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THE MOOD SWINGS

Effie Lea Wilson honored for 50 years of service at nursing

Performing 40s, 50s, 60s hits at Esther Bricques, Aug. 28, 6:30 p.m.

home - Page A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S

SINCE 1905

WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, AUGUST 28, 2014 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

RUBBER DUCKY, YOU’RE THE ONE

Oroville updated on airport, street and water projects City Council denies tax refund request by housing authority BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Oroville continues to move toward closing out recent water and street projects and looks ahead toward the upcoming airport project. Rod Noel, superintendent for Public Works gave a report on several projects that have taken place or will begin soon. “The grant offer has been received and Ed Naillon we have our notice of award,” said Noel, regarding an airport project funded through the FAA and state Department of Transportation-Aeronautics Division. The Federal Aviation Administration financed most of the $89,323 for project which will make repairs to the runway, including crack sealing. The city is also receiving $5339 from the state as a partial match on the project. Road Products, Inc. of Spokane was awarded the bid to do the work. “The contract is all ready to be signed,” said Noel, adding that work needs to get going before it starts to get cold. Councilman Ed Naillon made a motion to approve the mayor signing the contract. The motion was seconded by Councilman Walt Hart and passed unanimously.

STREETS AND WATER Noel said a representative from the state Department of Transportation came up to inspect the Central and Cherry street project, which seal coated Central from

Brent Baker/staff photo

Hundreds of rubber duckies - 493, according to the official count - are dumped from the Fourth Street Bridge as part of a fundraiser for the Tonasket City Swimming Pool project on Saturday, Aug. 23. The “race” ended at the boat ramp on the south end of Chief Tonasket Park, where the ducks were scooped out of the river after crossing the finish line. Inset, the ducks take flight.

Duck race nets nearly $2,500 BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - It’s just a drop of water in a very big pool, but it all helps. The Tonasket Pool Committee’s rubber duck race - a fundraiser for the Tonasket swimming pool project that likely will cost around $2 million - brought in $2,465. The race, on Saturday, Aug. 23, featured 493 ducks that were purchased by project supports. They were dumped off the Fourth Street Bridge into the Okanogan River and “raced” to the boat launch at the south end of Chief Tonasket Park, where they were scooped out of the water by a legion of volunteers. The big winner was KK Young of Shelton, who claimed both first and third prizes (donating her winnings back to the pool). Dave Mitchell of Tonasket owned the second-place duck. “(It) won’t build our new swimming pool,” said organizer Karen Stangland. “But I hope it will continue to promote our cause. We are serious about building a new pool for the community. Now that summer is ending, we can’t forget about the pool.” Confluence Health (formerly North Valley Family Medicine) has also donated $1,500, and the Tonasket Garden Club voted to donate $500. “We have been receiving donations and pledges,” Stangland said. “We thank all of those contributors. Now, we’re asking the rest of you to step up and make donations and pledges.” She pointed out that the donations, even small ones, are key,

Brent Baker/staff photo

Bud McSpadden (serving as race announcer), and a host of volunteers including finish line judges and duck scoopers, await the approach of the racing rubber ducks at Chief Tonasket Park. because as the committee applies for grant it is finding that most of them require matching funds. “The more we collect locally,” she said, “the easier it will be to apply. It shows that the community is supporting the endeavor.” For more information, visit the website www.tonasketpool. com.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 35

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

A promise fulfilled: Thorntons receive Five Star Banner valley,” said Thomas Wilburn, who wrote to The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune with the story of his and his family’s quest to receive the banner which was promised by the War Department, but was never received. All Wilburn had was a partial clipping his mother had BY GARY A. DE VON saved from the Oroville Weekly Gazette MANAGING EDITOR from 1945. After an article appeared CASHMERE – During World War II in the Gazette-Tribune last November, an Oroville family had five children who Commander Wilson contacted Wilburn stepped up to serve in the U.S. Armed and the family and arranged to have the flag presented at a family reunion Services. the Saturday, Aug. 9 in This month they Cashmere. received the Five Star “Thank you so kindBanner promised to “Thank you so kindly for ly for your instrumenthose brave siblings’ tal role played in the the instrumental role mother, nearly 70 years of this now ago. played in the resolution resolution 69-year-old accidental R.L. “Louie” of this now 69-year-old deed,” said Wilburn Wilson, Commander after the military’s of Hodges Post 84 of accidental deed.” promise was finalthe American Legion Tom Wilburn, ly fulfilled through in Oroville, presented Member of the Thornton Family Oroville’s American the flag to Delores Legion Post. Thornton Hogue of Originally, the flag Oroville and Margaret was to be given to the late Mr. and Mrs. Thornton Malm of Wenatchee. “The Commander presented the flag Earl Thornton for their five children, to my aunts and Aunt Delores returned all serving the country during wartime. to Oroville with the flag as it was earned Their children, Cpl. Oscar Thornton by an Oroville family and it only seemed and Cpl. Ernie Thornton, were both in appropriate it should find a home in the SEE FIVE STAR | PG A2

Family credits recent newspaper article, local Legion Post

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Main to Cherry and Cherry from Central to the Cherry Street Bridge. He said that everything passed inspection, but due to a change order for asphalt, the project’s price increased by $12,795, $10,094, if the federal government contributes to the project’s cost. The city will go to the county to use funds shared by the county and city for transportation projects. “They approved us as long as it does not exceed $15,000,” said Noel. The Central and Cherry Streets Project also included replacing water lines under a portion of where the street was to be repaired. The cost of that portion was financed by the city and went over by $3600 due to a couple of change orders, said Noel. The pavement where the water line connected on main street still needs to be redone before the paving contractor’s contract can be completely closed out, according to Noel. “We’re still holding fire on the Main Street repair,” he said. The next grant the city would like to obtain would be one to rebuild 16th street from Main Street to Cherry, including the sidewalk on one side of the street, according to Noel. The city will be looking at potential funding sources. He estimated the cost of at around $700,000 with the city’s share being around $35,000. “The Pavement Preservation Program is not being funded and the Arterial Street grant requires a five percent match,” said Noel, correcting information he gave at the previous council meeting. On the subject of water, the city refused to refund fees associated with a home on Westlake Road that had high water use in June. “The homeowner asked for $350 in relief, the excess amount was $251,” said JoAnn Denney, who was filling in for city clerk Kathy Jones. “To my knowledge we have never given relief; we have worked with people

Valley Life Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

A3 A4 A5

Community A6-7 Business Directory A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9

Real Estate Valley Life Obituaries

A9 A9 A10


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 28, 2014

COUNCIL | FROM A1

MUSIC AND ART

on fines and setting up payment plans,� Denney added. Councilman Naillon asked why the leak wasn’t discovered earlier and Supt. Noel said the home is used for vacations and is often unoccupied. He added that there have been several incidents of frozen pipes in the winter. He, along with the other council members wondered why the homeowner was seeking more in relief than the excess water charge. “I suggest we handle it how we normally do and extend an offer to create a payment plan,� said Naillon. Noel explained the homeowner did not have the water shut off in the winter because family mem-

bers would sometimes use the home at times other than the summer. The city offers one free

“I suggest we handle it how we normally do and extend an offer to create a payment plan.� Ed Naillon, Oroville City Council

water turn on service one free turn off per year. If the homeowner wants more than they have to pay extra. “I think paying a fee to have it

turned on and turned off depending on whether they are going to use it is a lot cheaper than paying $350 for a month of water usage,� said Councilman Tony Koepke.

TAX REFUND DENIED After very little discussion, the mayor asked the council if they wanted to vote on a request from the Oroville Housing Authority for a refund of approximately $9000 in utility taxes the OHA says it was not obligated by state law to pay. Councilman Hart made a motion to deny the refund and it was seconded by Councilwoman Neysa Roley and passed unanimously.

FIVE STAR | FROM A1 The Tonasket Summer Festival - the festival formerly known as “Garlic� - encamped at History Park last Friday and Saturday. Though attendance was about the same as last year, the park still featured loads of art for sale (as well as for kids to participate in, above), and musical entertainment nearly end to end (including Judy and Ron Hyde, right).

Brent Baker/staff photos

Librarian pleads guilty to one count of sexual misconduct Wednesday, May 21, according to Superintendent Paul Turner. “School employee/student OKANOGAN – Elizabeth Anne KinKade, the Tonasket High relationships are based on the trust that a student’s School classified librariwell-being is of utmost an accused of five counts importance,� Turner of sexual misconduct said in a statement at with an 18-year-old stuthe time. “When this dent, has pleaded guilty trust is broken, it is the in Okanogan County duty of the administraSuperior Court to one tion and school board count of sexual misconto react swiftly and duct with a minor and directly.� the court dismissed the Elizabeth KinKade On May 19, Tonasket other four. KinKade, 37, Tonasket, was administration received substantiarrested May 20, 2014 for sexual ated evidence of misconduct by misconduct with a minor after Mrs. KinKade. Mrs. KinKade, a admitting to school officials, as classified librarian at Tonasket well as police, that she had been Middle/High School, was immehaving an affair with an 18-year- diately put on administrative leave. old Tonasket High School A special board meeting was conStudent. Although the student vened on May 21 to address this was over 18 and the affair took employee issue. Upon reviewing place off school grounds, in the the evidence, the board voted librarian’s home and her car, state unanimously to terminate Mrs. law makes clear such conduct as KinKade effective immediately. According to the Tonasket a school employee is illegal. Report, School Her employment with the Police school district was terminated Superintendent Paul Turner and THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

KinKade met Monday, May 19, with Kinkade’s union representative present and she admitted to the affair. On Tuesday, May 20, Officer Fuller questioned the student at the police station and he too admitted to the affair, saying the librarian and he had intercourse five times, all off school grounds. Fuller called Elizabeth KinKade to the police station where she made a statement, again admitting to the affair, which she said had been going on for one to two months. At her arraignment in June KinKade had pleaded not guilty to all five counts. Sentencing is forthcoming, pending a pre-sentencing investigation done by the Washington State Department of Corrections.

Submitted photo

R.L. “Louie� Wilson, Commander of Hodges Post 84 of the American Legion in Oroville, presents a Five Star Banner to Delores Thornton Hogue of Oroville and Margaret Thornton Malm of Wenatchee France at the time; Pvt. Preston Thornton was with the Merchant Marine in the Pacific, nurse Laura Thornton was in training at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland and Verna Thornton was a Wave with the U.S. hospital staff in Jacksonville, Florida, according to the article which was sent to the Thorntons’ hometown newspaper. Wilburn said the article was sent to his mother Verna Thornton in Jacksonville where she cared for burned Air Force

SUBMITTED BY NEYSA ROLEY

OROVILLE - Reinna Quick will return from her mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Argentina Resistencia Mission on Aug. 27. Quick is the daughter of Steve and MArsallai Quick and is a graduate of Oroville High School. While serving her 18-month

mission, Quick represented the LDS Church as a missionary to teach the people of Argentina about the Church in Spanish and provide service to them. She will be speaking in the sacrament meeting service of the Oroville Ward of the LDS Church at 33420 Highway 97, Oroville, on Sunday, Aug. 31. The service begins at 10:00 a.m. All are welcome to attend.

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the hope that the United States would make up for this oversight and make good on the promise made to the Thornton family nearly seven decades ago. He said all the efforts were to no avail until a new article appeared in the family’s hometown newspaper.

for your convenience we have an

5th Annual

Saturday, August 30

Quick returns from Argentina mission

pilots that were returned from Europe. From what his mother told him, her parents never received the flag promised in the article sent to the Gazette by the military. He said he had been in touch with local legislators with

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AUGUST 28, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Long term commitment Effie Lea Wilson, Jennie Luhn honored for decades of music at nursing home BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Effie Lea Wilson found it impossible to say “no” to the sisters of the Spokane Dominican Order that at one time ran the Tonasket Nursing home. Fifty years later, with the Sisters long gone and the nursing home known as North Valley Extended Care, she’s still saying “Yes,” and has brought others along for the ride. Wilson was honored on Wednesday, Aug. 20, for the 50 years she has spent providing music and entertainment for the nursing home residents (as well as for her birthday). Jennie Luhn, one-time administrator of the nursing home, also received recognition for her 40 years serving alongside Wilson as her pianist. These days, Wilson, Luhn, Bud McSpadden and a host of others put on monthly singalongs / birthday parties for the Extended Care residents. After a half century, they show no signs of slowing down. “Nora Kirchner had been coming down whenever the Catholic Sisters wanted her to,” Wilson said. “I did some of that. When Nora wasn’t able to do it any more, Lois Pratt called me up and she said, ‘We’re having a guild meeting that night and the Sisters are serving lemon pie.’ I said I didn’t belong to the guild, and she said, ‘Well yes you do now because when you agreed to do these parties you joined the guild.’ “From then on, the sister would call on a Saturday morning or afternoon and say, (in her German accent), ‘Mrs. Wilson, wouldn’t it be nice if we have

Brent Baker/staff photos

Left, Bud McSpadden jokes around with Effie Lea Wilson at North Valley Extended Care last week. Wilson has been providing musical entertainment and birthday parties for the residents there for 50 years. Above, Jennie Luhn has been Wilson’s pianist for the past 40 years, including 25 since retiring as the nursing home director.

party on Monday afternoon? You can give us entertainment.’ “I would start saying, but Sister, I work at the apple shed - and she’d say ‘See you’ and hang up. She didn’t realize that other people have a life.” The Sisters pulled out of town about 10 years later; Jennie Luhn became the director once the nursing home became part of the newly-formed hospital district. “That’s how I fell into it,” Luhn said. “I was the only one who played the piano. At the time the state was ... getting demanding

about providing activities. In the old days they didn’t have activities in the nursing home. “We did this, and we started a little church service. We developed the activities program by ear; we didn’t have money to do much.” “I didn’t have a pianist at the time,” Wilson said. “I just did things a capella and used a pianist whenever I could find one. Jennie started coming and singing, or playing the hymns for us and would stay as long as she could before she had to go back to her office.

“Jennie and I have been together for a long time. We used to a lot of funerals, and did programs for the Kiwanis and the Grange. We didn’t practice or anything. We just talked about it on the telephone, went and did it.” Bud McSpadden - who has frequently accompanied the ladies on his guitar for the past 25 years and arranged Wednesday’s celebration - often brightens things up with his off-beat antics. That included dressing up as the Scarecrow, Tin Man and Lion of Wizard of Oz fame while belting

out “If I Only Had a Brain,” to the residents’ delight. Wilson said the first time he did something “outlandish” she hadn’t been expecting it. Now, it’s just part of what everyone anticipates as part of the show. “Since that first time,” she said, “I’ve gotten used to Bud and his antics.” “But I haven’t gotten them in trouble,” McSpadden said. “Like the time Effie Lea had belly dancers come and just about got us all run out of town.” Others that frequently take part in the “show” include Gloria Jones, Betty Holmes, Brock Hires and others. “It all just goes together,” Wilson said when asked about favorite memories. “Getting kids like Brock started, I enjoy that. He was like two years old the first time he played, with a homemade

guitar his grandpa had carved for him. He was playing in their orchestra. I remember the first time someone asked for his autograph; he didn’t know what to do.” Luhn said she looks up to her longtime friend. “She knows all the old songs from the First World War,” she said. “It’s amazing what she has in her collection; plus she remembers poetry. She’s had a lot of tragedies in her life but she’s a very optimistic and positive person. It’s been an inspiration to be her friend for this many years. She’s a great example.” Though both are in their early 80s and have been around longer than many of the residents, neither has any plans to stop singing and serving. Said Effie Lea Wilson: “You get started; you can’t stop, can you?”

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 28, 2014

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Jacob Patrick Vincent Ramsey, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to POCS (lorazepam) and unlawful possession of a legend drug. The court dismissed a use of drug paraphernalia charge. Ramsey was sentenced to seven months in jail and fined $3,110.50 for the June 16 crimes. Michael Scott Maloney, 27, Chatteroy, pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to third-degree assault. The court dismissed a fourth-degree assault charge. Maloney was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $1,110.50. The crime occurred Oct. 19, 2013 at the Barter Faire site near Tonasket. Shelby Laura Arias, 33, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 19 to seconddegree malicious mischief (DV). Arias was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,210.50 for the May 20 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Nov. 17. The court found probable cause to charge Keith Vernon Strickland, 61, Okanogan, with two counts of first-degree arson. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 17 and 18. The court found probable cause to charge David Glenn Ferrell, 32, Omak, with two counts of POCS with intent to deliver (heroin and methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 15.

JUVENILE

A 13-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Aug. 20 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The girl was sentenced to one day in detention with credit for one day served, and fined $100 for the July 28 crime.

CIVIL

The state Department of Revenue has assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes and penalties: Bert’s Satellite TV, Oroville, $1,182.67; The Shop Tavern, Oroville, $1,263.31; Lawrence Construction Services of Washington, Oroville, $1,048.45.

