĽ AĂĽ DElCIENCYĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ DIFFERENCEĂĽ BETWEENĂĽ THEĂĽ DEBTĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ GREATERĂĽ OFĂĽ SUCHĂĽ FAIRĂĽ VALUEĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ PRICEĂĽ PAIDĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽĂĽ 3ALE ĂĽ PLUSĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ COSTSĂĽ 4HEĂĽ FAILUREĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCIARYĂĽ TOĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ ANYĂĽĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽ THEĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ REFERREDĂĽ TOĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ THISĂĽ SECTIONĂĽ DOESĂĽ NOTĂĽ INVALIDATEĂĽ EITHERĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ NOTICESĂĽ GIVENĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTOR ĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽĂĽ $ATEDĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ -4#ĂĽ &INANCIALĂĽĂĽ )NCĂĽ DBAĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ #ORPS ĂĽ ASĂĽ $ULYĂĽ !P ĂĽ POINTEDĂĽ 3UCCESSORĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ "YĂĽ 7INS ĂĽ TONĂĽ +HAN ĂĽ !UTHORIZEDĂĽ 3IGNATORYĂĽ -4#ĂĽĂĽ &INANCIALĂĽ )NCĂĽ DBAĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ #ORPSĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 3EVENTHĂĽ !VENUE ĂĽ 3UITEĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 3EATTLEĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 0HONEĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ &ORĂĽ 2EINSTATE ĂĽ MENT0AYĂĽ /FFĂĽ 1UOTES ĂĽ CONTACTĂĽ -4#ĂĽĂĽ &INANCIALĂĽ )NCĂĽ $"!ĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ #ORPSĂĽĂĽ 42534%%3ĂĽ 3!,%ĂĽ ).&/2-!4)/.ĂĽĂĽ #!.ĂĽ "%ĂĽ /"4!).%$ĂĽ /.,).%ĂĽ !4ĂĽĂĽ WWWPRIORITYPOSTINGCOMĂĽ 0ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ 0UBLISHEDĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ /KANOGANĂĽ 6ALLEYĂĽĂĽ 'AZETTE 4RIBUNEĂĽ ONĂĽ 3EPTEMBERĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ/CTOBERĂĽ ĂĽ /6'

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#OMMISSIONĂĽ 4ELEPHONEĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ ORĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ 7EBSITEĂĽ WWWWSHFCORGĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 5NITEDĂĽĂĽ 3TATESĂĽ $EPARTMENTĂĽ OFĂĽ (OUSINGĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ 5RBANĂĽ $EVELOPMENTĂĽ 4ELEPHONEĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ 7EBSITEĂĽĂĽ WWWHUDGOVĂĽ 4HEĂĽ STATEWIDEĂĽ CIVILĂĽ LE ĂĽ GALĂĽ AIDĂĽ HOTLINEĂĽ FORĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ ANDĂĽ RE ĂĽ FERRALSĂĽ TOĂĽ OTHERĂĽ HOUSINGĂĽ COUNSELORSĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ ATTORNEYSĂĽ 4ELEPHONEĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ 7EBSITEĂĽ WWWHO ĂĽ MEOWNERSHIPWAGOVĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ 4/ĂĽĂĽ /##50!.43ĂĽ /2ĂĽ 4%.!.43ĂĽ ĂĽ 4HEĂĽĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ ISĂĽĂĽ ENTITLEDĂĽ TOĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽ SALE ĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ AGAINSTĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ THEĂĽ OWNER ĂĽ ANDĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ HAV ĂĽ INGĂĽ ANĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ INCLUDINGĂĽ OCCUPANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ !FTERĂĽ THEĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOL ĂĽ LOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ THEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ HASĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ RIGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ EVICTĂĽ OCCUPANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ BYĂĽ SUMMARYĂĽ PROCEEDINGSĂĽĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ 5NLAWFULĂĽ $ETAINERĂĽ !CT ĂĽĂĽ #HAPTERĂĽ ĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ &ORĂĽ TENANT OC ĂĽ CUPIEDĂĽ PROPERTY ĂĽ THEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ SHALLĂĽĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ AĂĽ TENANTĂĽ WITHĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ ACCORDANCEĂĽ WITHĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ 4/ĂĽ '5!2!.4/23 ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ  ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽĂĽ MAYĂĽ BEĂĽ LIABLEĂĽ FORĂĽ AĂĽ DElCIENCYĂĽ JUDG ĂĽ MENTĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ EXTENTĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ PRICEĂĽ OB ĂĽ TAINEDĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ ISĂĽ LESSĂĽĂĽ THANĂĽ THEĂĽ DEBTĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ  ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽ HASĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SAMEĂĽ RIGHTSĂĽ TOĂĽ REINSTATEĂĽ THEĂĽ DEBT ĂĽĂĽ CUREĂĽ THEĂĽ DEFAULT ĂĽ ORĂĽ REPAYĂĽ THEĂĽ DEBTĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ ISĂĽ GIVENĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ INĂĽ ORDERĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ AVOIDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ  ĂĽ 4HEĂĽĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽ WILLĂĽ HAVEĂĽ NOĂĽ RIGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ RE ĂĽ DEEMĂĽ THEĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ AFTERĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ  ĂĽ 3UBJECTĂĽ TOĂĽ SUCHĂĽ LONGERĂĽ PERI ĂĽ ODSĂĽ ASĂĽ AREĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ 7ASHING ĂĽ TONĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ !CT ĂĽ #HAPTERĂĽĂĽ 2#7 ĂĽ ANYĂĽ ACTIONĂĽ BROUGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ

4

ONĂĽ THEĂĽ REALĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ 0ARAGRAPHĂĽ )ĂĽ ABOVE ĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽĂĽ HASĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ SUCHĂĽ SER ĂĽ VICEĂĽ ORĂĽ POSTINGĂĽ 6))ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽĂĽ WHOSEĂĽ NAMEĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADDRESSĂĽ AREĂĽ SETĂĽĂĽ FORTHĂĽ BELOWĂĽ WILLĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ INĂĽ WRITINGĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ REQUESTINGĂĽ IT ĂĽ AĂĽ STATEMENTĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ALLĂĽ COSTSĂĽ ANDĂĽ FEESĂĽ DUEĂĽ ATĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽĂĽ PRIORĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ6)))ĂĽ4HEĂĽ EFFECTĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ TOĂĽ DEPRIVEĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ ALLĂĽ THOSEĂĽ WHOĂĽ HOLDĂĽ BY ĂĽ THROUGHĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽ THEIRĂĽ INTERESTĂĽĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ ABOVEĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ )8ĂĽĂĽ !NYONEĂĽ HAVINGĂĽ ANYĂĽ OBJECTIONSĂĽ TOĂĽ THISĂĽĂĽ SALEĂĽ ONĂĽ ANYĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ WHATSOEVERĂĽ WILLĂĽĂĽ BEĂĽ AFFORDEDĂĽ ANĂĽ OPPORTUNITYĂĽ TOĂĽ BEĂĽĂĽ HEARDĂĽ ASĂĽ TOĂĽ THOSEĂĽ OBJECTIONSĂĽ IFĂĽ THEYĂĽĂĽ BRINGĂĽ AĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ TOĂĽ RESTRAINĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽ TOĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽ &AILUREĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ BRINGĂĽ SUCHĂĽ AĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ MAYĂĽ RESULTĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ AĂĽ WAIVERĂĽ OFĂĽ ANYĂĽ PROPERĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ FORĂĽĂĽ INVALIDATINGĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ 8ĂĽ )FĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ RECEIVEDĂĽ AĂĽ LETTERĂĽ UNDERĂĽĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽ 4()3ĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ )3ĂĽĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ &).!,ĂĽ 34%0ĂĽ "%&/2%ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽĂĽ &/2%#,/352%ĂĽ 3!,%ĂĽ /&ĂĽ 9/52ĂĽĂĽ (/-%ĂĽ 9OUĂĽ HAVEĂĽ ONLYĂĽ ĂĽ $!93ĂĽĂĽ FROMĂĽ THEĂĽ RECORDINGĂĽ DATEĂĽ OFĂĽ THISĂĽ NOTICEĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ PURSUEĂĽ MEDIATIONĂĽ $/ĂĽ ./4ĂĽ $% ĂĽ ,!9ĂĽ #/.4!#4ĂĽ !ĂĽ (/53).'ĂĽĂĽ #/5.3%,/2ĂĽ /2ĂĽ !.ĂĽ !44/2.%9ĂĽĂĽ ,)#%.3%$ĂĽ ).ĂĽ 7!3().'4/.ĂĽ ./7ĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ ASSESSĂĽ YOURĂĽ SITUATIONĂĽ ANDĂĽ REFERĂĽĂĽ YOUĂĽ TOĂĽ MEDIATIONĂĽ IFĂĽ YOUĂĽ AREĂĽ ELIGIBLEĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ ITĂĽ MAYĂĽ HELPĂĽ YOUĂĽ SAVEĂĽ YOURĂĽ HOMEĂĽĂĽ 3EEĂĽ BELOWĂĽ FORĂĽ SAFEĂĽ SOURCESĂĽ OFĂĽ HELPĂĽĂĽ 3%%+).'ĂĽ !33)34!.#%ĂĽ (OUSINGĂĽĂĽ COUNSELORSĂĽ ANDĂĽ LEGALĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ MAYĂĽĂĽ BEĂĽ AVAILABLEĂĽ ATĂĽ LITTLEĂĽ ORĂĽ NOĂĽ COSTĂĽ TOĂĽ YOUĂĽĂĽ )FĂĽ YOUĂĽ WOULDĂĽ LIKEĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ INĂĽ DETER ĂĽ MININGĂĽ YOURĂĽ RIGHTSĂĽ ANDĂĽ OPPORTUNITIESĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ KEEPĂĽ YOURĂĽ HOUSE ĂĽ YOUĂĽ MAYĂĽ CONTACTĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ 4HEĂĽ STATEWIDEĂĽ FORECLO ĂĽ SUREĂĽ HOTLINEĂĽ FORĂĽ ASSISTANCEĂĽ ANDĂĽ REFER ĂĽ RALĂĽ TOĂĽ HOUSINGĂĽ COUNSELORSĂĽ RECOM ĂĽ MENDEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ (OUSINGĂĽ &INANCEĂĽ

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | OCTOBER 2, 2014

OUTDOORS

A picture is worth a thousand ... US Forest Service regulation furor partially, but not entirely, justified

We’ll dispense with the obvious first: the United States Forest Service does not want to charge hikers $1,500 to take family photos, no matter what headline you may have seen lighting Facebook afire last week. However, a temporary regulation that has been in effect for four years and is on the verge of becoming permanent does pose some issues that I (and many others) believe cross the line of constitutional protections that we all enjoy in this country. The Forest Service proposed a directive that requires permits for commercial filming in designated wilderness areas. As with most rules proposed by federal agencies, not only was it posted at the Federal Registry for public comment, it sat there for some time mostly unnoticed by the general public, save for a few legislation geeks who spend their free time tracking such things down. But it also has been in effect for much of that time, and the manner in which it was being enforced caught the eye of a reporter from The Oregonian (out of Portland), which published an article that got much of the controversy rolling. That article made the rounds

online, and The Seattle Times fol- get processed and buy liability lowed up with another article that insurance before being allowed to detailed what it called “wildly interview a biologist about wolf unequalâ€? enforcement by the reintroduction. Forest Service. The intent seems to be to keep While on one hand USFS Chief large filming companies from Tom Tidwell released a state- trampling over protected wilderment that the Forest ness areas. However, Service “remains what is being enforced committed to the goes far beyond that. First Amendment,â€? A couple of problemsome of his own atic passages from the employees’ actions rule highlight where indicated something this furor is coming else entirely. And if from. you have to release • “A special use perthat kind of statemit is required for all ment, you’re already use of motion picture, in danger of losing videotaping, sound HALF-BAKED recording or other the battle. Among the examtype of moving image Brent Baker ples cited by the two or audio recording newspapers: equipment (for com• Idaho Public Television was mercial purposes) ... Creation of forced to get a permit to film a a product for sale includes motion documentary on the 50th anni- picture films, feature films, videoversary of the Wilderness Act, taping, television broadcasts, or not because of potential harm to documentary ... when created for the wilderness, but because it had the purpose of generating income.â€? to convince the Forest Service My problem? It doesn’t really that the content of their docu- define what a commercial entermentary would be in keeping prise is other than something with USFS interpretation of the that generates income. A news“values of the wilderness.â€? paper ... that is a commercial Or, as acting USFS Wilderness enterprise. So is a solitary vidDirector Liz Close told The eographer, even if it is a leaveOregonian: “If you were engaged no-trace backpacker who might in reporting that was in support happen to make some money of wilderness characteristics, that off of a video filmed in the would be permitted.â€? backcountry. And a fee sched• A radio reporter in ule (ranging from hundreds to Yellowstone National Park was $1,500) for wilderness filming forced to purchase a permit, does include a cost for a one-towait weeks for an application to nine person crew.

• “Commercial filming in Congressionally designated Wilderness ... may be allowed if the activity or storyline contributes to the purposes for which Wilderness was established.â€? First Amendment, anyone? A federal agency setting up a fee schedule for permits, which may then be denied if the storyline doesn’t meet someone’s approval? What happened in Idaho would seem to be in the spirit of this portion of the regulation. Certainly it is within the letter of that law. Considering the proliferation of smartphones and their video capability, that could mean just about anyone. • Personal photos and reporters engaged in reporting “breaking newsâ€? were to be exempted. However, it defines that as any event that “arises suddenly, evolves quickly, and rapidly ceases to be newsworthy.â€? It does not say who decides what is newsworthy or for how long. Was the Carlton Complex fire newsworthy for just one day, or is it still newsworthy? Most of what burned was not wilderness, but the USFS could require (or deny) a permit for a journalist wishing to report on mop-up efforts, which would certainly not be considered “breaking news.â€? • Still photography doesn’t seem to concern USFS as much, though it requires a permit if the photography is to “promote or advertise a product or service

using actors, models, sets or props that are not part of the site’s natural or cultural resources or administrative facilities.� So, what is an actor (a friend pretending to be someone they are not?) What is a prop (trying to sell a lightweight camp stove)? What is a set? Photos taken for guide books ‌ would they be regulated under this rule? Is The Gazette-Tribune (indeed a commercial enterprise) subject to a fine because I didn’t request a permit before publishing photos taken last August in the Bitterroot Wilderness of Montana? That area is so illdefined the only real answer is ‌ maybe. The head of the USFS would say not. Individual rangers may read it differently. Here’s the kicker for me: while the USFS says its intent is to limit the activities of large production companies in Wilderness areas (which I wholeheartedly agree with), I am trying to figure out how such a company would even operate in the Wilderness while adhering to the same rules that apply to everyone else. Wilderness areas such as the Pasayten do not allow motor vehicles, boats, hang gliders, bicycles, the landing of aircraft, or the picking up or drop off of materials by helicopter. It does not allow parties to travel in large groups, as a youth pastor friend of mine discovered a few years back when he was reprimanded for taking a group

of 20 high school students on a hike in the Pasayten. Large commercial filmmaking, while staying within the guidelines already in place for Wilderness areas, would require hauling everything in by hand or animal, staying in small parties, not using combustion generators, and likely keeping a troupe of actors from rebelling while subsisting on dehydrated camp food. I joked online about forest rangers showing up in troop transports to raid art shows for images or videos taken that violate the numerous “commercial sale� clauses. A couple of people took that seriously and chided me for overreacting. Fair enough. No jokes on Facebook. In the end, it doesn’t matter what the intent of the rules are. It matters how they are written, how they are enforced, and what happens when lawyers get hold of them and stretch them beyond the bounds of rationality. In an era of ever-decreasing federal government transparency, it’s not a trail the U.S. Forest Service would be wise to travel. (The full text of the proposed directive, and the opportunity to comment, can be found online at: https://www.federalregister.gov/ articles/2014/09/04/2014-21093/ proposed-directive-for-commercial-filming-in-wilderness-specialuses-administration

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Land Surveying: Boundary Surveys Boundary line adjustments Short Plats Construction Staking Civil Engineering: Utility & Roadway Design Grading Plans Flood Elevation Certificates

Timothy R. Pecha, PE PLS 1105 Koala Drive Omak, WA 98841 (509) 826-2800

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Excavators „ Paint Sprayers „ All Contractor „ Scissor Lifts Equipment „ Z Booms „ Call Today! „ Reach Forklift PARTY RENTALS: Tents, Tables, Chairs & More! „ Bobcat

509-486-2888

132 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

OFFICE:

509-486-2624

Service & Trades Professionals Advertise /Affordable Full Color ads /Weekly exposure in newspaper and online

Call Charlene Helm For Rates & More Info

476-3602

809 14th Ave., Oroville 509-476-3200

CELL:

509-429-0417 Call today for a

FREE

509-486-2888

Email: avi_john@hotmail.com

509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

Well Drilling

Wow

“The Water Professionals�

Looking for something?

509-782-5071 Chelan & Kittitas County Serving all of Eastern Washington...

Fogle Pump & Supply, Inc.

z Water Well Drilling z Pump Systems z Water Treatment z Full Service Store z Free On-Site Estimates

800-845-3500

Ferry & Okanogan County

Since 1981

z Free Water Analysis z Zimmatic Pivots z Hydrofracturing z Geothermal Heat Loop

Systems Colville z Spokane z Republic

Lic. #FOGLEPS095L4

chelm@gazette-tribune.com

Storage units are fully fenced, easy 24 Hr. access, close to town. 132 Clarkson Mill Rd.

Tonasket

Estimate!

Service & Trades

Advertise where the

™ Special gift items ™ Locally handcrafted quilts ™ Kitchen gadgets galore ™ Woodwick candles ™ Many made in USA items

www.foglepump.com

D

Check out the Business & Service

irectory

To advertise your business in this section call Charlene at 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 02, 2014  

October 02, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, October 02, 2014  

October 02, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune