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OCTOBER 1-7, 2014 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 40

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE


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SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014


inside»   October 1-7, 2014

2014-15 FEATURED FALL & WINTER LECTURES

VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 40

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

University of Washington PUBLIC

LECTURE

November 20th | 7pm

November 6th | 6:30pm

OLYMPIA SNOWE

MARC ROTENBERG

U.S. Senator from Maine (1995-2013)

President of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)

Anything is Possible: How to Overcome Obstacles and Make a Difference

»5

news&comment 5

BATTERSWEET

BY SETH KOLLOEN | The long-

beleaguered Mariners finally end a season hopefully. Plus: the soundtrack to gentrification.

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RICHES TO RAGS

BY RICK ANDERSON | Posh resorts, rancorous divorces, and a cavalcade of lawsuits: the downward spiral of ex-billionaire Tim Blixseth.

»30 Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle

Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Intern Jeanny Rhee, Abby Searight

food&drink

16 CIDER BENEFITS

BY ZACH GEBALLE | The re-rise of a

traditional American tipple. 16 | FOOD NEWS/THE WEEKLY DISH

arts&culture 19 UW ART SAFARI! BY BRIAN MILLER | Why aren’t

students looking at this free art show? 19 | THE PICK LIST 21 | OPENING NIGHTS | The new

season begins at PNB, plus the police killing of a black teenager. 22 | PERFORMANCE/EAR SUPPLY 23 | VISUAL ARTS 24 | BOOKS OPENING THIS WEEK | Ben Affleck didn’t kill his wife! Plus a girl and her camels, alternative fuels, and the return of Juliette Lewis. 28 | FILM CALENDAR

30 MUSIC

BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT | A

legendarily combative artist releases his best album in years. Plus: New Pornographers and a new waterfront. 32 | THE WEEK AHEAD

odds&ends 35 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credit ILLUSTRATION AND LETTERING BY KELSEY DAKE

November 17th | 7pm

DOLORES HUERTA

MICHAEL LEVITT

Co-founder of United (National) Farmworkers Association, Activist, Civil Rights Leader

Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor of Cancer Research in the Department of Structural Biology, Stanford School of Medicine

An Evening with Dolores Huerta

Birth and Future of Multi-Scale Modeling of Macromolecules

Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, James Ballinger, Michael Berry, Roger Downey, Jay Friedman, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Chason Gordon, Dusty Henry, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Patrick Hutchison, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, John Longenbaugh, Jessie McKenna, Jenna Nand, Terra Clarke Olsen, Brian Palmer, Kevin Phinney, Jason Price, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Tiffany Ran, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti PRODUCTION Production Manager Sharon Adjiri Art Director Samantha Wagner Graphic Designer Nate Bullis, Brennan Moring Staff Photographer/Web Developer Morgen Schuler Photo Intern Kyu Han ADVERTISING Marketing Director Zsanelle Edelman Advertising Sales Manager, Arts Carol Cummins Senior Account Executive Krickette Wozniak Account Executives Cecilia Corsano-Leopizzi, Erin McCutcheon, Peter Muller Classifieds Account Executive Matt Silvie DISTRIBUTION Distribution Manager Jay Kraus OPERATIONS Administrative Coordinator Amy Niedrich COPYRIGHT © 2014 BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 / USPS 306730 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC., 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA PO STMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 • FOUNDED 1976.

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25 FILM

Watching the Watchers: Fighting back in an age of ubiquitous surveillance December 4th | 6:30 PM

Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott

SERIES

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news&comment

We Cheered the Mariners

On the final day of the season, our ball club lost its playoff bid. Why did it feel so good?

Four Songs That Go Great With Gentrification

BY SETH KOLLOEN

BY MARK BAUMGARTEN

“When the game was over, I was very disappointed, but right before I got back to the tunnel, walking off the field, I got so excited for the next opportunity, next year. Looking forward to what we have in the future.” —Russell Wilson, January 13, 2013

hile the city of Seattle, citizens, and developers battle over the pace and scale of new developments, the exodus of long-time residents—like those recently displaced from the Williamsburg Court Apartments downtown—to affordable homes outside the city’s urban center continues. The price of development has long been a subject for songs, but the old canon— anchored by Joni Mitchell’s “Big Yellow Taxi,” the Talking Heads’ “Nothing But Flowers,” and the Pretenders’ “My City Was Gone”—focuses on sprawl rather than on the displacement of people caused by the building of expensive highdensity housing. A new canon is needed. Here are a few songs you can play in your U-Haul as those big yellow cranes fade from view.

W

“When I took this job, I thought this was going to be a golden era for the Seattle Mariners. And the players haven’t let me down. I think it’s only going to get better.” —Lloyd McClendon, Sunday

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Felix Hernandez walks off the diamond to a deafening roar. We cheered the Mariners for making us care again. It was nice that the Seahawks’ bye week

So said my girlfriend Saturday night when she and I and a friend took over a corner of the Summit Pub to watch the M’s participate in their first pennant race in 11 years. It’s hard to communicate the appeal of baseball to someone who hasn’t been through the daily drama of a late-season run, with a year of baseball in the balance on every pitch, every swing, every manager’s decision. A single game of baseball on a Tuesday night in July can seem dull when it’s one of seven games that week. But a single game of fall baseball, followed very closely, can be as gripping from start to finish as any game in any sport.

We cheered the Mariners not so much for who they are but who we think they could be. Every key position player on the team, except

for Robinson Cano, is 28 or younger, and there is every reason to believe that these guys will improve or at least maintain next year. By run differential, the Mariners were the sixth best team in the majors. They’re the only team in the top 10 in that category to miss the playoffs, and the culprit may be simple bad luck—the M’s were 18-27 in one-run games, the games where chance plays the biggest part in the outcome. Hisashi Iwakuma, the Mariners’ second-best starter and one of the best in baseball, started suffering from back and groin tightness late in the season. In September, he lost three consecutive starts for the first time in his MLB career. And, to complete the Seahawks comparison, the Mariners play in the American League West division, baseball’s closest thing to the NFC West. By run differential, division rivals the Angels and A’s were the two best teams in baseball. The Mariners played 38 of 162 games against them. We cheered the Mariners because it feels good. Usually when we cheer, it’s for success—

a win, a championship. Cheering for failure isn’t something we do very often but probably should, not just in sports but in our everyday lives. Our everyday failures are always so easy to criticize. What Sunday taught me is that—even though it doesn’t change anything—it feels a lot better to celebrate. E

sportsball@seattleweekly.com

cutting the cuts » King County Gives Metro Riders Hope NEIL HODGES

On Monday, citing rosier-than-expected revenue projections, the King County Council signed off on a plan to cancel planned cuts to Metro bus service. While the decision likely eliminates future Metro reductions, it doesn’t reverse the 151,000 annual hours and 28 routes that were axed just last weekend. Seattle reacted. “So King County Metro doesn’t have to make cuts in 2015 now huh? Must have checked under the couch cushions!” —@WarlockKenny, via Twitter “Now it’s time to pass the November Seattle transit measure so we can expand bus service in our city, and protect against any future cuts.” —@cruickshank, via Twitter “Well, well, well. Do we say ‘I told you so?’ Yep, we just did.” —KVI Seattle, via Twitter “Dembowski rocks. Council gets backbone and stands up for commuters.” —Frank Blethen, via Twitter

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“The Hackney Gentrification Song” Written as a reaction to

the rampant development that preceded the 2012 Olympics in London, this Robin Grey ballad laments the loss of an artists’ community. “Now my life is in bags and my heart’s on my sleeve,” Grey sings. Former punk denizens of the now-gone Funhouse will find solace in its verse. “The first place I really felt home in London/Knock it down, build flats, knock it down.”

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“Kicked Out of Capitol Hill”

Less reflective than the others on this list, Don’t Talk to the Cops’ approach to the pressure of progress in Seattle is downright angry. “They kickin’ me off of my block, gonna kick me off of my block,” blurts El Mizell on the track, which was released in the midst of the current Capitol Hill building boom. “Gonna raise the price of my rent/If ya poor, ya might get shot.”

4

“Jacksonville” This recent single

finds Ryan Adams lamenting the loss of his hometown’s identity, equating it to the loss of a lover. “They’re tearin’ down another building in my hometown,” he sings. “It’s like I don’t know it anymore.” Highly recommended for those who would simply like to romanticize the past they’re leaving behind. On the downside, this track is probably getting a lot of spins in the shiny new towers that helped jack your rent. E

mbaumgarten@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

happened to fall on the final day of baseball season. It gave city sports fans a day to make a baseball pilgrimage. I showed up two hours before the game; traffic was already bad and deep lines were forming at the ticket counters. I’ve never seen so many Mariners jerseys at a game. For fans of a team that’s been so bad for so long, it was collective therapy to gather for a meaningful game, even if we all knew the team’s chances of advancing weren’t great. This was a cynicism-free zone, rare for a sporting event. Felix Hernandez got a raucous ovation when he left the game (never mind his dreadful start in a must-win game the previous Tuesday). Robinson Cano got a standing O too (never mind that he didn’t hit a homer after September 13). People, including me, reversed course as they were headed out of the stadium at game’s end to behold the glory of Tom Wilhelmsen’s spontaneous, unadulterated dancing as “Turn Down for What” played over the PA. Now: Think about what would happen at CenturyLink in December if the Seahawks get eliminated from the playoffs halfway through their final game. I don’t think you’d see a postgame standing ovation.

We cheered the Mariners for making baseball enjoyable again. “Baseball can actually be fun!”

“Cashout” Reminding us that gentrification has been with us longer than Seattle’s latest boom, this 2001 Fugazi track focuses on the collusion of city officials and developers in the band’s Washington, D.C., stomping grounds. “Development wants this neighborhood gone, so the city just wants the same,” Ian MacKaye intones in a hushed verse. Later he explodes, “Everybody wants somewhere.” ADAPTED FROM MONEY DESIGNED BY CHRISTOPHER SMITH, PAINT PALETTE DESIGNED BY DIEGO NAIVE FROM THE THENOUNPROJECT.COM

JEREMY DWYER-LINDGREN

R

ussell Wilson’s optimism following the Seahawks’ heartbreaking playoff loss to Atlanta in the 2012 playoffs was due primarily to the fact that Russell Wilson would probably call falling out of an airplane “an incredible opportunity to challenge myself to follow my dream of human-powered flight.” But also he was right: The Seahawks were young and likely to improve; they had underperformed relative to their actual talent; a key injury had happened at the worst time; and they’d suffered from playing in an incredibly talented division. All four of those factors also pertain to the 2014 Mariners, who wrapped up their season on Sunday by sweeping the Angels but just missing the playoffs. We all know what happened to the Seahawks. What will happen to the Mariners is anyone’s guess—and yet, as Manager Lloyd McClendon said, there is now in Seattle baseball the sense of possibility. So it was that the most life-affirming moment of my week was giving a standing ovation to a bunch of failures. The Mariners did not reach the goal they share with 31 major league teams, that of winning a World Series; nor did they make baseball’s 10-team postseason. So why did I and 40,000 others risk not being able to get a post-game table at Sluggers to cheer them well after the last pitch?

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manufacture disputes, and leverage its business im Blixseth’s six-bedroom, fiveposition in a duplicitous manner.” bathroom estate was sold a few The battle over his Medina house is a micromonths ago for the price of a very cosm of this legal warfare. Back in May, when he nice Winnebago. The two-level went to court here to save the home, he confihome with a finished basement sits on 110 feet dently announced the litigation “will be settled in of Lake Washington waterfront in Medina and the near future.” But, even though the home has has stunning views of the water and nearby been sold, the house battle is alive and well and mansions. Blixseth, a slightly balding and comscheduled for another court hearing this week. pact 64-year-old real-estate developer, didn’t Blixseth presents a blurry portrait to the particularly want to sell the home where he world—he refers to himself as a developer, lived with his third wife. He even fought it in record producer, songwriter, and timberman who court, claiming a Chinese consortium offered tries to do the right thing. “I’m as imperfect as him $10 million for the place, but lost. In the end, only one purchaser showed up for the June the next guy,” he writes of himself on his web page, “but I’ve tried my best to live by certain sale, and got quite the deal: $250,000 for a core values my whole life,” including working 6,800-square-foot home with a covered dock. hard, seeking justice for all, and not letting your Well, what the hell, Blixseth might tell you: possessions define you. But possessions—from The dock was too small to tie up his yacht huge commercial projects and luxury homes to anyway. He didn’t want to part with that either, private jets and business-partner wives—have the last of three yachts he’d owned in the past defined him nonetheless through his legal battwo decades, worth a total of $25 million. But tles to keep or discard them. He’s also been on a he apparently did; though, like the house sale, financial roller-coaster ride, from rags-to-richesmystery surrounds the deal. He says he had a to-rags-to-riches again, leaving creditors dizzy $2 million offer for the 157-foot Piano Bar, as attempting to determine what he’s got left in the it was named, and the gleaming white luxury bank or offshore. One thing is clear, however: yacht is seemingly no longer in his possession. No one calls him a billionaire anymore. Yet creditors are searching for it, and one is even offering a bounty to anyone who can show Blixseth’s still the captain. By the time Tim Blixseth married his second If you’re sensing that Tim Blixseth is in some wife, Edra Crocker, in 1983, the man who’d kind of financial downspin, you’re right. He tries grown up poor eating Spam five times a week to be upbeat about his setbacks, but they’re piling had evolved into a multimillionaire Northwest up, and creditors and courts have accused him timber baron, buying and logging vast swaths of deceiving them of forest. Three years with his legal games- Blixseth might still be later, with $15 million manship. Dramatic in debts and about a landowner on 73rd court moves are not $4,000 in assets, he untypical of him, but and Edra declared Avenue Northeast if in the past, it was bankruptcy. Three always Blixseth who only he wasn’t as good at years and more timber came out on top. He deals later, Blixseth losing money as he has was back, more expewheeled and dealed to buy timberlands rienced and moving been at making it. and develop resorts more cautiously as on his way to becoming a billionaire. He lived he turned into a multimillionaire again, then the good life among other billionaires and mere expanded into real-estate development. multimillionaires in the neighboring upscale By 2006, Blixseth had made the Forbes 400 enclaves of Medina, Hunts Point, and Yarrow list of richest Americans. He traveled the world Point, where police are sometimes summoned looking for investments and hung out with the to chase ducks from rich folks’ swimming pools. rich and famous. He also leveraged his connecThe cops also keep automatic weapons around tions and extracurricular talents to help people. should they be needed to safeguard presidenHe had a lifelong love for music, having bought tial fundraising visits, such as Barack Obama’s a piano and guitar as a youth and taught him$25,000-a-plate dinner in July at a former self to play and write songs (he has 10 songs Costco CEO’s Hunts Point mansion. registered with Broadcast Music Inc.). He ran That dwelling is just up the road from Blixshis own record company in the 1990s, and was eth’s nearly half-acre ex-paradise, on a street nominated for a Grammy in 2008 as executive that dead-ends at the lake. It’s two blocks south producer of Eric Benét’s R&B album, Love & of Bill Gates’s spread, a verdant solitude of Life. In 2005, after Hurricane Katrina slammed waterfront abodes with sloping gardens and New Orleans, Blixseth donated $2 million to matching L-shaped docks. Thing is, Blixseth the recovery effort and wrote a song—it came might still be a landowner on 73rd Avenue to him in a dream one night—called “The Northeast if only he wasn’t as good at losing Heart of America.” It was performed by Benét, money as he has been at making it. Michael McDonald, and Wynonna Judd and The Oregon native has been camped out helped raise $127 million for storm victims. in attorneys’ offices and courtrooms for a By then, Blixseth had homes in Medina good part of the past eight years—federal and California and a fortune estimated at $1.3 court dockets alone list his name on 159 cases billion. He seemed to have the ability to fall involving bankruptcy, civil actions, and appeals, backwards into money—in one case cited in many of them filed by Blixseth himself. He court records, he issued a $5 million promissory is being hounded by creditors and, because note for an interest in a condo development, of his aggressive legal moves, assailed by the and in less than a year flipped it for $60 milcourts. In varied rulings, judges have concluded lion. But he had also begun to sow the seeds that Blixseth and his business entities used of his demise, staking his future on building a “scorched-earth [and] unprofessional litigaposh resort in Montana, dubbed the Yellowtion tactics,” demonstrated a “pattern of sancstone Club, with multimillion-dollar chalets set tionable behavior,” and “elected to use every around a $100 million lodge. The ski and golf procedural mechanism of our legal system to resort, with a caviar bar, opened around 2005. evade . . . contractual obligations, obfuscate, » CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

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» FROM PAGE 7 Blixseth hired ex-Secret Service agents to watch over his deep-pocket investors and members, such as Dan Quayle, Bill Gates, and a shipload of captains of industry and sports figures such as Tour de France winner Greg LeMond (who would later sue Blixseth, claiming he’d been cheated). Many of the eventual 300 club members—you had to be invited to join—built resort homes ranging from $5 million to $25 million. Yet just three years later, in 2008, the resort would be headed for bankruptcy and Blixseth mired in a nasty divorce. To celebrate their breakup, his ex threw a $90,000 party at which she handed out toilet paper with his face printed on it. (Blixseth, in a weak return volley, referred to her as “the center of evil.”) At that point, Blixseth’s personal worth had gone off a cliff. Edra would end up with a chunk of it—including a Gulfstream II, a BMW, and a 2004 Rolls-Royce Phantom, along with a mansion in Palm Springs, a chateau in France, and control of the Yellowstone Club. The Great American Mortgage Meltdown eroded a lot of what was left.

mous Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, developing a computer-assisted program that could help the paranoid lawman identify anyone who conspires against him. I talked to Montgomery outside his impressive $2 million Yarrow Point home—which his attorney, who has also been Blixseth’s attorney, was able to buy for $20,000 through bankruptcy proceedings. Montgomery repeatedly said he had no comment about anything I would ask him. (See “Sheriff Joe’s Seattle Connection,” June 11, 2014.) It was a wild ride on the Blixseth money

Veter ans Appreciation Week Nov. 3–11, 2014 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 ROTC Open House 1–3 p.m. Clark Hall, UW Experience a tour of Clark Hall, the fourth oldest building on campus and home to the UW’s celebrated ROTC programs. UW Bothell Veterans Open House 4–6 p.m. UW Bothell Plaza Join UW Bothell Chancellor and U.S. Navy veteran Dr. Wolf Yeigh for a hosted reception in recognition of the important role that UW Bothell student, staff, faculty and alumni veterans play in campus life. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 5 UW Tacoma Veterans Appreciation Day 12:30–1:30 p.m. William W. Phillip Hall, UW Tacoma The UW Tacoma community gathers to pay tribute to university and regional veterans and military personnel. History Lecture Series: The Great War and the Modern World Domination, Integration and Betrayal 7–8:30 p.m. Kane Hall 130, UW UW history professor Raymond Jonas discusses how European power rivalries and geopolitical thinking informed the Great War, leading to national and racial intolerances that would shape the continent for decades to come. This series is sold out. For more information, visit UWalum.com/history

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6 Jessie and John Danz Endowed Lecture presents Senator Olympia Snowe 6:30 p.m. Kane Hall 130, UW With more than 40 years of public service, former US Senator Olympia Snowe chaired the Senate Armed Services Committee Subcommittee on Seapower, which oversees the Navy and Marine Corps. Join us for an enlightening talk from one of America’s most respected leaders. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8 UW vs. UCLA “Our Heroes” football game Husky Stadium, UW Join the Huskies as they honor veterans and recognize the 2014 Distinguished Alumni Veteran Award recipient on the field.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11 UW Veterans Day 2014 11 a.m. Ceremony Medal of Honor Memorial, Memorial Way, UW 11:30 a.m. Reception Walker Ames Room, Kane Hall, upper lobby, UW Please join the University of Washington community on the Seattle campus for Veterans Day 2014, when we honor men and women throughout our region for their dedication and service in our U.S. Armed Forces. The ceremony will include recognition of the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Veteran Award, speakers, presentation of the colors and a performance by the Husky Band.

INFORMATION AND REGISTRATION

UWalum.com/veter ans 206-543-0540

VETERANS APPRECIATION WEEK IS A CAMPUSWIDE UW COMMUNIT Y INITIATIVE COORDINATED BY THE UW ALUMNI ASSOCIATION.

To request disability accommodations, please contact the Disability Services Office at least 10 days in advance at dso@uw.edu or by phone at 206-543-6450 (voice) or 206-543-6452 (TTY).

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train—until it began to lose steam, that is. Besides divorcing Edra (and in the process duping her into taking over the debt-ridden Yellowstone development, she says), Blixseth also later sued his ex-wife and others, including the bank Credit Suisse, from which he’d gotten a $325 million Yellowstone loan. The suit was a dramatic attempt to recover all his losses and then some: He sought $6 billion in damages, contending the ex and others had participated in a racketeering conspiracy against him. Edra would later claim it had been Tim who had “looted the companies and taken the cash.” In 2011, Tim also sued one of his attorneys who he claimed conspired against him, and filed a $9 billion suit against a bankruptcy trustee. None The resort was his chief folly, but Tim Blixseth of the suits have succeeded. racked up other memorable adventures in investAs the real-estate meltdown loomed, Blixsing that came to haunt him. He bought, for eth had seemed unafraid of market changes, example, a Mexican resort for $40 million and ended up selling it for $13.8 million (and this year announcing plans to build a $155 million home for himself at Yellowstone—it would have been was fined that amount by a federal judge because the world’s most expensive home, he claimed. he pocketed the money at the same time he was That eventually declaring bankruptcy). fizzled out, like his Then there was a busiTo celebrate their Yellowstone dream. ness venture with a man breakup, his ex threw a In 2009, after Edra who is now one of his taken over the Yarrow Point neighbors, $90,000 party at which had resort and declared Dennis Montgomery. Montgomery was the she handed out toilet bankruptcy in hopes of reorganizing, it proprietor of a Nevada paper with his face was sold for $115 computer-software commillion to a Bospany called BLXware. printed on it. ton company. The Within the past decade, elaborate Palm Springs home she won in the Edra, Tim, and one of their investors, former divorce, with 16 bedrooms and 269 acres of presidential candidate Jack Kemp, went in on the land, was put on the market for $75 million, company, funded in part by money the Blixseths but was sold to software billionaire Larry Ellihad borrowed from the Yellowstone Club’s bank son for $43 million. accounts. Montgomery, who drove a $70,000 Today, with much of the legal dust settling Porsche Cayenne GTS and who once lost and court decisions lining up against him, Blixsmore than $400,000 in one day at a California eth is reportedly down to his last $200 million. casino, would become known as “The Man Who But records show he owes far more than that in Conned the Pentagon.” At least that was the unpaid taxes, penalties, and court judgments, most headline of a 2010 Playboy article about Montof which he is fighting or appealing. gomery, who had claimed he’d created software In June, a federal judge in California issued that could decode secret messages embedded a $200 million judgment against Blixseth for in Al Jazeera Media Network broadcasts and fraudulently transferring money from the Yelintended for would-be terrorists. lowstone Club. The resort’s lawyers have since After Edra and Tim had made their investsought Blixseth’s arrest for contempt for selling ment, Kemp used his connections with Vice and not turning over the funds from the MexiPresident Dick Cheney to gain an audience can resort sale, a charge he continues to fight. with the Pentagon. The military ended up Earlier this year a Montana bankruptcy judge paying millions for the software—which ruled that “Blixseth’s fraudulent intent could didn’t perform as promised. The Playboy story not be more clear,” and ordered him to pay $41 contended that the demonstration results that million to creditors. preceded the sale were in fact faked. Other creditors claim he owes as much as Montgomery fell on hard times—he was $45 million in defaulted loans and penalties, arrested for allegedly passing $1 million in bad and Blixseth also owes millions in unpaid checks on the Las Vegas strip and later filed income tax, according to court records. This for bankruptcy, listing debts of $12 million. Today he is reportedly working with infa» CONTINUED ON PAGE 11

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014


PRESENTS

» FROM PAGE 9 year, he filed twice for bankruptcy—in part as an effort to save his home. But, effectively, the billionaire is busted. “Mr. Blixseth is broke,” one of his attorneys, Michael Flynn, emphasized to a federal judge earlier this year. “As far as I know, his fight for justice has exhausted all of his resources.” Flynn said Blixseth owed him money as well. West Virginia attorney Brian Glasser doesn’t buy it. According to Glasser—who is trying to collect on the Yellowstone debts—and court records, Blixseth transferred $209 million of the borrowed Credit Suisse funds into his personal holding company, spending $100 million of it on foreign investments—buying, among other things, the Mexico resort and the French chateau. “Blixseth attempted to insulate himself from the original debt by

Blixseth’s chest-thumping response to Glasser’s bounty was to make a counter-bounty offer. In an e-mail to the Associated Press, he claimed he “will better their ‘bounty offer.’ I will offer [a] 50 percent reward to anyone who can find any hidden assets of mine.” The trust fund that Glasser represents in the action, Blixseth said, aims to “ransack me and my financial ability so badly [that] I would give up and be bludgeoned into ineffectiveness in my pursuit of justice.” That’s the kind of one-upmanship strategy Blixseth seems to love, court files indicate, helping him stay a step ahead of bill collectors. I asked Blixseth a few weeks ago if he was broke, and if he was hiding any assets as some of his creditors claim. He said he was in a meeting and would get back to me later that afternoon. He didn’t. He later e-mailed to say, “When I didn’t hear a response from you, I assumed you didn’t

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get e-mail or [it was] hung up in spam.” He didn’t respond at all to follow-up messages. It was 2007 when Tim Blixseth bought the grand house on Northeast 73rd Street that would eventually sell for $250,000. He purchased it through a new company he had formed, Kawish LLC, paying $7.9 million. When the good times faded, Blixseth found himself juggling investments, falling behind in tax payments, then stalked by Yellowstone creditors. As myriad debt cases progressed through the federal courts and millions in judgments began piling up, creditors came for Blixseth’s house, which had been put up as collateral for some of the loans. Tim and Edra had already gone through their bitter divorce, and Tim was living in the Medina home with new, younger wife Jessica Ferguson Kircher, then 39, whose family was also involved in the Montana resort business. They were wed in 2010. In a legal move, he put her on the Kawish incorporation papers as an official of the company. In an apparent attempt to protect his assets, he later drew up an agreement whereby the company would lease the

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 13

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assigning all liability to his wife in exchange for her taking the Yellowstone Club property as part of their divorce settlement,” Glasser says. Frustrated, Glasser is now offering a public bounty of 10 percent to anyone who exposes any assets Blixseth might have hidden. “There could be land holdings abroad, land holdings in other people’s names. That’s why we’re appealing to the public,” Glasser said. He contends that Blixseth still owns the 157-foot Piano Bar, which the once-billionaire had indicated in U.S. court records was being sold for $2 million. Blixseth said he was “working on getting the cash back in the U.S.” from the buyer’s offshore account to settle the yacht sale, and in May claimed $50,000 had been wired to him as earnest money for the sale. But in a July filing in King County Superior Court, he indicated the deal had fallen through. Blixseth revealed that he had registered the yacht under one of his companies, Western Air & Water, and was selling it to a company called Eastern Air & Water. He insisted Eastern was “unaffiliated” with Western. Attorney Glasser also suspects Blixseth is flying around in a Citation jet that could be registered to a family member.

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» FROM PAGE 11 home to Jessica, with $55,000 rent payable by her every six months. A pair of Nevada-based trusts, known in court as the Prim Trusts or the Prim Entities, hoped to collect on defaulted Yellowstonerelated loans to Blixseth. Filings indicate Blixseth owes the trusts about $10 million, although the lenders are seeking as much as $45 million with damages and interest. To collect some of that debt, they filed for foreclosure on the Medina home in 2012. Blixseth fought the action but lost, then declared Chapter 11 voluntary bankruptcy to stave off a pending sale. At a U.S. court hearing earlier this year, Seattle bankruptcy judge Marc Barreca said Blixseth’s bankruptcy had not been filed in good faith. “The facts, instead,” he said from the bench that day in an oral ruling, “indicate that the bankruptcy case was filed as a litigation tactic to hinder and delay the Prim Entities’ efforts

The consortium is one of many wealthy Chinese entities scouring the Eastside for luxury home investments. According to the National Associate of Realtors, wealthy Chinese make up the largest group of foreign buyers in the United States, spending $22 billion in a recent 12-month period. Agents estimate that 40 percent of $1-millionplus Eastside home buyers are Chinese. They find Medina alluring as the nest of such billionaires as Jeff Bezos and Gates. “The first question you often hear from Chinese clients is ‘Where does Bill Gates live?’ ” Moya Skillman, a Windermere Real Estate broker, recently told The New York Times. Next to Tim Blixseth would be a fitting answer. Attorney Brain submitted a court document that said Jia Lin Niu was willing to pay $10 million for the Blixseth home, which would fund a bankruptcy reorganization allowing Blixseth to parcel out repayments on a scheduled basis and help pay off the debt. But trust attorneys were suspicious. They noted that after the first bankruptcy was dismissed,

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Blixseth basking in his boondoggle, the Yellowstone Club.

Blixseth transferred Kawish ownership to wife Jessica, who was acting as both landlord and tenant, and who then waived her own rental payments (which the trusts were also hoping to seize). Also, Kawish was once again seeking to reorganize, despite still having no equity in the home, no other assets, and now no income, trust attorneys complained. “All facts and circumstances surrounding this dispute,” said the trust in a filing, “point to the same conclusion: that Kawish has again filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy petition in a bad faith effort to frustrate the Prim Entities’ efforts to collect the debts owed them and to allow Blixseth and his wife to continue living in the Medina mansion free of charge.” Blixseth’s second bankruptcy failed like the first, and the $10 million sale was not permitted. On June 13 the foreclosure sale went ahead, with Prim Trust as the only bidder, paying a quarter million for the property. The trust is now listed on county records as the official owner of the home, which the county has appraised at $4.5 million.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

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to foreclose upon the debtor’s primary asset, a multimillion-dollar home on Lake Washington, for the benefit of the debtor’s ultimate owner, Timothy Blixseth or Mr. and Mrs. Blixseth.” Barreca noted that Blixseth had never bothered to file a bankruptcy reorganization plan and failed to comply with bankruptcy reporting requirements. “Notably,” the judge added, “despite having abundant notice and having been identified by the debtor as a witness, Mr. Blixseth failed to appear and testify at [his bankruptcy] hearing on February 14, 2014.” Blixseth’s home was once again scheduled for foreclosure. But on May 8, an hour before the sale was to be held, he again filed for Chapter 11 protection. He also claimed to have a purchaser for his property who could help pay his trust debt. Paul Brain, Blixseth’s attorney, identified the buyer as Jia Lin Niu, who heads a Chinese real-estate investment syndicate and lives in Bellevue. One of her entities, according to county records, has bought $39 million worth of property in King County over the past two years.

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WELCOME TO » FROM PAGE 13 But Tim Blixseth is not through. In July he filed a complaint in King County Superior Court seeking damages and attempting to take back his home. He contends the trust should have acted on his offers to sell the home for $10 million and the yacht for $2 million, allowing him to reorganize and avoid foreclosure. The money would have been available within two weeks of the foreclosure sale, he claimed. Blixseth had been hoping for an outcome somewhat like that of one of his neighbor’s homes after they declared bankruptcy. Elderly developer Mike Mastro and wife Linda Mastro—now on the run from federal authorities and living on U.S. Social Security in France—declared in 2010 what was thought to be the largest bankruptcy in state history: about a third of a billion dollars. After the duo absconded, they were allowed by a French court to avoid extradition to the U.S. because of their ailing health (they could still be arrested for fraud and money laundering should they cross the French border). A trustee was able to recover only one cent on the dollar for Mastro creditors. But their Medina mansion—just up Evergreen Point Road from Blixseth and bought for $15 million in 2006—sold for a reasonable $9.1 million in 2011, helping cover some of their debts. (See “How to Go Bankrupt, the Millionaire’s Way!”, Aug. 14, 2013.) Compared to that, the quarter-million-dollar sale of his home was a “grossly inadequate” out-

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come, Blixseth said: “The conduct of [the trust] chilled bidding at the foreclosure sale as evidenced by the fact that no third party bidders attended the sale.” He is now seeking to set aside the transaction or, if that doesn’t happen, to be awarded damages of $10 million. The trust is moving to dismiss the case, and a hearing is set for this week. In my inquiries to Blixseth, I asked him for any comments he’d like to make about this and other cases, to which he didn’t respond. But here’s what he says about his assets on his website, listed under a section called “Values” and apparently posted in 2012: “I’ve certainly enjoyed my fair share of possessions, but I’ve never let them define who I am. A television interviewer once asked me if he could call me ‘rich’ in his program. I told him, ‘No, you can call me Tim.’ Money and objects are wonderful, but we only rent them while we’re here on Earth. As we say in real estate, they don’t convey. Let your character define you, not your things. If you’re defined by your possessions, you are undefined. Today, I have a wonderful family. And I have found the love of my life, my wife Jessica. In that sense, yes, I guess I couldn’t be richer.” E

15


food&drink Cider City

FoodNews BY JASON PRICE

How Seattle’s turning the drink of the frontier into a modern-day beverage.

R

Capitol Cider’s name gives itself away.

Charles Smith Wines is moving to Seattle’s Georgetown neighborhood in 2015. In a Wine Spectator article, Smith said: “That area has such heart and soul . . . We outgrew the winery in Walla Walla.” Phred Westfall and Laurie Reideman, of the late Elemental @ Gasworks, are hosting a fourcourse dinner in Greenwood on October 6. E-mail elemental.gasworks@gmail.com. morningfoodnews@gmail.com

TheWeeklyDish COURTESY CAPITOL CIDER

Just as with wine, the cider fermentation

process can be controlled to leave more or less residual sugar. Many classic European ciders have little or no sugar left in them, while the American palate has traditionally preferred more sweetness, or so conventional wisdom goes. Though most American ciders are made with at least some residual sugar, more and more producers are experimenting with truly dry ciders—and finding a market. Sweetness is just one of the elements that differentiates ciders. The choice of apple is key too. Some producers are using conventional apples like Gravensteins and Macintoshes, while others take a more dubious path: buying apple-juice concentrate and fermenting it. As Julie Tall, owner of Capitol Cider on Capitol Hill, tells me, “You can tell the difference between people who are growing and pressing their own apples versus buying juice from China. Price point is usually a good guide; if it costs more, more went into it.”

BY GRACE DOYLE

COURTESY FINNRIVER FARM & CIDERY

COURTESY FINNRIVER FARM & CIDERY

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

16

Homemade Pear Butter— With Brandy!

Cider: the other bubbly.

Another workaround has come through infusing flavors into cider. Modern store shelves carry a dizzying array: everything from habaneros to hibiscus. “The practice of infusing flavors came about because we have so few cider varieties in the U.S.,” says Tell, “and it mirrored the infused-flavor trend [in] the adult-beverage industry. Now you’re seeing lots of hopping, as a part of the crossover between the cider world and the beer world.” For now, cider seems to occupy a bit of a middle ground between beer and wine. For those who want a cold, crisp glass of something alcoholic, cider can be that. That it’s gluten-free doesn’t hurt:

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

Pears are one of my favorite fruits, but they’re often hard as rocks, or worse, soft and mushy. Last fall, with about five pounds of super-ripe Bartlett pears that needed attention stat, I decided to preserve the not-beautiful but tasty fruit by making pear butter. As with other fruit and nut butters, there’s no dairy in it. Instead, the fruit is cooked down with three cups of white sugar and spices into a thick, spreadable sauce that is delicious on biscuits or toast, swirled into oatmeal or pancake batter, or eaten straight from the jar with a spoon. Autumn flavors are natural pairings with pear. I tried a batch using about a tablespoon of cinnamon, a teaspoon of cardamom, and a generous dash of nutmeg, along with a bit of lemon zest and a tad of brown sugar to give a caramelized finish. The result was a deep chestnut color and very flavorful. It was hard not to eat it all from the pot before jarring it. Inspired by Portland’s Clear Creek Distillery, which bottles its pear brandy in a clear bottle with a whole pear suspended in the liquor, I also made a batch of brandied pear butter by combining the pears and sugar with half a vanilla bean, a dash of allspice, and a hearty splash of brandy added late in the cooking process. This version was lighter in color than the spiced butter, with a bit of warmth from the brandy and more of a pure pear flavor. The real key to good pear butter, in my experience, is to cook it just a bit longer than you think is necessary (about two hours). The consistency of the bubbling mixture will move just perceptibly from sauce to spread, which is right where you want it. Keep in the refrigerator for several weeks or can to enjoy through the year. E

GRACE DOYLE

emember the first hard cider you drank? If you aren’t quite young or exceptionally lucky, it was probably an unpleasant experience. For me it was a high-school party that turned me off it for years. Despite long being the drink of choice on the frontier, even when the frontier was east of the Mississippi, it ended up lumped in with other “non-serious” drinks like hard lemonade and wine coolers. Unless you happened to have a connection to get the few great French ciders that made it into the U.S., it was essentially impossible to find one that wasn’t sickeningly sweet and made from the cheapest ingredients possible. Now, a decade later, the demand for quality cider is so high that many Washington cideries are having trouble making enough to keep bottles on shelves. How in the world did we get here, and what exactly does the future hold? “We have been amazed to watch the demand for cider grow,” says Crystie Kisler, co-founder of Finnriver Farm and Cidery. “When we started only five years ago, we had to do Fruit at Finnriver. quite a bit of talking to get some folks to give our ciders a try. Now we are seeing more and more folks coming to Finnriver specifically for the cider experience and to see how and where we make it.” What goes into a cider is actually a fascinating subject, rooted in American history as well as modern economics. The most significant event is the neardisappearance of cider apples, once the major product of American orchards. While the myth of Johnny Appleseed is widely known, what’s rarely discussed is that the apples he planted were almost exclusively meant to be turned into hard cider or applejack, the quintessential drinks of the American frontier. Those drinks, and the apple trees that made them possible, were prime targets of the temperance movement; as a result, most orchards were either cut down or converted into more palatable varieties, and many classic varieties were either lost forever or drastically limited in availability. The effects of that loss are still felt. As Alan Shapiro, founder of the Seattle Cider Summit, explains, “One of the challenges is the amount of ‘proper’ cider apples available, as the acreage planted is very small compared to that for more commonly known apples. Plantings are increasing dramatically, but of course it does take some time for new plantings to yield to fruition, much like vines planted for grapes.”

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food&drink» Cider City » FROM PAGE 16 Everyone I talked to for this story acknowledged that the gluten-free craze has helped draw attention to cider. Yet cider can also be regarded like wine—a product of a very specific type of apple grown in a certain place and produced using traditional methods stretching back thousands of years. You’re starting to see cider show up alongside wine on some of the finest wine lists in the city, and its place in food pairing is only just now being appreciated in the sommelier community. We certainly don’t seem to be anywhere near the end of the cider boom. Attendance at the Seattle Cider Summit has risen from around 400 people in 2010 to almost 4,000 this year, and new cideries seem to spring up almost monthly. Given the abundance of apples grown locally, it’s not hard to imagine Washington’s cider industry continuing to grow as the state’s wine and beer industries have. While Carrie Nation and the other leaders of the temperance movement would disapprove, cider has a long and fascinating history in America, one that is getting a long-overdue second act. E food@seattleweekly.com

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Interested in exploring the world of Washington cider? Many cideries in the state are open to visitors at least a few days a week. As for taste-testing, here are a few favorites to consider. Most of these can be found in either local bars or specialty shops throughout Seattle. SWEET AND FLAVORFUL

Schilling Oak-Aged Cider The richness and sweetness of the barrel-aging brings an interesting dimension. Finnriver Farmstead Cider Sweet without being cloying, it has quite a bit more nuance than most semi-sweet ciders. DRY AND CRISP

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

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Seattle Cider Co. Dry Cider Clean, crisp, and refreshing. Dragon’s Head Cider Manchurian Cider Made from crab apples, it’s tart yet satisfying. UNUSUAL AND INTERESTING

Snowdrift Winter Red Like Champagne, this undergoes a secondary fermentation in the bottle, and is made from practically unknown varietals with bright-red flesh. Finnriver Habanero Cider Definitely spicy, but fascinatingly complex. Tieton Ciderworks Wild Washington Cider Made from wild apples, the flavors jump all over the place.


arts&culture

Not So Mad About the Art

ThisWeek’s PickList

A temporary public-art installation at the UW is worth a look. Now try to tell the students to look up from their smartphones to find it. BY BRIAN MILLER

BRIAN MILLER

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

UW CAMPUS Walking map & info: madartseattle.com. Ends Oct. 25.

Chris Taylor

It’s difficult to overstate now, to a millennial generation, how huge was the impact of the 1977 Star Wars, when there were no cable or Internet or home video games to compete. The lines, the repeat viewers, the fans camping in line, the fans camping in line in costume, the costume parties, the lunchboxes, and the frenzied anticipation of the next two parts. Then came the crash: George Lucas’ ill-advised second trilogy, generally deemed an embarrassment. And two years ago, a new hope: Disney bought the franchise from its father for $4 billion. Hence a new cycle of anticipation for the original Star Wars generation, and their kids, as J.J. Abrams prepares to deliver Episode VII (in the new math) for Christmas 2015. So now’s a good time to hear from the author of How Star Wars Conquered the Universe: The Past, Present and Future of a MultibillionDollar Franchise (Basic Books, $28.99). Chris Taylor, an editor for the website Mashable, takes us all the way back to the origins of the Lucassphere (Modesto, car racing, Joseph Campbell, etc.), and also delves into the technical arcana of filmmaking—from the little models and men in robot suits to the CGI era. Meanwhile, over in England, Harrison Ford has recovered from his broken leg, meaning that all of us will be standing in line together 14 months hence. Taylor, too. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhall seattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER FRIDAY, OCT. 3

Men in Dance

Last weekend at this biennial event, they gave Anne Green Gilbert (founder of the Creative Dance Center) the first Lawrence Tenney Stevens award; this weekend one of her many students returns to Seattle to perform. Aaron Loux is a member of the Mark Morris Dance Group, and he’ll perform a solo by Morris on a program

SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

price tag involved, people pay attention. Free art is more easily dismissed. CoCA’s shows-in-the-park have drawn a more motivated kind of visitor, those who expect to examine art in the serenity of nature. There’s a treasure-trail effect with a map (and those pesky QR codes). Touring these al fresco exhibits, I’m sometimes reminded of those geocaching enthusiasts in bright-colored team T-shirts who race about the city, smartphones in hand, using the GPS function to discover this mystery or that. Certainly Mad Campus ought to be engaging a similar demo of techsavvy visitors. But I think part of the problem here is that (involuntary) student-age artgoers aren’t accustomed to looking for conventional markers, mileposts, signs, or galley wall cards. They want the information broadcast to them via WiFi or social media. There needs to be more of a push model of engagement here; the art needs to call out to you, as does the more successful Sanctum at the Henry. That ongoing installation by the UW’s James Coupe and Juan Pampin entices busy students with audio and video, filming and rewarding the curious passersby to create a “Look, there I am!” effect. I suppose that’s narcissism, in which every spectator becomes a star, but it’s also interactive, which I think Xbox babies demand. To succeed in this environment, art needs to be more of a game. It needs to show up—initially, at least—on your phone. And that, of course, is what proximity-related apps like Grindr and Tinder are doing: signaling to you the presence of something (well, someone) you might like. Most of the creations in Mad Campus are comparatively reticent and retiring. I like the shaded-grove installation Hortus Curiosus by Saya Moriyasu and Maki Tamura, but it’s so shy and hidden—a little arboreal tea party, known only to initiates. (That too is the problem with most gallery art: insularity.) Given the competing demands on students’ attention, subtlety is never going to work here. And if you can’t have technological sophistiction (which would require an expensive team of coders), scale is your next best friend. Piper O’Neill simply bought and installed a 28-foot-tall inflatable cowboy, like something you’d see at a car wash or a tourist trap. Is it art? I don’t care. If it makes students stop and ponder, that’s enough. E

20TH CENTURY FOX

P

ublic art generally falls into two categories: 1) massive and durable enough to withstand the elements (and vandals and graffiti and pigeons and popular indifference . . . ); or 2) temporary and cheap enough that no one minds if it’s stolen or defaced or (again) greeted with popular indifference. Do you detect a theme here? There’s nothing particularly good or bad about the 12 art stations of Mad Campus, located along a 2.5-mile walking loop on the UW campus. The art, as with any group show, achieves a kind of mean average: some pieces make you stop and linger, wanting to learn more about the individual artist; others you quickly digest and pass by; and six weeks (the duration of the show) feels about right. The virtue of short-run outdoor exhibitions of this nature—like CoCA’s Heaven & Earth VI in Carkeek Park, ending Oct. 20—is their evanescence. Because they’re not permanent, we don’t really have to form a lasting judgment. These pieces aren’t Piper O’Neill’s Lone Stranger (Inflated), bound for indoor collections; most, in near the Northeast 42nd Street and 15th Avenue Northeast entrance to campus. fact, are bound for the scrap heap after their deployment. There’s no need or duty to form a long-lasting attachment (or disthe thing is 10 feet high (motorists can’t ignore it) like), as there is to whatever’s hanging over your and that it reflects the damp autumn light. With couch. In a gallery or museum, you often feel the sun at the right angle, it dazzles, and refracted peer pressure to linger and stare even when you’re raindrops can give it a kind of halo. (If Jeff Koons bored. One doesn’t want to be a dilettante or phi- were its creator, it’d be covered in polished silver or listine—at least not when people are watching. gold and sell for millions at Art Basel.) Down at the Olympic Sculpture Park, for Loop inside the campus, proceeding by foot, instance, the big new white Jaume Plensa head, and Evan Blackwell’s Relics of Experience presEcho, demands your fealty and appreciation, like ents a panoply of fossils in little cubbyholes. some kind of Easter Island totem. It’s roped There’s a natural kinship to the Burke nearby, off. There are security guards. It’s illuminated at and an affinity to Joseph Cornell’s boxes. On a night. And, most fundamental, it’s expensive. quiet walkway, it invites close-up examination; Tourists and other visitors feel obligated to stop it’s not art made for passing motorists. Deeper and photograph it with their iPhones because it’s into the arcadian grounds are installations in been officially designated as capital-A art, placed trees, on lawns, in Red Square, and in some in a permanent, official cloister of similarly academic courtyards. Some you have to hunt august objects. We will be forced to live with it, out in little glades and are easily missed. kowtow to it, even if we don’t like it. The greater problem during my visit last week was that no one—and I mean no one—was looking at the art but me. The UW had just begun its By comparison, the exhibits in Mad Campus, fall quarter, and the campus was teeming with organized by MadArt curators Alison Milliman bright, enthusiastic young people rushing between and Tim Detweiler, are more disposable—and new classes. The walkways were full, and all the I don’t mean that as disparagement. The most students were staring intently at their smartphones. prominent piece, at Northeast 45th Street and 15th Avenue Northeast (by the Burke), is Kevin McCarthy’s Sentinel, a kind of tricycle-looking wooden The issue here isn’t that young people don’t care assemblage covered in reflective foil. It relates to for art; rather, in such a busy setting, they don’t the busy intersection by suggesting mobility (those expect to be encountering it. Never mind the wheels), yet also resembles a bizarre, futuristic visilarge white signs—this isn’t the Sculpture Park, tor—like one of those Mars rovers, only sent here or SAM, or even Burning Man. You could call by distant scientists outside our galaxy. It helps that it the apathy of the unticketed: When there’s a

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 1

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that also includes an appearance by Bill Evans, whose influence on the Seattle dance community can’t be overemphasized. Alongside these elements from local history is a work by Ted Shawn, one of the founders of American modern dance. It’s a 10th-anniversary program covering almost 100 years of dance traditions. (Through Sun.)

Everybody loves Amélie (Audrey Tautou).

Many celluloid tears were wept when the Egyptian went dark in the summer of 2013, a casualty of the marketplace. Seattle Central College needed a paying tenant, and the San Diego– based Landmark Theatres had struggled to fill that oversized, single-screen hall. Now, with hundreds of new Cap Hill apartments rising within close walking distance, our own nonprofit SIFF has signed a 10-year lease on the former Masonic Hall (100 years old next year). To celebrate and show off (hear off?) its new sound system, the theater is programming a slew of free movie favorites this weekend. On the schedule are titles including Amélie, Enter the Dragon, Pan’s Labyrinth, My Neighbor Totoro, Y Tu Mamá También, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Blood Simple, Risky Business, Kagemusha, Orlando, and The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Then note that the following week, the Seattle Lesbian and Gay Film Festival takes residence, meaning the relaunched, rebranded Egyptian will be more fabulous than ever. (Through Sun.) SIFF Cinema Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 324-9996. Free. See siff.net for showtimes. BRIAN MILLER

The Esoterics

The evolve-or-perish mantra may hold for, say, consumer electronics, but doesn’t necessarily govern the performing arts. GASP! Heresy! The graying of the audience! Classical music is dying! I

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hear you, but I will offer a counterexample: The Esoterics, which, since its 1992 founding by then-UW student Eric Banks, has thrived as few local choirs have simply by doing what it’s always done. He established its niche early: a cappella choral music, from 1900 at the earliest, impeccably performed and thoughtfully thematically programmed. Add a social conscience and Banks’ own diverse skills—an encyclopedic knowledge of the repertory, a first-rate compositional gift, and a knack for languages (he seems to pick them up the way you and I pick up groceries on the way home from work)—and you have a concert experience beloved by its fan base like none other. (And if it ain’t broke . . . ) This weekend’s concert, titled “Aetheria,” is the third of three “choral ecologies” in The Esoterics’ 2014 season paying homage to the natural world, and includes music by the winners of the choir’s annual composition competition as well as Banks’ The Syrian seasons, sung in Arabic and English. (Through Sun.)

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 4805 N.E. 45th St. $10–$20. 8 p.m. See theesoterics.org for other venues and times. GAVIN BORCHERT

Jason Walker

A giant deer towers over the city, like all those Amazon construction cranes above South Lake Union. An elevated roadway turns to a river, pouring commuters over the brink of a waterfall. Aberrant chickens lay coins instead of eggs. Welcome to the fanciful urban menagerie of Jason Walker, whose solo show On the River, Down the Road has been specially created for BAM. The local artist works mainly in ceramics, combining whimsy and satire, “exploring American ideas of nature and how technology has changed our perceptions of it.” That notion of transmogrification seems apt in our booming, post-recession Northwest (Bellevue is sprouting as fast as Seattle, after all). There’s a woodsy surrealism to Walker’s work, as if unfathomable forces— hatched almost from dreams—are burrowing into our conscious cityscape. With Bertha slumbering underground, almost like a dormant monster, his fairy-tale phantasmagoria may be closer to reality than we think. (Through March 1.) Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts.org. $5–$10. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. (Artist talk 7 p.m.) BRIAN MILLER E


» Stage

Opening Nights PJewels MCCAW HALL, 321 MERCER ST. (SEATTLE CENTER), 441-2424, PNB.ORG. $28–$179. RUNS THURS.–SAT. PLUS SUN., OCT. 5. ENDS OCT. 5.

relationship with partner James Moore. Both women show a depth of rhythmic understanding in the piece. In the past, if you wanted to track the development of a dancer, you’d generally use the long-form classics (Swan Lake, Sleeping Beauty, etc.) as performance standards. Early in the 21st century, we’ve now added Jewels to that collection of landmarks. SANDRA KURTZ

Körbes with Batkhurel Bold in Diamonds.

ANGELA STERLING

Slip/Shot SEATTLE PUBLIC THEATER AT THE BATHHOUSE, 7312 W. GREEN LAKE AVE. N., 524-1300, SEATTLEPUBLICTHEATER.ORG. $15–$32. RUNS THURS.–SAT. ENDS OCT. 12.

Seattle Public Theater’s production of Slip/Shot is a sad example of a show that ought to rip your heart out, but the anticipated chemistry among audience, performers, and current events somehow fails to ignite. At a time when the killings of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown are central to America’s national conversation about race, Jacqueline Goldfinger’s 2010 drama, though set in 1962, is perfectly poised to be painfully topical. What’s it about? A white cop shooting a black kid. Goldfinger’s tale rests partly on our memory of the early martyrs of the Civil Rights movement (including Emmett Till and Medgar Evers). Yet the problem with Slip/Shot is that it holds itself at arm’s length from the very tragedy it intends to depict—the accidental killing of a young black man (Treavor Boykin) by the repentant policeman (Quinn Armstrong) who’s the son of a racist. After that grievous mistake, damage is done to families and friends on both sides, yet the cast mostly simmers when what’s needed is a rolling boil. It’s impossible to know if such depth of emotion is beyond them, but what’s certain is that director Kelly Kitchens chills the incendiary emotions of Goldfinger’s script with the Seattle Freeze. Just as locals happily assemble to protest today’s intolerable cause du jour, then shrink from an actual argument, this production tells us that racism is tragic—rather than actually showing the profound pain such injustice wreaks. In terms of the tech work, a very serviceable and minimalist set design by Craig Wollam cleverly addresses scene changes and makes this 90-minute drama zip by. But this show’s success rises and falls on its provocative story and characters—and somehow SPT has confused Arctic blast for the blast furnace. KEVIN PHINNEY E

stage@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

The last time Pacific Northwest Ballet danced all of George Balanchine’s neoclassical masterwork, in 2009, Lesley Rausch didn’t appear at all—she was recuperating from an injury and had to watch her colleagues perform the roles she’d rehearsed. This year she finally makes her debut in the central role in Diamonds, one of the three ballets that make up Jewels. One of the pleasures of a revival is using it as a benchmark—to see how favorite artists have developed and to compare new performances to past experiences. PNB’s history with Jewels dates to 1988, while Rausch joined the company in 2001. Now we see the progress she’s made. Her performance exemplifies her best attributes— modesty, articulation, and clarity. She and the choreography serve each other well. Carrie Imler and Carla Körbes are both returning to the lead role in Diamonds, and both have deepened their interpretation of the part. Imler’s innate technical security allows her to take risks that would topple other dancers, and she throws herself into the role, lifting her focus to the ceiling in a series of arabesque turns that add a note of wildness to the otherwise regal choreography. Körbes’ approach also feels very personal; within Balanchine’s framework, she conveys a detailed emotional arc that matches the expressive Tchaikovsky score. The same thoughtful attention is evident in Emeralds, where the delicate Fauré score is matched by her filigree gestures. She seems to carry on a flirtation with her hands as they twist and flex. Rubies links a jazzy, kinetic style to Stravinsky’s Capriccio, with a central duet where both Leta Biasucci and Angelica Generosa make auspicious debuts. Biasucci, a relative newcomer to PNB, has been leaping from strength to strength, and her pairing with Jonathan Porretta feels freshly coached and vividly danced. Generosa cultivates a sassy and flirtatious

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arts&culture» Performance Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

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flicks of yore. JewelBox Theater at the Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., scarlettohairdye.com. $18–$30. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4, 7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. BURLESCO DIVINO: WINE IN ROME It’s hard to imagine an over-the-top version of Federico Fellini, but burlesque artist Lily Verlaine has managed to channel La Dolce Vita in this fantastical combination of 1960s Italian indulgence and classic “sword and sandal” epic films. With her producing partner Jasper McCann, Verlaine’s work is an homage to vintage burlesque, a combination of irony and sweetness. SANDRA KURTZ The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, burlescodivino. com. $32–$47. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1–Thurs., Oct. 2; 7 & 10:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3–Sat., Oct. 4. (Early shows 17 and over, late shows 21 and over.) CAMPFIRE Improv scenes based on spooky ghost stories. Unexpected Productions’ Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, unexpectedproductions.org. $10. Opens Oct. 2. 8:30 p.m. Thurs. Ends Oct. 30. CLUES Jet City’s board-game-based improvised murder mystery. Jet City Improv, 5510 University Way N.E., 3528291, jetcityimprov.org. $12–$15. Opens Oct. 2. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri. Ends Nov. 21. THE EDGE Bainbridge Island’s own improv troupe. Bainbridge Performing Arts, 200 Madison Ave. N., Bainbridge Island, 842-8569, bainbridgeperforming arts.org. $12–$16. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4. EPISODE MW: THE CABARET Mathew Wright, ArtsWest’s new artistic director, hosts this fundraiser. ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., artswest.org. $100–$250. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. KINKY BOOTS Inspired by a true story (and movie) about a repurposed shoe factory, with a score by Cyndi Lauper. 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900, 5thavenue.org. $45.25 and up. Previews begin Oct. 7, opens Oct. 9. 7:30 p.m. Tues.–Wed., 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., 1:30 & 7 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 26. THE PILLOWMAN An author’s short stories contain creepy resemblances to a series of child murders in this edgy drama. SecondStory Repertory, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425-881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. $27. Preview Oct. 2, opens Oct. 3. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 18. QUEER RUSSIA Meet the LGBTQ figures who shaped the country’s culture and destiny. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org. $10–$15. 7 p.m. Tues., Oct. 7. REPRESENT Staged readings of new works by playwrights of color. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org. Pay what you will. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3–Sat., Oct. 4, 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. SPIN THE BOTTLE The October edition of Annex’s variety show includes “undulating torsos,” “merry tunefulness,” “a fusion of innocence and the macabre,” and much more. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre.org. $5–$10. 11 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. SUPRALIMINAL Seattle Immersive Theatre’s interactive tale about the paranormal, both set in and staged at the Georgetown Steam Plant. Meet at South Seattle College, 6000 16th Ave. S.W., and you’ll be bused there. seattleimmersivetheatre.org. $50. Opens Oct. 3. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Nov. 1. THE VAUDEVILLIANS Two 1920s musicians, played by Jerick Hoffer and Richard Andriessen, are frozen and thaw out a century later to perform songs by Janis Joplin and Gloria Gaynor. It’s being called a “vintage cabaret with a twist of drag,” and New York and Australia loved it. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $17–$67. Previews begin Oct. 3, opens Oct. 8. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun. plus some matinees; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 2. WAITING IN THE WINGS The Endangered Species Project presents Noel Coward’s funny and bittersweet story about former stage actresses living in a not-sofancy retirement home. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org. $10–$15. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. THE WOLF AND THE WITCH Classic fairy tales are mashed up with details (painful, we hope) from your life in this improv show. Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., seattleexperimentaltheater.com. $12–$15. Opens Oct. 3. 8 p.m. Fri–Sat. plus 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 12. Ends Oct. 12.

CURRENT RUNS

THE BUNNER SISTERS The Athena Theatre Project’s

inaugural show is this Edith Wharton adaptation. Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., 800-8383006, athenatheatreproject.org. $15–$22. 8 p.m. Wed.– Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 5.

barbershop quartet drops dead (I love it already!), they have to scramble for a replacement in John Markus and Mark St. Germain’s comedy with music. Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707. $15–$40. Runs Wed.–Sat; see taproottheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 18. THE GARDEN OF RIKKI TIKKI TAVI Friendship and cooperation are the messages in this adaptation of a classic Kipling tale. Seattle Children’s Theatre, Seattle Center, 441-3322. $15–$36. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see sct. org for exact schedule. Ends Nov. 9. GO, DOG. GO! A musical version of P.D. Eastman’s classic children’s book. Second Story Repertory, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425-881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. $5–$10. 1 & 3 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends Oct. 19. HITCHCOCK Improv in the style of the master of film suspense. Unexpected Productions’ Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, unexpectedproductions.org. $5–$7. 8:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 12. HOUSE OF INK In this improvised murder mystery, authors get bumped off one by one.Unexpected Productions’ Market Theater, 1428 Post Alley, unexpectedproductions.org. $5–$7. 10 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Oct. 4. I AM OF IRELAND Subtitled “A Celebration in Story, Song, and Dance,” Book-It stages tales by Yeats and others. Center Theatre at the Armory, Seattle Center, 216-0833. $25. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see book-it.org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 12. IN THE HEIGHTS See Village Theatre’s percolating production and be baffled anew at why this show hasn’t earned the fanatical popularity of Wicked or inspired the critical orgasms of The Book of Mormon. Sixty years ago, Lin-Manuel Miranda (music and lyrics) and Quiara Alegría Hudes (book) would have inked a Hollywood deal during intermission of opening night, so solid and surefire is their 2008 story of the changes that beset residents of Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood during two sultry summer days. The show’s challenges are not only emotional—from one scene to the next, it’s a roller-coaster from humor to anger to tragedy to salsa-driven joy—but technical too. In particular, the opening and closing numbers of Act 1 mix dialogue sung, spoken, and rapped in intricate succession with dance and, in the finale, a blacked-out stage. Nobody misses a beat of either kind, even though the show’s packed with incident and necessarily fast-paced. But everything lands; everything works; every song, scene, and bit gets its most impactful tempo and weight as guided by director Eric Ankrim. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N. Issaquah, 425392-2202. $35–$67. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see villagetheatre. org for exact schedule. Ends Oct. 26 (then moves to Everett Oct. 31–Nov. 23). GAVIN BORCHERT MARY’S WEDDING New Century Theatre Company presents Stephen Massicotte’s reality-blurring play about a WWI romance. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., wearenctc.org. $15–$30. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. plus Mon., Oct. 6. Ends Oct. 11. THE MOUNTAINTOP Katori Hall’s portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. imagines him on the night before his assassination. ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., 938-0339, artswest.org. $15–$34.50. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 5. OUT OF STERNO No, it’s not about a camping cookout mishap; Sterno is the mythical place the heroine escapes from in Deborah Zoe Laufer’s absurdist fairy tale. Burien Actors Theatre, 14501 Fourth Ave. S.W., Burien, 242-5180, burienactorstheatre.org. $7–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Oct. 19. SEASCAPE Two couples—one of them lizards—discuss “humanity, evolution, and the concept of time” in Albee’s play. Theater Schmeater, 2125 Third Ave., 324-5801, schmeater.org. $18–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Oct. 11. SLIP/SHOT SEE REVIEW, PAGE 21.

Hollywood Genius The very opening of Erich Korngold’s violin concerto demonstrates why he was the premier film composer of the silver screen’s Golden Age. The solo violin’s upward-arcing first phrase climaxes, and lingers, on a note outside the main key, D major; that G-sharp wants— BY GAVIN BORCHERT desires— aches to resolve up to the satisfying A, but the phrase instead collapses back down. (So close!) The violin tries again, reaching even higher—and at last settles into some kind of repose. The thwarted yearning in this eight-bar minidrama encapsulates all the romantic agony ever put onscreen by Warner Bros., the studio where Korngold was based from the mid-’30s to mid-’40s. This 1947 concerto came toward the end of his extraordinary career—which began as a supernaturally gifted child prodigy in Vienna and took a life-altering turn when Max Reinhardt asked him to come to L.A. to adapt the score for the director’s ravishing A Midsummer Night’s Dream. (The rise of the Third Reich, of course, was additional incentive.) Philippe Quint (pictured), who’ll play the concerto this weekend with the Seattle Symphony, first encountered it via the classic recording by Jascha Heifetz (who premiered it in 1947), and immediately set to learn it. Quint’s own 2009 recording of the piece was nominated for a Grammy, so unsurprisingly he was the violinist invited to step in on two weeks’ notice when Hilary Hahn, the scheduled soloist, had to drop out. A fervent Korngold advocate, Quint sees him as the natural, and fully worthy, successor to the late-Romantic line of Wagner-Mahler-Strauss, calling him “one of the greatest musical minds”

EARSUPPLY

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TEATRO ZINZANNI: BEAUMOUNT & CASWELL IN HACIENDA HOLIDAY TZ favorites Christine Deaver

and Kevin Kent return for a slapstick holiday adventure. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $99 and up. Runs Thurs.–Sun. plus some Wed.; see zinzanni. com/seattle for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 31.

Dance

KARIN STEVENS DANCE Sometimes the music came

first, sometimes the dance in this evening of new work in collaboration with the Sam Boshnack Quintet. Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave., 800-838-3006, karinstevensdance.com. $15–$22. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3– Sat., Oct. 4. MEN IN DANCE SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 19. PACIFIC NORTHWEST BALLET SEE REVIEW, PAGE 21.

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Classical, Etc. SYMPHONY SEE EAR SUPPLY, ABOVE. • SEATTLE • BROKEN BOW ENSEMBLE This new-musicmin, of

chamber orchestra premieres John Teske’s which he says “The theme is ‘intention’—where individuals and groups place their focus and how they make choices. As the piece progresses, musicians are given more freedom to choose how they relate to each other and the written material.” Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave., N., waywardmusic.org. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 2. SEATTLE SYMPHONY A one-hour “Untuxed” concert of chamber music and a symphony (the Ninth) by Dvorak. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 2154747, seattlesymphony.org. $24–$81. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. MUSICAL VOICES FROM MYANMAR Selfexplanatory, unless you weren’t aware Myanmar is another name for Burma. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music. washington.edu. Free. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. SCRAPE New music for strings from this cleverly named group. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave., N., jimknappmusic.com/scrape. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. THE ESOTERICS SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 20. CLARINETTISSIMO Recitals, master classes, vendors, and more. Seattle Pacific University, 3214 Fourth Ave. W., osbornmusic.com. Free. Noon–8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4 (concert at 6), noon–9 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5 (concert at 7). BYRD ENSEMBLE Choral music from the Spanish renaissance. St. Mark’s Cathedral, 1245 10th Ave., E., 3973627, byrdensemble.com. $10–$20. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4. BRANFORD MARSALIS From this sax master, baroque works with the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.

•  •  • 

and pointing out that “It’s Korngold that created that Hollywood sound”—in other words, this concerto doesn’t sound like movie music; movie music sounds like it. (Though Korngold does repurpose a few themes from his Warner Bros. scores.) On his own recording, Quint brings the piece a slight nervous energy, a febrility, a plangent tone I haven’t heard in other renditions; it’s a sit-up-on-the-edge-of-your seat performance rather than a lie-back-and-wallow one, which the piece’s cushioned opulence invites. This may be because, Quint revealed to me in a phone interview, it’s a live recording. Considering this will be his Seattle debut and his first collaboration with conductor Ludovic Morlot, and that he’s the hero who saved Korngold for the SSO audience, the energy should get turned up higher still. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 2154747, seattlesymphony.org. $20–$125. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 2, 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4.

MARIE DANIELS

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

BEAST ISLAND A burlesque salute to low-grade horror

THE FABULOUS LIPITONES When one member of a

org. $10–$55. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4.

• TRIO PARDALOTE Their ongoing series of

Shostakovich’s 15 string quartets (they’re up to number 12) makes room for Britten and Irving Fine too. Kenyon Hall, 7904 35th Ave. S.W., triopardalote. wordpress.com. $5–$14. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4.

SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER • ORCHESTRA Opening their season with a curious misSINGERS

cellany; Bach, Wagner, Johann Strauss, and a new work by Seattle composer Victor Noriega. First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., 800-838-3006, osscs.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4. SEATTLE REPERTORY JAZZ ORCHESTRA The music of Count Basie enlivens their 20th anniversary celebration. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 7:30 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4; Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., Kirkland, 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. $15–$47. 523-6159, srjo.org. SEATTLE SYMPHONY CHAMBER MUSIC Mahler, Brahms, and, yes, Dvorak from SSO players. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 215-4747, seattle symphony.org. $39. 2 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. ISABELLE DEMERS Performing on the Watjen Concert Organ, program TBA. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $20–$31. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. TAI MURRAY From this violinist, Pärt’s Fratres and sonatas by Debussy and Corigliano, with pianist Ashley Wass. PONCHO Concert Hall, Cornish College, 710 E. Roy St., cornish edu. $10–$22. 8 p.m. Wed., Oct. 8.

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B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended


» Visual Arts TOWN HALL

Openings & Events JAMES BROWN AND PAUL METIVIER No, this is not

a collection of work from the soul-singing legend. This particular James Brown trades in abstracted oil paintings on linen, while Metivier offers some terra cotta busts of various animals heads. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Gallery I|M|A, 123 S. Jackson St., 625-0055, galleryima.com. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tues.Sat. Ends Nov. 1. ROMSON REGARDE BUSTILLO Long Stories features the local artist’s complex patterned-paper work, which attempts to delve into the universality of our personal stories. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Gallery4Culture, 101 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 296-8674, 4culture.org. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Ends Oct. 30. CHRISTOPHER CULLEN This first lecture in a new series on the scientific history of East Asia features the Cambridge scholar speaking on historical Chinese concepts of the heavens. Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect St. (Volunteer Park., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $5-$10. 9:30 a.m. Sat., Oct. 4.

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ZANETKA KRALOVA GAWRONSKI AND TONY DATTILO Gawronski shows her sculpture and paint-

ings alongside Dattilo’s woodwork and ink drawings. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Core Gallery, 117 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 467-4444, coregallery.com. Noon-6 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Oct. 25.

M.C. ESCHER, TOMIYUKI SAKUTA, & TYNA ONTKO Surrealism is the name of the game at

Davidson this month—prints from the optical madman Escher will tessellate alongside Sakuta’s 100 portraits of bizarre faces and Ontko’s morhping, paper-cut installations. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Davidson Galleries, 313 Occidental Ave. S., 624-7684, davidsongalleries.com. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tues-Sat. Ends Nov. 14. HANDIEDAN AND SAIL These two artists both go by one name. Handiedan shows new collage work in Vesica Piscis. Sail creates narrative drawings in ink, collected in Canna Intrat. First Thursday reception, 6-9 p.m. Roq La Rue Gallery, 532 First Ave. S., 374-8977, roqlarue.com. Ends Nov. 1. ANDREA JOYCE HEIMER AND JOE MAX EMMINGER Both of the artists wield a certain sto-

whale myths, while Rorick’s work displays her Haida ancestral tradition of spruce root weaving. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Stonington Gallery, 125 S. Jackson St., 405-4040, stoningtongallery.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Mon.-Sun. Ends Oct. 31. GEORGE RODRIGUEZ Beautiful local ceramic art that at times recalls the imagery of the Dia De Los Muertos celebrations in Oaxaca. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 622-2833, fosterwhite.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 5.

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PRESTON SINGLETARY AND APRIL SURGENT

They show new works in glass. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Traver Gallery, 110 Union St., 587-6501, travergallery.com. Ends Oct. 25.

UNCHAIN UNDERGROUND STORIES OF AMERICA

Robert Horton, Roosevelt Lewis and Chaz Lindsey each interpret their vision of the black experience in America through work that confronts and explores slavery, iconic leaders, and socioeconomic empowerment. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Gallery 110, 110 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 624-9336, gallery110.com. Noon-5 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Nov. 1. WARHOL IN SEATTLE His less-seen, musically themed works will be on display and sale. Opening 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. Sole Repair, 1001 E. Pike St, solerepair.com. Ends Oct. 6. LISA WEDERQUIST Desert Rhythms collects her Southwestern landscape paintings. Reception, 6-8 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. The Island Gallery, 400 Winslow Way E. (Bainbridge), 780-9500, theislandgallery. net. 11 a.m. -6 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Ends Nov. 2. EMILY WOOD To the East shows her new landscapes, painted on the far side of the Cascades. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Lisa Harris Gallery, 1922 Pike Place, 443-3315, lisaharrisgallery.com. Ends Nov. 1.

Ongoing

THE ART OF GAMAN The subtitle of this group show

reveals its sad starting point: Arts & Crafts From the Japanese-American Internment Camps, 1942–1946. Over 120 objects are on view, many of them humble wood carvings, furniture, even toys made from scrap items at Minidoka or Manzanar. The more polished drawings come from professional artists like Ruth Asawa, Jimmy Tsutomu Mirikitani, Chiura Obata, and Henry Sugimoto. Some of the more touching items—like a samurai figurine made from wood scraps, shells, and bottle caps—come from family collections, not museums. As for the show’s title, gaman roughly translates as “enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity.” BRIAN MILLER Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts.org, $8-$10, Tues.-Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Oct. 12. CHEMTRAILS Did you know that the feds are employing airplanes to spray airborne chemicals on civilians in order to brainwash us/construct a malevolent New World Order/conceal the one and only, totally-not-dead Tupac Shakur from the public eye? Seven painters, illustrators, and photographers take on the world’s most out-there conspiracy theory in this group show, which will likely land you on a watch list. Wikstrom Gallery, 5411 Meridian Ave. N., 633-5544, bromwikstrom.com. Noon-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Oct. 24. CHEN SHAOXIONG The contemporary Chinese artist shows new video works and their source drawings in the exhibit Ink. History. Media, which is inspired by historical photos of major events from 1909-2009. Seattle Asian Art Museum, $5-$7. Weds.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Oct. 19.

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(10/1) EBBC: Sam Harris (10/2) Lucinda Franks Robert Morgenthau’s Unlikely Love Story (10/3) NWAPS: Molly Melching Community Development From the Ground Up (10/3) Paul Dorpat & Jean Sherrard ‘First Hill and Beyond’ (10/6) Penny U Imagining Tomorrow’s Work (10/6) Nicholas Carr Human Consequences of Technology (10/7) Cristina Eisenberg Benefits of Carnivore Conservation (10/7) Ignite! Seattle (10/8) Health Matters Obamacare at One Year

in This Bring T And ge n o Coup er iz T e p p one A 2 oFF! For 1/

(10/8) University Book Store Stephin Merritt TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(10/9) Marcelo Gleiser WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG Finding the Universe’s ‘Ultimate Truth’ (10/9) **SOLD OUT** Village Theatre’s Production of CornelDisney West and Cameron Mackintosh’s Rekindling ‘Black Prophetic Fire’ (10/10) Earshot Jazz Festival: Opening Celebration Monk 10/10 (10/11&12) **SOLD OUT** A Musical Based On ‘Says You!’ The Stories of P.L. Travers

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B Y K E LT O N S E A R S

Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

On Stage Nov 13, 2014 - Jan 4, 2015

VillageTheatre.org Box Office: (425) 392-2202

SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

rybook and often surreal sensibility in their acrylic work. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Linda Hodges Gallery, 316 First Ave. S., 624-3034, lindahodgesgallery.com. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 1. KATY HORAN The spooky, folklore-loving illustrator shows her whimsical, ghost-filled drawings at this solo exhibition. First Thursday opening reception, 5-9 p.m. Flatcolor Gallery, 77 S. Main St., 390-6537, flatcolor. com. Noon-6 p.m. Wed.-Sat. Ends Oct. 31. KAMLA KAKARIA After an incapacitating surgery, Kakaria began incessantly observing and painting the fish in her pond. First Thursday opening reception, 5-8 p.m. Shift Gallery, 312 S. Washington St. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), shiftgallery.org. Noon-5 p.m. Fri.Sat., Ends Oct. 24. JAMES KEY AND CHRIS DUFALA Key displays his encaustic “landscapes” alongside Dufala’s sculptures. Both thier work critiques modern humanity’s relationship to technology and industry. First Thursday opening reception, 5-8 p.m. Hall Spassov Gallery, 319 Third Ave. S., 223-0816, hallspassov.com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Oct. 31. LINEAGE: UW FACULTY & STUDENTS This retrospective takes a look at the work of the heavy-hitting artists who have graduated from UW’s hallowed halls, including Chuck Close, Jacob Lawrence, Roger Shimomura, and Doris Chase. First Thursday opening reception, 4-7 p.m. Seattle artREsource, 625 First Ave., 838-2695, seattleartresource.com. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tues.-Sat. Ends Nov. 22. CARRIE MCGEE Suspensions displays her new creations in colorful dangling acrylic squares. First Thursday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Patricia Rovzar Gallery, 1225 Second Ave., 223-0273, rovzargallery. com. Ends Oct. 31. MATERIAL IN MIND: WOMEN AND STEEL In this group show, seven female artists tackle metal. First Thursday reception, 6-8 p.m. SOIL Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264-8061, soilart. org. Noon-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sun. Ends Nov. 1. OF THE ART, BY THE ART, FOR THE ART To celebrate its 26th anniversary and possible move, A/NT is opening up this exhibition to any artists who want to participate. Opening reception 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4. A/NT Gallery, 2045 Westlake Ave., 233-0680, antgallery. com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Weds.-Sun. Ends Oct. 31.

PREVIEW

QWALSIUS SHAUN PETERSON AND ISABEL RORICK Peterson’s mixed media work deals in Salish

SCIENCE

(10/1) Chris Taylor The ‘Star Wars’ Spell

36TH ANNUAL AUCTION GALA • PILCHUCK’S Pilchuck celebrates its new storefront

in Pioneer Square with this preview of its upcoming gala. First Thursday opening, 5-8 p.m. Pilchuck Glass School, 240 Second Ave. S., 621-8422, pilchuck.com. NEW MEMBERS EXHIBITION Seven new gallery members show their stuff: Brandon Aleson, Elizabeth Gahan, Shelly Leavens, Ray Mack, Nate Steigenga, Liz Tran, and Brad Winchester. First Thursday opening reception, 5-8 p.m. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org. Noon-5 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. Ends Nov. 1.

CIVICS

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a&c»Books Author Events SAM HARRIS He’s the author of Waking Up: A Guide to

Spirituality Without Religion. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $30, 7:30 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1. COURTNEY MORENO Her lesbian romance In Case of Emergency also involves PTSD and the Iraq War. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1. DIANE MULDROW She’s the author of Everything I Need to Know About Christmas I Learned From a Little Golden Book. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, bookstore.washington.edu. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1. JOSEPH O’NEILL The Dog is the latest novel from the prize-winning writer. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. 7 p.m. Wed., Oct. 1. ALIX CHRISTIE She reads from her historical novel Gutenberg’s Apprentice. (Also: Eagle Harbor, 1 p.m. Weds.) Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. LUCINDA FRANKS Timeless: Love, Morgenthau, and Me is her memoir of marriage to the legendary Manhattan DA Robert Morgenthau. Town Hall, $5, 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. TED KOOSER A past Pulitzer winner, he reads from his poetry collection Splitting an Order. Chihuly Garden and Glass (Seattle Center), lectures.org. $15-$50. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. JOHN MARZLUFF The local naturalist talks about his Welcome to Subirdia: Sharing Our Neighborhoods with Wrens, Robins, Woodpeckers, and Other Wildlife. University Book Store, 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 2. KIRK SMITH His science-themed novel is Vanessa’s Curve of Mind. University Book Store, 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. ERIKA T. WURTH The visiting novelist (Crazy Horse’s Girlfriend) joins in a discussion with fellow Native American writers Casandra Lopez and Elissa Washuta. Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., 322-7030, hugohouse.org. 7 p.m. Fri., Oct. 3. BRANDON BOYD So the Echo collects the art and other musings of the musician behind Incubus. University Book Store, 6 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4. YASMINE GALENORN Priestess Dreaming is her new fantasy tome. Seattle Mystery Bookshop, 117 Cherry St., 587-5737, seattlemystery.com. Noon, Sat., Oct. 4. KIMBERLY BEYER-NELSON & GLENNA TETI Their new books are, respectively, Yeshua’s Yoga and Threshold: Poetry and Ponderings. Eagle Harbor Books, 157 Winslow Way E. (Bainbridge Island), 842-5332, eagleharborbooks.com. 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. JACK STRAW WRITERS Laurel Albina, Margot Kahn, Jane Wong, and Susan V. Meyers share their work. Elliott Bay, 3 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5. BEN LERNER The author of Leaving the Atocha Station reads from his newest novel, called 10:04. Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. CALEB SCHARF His new science history is The Copernicus Complex. University Book Store, 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6.

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STGPRESENTS.ORG (877) 784-4849

EST. 1907 2ND AVE & VIRGINIA ST

STGPRESENTS.ORG (877) 784-4849

EST. 1928 9TH AVE & PINE ST

ALMOND, DAVID SHIELDS, & WHITNEY • STEVEAlmond, author of Against Football: One Fan’s

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

OTTO

24

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GROUPS OF 10 OR MORE CALL (206) 315-8054 FOR SINGLE TICKETS CALL (877) 784-4849

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Reluctant Manifesto, joins with the local writers in a discussion of all things NFL. Richard Hugo House, $7. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. NICHOLAS CARR The journalist talks about his The Glass Cage: Automation and Us. Town Hall, $5. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. The omnivorous Boston intellec• STEVEN PINKERThe Sense of Style: The Thinking tual discusses his Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century. Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., 296-6000, seattleu.edu. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6. KATHERINE APPLEGATE She tells a sad primate tale in Ivan: The Remarkable True Story of the Shopping Mall Gorilla. University Book Store, 6 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7. You’ve seen his photos online, now • SETH CASTEEL collected in Underwater Puppies. Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7. CRISTINA EISENBERG The naturalist will discuss The Carnivore Way. Town Hall, $5. 7:30 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7. • GARTH STEIN A Sudden Light is his new novel about the legacy of a Northwest timber fortune; he’ll discuss the book with former radio host Steve Scher. Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 7. BY B R IA N M I LLE R

EST. 1907 2ND AVE & VIRGINIA ST

Send events to books@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended


arts&culture» Film

PGone Girl OPENS FRI., OCT. 3 AT SUNDANCE, SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN, AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED R. 145 MINUTES.

was precisely plotting against Nick with colored Post-It Notes. And Nick, when red panties are found in his college office, can’t be sure if they were left by his wife or an amorous student. How the hell did these two end up together? Flynn’s foundational joke answers that question with a satire of marriage. The movie poster and tabloid-TV plot suggest a standard I-didn’t-kill-my-wife tale, but matrimony is

PLast Days in Vietnam OPENS FRI., OCT. 3 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 98 MINUTES.

Kelly & Cal OPENS FRI., OCT. 3 AT SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 109 MINUTES.

Sexless in suburbia: Lewis and Hopkins.

How, short of total victory, do you end a war? The question has been haunting our military and political leaders since Korea. And though Rory Kennedy’s sobering new doc focuses on the last few desperate days of the Vietnam War, 40 years ago, its lessons are surely applicable today in Iraq, Afghanistan, and whatever the hell it is we call ISIS. Kennedy, director of Last Days of Abu Ghraib and daughter of RFK, is obviously super-connected. She gets Kissinger on camera, plus other veterans of Nixon’s White House, but the bulk of the testimony here comes from guys who were actually on the ground in Saigon—soldiers (American and Vietnamese), a CIA agent, embassy staffers, and the stray journalist or two. These fresh interviews are coupled with vivid archival news footage from a time when photojournalists were on the frontlines. They filmed on both sides of the U.S. embassy walls as a terrified tidal wave of humanity sought evacuation before the North Vietnamese Army overran Saigon in late April 1975. Kennedy’s task is now to make sense of that chaos.

The airlift of April 29.

Direct U.S. involvement in the war had concluded with the 1973 peace accords; but, as in Baghdad today, a sizable American contingent remained. Then Nixon resigned after Watergate, and North Vietnamese fears of new carpet bombing were dispelled. President Ford couldn’t get any military-assistance funds out of Congress (no surprise), and the NVA began its swift, relentless drive south. With a deluded ambassador in charge, his men began a covert evacuation plan that would also include thousands of Vietnamese (despite orders and U.S. immigration laws): girlfriends, wives and families, friends, and brothers-in-arms. (“We gotta save the tailor!” says one attaché whose suits he made.) There’s intrigue in these brave tales that occasionally recalls Argo, only with an unhappy outcome for all those natives left behind (some of whom Kennedy interviews). The helicopters frantically shuttled thousands to U.S. ships, and one Navy commander says the accompanying boatlift “looked like something out of Exodus.” Does he mean the Bible, the Leon Uris novel, or the movie? The analogy works in all senses. Events here took place only three decades after the Holocaust and the postwar partition of Europe. How could we Americans not feel guilty about our past failures? Starting with the best intentions, our country became the retreating imperial arbiter between the drowned and the saved. Kennedy hardly has to say it, but the same unhappy situation exists today. BRIAN MILLER

The Liberator OPENS FRI., OCT. 3 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. RATED R. 118 MINUTES.

The Great Man school of biography is alive—if not particularly well—in The Liberator. A quick glimpse of unloving parents, a tragic lost love, reluctant heroism, sweeping battle scenes, and of course a charismatic international star: All are part of the once-over-lightly treatment. The great man in question is Simón Bolívar (1783–1830), the George Washington of South America; the star is Édgar Ramírez, whose dashing performance as the Jackal in the three-part Carlos bagged him roles in Hollywood projects like Clash of the Titans and Deliver Us From Evil. Because the Venezuelan-born Bolívar’s goal was nothing less than the liberation of an entire continent from colonial rule, there’s a lot to cram into a two-hour movie. This means historical complexity is sidelined in favor of scenes in which Bolívar is nobly seated on the back of a charging horse, or clutched in the embrace of a beautiful woman while assassins lurk outside the hacienda. The images are handsome, but they don’t make much sense. The movie looks as though it has a budget, so the battle scenes are credible enough. Beyond the appeal of the physical production, director

SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

what’s being murdered here. Role playing and mundane daily deceptions— “No, honey, your breath doesn’t stink in the morning”—are integral to the daily maintenance of the nest. Then, scrutinized by the media circus, all those necessary little lies begin to look pathological. Nick becomes the scorned sap because of his untruths; but what really damns him in the movie’s intricate plot is his credulity—he believed in Amy too much. And here let’s add that Flynn has clearly studied the dark, twisty movies in which Barbara Stanwyck and Fred MacMurray used to star in the ’40s. Shades of Laura hang over Amy’s ghostly televised image, too. Gone Girl is all about manipulation—Fincher’s stock in trade, really, which helps make the film such cynical, mean-spirited fun. It’s not Coen Brothers-funny, but black humor helps mitigate the late-film geyser of blood. (There’s only one body in the film, and not the one you expect.) In a key, creepy role, Neil Patrick Harris gets to coin a new catchphrase with “Octopus and Scrabble!” And Flynn lets Nick and Amy supply the movie’s motto: “All we do is cause each other pain.” “That’s marriage.” BRIAN MILLER

IFC/SUNDANCE SELECTS

Likable characters are a curse in Hollywood. Studios want someone relatable, someone personable, someone who looks friendly on the cover of Us magazine. What the movies emphatically don’t like is a dour mug like Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) staring at them on a tabloid TV show: five o’clock shadow, dimple, a drinker’s saggy eyes, unsmiling and seemingly unloving about his missing (and presumed murdered) wife Amy (Rosamund Pike). What’s exceptional about Gillian Flynn’s adaptation of her 2012 novel, directed with acid fidelity by David Fincher, is that Gone Girl doesn’t like most of its characters either. Those who aren’t sociopaths are numbskulls or clowns. Ozark hillbillies and TV hucksters stroll through the action, along with nitwit trust-funders and desperate housewives. What’s to like? Who’s to like? And where to start with a movie brimming with plot twists and sudden reversals of perspective? For those like me who didn’t read Flynn’s bestseller, I’ll say that the small-town Missouri police investigation (led by Kim Dickens, from Treme and Sons of Anarchy) goes entirely against Nick for the first hour. He behaves like an oaf and does most everything to make himself the prime suspect, despite wise counsel from his sister (Carrie Coon) and lawyer (a surprisingly effective, enjoyable Tyler Perry). Second hour, still no body, but flashbacks turn us against the absent Amy. (Here the English Pike, of the current Hector and the Search for Happiness, gets to try on a New Orleans accent and embrace her inner trailer-park diva.) Fincher takes his time with the story—probably too much time for those expecting a straightforward thriller. He’s a famous crime-procedural perfectionist (e.g. Seven and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo) not much known for a sense of humor, so the perverse levity I’ll attribute to Flynn. As we slowly investigate the Dunnes’ very flawed marriage, funny little kernels of bile begin to explode underfoot. Control-freak Amy, as it turns out,

MERRICK MORTON/20TH CENTURY FOX

Pike as the girl in question.

Kelly is a onetime ’90s riot grrrl, now a domesticated new mom and prisoner of suburbia. Who better to play the part than Juliette Lewis, a survivor of such wild-child projects as Natural Born Killers and Strange Days and a veteran musician known for her theatrical caterwauling? Lewis lends lived-in credibility to the otherwise bogus Kelly & Cal, a stilted indie without a compass. Kelly is new to the neighborhood, shunned by the local ladies (they suggest she consult their website if she’d like to join their social group), and ignored by husband Josh ( Josh Hopkins), who’s at the office all day. And so she starts hanging out with local teen Cal ( Jonny Weston, from Chasing Mavericks), a paraplegic who makes it clear he’s interested in Kelly’s body as well as her sassy punk-rock attitude. A series of contrivances allows the plot to unfold: Josh’s mother (Cybill Shepherd, spacey as ever) and sister (Lucy Owen) insist on tending the new baby in the afternoons—they consider Kelly’s blue hair dye a sign of post-partum mental illness—thus making plenty of free time for Kelly to lounge around in Cal’s garage. Even if you’re with the movie thus far and sympathetic to the trapped feelings of the title characters, there’s a moment when director Jen McGowan and screenwriter Amy Lowe Starbin fumble it all away: Kelly plays a cassette from her music days for Cal, and the song—“Moist Towelette”—rings out. I couldn’t tell whether the movie wants us to take this straight or as a parody of a riot-grrrl anthem; either way, it makes Kelly look idiotic (the sound is good, but the lyrics are impossible). In fact, “Moist Towelette” and an end-credits tune called “Change” were written and performed by Lewis in the mode of something her character might create. The film becomes increasingly unbelievable, but the most annoying thing about it is the failure to commit. Kelly & Cal doesn’t have the nerve to go all the way with its more troubling implications, so it stays on the surface throughout. In the movie universe, there must be a place for the curious lost-girl presence of someone like Juliette Lewis, but if this film gets the casting right, it blows the execution. ROBERT HORTON

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Pacific AGGRESSION

All the ladies love Bolívar (Ramírez).

Alberto Arvelo goes for the well-worn anecdote—the equivalent of Washington’s cherry tree or Lincoln’s rail-splitting. A sequence in which Bolívar thrashes the native boy who steals his boots, then reconsiders his privileged reaction, is offered as a classic turning-point parable. This approach leaves aside much of the complicated business of geopolitics, although the recurring figure of an English banker (Danny Huston) stands in for all the outsiders waiting to profit from whatever happens after the revolution. Screenwriter Timothy J. Sexton provides enough scenes of Bolívar delivering speeches to guarantee some rousing rhetoric, and the movie does stir to life whenever an all-or-nothing battle looms. (The musical score is by wonder-boy L.A. Philharmonic conductor Gustavo Dudamel.) The brawny Ramírez handles both speechifying and swordplay with aplomb, and he suggests just enough of Bolívar’s aristocratic blood to keep the character from becoming saintly—Ramírez always looks as though he might be tempted back into lying in a hammock and eating peeled grapes. That’s not enough to save the movie, which never rises above the level of a dutiful classroom essay. ROBERT HORTON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

Pacific Aggression

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Local filmmaker Shaun Scott’s history-infused love story is superficially a case of opposites attracting. Native American college student Meryl (Libby Matthews) is cyber-stalking New York author Frank (Trevor Young Marston), whom she met on a book tour two years before. She embraces the Web and social media—so much so that she’s undergoing a “digital cleanse” with her shrink (Marya Sea Kaminski). Frank, though he’s blocked on his next book project, meanwhile disdains the Internet—until his editor convinces him it’s the best way to promote his new travelogue. This, conveniently, takes him back to Seattle, where Meryl is waiting, though Pacific Aggression bides its time in reuniting the pair. First, Scott wants to educate the viewer about the history of Washington state and the West in general. He makes Frank a history buff, fond of watching old cowboy movies in motel rooms. Frank’s ruminations on the frontier, like Meryl’s

explication of her heritage, are illustrated via eclectic old archival footage. Scott has employed this hybrid approach before in his 100% Off: A Recession-Era Romance, couching a fictional tale in its socioeconomic context. This makes Pacific Aggression as much a lesson, often talky, as a romance—which is equally talky. Frank and Meryl are staunch literary types, and their constant musings give the movie an epistolary feel. Around them, a few supporting characters also add to the swirling debate. (You’d like to see more of Kaminski, a noted local stage actress, who performs a silent meltdown while listening to the car radio.) Just as one expects Frank and Meryl to eventually connect, one hopes all these discursive lines will eventually land on a solid thesis. Pacific Aggression is nothing if not ambitious by local film standards, with interests that extend to uranium mining near Spokane and the A-bomb dropped on Hiroshima. That’s a lot for Scott, let alone his characters, to chew; and the easy part is simply to supply his lovers with a happy ending. The greater challenge, where this smartly engaged movie falls a little short, is to reconcile the broader underlying conflicts behind the love story. And yet, how many couples ever put past differences behind them? BRIAN MILLER

Pump OPENS FRI., OCT. 3 AT SUNDANCE. NOT RATED. 88 MINUTES.

This new advocacy doc is essentially the bastard child of Who Killed the Electric Car? and Fuel (also directed by Joshua Tickell). If you’re in the market for a Nissan Leaf, if you’re eager to run your present car on biodiesel or other alternative fuel, if you’re keen on conspiracy theories, this movie is for you. Did you know that Prohibition was a gambit by Standard Oil baron John D. Rockefeller to prevent Henry Ford from allowing his cars to run on ethanol? In this version of history, uncorroborated by actual historians, the temperance movement never existed. Certainly Big Oil has had undue influence in Washington, D.C., but is that the only reason for the petro-monopoly of the marketplace? The film’s producers, affiliated with the Fuel Freedom Foundation, allow no such quibbles or nuance. Relentlessly optimistic and one-sided (even for those who may agree with that side), Pump is


too much the infomercial, with plugs for Elon Musk and Tesla, biofuel peddlers, and various hackers selling semi-legal fuel conversion kits. It takes 40 minutes of historical recap—Rockefeller, Ford, Nikola Tesla, OPEC, the Gulf Wars—to get to the film’s belabored thesis, which boils down to the cheerful twin mantras of empowerment and choice. Yes, electric cars—mostly powered by coal, let’s note—and flex-fuel vehicles are a good thing, but is Brazil, with its government-mandated sugar-cane fuel industry, really the right economic model for the U.S.? Pump insists so. So fixated is the film on the original sin of oil that it never for a moment addresses sprawl or mass transit. If you gave every Seattle-bound commuter a free Tesla, the city would become a giant, emission-free parking lot. Is oil the problem here or single-car driving from the suburbs? Pump makes no such distinctions. Jason Bateman narrates, though there is no mention of transportation alternatives like carpooling, the stair car, or hop-ons. BRIAN MILLER

PTracks OPENS FRI., OCT. 3 AT SUNDANCE. RATED PG-13. 102 MINUTES.

g all Playin KS W SEAHAMNF and es! Gam

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

Robyn (Wasikowska) and her camel train.

MATT NETTHEIM/WEINSTEIN CO.

Mia Wasikowska’s face, body language, and vocal delivery are in perfect harmony with the countryside that surrounds her in Tracks: human figure and landscape are equally mysterious and unforgiving. The place is the Australian desert, where in 1975 a young woman named Robyn Davidson determined she would walk the 1,700 miles from Alice Springs to the Indian Ocean. In writing a National Geographic article and subsequent best-selling book about the trek, Davidson offered little explanation for her impulse, and the movie is blunt about acknowledging that no coherent justification can be made on that score. She just needed to do it. Wasikowska’s skeptical gaze and stony delivery are ideal for this tough character, and the actress never makes a bid for likability. We observe Davidson as she puts in months of camel training—she’ll need them to carry her stuff for the trip—even before she actually leaves Alice Springs. Once on the path, she endures/exploits the expectations of National Geo-

graphic photographer Rick (Adam Driver, from Girls—a necessary warm presence in this severe portrait), as he periodically meets her along the long miles of desert scrub. She also has her dog, Diggity, who remains spirit animal and soulmate for the trip; the only other fellow trekker is Mr. Eddy (Rolley Mintuma), a garrulous if largely unintelligible aboriginal guide who helps Davidson tread respectfully around sacred sites for a few weeks. Beyond that, it’s sand and sun and willpower. Director John Curran (The Painted Veil) imagines this journey in an admirably terse way. We do hear Davidson’s words on the soundtrack, but for the most part the movie simply forges ahead; the romance-of-thedesert familiar from Lawrence of Arabia is kept at bay. This isn’t about conquering the land, but it’s not a reassuring journey of self-discovery, either—Davidson seems a little too close to yearning for oblivion for this to be about empowerment. If you’re getting the idea Tracks isn’t exactly cuddly, that’s true; it’s easier to get excited by something like Nicolas Roeg’s Walkabout (1971), a more lurid take on outback trekking, made just before Davidson took her real walkabout. But Tracks feels true in spirit to the kind of soul who really would take this journey, which explains why you’re right there with this solitary woman every step of the way.

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Local & Repertory ADVANCED STYLE This new documentary, based on

the New York street photography and blog of Ari Seth Cohen, salutes well-dressed women of a certain age. (NR) SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff. net. $7-$12. Opens Fri. BEETLEJUICE If Tim Burton’s later career has proven disappointing, you might beneficially go back to this enjoyable 1988 post-mortem comedy with Michael Keaton, Geena Davis, Alec Baldwin, and Winona Ryder—few of whom have been used so well since. Keaton plays the ghoul renowned for frightening interlopers out of the houses of the dead, and he has a great time doing it. The same is true of Burton’s work here, even though the joy has been slowly draining out of his work ever since. (PG) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema. com. $6-$8. 7 p.m. Fri.-Mon. THE BREACH Salmon prepared by Tom Douglas precedes the screening of this recent documentary about dam removal and salmon habitat restoration. (NR) SIFF Cinema Egyptian, 801 E. Pine St., 324-9996, siff.net. $25. 6 p.m. Mon. EGYPTIAN REOPENING SEE PAGE 20. JAPANESE GIRLS AT THE HARBOR This is a dinner and fundraiser for NWFF, beginning at nearby Shibumi Izakaya restaurant and leading to the screening (at 8 p.m.) of this 1933 silent melodrama, with live musical accompaniment by Aono Jikken Ensemble. The film/ music component repeats at 3 p.m. Sunday at SAAM. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 2675380, nwfilmforum.org. $125. 6 p.m. Sat. KOCH BROTHERS EXPOSED Everyone’s favorite political villains are the subject of this recent documentary. (NR) Keystone Church, 5019 Keystone Pl. N., 6326021, meaningfulmovies.org. Free. 7 p.m. Fri. LAND HO! Dr. Mitch is well into his 60s, adult kids gone, divorced, eating dinner alone when we meet him. He won’t admit it, of course, especially to his somber visitor Colin, his former brother-in-law, who carries the weight of post-midlife more heavily. Colin initially seems the guy in need of cheering up, which the earthy, garrulous Mitch makes his mission by taking the two of them to Iceland. Land Ho! is a buddy movie and a road-trip picaresque with an unusual pedigree. It was directed and written (with a healthy dollop of improv) by indie filmmakers Aaron Katz and Martha Stephens; the latter cast her loud, colorful cousin, Earl Lynn Nelson (a non-actor), as Mitch; and the Bellevue-based Australian Paul Eenhoorn actor plays his quiet foil. These old goats are in need of an adventure—through the discos and fashionable restaurants of Reykjavík; out to the remote hot springs and black-sand beaches—and they’re fully aware it could be their last adventure. (R) B.R.M. SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net. $7-$12. 7 p.m. Mon. LIVE BY NIGHT In Jacques Tourneur’s 1947 noir Out of the Past, the deadpan-ironical patter of Robert Mitchum and Kirk Douglas renders each player ultimately unknowable; the plot snakes through so many double-crosses that viewers are left punch-drunk. Weighted by their past crimes, the characters move in Tourneur’s labyrinth with the unnervingly calm detachment of the damned. (NR) ED HALTER Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $63–$68 series. $8 individual. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Dec. 18. NIGHT MOVES Directed by Kelly Reichardt (Old Joy, Wendy & Lucy), the highly anticipated Night Moves stars Jesse Eisenberg, Peter Sarsgaard, and Dakota Fanning as three eco-terrorists determined to bomb an Oregon dam. No thriller, the movie turns out to be a slow and deeply undercharacterized study in alienation. You find yourself rooting for the dam, hoping they’ll blow themselves up instead. (R) B.R.M. SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net. $7-$12. 9:15 p.m. Mon. PARTICLE FEVER If nothing else, this documentary confirms something you’ve probably always suspected: Really brilliant physicists are almost exactly as nerdy as the average science-fiction geek. Director Mark Levinson was probably wise to focus on the personalities working on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), near Geneva. Their quirkiness allows a human portal into the science behind this massive underground laboratory. We are guided in this journey by a batch of physicists, from esteemed veterans to puppy-dog newbies. All of them are pretty much unified in their anxiety over the outcome of the LHC’s evidence. Tonight, the UW’s Anna Goussiou will help you understand why it all matters. (NR) ROBERT HORTON SIFF Cinema Uptown, $7-$12. 7 p.m. Tues.

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SEATTLE LATINO FILM FESTIVAL Chile is the focus

of this year’s programming, though countries including Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, Peru, Venezuela, and Cuba are naturally represented with over a dozen documentaries and features. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, Pacific Place, and other locations. Full schedule, information, and tickets: slff.org. Fri., Oct. 3-Sun., Oct. 12. SHOWGIRLS Paul Verhoeven’s 1995 trash classic is probably due for a remake about now. Or a Broadway musical. (NC-17) Central Cinema, $6-$8. 9:30 p.m. Fri.-Tues. SEATTLE POLISH FILM FESTIVAL Titles in this twoweek series, which includes a group of repertory classics selected by Martin Scorsese, include The Saragossa Manuscript, Man of Iron, and A Short Film About Killing. All films are screened with subtitles. (NR) Northwest Film Forum and other venues. See polishfilms.org for full schedule and ticket information. Sun., Oct. 5-Sun., Oct. 19.

Ongoing

• BOYHOOD Richard Linklater’s Boyhood was shot

in the director’s native Texas in short bursts over a 12-year period—Linklater knew the shape of the film, but would tweak its script as time marched on, incorporating topical issues and reacting to his performers. This means that unlike most movies, which remake the world and impose an order on it, Boyhood reacts to the world. Protagonist Mason (Ellar Coltrane), tracked from first grade to high-school graduation, is learning that life does not fit into the pleasing rise and fall of a threeact structure, but is doled out in unpredictable fits and starts. Linklater doesn’t reject melodrama so much as politely declines it, opting instead for little grace notes and revealing encounters. Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke are terrific as the parents, and Linklater’s daughter Lorelei is distinctive as Mason’s older sister. (R) R.H. Sundance THE EQUALIZER Yes, this is a movie nominally inspired by the old ’80s TV show. And yes, it’s essentially a Liam Neeson vehicle instead starring Denzel Washington as a grumpy old samaritan/vigilante/knight errant who defends the weak and defeats the bad guys. It is, down to the R rating and inevitable shot of Washington striding in slo-mo away from an exploding orange fireball (but never looking back, because that is the law with exploding orange fireballs), exactly what you expect. Punctilious old Boston widower McCall (Washington) befriends a teenage Russian hooker (Chloë Grace Moretz), then sets out to destroy both her pimp and a whole platoon of Russian mobsters (Marton Csokas plays their tattooed chief enforcer). The mysterious McCall eventually reveals himself to be a kind of Jason Bourne with an AARP card. And, because he works in a hardware store, you know where the final showdown will take place. Excuse me, Mr. McCall, but in which aisle could I find a nail gun? (R) B.R.M. Kirkland, Bainbridge, Thornton Place, Lincoln Square, Cinebarre, Meridian, others. FLAMENCO, FLAMENCO Carlos Saura’s 2010 dance doc is a series of individual performances reflecting the state of the art form today, from the traditional to the avant-garde. The structure of the film is quite simple—it’s just a series of numbers, some featuring only musicians or dancers, some more elaborate. Apart from section titles, there’s no description or explanation; the dancing simply speaks for itself. Instead of filming in a studio or a club, Saura built a platform in a soundstage and filled it with portraits of dancers—some from the past, others a figment of his imagination. Vittorio Storaro’s hyper-mobile camera slides through that gallery and around the performers. We rarely get the feeling that we’re watching from a theater seat. Instead we’re right next to the dancers, sometimes the direct focus of their attention. (NR) SANDRA KURTZ Varsity GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Give thanks to the Marvel gods for Guardians. If you’ve ever had to suppress a giggle at the sight of Thor’s mighty hammer, this movie will provide a refreshing palate-cleanser. First, understand that the Guardians of the Galaxy tag is something of a joke here; this is a painfully fallible batch of outer-space quasi-heroes. Their leader is an Earthling, Peter Quill (Lake Stevens native Chris Pratt, from Parks and Recreation, an inspired choice). In order to retrieve a matter-dissolving gizmo, he has to align himself with a selection of Marvel castoffs, who will—in their own zany way—end up guarding the galaxy. (His costars, some voicing CGI creatures, are Zoe Saldana, Bradley Cooper, Vin Diesel, and the pro wrestler Dave Bautista.) Guardians comes as close as this kind of thing can to creating explosive moments of delight. (PG-13) R.H. Majestic Bay, others

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father, some 40 years earlier, in the French contract called viager, which means the seller gets to live in it until she dies, as the buyer pays a monthly stipend in the interim. And she—in this case 92-year-old Madame Girard (Maggie Smith)—is still very alertly alive. So is her daughter Chloé (Kristin Scott Thomas), and so are various ghosts from the past, many of which come staggering to life as Mathias moves into an empty room and schemes a way to undercut these entrenched ladies. The pace is rocky here, and everybody speaks as though they’re in a play. This is partially mitigated by the fact that if you’re going to have people running off at the mouth, you could do worse than this hyper-eloquent trio. (PG-13) R.H. Sundance THE SKELETON TWINS Maggie and Milo are fraternal twins who are estranged (for 10 years), living on opposite coasts, and seriously depressed for reasons that seem dissimilar but boil down to past family trauma. That Maggie and Milo are played by Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader will get this mediocre dramedy more attention than it deserves. That their performances are good oughtn’t be surprising (the two SNL pros have plenty of experience with the comedy of awkwardness). That their script is so tonally sad-happy yet familiar, one has to attribute to the inexperienced writers (Mark Heyman and Craig Johnson; the latter is a Bellingham native and UW grad who directed the film). Maggie and Milo are catty, sardonic misanthropes, angry at the world because they haven’t lived up to their youthful potential. A failed actor, Milo returns home to New Jersey, where Maggie’s a dental hygienist married to a doofus (Luke Wilson) whom she treats with gentle contempt. There’s also a sex scandal lurking in the past, but the snark bogs down in melodrama, and no amount of ’80s pop montages can really change the film’s predictable trajectory. When even the bitter Maggie can declare “We’re supposed to be there for each other,” you know the cause is lost. (R) B.R.M. Harvard Exit, Sundance THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU The fractious Altman clan gathers for an awkward and altogether irreverent weeklong mourning period (sitting shiva) for its deceased patriarch, at the command of an imperious new widow (Jane Fonda) who wears her conspicuous boob job with blithe pride. All of which greatly discomfits her four grown children. Among them, Corey Stoll is the son who stayed to run the family business; Adam Driver is the ne’er-do-well youngest son who fled to the West Coast; Tina Fey is the unhappily married wife and mother, also visiting; and Jason Bateman is the New York radio producer whose marriage just imploded (not that he’s telling anyone, not just now, not on this trip, no way). There’s a lot of ground to cover in this cluttered adaptation of Jonathan Tropper’s 2009 novel (he did the adaptation), directed with no great subtlety by Shawn Levy, who helmed all those wildly popular, family-friendly Night at the Museum movies. There are moments that work well here. Fey shows tender lost love for her old boyfriend (Timothy Olyphant), a guy who never left town owing to an accident; how culpable she was, the script is reluctant to spell out. Driver, of Girls, brings a welcome jolt of energy to a feckless, underwritten character. On the whole, however, Levy is fatally wed to a formula of tears, outbursts, wise counsel, and reconciliation—repeated often. (R) B.R.M. SIFF Cinema Uptown, Bainbridge, Ark Lodge, Guild 45th, others 20,000 DAYS ON EARTH Nick Cave awakes on a mundane note in his Brighton bedroom. “I wake, I write, I eat, I write,” he says in his disquieting drawl. Yet as an equal partner in this quasi-documentary project with filmmakers Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, he divulges only so much about himself: Neither his life story nor his philosophy are easily understood. Rather, this is both a biographical sketch and a fanciful promotional art film, which documents the recording and live performance of 2013’s acclaimed Push the Sky Away. Throughout, Cave maintains his deadpan, oblique sensibility. 20,000 Days even puts Cave on the therapist’s couch to tease out his story. During this extended scene— shot, like the entire film, in a flattering and dramatic light that gives Cave’s universe a fittingly crisp and sinister air—we learn some secrets (unless they’re more of Cave’s fictions). Asked what he most fears, he replies, “Losing my memory”—and that’s likely the film’s most important notion: The past informs all his writing. (NR) MARK BAUMGARTEN Grand Illusion

• 

BY B R IA N M I LLE R

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title of this whimsical though ultimately conventional quest-com spells it out for you. Hector (Simon Pegg) is an upright British shrink with a committed girlfriend named Clara (Rosamund Pike), amusingly eccentric patients, and a very neat apartment. What he needs is an adventure, very much like Tintin, so he embarks on a world tour to find out what makes people happy. (The final answer will be Clara, but you knew that already.) Hector’s travels take him to Shanghai, the Himalayas, Africa, and Los Angeles. En route he meets a gruff business tycoon (Stellan Skarsgård), a gorgeous Chinese woman (Ming Zhou), a Tibetan monk, a drug lord (Jean Reno), an old flame (Toni Collette), and a sage neuroscientist (Christopher Plummer). There’s a lot of talent and international color here, and director Peter Chelsom knows how to use both quite agreeably. Hector is nothing if not agreeable—to a fault, really— though it’s impossible to hate. Hector himself is nice to a fault. Back home, we can understand why impatient Clara keeps shutting off their Skype chats: So much virtue can be a bore. (R) B.R.M. Seven Gables JIMI: ALL IS BY MY SIDE To its credit, this is an inconclusive, narrowly focused biopic sure to confound fans of Jimi Hendrix. It forgoes his Seattle origins (but for a phone call) and stops short of his global breakthrough at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival. John Ridley’s movie mostly takes place in a few smoky clubs and rooms in New York and London. Hendrix (a fine André Benjamin) himself flits through these rooms like an enigmatic wisp, only a rumor of greatness, a guy who refuses to be pinned down. Underconfident Jimi is still going by Jimmy James, a mere backup player, when Linda Keith (Imogen Poots) talent-spots him in a New York club. Go to London? he asks. That’s like going to the moon or becoming a rock star. Ridley (who earned an Oscar for writing 12 Years a Slave) shows us the good and the bad in Hendrix, the charmer and the brooder, but still one has to ask: If he’s unpacking the myth, putting the microscope to this one short period, what does he hope to reveal? Was playing guitar the most or the least interesting thing about Hendrix? Ridley can’t seem to find a position on that. (R) B.R.M. Sundance LOVE IS STRANGE Meet Ben (John Lithgow) and George (Alfred Molina), whose cohabitation stretches back long before same-sex marriage was a realistic goal. Their new legal bond means that music teacher George is fired by the Catholic school where he has long worked—everybody there likes him, but they have to obey their bylaws. Manhattan is sufficiently expensive that Ben and George have to give up their place, and financial complications dictate a few months of couch-surfing before they can settle. George moves in with tiresomely younger, hardpartying friends; Ben takes a bunk bed in the home of relatives Kate and Eliot (Marisa Tomei and Darren E. Burrows), who already have their hands full with an awkward teen son (Charlie Tahan). It’s one of those sad situations in which everybody generally means well, but things just aren’t working out. Yet director Ira Sachs (Keep the Lights On), who has charted an intriguing course for himself through the indie world, is confident enough to leave out the expected big scenes and allow us to fill in the blanks. We’re not supposed to notice the acting here—just the people. (R) R.H. Harvard Exit, Kirkland Parkplace MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT Set during the interwar period in the South of France, Magic in the Moonlight isn’t Woody Allen’s worst picture (my vote: The Curse of the Jade Scorpion), but it’s close. Colin Firth plays a cynical magician, who keeps repeating Allen’s dull ideas over and over and fucking over again. Emma Stone, in her first career misstep (Allen’s fault, not hers), plays a shyster mentalist seeking to dupe a rich family out of its fortune (chiefly by marrying its gullible, ukulele-playing son, Hamish Linklater). The recreations of this posh ’20s milieu seem curiously literal, like magazine spreads, so soon after seeing Wes Anderson’s smartly inflected period detail in The Grand Budapest Hotel, which both revered and ridiculed the past. Magic feels like Allen’s re-rendering of a thin prewar British stage comedy he saw at a matinee during his youth, now peppered with references to Nietzsche and atheism. It’s dated, then updated, which only seems to date it the more. Period aside, no one wants to see Firth, 53, and Stone, 25, as a couple. The math doesn’t work. It’s icky. (PG-13) B.R.M. Guild 45th MY OLD LADY Set mostly in a fabulous Paris apartment, tis film is based on a play by Israel Horovitz, and no wonder Horovitz (making his feature-film directing debut—at age 75) chose not to open up the stage work; that’s one great pad. A failed-at-everything 57-year-old blowhard named Mathias Gold (Kevin Kline) has arrived in Paris to claim the place, but there’s just one problem. It was purchased by his

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arts&culture» Music

The Heartbreaker Is Ryan Adams’ latest just another stage in his battle with the press, or a real breakthrough?

JULIA BROKAW

BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

El Corazon www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2ND

LOSE CONTROL

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

with Temperance, Trigger Happy, Snyatta Lounge Show. Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS/ $75 VIP

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Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 8:00 21+. $40 ADV / $50 DOS / $165 VIP

MONDAY, OCTOBER 6TH

AARON CARTER

SUFFOKATE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD

MONDAY, OCTOBER 6TH

UKE-HUNT

(Spike Slawson of Me First And The Gimmie Gimmies & Swingin’ Utters)

with Washed Up Ball Player, Chris Crusher, Chasing Hornets (Drew Smith & Adam France of Burn Burn Burn) Lounge Show. Doors at 8:00PM / Show at 8:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $$13 ADV / $15 DOS

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4TH

K Y OU OU T !

RICHARD MARX Plus Special Guests

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3RD with This Boy That Girl, Matt Ryan King, Amanda Markley, Steven Curtis, Domos Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $$17 ADV / $17 DOS/ $70 VIP

S TH OLD AN

SUNAY, OCTOBER 5TH SEATTLE WEEKLY & EL CORAZON PRESENT:

with Mouth Of The South, Adaliah, Sworn In Blood, Drone Strike Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $12 ADV / $14 DOS

EMPIRE! EMPIRE!

(I Was A Lonely Estate) with Free Throw,

Scarves, Afterwords, Moments

Lounge Show. Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 7:30 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10.00 ADV / $12 DOS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7TH

MIKE THRASHER PRESENTS:

MIKE THRASHER PRESENTS:

with Adelita’s Way, Falling Through April Doors at 8:00PM / Show at 8:15 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $20 ADV / $25 DOS

with Tyr, Metsatoll, Plus Guests Doors at 7:00PM / Show at 8:00 ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $20 ADV / $25 DOS

THE PRETTY RECKLESS

ELUVEITIE

JUST ANNOUNCED 10/19 - DEMON HUNTER 10/19 LOUNGE - THE KINGS 10/22 LOUNGE - DOWN WITH WEBSTER 11/14 LOUNGE - MELANIE MARTINEZ 11/15 LOUNGE - THE GOODNIGHT 11/17 LOUNGE - THE BOTS 11/21 LOUNGE - FOXING 12/3 - THE ATARIS 12/18 - NICK THOMAS (THE SPILL CANVAS) UP & COMING 10/8 - JACOB WHITESIDES 10/8 LOUNGE - GIGAN 10/9 - PRONG / WITCHBURN - 7PM 10/10 - HELLION 10/10 LOUNGE - HAIL THE SUN 10/11 - FRIENDS LIKE ENEMIES 10/11 LOUNGE - RAGS & RIBBONS 10/12 - GUTTERMOUTH 10/13 - HEAD NORTH 10/13 LOUNGE - THIRA 10/14 - EDDIE & THE HOT RODS 10/14 LOUNGE - PUP 10/15 - UNDER CITIES 10/16 - AB-SOUL 10/17 - TOGETHER PANGEA 10/17 LOUNGE - THIS WILD LIFE

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The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

T

his won’t come as a surprise to those of my review, said a friendly but firm reply, “we will you familiar with the backstory, but Ryan not be able to accommodate you.” Adams and I have some history: brief The situation only heightens my intrigue about and volatile, yet given Adams’ notorious the space Adams is attempting to inhabit in the relationship with the media, not unique to me. Just ask music world. Even though he’s censored even his Jim DeRogatis, who received a nearly three-minute own fan-based message board (ryanadams.org, no expletive-filled voice message after a 2003 performance longer active), a number of his fan sites still appear that he reviewed, less than favorably, in the Chicago robust (tobeyoung.org, mega-superior-gold. Sun-Times. Or Pitchfork’s Amanda Petrusich, who blogspot.com, and loseringbook.wordpress.com got her share of flack in are the results that popuan interview after rating page one of a Google Still intact is a very good late Adams’ album Rock N Roll search). His media consimilarly low. Or Drew songwriter who intuitively tacts, on the other hand, Fortune of L.A. Weekly, are ever-dwindling. who was countered sen- knows his finest work is the Which is a shame tence by sentence for or a sham, I’m not lush and polished alt-pop allegedly misrepresenting sure which, especially the rocker in an intersince Ryan Adams is rock presented here. view—by Adams himself. easily one of his best My experience involved Adams’ 2011 solo show releases in years. There’s no question it lacks at Benaroya Hall and my review of it, a piece that some of the potency of his finest solo efforts, raised the ire of his fans—Adams chief among Heartbreaker and Gold, but Adams, pushing them—and racked up hundreds of vitriol-fueled 40, has earned a pass for toning it down. What comments. By the time they finally tapered off, the album does well is bridge Adams at his best I was a little shaken, but still felt my review had and Adams now, with all those muddled, herkyaccurately captured the vibe of the gig, which jerky years in between. Still intact is a very good wasn’t a scene for a casual listener like me, but one songwriter who intuitively knows his finest where Adams followers came to worship. work is the lush and polished alt-pop rock preIt’s been almost three years since. When I sented here. As fate would have it, it’s the first heard he was visiting again in support of his new album Adams, ever the manipulator of forces self-titled album, I reached out for an interview beyond his control, has produced himself. This hoping to discuss the fallout of the piece and is the long-overdue look inward Adams needed the complex challenges faced by journalists and to take to realize that his dreams are well within artists in the digital age. Approached with an his reach—and that they have nothing to do open mind, I thought the conversation could be with what anyone says about him. E illuminating. Yet I’ve had no luck with multiple gelliott@seattleweekly.com requests for an interview, nor with admittance to the show for review purposes. At first I could RYAN ADAMS only speculate that my e-mails and requests were With Butch Walker. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., being dodged intentionally, but shortly before 877-STG-4TIX, stgpresents.org/paramount. press time yesterday I received proof: In light of $42–$49. 8 p.m. Mon., Oct. 6.


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masters of hawaiian music:

george kahumoku jr, ledward kaapana,

A weekly A R T Scalendar A ND EN TER TA INMEN“uncle” T richard ho‘opi‘i of the city’s TUE/OCTOBER 7 • 7:30PM best offerings. three below (michael manring,

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U&C: 10/8 JOEY CAPE (OF LAGWAGON) @ THE SUNSET, 11/2 REAL FRIENDS @ EL CORAZON, 11/16 THE WORLD IS A BEAUTIFUL PLACE @ VERA PROJECT, 11/19 THE FLATLINERS @ CHOP SUEY

Q

WED/OCTOBER 1 - SAT/OCTOBER 4 • SHOW TIMES VARY

P R OMO TION S burlesco divino: wine in rome

trey gunn, arreola)

N I G H TC LU B U P C O M I N G

E V E N T S

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brazilian nights! filó machado w/ jovino santos neto FRI/OCTOBER 10 • 7:30PM

nearly dan

SAT/OCTOBER 11 • 8PM

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

next • 10/12 greg brown • 10/13 taylor mcferrin • 10/14 carmen lundy group • 10/15 mike doughty’s question jar show • 10/16 bassekou kouyate & ngoni ba • 10/18 shawn mullins w/ max gomez • 10/19 an evening with terry bozzio • 10/20 garfield high school jazz band • 10/21 marketa irglova w/ rosi golan • 10/23 11/1 this is halloween! • 11/2 true blues: corey harris and alvin youngblood hart

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2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

arts&culture» Music

TheWeekAhead Wednesday, Oct. 1

WED, OCT 1

R&B soulman with unique contemporary flair. LARRY CORYELL, VICTOR BAILEY, LENNY WHITE AND SPECIAL GUEST PIANIST GEORGE COLLIGAN

THURS, OCT 2 - SUN, OCT 5

“A mix of jazz, funk and rock... infectious, especially when played with such incendiary inspiration.” - Allmusic.com

TRIBUTE TO ANTONIO CARLOS JOBIM FEATURING SCOTT HAMILTON

MON, OCT 6

A founding father of Brazil’s Bossa Nova, Jobim composed some of the world’s most popular songs.

HELEN SUNG QUARTET

TUES, OCT 7 - WED, OCT 8

Swinging, joy and finesse with pianist/ composer Helen Sung

JOSHUA REDMAN TRIO

THURS, OCT 9 - SUN, OCT 12

“Redman ranks with the best saxophonists in the world.” - Boston Globe

JACQUI NAYLOR

TUES, OCT 14 - WED, OCT 15

Velvet-toned vocalist and songwriter, far from a straight-laced jazz purist!

all ages | free parking | full schedule at jazzalley.com

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

Art rock doesn’t have to be inaccessible: OUGHT’s latest record, More Than Any Other Day, is ambitious and experimental, but never goes too far out there. While guitars move sporadically, vocals sputter, and drums clamor, Ought manages to make experimental music that appeals to those less familiar with the genre, grounding the tracks in familiar pop and rock structures. With This Blinding Light, Deep Creep. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 7099467, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $10 adv. 21 and over. Thanks to the likes of John Coltrane and Miles Davis, jazz has historically been a forward-thinking genre. Yet thanks to bland elevator tunes and Muzak, lately there’s been some perceived stagnancy in the art form. You’ll find Seattle duo BAD LUCK are anything but that: Its avant-garde sound is more like the brutality of punk rock than, say, Kenny G. Chris Icasiano’s drum work is sporadic and sputtering; saxophonist Neil Welch makes his instrument leap and jump. The band is celebrating the release of its latest album, Three, and you’ll need a limber brain just to take it all in. With Tomo Nakayama. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., waywardmusic.org. 8 p.m. $5–$15 suggested donation ($15 will include a copy of Three). Alt-country’s elder statesmen are all following different paths: Ryan Adams has embraced his rock roots, while the likes of Jeff Tweedy and Wilco have moved on to more experimental pastures. But JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE has stayed consistent with his father Steve Earle’s legacy, reliably churning out twang-filled tunes and earnest reflections on American life. That doesn’t mean he’s complacent: Earle stretches the genre to its brink with his own story of redemption—and covers of the Replacements, too. With American Aquarium, the Maldives. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-7844849, stgpresents.com/neptune. 8 p.m. $20 adv. All ages. NYC indie-pop outfit FRANKIE COSMOS walks a fine line between being quirky and highly earnest. Its songs are short, but boast big melodies and a fun bedroompop aesthetic. Its first studio album, Zentropy, offers 10 songs in 17 minutes, but it’s not a punk scorcher like Black Flag. The band simply doesn’t outstay its welcome, stopping by to drop a little bit of dreamy goodness, leaving you wanting more. With Porches, iji. The Vera Project, 305 Harrison St., 956-8372, theveraproject. org. 7:30 p.m. $8 adv./$10 DOS. All ages.

Friday, Oct. 3 AARON CARTER, the Shaq-challenging onetime he-boy,

SEATTLE WEEKLY • OCTOBER 1 — 7, 2014

INI NG

32

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MUSIC NEWSLETTER

H A P P Y H OU R

The inside scoop on upcoming shows

and the latest reviews.

is now 25 and returning to El Corazon to continue his strange conquest of the punk and metal venue. (Then again, Richard Marx plays there three days later, so maybe it’s not so strange.) Fingers crossed that the former heartthrob will bring his cover of “I Want Candy” and maybe even his seminal “Aaron’s Party (Come Get It).” With Amanda Markley, This Boy That Girl, Matt King Ryan, Steven Curtis, Domos. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 381-3094, elcorazonseattle.com. 7:30 p.m. $17–$70. All ages. Portland’s THE DANDY WARHOLS have seen their fair share of crazy antics over the years, signing record deals, losing record deals, and numerous lineup changes. But all those are footnotes compared to the band’s vast and influential catalog. Their blend of psychedelic rock and power pop thrived on albums like 2000’s Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia and, even more recently, their low-key 2012 effort This Machine. The band is always evolving and changing, even after two decades together. Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents. com. 9 p.m. $22 adv./$25 DOS. All ages. Through the ’90s and into the aughts, electronic music saw its first exposure to a mainstream audience. Alongside the celebrated return of Aphex Twin, some of that band’s contemporaries also deserve a revisit, including THE CRYSTAL METHOD. Though a bit over-the-top during its heyday, albums like Vegas, Legion of Boom, and Tweekend are serious entries in modern dubstep and EDM’s ancestral roots. Its rushing drum loops and glitchy synth lines might be the earliest incarnation of “the bass drop” in mainstream music. With Caked Up, Botnek, Darrius. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 6520444, showboxonline.com. 7 p.m. $27–$32 adv./$37 DOS.

EV EN T S

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

KENNY LATTIMORE

Lily Allen

tracks are deceptively keen to the portrayal of women in the media, with tongue-in-cheek titles like “Hard Out Here (for a Bitch)” and the album name’s homage to Kanye. Never one to stray from shock and awe, Allen’s latest incarnation is channeling the right issues at the right time. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-7844849, stgpresents.org/paramount. 8 p.m. $31.25. All ages. Singer/songwriter KRISTIN CHAMBERS was smart to name her latest record Everything Woman. It’s apt: She’s been known to bounce between alt-country crooning and synth-pop power ballads. Genres aren’t limitations for her, only different mediums to get her point across. Her smooth voice is able to morph with ease to each new aesthetic. With Verlaine. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., 906-9920, theroyalroomseattle.com. 8 p.m. $10 adv./$12 DOS. All ages until 10 p.m. English outfit KASABIAN are like the Jekyll and Hyde of modern rock. It’s hard to say which version you’ll get from track to track (either the grimy, gritty one or the one with the indie-rock sheen), as some of the band’s finest moments blend the two. The band’s latest record, 48:13, finds it going even further into the darker recesses of its sound. Don’t be fooled by the bright-pink cover—this is Kasabian with its claws out. With Bo Ningen. The Showbox. 9 p.m. $25 adv./$28 DOS. All ages.

Sunday, Oct. 5

Florida quintet MERCHANDISE is establishing itself as the newest incarnation of new wave. Its latest album, After the End, revels in ’80s guitar tones and synthesizers but with sleek, modern production. It’s an answer to the hypothetical question, “What would bands like Siouxsie and the Banshees or The Cure look like if they started today?” Merchandise isn’t living the past, finding new ways to experiment with old sounds, but the nostalgic vibes are undeniable. With Lower, Nudity. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, the crocodile.com. 8 p.m. $12 adv. All ages.

Oct. 6 PR OMonday, M O T I ONS

Prog devotees rejoice. KING CRIMSON’s sound has become even more influential in recent years. Lush arrangements and epic-scale melodies may be more relevant today than in their own time, laying a foundation for modern acts like Tame Impala and Temples. Kanye himself even sampled the band on his big hit “Power” a few years ago. 21st century, it’s all right. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stg presents.com/moore. 7:30 p.m. $37–$147. All ages.

Tuesday, Oct. 7

At 35, songwriter CHRISTOPHER OWENS has already had his fill of excitement: He was raised in a Children of God religious community, and left his sheltered home at 16 to seek a new life first in Texas, then California. He started writing whimsical indie pop with his critically lauded band Girls, tackling topics like religious upbringing and finding love. He’s since gone solo, and is writing the latest chapter in his life with his new album, A New Testament. With The Tyde. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 7099442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $18 adv. All ages.

A R T S A ND E NT E R TAI NM E NT

Saturday, Oct. 4

LILY ALLEN tackles feminist issues under the guise of a

pop starlet. Her latest album, Sheezus, embraces Top-40 production as a means of luring in the audience. Yet her

BY D U ST Y H E N RY

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for more listings.


29,000 FANS AND COUNTING Tell Me About That Album: New Pornographers’ Brill Bruisers

facebook.com/seattleweekly

1303 NE 45TH ST

BY DAVE LAKE

Tag Tag

Save 75% 10/1 10/1 — — 10/4 10/4 on items items with with on tags lavender tags lavender

7710 hours: Mon-Sat Mon-Sat 10-8 10-8 7710SE SE34th 34thSt. St.98040 98040 || 206-275-7760 206-275-7760 || Store Store hours:

T

his week we chat with singer/guitarist Carl Newman about his band’s latest. Read the extended interview at seattleweekly.com.

SW: What is a Brill Bruiser?

Newman: I thought it described our album well . . . Kathryn [Calder] was saying that she liked the title because she thought it made it sound like we were a gang of thugs armed with pop songs.

The doctor is in, and will see you

NOW.

With several singers, how do you decide who gets to sing lead on which song?

Sometimes you just know. [For] a song like “Marching Orders,” I thought, “Oh, this has got to be a Neko [Case] song.” Or “Another Drug Deal of the Heart”: I thought, “This will be a great Kathryn song.”

On the ones that are less clear, do you just have everybody sing a version and then choose the best?

Urgent Care that’s Convenient and Connected

You’ve talked about not wanting any ballads on Brill Bruisers, but can you imagine a New Pornographers record that’s all ballads?

Which is your favorite album cover?

I think this one. As the years go on we’re getting more of a clue in terms of album covers, whereas Electric Version and Twin Cinema were like, “I don’t know, what’s our album cover going to be?” Is it important to have a good album cover?

Clearly not. Think of how many records Green Day’s Dookie sold, one of the all-time worst album covers ever made. E

music@seattleweekly.com

THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS With The Pains of Being Pure at Heart. The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents.com. $26.50 adv./$30 DOS. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 5–Mon., Oct. 6.

Go online and grab an appointment time that works for you—or just walk right in. Enjoy our relaxed, comfortable, upscale décor and amenities, including flat screen entertainment in the reception and each exam rooms, loaner iPads, Wi-Fi throughout and children’s play area.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • O CTO BER 1 — 7, 2014

I don’t see myself doing an album of ballads. I think there’s too many people doing that . . . I feel like this record has songs that are essentially ballads, they’re just more warped ballads. Like “Champions of Red Wine” could have easily been a ballad. I could take Neko’s vocal and play a subdued acoustic guitar underneath it and people would go, “Oh, it’s the ballad.” So much of songs is arrangement.

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On this record, we got Neko to come and sing in three or four different sessions because I knew I wasn’t going to have it mapped out. From the beginning, I thought, “I need to make sure I have access to the band members throughout the making of the record,” because I knew it would change.

33


a&c» Music

15

Business as Usual

FALL EDITION Join us in the Trophy Room for Happy Hour: Thursday Bartender Special 8-Close Fridays: 5-8pm

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COURTESY OF VAUDEVILLE ETIQUETTE

DI N I NG

A fun new festival comes with a message: The waterfront is still open.

Chorus Bellevue Arts Museum F+W Media Broadway Across America Teatro Zinzanni UW Meany Hall Earshot Jazz Arts West

Vaudeville Etiquette will perform the firstever synchronized light show beneath the Great Wheel.

C

ontrary to what you might have heard, the waterfront is not going to close entirely now that construction on the new sea wall is underway. A number of businesses will still be open, and they are going to need your help to stay in business. This Saturday’s New Waterfront Festival will look to increase awareness about the state of affairs on Alaskan Way, and encourage people to continue visiting and supporting the area. Festival director Jocelyn Beresford Carnell says, “When I first met with Hal [Pier 57’s owner, Hal Griffith], his idea was to have a fullday festival. He wanted to do the salmon bake and a cookout and have bands playing throughout the day, and have it be the first in an annual event. It was such a good idea, and it’s a great event for a great cause, so I just ran with it.” The day-long event will also feature information and vendor booths and numerous family activities like caricatures and balloon art. But a highlight will be Seattle’s own Vaudeville Etiquette, closing the day with a 7 p.m. concert and light show. The band’s singer, Tayler Lynn, needed no arm-twisting to agree to perform. “We feel an extreme loyalty to Seattle and how it’s embraced us, so it’s an awesome feeling to return a little scratch on the back to the city that’s so lovingly been scratching ours,” she says. “We’re always searching for new ways to entertain our audience, so this seemed like the perfect idea.” Among all the music, food, and activities, Carnell wants one thing to come through loud and clear. “The main message is simple: the waterfront is still open and we need customers to come down,” she says. “There are really great businesses here, and many of them are national landmarks. They need to stay open and be active.” E

music@seattleweekly.com

SCAN HERE TO ENTER:

THE NEW WATERFRONT FESTIVAL With McTuff, Geoffrey Castle, ChebonChebon, Wanz, Stephanie Anne Johnson. Waterfront Park, 1301 Alaskan Way, seattlewaterfrontfest. com. Free. All ages. 2–8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 4.


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Employment Computer/Technology ServiceNow, Inc., provider of cloud-based services that automate enterprise IT operations, has opening in Kirkland, WA for Sr. Software Development Engineer (3267): Build scalable and reliable cloud computing solutions to support the growth of Company’s SaaS products. If interested, ref job code and send resume to: ServiceNow, Attn: A.B., Global Mobility, 3260 Jay Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054.

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TECHNICAL Salesforce.com, inc. has the following position open in Seattle, WA: Senior Member of Technical Staff, Software Engineering: Responsible for programming in Java, SQL, Selenium, LINUX, and Javascript. To apply or for more information, please go to http://www.salesforce.com/ company/careers/

Employment Legal Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless is proposing to collocate antennas (existing location modification) on a 56-foot building rooftop located at 3214 West McGraw Street, Seattle, WA 98199. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30-days from the date of this publication to: Paul Bean, Tetra Tech, Inc., 19803 North Creek Parkway, Bothell, WA 98011, 425-482-7811, paul.bean@tetratech.com.

W E E K LY

Employment General Climber Climbers needed in King County for established company. Full time, year round Work. Must have min. 2 yr. Climbing exp. Vehicle and DL Required. Send email with Work Exp. to recruiting@evergreentlc.com or call 800-684-8733

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Employment Services WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

Employment Social Services

VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Must live in Seattle area. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

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Caregivers needed all shifts and weekends! Live in & Hourly.

(206)440-5500 Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

WATERFRONT APT. Fully furnished. Newly remodeled w/ spectacular views of the water from every window. Separate entrance. Quiet location at the end of the lane, water only 30’ away! Makes this a hiker, kayaker or bird watchers paradise. Eagles and Otters are part of the local crowd. Comfortable w/ heated floors & lots of windows. Newly painted. Granite tile bath with jacuzzi tub. Large bedroom with large closet & king bed. All new kitchen. Open dining & living areas. Laundry available. No smoking or pets. Includes utilities, wi-fi, cable TV, phone, $1300/mo (year-round). 360-378-8332. Apartments for Rent King County

3.98 AC IN PARADISE Well, septic & garage on site. Perfect site for establishing a 3 BR, 2 BA residence $200000 Harriet 360-317-5745 Real Estate for Sale Lots/Acreage

20 Acres in West Texas CNA’s Needed!

$490 HOME SHARE IN quality neighborhood. One adult only. Your own private bedroom, bath, sink, fridge, counter area plus free TV. Private entrance. Private off street parking place. Laundry on site. Lg quality home. Employed with steady income, references & deposit req. No smoking/ pets. Call evenings 206-246-4700, 206-243-4171

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DESIGNER CLOTHES & Golf Sale. Friday, Saturday & Sunday from 8 am - 2 pm. New and gently used items! Golf shoes, new, men’s & woman’s, 16 pairs. Golf bags & hard golf travel bags. Assorted luggage (new and used). Tumi, Coach, Nike travel bags. Located 2825 60th Ave SE. Rain or shine. Look for signs.

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WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent Greenlake/WestSeattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360-9021857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx

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ARTS A

Seattle Weekly, October 01, 2014  

October 01, 2014 edition of the Seattle Weekly

Seattle Weekly, October 01, 2014  

October 01, 2014 edition of the Seattle Weekly