DISTRICT COURT Angeline Redhorse Whiting, 35, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and resisting arrest. Redhorse Whiting received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $518. Shanyce Rachel Rodriguez, 20, Oroville, had two charges dismissed: third-degree theft and use of drug paraphernalia. Stacy Lea Rodriguez, 48, Okanogan, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Rodriguez received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $768. She also had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Marcos Florention Rosas, 29, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Rosas was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $658. Cade Alexander Roy, 20, Omak, had a charge dismissed: supplying liquor to minors. William Scott Sanders, 43, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Sander was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $468. He had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Kane McKinsey Searcy, 31, Omak, guilty on four counts of thirddegree DWLS and two counts of fourth-degree assault. He had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Searcy was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 323 days suspended, and fined a total of $4,715. Timothy William Spaulding, 22, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Spaulding was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Kelly Lorne Taylor, 50, Omak, had three charges dismissed: DUI, no valid operator’s license without ID and refusing to comply. John Leon Thomas, 62, Tonasket, guilty of second-degree criminal trespassing. Thomas had a first-degree trespassing charge dismissed, as well as two charges of violation of a no-contact order. He was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 57 days suspended, and fined $358. Connor D. Thompson, 21, Oroville, had an MIP/C charge dismissed. Jessika Quinnelle Timentwa, 24, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Timentwa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days

suspended, and fined $1,058. Mariah Kristen Todd, 20, Omak, had two charges dismissed: MIP/C and possession of marijuana (less than 40 grams). Josefina Villavicencio Nunez, 36, Omak, guilty of second-degree criminal trespassing. Villavicencio Nunez received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $568. David Lawrence Ward, 32, Tonasket, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed Lisa Michelle Watt, 36, Okanogan, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed Marlana Ashley Wells, 24, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Cynthia Maria Wilson, 47, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of second-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree theft. Wilson was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,768. Jesse James Ytuarte, 32, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft. Ytuarte was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 175 days suspended, and fined $808.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Aug. 18, 2014 DWLS on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Benton St. in Omak. Custodial interference on Columbia Dr. in Loomis. Vehicle prowl on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Illegal burning on Quail Bay Ct. near Oroville. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Cell phone reported missing. Malicious mischief on Wildwood Dr. near Omak. Fraud on Locust St. in Omak. Fraud on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on N. Cedar St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Hanford St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Main St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Kay St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Joshua Owen Jones, 25, DOC detainer (fire crew). Robert Daniel Burris, 28, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: thirddegree DWLS and hit-and-run (unattended). David Allen Gorr, 56, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2014 Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on Maple St. in Okanogan. Wallet recovered. Warrant arrest on Dayton St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Locust St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Tires reported slashed. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Automobile theft on Dayton St. in Omak. Richard Allen Matthew Bush, 26, DOC detainer. Kenneth Ray Squetimkin, 22, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants, both for fourth-degree assault, and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Shawne Dee Lezard, 41, court commitment for POCS. Ernesto Eduardo Mendez Leon, 20, DOC detainer. James Edward Grant, 33, booked on three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine). Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014

Violation of a no-contact order on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on N. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Assault on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Fraud on George Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Lumber reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on Hart Rd. near Oroville. Automobile theft on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest at East Side Park in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Custodial interference on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Assault on E. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Cherryl Ann Grant, 60, booked on three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and POCS with intent to deliver. Casey James Lawrence Brender, 25, booked for attempting to elude a law enforcement officer, possession of drug paraphernalia, third-degree DWLS, reckless endangerment, unlawful imprisonment and second-degree TMVWOP. Samantha Ann Harding, 43, booked for second-degree assault (DV), second-degree malicious mischief (DV), reckless driving and first-degree assault (DV). Mark Anthony Yingling, 31, booked for second-degree robbery (DV), second-degree assault (DV), third-degree theft (DV) and second-degree ID theft. Lacey Ann Picard, 24, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both for thirddegree theft. Justin Nanpuya, no middle name listed, 37, DOC detainer. Ari Kay Hilliard, 24, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Christian Kane Lundsten, 34, booked for second-degree assault (DV). Bernardino Saldana Rodriguez, 46, booked for violation of a nocontact order. Thursday, Aug. 21, 2014 Violation of a no-contact order on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Linden St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Blue Heron Lane near Riverside. Harassment on Engh Rd. near Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Vehicle prowl on S. Ash St. in Omak. Tools reported missing. Automobile theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Elm St. in Omak. Two reports of vehicle prowls on N. Douglas St. in Omak Two reports of vehicle prowls on S. Birch St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Asotin St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Fraud on Golden St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Threats on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Dawn Maria Torrence, 39, booked for violation of a no-contact order. Jason Leroy George, 49, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV) and on a Tonasket Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Robin Gayle Blaylock, 39, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Jared Joseph Milam, 29, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Andrea Candice Orlando, 39, DOC

detainer. Ryan Paul Mulligan, 28, booked on three probable cause warrants: attempted first-degree murder, first-degree burglary and firstdegree robbery. Lance Martin Kapsh, 32, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Friday, Aug. 22, 2014 Domestic dispute on Columbia St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Vehicle prowl on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Custodial interference on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Vehicle prowl on Maple St. in Omak. Automobile theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Trespassing on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Birch St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on N. Elm St. in Omak. Assault on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Juniper St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Jordan Dean Whittle, 19, booked for a drug court violation. Kevin Erik Warbus, 18, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for no

valid operator’s license without ID. Seth Adam Stough, 35, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing. Klaudia Rose Marie Dick, 18, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Anthony David Martin, 46, court commitments for second-degree DWLS, DUI and an ignition interlock violation. Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014 Harassment on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Eighme Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Public intoxication on Oak St. in Okanogan. Harassment on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on Oak St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Omache Dr. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Kay St. in Oroville. Hazardous materials on S. Western Ave. in Tonasket. John Neil Nordhagen, 47, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Taylor Marie Smiley, 23, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Getulio Hernandez Garcia, 22, booked for felony harassment

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

DEMOLITION DERBY Sun., August 31, 2014 AT 1:00 P.M.

TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS $4000 Guaranteed added money 5 Heats + Powder Puff For Entry Info: Call 509-486-2398 .00

z Concessions & Beer Garden z Admission: $10 for Adults,

$5 for children, 6-12, 5 & Under Free

Sponsored By: Tonasket Comancheros, Les Schwab, Montanye Ranch, Tonasket Diesel Repair, Dave Hannah Trans., Webber Dirt Work, Washington Tractor, Whitney’s Garage, OK Chevrolet, Levine Plumbing, Modern Machinery, The Odom Corp. Flat Track Motorcycle Racing Registration Sun., Aug. 31 2014, 10:30 - 12:00 Classes May Vary Depending On Amount Of Registrations

Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014 Illegal burning on Pheasant Dr. in Omak. Burglary on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Assault on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Conconully St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Douglas St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Threats on Omak Ave. in Omak. Custodial interference on Ridge Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Burglary on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Joseph Nathaniel Bowers, 22, booked on two counts of felony harassment (threats to kill), four counts of fourth-degree assault, and one count each of seconddegree criminal trespassing, disorderly conduct and firstdegree extortion. Chase A.E. Carson, 20, DOC detainer and a Tribal FTC warrant for battery. Franklin John Raschka, 35, booked for possession of drug paraphernalia.

Okanogan Valley

Trinity Episcopal

Tonasket

(threats to kill). Carl Edward Morris, 33, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for disorderly conduct. Antonio Sanchez, no middle name listed, 47, booked for DUI. Alicia Lynn Flores, 35, booked on a Department of Fish and Wildlife FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist 1516 Fir Street‡3DVWRU5RG%URZQ‡476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am‡Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center‡607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm‡After School M-W-F 3-5pm RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Catholic Church 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.� -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2565

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


AUGUST 28, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER It’s all happening at the fair This week you’ll see we’ve included our annual special section celebrating the Okanogan County Fair and some of our local kids who participate by exhibiting their animals. While in the past I’ve had a chance to Out of write about My Mind g o a t s , Gary A. DeVon cows, pigs and horses – this year, like last, I seem to find chickens to be the chosen breed, at least in Oroville and it looks like I could have got in on some of those farm fresh eggs. Although I grew up in Oroville, I was never a farm kid and missed out on participating from that end of things. When I look at how much these kids enjoy what they’re doing, despite how much hard work and dedication it takes to raise, and train, a chicken, let alone a hog or a horse, I truly think I did miss out. However, w i t h chicken coops in town, it looks like my brothers and I could have raised our own animals – from what I know of my dad and his opinions of chickens, though, we might have had

to stick to something else, like rabbits. I think he got enough of chickens when he was a kid. Fair time in Okanogan County is a special time – I’ve great memories of attending the fair, although Oroville didn’t get out of school like Tonasket does. As a kid it seems like I’d usually catch a ride down with a family that was more farm orientated. There is so much to see and do – it’s like the whole county comes together for those few days and forms a family. Even with some fierce competition for ribbons going on between towns. Fair time is one of the few times we see people from all the towns – Oroville, Tonasket, Omak, Okanogan, Pateros, Brewster, Coulee Dam, Winthrop and Twisp – well you get the idea - those places and everything in between, coming together for a truly county event. We need to encourage our county commissioners to continue their support of our fair as it truly has something for everyone and shows that we can be one county. The G-T invites you to look o v e r o u r special section and read about the kids who h a v e put in all the hard work, as well as the schedule of events and our story on what’s new at your county fair.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Time can be compressed Dear Gary, About last week. Air is invisible – like time. We watch time blow by like the wind. We can’t see it, but we can feel it. Take 24 ounces of air and compress it into 16 ounces of air. Same amount of air in a smaller space. The same is possible with time. It can be

compressed from 24 hours to 16 hours – 24 old hours into 16 new hours. It’s still 24 hours and we wouldn’t notice the difference – except for our inner clock. We wouldn’t talk like chipmunks or walk like quail. Time is relative. God is mysterious. And all powerful. Almost everyone has noticed time flying by, even kids. I’ve asked some I don’t know. Revelations 8:12 has always stumped me. Then a light came on, or off if you will. It’s

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

P.S. My step-brother Adis Steele was in the Class of ‘79 also I believe. He has passed, like the others, just a year ago. Sorry isn’t the word when a deep early loss hits home. Love will heal. Fred would want it.

SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602

Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at (509) 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

a simple math equation. One-third of a day is eight hours. It’s been “smitten” or “struck” out of existence. Mark 13:20 seems to agree. To the scoffers and skeptics out there, I’m not saying I’m right. It’s a theory. Call me nutty, looney, loco, whatever. Just please don’t call me anything hateful. And sorry to the folks whyo don’t like my name for G.W.B. He should have been nicknames Dupeya. So many people were fooled. Many still are. Why? A lot of people can’t admit they were wrong. It’s not in their nature. Maybe they feel they would belittle themselves. Show weakness. Embarrassment. Admitting your mistakes is one of the most important things a good soul can do. It’s not weak or embarrassing or belittling. It’s a weight off your back. A relief. A pleasure. When a hear grows cold and the mind turns to stone, it shows the true character of the bearer of those two most feeling, reasoning, responsive organs in the human frame. Be true to yourself. It may just help in the upcoming selection. Back to back, Dan Dixon Oroville

The Oroville Gazette,

75 Years Ago: August 18 - 25, 1939: Fire conditions are now extremely hazardous, according to Mr. Huff, Supervisor of the Colville National Forest. He appeals to the public to take precautionary to prevent forest fires. He states that defective exhaust on automobiles, un-extinguished matches or cigarettes carelessly thrown away and un-extinguished campfires which have figured in many of the recent fires. Progress made by western farmers in bringing modern equipment to rural communities. Included among the advances made possible by farm electrification are the walk in refrigerators now being installed in many local farms, as well as the poultry lighting projects. According to L. A. Gillespie, one of the owners of the Osoyoos Theater (in Oroville), complete new air conditioning system is now being installed. It is expected to be ready for operation by Sept. 1 and when completed will be the best air cooling system north of Wenatchee. The Okanogan County Fair, which will be held at the county fair grounds in Oroville on Sept. 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, will be one of the most interesting ever according to reports made by the committees. The old time parade, which will be held through the streets of Oroville, Sunday and Monday afternoons with cowboys, cowgirls, old time stages, pack horses, miners and Indians in full dress. The huge grandstand, with a seating capacity of several thousand people, has one of the most beautiful settings of any fairgrounds in the west. Facing Lake Osoyoos with a background of mountains, a fast three-eighths mile race track in full view. The home stretch passing directly in front of the grandstand with the rodeo grounds within the circle of the track. NOTE: (This is the present location of the Oroville Veterans Memorial Park). A raging forest and grass fire swept a path from one to two miles wide and ten miles long across Palmer Mountain on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday of this week and is sill burning, although more or less under control. Grocery prices: Ben Prince Store: Carnation milk, 3 cans, $.20; Pink salmon, $.11 per can; Gallon of ketchup, $.39. Meyer Prince Store; Fresh tomatoes, 10# $.19; 2 0z. Black pepper, $.05; Round steak, “baby beef,” $.15 per lb.

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: August 2 -28, 1964: Open House is being planned for the John Moran Building, which is now fully occupied. The building is a concrete structure, located on Central Avenue next to the Oroville State Bank (Umquah Bank). The graduating class of Oroville High School in 1934, included: Henry Linscott, Karl Andrews, Troy Burnham, Wm. Barnes, Alden Sawtells, Mrs. Elizabeth (Armstrong) Cave, Mrs. L. (Helen St. Hill) Hancock, Mrs. (Winifred Juday) Fletcher, Mrs. (Celicia Robinson) Art Hargrave, Mrs. (Leola Vennebeg) Arthur Hanson, Mrs. (Fannie Hinton) Wesley Rogers. Mrs. (June Wilson) Norman Jensen. Among the local ribbon winners in the pre fair contest for 4-H Members are: “Meal Preparation,” Marilyn Rise and Cynthia Turner, Molson, Red: “Luncheon,” Sharman Rise and Christina Turner, Molson, Blue; “Dinner,” Janice Pickering, Chesaw and Kris Landreth, Oroville, Blue; “Clothing Activity,” Janice Pickering, Chesaw, Blue, Kris Landreth, Oroville, Blue and Sharman Rise, Red. Thirty five action-seeking Hornets have answered the first call for the 1964 football season. Fourteen letterman can be called on to give experience and some depth to this year’s eleven. Two year veterans, Dan Christensen, Darrell Shumway, Ken Scacco, Charles Cox, Pat Siegrist, Robert Dobbs and Howard Christianson should be able to provide some leadership. Other players are: Mike Day, Larry Reese, Jeff Bergh, Carl Holden, Bob Howe, David Kosonen, Jim Northcott, Mark Bayley, Dan Schultz, Greg Thayer and Larry Hemry. Real Estate: 3 acres Okanogan River frontage, sprinkler system, 3 miles south of Oroville on west side; good well, cabin, garage, good location for trailer court. $2,500.00 with $1,300.00 down with $50.00 monthly payments on balance. Weather Wise by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: August 19, 77 degrees maximum

and 46 degrees, minimum; Aug. 20, 83 and 49: Aug. 21, 90 and 50: Aug. 22, 90 and 55; Aug. 23, 84 and 54; Aug. 24, 85 and 51 and Aug. 25, 79 and 50. Total precipitation for the week, .02.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: August 17 -31, 1989: George Mathes, long time Tonasket resident, is shown in front of his Fruit Stand north of Tonasket on Highway 97. The Mathes run the stand on the honor system, as the sign often says “Put money in the jar and make your own change.” A sign of the times. A fire in the Whitestone Lake area was declared 100 percent contained as of last Tuesday morning. The fire burned a total of 150 acres and required over 50 men and fire retardant aircraft to bring it under control. The Tonasket Airport has undergone a transformation from what councilman Tom Fancher described as a one-time cattle trail to a viable airport. The airport, which has been closed for about five years, began its improvement through the aid of the Washington State Department of Transportation-Aeronautics Division. Oroville’s own Steve Blackler took a gold medal in the water skiing events of last weekend’s Washington State Summer Centennial games held in Spokane. Blackler, who was one of only 16 skiers in the state to classify for the Class III Waterskiing Division, beat out the large field to bring home the gold. Bill Nicholson, of Oroville, was instrumental in organizing the only event in the recent Centennial Games to include participants that live outside of Washington. That event being an amputee soccer tournament that included three teams of one-legged soccer players from Washington, Oregon and British Columbia, Canada. The Okanogan County Pioneer Picnic, one of the longest running traditions in this county, will be held at Conconully on Labor Day, Sept. 4, 1989. The annual picnic gets underway at the state park with registration a 10 a.m. Each year, hundreds of people throughout Okanogan County and many other states come to attend the affair. Real Estate: 3 bdrm brick home, 1 bath, fireplace, wood shake roof, metal storage shed on .58 acres land, located on Jennings Loup Rd., Oroville, $27,000.00; 2 bdrm home in good condition, electric heat, central air, new roof, lots of fruit trees and berries, great garden spot, double car garage, fenced, $45,000.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 28, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Time for some fresh peaches Now that we’re back down to two digit numbers in our temperature readings, maybe we’ll get a little more energy… maybe. Once again we have condolences to send out. What started out as fun times for Fred Cook ended in tragedy, last weekend, with the one car accident that took his life. He was well known in both the Tonasket and Oroville areas, as the “pump fixer” and other irrigation needs. Also Geneva Reeder, well known in both communities will be missed by many friends, has passed away. A Memorial for Velma (Colbert) Hill will be held at the Assembly of God

Church, Saturday, Sept. 6, 11 a.m. The report on Mark Gordon is, that he is improving, after being cared for in Sacred Heart Hospital, with one of the last steps, being his receiving a pacemaker. He is now home, infections are less and now the healing process will take over. Some members of the Ken Ripley family enjoyed last week at their getaway home at Lost Lake. Lots of memories are made as they continue the tradition that was started by Alden and Gertrude Sawtells, Judy’s parents. Lunch was served at the Red Lion Inn, Wenatchee, recently, for members

of classes of ’42 thru ’44, with Clyde and Everett Green, Al and Mary Alice Robinson, Richard Henneman and his friend, Ruth, and Clayton and Boots Emry attending. Just so you don’t have to do the math, these folks graduated over 70 years ago. Marlene Dietrich said, “Careful grooming may take 20 years off your age, but you can’t fool a long flight of stairs! There will be another pancake breakfast at the Oroville Senior Center, Saturday, Sept. 13, with serving starting at 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. All of us should take a lesson from the

weather. It pays no attention to criticism! been members for many years. A cowboy took his car to the repair Doris Hughes was a happy mom last shop and asked for estimates on the Sunday when her two daughters, Debbie repairs. Well, said the and Karen, were home, for mechanic, “if your car was a chit chat. And I’ll bet they a horse I’d shoot it.” went home with a bunch of The Red Cross is comgarden veggies, outta’ Mom’s ing! With blood drawing wonderful garden. from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. Do you like to look at lots of 3 at the United Methodist pretty quilts? Then, remember Church, 908 Fir St. to go to the Molson Grange Ah! Fresh peaches! I Hall this Saturday, Aug. 30 think I’d better buy some for their quilt show and other extra ice cream. And since interesting demonstrations on friends were extra generous, crafts, hobbies etc. It sounds maybe I’ll get ambitious THIS & THAT like a fun day! and make a pie. The talked of beer garden at A Memorial Service will Joyce Emry the Okanogan County Fair has be held for Dale Ward, been put on the back burner, Tonasket, on Saturday, Aug. at least for this year. In my 30, at the United Methodist Church, opinion, Good Move! Oroville, where he and his wife, Pat, had ‘Til next week.

Honoring SPC Bud Swenson

SAFETY FIRST

SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Submitted photo

The Torres family attended the first local Child Car Seat Safety Check sponsored by Oroville Emergency Services and the Royal Neighbors of America. EMTs and Child Passenger Safety Technicians, Jackie Daniels and Theresa Remsberg from AeroMethow, checked to see that car seats had not expired, been recalled, had no broken parts and were installed properly. This service is free to members of the community. For information call Jackie Daniels at 509-560-3589 if you are interested in having your child’s car seat checked. There is nothing as precious as keeping our children safe when in an automobile.

Movie nights each first Friday of the month SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

The Lemon Drop Kid starring Bob Hope and Marilyn Maxwell was the movie shown on our screen last Friday. The movies President James is selecting for viewing are suitable for families

Annual picnic is Saturday, Sept. 6 SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS and the programs are open to the public. They even have popcorn available. Movies are shown on the fourth Friday afternoon of the month starting at 1 p.m. The Senior Center is planning another fund raising breakfast, may even have one monthly. This breakfast will start at 8 a.m. on Saturday until 10 a.m. on May 1 3. We may even have more back

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

OROVILLE EAGLES

Summer is winding down and that means it’s time for our annual Eagles Picnic. On Saturday, Sept 6 we will celebrate Eagledom with hotdogs, hamburgers and a potluck at 1 p.m. on Thorndike’s beach at #7 Hard Cider Rd, off Eastlake. The club will be closed for this event so our employees can attend. Come out for food and fun and please bring something for a potluck. Our Joker Poker is doing well. Every Friday at 7 p.m. right after meat draw, we draw for a cash prize of $25. or half the total pot if you draw the joker. You must be a member in good standing and have your membership card in your possession at the time of

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the drawing. The cut-off for payment of this year’s dues is approaching. After Sept. 15 we will drop non-current members and there is a $10 fee for re-enrollment. Come in and catch up or call the club for more information. The Auxiliary is starting a money pot. Every time a member attends a meeting, joint meeting, district meeting or State visitation, $1.00 will be added to the pot. We will start the pot at $25 and watch it grow. Your name will be added for each time you attend one of these functions. We will draw the winning name at our last meeting in May. So please come and get your name in the pot.

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sale items available. Pinochle Scores for Aug. 16: The door prize was won by Clayton Emry while Boots had the most pinochles. The high scoring man was Jim Fry and the high scoring lady was Barbara Cline. Pinochle Scores for Aug. 23: The door prize was won by Danny Weitrick; most pinochles by Betty Steg and the high scoring man was Leonard Paulsen. Danny Weitrick was the high scoring lady for the evening. More next time.

Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Taco Night, and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Friday and Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what is happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

For the month of August we are honoring Army Heavy Equipment Mechanic / Operator Specialist Bud Swenson. His mother Karin is a Blue Star Mother who has two Army sons: Bud and his brother, Beau. Born in December of 1990, Bud graduated from Oroville High School with the Class of 2009. He then joined the Army and has been stationed in Fort Polk since May 2011. Fort Polk is an United States Army†installation located in West Central Louisiana named after Reverend Leonidas Polk, who served as a Confederate general during the Civil War. The base houses and trains approximately 11,000 infantry troops ready for deployment. Bud and his wife, Marina, are the proud parents of newborn

Hot August Nights and Quilt Show SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

It was a busy week for some of us on our Hilltop this past week. The Highland Hooters met at the Boneparte Café for lunch. The day was beautiful and there were 18 Red Hat Ladies around the big table. We all had a great visit with others and of course a good lunch. That was Monday. On Tuesday several of the ladies from the Chesaw Community Bible Church met and learned something about Sour Dough Bread Making and each of us went home with a “Starter”. A good lesson learned in transporting the starter. Do NOT add the new flour and water and shake to mix and then put it in your warm car and leave for a couple of hours. I know, don’t -- we are still scraping dough from in the back seat. Wednesday was another busy morning as we had our second lesson in China Painting a Coffee Mug. Besides learning how, we are having a good time, we are getting to know each other a bit more. This Coming Weekend will be a very busy time on our Hilltop with the Quilt Show in Molson on Saturday, Aug 30, from 9 a.m.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS daughter Abi. Bud will discharge from the Army in two weeks - on Sept 11 - and will be moving back to his hometown of Chesaw. Bud plans to further his education via the Post 9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act (often referred to as the ìG.I. Billî) but will determine where and when after he settles in back home. The term “G.I” originally referred to the plentiful ìgalvanized ironî used by the military during WWI and soon became synonymous with ìGeneral or Government Issueî. During WWII the initials were used for anything that belonged to the military. Soldiers and Airmen began to sardonically refer to themselves as “G.I.” = “General Issue” items, all equally as disposable as helmets, boots, tents, canteens, rifles, jeeps, trucks, tanks, and combat aircraft. They viewed themselves as being

HILLTOP COMMENTS to 3 p.m. at the Grange Hall. This is the third annual show sponsored by the Highland Stitchers. This years Quilts will be donated to Morning Sun Ministries. There will be food available in the form of Pulled Pork Sandwiches or Taco Salad, a drink and a cookie. Sounds good to me. There will be demonstrations on making your own fabric with shaving cream and ink at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. At 2 p.m. there will be Crochet, Knitting and Crocheting a rag rug. Quilts will be on display for your viewing pleasure and others for sale. You can display your quilt just contact Vicky Didenhover at 509-485 3020 for information. There will be a “Quilt Raffle” and tickets will be available for $1 each or six for $5. Those drawn need not be present to win. There will be a big flea market at Fiona in Chesaw on this Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 30 and 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the weekend of ‘Hot August Nights’ up in the highlands. Come up and see beautifully restored cars and trucks, and take home a treasure from several flea market vendors. Good food awaits you at the tavern, and espresso at Fiona. The 5th Annual Hot August

Make the Right Moves to Leave a Legacy to Grandchildren FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen

Reported by Edward Jones

On Sept. 8, we observe National Grandparents Day. If you have grandchildren, they will hopefully mark this occasion by sending a card, making a call or, best of all, paying a visit. But however your grandchildren express their feelings for you, you undoubtedly have a very big place in your heart for them. In fact, you may well be planning on including your grandchildren in your estate plan. If that’s the case, you’ll want to do the best you can to preserve the size of your estate — without sacrificing the ability to enjoy life during your retirement years. Here are a few suggestions to help you achieve this “balancing act”: Expect market volatility — and don’t overreact. If you’ve been investing for a while, you know that volatility in the financial markets

z

is normal. In fact, it’s not unusual for the market to drop 10%, or even more, in a year. Try not to overreact to this type of volatility. For example, don’t immediately sell investments just because they’ve had a down year — they may well bounce back the next year, especially if their fundamentals are still strong. z Diversify. It’s always a good idea to diversify across a range of investment vehicles — stocks, bonds, government securities, certificates of deposit (CDs) and so on. While diversification can’t guarantee a profit or protect against loss, it can help reduce the effects of volatility on your portfolio. z Maintain a cash cushion. During your retirement years, you may face unexpected expenses, just as you did when you were working. To help pay for these expenses without being forced to dip into your long-term investments, try to maintain a “cash cushion” that’s sufficient to cover six to 12 months’ worth of living expenses. z Limit withdrawals from your investments. To keep your investment portfolio intact for as long as possible, set limits on your annual withdrawals. Your withdrawal rate should be based on a variety of factors — age at retirement, other sources of income, lifestyle choices, etc. A financial advisor can help you calculate a

withdrawal rate that makes sense for your situation. z Delay your generosity. It can be tempting to provide for your grandchildren — and perhaps even your grown children — as soon as you can. But you need to balance this impulse with the financial challenges that two or three decades of retirement can bring. It’s not being “selfish” to take care of yourself first — in fact, by doing everything possible to remain financially independent, you will be helping your family in the long run. z Don’t delay creating your estate plan. If you are committed to leaving a generous legacy for your grandchildren, you need a comprehensive estate plan. And it’s best to create this plan as soon as possible, while you are mentally and physically healthy. You may never become incapacitated, of course, but the future is not ours to see. In addition to starting early with your estate plan, you’ll need to assemble the right team, including your financial advisor, legal professional and tax expert. You might enjoy receiving attention on National Grandparents Day. But you’ll get even greater pleasure out of knowing that you’re maximizing your efforts to leave the type of legacy you want for your grandchildren — while still enjoying the retirement lifestyle you desire.

SPC Bud Swenson “General Issue” items of Uncle Sam thus ìG.I. Joeî. We thank you and your family for your service, Bud! Your hometown of Chesaw and the Valley is proud of you! We would like to learn more about our area’s service men and women. Please contact us with details 509-485-2906 or ncw. bluestars@yahoo.com.

Nights Classic Car Show will also be held on Aug. 30. Registration starts at 9 a.m. at the Chesaw Mercantile and is $15. The Awards Presentation will begin at 2 p.m. Awards for all vehicle Categories will be determined by Spectator Ballot. The Big Raffle will start at noon. Prizes include a $300 exhaust system and a front end alignment. Free Camping is available. Food and drink venders are welcome, at no fee. Country Music at the Chesaw Tavern can be heard on Friday night, Aug 29.

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AUGUST 28, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR MOOD SWINGS TO PERFORM

OROVILLEâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;The Mood Swings with their hits from the 40s, 50s, and 60s, will be on stage at Esther Bricques Winery Thursday, Aug. 28. Their program includes hits from the 40s, 50s, and 60s, performed in tight three-part harmony, accompanying by percussion and keyboard. They will be followed by Rick Braman on guitar and Chris Stodola on keyboard on Thursday, Sept. 4. Doors open at 6 p.m.; music begins by 6:30 p.m. For more info call the winery a (509- 476-2861 or visit the Events page at www.estherbricques.com.

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP

OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group meets next on Thursday, Aug. 28 at The Youth Center at 607 Central Ave. in Oroville. The youth center is adjacent to the Free Methodist Church. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a presentation and discussion. There will be refreshments.

Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market will be Saturday, Aug. 30 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. For more info call 509-476-2096.

MOLSON QUILT SHOW

MOLSON - The annual Molson Quilt Show, presented by the Highland Stitchers, will take place on Saturday, Aug. 30. There will demonstrations on making your own fabric at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. At 2 p.m. there will be Crochet, Knitting and Crocheting a rag rug. Quilts will be on display for viewing and some for sale. To display a quilt contact Vicky Didenhover at 509-485-3020 for information.

FARMERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FLEA MARKET

OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market will host a Flea Market and Yard Sale Saturday, Aug. 30 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Space is available and your booth fee will benefit the Oroville Public Library. Call 509-4762096 for more information.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

PHYSICAL THERAPY COURSE

TONASKET - North Valley Health & Rehab will present a course on physical therapy on Thursday, Aug. 28 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. This course offers information on a variety of musculoskeltal conditions that individuals face every day and the causes of some of these injuries that may be overlooked. Topics that will be covered are low back pain, headaches, neck pain, knee pain, the young athlete, TMJ, Ankle/Foot pain and bladder health. The free course is being presented by Dr. Jeff Massart and there are 14 spots available. To register call 509-486-3163 or register online at www.nvhospital.org.

OROVILLE FARMERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; MARKET

OROVILLE - The next Oroville

OROVILLE - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is sponsoring an Emergency Preparedness Program on Saturday, Aug. 30 at their building on North 97 in Oroville. The program starts at 1 p.m. and is scheduled to end at 3 p.m. There will be handouts and it is open to the public.

FLEA MARKET IN CHESAW

CHESAW - There will be a big flea market at Fiona in Chesaw on this Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 30 and 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the weekend of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hot August Nightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; up in the highlands. Come up and see beautifully restored cars and trucks, and take home a treasure from several flea market vendors. Good food awaits you at the tavern,

OVOC gears up for season

and espresso at Fiona.

LABOR DAY CLOSURE

OROVILLE - The Oroville City Hall, Shop and Police Department Office will be closed Monday, Sept. 1 in observance of Labor Day. Customers with a Monday garbage collection day will be picked up on Tuesday.

OROVILLE SCHOOLS OPEN HOUSE

OROVILLE - The Oroville School District is having their K-12 Open House on on Tuesday, Sept. 2 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. School starts on Wednesday, Sept. 3 at 8:30 a.m.

BRAMAN & STODOLA, MARTINCAK TO PERFORM

OROVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;- Upcoming performances at Esther Bricques Winery include Rick Braman, of Oroville, on guitar with Chris Stodola, of Osoyoos, on keyboard and vocals on Thursday, Sept. 4, followed by Andy Martincak on ukulele on Thursday, Sept. 11. Doors open at 6 p.m.; music begins by 6:30 p.m. For more information, call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or visit the Events page at www. estherbricques.com. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road.

TONASKET FOOD BANK

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sargeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

SUBMITTED BY LYNN HOOVER OVOC

OMAK - Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus is kicking off their season with the Fall Season Premiere Concert on Sunday, Oct. 19, 3:00 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center. Rehearsals will begin for both groups on Tuesday, Sept. 2, in the Omak High School Band and Music rooms. On Sept. 2, the orchestra will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Memorial for Geneva Reeder Friday SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Hope everyone enjoys the last holiday of the summer. On Friday Aug. 29 we will be having a Memorial Service and luncheon in memory of Geneva Reeder at 11 a.m. On Saturday Aug. 30 there will be Karaoke with Linda Wood and on Sunday, Aug. 31 there will be pinochle at 1 p.m. The annual Demo Derby Steak dinner will be Sunday starting at 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., following we are having music by the Bad Habits Band. Come in and enjoy a great meal and a outstanding band after watching the Demo Derby. Get your dabbers out for Bingo Friday at 7 p.m. The Pick 8 is growing each week, up to almost

under the direction of Don Pearce and the chorus will begin at 7:15 p.m. under the direction of Jonathan McBride. The orchestra will meet weekly on Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. The chorus will meet weekly on Mondays at 7:15 p.m. In the event that Monday is a holiday, the chorus will meet on Tuesday at 7:15 p.m. All rehearsals will be held in the Omak High School Band and Music rooms. The three remaining concerts will be as follows:

TONASKET EAGLES $14,000. The kitchen will open at 5:30 p.m. for burgers and several other items also on Friday. Joker Poker is still growing, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to $2909. Come in and get your tickets, they are $1.00 each and the drawing is on Saturday at 7

* Christmas Concert, Sunday, Dec. 7, 3:00 p.m. * Family Concert, Sunday, Feb. 8, 3:00 p.m. * Spring Concert, Sunday, Mar. 22, 3:00 p.m. All concerts are held at the Omak Performing Arts Center. For information on how you can support OVOC, get season tickets or for more information, please visit the website at www.ovocinfo.com or call Lynn Hoover, Coordinator, at 509-3220261.

p.m. You could win half (must be present to win). Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Betty Paul, second place Dave Russell, low score went to Dale Byers and last pinochle to Betty Paul and Dave Russell. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

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Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb 05",)3(%23å./4)#% !LLå REALå ESTATEå AD å VERTISINGå INå THISåå NEWSPAPERå ISå SUB å JECTå TOå THEå &AIRåå (OUSINGå !CT å WHICHå MAKESå ITåå ILLEGALå TOå ADVERTISEå hANYå PREF å ERENCE å LIMITATIONå ORå DIS å CRIMINATIONå BASEDå ONå RACE åå COLOR å RELIGION å SEX å HANDI å CAP å FAMILIALå STATUSå ORå NA å TIONALå ORIGIN å ORå ANå INTENTIONåå TOå MAKEå ANYå SUCHå PREFER å ENCE å LIMITATIONå ORå DISCRIMI å NATIONvå 4HISå NEWSPAPERå WILLåå NOTå KNOWINGLYå ACCEPTå ANYåå ADVERTISINGå FORå REALå ESTATEåå THATå ISå INå VIOLATIONå OFå THEå LAWåå 4Oå COMPLAINå OFå DISCRIMINA å TIONå CALLå (5$å ATå    å å 4HEå NUMBERå FORå HEAR å INGå IMPAIREDå ISå    å 

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Sudoku 8 5 2

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Medium, difficulty rating 0.52 1 2

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Puzzle 34 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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4 2 7 3 6 9 5 8 1

9 7 4 2 1 8 3 5 6

6 8 3 7 9 5 4 1 2

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Puzzle 35 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

2. Humidor item

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22. Laugh-a-minute folks

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3. Educing

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23. Aggravate

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24. Pesky insects

4. Portugese Mr.

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25. “Don’t give up!” 3

6. Chill

28. “Aladdin” prince 30. Long, long time

7. British unit of nonprofessional soldiers (2 wds)

31. Bank job

8. Subjection to the law of another

35. Jeans material

9. Reddish-brown gem

38. Ace

10. Detergent

39. Cab driver in “It’s a Wonderful Life”

11. Browning’s Ben Ezra, e.g.

40. Musical sign marking the beginning or end of a repeat 5

13. Technical name for feet

3

18. Part of N.Y.C.

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41. Order between “ready” and “fire”

21. Police blotter abbr.

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1

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26. Segregation

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42. Badge-earning girls’ org. (acronym) 9

27. Not just “a”

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Puzzle 31 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

2 8 4

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43. Victory cheer

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45. Dumfries denial

6 1

9 8 7

5 6 1 8 2 3 4 7 9

4 2 7 9 1 5 8 3 6

8 9 3 7 6 4 1 5 2

6 1 9 4 5 8 7 2 3

7 4 2 6 3 9 5 1 8

3 5 8 1 7 2 6 9 4

47. Greek word for goddess

Puzzle 28 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.68)

32. Without distinction of one from others (2 wds)

51. 1,000 kilograms

33. ___ boom bah!

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4

53. House salesperson (3 wds)

34. Oolong, for one

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57. Pertaining to simple organisms like kelp

3

36. Something breathed in

1

37. ___ juice (milk)

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44. Harvest goddess

7 9

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58. Early term for locomotive (2 wds)

8

5

59. Airs

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1

60. Blue books?

3

9

61. Extol

6 4 2 7

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1 8 2 3 7 9 5 6

Puzzle 32 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

2 3 1 5 9 7 4 6 8 5 9 3 7 6 1 2

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9. Deep-six

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RV Spaces /Storage

Puzzle 25 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.40)

14. 1/500 of the Indianapolis 500 15. Arch type 16. Winged 17. 1415 battle with English longbowmen victors over French forces

62. ___-cochere (carriage entrance) 63. Fictitious story 64. British beers

46. Neighbor of Namibia 47. Bum 48. Prefix with centric 49. Avid 51. Extra inning 52. Arise 55. Plug

19. Offer a revised proposed price 20. Suitable for feeding directly into a computer (2 wds)

1. Mosque V.I.P.

Vehicles Wanted

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45. Wyle of “ER”

54. “... or ___!”

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29. “Malcolm X” director

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5. Cleansing tub

28. Infomercials, e.g.

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1. Frosts, as a cake

12. Inclined

50. Amigo 5

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9 6 7 1 4 5 8 2 3

8 5 3 9 6 2 7 4 1

3 4 2 7 5 1 6 8 9

5 8 6 4 3 9 2 1 7

7 1 9 2 8 6 5 3 4

Puzzle 29 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.57)

Across

5. Benefits

26. Brown-coated ermines 8

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4 7 8 9 2

6 2 1 5 8

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

4

HORSES Pets

For Rent

56. “Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure”

FALL CONSIGNMENT SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2014

TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS City Surplus from Omak & Tonasket - 2 Estates - Moving Let us know by Aug 25 for Handbill Advertising.

D & D AUCTION SALES LICENSE NO. 2241

DAL DAGNON 486-2570

LLC

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2138

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AUGUST 28, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE FALL IS IN THE AIR Salmon could be in your future at the depot

Sports practices for Fall high school sports are underway, beginning with football last Wednesday. Above, some of the Oroville football team gathers around Coach Tam Hutchinson; left, a Tonasket receiver makes a catch in 7-on7 non-contact drills; below, the Hornets stretch out at the end of an early-morning session; bottom, the Tigers get in some interior offensive line work.

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Depot Museum is exhibiting “The Samon People: Stories tell the Past,” now through Sept. 13 or by special arrangement after until the end of September. The Borderlands Historical Society is hosting a salmon dinner at the American Legion to help raise money for repairs and improvements tot he depot building. SUBMITTED BY KAY SIBLEY

Brent Baker/staff photos

DIRECTOR, BORDERLANDS HISTORICAL SOCIETY

OROVILLE - The Borderlands Historical Society is hosting a salmon dinner Saturday, Sept. 6 for 100 people at the American Legion. To be one of those lucky people a donation ticket can be purchased at the Museum or the Oroville Pharmacy. Members donation begins at $15 and nonmembers at $20. There will be a silent auction and a few live auction items as well. The will be served at 6 p.m.

The proceeds will be used for three major projects: 1. Preserve the exterior of the 1907 Railroad Depot. The ONLY Great Northern station of it’s configuration open to the public in the PNW. Estimated cost is $8000; 2. Rewire the interior of the building to bring it up to code and provide improving the lighting in display areas especially, providing lighting that will highlight and preserve delicate artifacts. Estimated cost $4,000; and 3. Improve temperature control by installing ducting and heat pump system. Estimated cost is $6,200.

The museum’s 2014 exhibit “The Salmon People: Stories Tell The Past” highlights the history and culture of the Okanogan/Okanagan people prior to European contact, and to the best of our knowledge, is the only display to have done so in Washington State or British Columbia will be closing on Saturday, Sept. 13. Special tours can be arranged until the end of September. The next general meeting of the historical society will be Tuesday, Sept. 9 at 4 p.m. at the Depot Museum. All interested individuals are welcome to attend.

Rounds-McAlpine Wedding Sabrina Kay Rounds and John W. “Jack” McAlpine are pleased to announce they were wed on Saturday, July 26, 2014 at the Valley Christian Fellowship. The couple expresses their gratitude to all the people who were able to attend and share in their union. The wedding ceremony was performed by Pastor Randy McAllister, Peggy Shaw was the bride’s Matron of Honor and Chris Brockmiller was the groom’s Best Man. Vicki Hart of Vicki’s Unique Boutique supplied the dresses, Justine Parsons at Cowgirl Connection did the bride’s hair and Early Dawn Marie did her makeup.

Photo by Bugs photography

REAL ESTATE Guide www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 28, 2014

OBITUARIES

Fred Cook

FRED WILLIAM COOK Fred William Cook was born in Tonasket, Wash. on November 7, 1960 to Howard P. Cook and Eva B. Spangler. Fred was known by many names: Uncle Fred, Freddie Crocker, Fast Freddie, Freddie the Toolman to name a few. He was a one of a kind guy. Fred made fun happen, from what we called Okanogan style golf (from our yard into the orchards) to always having something with wheels for our kids and many other kids to play and ride on when at our house, making bow and arrows out of sticks and strings just last month for a couple of our friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandchildren. It was never boring when hanging out with Fred â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he was inventive and adventurous, always busy. He worked hard and played hard. Like his dad, Fred also had an awesome talent in welding and creating things like a dinosaur, an alien and spaceship, a robot man and a teradactyl, to name a fewâ&#x20AC;Ś and a train he built with close friends one winter. Fred built his first boom truck out of a 1972 Chevy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he also built his boom on it. Fred started walking at the age of eight months and never slowed downâ&#x20AC;Ś His smile was infectious and he always lent a helping hand. He began working as a child, helping his father in any task at the time. He worked in orchards as a teenager. He worked at a local apple shed. He pumped gas at a station in Oroville. About the age of 21, he started working for Nultonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irrigation and was there until he started his own business at the age of 32. In 1993, Fred started his own business called Cooks Cutting Edge Inc., an irrigation and water pump business. Any type of water problem â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fred could figure it out! From installing and repairing pumps, lawn systems, orchard irrigation and not to mention any type of plumbing problem: he carried both plumbing and electrical licenses! He was a dedicated man to his profession and to anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need for anything. Also, from a boy under his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide and all through his life he mastered mechanics. Like his father Howard, whom Fred admired deeply, their motto was â&#x20AC;&#x153;that if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been made or done once, it can be done again.â&#x20AC;? Fred loved a challenge, and would hardly rest until he figured out whatever was in front of him. It was normal for him to work 10-14 hour days; dinner time was never easy to plan. Fred had a big heart tooâ&#x20AC;Śif someone needed help in most any way he was out the door day or night to help them. Fred had lived in Tonasket and Oroville most all of his life and has had many life long friends which he enjoyed so much. He graduated in Oroville, the class of 1979 and had kept strong friendships with them. Fred had so many characters... FUN & smiling, goofy, humorous, awesome, kind and loving, caring, curious, creative, nonjudgmental, joyful, helpfulâ&#x20AC;Ś this man amplified life and joy! Fun times were going to the beaches, both at the ocean and our local lakes. He enjoyed canoeing, fishing, camping, rock music & dancing, road trips... but most of all his family. Fred was preceded in death by his father, one sister, and one brother. He is survived by his wife Jessie, mother Eva, daughters Nikki and Kayla, son Wayne Rieb, grandson Khai, sisters Ann Cook, Kathy Bendickson (Dennis), brothers Jim Cook, Steve Cook (Teri), and many numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Services will be held Saturday, August 30, 2014 at 11 a.m. at the Loomis Community Church, Loomis, Wash. with Pastor Bob Haskell officiating. Please make sure to see his slide show as we will leave it running as long as possible. A potluck is to fol-

Geneva Reeder

GENEVA REEDER Geneva (Howard) Reeder died peacefully at home on August 19, 2014 of cancer. Had Geneva lived one more day, she would have died exactly 41 years after her husband (Johnny Reeder) had passed away. By her side was her â&#x20AC;&#x153;one and onlyâ&#x20AC;? son (Terry W. Reeder) and her niece, Tanya. Geneva was born May 2, 1936 in Japton, Arkansas and moved to Omak, Wash in the early 1940â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Geneva married Johnny Reeder of Loomis, Wash. in 1955 and they had one child, Terry. Over the years, Geneva worked at Regal Fruit in Tonasket and drove the Tonasket Senior Citizens bus. She also managed several apartments in Tonasket and was the manager of the Hillside Apartments since 1994. After her son joined the US Army in 1982, she enjoyed â&#x20AC;&#x153;going to auctions, yard sales, & buying antiques.â&#x20AC;? Geneva had an â&#x20AC;&#x153;extensiveâ&#x20AC;? collection of â&#x20AC;&#x153;stuffâ&#x20AC;? before her death, which she so â&#x20AC;&#x153;graciouslyâ&#x20AC;? left to her â&#x20AC;&#x153;one and onlyâ&#x20AC;? son to manage. Geneva is survived by her son Terry & daughter-in-law Regina of El Paso, Texas; grand daughters Abigail, Haley, and Melody; grandson TJ; brothers James, Don, Ron and Mike Howard; great grand daughters Bella and Mia; numerous nieces and nephews and many friends. Geneva was preceded in death by her parents James and Mae, brother Marion Howard, sisters Norma Jean Townsend, Bernice Howard and Glenda Wells and her husband Johnny W. Reeder. The family would like to thank hospice for their support during the last weeks of her life, especially Cory and Kayla. A memorial service will be held August 29, 2014 at 11 a.m. at the Tonasket Fraternal Order of Eagles. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the American Cancer Society or a charity of your choice. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

She received her teaching certificate from Lewis and Clark Normal School in Lewiston, Idaho in 1941. She taught all elementary grades except first, in Kootenai and Worley, Idaho (1941-1945) as well as St. John, Wash. between 1945-1948. While teaching in Worley, Marian met Evelyn Dull (now of Oroville) who was teaching in Worley as well. She married Alvin Gordon in 1948 in Spokane where they made their home and raised five children. Her parents, Frank and Erna moved to Oroville in 1948 where they were apple orchardists until late in their lives. For several decades, summer breaks and holidays were spent by Marianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family in Oroville. Her children took swimming lessons and learned to swim in Lake Osoyoos. She was a member of the American Legion post in Oroville, as her father, Frank served in the Army (WWI) and brother Walt served in the Navy during WWII. She was an involved parent in her childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schools, and a Cub Scout as well as Campfire leader. Her home in Spokane, was a base for the neighborhood and later Gonzaga University student friends of her children. She aptly called her kitchen â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grand Central Station.â&#x20AC;? From her German grandmother, Bertha Steg and her mother Erna, she carried on the tradition of graciously â&#x20AC;&#x153;adding another plate to the tableâ&#x20AC;? when anyone arrived at meal time. She was a calm leader of women who could gracefully smooth out any discord and bring a group to consensus. She was president of many Catholic womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organizations. She enjoyed bridge, gardening, as well as golf with the Wandermere Nine Holers. Her famous pecan rolls were treasured by many and were sent on several occasions to her son-in-law, John while stationed with the Army in Korea. She traveled to Alaska, Hawaii, Europe â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with her mother Erna, and Puerto Rico. All of her life she was a teacher, displaying patience, curiosity, joy in discovery, a generous spirit, humor, and facilitator of growth of groups of all ages. She was preceded in death by her husband Al (1980), son John (1974), brothers Frank and Walter Wyatt, as well as her parents. She is survived by her children, Maureen Shogan (Joe) Spokane, Wash., Denise Dhane (John) Steilacoom, Wash.; Mark (Kathy) Omak, Wash. and Jamie, Spokane, her sister Joanne Whiteaker (Clyde) Oroville. Grandchildren, John Gordon (Sarah) - Oroville, Beau Dhane, Dallas. Texas, Chris Shogan (Julie) - Spokane, Sarah Dhane, Austin, Texas, Katie Turner (Shad) Tonasket, Wash. and Stephen Shogan, San Francisco, Calif., three great grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews and her cousin John Stegâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, Betty (Oroville). Funeral Mass was held on August 16, 2014 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Spokane, Wash.

MARIAN KATHERINE (WYATT) GORDON Marian Katherine (Wyatt) Gordon died peacefully on the eve of a Super Moon at Spokane Hospice House on August 9, 2014 with her family at her side. She was the first born of four children to Frank Marion and Erna H. (Steg) Wyatt on September 26, 1921 in Sandpoint, Idaho. She grew up with her two younger brothers and sister and an extended family of many cousins in Sandpoint where she graduated in the class of 1939.

The Oroville Golf Club would like to give a Special Thanks to those who sponsored our 40th Ground Hog Open.

z Gold Digger Inc. z Hometown Pizza z Vassar Electric z Highland Internet z Trinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant

Dale Eldon Ward, age 85, of Tonasket died on Saturday June 21, 2014 following many years of heart problems and a stroke in 2002. He was born August 21, 1928, in Eagle City, Oklahoma to parents Harold and Myrtle Ward. He moved with family from Oklahoma to California when he was thirteen. During World War II, when he was 15, he travelled with his father combining wheat in parts of Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas. Dale had a paper route and worked at two theaters in Orange County, California. He rode his bicycle, transporting money from one theater to the other. He often remarked â&#x20AC;&#x153;You couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do that today.â&#x20AC;? Dale worked for 38 years at Pacific Valve, Inc. in Long Beach, California. On February 12, 1950

Garden Grove, California; sisterin-law Ginger Ward of Havasu City, Arizona; sons Jeff (Cora) and Dennis of Tonasket; four grandchildren and one great grandchild. Memorial Services will be held Saturday, August 30, 2014 11:00 a.m. at the Oroville United Methodist Church with Pastor Leon Alden, officiating. Memorials may be made to Oroville United Methodist Church. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

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grandchildren, Clover and Jay. Dale assisted his wife later when she did Girl Scouts. He would do the laundry while Pat worked with the children and worked at school. When Jeff married Cora in 1997, they acquired two more grandchildren, Mike and Crystal. Dale was a loving and caring grandfather and will be missed by many. He was a member of the Oroville United Methodist Church. Dale is survived by his wife Pat; sister Jean (Chuck) Gibo of

Thank You...

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

Dale Ward

Katherine Gordon

he married his wife Pat at the First Methodist Church in Garden Grove, CA. Their daughter Merrie Dale was born in 1951 and she preceded him in death in 1970. Dale was active in the 20/30 club, served as a coach for ball teams and attended Indian Guides as a father to his two sons, Dennis and Jeff. He was a loving and caring father. In 1984, he and Pat moved to Tonasket where they were busy building their home. They were involved with their

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

low and please feel free to wear Hawaiian shirts, dresses, bandanasâ&#x20AC;Ś. There will be a private family burial at a later date at the Loomis Mountain View Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Loomis Community Church. In comfort know these things: He asked Jesus into his life several years agoâ&#x20AC;ŚHe had a great time with his classmates those last hoursâ&#x20AC;Ś He did not sufferâ&#x20AC;Ś He is now finally resting.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 28, 2014  

August 28, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 28, 2014  

August 28, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune