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Extended Care capacity finalized Veterans Administration agrees to improved contract with clinic Verhasselt explained that the funding structure for nursing home/extended care facilities is TONASKET - North Valley even more complex than that for Extended Care’s capacity has offi- the hospital. The facility receives most if cially been reduced by 16 beds, to 42, as the NVH District Board of its reimbursements at Medicare Commissioners voted Thursday rates, based on a 2007 baseline to finalize a plan that the dis- of costs. “Our rate is $149 per pertrict has been moving toward for son per day,” nearly a year. Ve r h a s s e l t The nurs“If this thing gets smaller said. “But ing home’s and smaller, but there is our costs are population has $195.72.” a greater demand, the already dwinOn top of dled to about general public needs to that, facilities 40 through write their legislators to are in effect attrition so the say we need more nursing penalized if vote should not they don’t homes,.” affect any curkeep their rent residents. Dick Larson, NVH Commissioner occupancy The question rates at 92 wasn’t whether or not set the facility’s capacity percent or higher. “This (rate structure) is set up to around 40, but whether or not to “bank” or “relinquish” the for failure,” Commissioner Dick Larson said after some further now empty beds. This year to date the district explanation. If the empty beds are banked as a whole has turned a $530,000 profit. But that has come despite rather than relinquished, they the Long Term Care division still count toward the total availlosing $494,194; the hospital able beds. With 58 beds, that itself has turned a $1.02 million means 54 (averaged for the year) would need to be occupied in profit thus far. “We as a facility do not have order to receive full funding. By relinquishing the beds to 100 percent control over what our reimbursement is on (sever- 42 (in effect, Verhasselt said, 40 al components) of our rate,” said plus two more for transitional or Chief Financial Officer Helen short term needs), 39 will need Verhasselt. “The state compares to be occupied on average for us to other facilities that are the facility to receive all its availcomparable to us and divide able funding. Also, since the hospital disthem into peer groups. So it’s not just on our costs they base trict will no longer have access to borrowed money from the this on. “Your costs can’t exceed 110 county (warrants) sometime percent of the other facilities in within the next year, stemming your group. If it’s more than that the rate of loss at the extended care becomes even more crucial (it’s capped).” Verhasselt said that the 40-bed if it is to remain open. “When we went through the number was what the administrative team felt provided the budget process, 40 was where best balance between keeping we thought we could cover the the current level of services expenses for extended care,” said without losing more money than CEO Linda Michel. “It’s even the hospital division would have more important now that we available to cover the Extended Care’s losses. SEE NVH | PG A2 BY BRENT BAKER

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Motorcycle racing (above) was an added dimension at this year’s Tonasket Comancheros Demolition Derby as about a dozen riders - mostly between the ages of 9 and 17 - took their chances on the short track between heats of the derby. Right, Amber Utt and Stephanie Webber celebrate after outlasting the field in the Powderpuff heat of the demo derby. See page B2 for results and more photos. Brent Baker/staff photos

Pursuing even higher learning goals at Oroville high school Tonasket school Oroville School Board supports high schools awarding AA degrees BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Oroville High School is continuing a program of offering more college level classes and looks forward to a time where high schools can award two-year Associates of Arts degrees. High School Principal Kristin Sarmiento discussed some of the new advanced classes being offered through Central Washington University at the school board’s Monday, Aug. 25 meeting. “I also got a voice mail from a representative of Wenatchee Valley College on offering a Criminal Justice class at Oroville. She talked to the department and they are really excited about the potential... we would be the first in the state, “ said Sarmiento. “I’m so excited because the field is so broad and there is so much interest in the area,” she added. The principal explained at a previous board meeting that there was a lot of local interest, perhaps due to the number of different law enforcement agencies, including local police and sheriff ’s deputies, as well as Customs and Border Patrol. Several students from

Oroville are members of the U.S. Border there should be rules that govern earning a Patrol Explorer Scouts here. state AA degree for Running Start students Sarmiento also let the board know that just like for high school graduation,” said while most four-year colSarmiento. leges except credits earned “We’re going to a conferin the Running Start ence in three weeks so if it Program, the University of “We want to make it so is not in as a resolution we Washington is balking at by the time a student can’t do it. We need to get excepting them. this in there,” said DeVon. leaves Oroville High “UW does not think they The suggested resolution have to take any Running supporting an AA degree School he has an AA Start credits... that’s not was added to the board degree.” legal. They think their credagenda and approved. Rocky DeVon, Chairman its are better than any one Oroville School Board REPORTS else’s.” In addition to Sarmiento’s There was also some disreport the board also heard cussion about continuing to support a change in the state rules to where a reports from elementary principal Joanne high school could offer a state-approved two- Hoehn, Superintendent Steve Quick and Stassia Feltes with Upward Bound. year Associates degree. Upward Bound’s main goal is to resource “We want to make it so by the time a student leaves Oroville High School he has an college and career preparation for lower AA degree,” said Rocky DeVon, chairman of income and or first generation students who want to go to college, according to Feltes. the school board. “Right now schools will only accept 48... Students eligible for the program are in grades typically they need 90 for an AA degree,” said 9-12. She talked about how students last year Sarmiento. “We’re trying to keep as close to did Job Shadowing at North Valley Hospital. that max as we can.” DeVon asked for language to take to the There were ten students, a mix of kids from Washington School Director’s Association Oroville and Tonasket high schools. “We also designed a marketing and com(WASDA) to lobby the legislature to make changes so an state-approved AA degree munications internship opportunity. Kylee Davis launched a Facebook page for Upward could be offered at the high school level. “WASDA should take the position that

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 36

SEE BOARD | PG A2

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tonasket School District’s administrators expressed excitement about the 2014-15 school year at their final school board meeting of the summer Monday, Aug. 25, as the district finished preparations to return to a full-length school day for the first time in nearly 20 years. With 17 new staff on board, additional options for middle and high school students, and music and art now available or elementary students, there were more than the usual preparations to be made over the summer. Growing enrollment - and its attendant issues - were a theme amongst all of the administrators. Superintendent Paul Turner said that getting a firm number on what the net gain would be, but said that there seemed to be a high number of new enrollees leading up to the first day of school. “Two words are going to be

our theme: dealing with poverty, and hope,” Turner said. “It’s exciting that we’re wrapped around the same focus on that as we’re going through the year. “We don’t have an exact number yet but the trend on our attendance is up... there’s constantly been people coming in, as well as out of district transfers.” “We’ve been getting new kids every day,” said Middle School Principal Jay Tyus. “You know there will be some that will transfer (out) that haven’t yet. But we’re up significantly on paper. “If that sticks it will be a blessing and a curse. We’re running out of spaces for kids but we also are excited about that means, that kids are coming here.” Tyus said his building had about 240 kids set to attend class, 10 more than last year and 20 more than were budgeted for. “The bottom line is we’re making it work right now,” he said. “But you will hear in the next two weeks, ‘Oh my gosh, my kids’ classes are enormous’

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

Stabbing suspect arrested THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – The Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office has located and arrested a man they were seeking in the brutal stabbing and robbery of an Oroville man at the end of last month. Ryan P. Mulligan, was located and arrested Wednesday, Aug. 20, in Wenatchee by the Wenatchee Police Department. Arrangements will be made to bring Mulligan back to Okanogan County. Detectives were looking for Ryan P. Mulligan, 28 of Oroville. Mulligan, who has family in Oroville, is considered homeless but had been staying in the area since 2013. Detectives requested an arrest warrant for Mulligan regarding this case. According to Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers, Mulligan was wanted for the fol-

OCSO photo

Ryan P. Mulligan lowing: attempted murder in the first degree, robbery in the first degree, residential burglary and

theft in the third degree. “At this time robbery appears to be the motive of the stabbing,” said Sheriff Rogers. On July 31 a stabbing was reported at 1 Balmes Road in Oroville. The victim, John R. Omer, 58, of Oroville, was at home sleeping when he was awakened by an intruder in his residence. “Omer was stabbed several times during the attack, including wounds to his side, chest area and head,” said Rogers. Although Omer was not able to get a look at the suspect and was first reported as being “uncooperative,” he has since been working with detectives and deputies on the possible suspect in the case. Detectives and deputies have also interviewed several other witnesses in the case, according to the Sheriff.

BOARD | FROM A1 Bound,” Feltes said. There are 35 Upward Bound students from Tonasket and 25 from Oroville. The two groups often work together. For Science Week they went to Ellensburg to the wind project and to Wells Dam, she said. Among the group’s goals are to continue the Job Shadowing program at North Valley Hospital, ACT and Compass Prep, Field Trips, Communications Service opportunities, FAFSA and Senior/Parent information night, a semester newsletter and newspaper updates, as well as updates to the school board. Elementary principal Hoehn reported that her building was having a new teacher day on Wednesday, Aug. 27. School starts on Sept. 3 and preschool starts on Sept. 8. “The fifth graders will have two field trips this fall. The first will be World of Flight up at the airport and the next is the Pioneer Walk. Because of the fires and horses the Pioneer Walk has been moved to the fall,” she said. “The first assemble will be Book It Theater – a play in Spanish and English about a migrant farmer.” Hoehn answered questions

about the Leader in Me program and whether parents could get information to understand the program better. She said that more information would become available after one of the teachers received more training. “I would think if it begins in October parents would know something before then,” said Dara McCoy, an interested parent. The principal said that the program is implemented over five years. “I read The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Teens and I think Steven Covey has done a good job, I’m not knocking the program but am not sure I’m all the way on board,” said McCoy. “When we went down to Waterville what really impressed us was how well students took personal ownership for their own education,” said Chairman DeVon. “A couple of students that presented to us didn’t come from homes that were very supportive. Those students benefited too.” Hoehn was asked what happened to students that don’t get on board with the program and whether they “fall through the cracks.” DeVon and fellow board mem-

ber Todd Hill seemed sold on the program and were vocal in their support. They felt that what has worked in Waterville can work in Oroville too without anyone getting left behind. “Kids have daily, weekly, quarterly and yearly goals and teachers go through those goals with the students,” said DeVon, adding that the program works hard to build the student’s self esteem.

CONSENT AGENDA The board approved a consent agenda of several items, including hiring three teachers – Shelly Martin, Cyley Wytko and Carla Kerns and Daphne Booker as a high school secretary. They also hired Billy Monroe as Cross Country coach and Brad Scott as assistant high school football coach, depending on student participation and Tony Kindred as head girls high school soccer coach and Nicole Hogus as head high school volleyball coach. Whitney Massart was hired as a long-term substitute for the first semester of 2014-15. They approved a Classified Collective Bargaining Agreement and the Classified Salary Schedule and approved a fuel bid from Coleman Fuel.

SCHOOL | FROM A1 “All varieties of people coming in. We’ve got people coming in that are migrant/bilingual students, kids coming in from virtual academies, people from our own district, people from Oroville. It’s a hodgepodge; there’s no rhyme or reason.” High School Principal Jeff Hardesty said that he had three students from the west side of the state enroll, while Elementary Principal Jeremy Clark said he’d also seen more than the usual number of fresh enrollments over the past few weeks. With the increased staff, longer day and more kids, all were looking forward to getting started (the first day with students was two days later). “We’re excited about the changes and the new opportunities for our students,” Clark said. “We have a very rich environment, full curriculum. There’s been a lot of construction with the preschool moving and the new addition for the reading specialist... The building is looking phenomenal.” He added that his staff was focused on continuing to improve the building’s NWEA scores. Clark said that growth goals were the highest in the time that assessment had been used but that there were still issues with meeting of the achievement goals. “So we are focusing on bol-

renewal of its general liability and property insurance. In an unusual twist these days, the annual premium decreased from last year by about $2,000 to $115,755. The policy is held by United Schools Insurance, which provides group rates for most schools in the region, and is administered by VIP Insurance. Turner asked for information on paying via a payment plan this year; with the additional staff positions this year, the district’s cash flow will be stretched until the new year because the new levy, which provides funding for those additional salaries, won’t take effect until January.

ster that, coupling that high growth with achievement,” he said. “The staff feels a sense of urgency around this and ownership behind it.” Tyus said the Middle School will be using the song “Lean on Me” as a theme for the year. “It’s an opportunity to understand some social and cultural development of our school,” he said. “The basic idea is around both staff and students - studentto-student (relationships), staffto-staff, staff-to-student - we believe in you and we’ve got your back.” Hardesty said his building was implementing a freshman orientation that would kick off the school year. In the past, he said, it held in the evening and attendance was an issue. By holding it during the first day of school, just about all the students will be able to take part. “We said for a number of years it could be more meaningful,” he said. “We did it the first hour or so of school... Basically, how can you be successful academically?” He added that a new, digital handbook for new teachers had been put together with input from last year’s new staff. “We even have an Acronym Page,” Hardesty said.

STAFF The school board also approved the hiring of the following: Brett Franklin (Middle School language/history teacher); Brittany Jones (Elementary life skills/ resource room para-educator); and Kristi Denison (Elementary Title I paraeducator). The Monday Sept. 22 board meeting was canceled and rescheduled for Sept. 29 for billpaying purposes. The School Board next meets on Monday, Sept. 8. More on schools, including firstday photos and Brent Baker’s column, are on Page B1.

INSURANCE The board also approved its

NVH | FROM A1 won’t be able to go into warrants. We have to make sure we can stay at a level we can cover that, knowing that our (reimbursement) rates aren’t going up but our expenses do. “We really thought it would take us a year to a year and a half to get from 58 to 40 beds, and it only took six months.” Before a motion was made, each of the commissioners was polled for their opinion, and all felt that 42 was the best option for the nursing home’s long term viability. The subsequent vote was unanimous. “If this thing gets smaller and smaller, but there is a greater demand, the general public needs to write their legislators to say we need more nursing homes,” Larson said. “That’s what really moves things. It isn’t (the commissioners) going over there and

Noreen Olma and Verhasselt petitioned the VA to increase that rate. “We were successful in petitioning the VA,” Olma said. “Our July invoice was 737 veterans at a rate of $59.85. That’s a significant increase. Going forward for budgeting, we might be able to make budget for the department now).” Olma said that veterans heading to Spokane for specialty appointments now have transportation available for those appointments each Wednesday at 6:00 a.m. The commissioners will briefly meet on Sept. 8 to review and vote on bids for the construction of the CT scan room. The Thursday, Sept. 11 and Thursday, Sept. 25 regular meetings were canceled; the Sept. 25 meeting has been rescheduled for Monday, Sept. 29, at 7:00 p.m.

making an argument.” “In the last few weeks I’ve had (state representatives) Shelly Short here and Joel Kretz here,” Michel said. “I had long discussions (about funding) with them. They assure me they are doing everything they can but it’s not just going anyplace.”

GOOD NEWS FOR VA CLINIC The Veterans Administration clinic, up to now a success as far as use but a drain on hospital district resources, received word that its reimbursement rates from the VA would be increasing enough to get it on even financial footing. Since the clinic opened three years ago, the VA reimbursement rate had decreased each year, and was slated to go down to $39 per veteran per month. With the VA contract expiring, Director of Ancillary Services

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

DOT visits Tonasket council Laundry list of concerns discussed BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Three representatives of the Washington Department of Transportation engaged in a lengthy discussion with the Tonasket City Council at their Tuesday, Aug. 28, meeting regarding a laundry list of traffic concerns that Mayor Patrick Plumb communicated to the DOT over the summer. North Central Region Administrator Dan Sarles, along with Local Program director Paul Mahre (a frequent visitor) and one other discussed issues with this summer’s chip seal project on Whitcomb Avenue (including the recently removed “extra” crosswalk) and long-term projects that the council hopes can be addressed at some point. Plumb’s list included: • pedestrian safety issues on the south end of Tonasket (due to a lack of crossings); • poor quality of the chip seal project; • poor communication during the project on timelines and conditions; • continuing issues with drainage on Whitcomb Avenue during rainstorms; • changing the speed limits south of the city limits, particularly in areas that could be annexed in the future; • roadway degradation from off-street access; • cooperation between state agencies and the city; • crosswalk issues in the downtown core; • potentially adding metric conversions to speed limit signs within the city limits to help Canadian tourists; • find out the best process to register complaints; • and discuss the best placement for a bus rider shelter or stop. Most of the discussion centered around the US-97 (Whitcomb) chip seal project and the future possibility of much-needed, more extensive work to be done in the downtown core. Sarles said the DOT was not

blind to Tonasket’s issues, but that a lack of state-level funding has made it impossible to do more. “We are trying to squeeze everything out of the dollars we have,” Sarles said, presenting data reflecting financial issues. He said one way the state has changed its determination on where to do more extensive road work has to do with average daily traffic rates. Though US-97 is a main transport corridor/ “We used to chip seal only routes with (Average Daily Traffic) of 5,000 or less,” Mahre said. “Now we’re doing it in

“We are trying to squeeze everything out of the dollars we have.” Dan Sarles, DOT Regional Administrator Washington State Department of Transportation

10,000 ADT or less, and the way funding looks it will be 25,000 or less in the near future.” He said that Tonasket is in the 6-7,000 ADT range. “I understand that,” Plumb said. “But I wanted to make sure that you (the DOT) was in receipt of my comments because these will continue to be major issues for us.” Scott Olson also brought up the topic of the missing wheelchair ramp at Third and Whitcomb, near The Kuhler “We still have no ramp,” Olson said. “It’s hard to see because there are others that have been replaced. I know the reasons why, but it is still very frustrating.” Only the state has the jurisdictional right to put in such a ramp along US-97. “We really need it right there but we keep getting them in other places,” Olson said. “Don’t you have a deal, pay for five, set the sixth one free? I suggest you go take a wheelchair and try to get to the Kuhler from here and see how long it takes you to get there.”

MOSQUITO VOTE DELAY City planner Kurt Danison of Highlands Associates updated the council on the status of the proposed mosquito control district. At one time it was hoped that a vote on whether or not to

Tonasket clerk honored by IIMC THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb announced last week that Tonasket City Clerk Alice Attwood has earned the designation of Master Municipal Clerk, which is awarded by the International Institute of Municipal Clerks. “IIMC grants the MMC designation only to those municipal clerks who complete demanding education requirements; and who have a record of significant contributions to their local government, their community and state,” said IIMC President Brenda Kay Young in a release. “In light of the speed and drastic nature of change these days, lifelong learning is not only desirable, it is necessary for all in local government to keep pace with growing demands and changing needs of the citizens we serve. Your City can take immense pride in Alice’s educational accomplishments and achievement of

this milestone.” The International Institute of Municipal Clerks, founded in 1947, has 10,300 members throughout the United States, Canada and 15 other countries, and the mission of this global non-profit corporation is to enhance the education opportunities and professional development of its diverse membership. “The City of Tonasket is lucky to have hard working professionals continue enhancing their knowledge and training to serve the public,” Plumb said. “I would like to recognize Alice Attwood, Tonasket City Clerk/Treasurer for her diligence in her duties and I am pleased that she has received this designation. As a public servant, it is good to know that our City leadership is taking it upon themselves to bring back skills that make our City a better place to live, grow, play, and work. “Congratulations Alice!” FUEL: 24 Hrs a day - 7 days a wk!

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form the district would be on this November’s ballot, but Danison said a busy summer kept the Okanogan County commissioners from completing the required hearings for that to happen. “They opened the public hearing on July 22,” Danison said. “(The Carlton Complex fire) was taking a little time from those folks. so that hearing was continued until (Aug. 28). “That was continued until Sept. 15. That is basically the end of the window to hold their hearing, then they have a 30-60 days to hold the election. They are within the window of having

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the election, but not the ability to for the county to do what needs to be done to verify the map, identify the boundaries ... they really need 90-120 days to do what needs to be done.” He said it probably won’t be voted on until April at the earliest and possibly not for another year. “One of the commissioners said that you should go to your 7th and 12th District legislators and get the ability to get a bill on your utility bills so that only people in the cities would be paying for mosquito control,” Danison said. “We tried to point out that the mosquitoes don’t just breed and grow inside the city limits. A lot of the habitat is outside the city. That might be a way to collect some money but the city can’t go outside the city limits and deal with the mosquitoes on private property, while a mosquito district can. “So it’s an uphill battle to help them understand that, in order to be effective, it can’t just be a city to city deal, it needs to be a larger area. (For example) the entire area along the river from Oroville to Tonasket should be included, because it’s all habitat, and the mosquitoes can go three to four miles.” Danison said that many of the decisions can’t be made until a district is formed and the trustees that would be appointed (one

each from the five participating cities, and from each of the three districts represented by each county commissioner). They are the ones that will make the decisions about what will it actually do, what will the budget be, and how they’re going to get that money.”

JOHNSON DISCUSSES FIRE MITIGATION Responding to previously raised concerns, Fire Chief/City Permit Administrator Christian Johnson said that ensuring residents maintain their yards as a safety precaution against wildfires was a complicated matter. “We have abandoned properties that are now bank-owned,” Plumb said. “And there are some property owners that haven’t had (yard maintenance) as their highest priority.” “We have tried to work with several property owners with request for yard maintenance letters,” Johnson said. “And in some cases the police department has actually issued citations. Unfortunately, some of those people have been ‘frequent fliers.’ A citation, they persistently don’t pay them. “The other part of its (asking them directly), and that often works. And we can issue citations. The other part of it is, if you don’t fix it, we’ll fix it. If we fix it, we make a special assessment on the property. And if they don’t pay the county treasurer that money ... the county treasurer will collect that money by selling the property.” Johnson said that’s a four or five year process. Plumb said getting letters out to those property owners at this time might be effective due to the attention brought to the issue by this summer’s fires. “We had a Biblical event,” Johnson said. “Most of the cities weren’t concerned about having to experience what Pateros did. That was very eye-opening. No one expected to see that here. “It was a perfect storm ... but you could not afford to have a fire department to try to stop that at that time. There were good lessons learned. In the city or small town, a wildfire can move through there just as fast, and houses are combustible.”

5 mi. S. of OROVILLE, WA on 5 Ward Rd. (next to the Les Schwab sign on Hwy 97)

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Local production company takes on county fair vice at 8am on Sunday. There will be an open mic opportunity OKANOGAN - Stage & Studio for residents to share their short Productions, dedicated to pro- stories throughout the weekend. When asked about the upcommoting creative arts to the region and providing live entertain- ing festival entrepreneur Howell ment, will be at the center of said, “This year’s county fair will this year’s Okanogan County Fair. be unlike any before it. We have The company, in just its second a new board who have offered us the opportunity year, already build this produces the “Many families have to event from main stages been put out of their the ground for the biggest local festivals homes recently and up. We will be all such as Spring this is an opportunity recording the bands and Green in May for them to set aside hope and will and Conscious Culture in June. their troubles for an release a comalbum “Many famiextended weekend pilation from the willlies have been and enjoy some live ing performers. put out of there homes recently music and show their A guitar will be raffled and this is an support for the region.” also off and all proopportunity Derek Howel, Audio Engineering, ceeds will be for them to Stage & Studio Productions donated to the set aside their Community troubles for an Foundation of extended weekNorth Central end, enjoy some live music and show their sup- Washington. These recent tragport for the region,” said Derek edies truly have given us a new reason to get out of the house and Howell, with Stage & Studio. This year’s performers include: come together.” Howell started in the audio the ventriloquist Jerry Brenden, The Wicks, Good4U, Sammy field at the age of 15 and now Steele, Okanogan Bluegrass has a Certificate in Audio Company, Midnight Run, Barry Engineering from Musician’s Black, Love Stitch, John Jones, Institute Hollywood and is curThe Olson Brothers and more rently completing a bachelor’s local area talent. Cornerstone in Audio Production at The Art Church will also be holding ser- Institute. THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Thank You

Thank you to the employees of Okanogan PUD and to the line crews from Douglas PUD, Chelan PUD, Grant PUD, Ferry PUD and BPA for your efforts to restore power to our customers affected by the Carlton Complex Fire. Your efforts clearly demonstrate the Public Power commitment to serve our customers. Also, a special thank you to all of the merchants and businesses listed below. The goods, services and support you lent to the utility crews were essential to restoring power to our customers. You gave us your highest priority in our time of need and we sincerely appreciate your efforts. Steve Houston President

Ernest Bolz Vice President

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TICKETS!

Submitted photo

‘Dereck Howel with Stage and Studio Productions working at the Spring Green last May, one of several local festivals the company has helped to produce.

B.S. Bar-BQ, Twisp, WA Caso’s Family Foods, Okanogan, WA El Paraiso, Okanogan, WA Okanogan Ice, Okanogan, WA The Breadline, Omak, WA Hometown Pizza, Omak, WA Odom Corporation, Omak, WA Subway Sandwiches & Salads, Omak, WA Safeway, Omak, WA

David Womack Secretary

Food and Beverages Continued: Brewster Drug & True Value, Brewster, WA Camperos, Brewster, WA Columbia Ice, Brewster, WA Rancho Chico, Omak, WA Weinstein Beverage, Wenatchee, WA

Lodging for the Crews: Pateros Lakeshore Inn, Pateros, WA Twisp River Suites, Twisp, WA Idle-A-While Motel, Twisp, WA

Equipment, Operators, Services & Fuel: Bob McDaniel, Tonasket, WA Ty Olson Construction, Tonasket, WA Lees & Duke Excavating, Okanogan, WA Whitley Fuel, Okanogan, WA Central Landfill, Okanogan, WA Skirko Tree Service, Okanogan, WA Tollefson Construction, Omak, WA Les Schwab, Brewster & Okanogan, WA See’s Excavating, Bridgeport, WA Lloyd Logging, Twisp, WA Dennis Jones Chipping & Tree Service, Twisp, WA B.T.O. Construction, Pateros, WA Asplund Tree Service, Willow Grove, PA

Contractors: ID Consulting, Boise, ID

Miscellaneous: Heatstroke, Okanogan, WA Pro Stitch, Omak, WA


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

HOT AUGUST NIGHTS Bill Everly/submitted photos

There were over 50 entries in this year’s Hot August Nights Car Show held in Chesaw last Saturday. The following are the results as provided: Best of Show was won by Gene Fritts. Special Awards were given for Smallest car, Bill Smith; Best Engine Robert Every; Best Paint, Laurence and Mel Morgan; Best Interior, Rod Souder and Work in Progress, Joel and Betty Carter Class 100 - 2nd -Joel and Betty Carter and 3rd - John Coffelt Class 200 - 1st - 211 Joe Swenson, 2nd -207 Don Pratt and 3rd - 209 Terry Rampley Class 300 - 1st - Bob & Sue Kelly, 2nd - Gene Fritts and 3rd - Roberta Jones Class 400 - 1st - Larry Bouta, 2nd - Devon Sementilli and 3rd - 406 Bill Smith Class 500 - 1st - Walt Hart, 2nd - Leroy Hirst and 3rd - Terry Coil Class 600 - 1st - Lawrence & Mel Morgan, 2nd - Alba & Barry Ballard and 3rd - Rod Souder Class 700 - 1st - Dick Sweetman, 2nd - Robert Everly and 3rd - Don Sproule Class 800 - 1st - Bacon and 2nd - Mark Fedderson Class 900 - 1st - Bill Smith and 2nd - David Dillow Class 1200 - 1st - Bacon Class 1300 - 1st - Bud Hilstad

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Kinross employees run in Bloomsday race for animal shelter Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn (KRB) is proud St. Pierre, Asa East, Cindy Jones, Elizabeth Wagar one hour or less. to be able to support ideas that our employees and Terence Watungwa, raised $1,000.00 to doShortly after the donation was made, the site come up with that will have a received a very appreciapositive impact on our local tive thank you note from communities. The following the Forget-Me-Not Animal story is only one example of Shelter. They were thorour outstanding caliber of oughly pleased with the employees going the extra unexpected donation, and mile to do just that. informed us that our donaAs part of KRB’s wellness tion helped fund care for program, the company often pets in their Happy Homes pays the registration fee for Adoption Program, Fear employees to participate No Feral Program and Stop in various runs, marathons the Cycle Program. In ador other activities that prodition, the donation directly mote active living. Through benefited Sammi, a 10 this program, several of year old border collie who our employees decided to had a mammary tumor and run Bloomsday in Spokane whose owner had recently earlier this year. Collecpassed away. Sammi has tively, they came up with an since recovered from suridea to ask KRB to donate gery and was adopted by $100 to a local charitable her forever home in early cause for each employee August. who completed the race. KRB would like to thank The employees came up our employees for takwith a number of worthwhile Pictured with Sammi the Dog at the Forget-Me-Not Animal Shelter: Elizabeth Wagar, Ernie Miranda, ing such an active role in Cindy Jones, Simon Harbick, and Terence Watungwa. causes to run for, and in the helping to raise funds for end, they settled on running to support local ani- nate to the shelters: $500.00 to the Forget-Me- causes such as these in our local communities. mal shelters. Not Animal Shelter in Ferry County and another We would also like to thank the many volunteers Ultimately, the employees who participated in $500.00 to The Nourishing Hand in Okanogan at the local animal shelters for all of the hard work, the 12k Bloomsday run, including Alex Brown, Si- County. The three top finishers of the group – dedication and energy they put in to running sucmon Harbick, Mike Olson, Nadia St. Jean, Bradley Alex, Asa and Simon – all completed the race in cessful shelter programs.


SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER It’s time to go back to school As the fun-filled days of summer vacation draw to close, teachers and students across Central Washington are heading back into the classroom for a new school year. Throughout my years in Congress, I have often met with local teachers, administrators, parents, and students to discuss ways we can improve our educational system so that it better serves our students. The resounding message that I hear is the need for more local control and less interference from the federal government. More than a decade has passed since Congress first passed the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act. While there is no doubt this law is far from perfect, it established a level of accountability for the first time by insisting on results for the billions of federal dollars spent on education. However, many improvements can and must be made. It is clear that a one-size-fits-all approach to education is not in the best interest of our Doc Hastings students. Education programs that work well Representative for students in Seattle may not be the best fit for (4th District those in Ephrata or the Tri-Cities. In my view, students in Central Washington and all across the country are best served when decisions about education are made by local school districts and parents – not the federal government. Last year, the House of Representatives passed, with my support, the Student Success Act. This important legislation is aimed at restoring flexibility and local control of public education programs by putting decisions about students’ education back where it should be – in the hands of parents and local school districts. There is no question that we must continue to make sure that schools are held accountable for educating the next generation, and I am pleased that this bill would replace the existing federal one-sizefits-all student progress requirement with state-determined accountability systems. The Student Success Act would also save taxpayer dollars by eliminating more than 70 duplicative and unnecessary federal education programs that further create bureaucratic red tape for local schools. Unfortunately, the Senate has failed to act on this bill or present its own plan to reform our public schools. With students headed back to school, time is of the essence and I urge the Senate to act swiftly and pass the Student Success Act to ensure that American students have access to the quality education they deserve. I will continue working to restore local control and decision-making, and ensure taxpayer dollars are spent wisely. I wish all the teachers, students, and parents in Central Washington a safe and successful 2014-2015 school year. Editor’s Note: I’d just like to say I plan on being back in my usual spot next week. There’s a lot to read on education in this week’s newspaper -- starting with the Oroville and Tonasket school board stories on the front page, but also opinion on this editorial page. I’d especially like to draw your attention to B1 and Brent Baker’s analysis of how our schools are being given low letter grades for what appears to be more for political reasons than care about our kids’ education. Next week I might just write about my adventures in motorcycling and being broke down on the side of the road and all the good people who took the time to get me and my bike back home again. G.A.D.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Our state’s super wealthy social changer at it again OPINION BY JERRY CORNFIELD THE EVERETT HERALD

Two years after their money helped make charter schools possible, the Ballmers, the Gateses and the Nick Hanauer are using some of their loose millions to try to tighten gun laws in Washington. They’ve made six- and seven-digit contributions to the campaign for Initiative 594, the measure on the November ballot which would expand the state’s background check law to cover most gun sales conducted at gun shows and online. Their checks went to the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility whose strategists will, sometime after Labor Day, start spending the dough on television commercials claiming wider use of background checks will bolster public safety without infringing on anyone’s Second Amendment rights. The alliance can afford to wait because it is already getting a boost from a million-dollar ad campaign paid for by its nonprofit alter ego, the Center for Gun Responsibility. Since Aug. 8, the center has been running dozens of 30-second commercials as part of an “education” campaign dubbed “Background Checks Make A Difference.” The effort is set to end Sept. 5. The ads stress the value of background checks for enhancing public safety but never mention the ballot measure that its political

self is promoting. What’s nice about this campaign finance nuance is it also allows the Center for Gun Responsibility to keep secret the source of its money. Center spokeswoman Molly Boyajian noted in an email that the nonprofit has received “gifts from local individuals, partner organizations, foundations, and our national partners.” One of those partners is Everytown for Gun Safety, founded by Michael Bloomberg, the super rich ex-mayor of New York. He’s pledged to spend boatloads of money in every corner of the country to help enact tougher gun control laws and elect pro-gun control lawmakers. I-594 fits his investment profile perfectly. While billionaires soak up attention for their prodigious checks, where is the National Rifle Association in all of this? Is it possible the NRA, the established pulpit of the gun rights movement, will keep its money to itself in this fight? The NRA does have a political action committee to oppose I-594. But its coffers are pretty much empty. A significant infusion would be needed if the venerable organization intends to deliver a serious counterpunch. The NRA did contribute $25,000 to its PAC in July then spent most of it on staff, probably to have them survey the landscape. They couldn’t have liked what they discovered. An Elway Poll in July found 70 percent

of voters – many of them in the vote-rich Pugetopolis – “inclined” to back Initiative 594. Three months earlier, in April, an Elway Poll found the level of support at 72 percent. Things could turn quickly. They did in 1995 when voters initially embraced a gun control-type measure then rejected it. Of late the state’s electorate has been in the mood for reshaping society in ways the government won’t. They’ve privatized liquor and legalized marijuana, charter schools and gay marriage. Last year, voters seemed primed to pass a food-labeling initiative until opponents shelled out $22 million to successfully defeat it. The NRA can’t fork out that kind of money, nor must it. Neither can it hope to succeed on its reputation alone. NRA leaders must decide whether it is worth trying to convince voters in one state in the far corner of the country to defeat an initiative, or focus on keeping members of Congress from changing the background check law for the nation. The next few days will be very telling. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at 360-352-8623;jcornfield@ heraldnet.com and on Twitter at @dospueblos

Education or propaganda? I’m an evolutionism-inclined agnostic, but I trusted my kids (and do trust my grandkids) to be smart enough and objective enough not to let any particular church nor any faction of public education convince them it has the closed, last word on any issue. And call me crazy, but I don’t fear my progeny will somehow become intellectually corrupted by alternative thoughts, as evolutionists seem to dread, so I don’t feel driven to keep the kids sheltered from exposure to those alternative thoughts. All the trendy modern American secularist bigBill Slusher otry (against Christians anyway) notwithstanding, religionists who merely want their views included in public education are absolutely no more voo-doo, superstitious, self-impressed nor faith-driven than that large religious cult among scientists who fanatically preach the scriptures of political correctness at the expense of sound science. And lo they are many. For instance, there’s no more medieval a bunch of stern, inflexible, robed clerics in America than the faux ‘consensus’ among scientists who piously and angrily insist that global warming (hastily renamed ‘climate change’ when it was proved that the Earth hasn’t warmed in nearly twenty years) is a slam-dunk, welded-shut, done-deal despite enormous objective evidence and much thoroughly credentialed scientific hypothesis to the contrary. There was a time when academia confidently welcomed objective challenge to their pet theories, that the theories be tested on the crucible of evidence. No more. Post modern American academia now defensively castigates any who deign to suggest that there could possibly be any question of such trendy pop-science gospels

as global warming. Dare to advocate any diverse, tolerant and objective consideration of sound alternative possibilities and you will fast be damned by the Warmist cult as a scientific heretic, a ‘flat-earther!’, a ‘holocaust denier mentality!’ and worse. Some elements of academia are actually pressing to have the questioning of Warmist doctrine officially declared illegal with criminal punishments for dissenters. Oh for those wonderful, comparatively open-minded Dark Ages again. I don’t yet know whether climate change is as represented by the ‘scientific’ Warmist jihadis or not, but any fair read of the full scope of evidence on the question to date strongly indicates the Warmists don’t actually know either, their self-satisfied, computermodeled convictions notwithstanding. Yet, with every bit as much blind faith and fundamentalist zealotry as any creationists, that cult is also dogmatically demanding that their ‘scientific’ religion of evolutionism be exclusively taught in our public schools with nothing more to support a case for that exclusivity than the Gospel of Political Correctness. Surely for most of us nothing outranks our children’s welfare, and top among those concerns is their education. Ergo, we have annual battles among the varying factions as to how such issues as evolution, homosexuality, guns, abortion, religion, race and many others are presented. But is not the real education risk to our children more from exclusivity than any single theme? Isn’t the biggest threat to our children (from their education) more the imposition of an exclusive view than from their exposure to an objectively presented set of alternatives? Are not our kids more at risk from being force-fed a single ‘right’ way to think as opposed to being given a selection of alternatives from which they may choose? I personally believe we’re all agnostics because none of us can prove or disprove any deity. I believe evolutionism is more likely to be correct than creationism. (Yet I never

forget that even Darwin admitted before his death that he “had no satisfactory answer to the Pre-Cambrian Mystery” whereby even secularist mathematicians admit that the odds of evolution having progressed as fast and uniformly as the historical record indicates it did in the Pre-Cambrian Era absent - their words - “intelligent design” are ... one in ... seventy ... trillion). I believe that religion is the single largest mental illness afflicting humankind, and I offer the Christian Crusades in their day and modern Islam as proof beyond any reasonable doubt. Nonetheless, I would have no objection to my grandkids being taught evolutionism, as well as religious alternatives - even the Islamic accounts - in the same class. I don’t fear my grandchildren choosing unintelligently from a set of evidence derived alternative views. I do fear them being propagandized in a single politically correct view adjudicated by some Grande Committee of the All Knowing, be they conservative, liberal or other in nature. I’d humbly suggest that we need to have more faith in our children’s ability to know right from wrong, good from bad, or correct from incorrect as they’ve been taught by their families. Perhaps we should fear less that our children may be duped by alternatives and fear more their being inculcated in any school board’s notion of a single correct view exclusive to all others. For is not our mandate to educate our kids, rather than propagandize them? William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his nonpartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (Amazon, cmppg.com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@live.com.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 3, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE A new month and back to school A new month and school has started. Remember to watch out for the little guys that are going and coming from school. Sometimes they forget so we must be extra careful when driving. It’s so good to have some cooler days. Soon it will be soup time. And we’ll switch from iced tea to hot tea, or maybe a cup of cocoa. God is good BUT why did he make wasps? We’ve been invaded by them, and thanks to our grandson and great grandson, there are fewer of them at our place now, and no one got stung during the massacre. And those same guys

Go have some fun at the county fair SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

September has come and fall will be here before we know it. We hope that all are enjoying the last of the summer days. Go have fun at the Okanogan County Fair. Thursday Sept. 4 at 5:30 p.m. will be kick off for the Seattle Seahawks in Seattle playing Green Bay. Come on in and watch the game on our big screen TV (Go Hawks!). We would like to thank every-

Talented group of singers performed at Legion SUBMITTED BY VICKI HART HODGES POST #84

Thank you for supporting Friday’s “Girls Gone Country” on Friday, Aug. 29. What a talented group of young singers. We were honored to have them in Oroville and hope to have them back next year. Thanks Louie Wilson for getting that going. The Liberty Tree at the Entrance to the City Veteran’s Memorial Park has been so well received that we are getting many

flipped our mattress. What a blessing to have our extended family nearby, to help us with chores that used to simple and now sometimes seem monumental. Vivian Emry, who is now making her home on Vashon Island, with her daughter, Joanie Raymond, was here for the Molson quilt show. Joanie had a nice assortment of her crafts for sale. She has many nice selections using tatting, which she learned from her grandmother and for a while was almost a lost art, but has made a comeback and she does it so well. Mary Louise Lowe had a group of

TONASKET EAGLES one that brought salads and desserts for the Memorial in memory of Geneva Reeder. Every Sunday we have special prices on all drinks $1.00 off, half price or full price. (draw a ticket to see what it will cost you). Hours are from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. A big thank you to all the volunteers for their time and hard work at the beer garden and the steak feed. In fact the steak feed went so well, we ran out of steaks. No one won the Joker Poker the

AT THE LEGION POST donations for more names to be added. If you are a veteran or know of one you want added to the wall please provide us with the name, branch of service, and years they served. We would be happy to get a leaf in place for you. We are currently second place in membership for Ninth District. Please get your dues in as soon as possible. Our goal is to reach 100 percent by Veteran’s Day, Nov. 11. If you have any questions about membership call 509-476-4633.

Vivian’s friends at her home Sunday, touch” on pillow cases, tablecloths and wishing her the best in her new location. other items. The quilting ladies keep busy I just recently learned of the death of throughout the year with George Day, Jr. who made his many fine pieces for their home here in Oroville with efforts. Visiting the quilt his daughter Sheryl, until his show would be an excellent health deteriorated and he place to get the many items needed special care, which needed for quilting with lots he got in East Wenatchee, of advice that would posand ultimately passed away sibly make it much easier to last July. do the task. Also there were The pear season is in sesto be crocheting and knitsion now, and several of those ting demonstrations in the that were employed on the afternoon. In my day you lines are now doing THIS & THAT cherry learned those things from pears. I’m not a big fan of your mom and grandmoth- Joyce Emry pears. In fact they are about ers, but times change and my least favorite of all fruits. a lot of the “now” moms Family of Nathan Haney don’t do those things in lieu of iPads, gathered at the home of his parents, laptops and other computerized instru- Jason and Stephanie during the holiday ments, or simply don’t have the time for a “Happy Party.” Hopefully no more and energy after doing full time jobs, chemo will ever be needed to conquer so it is very nice to have classes offered the Hodgkin son’s disease. Sharing in for those who wish to put a “homey his good feelings were his two broth-

pot is up to $3,156. you could win half of the pot, must be present to win. Don’t forget bingo on Friday night at 7 p.m. and the kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. for Burgers and More. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Dale and Cindy Byers, second place Morrie DeBack and Cathy Moore, low score went to Penny Smith and Jerry Cooksey, and last pinochle to Bill Maple and Wanda Sutherland. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

The auxiliary has now elected new officers for the current year. We had the Washington State President, Lorna and other state officers Rita and Larry as guests. We appreciate them taking time from their busy schedule to swear in this year’s officers. Thanks so much for stepping up to get that done. Also thanks to those who have given so much in the past. Oroville is a very patriotic community and it shows with all the hours donated. The auxiliary will be meeting on Thursday, Sept. 11. If you have any time to help or have any suggestions for a successful year please attend the meeting or contact Delores Patterson.

Hilltop was buzzing SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT

ers, Caleb and Dakota; his grandparents, Lance and Vicki Haney and Steve and Ada Retasket; and aunt and uncle Sharon and Ed, Wenatchee; David, Janae and baby Mia Chryst, Issaquah; and Justin, Becky Haney, and three sons, Snohomish; and me and his great grandpa. The family truly thanks all for their love, prayers and concerns during his ordeal. I made over nine dozen cookies for eating here and a box “for the road” for the travelers. Somehow it takes me longer to do that, than it used to. Is it me getting slower? Surely not the years catching up with me? Are you going to the Okanogan County Fair? We’ve been having a lot of conversations at our house about when the fair was moved from Oroville to Okanogan. So far, about all we know is that it was 1947. Would like more information, so if you’ve something to share, let us know. ‘Til Next Week

HILLTOP COMMENTS

HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Our hilltop was buzzing this past weekend. The Hot August nights Annual Classic Car Show was just one of the big events. The field behind the Rodeo Arena in Chesaw was filled with Classic Cars of all years, shapes, colors and sizes. It was quite an impressive sight. Cars started arriving before 9 a.m. to register for the event. By the close of registration at noon there were 56 cars registered for the competition. That is double what we had last year. There were also several cars that just came to look. It was great weather for the show and many enjoyed the food venders and yard sales in the area. The Chesaw Tavern had live music on Friday night. The Knob Hill Club had ice cream sundaes and root beer floats. There were also brawts, burgers and popcorn available for your eating pleasure. Thanks go out to those who participated, those who organized, those that came and voted for their favorite

Dinners practically make themselves SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD

car, and to the Chesaw Rodeo Club for the use of there facilities. It was a good day. Over in Molson the Highland Stitchers Quilting Club was having their annual Quilt Show at the Grange Hall. The display of quilts was quite something to see. There were lots of compliments on the quilts even though the attendance was down a little they received many cash donations toward the “Fire Quilts” they are planning to make this next year. Thanks go out to Harvest Foods, Hughes Ace Hardware and Mary Lou’s for their donations and advertising. The venders had a good time and the kitchen was well stocked this year with taco salads and pulled pork sandwiches. They did not run out of food this year. Many are looking forward to next year. This Stitchers were planning to present Morning Sun Yellow Pony Ministries with the 51 they had made for her Montana Ministries. However at this time she is quite ill and was not able to attend. The

TONASKET MARKET REPORT

TONASKET FARMERS MARKET

New building manager sought The Community Cultural Center is seeking a new building manager. The part-time position requires 15 hours of work on a two-day-a-week schedule and will pay between $13.75-$15.00 per hour depending on qualifications. Apply by Sept. 15. For more information contact board@communityculturalcenter.org. September’s events at the CCC include: • Sept. 16, 6:00-8:00 p.m. -

THIS MONTH AT THE CCC Ukelele Club. Bring a ukelele as well as a song with chord charts, if available; • Sept. 19, 5:00-9:00 p.m. - Library fundraiser, including music and desserts; • Sept. 21, 10:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m. - Similkameen Sunday Colville Tribes, Lower and Upper Similkameen Bands, Okanogan Nation visit the CCC for a cel-

ebration of the cultural, spiritual and historic significance of the Similkameen River. Starts at 10 a.m. at the Similkameen Falls, then continues at noon at the CCC. For more information contact Rick Gillespie at 509-4853844. • Sept. 26, 6:30 p.m. - OHA Highland Wonders - “Evening with the Experts” plant identification lecture and workshop. More details and regularly scheduled events are online at www.communityculturalcenter. org, or email info@communityculturalcenter.org.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR ARC BLOOD DRIVE AT NVH North Valley Hospital will host a blood drive on Sept. 4th at 203 S. Western Ave. Tonasket. The American Red Cross Blood Drive will be from noon to 5 p.m. People can walk-in or they are encouraged to schedule an appointment by calling 800-RED-CROSS. BRAMAN & STODOLA, MARTINCAK TO PERFORM OROVILLE - Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include Rick Braman, of Oroville, on guitar with Chris Stodola, of Osoyoos, on keyboard and vocals on Thursday, Sept. 4, followed by Andy Martincak on ukulele on Thursday, Sept. 11. Doors open at 6 p.m.; music begins by 6:30 p.m. For more information, call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or visit the Events page at www.estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road. FAMILY FAIRE WORK PARTIES Green Okanogan is hosting two work parties to crush glass and prepare for the Okanogan Family Faire. The work parties will be at the Faire site, Saturday, Sept. 6, and Saturday, Sept. 13, beginning at 9:00 a.m. Eight

hours of volunteer time will earn you a camping pass into the Faire. Making the Faire as waste-free as possible is a huge task and help is needed. Contact Carol Lanigan at clanigan2@gmail.com for more information.

OROVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Sept. 6 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. For more info call 509-476-2096. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY The September meeting of the Okanogan Habitat for Humanity will be Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 7:00 p.m. It will be at the home of Mike and Peggy McDaniel, 170 Hubbard Rd., Riverside. TONASKET FOOD BANK TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192. OROVILLE FOOD BANK OROVILLE - The Oroville

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food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386.

LISTING YOUR ITEM Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com or at GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

This is a marvelous time of the year when the melons are ripe and the sweet corn is fresh and dinner practically makes itself. We have been harvesting garlic, zucchini and potatoes from our home garden. If you are not blessed with a garden of your own and still crave the fresh tastes of summer, visit Tonasket Farmers’ Market every Thursday afternoon and find a plethora of tasty choices. Last week we tried farmer Fred Fowler’s sweet corn, and this week we gave Wayne Verbeck’s a try. Verbeck corn is near legendary in these parts and these ears did not disappoint. The bi-color corn was fresh and firm, and it tasted every bit as sweet as the Ohio corn I remember from my

312 S. Whitcomb

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

treats while the season lasts. How to extend the seasonal bounty? Visit the Queen of Preserves, Val Welles. Val has been bringing her home canned “Fat Cat” brand of preserves and pickles to market since the first year it opened. Always made from as many local ingredients as possible, such as blackberry jam created from the aforementioned organic blackberries, Val has made year-round enjoyment of seasonal flavors possible. Not one to keep these secrets to herself, Val also has information available on food preservation classes available from Washington State University Extension. My advice? Enjoy the tastes of summer. Do the Can-Can. Eat what you can while you can, then can the rest. See you at the market!

MOVIES

509-486-0615

Oliver Theatre

www.olivertheatre.ca

250-498-2277 SUN-MON.-TUES-THURS 7:30PM Oliver, B.C. FRI. SAT: 7:00 & 9:20PM (unless otherwise stated)

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

FALL IS COMING! Scarves from $6.99 to $39.99

THE PURGE: ANARCHY THURS.-FRI -SAT. SEPT 4-5-6 CLOSED SUN.-MON.-TUES.-THURS SEPT 7-8-9-11

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Add an Important Item to Your Back-to-school List. For parents, back-to-school season means it’s time to stock up on school supplies. But it can also be a good time to think about how to save for your child’s future education. Developing a strategy for achieving your education savings goal – or other savings goals – can help you stay on track.

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32 N Main St Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638

IF I STAY

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DRAMA STARRING CHLOE GRACE MORETZ, MIREILLE ENOS, JAMIE BLACKLEY FRI.6:45, 9:30. SAT: *4:00, 6:45, 9:30. SUN:*4:00, 6:45. WKDYS: 6:45 The

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101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

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113 min

ADVENTURE/ACTION STARRING PATRICK STEWART, MAKO, CHRIS EVANS. FRI.6:30, 9:30 SAT: *3:45, 6:30, 9:30. SUN: *3:45, 6:30 WKDYS 6:45

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PG-13

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97 min

DRAMA/SCI-FI STARRING BRENTON THWAITES, JEFF BRIDGES, MERYL STREEP.

FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *4:00, 6:45, 9:45. SUN. *4:00, 6:45. WKDYS: 6:45

INTO THE STORM

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childhood. Winning the award for the most creative presentation of corn at the market, Mark Overton offers “pick your own” corn; freshly cut corn stalks sporting ripe ears sit in barrels of water, waiting for you to “pick.” You can buy the entire stalk, just the ears, or even get the bare stalks to use as animal fodder. Other offerings from Overton include green beans, peppers and squash. Morningstar is back with his River Song organic produce; peaches and blackberries, with the promise of more to come. There is nothing like biting into a fragrant, ripe peach and having the juices run down your chin! Eat all you can get of these fresh

quilts will be delivered to her this coming week. This lady needs our prayers. Back over in Cheaw, Fiona’s will be open through September on the weekends. Farmers Market is going on Saturdays with apples, garden produce, and plants for fall panting. (strawberries and perennials). You can also get your espresso and nuffins, yumm. See you on the weekends. The next BINGO Night will be on Friday, Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. Bring your families and friends. At a gathering at Mary Louise Loe’s home last Sunday many of her friends, neighbors and relatives came to wish Vivian Emry a safe journey, as she is leaving the Molson area for greener pastures on Vashon Island to live with her youngest daughter, Joanie. We will all miss her very much. She is looking well and is making the adjustment. Vivian has been a part of this community since she was nine-years-old and lived in Molson for 37 years. She will  be missed.  We all hope she will visit and wish her well. Attention all you pinochle players -- get ready to start up again on Monday nights, around the first part of October. Until next week

PG-13

89m

ACTION//THRILLER STARRING RICHARD ARMITAGE, SARAH WAYNE CALLIS, MATT WALSH.

FRI. 7:00, 9:15. SAT. *4:15, 7:00 & 9:15 SUN:*4:15, 7:00 WKDAYS. 7:00. Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVÀOPLV*UDWHG 1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGÀOPVZLWKRXWWKHLU own parent. Photo ID required.


SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS Molson Breakfast buffet is Quilt Show planned for Sept. 13 SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

The Oroville Senior Center is looking forward to the breakfast scheduled for Saturday, Sept 13 when we will be having another buffet with all the trimmings. Serving starts at 8 a.m. and will end about 10 a.m. Included in the menu are all you can eat pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, fruit, juice, coffee, tea. All you can eat for only $8. To clear up any misconceptions about the movie times: Movies are scheduled for the fourth Friday afternoon of each month starting right after lunch at 1 p.m. The next movie will be Arsenic and Old Lace with Cary Grant. Sometimes they even have popcorn. Joy and John Lawson and friends have promised they will be here for our entertainment on Sept. 19, the third Friday after-

noon. As far as they know now they will be available each month on the third Friday afternoon. We have ordered a new sound system, so our voices will be heard without yelling. We have many deaf or hard of hearing members, so this will be an improvement. Betty Steg will talk about beekeeping next Tuesday at 11 a.m. A new game is being taught and instructed by one of our Canadian neighbors by the name of Valerie Scrivner. She says they play Eukere all the time in Osoyoos. Maybe they will be playing it down here all the time also. I even heard Pinochle mentioned this afternoon. We may be starting something new around here, besides pool and bingo on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Double deck (or more) pinochle is still being played on Sunday afternoons along with a pot luck once a month. I would say we have a bunch of card players around here. Pinochle scores for Aug. 30 will be available next time.

Submitted photos

The Molson Quilt Show was held by the Highland Stitchers at the Molson Grange Hall last Saturday, Aug. 30. Above, quilts donated to Morning Sun Ministries. Right, Joannie Emry Raymond with a quilt by Vicky Didenhover on display behind her. “We thought the quilt show was a success even though attendance was down this year. Everyone loved the quilts on display and enjoyed the food,� said Didenhover, with the Highlands Stitchers group. Vicky Ernhardt won the Hugh’s raffle quilt. Deborah Gohrke won the quilt the Highland Stitchers made, said Didenhover.

Come join us!

DENTISTRY Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

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for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

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HEALTH CARE

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.�

In Tonasket & Oroville

OKANOGAN

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OROVILLE

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232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

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HEALTH CARE

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A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

Toll Free (866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

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Emergency VA Clinic „ Surgical Center „ Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket) „ Obstetrical Services „ Imaging „ Full-Service Laboratory „ Extended Care „ Swing Bed Program

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

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Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

suinlo@yahoo.com

.RDOD‡2PDN:$‡ZYPHGLFDOFRP

Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

„ Anti

„

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Physician-owned and patient-centered

(509) 826-6191

Mental Health

OROVILLE

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla EspaĂąol

CHURCH GUIDE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

TONASKET

WA Lic#MA21586

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We would be honored to work with you!

Advertise In The

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist Leon L. Alden, Pastor‡)LU2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. Sept. Message Series: Prayer Can Change Your Life www.Orovilleumc.org

Valley Christian Fellowship Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist

z Your

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center z Oxygen Concentrators z Portable Concentrators z Sleep Apnea Equipment z Nebulizers z Home Sleep Tests

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

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Call Charlene Helm

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Okanogan Valley

1516 Fir Street‡3DVWRU5RG%URZQ‡476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am‡Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center‡607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm‡After School M-W-F 3-5pm RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Catholic Church 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.� -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2565

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL Tiffeney Marie Olson, 34, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 26 to POCS (methamphetamine), use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. Olson was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,860.50 for the Feb. 4 crimes. The court found probable cause to charge James Edward Grant, 33, Omak, with three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred between July and August. The court found probable cause to charge Cherryl Ann Grant, 62, Omak, with three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and one count of POCS with intent to deliver (methamphetamine). The crimes allegedly occurred between July and August. The court found probable cause to charge Casey James Lawrence Brender, 25, Tonasket, with attempting to elude a law enforcement officer, unlawful imprisonment, reckless endangerment, second-degree TMVWOP, use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 20. The court found probable cause to charge Mark Anthony Yingling, 31, Omak, with second-degree robbery (DV), second-degree ID theft (DV), third-degree theft (DV) and fourth-degree assault (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 20. The court found probable cause to charge Christian Kane Lundsten, 34, Tonasket with second-degree assault (strangulation). The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 20. The court found probable cause to charge Getulio Hernandez Garcia, 22, Okanogan, with harassment (threats to kill). The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 23. JUVENILE A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Aug. 27 to MIP/C. The boy was sentenced to five days in detention with credit for three days served, and fined $10 for the May 30 crime. A 14-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Aug. 27 to thirddegree theft. The girl was sentenced to 16 hours of community service and fined $100. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Aug. 13 to MIP/C and third-degree malicious mischief. The boy was sentenced to seven days in detention with credit for seven days served and fined $100 for the Aug. 6 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 29. DISTRICT COURT Christopher C. Anaya, 23, Oroville, guilty of making a false statement to a public servant. Anaya was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $808. Anaya also had a charge dismissed: false reporting. David F. Arch, 48, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Noah Matthew Balauro, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and failure to transfer a title within 45 days. Balauro received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $718. Justine Christina Belgarde, 21, Omak, had a charge dismissed: third-degree rendering criminal assistance. David Ray Best, 55, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and DUI. Best was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,797. Matthew James Blackledge, 49, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Blackledge was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 179 days sus-

pended, and fined $258. Kristen Ann Bob, 32, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Tonya Marie Burroughs, 39, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Burroughs received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Burroughs had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Alfonso Cardenas Jr., 57, Omak, guilty of DUI and violation of a no-contact order. Cardenas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 324 days suspended, and fined a total of $2,844. Michael Roderick Carson, 35, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Carson received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $1,018. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 20, Omak, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. Ivan Pagaza Cortinas, 46, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Cortinas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $783. 911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Aug. 25, 2014 Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Orchard View Dr. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Engh Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Custodial interference on River Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Edmonds St. in Omak. DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Custodial interference on W. Ridge Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Hillcrest Circle Dr. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Threats on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Kernan Rd. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Juniper St. in Oroville. Jeremy James Monnin, 34, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Rusty Jochua Nimmo, 24, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for first-degree negligent driving. Mariah Kristen Todd, 20, booked for third-degree theft, POCS (heroin), possession of drug paraphernalia, introduction of contraband and on an FTA warrant for second-degree burglary. Bryce Jerald Kincaid, 38, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014 DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Burglary on Dwinnell Cutoff Rd. near Oroville. Wildland fire on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on N. A Ave. in Conconully. Assault on N. Fourth Ave. in

Okanogan. DWLS on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Engh Rd. near Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Fuel reported missing. Harassment on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Loitering on S. Ash St. in Omak. Custodial interference on Jasmine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Locust St. in Omak. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Kelly Paul Greene, 36, booked on two FTA warrants: POCS (methamphetamine) and second-degree DWLS. Edward John Mitchell, 24, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Carolyn Lee Lozano, 36, DOC detainer. Rodolfo Valdovinos, no middle name listed, 23, DOC detainer. Krystal Lee Carson, 30, booked for third-degree DWLS. Christy Lynn Merritt, 41, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014 Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Glover Lane near Okanogan. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on River Loop Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Oak St. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Disorderly conduct on Engh Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Ninth Ave. in Oroville. Brandon Shea Marchand, 40, booked on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Wayne Morris McGhee, 64, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for DUI, and two OCSO FTC warrants: DUI and seconddegree DWLS. Trevor Warren Armstrong, 29, DOC detainer. James Everett Davis, 57, DOC detainer. Michael Paul Utigard, 61, booked for fourth-degree assault. Gerael Leon Gardee, 19, court commitments for POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams), making a false statement and third-degree theft. Ivan Pagaza Cortinas, 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 Weapons offense on Hi-View Lane near Tonasket. Arrow reported in yard. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Assault on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Orchard St. near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Injuries reported. Warrant arrest on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. Trespassing on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak.

Theft on Jasmine St. in Omak. Laptop reported missing. Harassment on Cherry St. in Oroville. DWLS on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 20, booked for possession of pornography depicting minors, third-degree malicious mischief, second-degree burglary and second-degree theft (all on bond revocation) and for third-degree theft. Ivan Pagaza Cortinas, 46, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Trudie Leigh Mapes, 27, DOC detainer. Sean Alexander Lukes, 21, booked on three FTA warrants: one for possession of drug paraphernalia and two for POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). Jennifer Marie Miley, 33, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Lucas Duayne Cook, 29, booked for attempting to elude a law enforcement officer, possession of a stolen vehicle, POCS without a prescription, POCS (heroin), POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, a DOC detainer, and eight OCSO FTA warrants: three for delivery of a controlled substance, two POCS with intent to deliver, and one each for POCS, third-degree malicious mischief and TMVWOP. Ishna Rayman Mason, 33, booked on two Tonasket Police Department FTA warrants for second-degree vehicle prowling and thirddegree theft. Friday, Aug. 29, 2014 Warrant arrest on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Theft on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Sprinklers reported missing. Threats on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Recovered property on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. Vehicle recovered. Illegal burning on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Spectacle Lake near Tonasket. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Robbery on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Threats on Engh Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Apple

Shalonuns oFonod’s! Fabu

Breakfast Every Morning Steak Night on Wed. & Sat. Spaghetti Thursday „ Prime Rib Friday — We have WiFi — 626 Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2259 „ „ „

Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Juniper St. in Oroville. Trespassing on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Omak. Assault on Golden St. in Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Assault on S. Railroad Ave. in Tonasket. Seth Jared Harris, 28, booked on an Omak Police Department for second-degree assault and two State Patrol FTA warrants, both for thirddegree DWLS. Kevin Leroy Myers, 52, booked for fourth-degree assault. Kristen Ann Bob, 32, booked for first-degree robbery. Alan Ryne Stanger, 26, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for physical control. Nils Abraham Timentwa Berg, 26, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014 DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Malicious mischief on Patrol St. near Okanogan. Robbery on Main St. in Oroville. Threats on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Oak St. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on LoomisOroville Rd. near Loomis. Weapons offense on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on Engh Rd. near Omak. Juvenile problem on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Fifth Ave. in Oroville. James Michael Harvey, 60, booked for DUI. Sunday, Aug. 31, 2014 Trespassing on Apple Way Dr. in Okanogan. Burglary on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Horse Spring Coulee Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Rodeo Rd. near Tonasket. Threats on Barker Rd. near Tonasket. Two-vehicle crash on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Grafton Ranch Rd. near Tonasket. Custodial interference on Len Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak.

Trespassing on Third St. in Riverside. Assault on Cougar Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Birch St. in Omak. Vehicle reported keyed. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Golden St. in Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Noreene Elaine Lumm, 52, booked for DUI. Jeffrey Allan Bob, 27, DOC detainer. Eduardo Morales Cortez, 39, booked for attempted theft of a firearm, third-degree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. Marsha Leona Pakootas, 30, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Jerry Samuel Herrera, 27, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV). Derrick Lynn Barrett, 32, booked for first-degree rape. David Lee Fitzgerald, 56, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV) and a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Kyle Allen Thomas, 27, booked for third-degree theft and a DOC detainer. Rudy Garrett Parsons, 26, booked for disorderly conduct.

KEY: DUI - Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/ Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C - Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS Schools’ ‘grades’ not to be taken at face value Tonasket High School science won’t do that here, but determinteacher Shawn Rader explained ing what readily available inforto the district’s school board last mation actually reveals.) March why he has been working on a concept called Standards DIGGING DEEPER The Washington Public Based Grading for some time. The grading system is some- Policy Center makes its grade thing that is part of the Teacher/ allocation based upon the state board’s tier assigned Principal Evaluation to each school. It Project that school also posts each districts implementschool’s “Composite ing, but it’s been a pasAchievement Index.” sion of his for some It looks like this: time. That still doesn’t “It came to me tell us much. after a talk with (an What I’d rather exchange student see are the actual from Brazil),” he said Washington State at the time. “In AP Board of Education biology we started talking about grade HALF-BAKED Achievement Index scores (available on point averages. When Brent Baker the OSPI website at I asked him what he eds.ospi.k12.wa.us). had, he said they didn’t have that in Brazil. I thought that The policy center does include was interesting ... how do you that index (which is a composite of about 35 categories), but there measure what you’ve done? “He said, you have a checklist. is far more information there Once you’ve mastered everything than that single number. In fact, there is a chart on the on the checklist, you get to graduate. And that is what this stan- OSPI site that looks much like dards-based grading is all about. I the description of Rader’s grading can look at a student’s GPA and it system. So, since both Tonasket and tells me nothing about what that Oroville Elementaries are considstudent knows.” It’s interesting that as schools ered “Failing,” let’s see what lies and teachers are moving away beneath that composite average. The two basic categories are from the archaic “A, B, C” grading system, that others are trying Proficiency (meeting state-manto influence voters by using those dated standars) and Growth (difference between where students same designations. One of those pushing for those are at the end of the year relative kinds of grades is Gov. Jay Inslee. to the beginning). Each of those scores is broInterestingly, the Washington Policy Center, which bills itself ken down into subgroups - Nonas an “independent, non-partisan targeted subgroups (White and think tank” but tends to lean to the Asian students) and Targeted right with its policy recommen- Subgroups (the primary ones dations, embraced the Democrat being pertinent to our local disgovernor’s recommendations tricts being Hispanic students, and for the past several years has English Language Learners been issuing letter grades based (ELL), Students with Disabilities, on the State Board of Education’s and Free/Reduced Price Lunch (students considered to be living Achievement Index. We had a reader bring these in poverty). Each school has its strengths “grades” into our office, which included Tonasket Middle and and weaknesses. Each is strong High Schools each rating a C in some areas and in need of and Tonasket Elementary get- a lot of work in others. Not ting an F based on their 2012-13 only that, but this is a one year score. Similarly, Oroville Middle- snapshot. The website includes High School received a D, while that last several years of data, Oroville Elementary also rated so trends can be analyzed. Also, an F. one thing the state does not Sure, a letter grade is an iconic, take into account in its scorfamiliar way to quickly judge all ing is school size. This is key things academic. But what does it because when dealing with averreally tell you? Since my wife is a ages, one student’s score carries Tonasket teacher, of course this is a lot larger weight relative to the something that interests me (and total at a smaller school than a if you question my objectivity, go larger. So a school like Oroville ahead and stop reading. At the will likely see its scores fluctusame time, that’s why this is a ate up and down more from column. This isn’t about defend- year to year than a school such ing anyone’s performance, and I as Tonasket (which in turn will

show more fluctuation than a Seattle or Spokane large school). One other caveat to a school’s overall designation - the one that the Washington Policy Center referenced, and that even the state places front and center on its website, does not relate precisely to a school’s average of these scores. You have to read the website’s FAQ to pick this up, but getting “dinged” in one or two categories can drag down a school’s overall designation. As can having issues over a three-year period. To quote: Schools placed in the Priority Tier can be designated as one of the lowest performing schools for any of several reasons. a. Three-year average proficiency rate (combined reading and math for all students) is less than 40 percent. A school’s current proficiency rate might be over 40 percent (producing green cells) but the three-year average is still below 40 percent meaning that the school is placed into the Lowest 5% tier regardless of other performance. b. Three-year average graduation rate (for all students) is less than 60 percent. A school’s current graduation rate might be above 60 percent (producing green cells) but the three-year average is still below 60 percent, so the school is placed into the Lowest 5% tier regardless of other performance. c. A Continuing Priority school is placed into the Lowest 5% tier until a Turnaround Plan has been implemented for three years and the school meets the predetermined exit criteria. These Priority Schools could be showing blue and green cells for the current year and have a good index rating but are placed into the Lowest 5% tier regardless of other performance because the school did not meet exit criteria. Even those numbers could be analyzed more deeply. And they don’t reflect the totality of a student’s educational experience, by a long shot. But these are the numbers, scales and evaluation policies that are reduced to a single letter grade in the single, supposedly simple “letter grades” that have been making the rounds. There’s no such thing as a perfect school. Or perfect evaluation system. Regardless, boiling three dozen tiers of information down to one letter grade may tell you something. But what it tells you may not be an accurate reflection of anything other than what fits into someone else’s neatly packaged agenda.

WHAT DOES THIS REALLY TELL YOU? ORONDO OROVILLE OROVILLE

Middle School Oroville Elementary Oroville Middle-High School

TONASKET TONASKET TONASKET

Tonasket Elementary School Tonasket High School Tonasket Middle School h h h l

5.769 4.375 5.764 4.347 6.549 6.758

3 2 3

D F D 2 4 4

F C C

Fair Underperforming Fair Underperforming Good Good d Washington Public Policy Center

The Washington Public Policy center gives letter grades to schools based on the an index rating assigned by the Washington State Board of Education. But does this really give taxpayers any solid information on what is happening in their schools?

School Details Name: Oroville Elementary Code:

2422

Type: Category: District:

Public Elementary School Oroville North Central Educational Service District 171

ESD:

PERFORMANCE LEVEL

Achievement Index

Awards and Designations

RATING RANGE From To 7.85

10.00

6.81

<7.85

5.86

<6.81

4.84

<5.86

3.77

<4.84

1.00

<3.77

Performance Details

Proficiency

Growth

Rating based on Percent Proficient

Rating based on Median Growth Percentiles

Reading

Math

Writing

Science

Reading

All Students

6.00

5.00

7.00

4.00

3.00

Math 1.00

Targeted Subgroup Average

5.25

4.00

4.00

3.00

1.50

Hispanic

5.00

4.00

3.00

1.00

English Language Learners (ELLs)

3.00

3.00

Former ELL

7.00

5.00

6.00

4.00

4.00

3.00

2.00

7.00

6.00

5.00

3.00

1.00

Targeted Subgroups American Indian/Alaska Native Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian Black/African American

Students with Disabilities Free and Reduced Price Lunch Non-Targeted Subgroups Asian White

7.00

Two or More

Indicates fewer than 20 student records.

School Details Name: Tonasket Elementary School Code:

3176

Type: Category: District:

Public Elementary School Tonasket North Central Educational Service District 171

ESD:

PERFORMANCE LEVEL

Achievement Index

Awards and Designations

RATING RANGE From To 7.85

10.00

6.81

<7.85

5.86

<6.81

4.84

<5.86

3.77

<4.84

1.00

<3.77

Performance Details

Proficiency

Growth

Rating based on Percent Proficient

Rating based on Median Growth Percentiles

Reading

Math

Writing

Science

Reading

All Students

7.00

6.00

5.00

6.00

4.00

Math 7.00

Targeted Subgroup Average

4.25

3.75

3.50

4.50

4.33

4.33

Hispanic

5.00

5.00

3.00

4.00

English Language Learners (ELLs)

4.00

3.00

Students with Disabilities

2.00

2.00

Free and Reduced Price Lunch

6.00

5.00

4.00

7.00

7.00

6.00

Targeted Subgroups American Indian/Alaska Native Pacific Islander/Native Hawaiian Black/African American 4.00

5.00

5.00

3.00

5.00

4.00

5.00

8.00

4.00

7.00

Former ELL

Non-Targeted Subgroups Asian White Two or More

Indicates fewer than 20 student records.

Washington State Board of Education

The above charts are just one of several provided by the Washington State Board of Education on the OSPI website at eds.ospi.k12.wa.us that show the strong and weak areas of all state schools, including Oroville (top) and Tonasket (above) Elementaries. Separate charts are available online for the Middle and High Schools. The Index Rating (not shown on this chart but referenced in the Washington Public Policy Center chart at left) averages all the categories, but it in itself does not determine a school’s overall grade, which is subject to adjustment (almost always lower) based upon three year averages or not meeting state-mandated “exit criteria” from certain designations.

OPENING WITH A BANG

Brent Baker/staff photos

Area schools welcomed students and staff back for the new school year last week. Tonasket High School hosted an all-school assembly to start off the first day as (left) Principal Jeff Hardesty and Superintendent Paul Turner were called upon to compete against other students in a pyramid-building competition. Above, ASB President Chad Edwards welcomes students to the first day of school.


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

SPORTS

Demo Derby, racing draw big crowd BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Bolstered by the presence of flat track motorcycle racing, the Tonasket Comancheros’ Demolition Derby had its best attendance in years on Sunday, Aug. 31. “The Demo was a great success,” said Comancheros spokesman Bud McSpadden. “The Flat track racers were rad. “The rodeo club would like to thank all involved, especially (derby chairman) Don Johnson. Dylan Gage and Ruben Laurie also amazed us with the organizational skills (putting on the motorcycle race).” The main glitch, McSpadden said, was that the crowd was so large that it was tough for the volunteers in the concessions stand to keep up. “We added more help, but never did get caught up,” McSpadden said. “We apologize for any inconvenience ... Our concessions stand is a vital aspect of our profit margin at events. All the money goes back to the club fund, which was way down thsi year. We would love to open the rest of the windows and put another grill in. We need help.” McSpadden added that seniors looking for Senior Project ideas should contact the Comancheros. “We have dozens of ideas,” he said.

There was something for kids of all ages at the Tonasket Comancheros Demolition Derby and Motorcycle Races on Sunday, Aug. 31. Clockwise from below, Brentt Kallstrom hammers away at his back fender after the first heat of the Demo Derby; Ben Newman and his #97 were the big winner, outlasting the competition in two preliminary heats and the main heat; flat track motorcycle racing between demolition heats added a new dimension (and a larger crowd) to the annual event; most of the cheering came after during moments when cars suffered catastrophic events such as this; and the kids put every ounce of effort into the traditional Tug O’ War against the drivers and pulled their way to victory. Brent Baker/staff photos

DEMO DERBY OVERALL STANDINGS AND WINNINGS

1. Ben Newman #97 $1695 2. Keith Montanye #00 $846 3. Scott Kuntz #55 $645 4. Matt Jacobsen #77 $538 5/6 Jordan Montanye #69$323 5/6 April Webber, Ashley Utt, Amber Utt #3AS $323 7. Jake Grace #18 $216 8. Richard Lange #17 $215

1ST HEAT

1. Ben Newman #97 2. Jordan Montanye #69 3. Keith Montanye #00 4. Jake Grace #18

2ND HEAT

1. Scott Kuntz #55 2. April Webber, Ashley Utt, Amber Utt #3A 3. Richard Lange #17 4. Ben Newman #97

3RD HEAT

1. Ben Newman #97 2. Matt Jacobsen #79 3. Scott Kuntz #79 4. Jake Grace #18

POWDER PUFF

1. Stephanie Webber & Amber Utt

TROPHY SPONSORS

1st Heat - The Junction 2nd Heat - George Frank 3rd Heat - Parker Orchards 4th Heat - Tim’s Country Saw Shop Main Heat - Montanye Ranch Overall - Superior Auto Parts Best Appearing - Jim’s Repair Farther Traveled - OK Chevrolet Powder Puff - Tonasket Awards Mechanics - Kuhler Bar & Grill Most Wrecked - NAPA Allens Auto Parts

MOTORCYCLE RACING OPEN CLASS

1. Jake Barker 2. Greyson Fields 3. Dyllan Gage

AGE 15-17

1. Cory Goodwin 2. Greyson Fields 3. Ruben Laurie

AGE 9-11

1. Wyatt Judd 2. Ryden Harden 3. Carson Sasse Sponsors: Ty Olson Construction; Tonasket Pizza Company. Dash for Cash ($150): Chris Woods, Oroville Midway Building Supply, won by Jake Barker

Oroville alumni Speiker, Arrigoni excel in season-opening cross country meet THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SPOKANE - Sierra Speiker and Catie Arrigoni, former teammates at Oroville High School, finished fourth and fifth, respectively, at the season-opening Clash of the Inland Northwest in Spokane on Saturday, Aug. 30. Speiker, a freshman at the

University of Idaho, finished the four-kilometer course at Mead high School in 13:59.70, eight seconds out of third place and 21 seconds behind winner Abby Regan of Washington State University. Arrigoni is redshirting this cross country season at Eastern Washington

University but finished fifth while running unattached (not representing the school or team) in 14:04.4.

The meet included 102 runners from WSU, EWU, Idaho, Gonzaga, Lewis and Clark, Whitman and Whitworth.

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SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

VALLEY LIFE

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2014:

Teresa Newton/submitted photo

Friends and family of former Tonasket exchange student Lawrence Wambugu welcomed Teresa Newton to Lawrence’s village of Gathaka, Kenya last spring. She is trying to raise $7,000 to install a hydraulic ram pump that would bring clean water to the village.

Exchange student mom takes on Kenya water project BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

MUKURWE-INJ, KENYA Exchange students coming to the United States usually find it takes some time to adjust to American culture and living. What sometimes gets forgotten is the re-adjustment to going home. Lawrence Wambugu was an exchange student at Tonasket High School during the 2012-13 school year. Among other things he participated in cross country and soccer, and developed a reputation for his ravenous appetite for cookies. He spent his year here in the home of Teresa and Randall Newton, who have been deeply involved with the exchange student program for years. So Teresa figured, when she asked Lawrence what he missed most about America after his return to Kenya, that it would be the cookies. “He said ‘Clean water,’” Teresa said. “He said, ‘It’s hard to drink this murky, dirty water.” Running water is not only a luxury in many parts of Kenya, it’s a rarity. Lawrence’s family and neighbors, whose village, Gathaka, lies in the foothills of Mt. Kenya, have to walk nearly half a mile, navigate deep ravines and avoid crocodiles just to address that most basic of physical needs. “That second it was like, why aren’t you getting him water?” Teresa said. “What I heard was ‘Dig a well.’ It was like my ‘mom’s heart,’ it just kind of popped out. “I emailed and called over 30 companies. They all said, well, we don’t go that far. Or we don’t do it there, but we’ll take your money. But for me, I had a kid there.” That, and it turned out that a well wouldn’t do the job. What’s needed is a hydraulic ram pump, which draws water out of its source, provides some filtration, then pumps it into an aboveground tank. At a cost of about $7,000 and without encouraging news from the organizations Teresa had contacted, she was on the verge of giving up on the idea. “I stopped for awhile,” she said. “Then in January we got an email from Lawrence, saying he couldn’t go to school because his parents couldn’t pay for it. I didn’t hear, ‘Send me money.’ I heard, ‘Dig a well. So it was heavy on my heart. I needed a team. I called a friend of mine and asked her if she wanted to go to Kenya in October, because I figured it would take that long to raise the money. But she was already going in April. Two weeks later she called back and said her team would add two days to their project to work on mine, if I would go with them on theirs.” It was short notice, but Teresa scratched together enough money for a plane ticket to Kenya to lay the groundwork for the project. Just before leaving she first made contact with Ken Gatihi, who oversees water projects in Kenya for Crossway International, a Christian NGO doing work in Africa. “He said, we couldn’t do a well, it has to be this pump,” Teresa said. “The guys we were with were construction workers, so they knew what we needed.”

Rotary Stage: 9:00 am Throughout day 9:00 am 9:00 am 9:00 am - 2:00 pm 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

10:00 am 11:00 am 11:30 am 12:00 pm 12:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 2:30 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 4:30 pm 5:30 pm 5:45 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm After Pageant 10:00 pm

Fairgrounds open to public Jerry Breeden, Strolling puppets Market Swine Judging Rabbit Judging *PUD Youth Pole Climb (Horse classes) Intermediate and Adult Horse Fitting & Showing - North Arena; Adult Riding and Halter classes - North Arena; Intermediate Riding classes - North Arena; Senior and Junior Fitting & Showing - South Arena; Youth Halter classes - South Arena; Senior and Junior Riding classes - South Arena Produce Judging Contest-south of Arts & Crafts Building Mutton Bustin’ *PUD Electricity Safety Demonstration Jerry Breeden, Ventriloquist - Rotary Stage FFA Tractor Driving CDE Competition-Infield Bottle Baby calf show in beef show ring Market Lamb judging Jerry Breeden, Ventriloquist - Small animal barns area The Wicks - Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival opens Good4U Band - Rotary Stage Sheep Fitting & Showing demonstration Little People Fitting & Showing (Sheep) Royalty Pageant - Rotary Stage Lads & Lassies (Sheep) competition Mutton Bustin Cat Type Classes followed by Cat Fashion Show Youth Horsemanship Class sponsored by Sam & Raci McKee-Large Arena Sammy Steele Band - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2014: Rotary Stage: 9:00 am Throughout day 9:00 am 9:00 am - 3:00 pm 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:30 am 12:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:15 pm 4:30 pm 4:30 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm 6:30 pm 6:30 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm 8:30 pm 10:00 pm

Fairgrounds open to public Jerry Breeden, Strolling Puppets Rabbit, Goat & Livestock Fitting & Showing (Horse classes) Horse Trail classes (all ages) - North Arena; Youth Western classes South Arena; English classes - South Arena; Driving classes - South Arena *PUD Electricity Safety Demonstration Poultry Fitting and Showing - poultry barn Mutton Bustin’ Jerry Breeden, Ventriloquist - Rotary Stage Poultry & Sheep Fitting & Showing Okanogan Bluegrass Company - Rotary Stage Bottle Baby calf show in beef show ring Local Youth Musicians, Kathleen Christensen - Rotary Stage Davis Shows Northwest Carnival Mutton Bustin’ Midnight Run, Band - Rotary Stage Dynamic Duos (Sheep) competition Adult Fitting & Showing (Sheep) Barry Black, Acoustics - Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ Cat Fitting & Showing classes Truck & Tractor Pull - Grandstands Rabbit Agility Love Stitch, Band - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

* PUD events subject to crew availability due to regional disaster response efforts

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2014:

Brent Baker/staff photo

Top, a well would not do the job for Lawrence Wambugu’s village; a hydraulic ram pump will be installed once funding has been secured. Above, Wambugu ran cross country for the Tigers during his year in Tonasket. Her visit was enough to complete the first stage of the project, which included determining the water source, delivery method and location, and securing an engineering team. Teresa said that Lawrence’s parents donated a small piece of land upon which to place the hydraulic ram pump. His family, she said, was gracious during her visit. “I think when I got there Lawrence was in shock,” she said. “He really didn’t think it was going to happen. His parents were amazing. They welcomed me into their home, they gave me a head covering, and fed my whole team lentil soup and arrow root.” She said that the people she’s working with on the Kenya side of things would like the project to be completed in October, but raising all of the money by then

will be challenging. “Ken would like this project to be done by October, but $7000 is a lot of money and it’s August. Dean Chollar, the founder (of Crossway) is going to be there in October. He asked if I could come to dedicate the project, so we’ll see.” “I would absolutely love to go back but I don’t have the money, and I don’t want to ask people to fund me when I am trying to get water in there. I would rather give stuff to Africa.” Teresa, who had a booth set up at the Garlic Festival, said she’s hoping to get a bigger fundraiser together this fall. “To think,” she said, “it all started with this kid who came to America.” The GoFundMe donation location online can be found at www. gofundme.com/791ecw.

Rotary Stage: 8:00 am - 12:00 pm 9:00 am 9:00 am Throughout day 10:00 am 10:00 am - 2:00 pm 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:00 am 11:30 pm 12:00 pm -1:30 pm 1:30 pm-3:00 pm 12:00 pm 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 3:00 pm 4:00 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm 6:00 pm-7:45 pm 7:00 pm 7:00 pm After Rodeo 8:00 pm 11:00 pm

Horse Gaming in both Arenas Fairgrounds open to public Livestock Judging CDE; Agronomy Judging CDE to follow Jerry Breeden, Strolling Puppets Round Robin Fitting & Showing Contests - Small Animals Photography Scavenger Hunt - start in Photo Barn Round Robin Fitting & Showing Contests - Large Animals Best Dressed Rabbit contest Kids Races/Games at south end of fairgrounds Mutton Bustin’ Hippies on Vacation Pie / Corn on the Cob Eating Contest Okanogan Roping Club Team Roping & Women’s Barrels - Rodeo Arena Horse Races Low Rider Racing - in between Horse Races Poultry Costume Contest Jerry Breeden, Ventriloquist - Rotary Stage Market Livestock Sale - Berg Pavillion Davis Shows Northwest Carnival The Wicks, Band - Rotary Stage Mutton Bustin’ Good4U, Band - Rotary Stage Cody Beebe and the Crooks, Band Rabbit Agility contest Rodeo - Grandstands Fair Queen autograph signing (next to Rotary Stage) The Olson Brothers, Band - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2014: Rotary Stage: 8:00 am 8:00 am 9:00 am 10:00 am 10:00 am 12:00 pm 12:00 pm 12:00 pm 12:30 am 1:00 pm 2:00 pm 3:00 pm

Awards in Rabbit Barn Cowboy church services, Cornerstone - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds open to public Parade of Champions - Rotary Stage (without animals) Davis Shows Northwest Carnival Horse Races Kids horse playday - Rodeo Arena Sign-ups for Mutton Bustin’ Finals (55 lb weight limit) Mutton Bustin’ (Belt Buckle Finals!) Fur & Feather Auction - Berg Pavillion Royalty Coronation - Rotary Stage Fairgrounds closed to public

2014 GATE TICKET PRICES TICKET PRICES COVER ALL EXHIBITS, RODEO, ENTERTAINMENT, HORSE RACING AND ENTRANCE TO THE CARNIVAL. (DOES NOT INCLUDE CARNIVAL RIDES). ALL PRICES PER PERSON EXCEPT FOR 1 DAY FAMILY PASS. Daily Thursday through Saturday ...................... $8.00 Sunday .......................................................................... $5.00 Per Person Season Pass (4 Days) .......................$20.00 1-Day Pass Per Family (2 Adults, 3 Kids)............$25.00 Kids 5 and Under........................................FREE

To contact Okanogan County Fairgrounds: www.okfair.org fair@co.okanogan.wa.us Phone: (509) 422-1621 Fax: (509) 422-1203 Cell Phone: (509) 322-1621 PO Box 467 175 Rodeo Trail Rd. Okanogan, WA  98840


PAGE B4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

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Crosswords

25. On the other side of

6. Like some talk

26. Curt

7. Brownish purple

27. Appear

8. “Aeneid” figure

30. A way to catch fish (variant spelling)

9. Animal shelters

31. Mainstay

11. Burn treatment (2 wds)

34. Anger (pl.) 35. Railway coach where meals are served (2 wds)

12. Device for measuring the volume of fuel, e.g. propane (2 wds)

39. Allocate, with “out”

13. Classifies

40. “Jane Eyre” author

18. Half a matched set

41. Ancient Andean

24. Home, informally

42. Gabriel, for one

27. Table part

43. Arguments

28. The Kennedys, e.g.

48. Increase, with “up”

29. Camping gear

49. Day play

32. Checks

51. Alliance acronym

33. Halo, e.g.

52. Derby prize

35. Hired vehicle (3 wds)

55. N.Y. neighbor

36. And so forth

56. Maple genus

37. Harbor or town with shop facilities

57. Blouse with buttons down the front 59. K follower 60. High officer in the Ottoman Empire

ANSWERS

Across 1. Ceiling 4. Uttered in a grating voice 10. “Roots,” e.g.

61. “___ any drop to drink”: Coleridge

16. “Ah, me!”

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39. Call by the wrong identifying term 44. 12-point type 45. Consecrate 46. Muscle that stretches or tightens a body part

63. Bookstore section

47. Guard

64. “Don’t give up!”

49. Excellence 50. Daisylike bloom

Down

17. Anglican clergyman 19. Clooney character on “ER”

1. Bordeaux product

20. Autumn tool

2. Freshen

21. Grace word

3. Wrinkle or irregular fold

22. Audition tape

4. Free from, with “of”

23. God, with “the”

5. Amorphous creature

52. Common party request (abbrev.) 53. Its quarter says “Birthplace of Aviation Pioneers”

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38. Makeup, e.g.

62. “-zoic” things

14. Basic unit of money in Romania 15. Imprison

10. Scornful and mocking

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AGRWAGOVINSPECTION7EIGHTS-EASURES&IREWOODINFORMATIONASPX

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54. King or queen, e.g. 58. Crooked

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SUN LAKES REALTY

1411 Main St., Oroville, WA

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Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Keith Kistler

Love the Country!

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Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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REDUCED!! 2 Lake View Loop-Oroville. -spacious Lakeview home with Lake access, well maintained 4 bed, several upgrades. House has newer carpet, tile floors, roof, and vinyl windows. Enjoy the view of the lake from the deck off the master. NWML# 603356 $289,900

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1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Make me yours! Like new park model home with 1 bd / 1 ba situated on approx .33 of an acre. Shared access to Lake Osoyoos nearby, about 43 ft. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a large 2 car insulated JDUDJH [ DQG RI¿FH VSDFH LV DWWDFKHG 59 SDUNLQJ Pretty location, close to amenities. MLS#638313 $119,000

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2-bdrm + Bonus Room. 1-3/4 Bath. Over 1800 sq.ft. 1963 Brick Home. Huge Living Room w/Floor to Ceiling Fireplace. Big Picture Windows with View of Okanogan River. Over 165 ft River Frontage. Boat to Lake Osoyoos. Large 2-car Garage plus enclosed room. Big Attic Storage. 2 Lots. City Services. Perm Set Sprinklers in part of yard. Motivated Seller. Price Reduced to $249,000.00 - Possible Owner Contract.

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

Incident Command issues final fire updates NATIONAL WILDFIRE COORDINATING GROUP

TWISP, WA: The Upper Falls, Little Bridge Creek, and Carlton Complex Fires are all at 100% containment. Fire crews are finishing all suppression repair work within the burn areas and then fires will all go into a monitoring status. The incident command center located on the Twisp-Carlton Road will begin to be disassembled and removed over the weekend into early next week. This is the final fire update for all three fires. Information boards have been removed from the communities of Twisp, Carlton, Winthrop, and Mazama. Inciweb, the Google Blog Site, and the Google e-mail lists used during the incident will no longer be active or updated. For continuing questions, please contact the Methow Valley Forest Service Ranger District in Winthrop at (509) 996-4003 or go to their website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/okawen Campfires are allowed in developed fire pits in the designated campgrounds and in the Pasayten and Lake Chelan Sawtooth Wilderness areas. Campsite number three in Foggy Dew campground is closed because of concerns about flooding and debris flows. The remaining 11 campsites in Foggy Dew Campground are open. There are still some road and area closures associated with this summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fires and the recent flooding. The South Summit area, south of Highway 20, remains closed. The area around Falls Creek Road is closed, as is the area around Little Bridge Creek Road. Finley Road #4100300 and Pole Pick Mountain Roads #4100500 and 4100535 are impassable. The Incident Management Teams and Firefighters involved would like to thank the local communities that were impacted, for their patience and support during the suppression of the Carlton Complex, Uppers Falls, and Little Bridge Creek Fires.

POST CLEAN-UP AND RECOVERY HELPFUL LINKS The Okanogan Conservation District: www.okanogancd.org/Carlton

OBITUARIES

Carroll Taylor Carroll Daniel Taylor Carroll Daniel Taylor, 91, of Omak, Wash. passed away at home on June 11th, 2014. Carroll was born on October 14, 1922 in Hartford, Connecticut to Wilhelm Emerson Taylor and

Agnes Baldwin Taylor. Carroll served our Country in the United States Army from 1940 - 1960. Carroll lived in Seattle, Wash. where he worked for The University of Washington as a B o o k b i n d e r, retiring after 20 years. Cal spent the last 15 years of his life in Okanogan County, where he made his home. Carroll Taylor is survived by son Daniel Taylor of Seattle, daughter Shirley Morstad of Tacoma, Wash., son William Taylor of Oroville and four grandchildren. Carroll was preceded in death by his parents. PrechtHarrison-Nearents Chapel and the Okanogan Co. Crematory of Okanogan are caring for the arrangements. Cal will be missed by all those he left behind.

Did you know?

k Thin ! n Gree

We use... Soy Ink

Recycled Paper Excess paper recycled for JDUGHQVÂżUHVWDUWHU & more!

NWCG map

This map, last updated August 17, shows the extend of the 256,000 acre Carlton Complex fire that has burned for much of the summer. The U.S. Department of Agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS): http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/programs/landscape/

ewpp/#actualContent. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER): http://centralwashingtonfirerecovery.info/

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509-476-3602 888-838-3000 Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 04, 2014  

September 04, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, September 04, 2014  

September 04, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune