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Hitting the ice running Second-year Tips coach knows what to expect, C1

FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

Schack wins state award

EVERETT, WASHINGTON

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OSO MUDSLIDE

Fundraising winds down The three largest relief groups have raised more than $9 million, and have shifted their focus to long-term needs. By Chris Winters Herald Writer

OSO — Five months after a mudslide wiped out a neighborhood and cut the nearby town of Darrington off from the rest of the county, the massive

The art center in Everett, which offers dozens of annual programs, was recognized by the governor and state Arts Commission.

fundraising effort that fueled much of the recovery effort to date is winding up. The three largest relief organizations involved together have raised more than $9.1 million in response to the March 22 slide, which killed 43 people and

destroyed or damaged 48 homes. United Way of Snohomish County and the Cascade Valley Hospital Foundation together have raised more than $4.5 million since the slide and have been closely coordinating how that money is being distributed. While the two agencies have distributed about $3 million, nearly all of it has been earmarked for a specific purpose

and will be distributed over the next two years. The American Red Cross, meanwhile, also has raised $4.5 million since the slide and has distributed or otherwise earmarked $2 million of that, with the balance being kept in reserve. The three agencies have See OSO, Page A2

A generous beginning

By Gale Fiege Herald Writer

First day of fair opens with $50,000 donation to benefit children

EVERETT — The Schack Art Center is the winner of this year’s Arts Organization Award from the state Arts Commission and Gov. Jay Inslee. The 2014 Governor’s Arts and Heritage Awards, announced Wednesday, honor the Everett art center, The Evergreen State SnoCollege and homish four individu- watercolorist is als involved in Schack’s Artist arts and heritage of the Year, endeavors. A&E 18 “It’s fabulous,” said Judy Tuohy, the Schack’s executive director. “So many people, dedicated staff, board members, artists and patrons, have contributed to what we are today. We send a thank you to all of them.” Joan Pinney, the Schack’s artist of the year, said the center has great importance in the local arts community. “The Schack and its programs are a real encouragement to all artists in the county,” Pinney said. Formerly known as the Arts Council of Snohomish County, the 40-year-old nonprofit organization has been operating since 2011 as the Schack Art Center, honoring John and Idamae Schack for their support of Everett’s cultural institutions. As one of the main visual arts education centers in the region, the Schack offers dozens of annual programs including artist support services, arts education that includes glass blowing, and gallery exhibits and festival-style art events that attract young people. It logs seven admission-free and greatly varying exhibits each year. Past exhibits have included works by regionally acclaimed artists such as Dale Chihuly and Alfredo Arreguin, as well as juried shows involving artists from throughout the region. An exhibit based on photorealistic painter and Monroe native Chuck Close is planned in the next two years.

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MARK MULLIGAN / THE HERALD

Joseph Huskey, 12 (left), and Liam Jordan, 13, snap a picture of themselves with Lucy, a 5-year-old American alligator held by the Reptile Man, Scott Peterson, at the Evergreen State Fair in Monroe on Thursday afternoon.

Herald Writer

See SCHACK, back page, this section

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MONROE — Shrieking kids, whirling rides and a mishmash of aromas from frying fair food signaled the opening of the Evergreen State Fair’s 106th year Thursday. The fair also opened with a gift. Recycling and waste company Republic Services, a longtime sponsor of the fair, gave $50,000 to the

VOL. 114, NO. 192 © 2014 THE DAILY HERALD CO.

INSIDE

Business . . . .A13 Classified . . . . B1

Comics . . . . . .D4 Crossword . . .D4

Mukilteo and Arlington Boys & Girls Clubs for its annual Community Stewardship Award. The Boys & Girls Club of Snohomish County provides meals and activities for about 17,000 children at 19 locations each year. Kids between the ages of 5 and 18 can stay at the clubs before and after school or in the summer. Joe Casalini, director of business development for Republic Services,

Does not compute I’m afraid I can’t quite believe that, Dave: A computer projection gives the Seattle Mariners a 45.7 percent chance of making the playoffs for the first time in 13 seasons (Page C5). Those are pretty good odds, considering that the first time the words “Seattle Dear Abby. . . .D5 Horoscope . . . B6

Mariners” were entered into the computer, it choked on the data and began laughing in binary code. Still has that new plane smell: The second season of “Airplane Repo,” in which a team of pilots repossess luxury jets from 1 percenters behind on their payments, premieres tonight on

Lottery . . . . . .A2 Obituaries. . .A11

Opinion. . . . .A15 Sports . . . . . . . C1

said the company has partnered with Snohomish County for decades to put on the fair. When the company and county were deciding who should receive this year’s stewardship award, the Boys & Girls Club stood out. Three members of the Snohomish County Council went to the Boys & Girls Club when they were children.

More inside ■ Bill Cosby leads the lineup of star power appearing at the fair, A&E ■ Today’s fair results, A10

See FAIR, back page, this section

the Discovery channel (The Clicker, D6). But we have to ask: Is there a pine tree air freshener in the cockpit of every repossessed jet, as there is in every repo’d car? Don’t talk to me until I’ve had my morning nectar: Scientists studying hummingbirds said the birds Stocks . . . . . .A14 Short Takes . . .D6

reacted angrily when the sugar-rich nectar in feeders was replaced with plain water. “The hummingbirds look mad,” noted a researcher (Page A11). But not as mad as the researchers themselves when the hummingbirds switched the scientists’ morning coffee with water.

—Jon Bauer, Herald staff

Obscure 72/53, C6

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A2 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Ryan would love to see Romney run again By Tammy Webber Associated Press

CHICAGO — U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan said Thursday he would love to see Mitt Romney run again for president and teased the GOP’s former nominee at one point that the “third time’s the charm.” Appearing with Ryan at a public event for the first time since their ticket lost two years ago, Romney offered his own good-humored praise by saying that Ryan “wouldn’t be a bad president” himself. Ryan, R-Wisconsin, has said he will wait until after the midterm elections to decide whether to pursue his own presidential campaign in 2016. Romney has repeatedly denied any

Oso From Page A1

different organizational structures and functions: United Way and the hospital foundation are locally based, while the Red Cross is a national organization with significant overhead to manage rapid response to disasters. But all three have shifted their strategies to respond to the evolving needs of the communities affected by the mudslide, focusing more on long-term needs now. On the ground, North Counties Family Services in Darrington and the Arlington Family Resource Project have received much of the financial support that gets passed directly to the people affected by the slide. “What we will do is work with the family support centers to distribute those

1102980

CHARLES REX ARBOGAST / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (right) and his former vice presidential running mate, U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin, arrive for a dinner Thursday at the Union Club in Chicago, where Romney interviewed Ryan about his new book.

plans for another campaign for president. He failed to win the nomination in 2008 and then lost the election to President Barack Obama in 2012.

Romney interviewed Ryan about his new book, “The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea,” on the brink of the fall election season. Republicans are

dollars over the next two years as the need arises,” said Dennis Smith, CEO of United Way of Snohomish County. For example, the United Way set aside money to finance — through the Salvation Army — the hiring of a case manager to work at the two service centers for the next two years. That money comes from donations by corporate or institutional donors. Even more money has been received from individual donors — about 73 percent of the total. That pool of money has been distributed to the family service centers or to other community organizations, such as the Oso Fireman’s Fund that provide direct aid to individuals and families. Going forward, it’s hoped that at least 70 percent of the money raised will go toward such direct assistance, Smith said. A similar system is in place at the Red Cross,

MUDSLIDE MONEY Raised

(figures approximate)

Cascade Valley Hospital Foundation United Way of Snohomish County

$2.0M

American Red Cross $2.6M $4.5M

CHUCK TAYLOR / THE HERALD

said regional executive director Chuck Morrison, although the exact breakdown wasn’t immediately available. “A certain percent is anticipated for individual needs, but everything else will be driven by what the community tells us,” Morrison said. That guidance comes from case managers working in communities to assess individual needs, and it informs what is called the Unmet Needs Group — leaders from various charities and

driving for the six-seat gain required to grab the Senate majority. Success would put the GOP in control of Congress and dramatically shape the final two years of Obama’s term. They took turns criticizing Obama’s record on domestic issues, including the economy, health care and immigration, with Ryan warning that Obama will “poison the well” on immigration compromise if he takes any unilateral action. Romney said Obama sent a message to Russia when he did not act in Syria and that there has been “an explosion of very bad things in the world” since then. Romney said Obama’s foreign policy is “based on his belief that everyone has the same interests”

while he himself believes that some world leaders “want to dominate and some are fundamentally evil.” They also blamed Obama and the Democratic-led Senate for doing too little to reach out to Republicans and to act on important issues. “If people want to actually see action in this country and dealing with problems from education to health care, immigration to our fiscal needs ... they’re going to have to vote for Republican senators and ... a Republican president, as well,” Romney said. Long before Romney and Ryan took the stage at the Union League Club of Chicago, Democrats said the pairing is a reminder of failure.

organizations who meet weekly to make decisions on funding. Those case managers have been the key to making sure money is making it into the hands of those who need it, said Wyonne Perrault, the executive director of North Counties Family Services. Some families, Perrault said, have identified needs that will require money over a longer term. “We know that winter’s around the corner and we know some folks are not yet into the housing they want to be in,” she said. Others might need help with ongoing medical concerns, she said. “This is a marathon, not a race,” she said. While donations to the larger organizations has slowed, United Way and the hospital foundation still have about $1.75 million in reserve, earmarked for the needs of individuals and families over the next

couple of years. So far, United Way and the Cascade Valley Hospital Foundation have provided about $860,000 to the two family service centers. About 83 percent of that money has been passed on to families who lost someone or their primary home in the slide. The remaining 17 percent has helped those who were economically inconvenienced, but not devastated, by the slide. For example, some needed gas cards for help in covering the cost of a suddenly longer commute. The amount provided by the Red Cross was not immediately available. “We will assess each case going forward as needs are identified. We’re going to be there when they need that assistance,” Morrison said. Chris Winters: 425374-4165; cwinters@ heraldnet.com. Twitter: @Chris_at_Herald.

LOTTERY LOTTO: Wednesday’s drawing was for $1.5 million. Wednesday’s numbers: 11-12-17-25-41-47. The next drawing is Saturday for $1.7 million. DAILY GAME: Thursday’s numbers: 1-0-2. KENO: Thursday’s numbers: 4-11-18-21-28-32-

33-35-36-40-42-53-5861-65-67-68-69-70-76.

HIT 5: Wednesday’s drawing was for $130,000. Wednesday’s numbers: 14-16-23-3539. The next drawing is Saturday for $170,000. MATCH 4: Thursday’s numbers: 9-11-13-17. POWERBALL: Wednesday’s drawing was for $60 million. Wednesday’s numbers: 4-8-21-38-40, Powerball 3. The next drawing is Saturday for $70 million. MEGA MILLIONS: Tuesday’s drawing was for $160 million. Tuesday’s numbers: 22-39-56-6771, Megaball 15. The next drawing is Friday for $180 million.

HERALD EDITORS Home delivery questions: 425-339-3200 Executive Editor Neal Pattison: 425-339-3480; npattison@heraldnet.com Local news: Robert Frank, 425-339-3426; rfrank@ heraldnet.com Business news: businessnews@heraldnet.com Sports: Kevin Brown, 425-339-3474; kbrown@ heraldnet.com Photography: Mark Mulligan, 425-339-3462; mmulligan@ heraldnet.com www.heraldnet.com: Doug Parry, 425-339-3433, dparry@heraldnet.com


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FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

Feds to seize home of food stamp suspect Authorities say the owner of an Everett store made more than $410,000 through fraud. By Diana Hefley Herald Writer

EVERETT — A downtown store owner is now facing criminal and civil sanctions based on allegations that he was running a food stamp fraud ring out of his business. Fraz “Tony” Mushtaq recently

pleaded not guilty to a trio of felony charges stemming from a 17-month investigation by Everett police into A-1 Smoke and Grocery. Meanwhile, federal authorities have moved to take possession of Mushtaq’s Everett home and the more than $410,000 that detectives seized as part of their investigation. Authorities believe the assets are proceeds from a criminal enterprise. Mushtaq, 34, continues to run the small grocery store in the 2600 block of Colby Avenue. He is no longer allowed to accept

EBT cards after his machine was seized by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Office of Inspector General. Everett police continue to monitor the convenience store, which the city has deemed a chronic nuisance. The business must comply with conditions established by the city or risk being closed down. Mushtaq was arrested in February during a raid of his store. Prosecutors allege that he was buying food stamp benefit cards for cents on the dollar and using the cards to purchase inventory for his store.

Court documents say that a confidential informant working with police accompanied Mushtaq to big grocery stores where he directed the informant to purchase dozens of cases soda pop with his EBT card. Mushtaq later paid the man in cash, about half the price of what the informant was charged at the grocery store. In one instance, Mushtaq became nervous after a cashier made a comment about the informant buying $132 worth of Pepsi “using government food stamps,” according to court papers. Prosecutors allege that

Mushtaq bought what he believed was stolen cigarettes and energy drinks for a fraction of the fair market value and reselling the goods at his store, court papers said. Theft investigators at an Everett Safeway and QFC also reported that shoplifters said that they were stealing from the stores to sell the merchandise to Mushtaq for a fraction of the price, court papers said. Mushtaq is suspected of storing his inventory inside the garage at See FRAUD, Page A4

Alleged bank robber has long rapsheet By Caleb Hutton The Bellingham Herald

SEATTLE — A 40-year-old man dubbed the Alabama Band Bandit — an alleged serial bank robber who threatened to shoot tellers in Bellingham, Shoreline and Lynnwood — has a criminal record dating back to 1993, court records show. Michael Ryan Hardesty, of Woodinville, was arrested Tuesday after allegedly evading police in Skagit and Snohomish counties, according to authorities. He’s being held in the King County Jail on $500,000 bail for investigation of at least five bank robberies in July. His next court hearing is scheduled for Friday. Officials have not yet decided if Hardesty will be prosecuted at the state or federal level. In each heist, the bandit slipped a note to the clerk, saying he would shoot if he didn’t get cash, according to the FBI. He struck two Washington Federal banks in Bellingham on consecutive Friday afternoons in July, wearing his trademark disguise: a hat, largerimmed glasses and what looked like a wig. He never flashed a gun. In one robbery, the suspect wore a hat bearing the logo of the southern rock band Alabama — hence the moniker Alabama Band Bandit. A tip led police to the Mark II

GENNA MARTIN / THE HERALD

Hazel Hamor, 98, receives flowers from Lynnwood Fire Department assistant fire chief Greg Macke (left) and chief medical services officer Larry Hadland at the HCR Manor Care nursing home on Wednesday.

A birthday wish come true

At 98, Hazel Hamor knew what she wanted and knew how to get it By Amy Nile Herald Writer

LYNNWOOD — She wants what most women want. And she isn’t afraid to ask for it. For her 98th birthday, Hazel Hamor asked for a cold beer and a man in uniform. As she sat in her wheelchair with a bottle of Blue Moon in hand, a police officer and two firefighters made surprise visits to her birthday party at her assisted-living home on

See ROBBER, Page A4

Wednesday. “Look at grandma,” Hamor said, grinning as she held her Belgian-style wheat beer. “This is what I needed.” ManorCare of Lynnwood’s recreation director, Julie Garreis, threw Hamor a party after learning what she wanted for her birthday. “Hazel is a character,” Garreis said. “We love her.” Garreis arranged for her brother-in-law, a Washington State Highway Patrol officer, to

stop by first. Motorcycle Officer Deion Glover donned his uniform on his day off for the occasion. “Good thing I’m married, or I’d have to take you out,” Glover told Hamor. She wore a silver crown with flashing red lights to her party. She held her beer in one hand and a scepter in the other as she chatted with the officer. “I can’t talk, I’m getting so excited,” Hamor said, blushing. “Let me give you a kiss.”

Glover leaned down. Hamor gave him a smooch on the cheek. And then another. The excitement didn’t end there. Larry Hadland and Greg Macke of the Lynnwood Fire Department also showed up in uniform to give Hamor a bouquet of flowers. “She loves firemen. She’d always say, ‘They have the cutest little tushes,’” said her son, Bill Hamor. “I guess when you get old See BIRTHDAY, Page A4

How much progress is much progress? W

front porch

 hether you call it a sit-in or a sit-up, this week’s protest by a Bainbridge Island teen couldn’t halt a planned shopping center. Chiara D’Angelo spent two days in a tree, drawing attention to an Ohio developer’s plan to cut down 800 trees on Bainbridge to build a bank branch and drugstore. D’Angelo came down from her evergreen perch Tuesday. The project is moving ahead. But the 19-year-old Western Washington University student succeeded in raising a question: How much is too much?

JULIE MUHLSTEIN How many shopping centers, parking lots and housing projects does a community need — or want? Driving around Snohomish

County, it’s hard not to bump into change at every turn. Oncefamiliar landscapes are being altered so fast that you might notice one view on a Monday, and by Friday see something different while driving the same route. That’s true in Everett, Lynnwood, Marysville and points north, where hotels, apartments, shopping centers and car dealerships are being built or have recently opened. There’s more to come. In Everett early next year, Snohomish County plans to

Detour coming up on Highway 530

rebuild the elevated west side of the new roadway.

Crews will again detour traffic to the Seattle City Light access road around the clock 9 p.m. Aug. 26 to 4 a.m. Aug. 28. Crews will install drainage features and temporary fish passages, begin to remove the existing Highway 530 roadway, restore streams on the east side of the project, and continue to

An ALS challenge is on: The head of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Ray Conner, joined countless others in taking the “Ice Bucket Challenge” on Thursday to support the ALS Association, a nonprofit group fighting amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

break ground on a nine-story courthouse north of Wall Street, between Oakes and Rockefeller avenues. On trips to my hometown of Spokane, I have been disoriented by new buildings in places that shaped my childhood. I attended Spokane’s Jefferson Elementary, which last fall reopened in a snazzy new building blocks from the old brick school I remember. In July, I stopped by Joel E. Ferris High School, my Spokane alma mater. It’s on the same campus I attended, but much of the 50-year-old school was razed in

The ALS Association isn’t the first to use the ice bucket challenge to raise money, but it’s campaign has gone viral on social media. Participants include former Pres. George W. Bush and Steven Spielberg. The association has raised nearly $42 million since late July. Here’s how it works: Someone challenges you to dump a bucketful of ice cold water on your head, you do, you make a donation to

a recent renovation project, and the new pitched-roof architecture makes the place unrecognizable to this 1972 graduate. That’s nothing compared with what alumni of old Lynnwood High School now see on shopping trips to Alderwood mall. Since 2009, when the new Lynnwood High opened east of I-5 near Bothell, former students have known that their old school north of the mall would be demolished. Now, not only is the school gone, the play fields have been

an ALS charity, you post it on social media and challenge others to do the same. EVA Air’s chairman, Chang Kuo-Wei, challenged Conner. Conner did not say how much he is donating. He challenged Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson, GE Aviation CEO David Joyce, Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly and Cathay Pacific executive James Barrington.

See MUHLSTEIN, Page A4

CONTACT US Home delivery: Call 425-339-3200. News tips: Call 425-339-3451 or email newstips@ heraldnet.com. Share photos: Submit shots to our reader galleries at www.heraldnet. com/yourphotos.


A4 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Birthday From Page A3

you can make comments about men’s derrieres.” Five generations of the Hamor family came to the party. Bill Hamor and his wife, Sally, came from San Luis Obispo, California. Her daughter, Norene Lowery, of Lynnwood, also attended with more than a dozen other friends and family members. Several of Hamor’s six grandsons, 13 great-grandchildren and six great-great-grandchildren made it, too. “It’s all family, even if you

Muhlstein From Page A3

removed. The place where generations of Lynnwood Royals went to class and played sports is now bare dirt, with construction equipment clearing the way for a Costco store across from Alderwood at 184th Street SW. Costco will be the first phase of Lynnwood Place, built by Texasbased Cypress Equities. The 40-acre site is owned by the Edmonds School District, which will lease it to the developer. More commercial buildings and apartments are planned for a next phase. Another huge Lynnwood development, 180 apartments and townhomes, is hard to miss next to I-5 at 164th Street SW and Larch Way. Built by Goodman Real Estate of Seattle, that complex is called Altia. The

don’t like them,” Hamor joked. She has quite a reputation for rich remarks made over the years. So much so that her friend, Carla Hubbard, also of Lynnwood, is writing a book on her life and her humor. Hamor was born in Aztec, New Mexico. She attended school in Durango, Colorado. In 1935, she married Tony Hamor. The couple had two children. They lived in Arizona and California before moving to Lynnwood in 1976. Tony Hamor worked for a telephone company while Hazel managed a five-anddime store and a discount

bread shop. After her husband died in 1981, she bought a motorhome and traveled the country on her own for years. Hamor always had an adventurous streak. She enjoyed water skiing and scuba diving. “She’s done everything but jump out of an airplane,” said Lowery, her daughter. Now, Hamor said, she’ll have to think of something to do for her 100th birthday. That said, “Nobody could have a better birthday than this,” she said. “I just wanted to be happy. What else could you ask for?”

same company is building a 383-apartment project called Tivalli on Ash Way, north of 164th Street. Downtown Everett’s skyline is rising with completion of the new six-story Hampton Inn hotel at 2931 W. Marine View Drive. Nearby, on the southeast corner of Rucker and Hewitt avenues, Everett’s Skotdal Real Estate is at work on a new 102-unit, seven-story apartment complex. The company also built Everett’s Library Place apartments. On Grand Avenue to the west, developer Lobsang Dargey’s Path America company is building a 220-apartment complex. In some downtown places, big new buildings now block waterfront views. When they arrive, all those apartment dwellers will bring more changes — and perhaps a more lively downtown scene. To the north, Marysville’s Roy Robinson

Chevrolet-Subaru has opened a new Subaru-only showroom and service center. And along I-5, Honda of Marysville is another new dealership. Farther north, the Stillaguamish Tribe plans to open a five-story, 125room Angel of the Winds Casino hotel by year’s end. Anyone with a long history in one area sees lots of change. If it’s a problem, it’s a better one than having no development. New construction, with the jobs and people it brings, is a sign of economic vitality. And yet, that young woman in the tree raises questions worth asking. Does one more drugstore, bank branch or apartment complex add real value to a community? Is it more valuable than what it replaced? As we keep building, we should keep asking. Julie Muhlstein: 425339-3460; jmuhlstein@ heraldnet.com.

Fraud From Page A3

his home. Prosecutors also allege that Mushtaq was selling illegal “spice,” a synthetic drug. He reportedly accepted cash and EBT cards.

Robber From Page A3

Motel in Burlington around 7 a.m. Tuesday, where police spotted a green Mercedes — a car that hadn’t been used in the robberies but that Hardesty was known to drive — parked outside. Hardesty jumped into the Mercedes and sped off north on I-5, according to police. Officers lost sight of him before he reached the Bow Hill exit, a few miles to the north. Six hours later police in Snohomish County spotted Hardesty trying to swap cars in the Everett area. Deputies confronted him. He ran, ditching a .45-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver as he fled, said Shari Ireton, a spokeswoman for the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office. A police dog caught up to

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Herald staff

EDMONDS — Retired Edmonds police dog Dash died Aug. 16.

as of Wednesday, bureau spokeswoman Ayn Dietrich said. Here are the details on the two Lynnwood cases: ■ On July 7, a man walked into the Bank of America at 1424 164th St. SW, wearing a dark striped long-sleeve shirt and a dark ball cap with no logo. He slipped a note to the teller and fled with cash at 4:30 p.m. He was described as about 5-foot6, in his late 30s, and 140 pounds. (Court records from this week say Hardesty, 40, stands 5-foot-9, weighs 170 pounds, and has hazel eyes and a shaved head.) ■ On July 30, at a Wells Fargo two blocks from the first Lynnwood bank, the suspect wore sunglasses, a plaid shirt and a tan sun hat with a floppy brim. He handed the note to the clerk at 12:30 p.m., then got away.

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Hardesty about 15 minutes later. Court records show that over the past two decades, Hardesty has been convicted of crimes in Florida, Michigan, and Island and Whatcom counties in Washington. His rap sheet includes home burglaries, grand theft, carrying a weapon with unlawful intent, forgery and delivering methamphetamine. In 2008, Hardesty pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to possessing an unregistered firearm. A federal judge sentenced him to seven years and eight months prison. Before his arrest on Tuesday, Hardesty was wanted on a federal warrant for violating probation. FBI agents were looking for a getaway driver, too: a white woman seen driving Hardesty from the scene of two robberies. An accomplice hadn’t been arrested

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reporting income of about $128,000 during that same period, according to the forfeiture documents filed in federal court. Mushtaq is originally from Pakistan but has lived in the U.S. for years. He was required to surrender his passport and is prohibited from leaving the state pending his trial, scheduled for Oct. 31.

Edmonds police dog dies

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Investigators suspect that Mushtaq was making hundreds of thousands of dollars off of his scheme and laundering the money through his business. They also suspect that he underreported his earnings to the Internal Revenue Service. For example, Mushtaq reportedly paid off a $230,000 home loan in the span of 3½ years while only

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1102805

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1118741

All appraisals are FREE! At Bauer Funeral Chapel, 701 First Street, Snohomish, WA.

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The Daily Herald

Fire damages Mill Creek apt. Herald staff MILL CREEK — An early morning fire Thursday damaged a Mill Creek apartment complex. Crews from Snohomish County Fire District 7 were dispatched to the fire just before 12:30 a.m. in the 1100 block of 156th Place SE. A neighbor called 911 after spotting flames inside a first-floor window, said Autumn Waite, a fire district spokeswoman. The neighbor and his son quickly knocked on doors to clear the three-story

apartment building. They also used a fire extinguisher on the flames, Waite said. Crews were able to finish putting out the fire minutes later. Damage was contained to one apartment, which was unoccupied at the time of the fire. One person was treated for minor smoke inhalation and taken to a local hospital as a precaution. More than 20 firefighters responded from fire districts 1 and 7. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

Worker electrocuted in Edmonds identified Herald staff EDMONDS — A 38-year-old man who was killed Wednesday in a construction accident at Swedish/ Edmonds hospital has been identified as Jason E. Vanlandingham. Vanlandingham, from the town of South Prairie in Pierce County, died from high-voltage electrocution, according to the Snohomish County

Medical Examiner’s Office. His death was ruled an accident. He was on a crew working in a ditch as part of the hospital expansion project, officials said. Investigators believe the crew accidentally hit a power line. The accident caused a half-hour power outage for nearly 900 people. Edmonds police and the state Department of Labor and Industries are investigating.

FUGITIVE WATCH

NORTHWEST BRIEFLY Mudslides, floods close was contacted Wednesday. Superintendent Brian Flones says legal expenses, back pay and the settleroads, trap motorists TWISP — A Washington state trooper says floods and mudslides triggered by heavy rain on wildfire-burned terrain in north-central Washington have blocked portions of two highways, stranding some motorists. No injuries have been reported. Trooper Darren Wright says five to 10 vehicles were cut off by mud and slides Thursday night and were temporarily unable to get off Highway 153, which runs through the Methow Valley. He says those vehicles are in a safe area. It wasn’t immediately clear how long they might be stuck. Elsewhere in Okanogan County, the state Transportation Department said a 24-mile stretch of State Highway 20 was closed due to mud and rocks across the highway. Local road detours were available there and crews were working to clear the debris. The National Weather Service issued a flash flood warning as thunderstorms moved through the area Thursday night. Meteorologist Matthew Fugazzi says more than an inch of rain was reported in one hour near Twisp in an area burned by the massive Carlton Complex wildfire.

Wenatchee: Settlement pays teacher in student drowning case The teacher who was in charge of a Wenatchee High School gym class when a student drowned will be paid for two more years to remain on leave. A settlement was reached this month with Ed Knaggs who was fired over the 2011 drowning but won reinstatement. The Wenatchee World reports he’ll be paid about $165,000 to remain on administrative leave through August 2016. The settlement was approved by the school board and teachers union. Knaggs declined to comment when he

The state Department of Corrections’ Everett office has felony warrants for the following offenders. If you have information about them, call police or the Department of Corrections at 425-356-2800. Callers do not have to give their names.

ment for Knaggs totaled about $500,000. The district also paid $2 million to settle a wrongful death lawsuit with the family of Antonio Reyes who could not swim.

University Place: Teacher guilty of sexual misconduct A man who had sex with a student while he was a teacher at Curtis High School in University Place pleaded guilty Thursday in Tacoma to sexual misconduct with a minor and violating a no-contact order. Thirty-three-year-old Michael Allen faces more than a year in prison when he’s sentenced Oct. 2 in Pierce County Superior Court. Allen was placed on leave in January and has been in custody since March. The News Tribune reports Allen resigned and surrendered his teaching certificate. The biology teacher had taught at Curtis since 2009.

Derrick Evans Age: 24 Height: 5 feet, 10 inches Weight: 171 pounds Hair: Brown Derrick Evans Eyes: Brown Evans has a warrant for failing to report to the state Department of Corrections. He is being supervised for failure to register as a felony sex offender. Evans is a Level 1 sex offender.

Bremerton: Man knocks down guard fleeing court

Steven Wilkins

Police say a Bremerton Municipal Courthouse guard who was knocked down by a fleeing suspect suffered a broken shoulder. Lt. Peter Fisher says police are looking Thursday for 19-year-old Holden James Lippard-Taste for the apparent assault as well as domestic violence arrest warrants. Fisher says Lippard-Taste was brought to court Wednesday by a probation officer who suspected him of being under the influence of methamphetamine. When his name was called he bolted and ran over the 74-year-old guard who attempted to stop him from running out the front door. The Kitsap Sun reports Lippard-Taste was convicted in October in Kitsap County Superior Court of possessing heroin and was sentenced to 10 days in jail. From Herald news services

Age: 31 Height: 6 feet, 1 inches Weight: 175 pounds Hair: Black Eyes: Steven Brown Wilkins Wilkins has a warrant for failing to report to the state Department of Corrections. He is being supervised for a domestic violence court order violation. If you see these people, do not approach, arrest, detain or follow them. In an emergency, call 911.

d te to e % an tim 25 t w st ra os ol! be xt d m cho e th n e s an to-s It’s e a and ckv r a sa st b for b be les e th sty

on

U.S. 2 scene of apparent suicide

Friday, 08.22.2014 A5

Herald staff EVERETT — A police investigation on the U.S. 2 trestle on Thursday morning was for the apparent suicide of a man in his 20s from Lake Stevens. Everett officers and medics were summoned to the west side of the trestle at 8:21 a.m., Sgt. Ryan Dalberg said. The man was taken to a local hospital, where he later died. No further information was available.

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LYNNWOOD — Officials have identified a man killed in a forklift accident earlier this week. Chuck K. Lee, 69, of Bothell, died from bluntforce trauma, according to the King County Medical Examiner’s Office. His death was ruled an accident. Police say Lee was walking through a parking lot off 198th Street SW on Monday when he was struck by a box falling from a forklift. The forklift operator told investigators he saw something in front of the machine and braked suddenly. Lee was rushed to a Seattle hospital, where he later died. Lynnwood police continue to investigate, along with the state Department of Labor and Industries.

*SHOP FOR A CAUSE discount applies to sale, clearance and regular prices, with exceptions listed. EXTRA 10% off applies to electrics, electronics, watches, furniture, mattresses and rugs/floor coverings. EXCLUDES: Everyday Values (EDV), Specials, Superbuys, Doorbusters, Deals of the Day, cosmetics/fragrances, athletic shoes for him, her & kids, Dallas Cowboys merchandise, gift cards, jewelry trunk shows, New Era, Nike on Field, previous purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special purchases, services. Excludes macys.com. Cannot be combined with any savings pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer except opening a new Macy’s account. EXTRA SAVINGS % APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES. Present this pass at register. Discount valid 8/23/14 only. †ENTER TO WIN: No purchase necessary. One winner per store. Odds of winning depend on the number of entries per store. One entry per customer, please. Employees of Macy’s and their immediate families are not eligible. You need not be present at drawing to win. Any taxes associated with the prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. Prize not transferable or redeemable for cash. Certain restrictions apply. See official rules for details. Official rules, including alternate means of entry, are available at your local Macy’s store. Valid only on 8/23/14. N4070035AC.indd 1

8/18/14 9:20 AM


Northwest A6

|

THE DAILY HERALD

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

|

FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

Court rules against state in health benefits case By Rachel La Corte Associated Press

OLYMPIA — The state Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously upheld a lower court’s ruling that

says that damages to be paid to part-time state employees who were wrongfully denied health benefits must take into account more than actual out-of-pocket costs. The high court’s unanimous ruling sided with a class-action group’s stance on such damages, and it rejected the Washington Health Care Authority’s argument that the state

should only pay for actual costs paid by class members during the time they were denied benefits. “People without health benefits are less likely to seek and obtain medical treatment, especially preventive care,” the opinion, written by Justice Susan Owens, reads. “The State would use this fact as a reason to use a lower estimate of the

damage it caused to the employees to whom it improperly denied health benefits. But those lower short-term medical costs have significant longterm consequences, both medical and financial, to uninsured individuals.” The employees proposed three options to measure the damages due to them: what the state should have paid in health

Convicts get more access to DNA testing

Associated Press

LARRY STEAGALL / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fairly friendly Little cowpoke Reuben Bond, 5, of Poulsbo, pets 9-day-old pygmy goat Ryder held by Susan Drinnon, of Brownsville, at the Kitsap County Fair and Stampede in Bremerton on Wednesday. The other goat is Daisy.

Parks may bring back grizzlies Associated Press

(USPS-181-740) The Daily Herald is published daily by Sound Publishing Inc., 1800 41st Street, Suite 300, Everett, WA 98203. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Herald, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206 Periodicals Postage Paid at Everett, WA and at additional mailing offices. Member of the Associated Press The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for republication of all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches.

SEATTLE — The National Park Service said Thursday it will consider moving grizzly bears into the North Cascade Mountains of Washington state to aid their recovery. The agency is launching a three-year process to study a variety of options for helping their

The Daily Herald Information 425-339-3000 Circulation 425-339-3200 (Out Of Area: 1-800-422-6018) Hours: Monday-Friday 6:00 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday, and Holidays 7:30 am - 11:30 am Classified Advertising 425-339-3100 (Out of Area: 1-800-854-4411) Retail Advertising 425-339-3030 News Department 425-339-3426 Sports 425-339-3470

Delivery Times: Papers are due to homes by 6:00 a.m. Mon.-Fri., 7:30 a.m. Saturdays, Sundays and major holidays. Deadlines are one hour later on Whidbey Island and other outlying areas. Suggested Home Delivery Rates: 7-day delivery: $16.75 monthly billing, $48.75 for 3 months billing, $96.00 for 6 months billing, $186.00 for 12 months billing, $15.00 per month for Easy Pay. 5-day delivery: (Monday-Friday): $15.00 monthly billing, $45.00 for 3 months billing, $90.00 for 6 months billing, $180.00 for 12 months billing, $14.50 per month for Easy Pay. 3-day delivery: (Friday-Sunday): $12.75 monthly billing, $37.50 for 3 months billing, $73.50 for 6 months billing, $144.00 for 12 months billing, $11.50 per month for Easy Pay. Sunday Only delivery: $8.67 monthly billing, $26.00 for 3 months billing, $52.00 for 6 months billing, $104.00 for 12 months billing, $8.25 per month for Easy Pay. Rates are higher in outlying areas. Mail Rates: 7-day delivery: Snohomish, Island and King counties: $36.25/month, $435.00/year. Balance of Washington state, U.S., territories and possessions: $37.00/month, $444.00/year. Active military personnel are entitled to Snohomish Co. rate. Sunday Only delivery: Snohomish, Island and King counties: $14.50/month, $174.00/year. Balance of Washington state, U.S., territories and possessions: $16.75/month, $201.00/year. Prepayment required. Mail subscriptions do not contain advertising inserts. Mail service may not be available to some areas outside the USA. 1098331

See HEALTH, Page A7

Several counties are splitting a bounty of humvees, grenade launchers and armored trucks.

By Gene Johnson Josh O’Connor, Publisher Neal Pattison, Executive Editor Peter Jackson, Editorial Page Editor Pilar Linares, Advertising Director

court held off on ruling on an award because of questions that remained, including about the size of the class. The case now heads back to King County. The high court noted that while they affirmed the King County’s court’s decision to reject the state’s method to measure

Military gear goes to Oregon law officers

Associated Press OLYMPIA — Washington’s Supreme Court is expanding convicts’ access to DNA testing that could prove their innocence. In a 6-3 ruling Thursday, the justices ordered DNA testing for Lindsey Crumpton, who was convicted of repeatedly raping a 75-year-old Bremerton woman in 1993. Crumpton was arrested running near the woman’s house, carrying bedding smeared with blood and jewelry the woman identified as hers. State law says that postconviction DNA tests can be ordered when a convict shows that DNA evidence would more probably than not demonstrate innocence. The question in Crumpton’s case was whether judges should presume that DNA evidence would be favorable to the defendant. The majority reversed two lower courts in saying they should. The three dissenting justices said the law includes no such presumption.

benefits per employee as part of overall compensation; the amount the state saved by failing to provide benefits to the employees; and the amount the state would have paid in healthcare costs for employees as a group had they been covered. The King County Superior Court ruling found in favor of the plaintiffs in December 2012, but the

population. Director Jonathan B. Jarvis said the process is required under federal law but no decision had been made. Native American tribes and conservation groups have pressed for years for the federal government to do more to bring back the bears. “It marks the potential turning point in the decades-long decline of the last grizzly bears

remaining on the U.S. West Coast,” Joe Scott, international conservation director of Conservation Northwest, said in a written statement. “Without recovery efforts, these bears may soon be gone forever.” Federal authorities listed the grizzly bear as threatened in the lower 48 states in 1975 and See BEARS, Page A7

Congratulations August Employee Of The

C D

Month

ongratulations to Dan Frye, Bickford Motors’ August employee of the month.

an has been with Bickford Ford for over 3 years. In his role as one of our lot attendants, he takes care of organizing, displaying and merchandising all of our new and used vehicle inventory.

W

hen Dan is not at work he enjoys spending time with his friends and playing his guitar.

Thank you, Dan! Our People Make the Bickford Difference

SALEM — Oregon law enforcement officers have gotten $10.7 million worth of military gear from the federal government in a program that’s gained prominence as a result of the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. The program donates or lends armored vehicles, rifles, body armor and other equipment to local authorities, The Bulletin newspaper of Bend reported. The weapons are no longer needed for wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and other international conflicts that increasingly rely on automated warfare. The Deschutes County sheriff’s department has gotten an armored truck, four grenade launchers, night vision scopes, rifles and magazine cartridges, and body armor, said Capt. Erik Utter. Much of

the gear, valued at nearly $385,000, is used for a tactical unit formed five years ago, he said. “We know for a fact that the weapons we carry in our vehicles, that citizens in the community have access to those same kinds of weapons,” Utter said. The grenade launchers, he said, are used for smoke and tear gas, not live grenades. The newspaper said a review of the distributions shows the Lane County sheriff’s office has gotten, or gotten approval for, more free equipment than any other agency in the state — $2.2 million worth. Sgt. Carrie Carver, a spokeswoman in Lane County, said there are regular situations in which the department uses its five Humvees, but most of the equipment isn’t used on See GEAR, Page A7

Oregon teen sentenced for torturing his friend By Steven Dubois Associated Press

PORTLAND — An Oregon teenager who carved a swastika into another teen’s forehead as he and others tortured the boy has been sentenced to 11 years in prison. In a Portland courtroom Thursday, 16-year-old Blue Kalmbach told the victim in a barely audible voice that he was “very sincerely sorry.” Kalmbach was the last of four teenagers to be sentenced in the case. “It’s almost impossible to imagine this could happen between friends, but it did,” Multnomah County Judge Jean Kerr Maurer said when accepting Kalmbach’s guilty pleas on kidnapping, robbery and assault charges. Police and prosecutors said the teens spent the evening before the February attack sketching out ideas for torturing the victim. Before Kalmbach carved the swastika with a box-cutter style of knife, they shot the victim with a BB gun, forced him to eat cat feces and hit with him a crow bar and cricket-type bat. The victim, bangs covering his forehead, sat with his mother and girlfriend in court. He did not make a statement or speak with reporters. His mother said

the scar has mostly healed, but her son, who turned 17 on Wednesday, has nightmares. She said he plans to attend an alternative high school this fall and study to become an auto mechanic. “The biggest question I have is: How can anyone do this to another human being?” she said in court. Later, she told reporters her son has yet to forgive Kalmbach, who once was his best friend. “(He’s) still very angry, as I am,” she said. The Associated Press is withholding the mother’s name to avoid identifying the victim. Public defender Casey Kovacic said the case is more complex than what has been reported. He described Kalmbach as a “deeply, deeply depressed kid” who has never fit in. A statement from Kalmbach’s parents said there’s no excuse for what happened, but their son was in and out of therapy before the attack. The victim’s mother, however, has said the bad blood began when a girl broke up with Kalmbach and started dating her son. The violence began when 15-year-old Jenna Montgomery invited the victim to hang out with her. After See TEEN, Page A7

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1015923

Thousands of employees are eligible for damages, attorney says.


The Daily Herald

Friday, 08.22.2014 A7

Health: Workers deserve more than just costs, court says From Page A6

damages, they were not prescribing any means on how to ascribe value to health benefits. “Instead, trial courts have discretion to select

the most appropriate method for calculating damages depending on the facts presented,” the court wrote. Steve Festor, an attorney for the class, said that the next step is that they will

finalize who is in the class and determine the eligible months, and multiply that by the premium that the state should have paid in each case. Festor said that thousands of employees who worked in multiple

state agencies and higher education are eligible. “The decision emphatically tells the State that it cannot profit from unlawfully denying employees health insurance,” Festor wrote in an email to The

Associated Press. “The Supreme Court ruled that the State’s conduct directly resulted in the lost health and longevity of its employees, and the State’s proposed measure of damages would both

understate the damages suffered by the employees and be unworkable.” Officials with the Health Care Authority said they were still reviewing the ruling and would comment later in the day.

Gear From Page A6

a daily basis. The Klamath County Sheriff’s Office received more than $1 million in free equipment. Several departments in Oregon obtained armored vehicles they say are used by tactical units or SWAT teams. Bend Police Chief Jim Porter said his agency got 15 rifles and demilitarized the weapons by changing them from fully automatic to semi-automatic. “It is our philosophy that we do not militarize police officers in routine patrol situations,” he said.

Teen From Page A6

meeting up, they walked to a home and into a backyard shed, where three boys confronted him. When the torture ended, Montgomery walked the victim out to the street and left him there. The victim went to a nearby business for help. Montgomery was sentenced last month to nearly 10 years in custody. Jess Taylor, 17, was sentenced to seven years and nine months. A 14-year-old was sentenced in juvenile court to 10 years at the MacLaren Youth Correctional Facility.

‘‘THIS IS THE ULTIMATE EXPERIENCE.’’ Alex Q. | Real consumer trying the latest from XFINITY®

We went out into the real world to show real people what XFINITY® can do. With the X1 Entertainment Operating System,® you can enjoy TV and Internet together like never before. Plus, you’ll get faster in-home WiFi and more entertainment for less than what you’ll pay with Frontier FiOS. XFINITY. What will you say when you try it?

Bears From Page A6

ultimately designated five areas in Washington, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming to focus on boosting the population. A small population of grizzlies exists in Washington’s Selkirk Mountains, and the park service says the animals have been seen recently in the Cascades north of the Canadian border. But they haven’t been seen in the Washington Cascades in years. Officials have been looking hard, too. In the past three years, they’ve set up “hair-snare” traps that snag samples of a bear’s hair. The traps have produced many samples of black bear hair, as confirmed by DNA tests, but no grizzly hair, said Bob Everitt, northwest Washington regional director of the state Fish and Wildlife Department. In 1997, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service added a chapter on the North Cascades to its grizzly bear recovery plan. The document said that within five years, authorities should evaluate options for recovering bears in the region, which covers a 9,800-square-mile swath of north-central Washington state, including the eastern and western slopes of the Cascades, North Cascades National Park, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest and Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. It suggested that a sustainable grizzly population in the North Cascades might be about 200 to 400 bears. Since that chapter was added, some work has been done to improve conditions for grizzlies in the North Cascades that mainly involved securing garbage to keep bears away from humans, Everitt said.

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A10 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

EVERGREEN STATE FAIR RESULTS 4-H PHOTOGRAPHY Junior Matted Color Photo Grand Champion: Ayla Jensen with “Peacock”; Reserve Grand Champion: Claire Brennan with “Light thru Rock”; Matted Black & White Photo Grand Champion: Elle Springer with “Wishes in the Air”; Reserve Grand Champion: Claire Brennan with “Shadow on the Lake”; Digitally Enhanced Photo Grand Champion: Elle Springer with “Celebration Sparkles”; Reserve Grand Champion: Allyson Pratt with “The Ladies Light”; Overall Grand Champion: Elle Springer with “Wishes in Air” Reserve Overall Grand Champion: Ayla Jensen with “Peacock”; Intermediate Matted Color Photo Grand Champion: Dawson Pratt with “Sacre’ Coeur”; Grand Reserve

Champion: PJ Heusted with “Pike Place Fresh”; Matted Black & Photo Grand Champion: Dawson Pratt with “View from Paradise”; Reserve Grand Champion: Kindred Harvey with “Old Bridge”; Digitally Enhanced Photo Grand Champion: Dawson Pratt with “Ally”; Reserve Grand Champion: Aubrey Springer with “Heart of a Sunflower”; Overall Grand Champion: Dawson Pratt with “View from Paradise”; Reserve Overall Grand Champion: Dawson Pratt with “Ally”; Senior Matted Color Photo Grand Champion: Emmalyn Beede with “Bubble”; Reserve Grand Champion: Emmalyn Beede with “Hyacinth”; Matted Black & White Grand Champion Sarah Bertapelle with “Bored in School”; Reserve Grand

Champion: Angela Kull with “Lion’s Head”; Digitally Enhanced Photo Grand Champion: Sarah Bertapelle with “Plastic Wrapped”; Reserve Grand Champion: Garrett Meyer with” Babbling Brook”;

4-H RABBITS Informational Exhibit (Posters): Juniors Champion: Sarah Kovich, Bothell; Reserve Champion: Kilene Kovich, Maple Valley; Judge’s Choice: Abby Lundy, Brier; Creative Award: Claire Prentice, Woodinville; Special Award: Alexis Maund, Carnation; Intermediates: Champion & Award of Excellence: Melissa Harnden, Snohomish; Reserve Champion: Leslie Ross, Monroe; Judge’s Choice: Kendra Mutch, Duvall; Creative

Award: Andrew Gibson, Monroe; Special Award: Chloe Carpenter, Monroe and Presley Dewald, Bothell; Merit Award: Hannah Bradley, Snohomish; Presley Dewald, Bothell; and Ashton Moody, Snohomish; Seniors: Champion: Kirsten Dovey, Bellevue; Reserve Champion & Creative Award: Shay Stenchever, Sultan; Special Award: Gracelyn Ross, Granite Falls; Arts & Crafts: Juniors Champion: Brandon Becker, Sultan; Reserve Champion: Abby Lundy, Brier; Merit Award: Sarah Kovich, Bothell; Intermediates: Champion & Judge’s Choice: Melissa Harnden, Snohomish; Reserve Champion: Meghan Browne, Everett; Seniors: Champion: Celine Vallieres, Bothell; Reserve Champion: Kendall McIntyre, Lynnwood; Photography: Juniors Champion & Special Award: Sarah Kovich, Bothell; Reserve Champion & Merit Award: Abby Lundy, Brier; Award of Excellence: Brandon Becker. Sultan; Creative Award: Maya Bennett, Redmond; Intermediates: Champion: Presley Dewald, Bothell; Reserve Champion: Rebecca Clayton, Lynnwood; Judge’s Choice: Genevieve Schmidt, Snohomish; Seniors: Champion & Reserve Champion: Nicole Gallagher, Brier; Creative Award: Kendall McIntyre, Lynnwood; Merit Award: Hannah McCaughan, Snohomish; Tanned

Hides: Intermediates: Champion: PJ Heusted, Bothell; Seniors: Champion, Reserve Champion, & Creative Award: Shay Stenchever; Angora Fiber: Champion: Hannah McCaughan, Snohomish;

4H CATS Cage Decoration: Senior Amy Pratt, Class Winner Best of Show, Snohomish: Blake Priestley, Runner Up, Everett; Intermediate Sarah Hallman-Luhn, Class Winner Best of Show, Woodinville; Karli Eldore, Runner Up, Tacoma; Junior Ella Hallman-Luhn, Class Winner, Best in Show, Woodinville; Ella-Kate Pierce Runner Up, Monroe; Informational Posters: Senior Blake Priestley, Class Winner, Best in Show, Everett; Amy Pratt Runner Up, Snohomish; Intermediate Sarah Hallman-Luhn Class Winner, Best in Show, Woodinville; Karli Eldore Runner Up, Tacoma; Junior Ella Hallman-Luhn Class Winner, Best in Show, Woodinville; Hannah Brotherton Runner Up, Granite Falls;

FFA HORSE JUDGING 1st Place Team: Stanwood FFA, 381 points; 2nd Place Team: Snohomish FFA, 380 points; 3rd Place Team: Monroe FFA, 379 points; 1st Place Individual: Keira Foster, Stanwood FFA, 133 points; 2nd Place Individual: Fiona Lyle, 131 points; 3rd Place Individual: Morgan Skoog,

Monroe FFA, 130 points; 4th Place Individual: Tyler Vroman, Snohomish FFA, 129 points; 5th Place Individual: Ryan Hall, Snohomish FFA, 127 points; 6th Place Individual: Haley Fryrear, Stanwood FFA, 126 points; 7th Place Individual: Christian Rutten, Snohomish FFA, 124 points; 8th Place Individual: Natasha Davis, Stanwood FFA, 122 points; 9th Place Individual: Alex Akins, Snohomish FFA, 122 points; 10th Place Individual: Annabelle Colley, Snohomish FFA, 122 points;

OC SEWING & QUILTING Class Winners: Dave Ball Snohomish; Barb Ford Snohomish; Kristin McKinney, Lake Stevens; Sandra Sifferman, Kirkland; Susan Walkup, Bothell; Sheryl DeFreese, Arlington; Melissa Devin, Bothell; Dianna Lynn King, Seattle; Heather Cleveland, Marysville; Lauren Snyder, Snohomish; Connie Berner, Snohomish; Hadley Grant, Monroe; Paige Catlin, Sultan; Hannah Mismas, Snohomish; Natalie Clarke, Kirkland; Tesla Goldstein; Dorothy Moseley, Monroe; Sheryl Hemp, Everett; Cassandra Allen, Arlington; Janet Collier, Camano Island; Donna Eines, Edmonds; Dee Wilcox, Monroe; Delores Stoops, Bothell; Best Of Show Donna Eines, Edmonds; Reserve Best Of Show, Summer Truswell.

Gorge concerts are music to Grant County coffers By Nicholas K. Geranios Associated Press

SPOKANE — Nearly 400,000 people attended concerts at The Gorge Amphitheatre in 2013, generating $4.6 million in state and local taxes, according to an economic study created by the owners as they seek to expand the scenic venue. The Gorge is on a cliff above the Columbia River in rural Grant County, about 140 miles east of Seattle. Despite the remote location, it draws some of the nation’s top musical acts and festivals. On concert days, the 22,000-capacity amphitheater becomes the largest community in the county. ‘The Gorge Amphitheater has become an increasingly valuable cultural and significant economic asset to Grant County and the central Washington region,” said Jeff Trisler, president of Live Nation Northwest, which produced the study. “The jobs created and taxes generated from Gorge concerts are substantial,” Trisler said. “Revenue concerts bring

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to Grant County governments far outweigh any costs incurred by those governments to serve concertgoers during our 20 event days each year.” The Gorge employs about 1,500 people each concert weekend, he said. However, concerts at the venue also strain the resources of local law enforcement agencies and sometimes produce drug arrests and overdoses. Last year, concert attendees left $400,000 in unpaid bills at the nearby Quincy Valley Medical Center. The economic analysis, which covers the 2009 to 2013 concert seasons, was created by former Washington State Revenue Director Donald R. Burrows. It found: Grant County government received $1.5 million in taxes in 2013 and $5.3 million during the past five years. A total of 1.4 million people attended 60 concerts and festivals at the Gorge during the past five years, including 387,732 in 2013. Grant County has about 90,000 residents, and most concert attendees are from outside the county.

Gorge attendees spent a total of $199.6 million in Grant County and in other nearby counties during the five years. The attendees’ 2013 expenditures of $55.8 million were 62 percent higher than the 2009 amount of $34.4 million. The Gorge paid $9.1 million in wages and salaries to more than 1,570 full and part-time employees and contract workers during the five year period. The majority of those workers were residents of Grant County. “We expect our positive economic and fiscal impacts to grow in importance,” said Danny Wilde, general manager of The Gorge, as Live Nation seeks to modernize and expand the facility. The Grant County Planning Department is currently weighing a request from Live Nation for a major expansion of The Gorge. The company wants to add a restaurant, café, cabins, outdoor cinema, grocery and camping stores, more stage space, additional RV spaces and 1,000 more camping sites.

New building to spur research at university Associated Press MOSCOW, Idaho — A new building to be constructed at the University of Idaho is designed to help spark new ideas, according to Professor Holly Wichman. The $49 million building is called the Integrated Research and Innovation Center. “So the plan is to get people from lots of different disciplines rubbing shoulders with each other every day,” Wichman told The Lewiston Tribune. “You need people to rub shoulders and talk about things to get ideas going.” Wichman, a professor in biological sciences, said she believes that type of interaction will lead to more innovative thinking and new ideas. It also will teach students how to work together on a common project or research initiative. Groundbreaking for the 69,000-square-foot building will be Friday morning. UI Vice President for Research Jack McIver said the interdisciplinary concept means several

different people will study large-scale issues that pose problems for Idaho and the region. An example of the type of work to be done at the center is wildfire research, he said. That research could include people who study fire behavior, how fire affects the soil, water and trees and plant life, as well as economists who look at financial impacts of wildfires, McIver said. Topics like urban interface and climate change are also related to wildfires. During his career, McIver said he has seen a trend toward a more interdisciplinary and collaborative approach to addressing large-scale issues. He thinks that’s because people realize that big problems are complicated. The center is being financed primarily through bonds, which will total $44 million of the total project cost. The remaining $5 million will be funded through state aid and money within the university budget.


The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014

Hummingbirds get angry over the wrong food hummingbirds?” Baldwin, who’s visiting Tokyo, said in a statement that explained the research. “If they are missing the single sweet receptor, how are they detecting sugar?” Baldwin, the paper’s first co-author, worked to clone genes for taste receptors from chickens, swifts and hummingbirds to test how the responded to amino acids and proteins to detect sugars. Toda, another first coauthor, mixed chicken and hummingbird taste receptors to see how their functions changed over time. Those are two reasons why the project took so long. Toda discovered that hummingbirds somehow developed 19 mutations over the eons since they diverged from their closest relatives among birds. “Together they showed that in chickens and swifts, the receptor responds strongly to amino acids,” but hummingbirds responded to them weakly, the paper said. Hummingbirds reacted strongly to the sweet stuff, carbohydrates. It is the first time a receptor has been shown to react to carbs, Baldwin said. “If you look at the structure of the receptor, it involved really dramatic changes over its entire surface to accomplish this complex feat,” Liberies said in the statement. “This dramatic change in the evolution of a new behavior is a really powerful example of how you can explain evolution on a molecular level.” They tested their theories outside the lab in the Santa Monica Mountains, where hummingbirds frequent outside Los Angeles, and on the banks of the Charles River in Boston. That’s where the birdfeeders and cameras were set up. Researchers seduced them with sugars full of nectar — glucose, fructose and sucrose, among others. Then they pulled a switch, substituting water and other flavors, such as synthetic sweeteners that flavor soft drinks, then tested how long the birds fed. The research said Anna Hummingbirds slurped at natural sugars and artificial sweeteners for longer periods, but were averse to synthetic sugars. And they wanted nothing to do with water. “They spat out the water, but they siphoned up both the sweet nectar and one artificial sweetener,” however they didn’t go for “aspartame and its ilk,” the statement on the research said.

8am-5pm Monday-Friday 861964 and until noon Saturday Deadlines: 2pm day prior for Tues.-Sat. Pub. By email until noon Sat. for Sun/Mon. Pub. Email: obits@heraldnet.com

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Verna Vera Keyes Ve r n a Ve r a Key e s b o r n Januar y 3, 1929 passed away due to a sudden illness on August 15, 2014. Ver na retired from PUD where she worked for many years. She enjoyed gardening, thrift store shopping and enjoyed going to the casino. She was born in Everett, Wa s h i n g t o n a n d r e s i d e d there for most of her life. Ve r n a w i l l b e g r e a t l y missed by her family, daught e r, K a r e n a n d h u s b a n d , Bob; son-in-law, Her man; grandchildren, Keri, Jeff and Lisa; six great-grandchildren and one great great granddaughter ; her cousin and best friend, Mickey; and sister in law/friend, Maureen; as well as many family and close friends. Per Verna’s wishes, there will be no services.

Wesley was born in Iron River, Michigan on March 9, 1930, and went to be with Jesus on August 16, 2014. After attending local schools through his junior year, the family moved to Edm o n d s , Wa s h . w h e r e h e completed his senior year. He also worked after school on the Edmonds-KingstonPort Ludlow ferry run, working in the galley. In 1951 Wes was drafted into the Army and was stationed for two years in Manheim, Ger many. With his tour of duty completed, he returned to Edmonds, where he met his soon-to-be wife, Norma Betts. Their wedding took place 60 years, plus 10 days at the day of his passing. Soon after marriage, Wes began his sheet metal apprenticeship training. His four years of training prepared him for a successful career in this field, until his retirement in 1988. Hunting season was Wes’ most favorite time of year. Getting all the gear together, and Norma packing the trailer with food and bedding, then, over the pass they would go. We usually had part of the family camping nearby, which made the trip even more fun. 4th of July at our Camano Island cabin was an annual family event for the past 50 years. We enjoyed motor home travel, which included trips with family to Canada for fishing, visiting family and friends in several states, even discovering a relative in New Brunswick! She and Wes are descendants of Norway’s fam o u s c o m p o s e r, E d v a r d Grieg. Wes’ brothers, Lawrence Greig and Ellis ”Bud” Greig are both deceased; as are his sisters, Joyce Greig and Laura Dowell. Wes’ gentle spirit is now in the presence of Jesus. Sur viving is his wife, Norma; daughters, Patti Bunkelman (Jack) and Diane Murdock (Tim); grandchildren, Joshua Lambert, Corin a H u n t e r ( C o r ey ) , C h a d Murdock and Anna Murdock; great-grandchildren, Luke Hunter and Anastasia Lambert. Family will gather for viewing and interment at 9 a.m. August 25, 2014 at Floral Hills cemetery. Following at 11:30 will be a memorial for friends and family, to be held at Atonement Free Lutheran Church, 6905 172nd St. NE, Ar lington, Wash. Luncheon will be served. In lieu of flowers you may donate in Wes’ name, to the building fund or the missionary fund of Atonement Free Lutheran Church.

Bruce Lee Potter 1967-2014

Bruce Lee Potter left us suddenly on August 16, 2014. He will be sadly missed by his sons, Josiah, Anthony and David, all of Everett, and Raymond of Idaho. He leaves behind his parents, Raymond and Eilene Potter of Wyoming. He was the sonin-law to Robert and Leona McGraw of Wyoming; and a loving brother to both Cheryl and Gerald Potter of Everett. Bruce leaves behind many loving aunts, uncles, nieces a n d n e p h e w s ; h i s A PA family, and many friends and co-workers. Bruce will be missed, but never forgotten. A celebration of Bruce’s life will be on Friday, August 22 2014 at 5 p.m. at 9618 Holly Dr., Unit 3, Everett WA 98204

George Walter Pope, Jr. George Walter Pope, Jr. of Lake Stevens, husband of Eleanor; father of Andrea, Audrey, Alison and Ardith; 9 grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren; sister, Helen Brown of Seattle and her family. George peacefully went to be with his maker Jehovah God on August 14, 2014. He was a caring family man and a wonderful husband. All together he was a wonderful man. There will be no services at his request.

To Place an In Memoriam or Obituary, please call Office hours: 8am-5pm Monday-Friday Phone availability: 8am-5pm Monday-Friday and until noon Saturday “Please sign the Deadlines: Guest Book at 2pm day prior for Tues.-Sat. Pub. www.heraldnet.com/ By email until noon Sat. for Sun/Mon. Pub. obituaries” indicates Email:an obits@heraldnet.com that online Guest

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Betty Mae George

May 22, 1964-August 19, 2014 Betty Mae George left us on August 19, 2014 in the early mor ning hour s. She was bor n May 22, 1964 in Leesburg, Virginia. Betty was a beloved daughter, partner, sister and aunt who was an avid history buff having received her Bachelors of Science Degree in History from Arizona State University in 1991. Betty’s passions spanned from h i s t o r y t o t r av e l i n g a n d spor ts of all kinds to her time managing a State Liquor Store. B e t t y wa s p r e c e d e d i n passing by Linda Hardy her partner and true love. S h e i s s u r v i v e d by h e r parents, Allan and Louise George; her sisters, Sandra George and Janet Carrasco; her brother, Mark George; and nieces, Raquel and Rose Carrasco. Betty was loved and will be missed by her immediate and extended family and close friends as well as those who were fortunate to have known her during her brief time with us. Visitation will be Friday, August 22, 2014 from 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. at Evergreen Funeral Home, 4504 B r o a d w a y, E v e r e t t , W A 98203. Graveside Service will be held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, August 23, 2014 at Evergreen Cemetery, Everett, Washington. Memorials may be made to P.A.W.S or Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.

Edward Allen Proudfoot Edward Allen Proudfoot, 85, died Thursday, August 14 at Sisters of Providence Hospital in Everett, Wash. He is sur vived by his six c h i l d r e n , H a r r y A n d r e w, Wendy, Edward Jr., Mary and David. He was married to the late Marthe (Watson) Proudfoot. A private memorial service is planned. He worked on building the reactor for the Nautlilus, the first nuclear powered submarine; testing the heat shields for the Apollo reentry vehicle; and served on the group that investigated the space shuttle Challenger disaster. The family requests donations be made in his name to one of his favorite charities: the Alzheimer’s Association (www.alz.org); C u r e A l z h e i m e r ’s F u n d ( w w w. c u r e a l z . o r g ) ; o r Walking with Jane (www.walkingwithjane.org).

Donald L. Perry Dancin’ Don Perry took the checkered flag on August 5, 2014. He was 86. Don was best known for his 60+ years of involvement in auto racing. He began at Sea-Tac Raceway and Aurora Speedway and worked his way north to Evergreen Speedway where he was instrumental in the development of the 5/8 track that brought Nascar to the Northwest. He was lead flagman at Evergreen through the 60’s and 70’s. He survived getting hit at the track twice and then went on to flag the Nor thwest Nascar Tour. He ended his flagging career at Wenatchee Super Oval, where he loved the fans and he was given the name “Dancin’ Don Perry” and placed in their Hall of Fame. In 2012 he was also inducted into the Monroe Hall of Fame. Don was preceded in death by his wife of 54 years, Virginia and his daughter Candice. He has left his children, Chris Perr y, Vickie Green, and Monica Perry-Strom as well as many grandchildren and great grandchildren to continue the race. Don was a truck driver by trade and worked for Palin Trucking, McCanta Services, Allied Steel and for retirement he put in 26 years at Harris Ford. There will be a Celebration of Don Perry’s life on August 24, 2014. 4-7 p.m. At the Medallion Hotel in Everett Wash. All friends are welcome to attend! Don was a great man who influenced and was loved and admired by many people. His life was truly well lived.

In Loving Memory of

Frank C. Mortenson Jr. January 3, 1927 - August 22, 2013 A year has past since you became our Guardian Angel. We love and miss you so much. Not a day goes by that we don’t think of you. Forever and Always in our hearts. Love, Anne-Marie, Diane, Debi, Frank (Tony) and family.

Janet Marie Williams

Janet Marie Williams was born on June 26, 1956 and Richard Larry died August 1, 2014. Memorial Ser vices to Edwards celebrate her new life will be Richard Larry Edwards, 47, held August 24, 2014 at 3 of Lynnwood, Wash. entered p.m. at the Vineyard, 1315 into Eternal Life on Tuesday, N 1 6 0 S t . i n S h o r e l i n e , Wash. August 19, 2014. A memorial service will be Bonnie Voss held at a later date. Bonnie Voss of Snohomish, Wash. passed away on August 19, 2014. No service dates are currently scheduled.

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Hummingbirds are speedy feeders, with their tongues darting 17 times a second, but they are also fussy eaters, researchers observed. When they slurped water that researchers slipped into feeding stations in place of a sugary substance with nectar, hummingbirds pulled back their beaks, shook their heads as if to say, “What in the world is this garbage?” and spat it out. “These hummingbirds look mad,” said a statement about the research, published Thursday in the journal Science. The paper explores how hummingbirds evolved to prefer nectar when other birds lack the ability to perceive sweetness. Since they diverged from their closest relative, the swift, 40 million to 72 million years ago, hummingbirds have used their rare avian sweet tooth — and a taste for bugs — to expand to 300 species in South and North America. It took an international team of scientists led by Harvard University biologist Maude Baldwin more than three years to answer the sweetness question. Baldwin reached out to Stephen Liberles at the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard’s medical school, and they started researching how hummingbirds developed a taste receptor that wasn’t present in the genome of other birds. Eventually they turned to Yasuka Toda, a graduate student at the University of Tokyo, who developed a way to test taste receptors in cell culture. The research is important because “sensory systems give us a window into the brain to define what we understand about the world around us,” Liberles said. “The taste system is arguably a really direct line to pleasure and aversion, reward and punishment, sweet and bitter. Understanding how neural circuits can encode these ... gives us a window into other aspects of perception.” Before genes were sequenced and studied, scientists assumed what everyone else did: chickens responded to sugar, salt, sourness and bitterness the way mammals do, with sensory functions that recognize savory flavors. Later research showed that chickens had no sweettaste receptor gene. “The immediate question to ornithologists or to anybody who has a birdfeeder in the backyard was: What about

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS

861997

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A11

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Nation & World A12

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FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

Militants sought $132.5M ransom Associated Press WASHINGTON — The beheading of freelance journalist James Foley has forced a new debate between the longtime U.S. and British refusal to negotiate with terrorists, and Europe and the Persian Gulf’s increasing willingness to pay ransoms in a desperate attempt to free citizens. The dilemma: How to save the lives of captives without financing terror groups and encouraging more kidnappings. By paying ransoms, governments in the Mideast and Europe have become some of the biggest financiers of terror

groups. By refusing to do likewise, the U.S. and Great Britain are in the thankless position of putting their own citizens at a disadvantage. Foley’s captors, the Islamic State militants, had for months demanded $132.5 million from his parents and political concessions from Washington. They got neither, and the 40-year-old freelance journalist from New Hampshire was savagely beheaded within the last week inside Syria, where he had been held since his disappearance in November 2012. Extremists called his death a revenge killing for the 90 U.S.

airstrikes, as of Thursday, that have been launched against Islamic State militants in northern Iraq since Aug. 8. But the ransom demands began late last year, even before the Islamic State — one of the world’s most financially thriving extremist groups— had begun its brutal march across much of western and northern Iraq. “They don’t need to do this for money,” said Matthew Levitt, a counter-terror expert at the Washington Institute think-tank. “When you ask for $132 million, for the release of one person, that suggests that you’re either trying to make a point ... or you don’t really

need the money.” A senior Obama administration official said Thursday the Islamic State had made a “range of requests” from the U.S. for Foley’s release, including changes in American policy and posture in the Mideast. At the State Department, deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said the militancy — which controls a swath of land across northern Syria and Iraq — has collected millions of dollars in ransoms so far this year alone. “We do not make concessions to terrorists,” Harf told reporters. “We do not pay ransoms.”

Pentagon ‘looking at all options’ in Iraq By Robert Burns Associated Press

WASHINGTON — U.S. airstrikes have helped Iraqi and Kurdish forces regain their footing in Iraq, but the well-resourced Islamic State militants can be expected to regroup and stage a new offensive, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Thursday. Speaking alongside Hagel at

a Pentagon news conference, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey said that although the Islamic State group can be contained it cannot be defeated without attacking it in Syria. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said this would not necessarily require airstrikes by the U.S., although Hagel appeared to leave open that possibility by telling reporters, “We’re looking at

all options.” Citing the recapture this week of the Mosul Dam that had been in Islamic State militants’ hands, Hagel credited U.S. bombing as well as U.S. arms supplies to Iraqi and Kurdish forces and international humanitarian assistance to the thousands of Iraqis displaced across northern Iraq. “Overall, these operations have stalled ISIL’s momentum

and enabled Iraqi and Kurdish forces to regain their footing and take the initiative,” Hagel said, using an alternate acronym for the Islamic State group that is an outgrowth of al-Qaida. The U.S. has restricted its military action to Iraq, but concerns have increased as the Islamic militant group extends its reach from safe havens in Syria across the Iraqi border.

National So long, Saratoga Guard leaving Ferguson

GAO: Bergdahl swap violated law WASHINGTON — The Pentagon broke the law when it swapped Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, a prisoner in Afghanistan for five years, for five Taliban leaders, congressional investigators said Thursday. The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office said the Defense Department failed to notify the relevant congressional committees at least 30 days in advance of the exchange — a clear violation of the law — and used $988,400 of a wartime account to make the transfer. The GAO also said the Pentagon’s use of funds that hadn’t been expressly appropriated violated the Antideficiency Act.

Move to ease testing worries Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Thursday that states can apply for extra time before they use student test scores to judge teachers’ performance. Duncan’s decision is an acknowledgement of the concerns by teachers unions and others that it’s too early to make teacher personnel decisions based on how well students do on new assessments developed under the Common Core standards that will be used in much of the country this school year. The move affects the more than 40 states and the District of Columbia that have a waiver around stringent parts of the No Left Behind Law. One condition the Obama administration put on obtaining a waiver was the development of a meaningful teacher evaluation system.

Fla.: Ban unconstitutional A federal judge on Thursday declared Florida’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional, joining judges across the country who have sided with gay couples wishing to tie the knot. U.S. District Judge Robert L. Hinkle in Tallahassee ruled that the ban added to Florida’s Constitution by voters in 2008 violates the 14th Amendment’s guarantees of equal protection and due process. Hinkle issued a stay delaying the effect of his order, meaning no marriage licenses will be immediately issued for gay couples. That also means gay couples legally married in other states will not immediately have their marriages recognized in Florida.

By Alan Scher Zagier and Jim Salter Associated Press

FERGUSON, Mo. — Gov. Jay Nixon on Thursday ordered the Missouri National Guard to begin withdrawing from Ferguson, where nightly scenes of unrest have erupted since a white police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old nearly two weeks ago. Since the guard’s arrival Monday, flare-ups in the small section of town that had been the center of unrest have begun to subside. The quietest night was overnight Wednesday into Thursday, when police arrested only a handful of people in the protest zone. “The last two nights have been really good. I feel we’re making progress,” Nixon told KMOX-AM, noting that a state of emergency remained in effect in Ferguson. About 100 people gathered Thursday evening, walking in laps near the spot where Michael Brown was shot. Some were in organized groups, such as clergy members. More signs reflected calls by protesters to remove the white prosecutor from the case. Demonstrations began after the Aug. 9 shooting of Brown, and authorities have arrested at least 163 people in the protest area. Data provided Thursday by St. Louis County showed that while the majority of those arrested are Missourians, just seven live in Ferguson, a St. Louis suburb. The vast majority, 128 people, were cited for failure to disperse. Twenty-one face burglary-related charges. St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch reiterated Thursday that he has no intentions of removing himself from the case, and he urged Nixon to once and for all decide if he will act on calls for McCulloch’s ouster. Some question McCulloch’s ability to be unbiased since his father, mother and other relatives worked for St. Louis police. His father was killed while responding to a call involving a black suspect. Nixon said this week he is not asking McCulloch to recuse himself. But a McCulloch aide, Ed Magee, said the governor “didn’t take an actual position one way or the other.”

ACROSS THE U.S.

Calif.: State to appeal ruling U.S. NAVY

A tug works alongside the decommissioned aircraft carrier USS Saratoga at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island on Thursday before the carrier left for its final journey to a ship recycling plant in Brownsville, Texas, where it will be scrapped.

American Ebola doctor: ‘I am thrilled to be alive’ Associated Press ATLANTA — Calling it a “miraculous day,” an American doctor infected with Ebola left his isolation unit and warmly hugged his doctors and nurses on Thursday, showing the world that he poses no public health threat one month after getting sick with the virus. Dr. Kent Brantly and his fellow medical missionary, Nancy Writebol, who was quietly discharged two days earlier, are still weak but should recover completely, and no one need fear being in contact with them, said Dr. Bruce Ribner, who runs the infectious disease unit at Emory University Hospital. Brantly’s reappearance was festive and celebratory, a stark contrast to his arrival in an ambulance under police escort three weeks earlier, when he shuffled into the hospital wearing a bulky white hazardous materials suit. “I am thrilled to be alive, to be well, and to be reunited with my family,” Brantly said, choking up as he read a written statement. Then he and his wife turned and hugged a parade of doctors and nurses, hugging or shaking hands with each one. For some, it was their first direct contact without protective gear.

JOHN BAZEMORE / ASSOCIATED PRESS

California’s attorney general said Thursday she will appeal a federal court ruling that called the state’s death penalty unconstitutional. The announcement by Attorney General Kamala Harris came after U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney in Los Angeles ruled last month that the state’s death penalty takes too long to carry out. The judge said the unpredictable delay in carrying out executions is unconstitutionally arbitrary and unfair.

AROUND THE WORLD Gaza Strip: Airstrikes kill 3 Hamas commanders Israel stepped up its campaign against Gaza’s ruling Hamas on Thursday, killing three of the group’s senior military commanders in an airstrike that pulverized a four-story home, the second such attack targeting top leaders in two days. The pinpoint predawn attack on Hamas’ inner sanctum was launched minutes after the men emerged from tunnel hideouts, a security official said — displaying the long reach of Israel’s intelligence services. Thursday’s strike in the southern Gaza town of Rafah, coupled with a Cabinet decision to call up 10,000 more reserve soldiers, signaled an escalation in the Israel-Hamas war after Egyptian ceasefire efforts collapsed this week.

Ebola victim Dr. Kent Brantly and his wife, Amber, leave a news conference after Brantly was released from Emory University Hospital in Atlanta on Thursday.

Mexico: Missing people

After Brantly, 33, and Writebol, 59, were infected while working with Ebola victims in Liberia, their charity organizations, Samaritan’s Purse and SIM, reached out to top infectious disease experts for help. Working connections, they obtained one of only five courses available worldwide of an experimental drug known as Zmapp, and Brantly and Writebol split the doses before being evacuated to Atlanta. The other four were later given to a Spanish priest, who died, and three doctors in Africa, who have been improving. Writebol’s son, Jeremy Writebol, of Wichita, spent two weeks at the hospital with her but he left Tuesday morning.

The Mexican government has recalculated the number of people who have disappeared since the start of the country’s drug war in 2006, now saying a total of 22,322 are missing. It had said in May that 8,000 people were missing. Deputy Attorney General Mariana Benitez said Thursday that 12,532 people went missing during the 2006-12 administration of President Felipe Calderon, who declared war on drug traffickers. An additional 9,790 have disappeared since President Enrique Pena Nieto took office on Dec. 1, 2012. Authorities have given conflicting figures on the missing since announcing in February 2013 there was an official list showing 26,000 people unaccounted for. It is unclear how many of the missing were kidnapped or killed by drug gangs, which frequently bury their victims in clandestine graves. From Herald news services

“I haven’t given her a hug yet, I am anxious to do that, but we are waiting for the right time and for her to be able to be with us,” he said in a telephone interview. His mother is able to move around, eat and drink normally. “It is better than what she expected,” he said, adding that his parents are considering their next steps. Brantly didn’t take questions at the news conference, but he did briefly describe how they confronted Ebola in Liberia. He said aid workers had begun “preparing for the worst” after learning of the outbreak in March, and saw their first patient in June. Soon, many more arrived.


Business A13

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM/BUSINESS

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FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

Demand drives Mukilteo firm Electroimpact is expanding its footprint and hiring more employees as it eyes more composite work from Boeing. By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

MUKILTEO — Electroimpact is growing. The Mukilteo-based company is adding a new production building and hiring more workers. Founded in 1986, the company has developed a worldwide reputation for making highly specialized machines for aerospace manufacturing and assembly.

Electroimpact is adding a 29,700-square-foot building to its campus near Paine Field. The foundation is laid, and the prefabricated building should be ready in a few months, said Peter Zieve, the company’s CEO and founder. The building will be used to make giant machines used for making even bigger machines — often airplanes. Electroimpact’s customers include the world’s major

commercial jet makers: Airbus, Boeing, Bombardier and Embraer. It has gotten into the Chinese market with Comac, which is trying to break into the narrow-body jetliner market. For Boeing’s 787, Electroimpact designed a machine to lay carbon-fiber-composite material tape much faster than what was available at the time. The company hopes to make machines for producing the composite material wings on Boeing’s 777X, which will be assembled at the airplane maker’s nearby Everett plant. In February, the Pacific

Northwest Aerospace Alliance chose Electroimpact as its aerospace company of the year. Electroimpact’s growth is in response to “overall demand,” rather than due to a specific project, Zieve said. “The workforce keeps expanding,” he said. Earlier this year, the company had about 600 employees, and it should be at roughly 700 by the end of the year, he said. Most are in Mukilteo. The company also has about 120 workers in the United Kingdom and a handful of employees scattered across the globe.

Wealth gap grew in the last decade

See WEALTH, Page A14

Facebook sued for false profile PHOTO COURTESY BOEING CO.

A KC-46 tanker is shown on the production line at Boeing’s Everett plant in January. Jim Eisenhart, a top Boeing executive for the KC-46 program, will address the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance’s conference Oct. 8.

Aerospace conference to draw key industry players By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

The speakers lineup for the Pacific Northwest Aerospace Alliance’s Defense, Space & Security Conference this fall in Seattle include executives from two of three companies competing to ferry NASA astronauts and supplies to the International Space Station. The Oct. 8 conference’s keynote speaker is Mark Sirangelo of Sierra Nevada Corp.’s Space Systems. Sierra Nevada Corp. is vying with the Boeing Co. and SpaceX

A

biz bits

Fewer people applied for U.S. unemployment benefits last week, another sign the job market is improving. The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly claims for jobless aid fell 14,000 last week to a seasonally adjusted 298,000. The prior week’s figures were revised up slightly to 311,000. The less-volatile four-week average rose 4,750 to 300,750. It remains close to levels that predate the Great Recession of 2007-2009. Applications are a proxy for layoffs. “Readings at or below the (300,000) mark are extremely rare in an historical context,” Robert Kavcic, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, wrote in a note to clients.

A fourth straight monthly increase in sales of existing homes provided the latest evidence Thursday that the housing market is rebounding from a weak start to the year. Sales of existing homes rose 2.4 percent in July to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.15 million, the National Association of Realtors said. That was the highest annual rate since September of last year.

for NASA contracts to provide reliable transportation to the space station and to put objects into low Earth orbit. Brandon Pearce of SpaceX will also be speaking at the conference in Seattle. NASA ended the space shuttle program in 2011 and has been paying Russia’s space program for rides since. The federal agency is expected to award one or more contracts by the end of the year. “Mark Sirangelo’s participation demonstrates the caliber of information attendees can expect to hear at this conference,” said PNAA Executive Director

Bob Uptagrafft. Conference speakers will talk about new business opportunities and challenges created by defense budget cuts and extended service time for legacy aircraft. Other topics to be covered during the one-day event include defense, space and drone market trends, new supply chain opportunities, and cyber security issues. “As governments around the globe reconfigure budgets to match new defense and security postures and new factors threaten See CONFERENCE, Page A14

NCAA begins to admit it employs athletes s befits a higher education organization, the National College Athletic Association knows its English literature. Although there is no official acknowledgement of it, the governing body’s most recent edict clearly owes a debt to George Orwell’s “Animal Farm”: All colleges are equal, but some colleges are more equal than others. In the NCAA’s Division I, there are 350 colleges and universities. The new rules apply to 65 of them: the ones with the most sports money. The new rules will apply to the five largest conferences: the

Applications for unemployment drop to 298,000

Housing market continues to shine

Associated Press A report from the Census Bureau is the latest evidence that the rich are getting richer while the poor get poorer. The study released Thursday divided the U.S. into five groups, from wealthiest to poorest. The median net worth of the richest households rose 11 percent between 2000 and 2011, to $630,754. The next-wealthiest group’s net worth also rose. But because wealth dropped for the majority of Americans, the median household net worth for the country overall declined about 7 percent to $68,828. A rebound in the stock market and rising home values after the housing bust helped richer Americans regain their wealth since the recession, which began in December 2007 and ended in June 2009. But the bottom 20 percent owed more than they had and were worse off in 2011 than they were in 2000. In 2011, the median net worth of the poorest Americans was negative $6,029, compared with negative $905 a decade before. There was also disparity between races and ages. The median net worth for whites, overall, rose between 2000 and 2011, but fell for black and Hispanic Americans, the Census Bureau said. For those under 55 years old, median net worth fell. Median net worth rose for people 65 and older, while there was almost no change for those

BRIEFLY

JAMES McCUSKER ACC, Big 10, SEC, Big 12, Pac 12, and also to Notre Dame. These are the schools with the athletic programs that bring in the most money and supply most of the key manpower needs of the National Football League and the

Heather L. Fitzpatrick, CPA and a chartered global management accountant, is the new executive chairwoman for the Washington Society of Certified Public Accountants’ Board of Directors for fiscal year 2015. Fitzpatrick is president and CEO of MarketFitz Inc., a management consulting company based in Edmonds.

National Basketball Association. It is not clear whether the NCAA is leading or following in this latest move, but the smart money is on following. Recent court rulings have established the right of college football players to form a labor union as well as the right of college athletes to share in monies derived from the use of their names, images or likenesses in marketing — possibly including radio and TV broadcasts. Like it or not, it looks like the day of amateur college athletics and the ideal of the “scholar athlete” is coming to an end. The remains of the tradition will carry

Dr. Shawn West has joined Premera in Mountlake Terrace as the medical director of provider engagement. West comes from Coordinated Care, where he served as chief medical director. In his new role, he will work closely with healthcare providers to improve quality for members. West is a graduate of the University of Washington

School of Medicine. According to a quarterly report released by the Washington State Department of Revenue, the state’s taxable retail sales totals grew to $27.3 billion in the first quarter of 2014, recording a 4.9 percent increase over the same period in 2013. Retail

on, but its light will shine in the smaller schools where competitive sports remain as part of the “whole person” concept of higher education. There are many who say that amateur athletics was a sham anyway and will not be missed; that the old system, with its increasingly Byzantine rules — for college athletes, parents of athletes, coaches, tutors, staffers, agents, and even fans — invited and even encouraged cheating and corruption. They are not wrong. The old See MCCUSKER, Page A14

trade, a subset of total taxable retail sales, rose 2.4 percent to $12.3 billion. Biz Bits runs Monday through Saturday. Send your business news and high-resolution photos to businessnews@heraldnet.com. We post the complete list online every Monday at HeraldNet. com/bizblog.

A Texas woman has filed a $123 million lawsuit contending that Facebook failed to remove a false profile of her created by a former friend who superimposed her face over pornographic images. Meryem Ali in a revised suit filed this week in district court in Houston claims the former friend then invited Ali’s friends and family to visit the profile page. The lawsuit says the “revenge porn” case caused Ali “significant trauma” and “extreme humiliation.” She claims Facebook over many months failed to act on repeated requests to have the page deleted. The company did eventually remove the page. The suit says damages being sought represent 10 cents on the dollar for each of the 1.23 billion Facebook users. Facebook media representatives did not immediately comment on the claims.

Gap reports higher profit, plans to expand Gap Inc. said its profit rose 10 percent in the second quarter as the clothing retailer cut expenses and managed to lift sales. The San Franciscobased company also said it plans to open Gap stores in India next year. The first locations will open in the country’s two largest cities, Mumbai and Delhi. Over time, the company expects about 40 franchise-operated locations in India. For the quarter, Gap said sales at established stores globally were flat. The performance reflected a 5 percent decline at Gap, flat sales at Banana Republic, and growth of 4 percent at Old Navy. That measurement is a key indicator because it strips out the volatility of newly opened and closed locations. Operating and marketing expenses were lower in the quarter. From Herald news services

Amazon . . . . 332.91 -2.87 Boeing . . . . . 127.50 0.15 Costco . . . . . 121.62 0.71 Crane . . . . . . . 71.27 0.32 FrontierCom . . 6.64 0.03 HeritageFin . 16.51 0.10 Microsoft . . . 45.22 0.27 Nordstrom . . 68.93 0.54 Starbucks . . . 77.47 -0.56 WshFederal . . 21.59 0.26 Zumiez . . . . . . 31.95 0.96 Market report, A14


Market Report THE DAILY HERALD

THE DAY ON WALL STREET The stock market advanced for a fourth straight day Thursday, pushing the Standard & Poor's 500 index to a record high. Investors were encouraged by news that the number of people seeking unemployment benefits remains at a multi-year low. HewlettPackard rose after delivering better results, while Sears plunged after reporting that its loss doubled from a year ago. HP was the biggest gainer in the S&P 500. The technology giant rose $1.88 to $37 after reporting betterthan-expected results and its first sales increase in nearly three years. — Associated Press

INTEREST RATES Last 3.25 0.75 .00-.25 0.02 0.05 1.63 2.41 3.19 0.23

Prime Discount Federal Funds Treasury 3 month Treasury 6 month Treasury 5 year Treasury 10 year Treasury 30 year Libor 3-month

CURRENCY Australia Britain Canada China Denmark Euro Hong Kong India Indonesia Israel Japan Malaysia Mexico New Zealand Norway Philippines Russia

Previous 3.25 0.75 .00-.25 0.04 0.05 1.63 2.43 3.22 0.23

U.S. dollar buys

Foreign buys

1.0750 .6029 1.0945 6.1533 5.6136 .7530 7.7501 60.525 11714.00 3.5256 103.80 3.1720 13.0985 1.1897 6.1481 43.84 36.0206

.9302 1.6586 .9136 .1625 .1781 1.3281 .1290 .0165 .000085 .2836 .009634 .3153 .076345 .8405 .1627 .0228 .0278

COMMODITIES Unleaded gas (gal) Crude oil (bbl) Natural gas (mm btu) Heating oil (gal) Copper (lb) Gold (oz) Platinum (oz) Silver (oz) Cattle (lb) Coffee (lb) Orange juice (lb) Corn (bu) Cotton (lb) Lumber (1,000 brd ft) Ethanol (gal) Soybeans (bu) Wheat (bu)

Last 2.75 93.96 3.89 2.84 3.17 1273.70 1419.30 19.39 1.50 1.84 1.46 3.62 .67 355.60 2.14 11.36 5.46

Previous 2.71 96.07 3.82 2.83 3.17 1293.40 1429.20 19.47 1.49 1.84 1.46 3.60 .65 355.00 2.13 11.20 5.40

to affect international space programs, supply chain opportunities are changing rapidly,” said Melanie Jordan, PNAA’s chief operating officer. “PNAA is assembling an unrivaled lineup of industry experts to explain how these changes will impact regional businesses,” she said. Jim Eisenhart, a top executive for Boeing’s KC-46 program, will also take the stage. Other speakers include

Wealth From Page A13

between 55 and 64. The report was compiled using surveys done by the Census. It

Last

Chg

%Chg

17,039.49 8,428.57 10,982.83 4,532.10 1,992.37 1,427.04 21,084.51 1,160.03

+60.36 -32.40 +33.35 +5.62 +5.86 +2.35 +52.96 +2.52

+.36 -.38 +.30 +.12 +.29 +.16 +.25 +.22

+2.79 +13.89 +5.60 +8.51 +7.79 +6.29 +7.00 -.31

Last

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Chg

BkofAm S&P500ETF MktVGold HewlettP SPDR Fncl

1648166 16.16 +.64 588566 199.50 +.58 414441 26.07 -.59 388935 37.00 +1.88 351871 23.20 +.27

Name

Vol (00)

ChinaGreen Globant n DrxGldBear Evogene n TCF Fn wt

Last

15886 2.42 +.19 2855 12.45 +.88 1 41.36 +2.92 46 13.95 +.95 7 2.66 +.18

Most Active ($1 or more)

Vol (00)

RexAmRes Autohme n StageStrs 58.com n DxGldBull

Last

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

eBay Intel ChiFnOnl Apple Inc s SiriusXM

502341 55.89 +2.49 368252 35.15 +.65 342221 9.74 +.57 326234 100.58 +.01 235135 3.58 +.01

Chg

Name

Vol (00)

HeatBiolog EveryWr h DigitalAlly ChinaHGS ChiMobGm

4262 12830 18271 52420 52049

Last

Chg

92.07 -10.26 43.66 -3.83 17.03 -1.47 46.73 -3.86 43.04 -3.01

Last

Losers ($2 or more) Chg

13609 5.30 +1.16 37491 2.56 +.50 72530 7.01 +1.22 15249 5.60 +.90 16420 18.48 +2.59

Name

Vol (00)

KindredB n BostPrv wt T2 Biosys n VillB&T rs Kirklands

17469 16 1742 1 7605

Last

Chg

10.21 5.75 20.43 25.06 17.30

-4.00 -.79 -2.54 -2.63 -1.68

AMEX Most Active ($1 or more) Name

AmpioPhm NwGold g CheniereEn Globalstar B2gold g

Vol (00)

Last

Gainers ($2 or more) Chg

62405 5.66 -1.80 33686 6.18 -.17 23436 75.23 +.38 21826 4.02 ... 20373 2.53 -.01

Name

Name 22ndCentry InovioPh rs LiberMed DakotaPlns TrioTch

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg

Name

6084 3.26 16507 10.58 5537 2.86 341 2.25 48 4.07

+.29 +.65 +.17 +.11 +.15

AmpioPhm Tofutti Richmnt g EnviroStr SupDrill n

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

62405 993 5475 85 351

5.66 3.90 2.35 2.32 5.92

-1.80 -.58 -.14 -.12 -.26

25 BIGGEST MUTUAL FUNDS Total Assets Return%

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRt Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx Vanguard Instl Fds: InsPl Vanguard Instl Fds: TSInst Fidelity Invest: Contra American Funds A: IncoA p American Funds A: GwthA p American Funds A: CapIBA p Dodge&Cox: IntlStk Vanguard Admiral: WelltnAdm Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: ICAA p American Funds A: CapWGA p Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncomA p American Funds A: WshA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotlIntl Harbor Funds: Intl r American Funds A: BalA p Vanguard Admiral: TtlBAdml American Funds A: FdInvA p Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv Price Funds: Growth

OBJ

($Mlns)

4-wk

12-mo

IB XC SP XC SP SP XC LG BL LG BL IL BL LV LC GL BL LC IL IL BL IB LC SP LG

143,967 112,558 107,249 98,233 94,348 80,970 80,240 74,560 71,290 71,285 69,220 63,125 60,122 57,247 56,927 56,797 54,831 50,528 50,375 45,065 44,358 42,372 42,359 41,740 37,589

+0.6 +0.5 +0.4 +0.5 +0.4 +0.4 +0.5 +0.9 -0.1 +0.4 -0.3 -1.1 -0.3 -0.1 +0.5 -0.6 0.0 +0.2 -1.4 -2.4 +0.4 +0.6 +0.3 +0.4 +1.1

+6.4 +23.0 +23.8 +23.1 +23.8 +23.8 +23.2 +23.4 +17.5 +23.7 +15.9 +23.4 +16.6 +25.1 +25.3 +19.2 +17.6 +21.9 +16.7 +10.7 +17.6 +6.0 +22.7 +23.8 +26.4

5-year

+32.9 +117.8 +115.4 +119.1 +115.5 +115.7 +119.2 +118.9 +84.6 +102.5 +64.9 +71.9 +79.3 +120.9 +100.8 +71.6 +82.2 +113.5 +47.3 +58.3 +85.5 +24.6 +102.4 +115.2 +129.5

Load

Minimum investment

NL 1,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 10,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 200,000,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 2,500 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 50,000 NL 2,500 5.75 250 5.75 250 4.25 1,000 5.75 250 NL 3,000 NL 50,000 5.75 250 NL 10,000 5.75 250 NL 10,000 NL 2,500

G = Growth. GI = Growth & Income. SS = Single-state Muni. MP = Mixed Portfolio. GG = General US Govt. EI = Equity Income. SC = Small Co Growth. A = Cap Appreciation. IL = International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Initial Investment: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence.

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1051862

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NASDAQ

1098061

Call:(800)650-1879

+13.87 +30.22 +16.52 +24.55 +20.24 +17.38 +19.66 +11.95

Losers ($2 or more) Chg

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A14

NORTHWEST STOCKS NAME

TICKER

YTD

52-WK LOW

AlaskaAir s Amazon Avista BallardPw BarrettB Boeing ColBnkg ColSprtw ConcurTch ConocoPhil Costco CraftBrew Cray Inc Data IO ElectSci Esterline ExpdIntl FEI Co FLIR Sys HrtgeFn Idacorp Itron KeyTech KeyTrn Lattice LithiaMot LaPac MentorGr MicronT Microsoft Microvisn Nautilus NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG NwstPipe Outerwall Paccar Penford PlumCrk PopeRes PrecCastpt RadiSys RealNetwk Rntrak SareptaTh SeattGen Starbucks TTM Tch TmbrlndBc TriQuint US Bancrp VerizonCm WashFed Weyerhsr Zumiez

ALK AMZN AVA BLDP BBSI BA COLB COLM CNQR COP COST BREW CRAY DAIO ESIO ESL EXPD FEIC FLIR HFWA IDA ITRI KTEC KTCC LSCC LAD LPX MENT MU MSFT MVIS NLS NKE JWN NWN NWPX OUTR PCAR PENX PCL POPE PCP RSYS RNWK RENT SRPT SGEN SBUX TTMI TSBK TQNT USB VZ WAFD WY ZUMZ

+25.5 -16.5 +13.7 +148.2 -35.7 -6.6 -5.4 -.4 -2.8 +14.6 +2.2 -20.8 -1.6 +21.8 -33.1 +15.4 -7.3 -6.4 +12.5 -3.5 +7.9 -.1 -8.8 +1.4 +33.9 +24.8 -22.0 -11.0 +52.6 +20.9 +57.6 +45.4 +.4 +11.5 +4.8 -4.3 -8.3 +7.0 +1.2 -11.3 +.2 -9.5 +29.3 +2.8 +28.0 +5.5 +6.5 -1.2 -12.4 +10.8 +134.9 +4.4 -.5 -7.3 +8.9 +22.9

28.04 279.33 25.55 1.25 41.96 102.57 23.17 55.58 74.43 62.74 109.50 9.63 21.30 2.16 5.96 74.81 38.42 75.32 27.91 14.86 45.62 32.30 10.75 9.60 4.17 53.57 12.71 19.14 13.05 30.95 1.03 6.16 62.60 54.90 39.96 28.15 46.25 53.07 10.71 40.24 60.07 210.79 2.02 6.83 21.60 12.12 32.35 67.93 7.24 8.20 6.80 35.69 45.08 19.53 26.64 20.68

52-WK HIGH

50.49 408.06 33.60 8.38 102.20 144.57 30.36 89.96 130.39 87.09 126.12 18.70 42.09 3.48 12.33 122.52 46.90 111.57 37.42 18.64 58.79 46.09 15.40 11.93 9.19 97.20 18.96 24.31 34.85 45.71 3.38 12.43 80.26 70.71 47.50 41.43 74.30 68.81 15.18 50.08 71.00 275.09 4.59 8.95 69.00 55.61 55.99 82.50 10.91 11.83 19.93 43.92 53.66 24.53 34.15 31.18

DIV

LAST

CHANGE

.50 ... 1.27 ... .72 2.92 .56f 1.12 ... 2.92f 1.42 ... ... ... .32 ... .64f 1.00f .40 .36f 1.72 ... ... ... ... .64 ... .20 ... 1.12 ... ... .96 1.32 1.84 ... ... .88 ... 1.76 2.60 .12 ... ... ... ... ... 1.04 ... .20f ... .98f 2.12 .44f 1.16f ...

46.03 332.91 32.05 3.76 59.60 127.50 26.00 78.42 100.29 80.98 121.62 13.01 27.01 3.13 7.00 117.62 41.04 83.66 33.87 16.51 55.91 41.38 13.07 11.17 7.35 86.61 14.43 21.43 33.19 45.22 2.08 12.26 78.94 68.93 44.89 36.14 61.66 63.31 13.00 41.24 67.11 243.85 2.96 7.76 48.50 21.49 42.50 77.47 7.52 10.66 19.59 42.19 48.87 21.59 34.38 31.95

-1.11 -2.87 +.08 -.11 +.17 +.15 +.47 -.37 -.20 +.48 +.71 -.11 +.35 +.07 +.22 +1.29 -.19 -.37 -.13 +.10 +.31 +.09 +.07 -.21 +.06 -1.78 -.11 +.20 -.11 +.27 -.02 +.36 +.03 +.54 +.20 +.28 -.21 -.99 +.53 -.08 -.35 +.14 +.06 +.03 -.74 -.23 -.49 -.56 +.09 ... -.01 +.48 +.05 +.26 +.28 +.96

BofA settlement can have tax implications The Washington Post WASHINGTON — The $17 billion settlement that Bank of America reached with the Department of Justice on Thursday sets aside billions in aid for some troubled homeowners. But those that accept the help could get hit with a hefty tax bill later. As part of the settlement, the bank agreed to spend $7 billion on helping homeowners and their communities, some of which would be used to lower the mortgage balances of certain borrowers who owe more than their homes are worth. The problem is that some of these “underwater” borrowers might have to pay taxes on the debt that’s forgiven.

In 2007, Congress adopted a law that spared homeowners from being taxed on the amount of the loan that was written off. But that tax break expired in December, and now that kind of relief can be counted as income by the IRS. In negotiating the deal, the Justice Department recognized that many of the borrowers it was trying to reach would be in no position to accept the help if doing so would lead to a huge tax bill. “That’s why the Department secured a commitment from Bank of America to pay a portion of the settlement — over $490 million — to defray some of this tax liability,” U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement

McCusker From Page A13

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Janicki Industries head John Janicki; Cascade Aerospace CEO Benjamin Boehm; and Planetary Resources Vice President of Space Development Chris Voorhees. Michel Merluzeau, aerospace analyst and G2 Solutions CEO, and Alex Pietsch, the state’s top aerospace adviser, will also speak. The conference runs from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 8 at the Museum of Flight in Seattle. For more information, go to the PNAA’s website: pnaa.net.

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system, which will still apply to the majority of schools, is difficult to enforce, especially when the commitment to the amateur athletics and scholar athletes is weakened by daily combat with economic opportunity and demands. They might add that the new system is at least honest in recognizing economic reality: The big-money sports programs at these 65 schools are different from the cost-center sports programs at the rest of America’s higher education institutions. The new rules simply begin to cut the athletes in on the action. It’s not clear that economics is the villain in this story. After all, the 65 schools (the “LXV” schools in the Latin of classics and Super Bowls) include

some of the top academic universities in the country — in spite of running sports programs that are often look-alikes of professional franchises. While the new NCAA rules did not create all of the problems besetting the college athletics’ relationship with its academic parent they will legitimize them, which is an issue in its own right. Defining students playing sports as employees, for example, would not by itself present an insuperable problem for a university to absorb. It isn’t even unprecedented. Colleges and universities have a long history of offering employment to students. Libraries, dining halls, dormitories and other facilities were staffed in part by student-workers. The difference, though, is that defining incoming

announcing the deal. The Bank of America settlement includes a program that would reduce the size of a borrower’s mortgage so that the loan amounts to 75 percent of the value of the home, and the interest rate would be permanently set at 2 percent. Such “principal reductions” are considered one of the most effective ways to help underwater borrowers. Associate Attorney General Tony West offered an example of how that would work for a homeowner who owes $250,000 on a house that’s worth only $150,000. Under the plan, the balance of the mortgage would be reduced to about $112,000. But the roughly $137,000 forgiven could be a tax liability.

To help pay such liabilities, the settlement has a 25/25 Tax Relief Fund. Once the mortgage debt is forgiven, 25 percent of the value of that relief will be made available to help offset any tax liability for the borrower, up to $25,000, West said. “Now, this will help tens of thousands of consumers to offset, at least in part, any taxes that result from consumer relief they receive as a result of this settlement,” West said. “But it’s only a temporary fix; the fund isn’t large enough to cover every potentially affected consumer, which is why the best solution to this problem is for Congress to heed the attorney general’s call to extend the tax relief coverage.”

athletes as employees will further isolate them from the rest of the student body and, in fact, from the rest of the university. It will clarify beyond doubt that they are there to play football, basketball, or some other sport. That is their job. Employee status will also encourage the “one and done” approach in college athletics, where the most proficient athletes complete a year of playing basketball for a university, then declare eligibility for the NBA draft. This prompts some schools to recruit academically deficient athletes whose skills give the school a shot at a championship, providing an academic path that will enable the student to join the professional ranks virtually untouched by anything resembling higher education. Some of the 65 have been resisting, more or less successfully, the forces that are driving a wedge

between athletes and scholars. These schools still see the “scholar-athlete” as an admirable and achievable goal. We can expect them to absorb these new rules and continue their programs as they are, but they will undoubtedly find it increasingly difficult to recruit players and compete in the new semiprofessional leagues that are being created. The NCAA’s new rules are not all bad; recognizing economic reality is generally a good idea. Recognizing, accurately, that top-level college sports are really part of the lucrative entertainment industry, though, brings some obvious conflicts with our ideas and ideals of what a college or university is all about. We should think about that. James McCusker is a Bothell economist, educator and consultant. He also writes a monthly column for The Herald Business Journal.


Opinion A15

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM/OPINION

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Editorial Board Josh O’Connor, Publisher Peter Jackson, Editorial Page Editor Neal Pattison, Executive Editor Jon Bauer, News Editor/Content

FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

IN OUR VIEW | See you in Monroe

An Evergreen fair to remember No need to ballyhoo: The Evergreen State Fair already is the big kahuna, the harbinger of a new school year, the prelude to autumn and, as Fairgrounds Manager Hal Gausman notes, the “county’s biggest party.” Unlike traditions that seem preserved in amber (insert lyrics from “The Music Man” here), the fair tracks with the times, as relevant as it is fun. This extends not only to the programming, but to fundamentals such as recycling and composting. As The Herald’s Amy Nile reports, the 12-day shindig draws 340,000 visitors. Snohomish County spends about $2.5 million to sponsor the annual event. Admission

is $10 for adults and $7 for seniors and youth. Those age 5 and younger and 90(!) and older wriggle in free. The gumming of U.S. 2 traffic fuels the one grumpyman whine. Someone should conjure a Monroe version of the old Everett-ism concerning pulp mills: Smells like jobs is now “bumper-to-bumper spells money.” Thursday, opening day of the 106th annual Evergreen State Fair, featured the 4-H Cats Costume Contest, a bipartisan favorite (witness political candidates admiring tabbies dressed as ballerinas) and Frontierland’s Great American Petting Zoo. The latter, a perennial favorite, scalds the minds of

all four-year olds who’ve ever had their shirttails chewed by goats. Today’s Sky Valley Stock and Antique Tractor display (near the dairy barn) is always cool, especially seeing their pristine condition. Steve the Pretty Good comedy magic show at the Courtyard Stage at 12:45 p.m. today is, by all accounts, pretty good. There’s an element of nostalgia, true enough. As songwriter Neal Young crooned, “It’s so noisy at the fair/But all your friends are there/And the candy floss you had/And your mother and your dad.” The rides are kid-centric while the food options

(gluten-free grub) are oriented to the middle-aged set. New for the 2014 fair is the “Freak Out,” Nile reports. It swings riders up to 40 feet over the midway as their seats rotate (Note: Don’t pig out pre-Freak Out.) There’s also a highspeed roller coaster called the “Zillerator.” Marquee acts this year include Bill Cosby, The Charlie Daniels Band, Chris Young, the Newsboys and Emblem3. Go and go soon. As Neal Young observed, “Oh to live on Sugar Mountain/With the barkers and the colored balloons/You can’t be twenty on Sugar Mountain/ Though you’re thinking that you’re leaving there too soon/ You’re leaving there too soon.”

paid in part by the industries that use them. Which it is, via taxation and corporate fees. The writer seems to believe that only users of the service should have to pay for them. To that I say: If you yield a benefit from these services then you are using them. In the case of Seattle and public transportation, I am sure that there are far less cars on the road due to heavy use of the bus and train system and therefore reducing traffic congestion. I would certainly call that a benefit. The idea of pay-for-use is a bad libertarian concept and needs to be stamped out as it is detrimental to a civilized and productive society.

1 second? One and a half? Perhaps less? Probably less! Not very long! Please grow up and don’t second guess the situation until all the story is out. To the news media. Really? You are partially responsible for the riots happening for so long. You be more responsible with your reporting. I am ashamed of you all.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ■■SNOHOMISH COUNTY

Comment now on 20-year plan

I remember when Snohomish County first updated our Comprehensive Plan — our blueprint for where and how we were going to grow over the next 20 years. There were lots of opportunities for our neighbors to weigh in, scattered throughout the county, even before the official public hearings held by the planning commission and Snohomish County Council. By reaching out to the public ahead of the hearings, residents were able to first learn about the changes being proposed, find out if their neighborhood would be affected, voice concerns, ask questions and become educated. The county empowered our neighbors to have a more effective voice. Now, 10 years later, the county is preparing to again update our 20-year vision. Unfortunately, our neighbors won’t be empowered — and many probably don’t even know it’s underway. Disturbingly, since May, the only opportunity for the public to really understand the changes being proposed for the next update to the Comprehensive Plan were done in planning commission study sessions — with no opportunity for public input or questions. Moving forward there are limited opportunities to be engaged. The only planned public outreach and education opportunities are an open house briefing on Sept. 9, a public hearing on Oct. 7, and the Draft Environmental Impact Statement 30-day comment period starting at its release on Sept. 8. This update plans for more growth and development through the year 2035! So much is changing in our communities — and we have tremendous opportunities to make sure we grow jobs and affordable housing near transit. But we can only seize this opportunity if the public knows what’s up for consideration. To learn more visit the county’s webpage at http://2015update-snoco.org/. Kristin Kelly Snohomish Program Director, Futurewise Smart Growth director, Pilchuck Audubon Society Snohomish

■■PUBLIC SERVICES

Picking taxes to pay won’t work Regarding the letter “Those who use rail should pay for upgrades”: The writer seems to fully favor a “pay per use” type of system for public services. I would like to look at other services this kind of

Have your say Include your name, address and daytime phone number. Send it to: E-mail: letters@heraldnet.com Mail: Letters section The The Daily Herald P.O. Box 930 Everett, WA 98206 Have a question about letters? Call Carol MacPherson at 425-339-3472.

system could provide. Public safety: I have never used nor do I plan to use the publicly funded fire department, so I would like my portion of the property taxes I have paid to be refunded to me. I would like to only pay for the services of law enforcement as I need them. It would likely be much easier to pay a couple hundred dollars whenever I need to call them on loud and obnoxious neighbors having a pre-Fourth of July party. That would be so much better than having them sitting around just sucking up tax dollars. Public transportation: Since I have never taken a bus or train in my life, why not give me all these years of taxes back? I am sure the poor that rely on these services are more than willing to pay more for the privilege of riding the bus. There is no way that could ever cause an issue, unless one frequents a business whose employees use public transportation as their sole means of getting to and from work. Can I stop paying for roads and infrastructure in areas I will never visit? It is highly unlikely I will ever make it to Pasco, so I should not have to pay to keep their roads intact. If I ever do go there, I will just complain about how these places never keep their roads in good condition. Sarcasm aside, I agree that some of the bill for the upgrades to commercially used infrastructure should be

Robert Ray Granite Falls

■■FERGUSON CRISIS

Media fans fire, speculation The riots in Missouri. I am amazed at the response of people there. This very large, so-called man, the 18-year-old, 290pound individual in the video inside the convenience store stealing an inexpensive item intimidates the person he is robbing. Leaves the store. Proceeds down the middle of the road and is stopped by a police officer. For walking down the road blocking traffic. The officer apparently not knowing what the individual may have just done moments before. The man gets belligerent and uncooperative. Perhaps because the man knows what he has just done. While the whole story of what happened next has not been disclosed, let’s speculate. The large man goes for the officer’s gun or comes at the officer in a physically threatening manner. What might you do? The family’s medical report says he was shot six times. If you are in a bit of a stressful situation how long does it take to fire six times from a semi-automatic hand gun? What, perhaps

Norman Moss Snohomish

■■SENIOR CENTER

Built with public, private, funding In reply to Bernice Wright’s letter, “Senior Center built privately”: I stand by my statement, “the senior center was built with taxpayer dollars.” A statement from the city says: “The City of Snohomish is proud to participate financially in the community’s successful construction and operation of the award-winning Senior Center on Fourth Street. “Financial support includes over $350,000 in development cost and $1.5 million in ongoing subsidies. The city paid $136,000 to remove contaminated soils on the building site and over $220,000 to install utilities and sidewalks, pave Fourth Street, and pay permit and connection that would otherwise have been charged to the Senior Center. Ongoing support includes maintenance services, the below-market lease and the city’s $12,000 annual cash subsidy of the center’s operating costs.” The taxpayers’ contribution of well over a million dollars and a monthly stipend of $1,000 a month should warrant the use of a meeting room at the center for only two nights a month council meetings. Without city taxpayer dollars and land, the current senior center would not have been built. Morgan Davis Snohomish

Stopping the worst people on earth

W

ASHINGTON — Baghdad called President Obama’s bluff and he came through. He had refused to provide air support to Iraqi government forces until the Iraqis got rid of their divisive sectarian prime minister. They did. He responded. With the support of U.S. airstrikes, Iraqi and Kurdish forces have retaken the Mosul dam. Previous strikes had relieved the siege of Mount Sinjar and helped the Kurds retake two strategic towns that had opened the road to a possible Islamic State assault on Irbil, the capital of Kurdistan. In following through, Obama demonstrated three things: the effectiveness of even limited U.S. power, the vulnerability of the Islamic State and, crucially, his own seriousness, however tentative. The last of these is the most important. Obama had said that there is no American military solution to the conflict. This may be CHARLES true, but there KRAUTHAMMER is a local military solution. And that solution requires U.S. air support. It can work. The Islamic State is overstretched. It’s a thin force of perhaps 15,000 trying to control a territory four times the size of Israel. Its supply lines are not just extended but exposed and highly vulnerable to air power. Stopping the Islamic State’s momentum creates a major shift in psychology. Guerrilla armies thrive on a sense of inevitability. The Islamic State has grown in size, demoralized its enemies and attracted recruits from all over the world because it seemed unstoppable, a real caliphate in the making. People follow the strong horse over the weak horse, taught Osama bin Laden. These jihadis came out of nowhere and shocked the world by capturing Mosul, Tikrit and the approaches to Kurdistan, heretofore assumed to be impregnable. Now that’s begun to be reversed. Obama was slow to bring American power to bear. And slower still to arm the Kurds. But he was right to wait until Baghdad had gotten rid of Nouri al-Maliki, lest the U.S. serve as a Shiite air force. We don’t know how successful Haider al-Abadi will be in forming a more national government. But Obama has for now wisely taken advantage of the Abadi opening. The problem is that the new policy has outgrown the rationale. Our reason for returning to Iraq, explained Obama, is twofold: preventing genocide and protecting U.S. personnel. According to Obama’s own assertions, however, the recent Kurdish/Iraqi advances have averted the threat of genocide. As for the threat to U.S. personnel at the consulate in Irbil, it too is reduced. It was a flimsy rationale to begin with. To protect Americans in an outpost, you don’t need an air war. A simple evacuation would do. Besides, what does the recapture of the Mosul dam, the most significant gain thus far, have to do with either rationale? There are no Christians or Yazidis sheltering there. Nor any American diplomats. So Obama tried this: If the dam is breached, the wall of water could swamp our embassy in Baghdad. Quite a reach. An air war to prevent flooding at an embassy 200 miles downstream? Well yes, but why not say the real reason? Everyone knows it: The dam is a priceless strategic asset, possession of which alters the balance of power in this war. And why not state the real objective of the U.S. air campaign? Stopping, containing, degrading the Islamic State. For now, Obama can get away with stretching the existing rationale, but not if he is to conduct a sustained campaign. For this you must make the larger case that we simply cannot abide a growing jihadist state in the heart of the Middle East, fueled by oil, advanced weaponry and a deranged fanaticism. These are the worst people on earth. They openly, proudly crucify enemies, enslave women and murder men en masse. These are not the usual bad guys out for land, plunder or power. These are primitive cultists who celebrate slaughter, glory in bloodlust and slit the throats of innocents as a kind of sacrament. We have now seen what air cover for Kurdish/Iraqi boots on the ground can achieve. But for a serious rollback campaign, Obama will need public support. He has to explain the stakes and the larger strategy. His weak and passive rhetorical reaction to the beheading of American journalist James Foley was a discouragingly missed opportunity. “People like this ultimately fail,” Obama said of Foley’s murderers. Perhaps. But “ultimately” can be a long way — and thousands of dead — away. The role of a great power, as Churchill and Roosevelt understood, is to bring that day closer. Email letters@charleskrauthammer.com.


A16 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Schack From Page A1

Award winners are recognized for their contributions to Washington’s cultural heritage. The 2014 honorees are:

■ Arts Organization Award: The Schack Art Center. ■ Arts Organization Leadership Award: Speight Jenkins, the former longtime general director of Seattle Opera. ■ Heritage Individual Award: Johnpaul Jones, of Bainbridge Island, who was the lead architect on

the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. His work also includes the Sleeping Lady mountain resort in Leavenworth and the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Internment Memorial. ■ Heritage Organization Award: The Evergreen State College Longhouse

Education and Cultural Center, Olympia. ■ Individual Artist Award: Seattle sculptor Norie Sato, whose work has concentrated on public art projects, including seven in the state’s collection. ■ Young Arts Leadership Award: Earl Davis, Shoalwater Bay Tribe,

Tokeland. Davis manages the Shoalwater Bay Carving Apprenticeship Program for the tribe. The award review panel looked at 39 nominations for the six awards. The panel’s recommendations were approved by the state Arts Commission and forwarded to the governor for

Fair

I grew up in the Mukilteo Boys & Girls Club.

From Page A1

Dave Somers, Brian Sullivan and Ken Klein said having a safe place to learn new skills, play sports and meet other kids was life-changing. “I came from a very, very difficult family background,” Sullivan said. “I had nowhere to go. I grew up in the Mukilteo Boys & Girls Club.” Republic Services awarded a total of $30,000 to the Mukilteo club, $10,000 each year until 2016. The money is set to go toward the club’s campaign for a new, larger center in Harbour Pointe. Republic Services also gave $20,000 to the Arlington Boys & Girls Club, which serves children in Arlington, Oso and Darrington. County Council members said the club is an important resource after the March 22 Oso mudslide that claimed 43 lives and blocked Highway 530 between Arlington and Darrington. “As we all know, community is not just about celebration,” Casalini said. “It’s about coming together when disaster strikes.” Klein recalled being part of the Arlington Boys & Girls Club as a kid and meeting children from Darrington. “I remember the boys from Darrington were bigger and tougher than we were,” he said.

final approval. The governor’s awards were established in 1966. Since then, 150 individuals and organizations have received arts awards and 51 individuals and organizations have been honored with a heritage award. Gale Fiege: 425-339-3427; gfiege@heraldnet.com.

—Brian Sullivan Snohomish County Council member

MARK MULLIGAN / THE HERALD

Newborn piglets suckle their mother, Paige, inside the swine barn at the Evergreen State Fair on Thursday afternoon.

The friendships he made are especially important now, he said. Republic’s donation to the Boys & Girls Club preceded a ribbon cutting ceremony to officially kick off the Evergreen State Fair. The fair is about celebrating agriculture and the history of farming crops and raising livestock in Snohomish County, county parks director Tom Teigen said. “That’s been true all 106

years,” he said. For many Snohomish County families, the fair is a summer tradition. Mariah and Dave Egbert, of Edmonds, said they know all the ins and outs of the fair. Their oldest daughter was in 4-H for four years, which means they spent eight long days in a row at the fair each summer. This year, they brought their youngest, 4-year-old Danni, to the fair for a few hours of fun.

“It’ll be rides, food, probably get an elephant ear,” Dave said. Danni had her heart set on riding the roller coaster. “I like doing the big kid rides,” she said. Kathy Ezell’s granddaughter, on the other hand, was happy to stay on the pony ride. Ezell snapped pictures as the 3-year-old waved to her. Her grandchildren are visiting from Oregon and the fair seemed like the

perfect thing to do, she said. Ezell remembers when her grandson, now 7, rode a horse at the Evergreen State Fair five years ago. “He was 2, and he thought it was a cow,” she said. The animals and crafts are her favorite exhibits. But Thursday, her plans for navigating the fair were simple. “We’ll do whatever the kids want,” she said. Colleen Fisher had a

similar philosophy as she hurried to keep up with 6-year-old Maggie while helping 4-year-old Olivia, who was struggling to finish her melting chocolate ice cream cone. The ice cream dripped off Olivia’s chin and onto her striped sun dress, but she and Colleen caught up with Maggie near a toy display. It was the Seattle family’s first time at the fair. “It’s great to have this available to get in touch with the way things used to be,” Colleen said. Olivia and Maggie aren’t sure how things used to be. They do know that their favorite part of the fair is the rides, especially the roller coaster. But Olivia didn’t plan to go on the roller coaster again Thursday afternoon. Not after all that ice cream. The rides, food and fun are set to continue until Sept. 1 at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe. Kari Bray:425-339-3439; kbray@heraldnet.com.

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B1

2015 Hyundai Genesis 3.8: hits on all cylinders ROAD TEST by Larry Lark Herald Special Sections Writer

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t seems like yesterday when Hyundai’s groundbreaking, premium Genesis sedan made its debut, winning the prestigious North American Car of the Year Award in 2009. The South Korean manufacturer is about to make another splash with the introduction of its second-generation, 2015 Genesis 3.8 four-door, rear-wheel sedan that delivers a generous suite of standard safety and convenience features that are unsurpassed in its class. Remember, the Genesis bar was already at pole vault height. This incarnation adds automatic emergency

braking, blind-spot detections, cabin CO2 sensor, lane-keep assist, and updated Blue Link telematics and infotainment suite, just for starters. The Genesis 3.8 was incredibly quiet, spacious,

comfortable, powerful, nimble, athletic, safe and easy on the eyes. To wax poetic with a car cliché, the Genesis hits on all cylinders. A 3.8-liter V6 Lambda engine utilizes direct-injection and produces 311 horsepower at 6,000 rpm and 293 lb.-ft. of torque at 5,000 rpm. The engine is coupled to an eight-speed automatic transmission with Shiftronic paddles that mimic manual shifts and deliver more spirited performance on command. When the gas pedal is goosed, the Genesis goes! Merging onto the freeway in Skagit County – where the speed limit is 70 miles per hour – this Hyundai roared to life and exceeded that speed in short order. Better yet, it delivers 29 miles per gallon down the highway and a combined 22 mpg rating for city/highway driving. The Genesis seats up to five adults with an abundance of leg, hip, shoulder and head room. The headrests, in particular, were like pillows. And the driver’s seat could be dialed to order, with enough lumbar support to make a chiropractor frown.

The 3.8 suspension makes you feel like you’re floating on a cloud, and speed bumps are smoothed into virtual oblivion. And the Genesis goodie bag is a lot like Santa’s on Christmas Eve. Overflowing. There’s leather seating, navigation system with eight-inch display and rear view camera, AM/FM/XM/CD premium stereo system with seven speakers, Bluetooth, dual-zone automatic climate control, steering-wheel-mounted controls including cruise, heated, dual-power, outside mirrors, rain-sensing wipers, 18-inch alloy wheels and more. The trunk on the 3.8 was humungous. It swallowed three full-size golf bags and three Sun Mountain push carts (minus a couple of long drivers), still leaving room for shoes and other small items. Genesis also offers a Hyundai first: automatic emergency braking. The system uses sensor fusion technology to help avoid a potential collision or reduce its impact. The system will employ automatic braking whenever it detects another vehicle at an unsafe closing rate of speed. This system uses the vehicle’s smart cruise-control system and the forward camera from the lane departure warning system, to provide an extra margin of safety. Q

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By FRANK A. AUKOFER AutoWriters Associates

T

he Japanese manufacturer, which also builds cars in the United States, has always rolled on a different road than its competitors, which has enabled Subaru to increase sales during the 2007-2008 recession that caused other automakers to sputter. Recently Subaru introduced its all-new sports sedan, the 2015 WRX and its stellar STI performance companion edition, which I had already called the “the best Subaru ever.” Now, with the new Legacy, Subaru’s entry in the midsize family sedan category, it has leapfrogged even those sports cars, though in an oblique way. The STI and Legacy may bear a family resemblance, but they’re as different as a hockey player and a mattress tester. One is all storm and fury; the other relaxed and serene. But each, in its own way, could be called the best Subaru ever. First impressions are always important and my first impression of the new Legacy was a top-

Midsize game changer of-the-line Limited model with Subaru’s horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine and a full load of goodies. It was handsome, outside and in, prompting speculation that Subaru had decided to take the Legacy upscale into near-luxury territory. The instant guess was that the Limited carried a price tag north of $40,000. It did not. Fully tricked out, the 3.6R model carried a price tag of $33,380. That included navigation, leather upholstery, automatic climate control, lane change assist, blind spot warning, motorized glass sunroof, adaptive cruise control, pre-collision braking, cross traffic alert, and even fog lights that swivel with the steering. Though it is curiously nowhere near as successful as midsize sedan sales leaders like the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, Ford Fusion, and Nissan Altima, the Subaru Legacy is unique in

that it is equipped with all-wheel drive — as are all Subaru models except for the rear-drive BRZ sports car, which the company jointly developed with Toyota. Subaru also equips all of its cars and crossover utility vehicles with horizontally opposed engines, which also are called Boxer or flat engines. The design has the cylinders lying flat, feet to feet, on both sides of the crankshaft, instead of leaning or standing upright as in V or inline configurations. The layout allows Subaru’s engineers to settle the engine low in the compartment for a lower center of gravity. It also makes engineering the all-wheel drive relatively easy because the driveshaft to the rear wheels connects right off the back of the engine. Boxer engines traditionally have delivered lower fuel economy than conventional inline engines, but Subaru seems to

have mitigated that. Even the sixcylinder engine has an EPA city/ highway/combined fuel economy rating of 20/29/23 mpg, while the test car with the 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine came with a 26/36/30 mpg rating. For all of the class and panache of Legacy’s Limited model, you can save a bunch of money without giving up much if you specify the version tested for this review: Premium trim with the 175-horsepower fourcylinder engine. All of the Legacy trims use a continuously variable automatic transmission, which uses a system of belts and pulleys to provide a seamless transfer of power to the wheels. There are no shift points, although if you wish, the car’s computer can mimic the performance of a sixspeed conventional automatic that shifts manually with paddles on the steering wheel. With the 2.5 engine, the

Legacy runs to 60 mph in less than 9 seconds, though it feels quicker and is never challenged in traffic, passing, or merging onto freeways. Should you desire more oomph, the 3.6 engine does it in less than 7 seconds. But unlike its garage mate, the STI, the Legacy is all about relaxed cruising on anything from twisting ocean roads to Interstate highways. Comfort with the sturdy and nicely detailed cloth upholstery would satisfy any dedicated couch potato and, in this reviewer’s opinion, is superior to leather. Moreover, the tested Premium model with the four-cylinder engine does it all without anxiety or fuss, and at a price that is not daunting. It starts at $24,290 and, with an option package that includes Subaru’s Eyesight package of adaptive cruise control, pre-collision braking, and other safety measures, checked in at $27,180, including the destination charge. The Legacy deserves consideration by anyone in the market for a midsize sedan. And don’t forget what sets it apart: Subaru’s all-wheel drive.

2015 Subaru Subaru’s all-new 2015 Legacy delivers a compelling blend of standout design, interior refinement, safety technology and higher fuel efficiency, along with the largest interior passenger volume in the midsize sedan segment.

SPECIAL OFFER! 30 Days, 4 Lines + Photo

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2006 Acura RL 3.5 Stk 342777A $15,999

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2007 BMW X3 PURE LUXURY Stk VL0526A $15,788 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

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2008 BMW 328i Stk 19628B $16,707

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2007 Acura MDX Tech Pkg.-LOADED Warranty Included Stk# 13291P $18,499

2004 Buick Regal Stk B19892A $4,250

2005 Chevy Cobalt LS Only 57K miles Stk P0513A. $7,888. Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

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94 FORD MUSTANG Stk B19416A $3,923 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

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1118237

SALE

The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 B3

Take A Test Drive At Your Mazda Dealer Now!

OUR PRICES ARE REAL PRICES!

100 Mazda3’s AVAILABLE! 2014

OVER

EVERYONE QUALIFIES FOR OUR PRICES No phony incentives‚ No incentives advertised that you can’t qualify for. If there is a incentive you qualify for, we will find it for you & apply it!

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2014 Mazda3 i

2014 Mazda2

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16,506

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George Leckenby 44 Years Experience Enjoys Golf, Fishing

Joe Garcia

15 Years Experience Enjoys Archery, Pow Wows

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2012 Ford Focus Wagon

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16,898*

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2004 Infinity G35

2013 Mazda 3 Vin #D1711707 Stk #P1992

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20,468*

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2013 Hyundai Elantra Limited

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16,890*

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Vin #9M035983 Stk #7546A

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2012 Toyota Matrix

2007 Mazda RX8 Grand Touring

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2011 Mazda MX-5 Vin #B0216627 Stk #P2053

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25,744*

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2009 Mini Cooper S Vin #39TP91437 Stk #7561A

15,972*

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2012 Mazda3 Hatchack Vin #C168789 Stk #7336B

17,950*

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2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser Vin #70060975 Stk #S1988

26,658*

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Our professional sales staff has over 134 years of experience. We will listen to your needs and assist you in finding the right vehicle for you.

New car pictures are for illustration purposes only. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Expires 8/25/14. *plus tax and license. All financing subject to credit approval. A documentary service fee of up to $150 may be added to the sale price or capitalized cost. Take a Test Drive At Mazda of Everett Now

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EVERGREEN WAY

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2006 Ford Focus

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10630 EVERGREEN WAY 128TH ST SW


B4 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

0% NISSAN MODELS UP TO 72

MONTHS ON SELECT

99

2015 $ NISSAN

LEAF S

MANUFACTURER REBATES AS MUCH AS $8150 ON SELECT MODELS

89

THE WAIT

Leaf’s Available

PER MONTH

24 month lease, $99 per month plus tax

VERSA NOTE S Plus

MPG 36 HWY CITY 27 MPG

NISSAN

2014

2014

NISSAN

NISSAN

MPG 39 HWY CITY 30 MPG

SENTRA S

Model Code: 17015 Vin #302921

2 Available at this price

2014

2015 LEAF S model 17015 – MSRP $31,810. $12,935 due at delivery, includes $8,150 Nissan Rebate. Residual $15,268.80. Net capitalized cost of $17,625.69 Monthly payments total $2,376.

ALTIMA 2.5 S

NO SALES TAX!

IS OVER!

28

MPG 38 HWY CITY 27 MPG

REDESIGNED Model Code: 12014 Vin #269102 2 available at this price

99 99

49 AVAILABLE

$

54 AVAILABLE

PER

$

MO

ROGUES

Model Code: 13114 Vin #360607 2 available at this price

58 AVAILABLE

PER

99

$

MO

24 MONTHS $99 PER MONTH

24 MONTHS $99 PER MONTH

2014 Versa Note S Plus lease Model 11514 – MSRP $16,475. $2,900 due at delivery. includes $725 Nissan Rebate. Residual $10,544. Net capitalized cost of $12,919.17. Monthly payments total $2,376.

2014 Sentra S lease Model 12014 – MSRP $18,020. $3,450 due at delivery. includes $400 Nissan Rebate. Residual $12,253.60. Net capitalized cost of $14,621.99 Monthly payments total $2,376.

79

$

Available Now! MPG 33 HWY CITY 26 MPG

NISSAN

2014

Model Code: 11514 Vin #435494 2 available at this price

ROGUE S

PER

MO

24 MONTHS $79 PER MONTH 2014 Altima 2.5S 13114– MSRP 23,745. $5,555 due at delivery. includes $1,225 Nissan Rebate Residual $14,959.35. Net capitalized cost of $16,842.93..Monthly payments total $1,896.

Model Code: 22214 Vin #854097

10500 HWY. 99 • EVERETT

Vehicles shown for Illustration purposes. O% financing on approved credit and in lieu of Special lease rate pricing. All offers on approved credit. 36 Month Lease Excludes taxes, title, license, and $150 Negotiable doc feemay be added tot he price or capitalized cost. Leases include a $595 non-refundable acquisition fee, plus purchase option fee up to $300, plus tax, or pay excess wear & use plus $0.15 per mile for mileage over 12,000 miles per year. Lessee is responsible for maintenance and repairs. A disposition fee is due at termination of lease term. No security deposit required. Offer valid only when financed through Nissan Motor. Acceptance Corporation. See Magic Nissan for complete details. Offers end 9/2/14.

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PRICE 87 AVAILABLE AT THIS LEASE

44

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24 month lease, $209 per month plus tax, due at signing $3,139

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1 AVAILABLE 26 AVAILABLEAT ATTHIS THISPRICE LEASE

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Camrys Available


The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 B5

SPECIAL OFFER! 30 Days, 4 Lines + Photo

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KLEIN HONDA 2008 Infiniti G35 SPORT/TECH PKG HAWT- Bananas!! Stk# 13368P $19,999 USED CAR CENTER 2001 Honda Odyssey Van, 7 Passenger, Alloys stk 27695TC $5,988

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2002 Mazda 6 Stk #35819J $17,230

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2005 Saturn Forenza S Stk 341686A $6,000

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2005 Toyota Highlander AWD, Roof, 3rd Row stk 27678TD $14,188

2013 Toyota Tundra 4x4, 2.9% APR up to 60 mos. OAC 12K, Tow, Liner stk 27611PD $31,488

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2005 Volvo S60 Series T5 Stk 3341612A $11,999

2014 Toyota Prius 2.9% APR up to 60 mos. OAC Certified, Only 2K Miles stk 27628PD $24,188

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2005 Nissan Frontier CREW CAB Stk 2858B. $17,888. Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

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2005 Toyota Tacoma Auto, SR5, 49K stk 27613PD $17,988

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2004 INFINITY G35 VIN 4M307985 Stk 7259A. $17,697.

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1998 Dodge Durango Stk B19810A $3,171

Stk 29992D $10,237

2004 MAZDA 6 VIN 45N39795 Stk 7445A. $5,590.

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HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2007 Hyundai Accent Stk 19571B $7,495

Rodland Toyota 1-888-705-0417 rodlandtoyota.com

Stk #30854B $23,284

2009 VW JETTA VIN 9M035983 Stk 7546A. $11,988.

Stk #35789J $29,641

1998 Toyota Avalon VALUE PRICED Stk V3820A. $3,988. Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2010 Dodge Journey Stk #31005A $16,253

2008 Toyota Highlander

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2007 TOYOTA FJ CRUISER VIN 70060975 Stk S1988. $26,658.

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2003 VW Passat Wagon LEATHER INTERIOR Stk 4039A. $7,888. Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

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2012 Toyota Corolla S 2.9% APR up to 60 mos. OAC certified, Sunroof, Auto, 37K stk 27635PD $17,988

2004 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER Stk B19526B $6,000

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2012 Subaru Outback Wagon AWD, 1 owner, Automatic stk 27643TD $22,488

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2006 Lincoln Zephyr Stk 35805JA $11,232

KLEIN HONDA 2-Year Unlimited Mileage Maintenance on All New Vehicles Much More Than Just Oil Changes.

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B6 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Please Call For Monthly Specials! To advertise, call 425.339.3074 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Jobs

SKILLED MECHANIC FISH PROCESSING onboard vessels in Alas- WA N T E D t o w o r k o n k a . Fa s t p a c e d , l o n g Dairy Farm. Experience hours, heavy lifting. Ap- with milking parlors and ply in person Mondays a l l a r o u n d m e c h a n i c at 2:00pm @ 4315 11th work necessary. Salary Commercial Tire DOE, must be willing to Ave NW, Seattle. Service Technician re-locate to Oregon. See our website at For job description and 503-842-3166 (PNDC) oharacorporation.com requirements, please go to http://bridgestoneWINDOW INSTALLERLake Stevens School americas.jobs/ to search Residential retroďŹ t: District and apply. Enter locaWage depends on expeS c h o o l S a fe t y, S e - rience; WDL required; tion: Snohomish, WA. curity and Health Spe- drug test required; cialist, Will serve in the references required, a r e a s o f wo r k p l a c e Transportation required. safety, school security 425-356-9556 and health services. To view job description Chief Executive OfďŹ cer and apply please go to Interim www.lkstevens.wednet Leader willing to take .edu call 425 335-1500 risk, exercise initiative, for assistance. EOE CAREGIVER needed for take advantage of marparalyzed Mukilteo Male. ket opportunities, plan, SE ALASKA Auto req’d. Please call organize, and employ reLOGGING COMPANY sources. Must be exp’d Log/Dump Truck Driv- 206-697-1401 in developing compre- ers, Diesel Mechanics, hensive business devel- Shovel Loading and Wa- Delta Rehab. is hiring opment strategies, poli- ratah Operators. Over- for NAC. Training provided by N.W. Pathcies & procedures, and time + BeneďŹ ts. w ay s N AC Tr a i n i n g financial management. (907)225-2180 Center. Class will start Will work under the di9/15/14. If interested, rection of the STECO please apply in person (Stillaguamish Tribe EnSevere Food and ask for the NAC ter pr ise Cor poration). Allergies? Training Application B a c h e l o r ’s D e gr e e i n Packet. 1705 Terrace business or finance Earn $185 Ave., Snohomish, WA req’d- Master’s pref ’d. 98290. 360-568-2168 Donate Plasma This position, as are all positions with the Stillaplasmalab.com g u a m i s h Tr i b e o f I n dians, is Indian Prefer425-258-3653 ence in Hiring, in accordance with P.L. 93638. For more information regarding this posit i o n , a n d t o a p p l y, Sports Clerks please visit www.stillaguamish.com. or apply in person Stillaguamish The Everett Herald is looking for part-time sports Tr ibe of Indians 3310 clerks to join its award-winning Sports staff. Smokey Point Dr., ArThe primary job responsibilities are: lington, WA. 98223 • Taking game results over the phone • Compiling information off the Associated Press wire • Proof-reading pages. Automotive Painters/ Body Technicians Earn up to $1-2K a wk, Commission pd wkly, 1 yr exp req’d. 425-379-9119

C R E D O R e l i g i o u s Fa cilitator, Masters in Divinity, Social Work, Mental Health. Military knowledge/ experience. 1 ea NAS Whidby, NS Everett, NS Kitsap. Conduct retreats, workshops, briefings. Military Chaplains encouraged to apply. 210-379-5110.

To apply, send a cover letter and resume to hreast@soundpublishing.com ATTN: EDHS or mailed to: 11323 Commando Road W., Main Unit, Everett, WA 98204 ATTN: EDHS.

Nursing Manager Ambulatory Care Clinic Jamestown S’Klallam Tr i b e i n b e a u t i f u l Sequim, WA seeks a strong leader to develop Patient Care Te a m s , p r o v i d e direction to nurses & medical assistants & uphold high standards of medical care. R e q u i r e s WA R N license, 5 yrs. super visor y & 2 yrs. ambulatory care clinic exp., strong analytical s k i l l s. P r e fe r B A i n nursing and/or health care administration, exp. in accreditation, quality assurance & Pa t i e n c e C e n t e r e d Medical Home model. Salary: $62,100 $94,200. Indian preference. Apply: http://jamestowntribe.i applicants.com

PT AIDE AM/PM M-F shifts, req. valid WDL, own car, Exp helpful $12/hr 425-774-3042

Therapeutic Health Services (THS) is seeking a treatment supervisor for its Everett Clinic. Interested candidates should have current WA State C D c r e d e n t i a l s, B A and/or Master’s Degree in related ďŹ eld. Excellent Salary and Outstanding Benefit package including 12 days vacation to start, 11 holidays, fully paid medical, dental, vision, and life insurance. Additionally there is a 401K (403B) plan with matching funds, a wellness program and a truly desirable client driven company culture where individuals a r e r e c o g n i z e d fo r their unique talents and their passion for human services. For further information, please call Marli Br icker at 425-3475121 #304 after 11am or e-mail us (attaching your resume) at marlib@ths-wa.org

Multi-Media Advertising Consultant – Northeast Puget Sound Be a part of the largest community news organization in Washington! ¡ Do you have a proven track record of success in sales and enjoy managing your own territory? ¡ Are you competitive and thrive in an energetic environment? ¡ Do you desire to work in an environment which offers uncapped earning opportunities? ¡ Are you interested in a fast paced, creative atmosphere where you can use your sales expertise to provide consultative print and digital solutions? If you answered YES to the above, then we are looking for you! Sound Publishing, Inc. is looking for self-motivated, results-driven people interested in a multi-media sales career in the Northeast Puget Sound area (Snohomish, Skagit, Whatcom counties). This position will be responsible for print and digital advertising sales. As part of our sales team you are expected to maintain and grow existing client relationships, as well as develop new client relationships. The successful candidate will also be goal oriented, have organizational skills that enable you to manage multiple deadlines, provide great consultative sales and excellent customer service. This position receives a base salary plus commission; and a beneďŹ ts package including health insurance, paid time off, and 401K. Position requires use of your personal cell phone and vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. Sales experience necessary; Media experience is a definite asset. Must be computer-proficient. If you have these skills, and enjoy playing a pro-active part in impacting your local businesses’ financial success with advertising solutions, please email your resume and cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing.com, ATTN: NEPS. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employee (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Caregivers Seeking Work Individual or Couple Great References! Very Experienced. Live-in or Live-out. 206-326-8653 I Will Clean Your Oven! Professional Cleaner 425-387-6255

MULTIMEDIA ADVERTISING CONSULTANT - B e a p a r t o f t h e l a r g e s t community news organization in Washington! The Whidbey News-Times, in charming Coupeville, WA, is looking for a self-motivated, results-driven professional interested in a multimedia sales career. As part of our sales team you will maintain and grow existing client relationships, as well as develop new client relationships. The successful candidate will be goal oriented, have organizational skills that enable him/her to manage multiple deadlines, provide great consultative sales and excellent customer service. If you have these skills, and enjoy playing a proactive part in impacting the ďŹ nancial success of local businesses, please email your resume and cover letter to hr@soundpublishing.com for immediate consideration This position receives a base salary plus commissions and beneďŹ ts package including health insurance, paid time off, and 401K. Position requires use of your personal vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employee and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website to learn more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

REPORTER The Bellingham Business Journal, a division of Sound Publishing Inc. is seeking a general assignment reporter with a minimum of 1-2 years writing experience and photography skills. This position is based out of the Bellingham ofďŹ ce. The primary coverage will be city government, business, sports, general assignment stories; and may include arts coverage. Schedule includes evening and/or weekend work. As a Reporter for Sound Publishing, you will be expected to: be inquisitive and resourceful in the coverage of assigned beats; produce 5 by-line stories per week; write stories that are tight and to the point; use a digital camera to take photographs of the stories you cover; post on the publication’s web site; blog and use Twitter on the web; layout pages, using InDesign; shoot and edit videos for the web. We are looking for a team player willing to get involved in the local business community through publication of the monthly journal and daily web journalism. The ideal applicant will have a general understanding of local commerce and industry, education, employment and labor issues, real estate and development, and related public policy. He or she will have a commitment to community journalism and everything from short, brief-type stories about people and events to examining issues facing the community; be able to spot emerging business issues and trends; write clean, balanced and accurate stories that dig deeper than simple features; develop and institute readership initiatives. Candidates must have excellent communication and organizational skills, and be able to work effectively in a deadline-driven environment. Must be proďŹ cient with AP style, layout and design using Adobe InDesign; and use BBJ’s website and online tools to gather information and reach the community. Must be organized and self-motivated, exceptional with the public and have the ability to establish a rapport with the community. We offer a competitive hourly wage and beneďŹ ts package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Email us your cover letter, resume, and include ďŹ ve examples of your best work showcasing your reporting skills and writing chops to:

hreast@soundpublishing.com

or mail to:

Sound Publishing, Inc., 19426 68th Avenue S. Kent, WA 98032, ATTN: HR/BBJ Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to ďŹ nd out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

7 DAYS!

SPECIAL OFFER! Open House Feature Ad

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EVERETT

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MONROE 2 Ramblers, both 4 Bd, 3 Ba, 2035sf w/3 car gar, 2640sf w/2 car gar (Under Construction); Two - 3 Bd, 3 Ba, 2 stories w/dbl gar, 2035sf, 2750sf, Move-in-ready, Each one on a 1-acre Parcel. Mid $300K$400K 236th Ave SE on Florence Acres Rd, King Homes 425-737-8645 or 360-794-8645

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EVERETT Garden Court 3410 Colby Ave. Lg 1 bd, 1ba, Must-see apt! Easy I-5, close to dwntwn. Easy access to bus lines. Dishwasher, lots of strge rm, W/D. Very clean with lots of natural light. Covered pkg incl. $995. Call Linda 425-420-4458

Bank Owned Homes Free List with Pictures BothellBankOwned.net

17122 72 Ave W Edmonds $ 665,500 *A Smart Home* 3bd/2.5 bth 3452 sq. ft. Puget Sound View Premium Ent. Theater Gourmet kitchen & much more

Open House Sunday 1 pm-4 pm

GORGEOUS 4bd, 2ba, on 3/4 acre on Fobes Hill w/sweeping valley views. Completely remd’l w/ classic touches left intact. Private yet close to DT Snohomish. MLS 655716. $384,950. Call Michael DeLaney 425-422-1721

Bring all offers Call Chris Vallo 425.330.7395

Lake Stevens

ARLINGTON $379,950

4 Bed / 2.5 Ba ad #679256 360-659-6800

$245,950 3 Bed / 2.5 Ba 1,962 SF ad #681896 360-659-6800

IT’S THE VIEW AND THE BIG DECK AND SO MUCH MORE 2 BED- 2 BATH CONDO GROUND FLOOR 2008 GRAND AVE, #103 $387,500 By Appointment Only 425-238-4236

Fixer Upper Mobile/Storage on 20 Timber Acres, Close to Lake Roosevelt $49,900 $500 Down $541 Month Also, 5 Timbered Acres Minutes to Long Lake and Spokane River. Great Cabin Site. $25,900 $500 Down $278 Month

Everett:

1, 2 & 3 bd Apts/Duplx

Mill Creek:

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Bellevue:

2 bd Condo

Monroe:

3 bd Duplx SACRIFICE $17,950 18’ MASTER SUITE 14’ liv rm w/ bay window, light & bright. mdrn kit, all blt-ins, frig. & 2 pantrys, mstr bdrm ste w/ pvt ba & walk-in closet. Main ba, soaking/jetted wlk-in tub. Thermo wdw & heat pump 18’ cvrd porch/deck 1-800-2417800

C a s h fo r L o t s, P l a t s & Houses. Robinett & Assoc Inc. 425-252-2500

Frontier 509-468-0483

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MARYSVILLE

$259,950 4 Bed / 2.5 Bth 1,622 SF ad #680142 425-348-9200

MONROE 4.53 flat acres next to Pegasus Horse Fa r m w i t h H a n d R d frontage with driveway. Bordered on one side by small salmon spawning stream. Partial fenced. Privacy. Ready to build. Plat map avail. $149,000 O p e n t o o f fe r s. C a l l Stan at 808-298-1031.

OCEAN SHORES

FA M I LY G E TAWAY i n desirable south eastern Ocean Shores, WA. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, detached garage, Built in 2008. $119,500 - FSBO. For a pictorial tour and specs, go to: http://comfy

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CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Customer Service/OfďŹ ce Support person needed at our Paine Field ofďŹ ce in Everett, WA. This is an entry level position. Effective telephone, customer service, computer, math, organizational and communication skills required. Excel experience a must. Must be a good listener and be able handle difďŹ cult customers. This full-time position includes excellent benefits: medical, dental, life, 401k and paid holidays, vacation and sick days. EOE. Visit us on the web at www.soundpublishing.com. Please send resume and letter of interest to hr@soundpublishing.com or mail to HR/CSOS, Sound Publishing, Inc., 11323 Commando Rd. W, Main Unit, Everett, WA 98204

Arlington:

2 bd Home

Commercial Space: Evergreen Way

The Rental Connection Inc

rentalconnectioninc.com

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Everett Silver Firs, 3bd, 2ba, 2 car gar, gas heat, $1290 1st/last/dep. Avail in Sept. 425-778-6642

Lake Goodwin wa t e r front. 4bd, 4ba, ofc, bonus room, game room, hrdwd, cathedral ceilings, two decks, 500 sf Ironwood dock. Mt. Baker views. Availability and lease length negotiable. Credit/Income verification. $2500/month. 206-948-4507 App at Brierrealty.com

North Seattle, Now accepting applications. Studio apts: $526 HUD Senior Housing 62+. Rent incl/utilities. Income limits apply. Four Freedoms House 206-364-2440

BRAND NEW 1, 2 & 3 BR Apts Hurry! Only a few left! 1-855-671-6162 Marysville quilcedacreekliving.com

The Housing Authority of Snohomish County

now accepting applications for USDA subsidized housing wait list for the elderly or disabled HASCO has 1 & 2 bds in Stanwood, Arlington & Marysville. Rent is based on income. Income limits apply. Call for application 425-290-8499 Housing Authority of Snohomish County is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Everett- 2 r m i n c o z y hm, xtra rm for storage or hobby/office, $600 + $200 dep. 425-879-6952 Everett- Nice r m, near Dntwn, Kit, Laund, Cbl, TV, Utils $495/mo, 425772-6494 /425-249-8878

Lynnwood area. Kitchen privileges. Prefer nonsmoking, no drugs. $350/month, $175/ deposit & 1/4 utilities. References a must. Ready now! Call 425-774-2707 N. Everett Room for rent in clean & sober home. $450 - $600, + dep. 425-327-2015

Everett - Best Value! D e l u xe s p a c i o u s 2 b d R o o m o r RV fo r r e n t . N Sno Co $475/mo, $250 twnhse, 1ba, cov’d prkg. $825+dep.425-339-6200 dep. Good for 1 person. 206-310-9232 Newspaper advertising is still one of the most effective ways to market your home.

RV SPACE FOR RENT 1 acre, Lk. Stevens, $400/mnth425.334.0382

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HOROSCOPE Happy Birthday: Your compassionate and friendly demeanor will help you get ahead. Your insight into future trends will enable you to make good choices and to manufacture trust and loyalty from those who share your goals. An important partnership will result in greater wealth and a higher standard of living. Your numbers are 8, 12, 20, 23, 32, 38, 41. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Attending networking or social functions will lead to new acquaintances. Your youthful approach to life will attract the interest of someone who can help you further your goals. ����� TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Things will be disruptive at home and within your personal relationships. Don’t let things get to you when a practical but sensitive approach will help you get to the bottom of whatever situation you face. �� GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Focus on home, family and making alterations that will help you reach your goals. A move or change to the way you live will be beneficial. Romance will help you form a closer bond with someone special. ��� CANCER (June 21-July 22): Creative changes at home will ease any trouble that may be brewing. Concentrate on improving your relationships with older relatives or colleagues. ��� LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Do whatever it takes to stay in control. Someone is likely to test your strength and courage. Being adaptable and open to suggestions will help you gain respect and win favors. ���

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Underlying factors that lead to more responsibility than suggested are apparent and must be addressed before you engage in a binding commitment. ���� LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Offer suggestions and practical support for something or someone you believe in. Your ability to find solutions and offer expertise will be appreciated by those receiving your help, while someone close to you will complain. �� SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t take on something that doesn’t feel right in order to please someone you love. Be true to your needs and refrain from overdoing, overspending or overindulging to make someone else happy. ����� SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You can make headway if you focus on the task at hand and refrain from getting involved in negative talk that can make you look bad and slow down your progress. ��� CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your keen sense of perception coupled with your business savvy will bring in more cash. Sticking to what you know and do best will give you control. ��� AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A partnership will offer you the little extra you require in order to achieve success. Romance is in the stars and a commitment or promise made will improve your life. ��� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t let emotions interfere with what you need to accomplish. Deception and disillusionment can lead to a poor financial decision. Reconnect with someone you have worked with in the past who can help you get ahead. ��� Universal Uclick


The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 B7

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Labrador Retr iever, Yellow Female Puppy, AKC, 3yr Health guarantee, excellent family dog, $800. 360-631-2391 LOST: “SMOKIE� Autralian Shepard Border Collie mix, black/brown. Gone Monday, 8/18 from 84th & 176th St NW, Stanwood. 360-722-6063

ENGLISH BULLDOG fe male puppy, pure-bred, current vac., health cert. $800. 425-710-0784

PUPPIES: Second generation Scotties, will stay small, born June 14, 2014, sire is AKC, mom is a pretty Scotty. 3 females, 1 male. $500-$700. (509)662-1659.

ALWAYS BUYING Antiques & Collectibles

Estate Items (425)776-7519 House Calls Available Call Anytime - Thanks! Yorkie Pups, P u r e b r e d , playful, energetic, Potty Trained, shots, 2 males, $800. 425-320-7957 or 503-750-1828

YORKI-POO PUPPIES DOB 6/17/14, shots, P W D p u p s p u r e b r e d , wormed, lively, loving. AKC, born 6/1. Wormed, $500. 425-232-8737 or shots up to date, crate 360-386-8272. trained, microchipped. 425-334-8207

AKC Tiny Yorkie & English Cream Golden Retrievers. Quality and Love await you! Arlington Area. 425.238.7540

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BUYING OLD COINS Collections, gold, silver.

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WINDOW AC purchased new last Aug for $450. Used less than 100 hours, filter still clean. $300. (360) 659-8278

FREE Household Furniture in good shape, & small selction of Yard Tools. You Haul! 5810 Fleming St, #71 Everett or call 425-438-0102

DISH TV Retailer. Star ting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1800-308-1563 (PNDC)

Family seeking, free, good cond.: laptop, piano bench, Rec men’s s m / t l . we t s u i t , h i k i n g backpack, women’s 10 spd bike. 425-379-6147, after 8am Metal Bench Lathe with all standard equipment and more. $600 obo 425.339.9400

REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a whole-home Satellite system installed at NO COST and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to new callers, SO CALL NOW 1-800-871-2983. (PNDC)

Brand New Saw Mill For Sale Foley Belsaw Company Model: M-14 45’’ circular saw with removable teeth. 30’ in length and a 3 blade edger with motor. $2,999 obo 425.337.6618

T H E F LY I N G R O L L This book is the words of the Comforter that Jesus Christ promised to send. It explains the mysteries of the Bible and is sent to prepare the world for the return of Jesus Chr ist. Call Dave Q., 425-686-2494 or email theyingroll@gmail.com WELDING: 240v electric arc welder, leads, $200/obo. Acetylene cutting torch/gauge, $150. (425)252-9465.

A+ SEASONED Dayville Hay & Grain F e m a l e Tr i - C o l o r Rough Collie Pup. DOB 4-30. Current s h o t s, P u r e b r e d r e g . Sire, purebred dam, $850. 425-366-1748

Top Quality HAY

Piebald Dachsund, Born 6/21, $450, 1F; 2 M $400/ea; Call Linda @ 360-652-4106

We guarantee our feed! Rottweiler Pups ~ 8 wks old, AKC reg. Outstanding Parents! Ready Now! Check our web for more Pics & info: www.luckyrottweiler. com Call or text Nikki @ 425-359-0515

AKC Rottweiler Pups Champion sired, avail. now. Exc. temperments, home-raised, socialized, vet-examined. $1500.00. 206-450-5700

Shih Tzu pure breed male puppy. creamPUPPIES: Olde English brown color, 9 wks, Bulldogge, IOEBA regis$800,360.899.5367 t e r e d , h o m e r a i s e d . POMERANIAN Puppies. Siberian Husky Puppies, Wolf sable and black. $1,000. 425-923-4376. Beautiful blue eyes, Shots, wormed, Social$850, AKC, health guar. ized and loved. Teddy Getting a new car? 360-668-2496 Lve mess. bear faces. $600 253425.339.3100 397-7909

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ESTATE SALE: Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m., no early sales, 2410 104th Place SE, Everett. Furniture, china, glasswa r e, l a m p s, c o o k ware, linens, jewelry, lawn furniture, tons of great stuff.

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Fill a U-PICK bucket, Buy the bucket, Buy the piece Sat Aug. 23 9-5 ONLY 9330 180th St. SE Snohomish, Wa ESTATE SALE: Fri.Sat., 9-5 p.m., 2929 Lake Ave., Snohomish. Lots of everything. ESTATE SALE: Fri.Sat.-Sun., 9-5 p.m., 11820 127th Ave. NE, Lake Stevens. Antiques, furniture, garden, rugs, china, misc. household, pedal cars, books, records, and lots more. ESTATE SALE: Sat.Sun., 9-4 p.m., 5900 64th Street NE, #222, M a r y s v i l l e . To o l s , yard, camp, BBQ, sew, household, toys, shelves, pets, quilt, mags/books, MS patio set. 360-658-7102.

BIG SALE: Fri.-Sat.Sun., 8-4 p.m., 130 S. Dabies Rd., Lake Stev e n s . To o l s , c o l lectibles, art, jewelery. Come BUY our Stuff! Multi Family Community Garage Sale. One day o n l y. S a t u r d ay O n l y, 8/23 9am - 3pm. Cedar Creek Condos on the corner of 48th & 200th St SW, Lynnwood. Crazy Good Garage s a l e ! S a t u r d ay O n l y, 8am-2pm (no early birds please), 9411 47th Dr NE, Mar ysville. Fur n, lots of baby, clothes, hshld items, craft items. Cash or credit (via Square) accepted. Down Sizing Multi- Family Sale 72nd & 189th in Lynndale Park Fishing equip., furniture, dishes, games,exercise equip. tools & more! Opens @ 11am Thurs-Sat, 8/21-8/23 Estate Sale. Saturday and Sunday, Aug 23-24. 9:00AM-5:00PM. Variety of items. Turn South at Highway 2 mile post 26, Startup 98293.

Estate Sale: 8/22 & 8/23 Fr i - S a t , 9 a - 4 p ; 1 7 1 0 Park Ave, Snohomish. Antiques, books & bookcases, tables, Hummels/figurines, Canning jars, tools & Much More Please No Early Birds! EVERETT 1131 115th St SW Kassie’s Way Condominium Community Sale Fri/Sat/Sun; 9-3PM A LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING

★★★★★★★★★★★★ ASSISTANCE LEAGUEŽ OF EVERETT ESTATE SALE Thurs, Fri, 9 to 5 Sat 9 to 3 609 33rd ST, SE, Everett

BUYER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR MOVING HEAVY ITEMS. CASH/DEBIT/CREDIT

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HUGE mulit-family sale, Fri 8-22 & Sat 8-23 from 8am-4pm, 4023 108th ST SE, Evt. ALL the proceeds to benefit Seattle Children’s in honor of G A R AG E S A L E : B i g Makai. Lots of clothes, sale after moving elderly household and MORE! parents. Sat.-Sun., 9-4 Many items from two difp.m., 25618 Mountain ferent estates! We have D r i ve, A r l i n g t o n . A n - Grandma and Grandpa’s tiques, furniture, potting stuff! Something for evebench, computer desk, ryone! Collectibles, furnijewelry, glassware, col- ture, outdoor gear, fishl e c t i b l e s , h o u s e h o l d ing, vintage lighting, high items. end clothing and housewares. 3402 104th Pl SE GARAGE SALE! Satur- Everett, 9am-6pm Friday day and Sunday, 8/23 & 9am-12pm Saturday 8/24, 9-5. 27923 41st Moving Sale Ave N E , A r l i n g t o n , 98223. Lots of furniture Friday & Saturday ONLY 9 am - 5 pm and misc. items Lots of XMAS (inside & out), tools, Fishing gear, HUGE MUKILTEO and MISC. STUFF. Multi-family Garage Sale 20721 Canyon Dr. People remember our Granite Falls sales for quality items at MOVING SALE: Wed.SELL OUT prices. T h u s . - Fr i . - S a t . - S u n . , Fri-Sat, 8/22 & 8/23, 10-6 p.m., 6211 58th St 8am - 4pm NE, Marysville. Every1633 Highland Terrace thing must go. CT., Mukilteo

1VCMJD/PUJDFT LEGAL NOTICE On August 19, 2014, the Snohomish County Road Engineer approved the following COUNTY FORCES PROJECT for the 2014 program year. All construction estimates include the cost of labor, materials & equipment. Details are on file with the Snohomish County Department of Public Works. CRP# RC7413 - Lockwood Elementary School Pedestrian Beacons Two RRFB (one set) to be installed at crossing of Locust Way and 235 Pl SW near Lockwood Elementary School. ADA ramps will be updated as well. The total estimated construction cost is $38,000.00. Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583512 LEGAL NOTICE On August 19, 2014, the Snohomish County Road Engineer approved the following COUNTY FORCES PROJECT for the 2014 program year. All construction estimates include the cost of labor, materials & equipment. Details are on file with the Snohomish County Department of Public Works. CRP# RC7411 - Hilltop Elementary School Pedestrian Beacons Two sets of RRFB to be installed along Damson Rd. One set to be installed north of Hilltop Elementary School, and one set south of the school. The total estimated construction cost is $22,000.00. Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583513 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE CITY OF MOUNTLAKE TERRACE CITY COUNCIL A public hearing will be held by the Mountlake Terrace City Council on Tuesday, September 2, 2014 at 7:00 pm in the Mountlake Terrace Interim City Hall Council Chambers, 6100 219th Street SW, Suite 220, to consider: • Adoption of Park Impact Fee Regulations Ordinance Extending 50% Discount until 2017 • Adoption of Transpor tation Impact Fee Regulations Ordinance Extending 50% Discount until 2017 If you are unable to attend the meeting, written comments will be accepted until September 2, 2014 at 4:00 pm, to the attention of the City Clerk (6100 219th Street SW, Suite 200, Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 or via email: cityhall@ci.mlt.wa.us), and will become part of the permanent record. For more information, please contact the Community and Economic Development Director at 425.744.6281. MOUNTLAKE TERRACE CITY COUNCIL City Clerk Dated this August 19, 2014. The City of Mountlake Terrace strives to provide access and services to all members of the public. Please notify the City at least one week prior to the event if reasonable accommodations are needed. Large print and audio are available upon request, fees apply. Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583499

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FIVE FAMILY GARAGE SALE at 2810 91st St. SE Everett; Kayak camping eqpt. furn., lamps, coffee table, kitchenware, antiques, tools, dolls, clothes, Jewelry inventory sell off $5 (vintage jewelry avail. also not reduced) nicknacks. Free Nordic Track

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Moving/Estate Sale: All must go! 8/22-8/23, Fri-Sat, 9a-4p, 1825 148th St SE, Mill Creek, 98012. High End tbls, lamps, chairs, rugs, Xmas, glassware, China. Collectibles, Much More! Cash Only! Saturday Only August 23 from 8 a.m. to 4 p. m . 3 5 2 4 Fe d e r a l Avenue, Everett. Furniture, clothing, garden items, bike, kitchen, craft supplies, camping, and decorative items. SNOHOMISH Estate Sale Wanser Farm 4621 171st Ave SE Fri/Sat, 9-5; Sun 9-5; Old & Intresting Things from 4 generations. Appliances, dishes & more Stanwood

Multi-Family Sale 3121 212th St NW

Antiques, glass ware, furniture,car parts, tools, clothes, dolls and much more! Fri.(8/22)& Sat.(8/23)9-4

NO. 12 2 07853 8 SHERIFF’S PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL PROPERTY IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON HOMESTREET BANK, A WASHINGTON STATE CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, PLAINTIFF, VS THE ESTATE OF FRANK PEREZ, AND ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS OR DEVISEES OF THE ESTATE OF FRANK PEREZ; AND ALL OCCUPANTS OF THE REAL PROPERTY COMMONLY KNOWN AS 1206 89TH AVE SE, EVERETT, WASHINGTON, DEFENDANTS. TO: THE ESTATE OF FRANK PEREZ, THE SUPERIOR COURT OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY HAS DIRECTED THE SHERIFF OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY TO SELL T H E P R O P E RT Y D E S C R I B E D B E L OW TO S AT I S F Y A J U D G M E N T I N T H E A B OV E E N T I T L E D AC T I O N . I F DEVELOPED, THE PROPERTY ADDRESS IS: 1206 89TH AVE SE, EVERETT, WA 98258 AKA 1206 89TH AVE SE, LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258. THE SALE OF THE DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS TO TAKE PLACE AT 10:00 A.M. ON FRIDAY, 8/29/2014 IN THE FRONT DOOR LOBBY AREA OF THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, EVERETT, WASHINGTON. THE JUDGMENT DEBTOR CAN AVOID THE SALE BY PAYING THE JUDGMENT AMOUNT OF $81,540.23 TOGETHER WITH INTEREST, COSTS AND FEES BEFORE THE SALE DATE. FOR THE EXACT AMOUNT, CONTACT THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE AT THE ADDRESS STATED BELOW. DATED JUNE 19, 2014 SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE DOCKET # 14003018 CIVIL DEPUTY BLAKE EVERETT, WASHINGTON, 98201 (425) 388-3522 L E G A L D E S C R I P T I O N : L OT 1 7 , T I M B E R L A N D S O U T H , AC C O R D I N G TO T H E P L AT T H E R E O F, R E C O R D E D I N VOLUME 42 OF PLATS, PAGES 179 AND 180, RECORDS OF S N O H O M I S H C O U N T Y WA S H I N G TO N . S I T UAT E I N T H E C O U N T Y O F S N O H O M I S H , S TAT E O F WA S H I N G TO N . T O G E T H E R W I T H T H AT C E R TA I N 4 4 X 2 8 1 9 8 3 FUGUA/TOWNH MANUFACTURED HOME BEARING VIN NO. 7586 BEING MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME TITLE ELMINATION APPLICATION RECORDED BY THE CLERK OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY ON OCTOBER 28, 1993 UNDER RECORDING NO. 9310280717. A S S E S S O R ’ S P RO P E RT Y TA X PA R C E L O R AC C O U N T NUMBER: 007069-000-017-00. ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 1206 89TH AVE SE, EVERETT, WA 98258 AKA 1206 89TH AVE SE, LAKE STEVENS, WA 98258. Published: July 18, 25; August 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014. EDH570716

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100 year old slant top desk with original keys, Excellent Condition $250 360-435-2387

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Lost: “Andy� German Shorthair Pointer Mix, white w/red/black liver spots, blue collar w/ID tag/license. Missing from Olympic Dr. - 75th & Madison. REWARD! 425-513-1517

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JOHN DEERE Complete Mower, 1980-111. for parts & xtra parts $250 360-668-7295

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Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Seen on CNN. A BBB. Call 1-800-989-1278. (PNDC) (PNDC)

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LOST: Camera. Cannon Elph 100, blue/silver, Tuesday, Aug. 9, at park at 44th and 185th, LynnYARD SALE Good variety - Crafts & wood. REWARD. (360)387-9587 7 0 ’s c l o t h e s, F i s h i n g items and LOTS MORE! Fri-Sat, 8/22 & 8/23, REWARD Lost Tortoise 9a-4p in Lake Stevens area, 4631 Marble Lane, if found please call Everett 425-334-5611 YARD SALE: Sat.-Sun., 9-5 p.m., 9212 3rd Place SE, Everett. 3-families wo r t h o f s t u f f ! To o l s, clothes, golf clubs, poker table, household items, toys and much more!

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NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL WORKSHOP Notice is hereby given that the Lake Stevens City Council will conduct a workshop in accordance with RCW 42.30 and LSMC § 2.08.030. Purpose of Meeting: To identify topics for future planning. Meeting Place: Lake Stevens School District Administration Building 12309 22nd Street NE Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Meeting Date/Time: Monday, August 25, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. Notice Delivered/Mailed To: Lake Stevens City Council Lake Stevens Journal Posted: Lake Stevens City Hall The meeting is a City Council work session and no action will be taken. The public is welcome to observe but will not be allowed to participate. Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583521 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 3396-14 OF THE CITY OF EVERETT, WASHINGTON On the 13th day of August 2014, the City Council of the City of Everett passed Ordinance No. 3396-14. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE establishing School District Impact Fees for Residential Development in the city of Everett based upon School District Capital Facility Plans required under the Growth Management Act The full text of this ordinance will be mailed upon request. Dated this 19th day of August 2014 City Clerk, Sharon Fuller 2930 Wetmore Avenue Everett, WA 98201 (425) 257-8610 Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583526 SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 3397-14 OF THE CITY OF EVERETT, WASHINGTON On the 13th day of August 2014, the City Council of the City of Everett passed Ordinance No. 3397-14. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE closing a special improvement project entitled, “112th Street S.E. - Silver Lake Road to SR 527,� Fund 303, Program 076, as established by Ordinance No. 2934-06 The full text of this ordinance will be mailed upon request. Dated this 19th day of August 2014 City Clerk, Sharon Fuller 2930 Wetmore Avenue Everett, WA 98201 (425) 257-8610 Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583529

1VCMJD/PUJDFT SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 2645 of the City of Mountlake Terrace, Washington On August 18, 2014 the City Council of the City of Mountlake Terrace passed Ordinance No. 2645. A summary of the content of said Ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE OF MOUNTLAKE TERRACE, WASHINGTON, AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2577 § 2 AND CHAPTER 3.95 MOUNTLAKE TERRACE MUNICPAL CODE PROVIDING FOR A THREE-YEAR CONTINUATION OF THE “PROPERTY TAX ABATEMENT PROGRAM FOR QUALIFIED MULTIFAMILY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT� IN RESIDENTIAL TARGET AREAS AND AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 2577 § 6 “EXPIRATION� PROVIDING FOR THE EXTENSION OF THE EXPIRATION DATE OF ORDINANCE NO. 2577 The full text of this Ordinance will be mailed upon request. Virginia V. Olsen City Clerk Dated this 19th day of August, 2014. Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583485 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING MUKILTEO CITY COUNCIL 2014 BUDGET AMENDMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Mukilteo City Council will hold a Public Hearing at their September 2, 2014 meeting that begins at 7:00 P.M. in the City Hall Council Chambers, located at 11930 Cyrus Way, Mukilteo, WA. The purpose of the hearing is to consider a 2014 Budget Amendment. For additional information contact Finance Director Scott Morgan at 425.263.8030. Persons interested in commenting may provide oral or written comments at the hearing. Written comments will be accepted at City Hall, located at 11930 Cyrus Way, until 4:30 P.M. the day of the hearing. If you have a disability which may limit your participation in the hearing process, please contact the City Clerk’s office at 425.263.8005 at least three (3) business days in advance of the hearing so that we can arrange a reasonable accommodation for you. Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583507

SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 3398-14 OF THE CITY OF EVERETT, WASHINGTON On the 13th day of August 2014, the City Council of the City of Everett passed Ordinance No. 3398-14. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE closing a special improvement project entitled, “City Center Safety Improvements,� Fund 303, Program 085, as established by Ordinance No. 3157-09 The full text of this ordinance will be mailed upon request. Dated this 19th day of August 2014 City Clerk, Sharon Fuller 2930 Wetmore Avenue Everett, WA 98201 (425) 257-8610 Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583532


B8 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

1VCMJD/PUJDFT SUMMARY OF ORDINANCE NO. 3399-14 OF THE CITY OF EVERETT, WASHINGTON On the 13th day of August 2014, the City Council of the City of Everett passed Ordinance No. 3399-14. A summary of the content of said ordinance, consisting of the title, provides as follows: AN ORDINANCE relating to Special Charges for connection to the city of Everett Water System and Sewer System, and repealing Section 13 of Ordinance No. 3095-08 The full text of this ordinance will be mailed upon request. Dated this 19th day of August 2014 City Clerk, Sharon Fuller 2930 Wetmore Avenue Everett, WA 98201 (425) 257-8610 Published: August 22, 2014. EDH583533

#JET 3'2T 3'1T ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS PROJECT:

New Northshore High School #4

Description CIP Concrete Steel Fabrication Joist & Deck Supply Steel Erection Elevators Fire Sprinklers Athletic Fields

Bid Package No. Bid Package NSD-03.1 Bid Package NSD-05.1 Bid Package NSD-05.2 Bid Package NSD-05.3 Bid Package NSD-14.1 Bid Package NSD-21.1 Bid Package NSD-32.1

LOCATION:

3722 188th Street SE Bothell, WA 98012

BIDS DUE:

3:00 PM September 17, 2014

OWNER:

Northshore School District No. 417 22105 23rd Drive SE Bothell, WA 98021 Contact: Ed Lee Phone: (425) 408-7858 Email: elee@nsd.org

GCCM:

Cornerstone General Contractors, Inc 11807 Northcreek Parkway South, Ste #102 Bothell, WA 98011 Contact: Dave Flynn Phone: (425) 481-7460 Email: dave@cornerstonegci.com

ARCHITECT:

Dykeman 1716 West Marine View Drive Everett, WA 98201-2098 Contact: Tim Jewett Phone: (425) 259-3161 Email: timj@dykeman.net

BID DOCUMENTS:

Bills Blueprint in Everett upon receipt of a $200 refundable deposit. Electronic viewing at www.bxwa.com under Cornerstone General Contractor’s Inc, link, Projects Bidding (no password required).

BONDS:

Bid Bond in the amount of 5% of the total bid is required Performance and Payment Bond is required.

PREBID MEETING: Date/Time:

August 28, 2014, 3:30 pm

Location:

Fernwood Elementary School, Library 3933 Jewell Rd. Bothell, WA 98012

All bidders are encouraged to attend pre-bid meeting. Meeting will be followed by a job-site tour.

SCOPE:

Cast-in-place Concrete, Structural & Miscellaneous Steel Fabrications Supply, Joist & Deck Supply, Steel Erection, Elevators, Fire Sprinklers and turn-key Athletic Field Complex.

Engr Est $3,000,000 $3,250,000 $1,000,000 $1,750,000 $275,000 $1,000,000 $2,900,000

NOTES: Cornerstone General Contractors Inc. is acting as a construction manager for Northshore School District, not as a general contractor on this project. For this reason, all rules for public bidding must be followed by all contractors bidding these packages. Bids must be submitted as indicated in the Instructions to Bidders. Faxed bids, bids which are not on the proper bid form, and bids that do not fulfill the requirements of the Instructions to Bidders, cannot be accepted. All bids shall remain valid for a period of 60 calendar days. Refer to RCW 39.10.380, Cornerstone General Contractors has a labor agreement with the Pacific Northwest Regional Council of Carpenters. It is the intent of Cornerstone General Contractors, Inc. to submit a bid on BP NSD-03.1 as a Trade Contractor. Published: August 22, 26, 2014. EDH583622 INVITATION FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that sealed bids will be received at the Office of Capital Projects, Mukilteo School District No. 6, located at District Support Services Center, 8925 Airport Road, Everett, WA 98204 in Snohomish County, Washington, for the TEACHING AND LEARNING CENTER project at Explorer Middle School. Bids will be received on Form of Bid until 2:00 pm on September 18, 2014, stamped in and held. Bids will be opened and publicly read following the time set for receipt of the Form of Bid. A Bid Deposit of five percent (5%) of the amount of the Base Bid is required at the time of Bid Opening and must be in the form of a surety bond, postal money order, cashier’s check, or certified check. Estimated construction cost: $ 6,025,515. A mandatory Pre-Bid Conference to answer questions and review the scope of work and the documents will be held at Explorer Middle School, House 3 conference room, 9600 Sharon Drive, Everett, 98204 on September 4, 2014, 2:00 pm. All Bidders must attend. Drawings and Specifications may be examined at the office of the architect, McGranahan Architects, 2111 Pacific Avenue, Suite 100, Tacoma, WA 98402. Free-of-charge access to project Bid Documents (Plans, Specifications, Addenda, and Bidders List) is provided to Prime Bidders, Subcontractors, and Vendors by going to www.bxwa.com and clicking on “Posted Projects”, “Public Works”, and “Mukilteo School District”. This online plan room provides Bidders with fully usable online documents with the ability to: download, view, print, order full/ partial plan sets from numerous reprographic sources, and a free online digitizer/take-off tool. It is required that Bidders “Register” in order to receive automatic email notification of future addenda and to place themselves on the “Self-Registered Bidders List”. Bidders that do not register will not be automatically notified of Addenda and will need to periodically check the online plan room for Addenda issued on this project. Contact Builders Exchange of Washington at (425) 258-1303 for assistance with access or registration. The Mukilteo School District reserves the right to reject any and all Bids and to waive any irregularities or informalities. The right is reserved by the Mukilteo School District to postpone contract award for the period of thirty (30) days after the Bid Opening. No Bidder may withdraw its Bid after the hour set for the opening thereof, or before award of contract, unless said award is delayed for a period exceeding thirty (30) days. Dated this 19th day of August, 2014. MUKILTEO SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 6 SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON Published: August 22; September 2, 2014. EDH583546 NOTICE OF TAX TITLE PROPERTY SALE Notice is hereby given that Snohomish County Proper ty Management will conduct a public auction on August 27, 2014, at 9:30 a.m. in Room 6A03 on the 6th floor of the Robert Drewel Building located at 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA. BIDS - All sales will be made by public verbal auction to the highest bidder. All parcels must be paid for in cash or cashier’s check only, payable at the time of purchase otherwise, the bidding will be re-opened. Successful bidders must give Proper ty Management the name and address that is to be on the deed. NO CHANGES IN NAME CAN BE MADE AFTER THE SALE. All bids received must be by oral bid and it is requested that they be presented loudly and clearly. It would also be appreciated if private conversations would be held to a minimum in order that the officials may hear all bids and give everyone an equal right to bid. According to SCC 4.46.260 the Council or Property Management Division, if it deems such action to be for the best public interest, may reject any and all bids and withdraw the property from sale. DEEDS - NO WARRANTY - A Treasurer’s Deed will be issued upon receipt of full payment within thirty (30) business days from the date of sale. The parcel is sold “where is” and “as is” without any representation or warranty, expressed or implied. No representation is made or implied as to whether the parcel meets zoning or building requirements. Purchaser will take responsibility for any hazardous material on site of purchased parcel. Purchaser will take responsibility for any wetland protection regulations on said property. UNQUALIFIED BIDDERS - No person who is a County employee or officer may bid at this sale, nor may such person bid as an agent or allow any agent to bid on his behalf. COMPETING LIENS AND EASEMENTS - The sale is subject to any special assessment liens of other taxing districts, competing Federal liens, whether known or unknown, and easements, covenants, and restrictions of record, if any. COUNTY AS BIDDER - If no bid is received, the County will retain ownership of the property. The following parcel(s) of land will be sold. Tax Account: 00449700001200 Legal Description: Lot 12, Forgotten Mountain River Tracts, according to the plat thereof recorded in Volume 22 of Plats, pages 94 through 96, inclusive, records of Snohomish County, Washington; Together with an equal and undivided interest in Tract “A” in common with all other owners of various tracts in said Plat. Situate in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington. Minimum Bid: $2,373.90 Published: August 8, 15, 22, 2014. EDH578457 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS TO: Interested Architects FROM: Boys & Girls Clubs of Snohomish County This is a Request for Qualifications to perform the following work for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Snohomish. Responses to this request must be submitted as described below by 5pm on Friday, September 5, 2014. PRODUCTS Architect will produce drawings and job specifications, prepare bid documents, coordinate bidding and negotiations, communicate with City of Everett, and monitor the roof replacement of the Everett Boys & Girls Club located at 2316 – 12th Street. CRITERIA FOR REVIEW Statements of qualifications will be reviewed using relevant experience and background of personnel assigned to the project, quality sample of work products, and past record of completing projects on budget and on time. BUDGET: Approximately $10,000.00 PROJECT TIMELINE: Drawings and bid specifications due two weeks from contract approval. DUE DATE FOR QUALIFICATIONS Statements of qualifications for this project must be submitted by 5pm on Friday, September 5, 2014 and may be submitted by mail, fax or email to the following addresses: Bill Tsoukalas btsoukalas@bgcsc.org Phone: 425-315-7080 Fax: 425-315-7079 QUESTIONS: Please contact Bill Tsoukalas at the phone or email above. The Boys & Girls Clubs of Snohomish County reserves the right to reject any and all Requests for Qualifications and to waive minor irregularities. Published: August 22, 24, 2014. EDH583709

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WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on August 29, 2014 at 10:00 am on the steps in front of the North side to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, in the City of Everett located at Snohomish County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable, at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Snohomish County, State of Washington, to-wit; U N I T 3 0 6 , B U I L D I N G 2 O F B A L L I N G E R P O I N T, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION THEREOF RECORDED UNDER SNOHOMISH COUNTY RECORDING N O. 8108120194, AND ANY A M E N D M E N T S T H E R E TO, A N D I N VO L U M E 4 3 O F CONDOMINIUMS, PAGE(S) 35 THROUGH 53, INCLUSIVE, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. THE CONDOMINIUM DECLARATION WAS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT(S) RECORDED MAY 23, 1996, JULY 3, 1996 R E C O R D I N G N O. ( S ) 9 6 0 5 2 3 5 0 0 1 . 9 6 0 5 2 3 0 0 7 4 A N D 9607030014 SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH. STATE OF WASHINGTON which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 26, 2002, recorded December 31, 2002, under Auditor’s File No. 200212312027 records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Nathan T. Holland, an Unmarried Man, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title Company of Washington, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Capitol Commerce Mortgage Co., A California Corporation and its successors and assigns as beneficiary. Lakeview Loan Servicing LLC is now the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust. Said Deed of Trust was modified by an instrument on February 20, 2013. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on September 19, 2014 at 10:00 am on the steps in front of the Nor th side to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, in the City of Everett located at Snohomish County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Snohomish County, State of Washington, to-wit; LOT 1 OF BOUNDARY LINE ADJUSTMENT NO. 98-101948, RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER 9804280535, B E I N G A P O RT I O N O F L OT S 1 2 9 , 1 3 0 A N D 1 3 1 , C AT H C A RT, AC C O R D I N G TO T H E P L AT T H E R E O F R E C O R D E D I N VO L U M E 9 O F P L AT S , PAG E S 3 9 THROUGH 42, INCLUSIVE, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated February 12, 2007, recorded Februar y 16,2007, under Auditor’s File No. 200702160871 records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Anthony R. Iazeolla and Melanie R. Iazeolla, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to Pacific North West Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Frontier Bank and its successors and assigns as beneficiary. The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders of the CWMBS Inc., CHL Mor tgage Pass-Through Trust 2007-5, Mor tgage Pass Through Certificates, Series 2007 is now the beneficiary of the deed of trust. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on September 26, 2014 at 10:00 am on the steps in front of the Nor th side to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, in the City of Everett located at Snohomish County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Snohomish County, State of Washington, to-wit; LOT 13, SQUIRE LANE NO. 7 DIVISION B, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 21 OF P L AT S , PA G E 6 0 , I N S N O H O M I S H C O U N T Y, WASHINGTON. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 26, 2008, recorded March 31, 2008, under Auditor’s File No. 200803311002 records of Snohomish County, Washington, said Deed of Tr ust was re-recorded on August 7, 2008 under Recorder’s/Auditor’s Number 200808070334 from Erin S. Gamble and Antwoine J. Gamble, Wife and Husband, as Grantor, to Fidelity National Title Company of Washington, a Washington Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Guild Mortgage Company, a California Corporation and its successors and assigns as Beneficiary. Nationstar Mortgage LLC is now the beneficiary of the deed of trust. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:

i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Amount due to reinstate by April 24, 2014 Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 1/1/2012 through 4/1/2014: 4 payment(s) at $1184.06 3 payment(s) at $1173.26 21 payment(s) at $1166.76 Total: $32,757.98 Late Charges 8 late charge(s) at $46.67 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date Total Late Charges $373.36 Accrued Late Charges: $47.68 NSF Fee $15.00 Other Fees $14.00 Corporate Advances $1,174.78 TOTAL DEFAULT $34,382.80 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $174,205.13, together with interest from December 1, 2011 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on August 29, 2014. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by August 18, 2014 (I I clays before the sale date) t o c a u s e a d i s c o n t i nu a n c e o f t h e s a l e. T h e s a l e w i l l b e discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before August 18, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after August 18, 2014 (II days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any G u a ra n t o r, o r t h e h o l d e r o f a ny r e c o r d e d j u n i o r l i e n o r encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): Nathan T. Holland Jane Doe 23003 Lakeview Dr #306 23003 Lakeview Dr #306 Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 Nathan T. Holland Jane Doe 23003 Lakeview Dr Apt 306 23003 Lakeview Dr Apt 306 Mountlake Ter, WA 98043 Mountlake Ter, WA 98043 Nathan T. Holland Jane Doe 23003 Lakeview Dr 306 23003 Lakeview Dr 306 Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 Mountlake Terrace, WA 98043 by both first class and certified mail on June 24, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on June 24, 2013, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary. XI N OT I C E TO A L L P E R S O N S A N D PA RT I E S W H O A R E GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THIS DEED OF TRUST: (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSNG COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.wshfc.org/buyers/counseling.htm The United States Depar tment of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm? webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&fiIterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear DATE: April 22, 2014. BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. FORMERLY KNOWN AS BISHOP, WHITE, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S., Sucessor Trustee By: WILLIAM L. BISHOP, JR., President 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 State of Washington ) ) ss. County of King ) On this 22 day of April, 2014, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared William L. Bishop, Jr., to me known to be an Officer of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., the corporation that executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned, and on oath states that they are authorized to execute the said instrument. WITNESS my hand and official seal hereto affixed the day and year first above written. MIA E ROGERS NOTARY PUBLIC in and for the State of Washington at King County My Appt. Exp: Feb. 29, 2016 Published: August 1, 22, 2014. EDH577603

i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Amount due to reinstate by May 15, 2014 Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 12/1/2009 through 5/1/2014: 40 payment(s) at $6120.24 Total: 332,633.14 Late Charges: 51 late charge(s) at $246.28 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date Total Late Charges 12,560.28 Corporate Advance 3,522.40 TOTAL DEFAULT $348,715.82 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $773,642.58, together with interest from November 1, 2009 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 19, 2014. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by September 8, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before September 8, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally char tered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after September 8, 2014 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any G u a ra n t o r, o r t h e h o l d e r o f a ny r e c o r d e d j u n i o r l i e n o r encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): Anthony R. Iazeolla Melanie R. Iazeolla 17310 107th Ave SE 17310 107th Ave SE Snohomish, WA 98296 Snohomish, WA 98296 Anthony R. Iazeolla Melanie R. Iazeolla PO Box 2780 PO Box 2780 Everett, WA 98213 Everett, WA 98213 by both first class and certified mail on November 13, 2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on November 13, 2012, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary. XI N OT I C E TO A L L P E R S O N S A N D PA RT I E S W H O A R E GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THIS DEED OF TRUST: (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSNG COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.wshfc.org/buyers/counseling.htm The United States Depar tment of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm? webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&fiIterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear DATE: May 15, 2014. BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. FORMERLY KNOWN AS BISHOP, WHITE, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S., Sucessor Trustee By: WILLIAM L. BISHOP, JR. 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 State of Washington ) ) ss. County of King ) On this 15 day of May, 2014, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared William L. Bishop, Jr., to me known to be an Officer of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., the corporation that executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned, and on oath states that they are authorized to execute the said instrument. WITNESS my hand and official seal hereto affixed the day and year first above written. MIA E. ROGERS NOTARY PUBLIC in and for the State of Washington at King County My Appt. Exp: 02/29/16 Published: August 22; September 12, 2014. EDH579806

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i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Amount due to reinstate by May 22, 2014 Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 01/01/2013 through 5/1/2014: 6 payment(s) at $1,907.63 11 payment(s) at $1,914.99 Total: $32,510.67 Accrued Late Charges: $499.50 Corporate Advances $1,923.83 TOTAL DEFAULT $34,934.00 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $324,000.00, together with interest from December 1, 2012 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 26, 2014. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by September 15, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before September 15, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally char tered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after September 15, 2014 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any G u a ra n t o r, o r t h e h o l d e r o f a ny r e c o r d e d j u n i o r l i e n o r encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): Antwoine J. Gamble Erin S. Gamble 5630 178th Pl SW 5630 178th Pl SW Lynnwood, WA 98037 Lynnwood, WA 98037 by both first class and certified mail on October 22, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on October 22, 2013, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary. XI N OT I C E TO A L L P E R S O N S A N D PA RT I E S W H O A R E GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THIS DEED OF TRUST: (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSNG COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.wshfc.org/buyers/counseling.htm The United States Depar tment of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm? webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&fiIterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear DATED: May 16, 2014. BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. FORMERLY KNOWN AS BISHOP, WHITE, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S., Sucessor Trustee By: WILLIAM L. BISHOP, JR., President 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 State of Washington ) ) ss. County of King ) On this 16 day of May, 2014, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared William L. Bishop, Jr., to me known to be an Officer of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., the corporation that executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned, and on oath states that they are authorized to execute the said instrument. WITNESS my hand and official seal hereto affixed the day and year first above written. THOMAS J. STROUD NOTARY PUBLIC in and for the State of Washington at: King County My Appt. Exp: July 11, 2017 Published: August 22; September 12, 2014. EDH579864

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The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 B9

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01FSL-119060 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on September 5, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at ON THE STEPS IN FRONT OF THE NORTH ENTRANCE TO THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVENUE, EVERETT, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington: UNIT M, BUILDING 307, THE HAMPTONS AT HARBOUR POINTE, A CONDOMINIUM, ACCORDING TO THE DECLARATION RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER 200507250249, AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERETO, AND IN SURVEY MAP AND PLANS RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER 200507255241, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATED IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, STATE OF WASHINGTON. TOGETHER WITH LIMITED COMMON AREAS Tax Parcel No: 01033430701300, commonly known as 5300 HARBOUR POINTE BOULEVARD #307M, MUKILTEO, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 5/17/2006, r e c o r d e d 5 / 3 0 / 2 0 0 6 , u n d e r A u d i t o r ’s / R e c o r d e r ’s N o . 200605301145, records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from MATTHEW P ERICKSON, AND SARAH M ERICKSON, as Grantor, to LANDSAFE (BENTON) TITLE OF WASHINGTON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICA’S WHOLESALE LENDER, ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the certificateholders of the CWABS, Inc., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-7. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/1/2009, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of May 7, 2014 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2009 20 payments at $928.84 each $18,576.80 2 payments at $938.43 each $1,876.86 10 payments at $1,024. 14 each $10,241.40 2 payments at $995.06 each $1,990.12 10 payments at $1,082. 62 each $10,826.20 10 payments at $1,055.90 each $ 10,559.00 (12-01-09 through 05-07-14) Late Charges: $2,181.55 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TOTAL UNC O L L E C T E D $ 1 , 5 4 9 . 4 5 S u s p e n s e C r e d i t : $ 0 . 0 0 TOTA L : $57,801.38 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $164,400.06, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 5, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by August 25, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before August 25, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after August 25, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: MATTHEW ERICKSON, 2203 107TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, LAKE STEVENS, WA, 98258-5792 MATTHEW ERICKSON, 5300 HARBOUR POINTE BOULEVARD #307M, MUKILTEO, WA, 98275 SARAH ERICKSON, 5300 HARBOUR POINTE BOULEVARD #307M, MUKILTEO, WA, 98275 SARAH ERICKSON, 2203 107TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, LAKE STEVENS, WA, 98258-5792 SPOUSE OF SARAH M ERICKSON, 2203 107TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, LAKE STEVENS, WA, 98258-5792 SPOUSE OF SARAH M ERICKSON, 5300 HARBOUR POINTE BOULEVARD #307M, MUKILTEO, WA, 98275 SPOUSE OF MATTHEW P ERICKSON, 5300 HARBOUR POINTE BOULEVARD #307M, MUKILTEO, WA, 982 7 5 SPOUSE OF MATTHEW P ERICKSON, 2203 107TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, LAKE STEVENS, WA, 98258-5792 by both first class and certified mail on 3/31/2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 3/31/2014, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-984-4663) Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_ counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?web ListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 5/6/2014 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: BRIAN WELT, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4457881 08/01/2014, 08/22/2014 Published: August 1, 22, 2014. EDH576532

before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es):

ants thereof, and all goodwill in any way relating to the Land; (ii) all permits, licenses, authorizations, variances, land use entitlements, approvals and consents issued or obtained in connection with the construction of the Improvements; (iii) all permits, licenses, approvals, consents, authorizations, franchises and agreements issued or obtained in connection with the use, occupancy or operation of the Land; (iv) all rights as a declarant (or its equivalent) under any covenants, conditions and restrictions or other matters of record affecting the Land; (v) all materials prepared for filing or filed with any governmental agency; (vi) all rights under any contract in connection with the development, design, use, operation, management and construction of the Land; and (vii) all books and records prepared and kept in connection with the acquisition, construction, operation and occupancy of the Land and the Improvements; (3) All construction, service, management, engineering, consulting, leasing, architectural, design, landscape and other similar contracts of any nature, as such maybe modified, amended or supplemented from time to time, concerning the design, construction, management, operation, occupancy, use, and/or disposition of any portion of or all of the Land; (4) All architectural, design and engineering drawings, plans, specifications, working drawings, shop drawings, general conditions, addenda, soil tests and reports, feasibility studies, appraisals, engineering reports, environmental reports and similar materials relating to any portion of or all of the Land and modifications, supplements and amendments thereto; (5) All payment and performance bonds or guarantees and any and all modifications and extensions thereof relating to the Land; (6) All deferred payments, refunds, cost savings, and letters of credit relating to the construction, design, development, operation, occupancy, use and disposition of all or any portion of the Land, including, without limitation, any property tax rebates now owing or hereafter payable; (7) All proceeds and any claims arising on account of any damage to or taking of the Land or any part thereof, and all causes of action and recoveries for any loss or diminution in the value of the Land; (8) All policies of, and proceeds resulting from, insurance relating to the Land, Improvements or any of the foregoing collateral, and any and all riders, amendments, renewals, supplements or extensions thereof, and all proceeds thereof; (9) All deposits made with or other security given to utility companies with respect to the Land and/or the Improvements, and all advance payments of insurance premiums made with respect thereto and claims or demands relating to insurance and all deposit accounts wherever located; (10) All shares of stock or other evidence of ownership of any part of the Land that is owned in common with others, including all water stock relating to the Land, if any, and all documents or rights of membership in any owners’ or members’ association or similar group having responsibility for managing or operating any part of the Land; (11) All sales contracts, escrow agreements and broker’s agreements concerning the sale of any or all of the Land, and all amendments thereto; and (12) All income, rents, revenues, issues, deposits, receipts, profits and proceeds, and accounts receivable generated from the use and operation, of the Land, the Improvements and the foregoing collateral to which Grantor may be entitled, whether now due, past due or to become due; including, without limiting the above items, all “Goods”, “”Documents”, “Instruments”, “Money”, “Chattel Paper” and “General Intangibles”, as those terms are defined in the Washington Commercial Code from time to time in effect; and (h) All products and proceeds of, and any additions and accessions to, any of the foregoing. Tax Parcel No: 28063500400900, commonly known as 14692 179TH AVE. S.E., MONROE, WA. The Property is subject to that certain (i) Deed of Trust and Absolute Assignment of Rents and Leases and Security Agreement (and Fixture Filing) dated 5/10/2007, recorded 5/11/2007, under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200705111234, records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from MONROE PARTNERS LLC, A WASHINGTON LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of INTERVEST-MORTGAGE INVESTMENT COMPANY, A WASHINGTON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary (the “Deed of Trust) (ii) Limited Guaranty dated 5/10/2007 by C. David Taylor, an individual, as guarantor, in favor of Intervest-Mortgage Investment Company, as lender. The beneficial interest is presently held by WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE, IN TRUST FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF BANC OF AMERICA COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE INC., COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-5 pursuant to that certain Assignment and Conveyance recorded 5/11/2007 under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200705111236, that certain Assignment and Conveyance recorded 5/11/2007 under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200705111237, and that certain Assignment of Deed of Trust and Absolute Assignment of Rents and Leases and Security Agreement (and Fixture Filing) recorded 5/7/2008 under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200805070480. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 11/1/2013, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS DEFAULT INTEREST, LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. IN ADDITION, THE BENEFICIARY WILL REQUIRE AS A CONDITION TO REINSTATEMENT THAT YOU PROVIDE RELIABLE WRITTEN EVIDENCE THAT ALL PROPERTY TAXES AND HAZARD INSURANCE PREMIUMS ARE PAID CURRENT AS PROVIDED IN THE DEED OF TRUST. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of June 6, 2014 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2013 8 payments at $40,803.31 each $326,426.48 TILC Reser ve Payments: 8 payments at $17, 500.00 each $ 1 4 0 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 L a t e C h a r g e s : $ 1 6 , 3 2 1 . 3 6 D e fa u l t I n t e r e s t : $195,457.12 Outstanding Advances (Includes Tax Advances) $108,554.03 Interest on Advances through 5/1/2014: $2,627.29 Noteholder Expenses and Fees: $817.00 Attor ney Fees: $26,749.33 TOTAL: $816,952.61 The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $6,638,162.68, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 5, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by August 25, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before August 25, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after August 25, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower, Grantor or Guarantor at the following addresses: BEVERLY J. TAYLOR, 819 WINDSOR DRIVE SE, SAMMAMISH, WA, 98074 BEVERLY 0. TAYLOR, 14692 179TH AVENUE S O U T H E A S T, M O N RO E , WA , 9 8 2 7 2 C. DAV I D TAY L O R , 14692 179TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, MONROE, WA, 98272 C. DAVID TAYLOR, 819 WINDSOR DRIVE SE, SAMMAMISH, WA, 98074 MONROE PARTNERS, LLC, C/O KTC SERVICE CORPORATION, REG. AGENT, 701 5TH AVENUE, SUITE 330C, SEATTLE, WA, 98104 MONROE PARTNERS, LLC, C/O NAVIGATOR REAL ES1AIE SERVICES, LLC, ATTN: TOM W. GROSSI, 3020 ISSAQUAH PINE LAKE ROAD, #508, SAMMAMISH, WA, 98075 MONROE PARTNERS, LLC, C/O VIKING VENTURIS, LLC, ATTN: C. DAVID TAYLOR, 819 WINDSOR DRIVE SOUTHEAST, SAMMAMISH, WA, 98074 MONROE PARTNERS, LLC, 319 WINDSOR DRIVE SE, SAMMAMISH, WA, 98074 MONROE PARTNERS, LLC, 14692 1797H AVENUE SOUTHEAST, MONROE, WA, 98272 by both first class and cer tified mail on 3/26/2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 3/26/2014, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. X The obligation secured by the Deed of trust being foreclosed herein was not incurred primarily for personal, family or household pur poses. Pursuant to RCW 61.24.100, the subject foreclosure does not preclude any judicial or non-judicial foreclosure of any other deeds of trust, mortgage, security agreements or other security interests granted to secure this obligation. The Beneficiary hereby reserves its right to foreclose any or all additional security. XI NOTICE TO GUARANTORS The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the trustee’s sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust. The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale. The Guarantor will have no rights to redeem the property after the trustee’s sale. Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington deed of trust act, chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the trustee’s sale or the last trustee’s sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt. In any action for deficiency, the guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the trustee’s sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the trustee’s sale, plus interest and costs DATED: 6/4/2014 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: LISA HACKNEY, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4463825 Published: August 1, 22, 2014. EDH577045

Case No. 14-2-04548-2 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION (60 DAYS) THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH BERRY FARM MASTER CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, a Washington Non-Profit Corporation, Plaintiff, v. DAVID R. NORMAN, an individual, and JANE or JOHN DOE NORMAN, an individual, and the marital or quasi-martial community comprised thereof; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; STATE OF WASHINGTON, DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND HEALTH SERVICES, DIVISION OF CHILD SUPPORT; and STATE OF WASHINGTON, EMPLOYMENT SECURITY DEPARTMENT, Defendants. The State of Washington, To: DAVID R. NORMAN, an individual, and JANE or JOHN DOE NORMAN, an individual, and the marital or quasi-martial community comprised thereof, Defendants. You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 1st day of August, 2014, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled cour t, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiff at his (or their) office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. The object of this action being to collect unpaid assessments and foreclose a lien for the same. This concerns collection of a debt. Any information obtained or provided will be used for that purpose. The attorney is acting as a debt collector. Signed: RACHEL R. BURKEMPER CONDOMINIUM LAW GROUP, PLLC Rachel R. Burkemper, WSBA #39989 Attorneys for plaintiff 10310 Aurora Avenue North Seattle, WA 98133 EDH578878 206-633-1520 Published: August 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; September 5, 2014.

NOTICE: AS THE RESULT OF AN ORDER ENTERED IN A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, AMY LYNN HAWK MAY NOT BE PERSONALLY LIABLE FOR THE UNPAID BALANCE OF THE BELOW REFERENCED LOAN. HOWEVER, THE BENEFICIARY RETAINS A DEED OF TRUST DESCRIBED BELOW WHICH IS SUBJECT TO FORECLOSURE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAWS OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON. NOTICE: IF YOU ARE NOT PERSONALLY LIABLE TO PAY THIS OBLIGATION BY REASON OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THEN THIS NOTICE IS NOT AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT BUT IS INTENDED ONLY TO RELAY INFORMATION REGARDING YOUR DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE: IF YOU ARE PERSONALLY LIABLE TO PAY THIS OBLIGATION, WE WISH TO INFORM YOU THAT WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. ANY INFORMATION YOU PROVIDE TO US WILL BE USED FOR THE PURPOSES OF FORECLOSING THE DEED OF TRUST MENTIONED BELOW. NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on September 19, 2014 at 10:00 am on the steps in front of the North side to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, in the City of Everett located at Snohomish County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Snohomish County, State of Washington, towit; LOT 3, HAYES ADDITION PART ONE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 17 OF PLATS, PAGE 102, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated May 1, 2006, recorded May 19, 2006, under Auditor’s File No. 200605190232 records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Preston A Hawk, and, and, Amy Hawk, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to CTC Real Estate Services, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., and its successors and assigns as beneficiary. Nationstar Mortgage is now the beneficiary of the deed of turst. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows:

i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Amount due to reinstate by May 19, 2014 Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 10/1/2010 through 5/1/2014: 8 payment(s) at $1405.84 12 payment(s) at $1113.55 12 payment(s) at $1135.18 12 payment(s) at $1114.32 Total: 51,603.32 Accrued Late Charges: $373.62 Corporate Advances 1,845.57 Escrow Advance 3,283.63 Previous Mediation Fees 750.00 TOTAL DEFAULT $57,856.14 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $172,937.36, together with interest from September 1, 2010 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on September 19, 2014. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by September 8, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before September 8, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after September 8, 2014 (11 days before the sale date), and

Preston A. Hawk Amy Hawk 5722 80th St NE aka Amy Lynn Hawk Marysville, WA 98270 5722 80th St NE Marysville, WA 98270

Preston A. Hawk Amy Hawk PO Box 2576 aka Amy Lynn Hawk Everett, WA 98213 PO Box 2576 Everett, WA 98213

Preston A. Hawk Amy Hawk 13807 25th Ave SE aka Amy Lynn Hawk Bothell, WA 98012 13807 25th Ave SE Bothell, WA 98012

Dennis Lee Burman Trustee 1103 9th St Marysville, WA 98270

Dennis Lee Burman Trustee PO Box 1620 Marysville, WA 98270

Amy Lynn Hawk C/O Stephen J Garvey, Attorney 7100 Evergreen Way Ste E Everett, WA 98203 by both first class and certified mail on March 25, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on March 25, 2013, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary. XI NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS AND PARTIES WHO ARE GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY THIS DEED OF TRUST: (1) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSNG COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.wshfc.org/buyers/counseling.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm? webListAction=search&searchstate= WA&fiIterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear DATE: May 19, 2014. BISHOP, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S. FORMERLY KNOWN AS BISHOP, WHITE, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S., Sucessor Trustee By: WILLIAM L. BISHOP, JR. 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 State of Washington ) ) ss. County of King ) On this 19 day of May, 2014, before me, the undersigned, a Notary Public in and for the State of Washington, duly commissioned and sworn, personally appeared William L. Bishop, Jr., to me known to be an Officer of Bishop, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. formerly known as Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., the corporation that executed the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the said instrument to be the free and voluntary act and deed of said corporation, for the uses and purposes therein mentioned, and on oath states that they are authorized to execute the said instrument. WITNESS my hand and official seal hereto affixed the day and year first above written. MIA E. ROGERS NOTARY PUBLIC in and for the State of Washington at King County My Appt. Exp: 02/29/16 Published: August 22; September 12, 2014. EDH579843

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01CM-131962 TO: MONROE PARTNERS LLC C. DAVID TAYLOR I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on September 5, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at ON THE STEPS OF THE FRONT OF THE NORTH ENTRANCE TO THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE AT THE FLAG PLAZA. 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVENUE, EVERETT, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington: Lot 2 and a portion of Lot 4 of Short Plat recorded under Recording No. 7908170205, revised Boundary Line Adjustment recorded under Recording No(s). 8911290086, particularly described as follows: That portion of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 6 East, W.M., records of Snohomish County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Section 35; THENCE North 00º59’27” West along the East line of said Section 220.00 feet to the True Point of Beginning; THENCE South 89º00’27” West at right angles to said East line 329.90 feet to the beginning of a tangent curve to the right, having a radius of 284.81 feet; THENCE Westerly along said curve an arc distance of 175.19 feet through a central angle of 31º41’42”; THENCE North 55º44’45” West 67.91 feet: THENCE North 00º59’26” West 240.33 feet; THENCE North 88º29’13” East, 159.00 feet; THENGE South 01º30’47” East 122.00 feet; THENCE North 88º29’13” East, 389.62 feet to a point on the East line of said Section 35; THENCE South 00º59’27” East along said East line 214.72 feet to the Point of Beginning; EXCEPT the East 30.00 feet for 179th Avenue Southeast. Situate in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington. Together with all estate, right, title and interest which Grantor now has or may hereafter acquire in, to, under or derived from any or all of the following: (a) All appurtenances, easements, rights of way, water and water rights, pumps, pipes, flumes and ditches and ditch rights, water stock, ditch and/or reservoir stock or interests, royalties, development rights and credits, air rights, minerals, oil rights, and gas rights, now, previously or later used or useful in connection with, appurtenant to or related to that real property located in Snohomish County, Washington, and more particularly described above on this Exhibit “A” (the “Land”); (b) All buildings, structures, facilities, other improvements and fixtures now, previously or hereafter located on the Land; (c) All apparatus, equipment, machinery and appliances and all accessions thereto and renewals and replacements thereof and substitutions therefor used in the operation or occupancy of the Land so far as permitted by law, whether or not attached or affixed to the Land; (d) All land lying in the right-ofway of any street, road, avenue, alley or right-of-way opened, proposed or vacated, and all sidewalks, strips and gores of land adjacent to or used in connection with the Land; (e) All additions and accretions to the property described above; (f) All licenses, authorizations, certificates, variances, consents, approvals and other permits now, previously or hereafter pertaining to the Land and all estate, right, title and interest of Monroe Partners LLC, a Washington limited liability company (“Grantor”) in, to, under or derived from all trade names or business names relating to the Land or the present or future development, construction, operation or use of the Land; and (g) All Grantor’s now owned or hereafter acquired goods, inventory, equipment, accounts receivable, contract rights, general intangibles, chattel paper, documents, documents of title, instruments, letter-of-credit rights, investment property, tort claims (including commercial tort claims), fixtures, and other property, including but not limited to the following: (1) All existing and future goods and tangible personal property located on the Land or wherever located and used or useable in connection with the use, operation or occupancy of the Land or in construction of any improvements, including, but not limited to, apparatus, equipment and appliances used to supply air cooling, air conditioning, heat, gas, water, light, power, refrigeration, ventilation, laundry, drying, dishwashing, garbage disposal, waste removal, recreation or other services on the Land; and all elevators, escalators, and related machinery and equipment, fire prevention and extinguishing apparatus, security and access control apparatus, partitions, ducts, compressors, plumbing, ovens, refrigerators, dishwashers, disposals, washers, dryers, awnings, storm windows, storm doors, screens, blinds, shades, curtains and curtain rods, mirrors, cabinets, paneling, rugs, attached floor coverings, furniture, pictures, antennas, pools and spas and pool and spa operation and maintenance equipment and apparatus; and all trees and plants located on the Land; and all renewals or replacements thereof or articles in substitution thereof, it being intended and agreed that all such items will be conclusively considered to be part of the Land, whether or not attached or affixed to the Land (“Improvements”); (2) All general intangibles relating to design, development, operation, management and use of the Land and construction of the improvements, including, but not limited to: (i) all names under which or by which the Land or the Improvements may at any time be operated or known, all rights to carry on business under any such names or any vari-

No. 14 3 00901 3 Summons by Publication (SMPB) Superior Court of Washington County of Snohomish

In re: GERMAINE MELENDEZ Petitioner, and JUAN MELENDEZ Respondent. To the Respondent: JUAN MELENDEZ 1. The petitioner has star ted an action in the above cour t requesting: that your marriage or domestic partnership be dissolved. 2. The petition also requests that the court grant the following relief: Change of the name of the petitioner to: GERMAINE NICOLE SWIFT 3. You must respond to this summons by serving a copy of your written response on the person signing this summons and by filing the original with the clerk of the court. If you do not serve your written response within 60 days after the date of the first publication of this summons (60 days after the 18th day of July, 2014), the court may enter an order of default against you, and the court may, without further notice to you, enter a decree and approve or provide for other relief requested in this summons. In the case of a dissolution, the court will not enter the final decree until at least 90 days after service and filing. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned person, you are entitled to notice before an order of default or a decree may be entered. 4. Your written response to the summons and petition must be on form WPF DR 01.0300, Response to Petition (Marriage). Information about how to get this form may be obtained by contacting the clerk of the cour t, or by contacting the Administrative Office of the Courts at (360) 705-5328, or from the Internet at the Washington State Courts homepage: http://www.courts.wa.gov/forms 5. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. 6. One method of serving a copy of your response on the petitioner is to send it by certified mail with return receipt requested. 7. Other: This summons is issued pursuant to RCW 4.28.100 and Superior Court Civil Rule 4.1 of the state of Washington. Dated: July 16, 2014 GERMAINE MELENDEZ Petitioner File Original of Your Response Serve a Copy of Your with the Clerk of the Court at: Response on: Snohomish County Clerk Petitioner MS 605, 3000 Rockefeller GERMAINE MELENDEZ Everett, WA 98201 PO Box #93 Joyce, WA 98343 Published: July 18, 25; August 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014. EDH576092

No. 14 3 01822 5 Summons by Publication (SMPB) Superior Court of Washington County of Snohomish

In re: HEATHER L. ELLIOTT-CALL Petitioner, and DAVID A. CALL Respondent. To the Respondent: DAVID ALLEN CALL 1. The petitioner has star ted an action in the above cour t requesting: that your marriage or domestic partnership be dissolved. 2. The petition also requests that the court grant the following relief: Dispose of property and liabilities. Change of the name of the petitioner to: HEATHER LYNN ELLIOTT. 3. You must respond to this summons by serving a copy of your written response on the person signing this summons and by filing the original with the clerk of the court. If you do not serve your written response within 60 days after the date of the first publication of this summons (60 days after the18th day of July, 2014), the court may enter an order of default against you, and the court may, without further notice to you, enter a decree and approve or provide for other relief requested in this summons. In the case of a dissolution, the court will not enter the final decree until at least 90 days after service and filing. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned person, you are entitled to notice before an order of default or a decree may be entered. 4. Your written response to the summons and petition must be on form WPF DR 01.0300, Response to Petition (Marriage). Information about how to get this form may be obtained by contacting the cler k of the cour t, or by contacting the Administrative Office of the Courts at (360) 705-5328, or from the Internet at the Washington State Courts homepage: http://www.courts.wa.gov/forms 5. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. 6. One method of ser ving a copy of your response on the petitioner is to send it by certified mail with return receipt requested. 7. Other: This summons is issued pursuant to RCW 4.28.100 and Superior Court Civil Rule 4.1 of the state of Washington. Dated: 7/15/14 HEATHER L. ELLIOTT-CALL Petitioner File Original of Your Response Serve a Copy of Your with the Clerk of the Court at: Response on: Snohomish County Clerk Petitioner MS 605, 3000 Rockefeller HEATHER L. ELLIOTT-CALL Everett, WA 98201 PO Box 1764 Marysville, WA 98270 Published: July 18, 25; August 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014. EDH576046 No. 14 3 01920 5 Summons by Publication (SMPB) Superior Court of Washington County of Snohomish

In re: TERESA L. LEE Petitioner, and MARCUS T. LEE Respondent. To the Respondent: 1. The petitioner has star ted an action in the above cour t requesting: that your marriage or domestic partnership be dissolved. 2. The petition also requests that the court grant the following relief: 3. You must respond to this summons by serving a copy of your written response on the person signing this summons and by filing the original with the clerk of the court. If you do not serve your written response within 60 days after the date of the first publication of this summons (60 days after the1st day of August, 2014), the court may enter an order of default against you, and the court may, without further notice to you, enter a decree and approve or provide for other relief requested in this summons. In the case of a dissolution, the court will not enter the final decree until at least 90 days after service and filing. If you serve a notice of appearance on the undersigned person, you are entitled to notice before an order of default or a decree may be entered. 4. Your written response to the summons and petition must be on form WPF DR 01.0300, Response to Petition (Marriage). Information about how to get this form may be obtained by contacting the cler k of the cour t, or by contacting the Administrative Office of the Courts at (360) 705-5328, or from the Internet at the Washington State Courts homepage: http://www.courts.wa.gov/forms 5. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. 6. One method of serving a copy of your response on the petitioner is to send it by certified mail with return receipt requested. 7. Other: This summons is issued pursuant to RCW 4.28.100 and Superior Court Civil Rule 4.1 of the state of Washington. Dated: 7-28-14 TERESA LEE Petitioner File Original of Your Response Serve a Copy of Your with the Clerk of the Court at: Response on: Snohomish County Clerk Petitioner MS 605, 3000 Rockefeller Teresa Lee Everett, WA 98201 11607 28th St. NE Lake Stevens, WA 98258 EDH579026 Published: August 1, 8, 15, 22, 29; September 5, 2014.


B10 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

rin

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ROY ROBINSON CHEVROLET

Quil Ceda Casino 64th St NE

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ROY ROBINSON SUBARU USED VEHICLES

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2011 Honda Ridgeline RTL 10k Miles #BB454422

2005 Volvo S60 Leather, Moonroof #52466684

2012 Hyundai Elantra AT, 30k #9CU13948

2011 Honda Insight Hybrid

2007 Infiniti G35

#BS004568

AT, Leather #7M730014

2003 Infinity G 35

2011 Honda Insight

49k Miles #3M328880

2013 Toyota Sienna

2012 Honda Civic LX

AT, Leather #54ATZ225

AT, 28k #CH536263

2011 Chev Camaro

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$

299

36 month lease $1000 down plus inception fees 12K miles per year.

Stk #T342732

2002 Chrysler T&C

2005 GMC Sierra

2010 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

2013 Ford F-150

2008 Chev Corvette Supercharged

2007 Ford Ranger

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#85123517 Convertable

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2009 Suzuki Grand Vitara

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1992 COLEMAN TENT TRAILER

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2004 LANCE 1071 CAMPER

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2004 JAMBOREE 29S GT

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2004 WINNEBAGO ADVENTURER 38G

2006 DAMON CHALLENGER 37’

2005 SAFARI CHEETAH DIESEL 35’

58k Miles #T15687A

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CLASS A’s

2003 4 WINDS INFINITY 35F

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2005 FLEETWOOD FLAIR 33’

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CLASS C’s

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1990 Winnebago Chieftan

1993 Gulfstream Ultra 29’

2004 Prowler Regal 25’

2002 Itasca Sunrise 30W

2001 Gulfstream Ultra 26’

1996 Thor Chateau 5th Wheel

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2000 Harney Riata Diesel Pusher

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2005 Fleetwood Bounder 35’

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2006 R-Vision 35’ Trailaire

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2003 Monaco Dynasty 38i

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2004 Gulfstream BT Touring

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2010 Fleetwood Pulse 24’

Diesel #T15741A............................... $59,999

2011 4Winds Siesta 26’

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2008 Winn. View Class C

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Fixer-upper 5th Wheel #0001 .............. $4,999 #T15845A ........................................... $5,999

1996 Skyline Aljo Stmw

#T15993A ........................................... $7,999

2008 Northwood Nash TT

#T4236B ........................................... $14,999

2002 Cameo Carriage 5th Wheel

#8G105177 ....................................... $16,999

2007 Sunnybrook 29RBS

#71X760001 ...................................... $21,999


Sports SECTION C

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM/SPORTS

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Odds are ... That the Seattle Mariners won’t make the playoffs. See a breakdown of American League postseason contenders, C5

FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Everett Silvertips assistant coach Brennan Sonne dismisses the team for drills during the first day of training camp at Comcast Arena in Everett.

Tips, coach know what to expect Training camp opens with Constantine, players comfortable with each other and ready to build on last year’s success By Nick Patterson Herald Writer

EVERETT — Kevin Constantine didn’t take the lead during the first day of Everett Silvertips training camp. Everett’s head coach instead deferred to his assistants during camp’s opening practice sessions Thursday at Comcast Arena, spending his time during practices watching from the bench and taking in the proceedings from a different perspective. But while Constantine wasn’t occupying his usual home on the ice, he was still in a more

comfortable position than he was a year earlier. Constantine is beginning the second season of his second stint as Everett’s head coach, and this year he’s able to hitting the ground running instead of starting from a standstill. “I probably feel the same way as maybe a 16-year-old who tried out last season as a 15-year-old,” Constantine explained. “You come and you’re a little more comfortable, you have a few of the things already figured out, there’s less to know, you feel more confident coming back. It’s kind of the same for me, I don’t have to soak in quite as much

this year because I already know so many of the guys. I think it will allow me to focus on some of the people I don’t know, some of the 15s, 16s or older invites to camp. That will be nice.” In a strange way Constantine was Everett’s most prominent rookie last season. Yes, he was the first coach in franchise history, guiding the Tips to three U.S. Division championships in four seasons from 2003-07. So the team, the town, the arena and the organization were all familiar entities to Constantine. But what wasn’t familiar to Constantine were the players. Not

one player who was in camp with Everett last year was part of the organization during Constantine’s first stint behind the bench. Therefore, last year’s training camp was just as much a familiarization process for Constantine as it was for the incoming bantam draft picks and camp invitees. However, now with a year under his belt and a thorough knowledge of the returning players, Constantine isn’t having to play catch-up. “I think this year there is a foundation,” Constantine said. “I know what to expect from them, I know what kind of players they are, I know what kind of roles they can

play, they know how our practices go and what our style of play is.” The familiarization extends beyond Constantine, too. Last year, the players were wondering just what they were going to get from their new head coach. They’d heard the rumors about his detailed systems and intense coaching style, but had yet to experience those themselves. Now that the returning players know what Constantine is all about, they also come into camp better prepared. “It’s good to kind of know what we’re getting into before we actually See TIPS, Page C2

Chicago Bears at Seattle Seahawks CenturyLink Field

7 p.m.

TV: Fox (CH. 13)

Radio: ESPN (710 AM); KIRO (97.3 FM)

Can Carpenter, O-line continue impressive play? By Tim Booth Associated Press

RENTON — All James Carpenter wanted was to be able to run. That seems an odd wish coming from a 6-foot-5, 321-pound offensive lineman. For each offseason during his brief NFL career since becoming a first-round pick by the Seattle Seahawks in 2011, Carpenter was undergoing or recovering from some surgery. So when the 2014 offseason arrived and Carpenter wasn’t in recovery mode, running was a joy. “This time I was really able to run and I was excited about doing it,” Carpenter said. Carpenter’s transformation has stood out during

Seattle’s training camp. He’s down 15 pounds from where he finished last year and his conditioning has improved to where he doesn’t need to be in a rotation. Carpenter will get his most extensive playing time of the preseason Friday night when the Seahawks host Chicago in the third preseason game for both clubs. He won’t be alone as both teams are expected to play their starters for at least the first half and possibly into the third quarter. This is truly the dress rehearsal, especially for Seattle, which is unlikely to let its starters see much of the field next Thursday in Oakland with the See SEAHAWKS, Page C3

INSIDE: Boeing Classic, C2

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Five things to watch Focus on these aspects of the game tonight By John Boyle Herald Writer

RENTON — The Seahawks host the Chicago Bears tonight in the most important of the games that don’t count, aka, preseason game No. 3. And while, as always, the end result doesn’t mean a darn thing, this particular preseason game is plenty important to the teams involved for several reasons, not the least of which is that it is basically the final dress rehearsal for the starters, most of whom will see little if any playing time in next week’s preseason finale. Here are five things to watch in tonight’s game:

1

TED S. WARREN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle Seahawks guard James Carpenter will get his most extensive playing time this preseason in tonight’s game against Chicago.

Preps, C2

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Football, C3

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Does Marshawn Lynch get involved, and how is Christine Michael looking? Technically, Lynch made his preseason debut last week, but he played just two snaps — Seattle’s first two of the game — and did not touch the ball. While it’s likely Lynch plays less tonight than a lot of his fellow starters, he should at least get a few series and carry the ball a few times. The Seahawks have made no secret of the fact that they want to limit Lynch’s workload in the preseason and practice, but getting him at least a little game-like action before the season opener would be beneficial. “It’s time for him to get some carries and get involved a little bit,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “I could not be more pleased with the conditioning level that he’s had, the consistency of practice and his preparation has been great. He’ll be ready to go and I know he’s looking forward to that, too.”

AquaSox, C5

See WATCH, Page C3

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Storm, C6

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Weather, C6


C2

Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Couples still seeks elusive hometown win

CALENDAR AUGUST

FRI SAT 22 23 Boston 10:35 a.m. ROOT

Boston 4:10 p.m. ROOT Chicago 7 p.m. FOX,13

Next game: at Portland 2 p.m., Sun., Aug. 24

Eugene 7:05 p.m.

Eugene 7:05 p.m.

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Associated Press SNOQUALMIE — It will remain a sore spot with Fred Couples until he’s finally able to add the accomplishment to his resume. For all the tournament’s won during his career, Couples has still never won in the Seattle area, where he grew up. Not that he’s had many chances. With Seattle lacking a regular PGA Tour stop the most marquee events that Couples has participated were the 1998 PGA Championship and 2010 U.S. Senior Open, along with being a regular participant in the Boeing Classic since joining the Champions Tour in 2010. Couples is back at the TPC Snoqualmie Ridge this week trying to win that elusive hometown title in the 10th edition of the popular tournament. “It’s really one of my favorite courses and not just because

TPC Snoqualmie Ridge First players tee off at 11:30 a.m.

TV: GOLF (cable), delayed broadcast at 5:30 p.m.

I’m from here, but it’s for a longer hitter,” Couples said. “It’s always in immaculate condition. The greens are perfect, the fairways are perfect. You get a good amount of people out there to watch.” He’s come close to breaking through in his hometown in the past. Three times Couples has finished in the top three of events around Seattle. That included his runner-up finish to Bernhard Langer at the 2010 Senior Open played at nearby Sahalee Country Club. Last year

Couples closed with a 66 on the final day of the Boeing Classic but was unable to catch John Riegger and finished third. “For me personally, my first senior tour event was at Sahalee and I lost to Langer. It wasn’t the end of all ends, but I was trying to win hard and this is a tournament that I really would love to win,” Couples said. “I probably don’t have that many more chances, maybe another two or three years before I get too old to totally compete, but that is my goal.” Although unlikely, Couples is hoping to give himself two chances to win in his home state in 2015. Couples said he plans on trying to qualify for the U.S. Open being played at Chambers Bay if he does not receive an exemption for the tournament. Couples and Langer will be paired together for the first round on Friday. It will be just the second Champions Tour start for Couples since May,

slowed by continued back problems. His only victory this season came at the Toshiba Classic in March. Meanwhile, Langer is the clear leader in the Charles Schwab Cup points race. He’s won five times this season, including last week’s victory at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open. He’s finished first, second and first in his last three starts and nearly caught Kenny Perry on the final day of the 3M Championship to make it three consecutive victories. Also participating in the Boeing Classic for the first time will be Kevin Sutherland fresh off shooting the first 59 in Champions Tour history in last week’s tournament. Sutherland, who bogeyed the 18th or he could have posted a 58, will be paired with Paul Goydos and Chip Beck. Both Goydos and Beck shot 59s in their careers on the PGA Tour.

Postcards from camp ...

T-wolves vow to fight to the finish By David Krueger and Aaron Lommers Herald Writers

MILL CREEK — It’s just two days into practice for Jackson High School’s football team and already one word seems as though it will define its season — finish. After finishing undefeated in league play and winning the Wesco 4A South in 2012, the Timberwolves stumbled to a 2-4 league record and missed the postseason in 2013. Close early season losses to Edmonds-Woodway and Kamiak seemed to take a toll on the squad. In order for that to change this season, the Timberwolves will have to give full effort for 48 minutes every game. “Finish is a big word for us this year,” coach Joel Vincent said. “When I stand in front of them and talk about finishing things, finishing plays, finishing games and finishing drives, that because of their experience this last year they’re going to understand what that means. We were in a lot of those games that were nailbiters and we just couldn’t find a way to finish it.” Finishing will start with senior quarterback Alex Cheesman. He started for the Timberwolves last season, but split time with Wesley Love. This season, there isn’t a question who will be taking the snaps. “Alex is the man,” Vincent said. “Alex is the starter. He’s going to get all the snaps. Of course, we would like to get games in certain situations where we can get some other kids in and get them some game time, but this is Alex’s job. He’s worked his tail off and we’re really looking for him to lead us this year and do some big things.” Quarterback is one of the few positions the Timberwolves don’t have competition. Vincent said competitions at linebacker, running back, safety and defensive line will make training camp more interesting over the next two weeks. In all, the team has 82 varsity players turning out this season — up from 65 a year ago — and nearly 130 when you include the freshmen. “It gets rid of any sense of complacency or being content,” Vincent said. “I think guys feel that when they’ve got a guy nipping at their heels and they’re hungry and they want that spot, it just pushes them to be better. Of course the guy chasing is working hard. The roundabout effect is, everybody gets better.” The Timberwolves can only

Tips From Page C1

come here,” goaltender Austin Lotz said. “I think we’re more prepared for everything that’s coming our way and for the workload we know is coming, because obviously K.C. pushes us to the limit, which is good. It’s definitely good to know that’s going to happen before things get going.” Added overage forward Brayden Low: “He’s more comfortable in the environment,

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Alex Cheesman, (L-R) Jack Doney, Jackson Hering, and Jordan Brajcich drops back to pass during practice Aug. 21 at Jackson High School.

hope the competition at various spots and depth can lead to a renewed ability to finish games. So far, Vincent said he sees a team that is ready to take on that challenge together. “This is a team that seems to really be together,” Vincent said.

Meadowdale LYNNWOOD — At Thursday’s afternoon practice on the second day of training camp, Meadowdale football coach Mike Don smiled like he had a trick up his sleeve when he talked about his football team. At the end of the 2013 season, the Mavericks stumbled late in the regular season before righting the ship in the playoffs and advancing to the 3A state quarterfinals — an experience that’s hard to put a value on. This year, many of the players that played key roles in that run are seniors. “It’s nice to have a bunch of older kids,” Don said. “(It’s) a good group of seniors with a lot of returning kids and a lot of kids that are going to step in and take pretty predominant roles. I think getting to the playoffs and making runs in the playoffs is always good for you as a team. Part of it is, losing in the playoffs is also good because it gives the kids an idea of how close they are and how much harder they have to work to get just a little bit further.” Of the 22 starters, only a handful won’t be seniors, Don said. The most important of those returnees likely will be running back Malik Braxton, who at times put the team on his back during last year’s playoff run. “He’s going to be even better,” Don said. “He worked really hard this offseason and he’s done a good job of changing himself. He got bigger, stronger and faster. I think he put on 10 pounds of muscle. He’s was able to fix some things running-wise. He’s going to be pretty special.”

we’re a lot more comfortable with him, we know what to expect. But we know there’s a lot of work to be done. We want to come back here a winner and we’re chasing excellence in this program. It’s nice to come back and be more comfortable with the whole situation, but there’s more pressure to perform and hang some banners.” Constantine brought with him a level of discipline that hadn’t been experienced by any of Everett’s players previously during their tenure with the Tips. So, the first season under Constantine involved a lot of learning.

The Mavericks lost their final threeregular season games last season before turning things around in the playoffs with victories over Timberline and Lakes. With games against Lake Stevens, Mountlake Terrace, EdmondsWoodway and Glacier Peak in the first four weeks of this season, the Mavericks can’t afford a slide like the one it had a year ago. A similar stretch could cost them a spot in the postseason. “It forces our kids to really focus up in the beginning of the year,” Don said. “We can’t have that build up like we did last year, where we kind of hit stride late in the year. We’ve really got to hit the ground running.”

fight for those offensive line positions.” The Tomahawks reached the state quarterfinals for two consecutive seasons. This year, MP hopes to make an even deeper playoff push. “We have playoff expectations here, which I’m sure a lot of teams do,” Carson said. “But it’s how you go about your business getting there.”

Lakewood

MARYSVILLE — Much like the construction on the road outside of the school, the Tomahawks’ offense is undergoing some renovations as well. With quarterback Jake Luton graduated and playing at the University of Idaho, the Tomahawks — who have long been a run-first offense — are hoping to continue a passing game with junior quarterback Erik Lind. “Right now, Erik Lind seems to be the guy,” Marysville Pilchuck coach Brandon Carson said. “He’s had a pretty good summer. He was our JV quarterback last year. He’s worked really hard. You can’t replace a guy like Jake. We’re going to have to do some different things, offensively, to make up for the yardage.” One benefit for Lind and the Tomahawks is who will return to Marysville. Along with All-Area running back Austin Joyner, Marysville Pilchuck returns a few players with experience on the offensive line, a rarity for the Tomahawks. “We’ve always kind of reloaded at that position from year to year,” Carson said. “We have a handful of guys that got a lot of playing time, as juniors, up front. Typically, that doesn’t happen around here. So we’re going to ask those guys to step up. It’s going to be a

ARLINGTON — The Cougars have no fear about challenging a bigger opponent. The 2A school, which has a history of scheduling difficult nonleague opponents to begin the season, is at it again. The Cougars start with Liberty, a 3A school in the Metro League with perennial state champion Bellevue, and follow it up with defending 2A state champion Lynden — winners of six to the past eight state titles. “The whole first half of our schedule is pretty good,” Lakewood coach Dan Teeter said. “Liberty is a tough school … and (Lynden is) the top dogs, by far, in our classification. Then right after that we’ve got (Cascade Conference rivals) Archbishop Murphy and King’s. So, we’ll find out real quickly where we’re at.” Teeter said the Cougars have 74 kids participating in football. Lakewood returns quarterback Blake Watts, as well as skill players Brett Bustad and Paulmer Gregory as the Cougars hope to return to the state playoffs after a one-year absence due to a loss to Sehome in the district tournament. “We won league champs last year and we want to defend that,” Teeter said. “We were disappointed by our quick exit in the playoffs and not making it to state for the first time in a few years. Our goal is to see if we can make it back to state and make a run and see if we can go further than we’ve gone before.”

“I think we all learned a whole lot, just how to play hockey the right way,” Low said. “I was never really taught how to play a complete structured game before last year. That’s what I took away: Do what you can to your strengths, and do them really well.” Because the majority of the players who will ultimately make the team already know the program, it gives the coaching staff more options with how to use their time. “We’re going to make some small changes,” Constantine said. “Ninety percent of what we did will be the same way, but 10

percent will be slightly different. We don’t have to spend quite as much time on some details of a certain way we play. We can maybe take some of that time and dedicate it toward some individual skill development type of stuff because we don’t have to spend as much time putting our systems in place.” All of which the Tips hope will have team running at full steam when the season begins. Check out Nick Patterson’s Silvertips blog at http://www. heraldnet.com/silvertipsblog, and follow him on Twitter at @ NickHPatterson.

Marysville Pilchuck


The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014

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UW offensive line not lacking experience The Huskies return 6 o-linemen with starting experience, including 5 seniors. By Christian Caple The News Tribune

SEATTLE — Before the Washington Huskies began fall camp, their first-year head coach, Chris Petersen, sat at an outside table on a sunny weekday afternoon in Hollywood and was asked how nice it felt to have such depth along both the offensive and defensive lines. He half-agreed with that implication. “I don’t see the same depth on the defensive line as I do on the offensive line,” Petersen said during Pac-12 media days in July. “These guys have all played a lot.” That is not in dispute. The Huskies return six offensive linemen with starting experience, as well as a few others who saw the field in 2013. There is left tackle Micah Hatchie, a fifth-year senior and two-year starter. There is left guard Dexter Charles, a fourth-year junior and two-year starter. Colin Tanigawa, formerly a guard, appears the most likely candidate to start at center. He’s a fifth-year senior with nearly two full seasons of starting experience. UW’s other center option is Mike Criste, another fifth-year senior who started every game last season. James Atoe, who appears to

TED S. WARREN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington’s offensive linemen huddle near the end zone of Husky Stadium during spring practice earlier this month. The Huskies’ offensive line is one of the most experienced units on the team.

have locked down the starting right guard position, is a 6-foot7, 381-pound fifth-year senior with experience as a starter and backup. And right tackle Ben Riva — yet another fifth-year senior — started every game in 2013. In other words: if the Huskies fail to protect the quarterback or create holes suitable for running through, it will not be for lack of experience. Offensive line coach Chris Strausser said the number of bodies on the offensive line — 19 — “gives us the chance to have the

Watch From Page C1

Once Lynch comes out of the game, the man to watch will be second-year back Christine Michael. Robert Turbin has clearly been the better back in the fight for the backup job, so he has less to prove tonight, but Michael, a player who came into camp with a lot of buzz, has fumbled in each of his preseason games and has work to do to prove he deserves an increased workload in his second season. Despite those fumbles, Carroll has seen mostly good things out of Michael. “I think he’s the most improved player on our team,” Carroll said. “He’s come a long ways in so many ways. He just needs to keep playing and he needs to keep competing and showing he’s growing as a football player. He’s explosive, his mind is in it, he’s all over it, so we’re just anxious to keep bringing him along.”

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Can the O-line continue its growth?

The offensive line took a big step forward from preseason game No. 1 in Denver to last week’s win over San Diego, and particularly encouraging was the play of guards J.R. Sweezy and James Carpenter. Center Max Unger and left tackle Russell Okung have yet to play in the preseason, but if both play tonight — and both have practiced all week — that would be big for a position group that needs to get its timing down.

3

How do Malcolm Smith and Korey Toomer look after long layoffs? Both linebackers returned from injury this week, and Carroll said both should play in this game. Inevitably there will be rust for both players, but for Smith, who is competing for playing time at a deep position, and for Toomer, who is competing for a roster spot, tonight will be important. That’s especially true for Toomer, who has missed the past two seasons with injuries, and

type of competition that we have.” Of the experience among the starters, he says, “that’s a bonus.” Hatchie and Charles both pointed to communication as an area of needed improvement from a year ago, when the offensive line blocked well enough for Bishop Sankey to gain a schoolrecord 1,870 yards, but also allowed 30 sacks. The year before, they allowed 38. There’s a reason former quarterback Keith Price was hobbled for a significant portion of his career as a starter. Communication will be key to

who, after being one of the big bright spots in offseason workouts, missed all of training camp with a hamstring injury. The talent is there, but if Toomer is going to win a job, he needs to prove it in game action and show he can stay healthy between now and the end of the month, when cuts are made. “Time’s running out,” Carroll said of Toomer. “We haven’t had a chance to see him. He had a really good offseaon, but unfortunately he just has not been able to get enough time to really establish where he is on the roster. So more than some other guys, he has a lot to and hopefully he’ll get some good opportunities.”

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How are the backup D-line jobs shaking out? While the starting group, plus one, of Michael Bennett, Cliff Avril, Brandon Mebane, Tony McDaniel and Kevin Williams seems set, there are jobs and playing time up for grabs beyond that. O’Brien Schofield seems like a near-lock to make the team after two very good preseason games, but the Seahawks still want to find out if second-year defensive tackle Jordan Hill can be this year’s version of Clinton McDonald, or if the versatile Greg Scruggs can be an impact player, or if Benson Mayowa can build off of last year’s promising rookie camp. Rookie Cassius Marsh has looked good so far, but he too can do more to assure himself a significant role in 2014.

5

Is there any more clarity when it comes to punt return? Earl Thomas has gotten the bulk of the work as a punt returner in the first two preseason games, and while he hasn’t made any big plays, he also hasn’t made big mistakes. Receiver Bryan Walters, who is fighting for a roster spot, was impressive as a punt and kick returner last week, but a rib injury will likely keep him out of this game. Carroll has mentioned Richard Sherman, Percy Harvin and Doug Baldwin as other punt return options, but so far none of them have done it in a preseason game.

eliminating mistakes in 2014. “Even though we played together last year, all of us, there’s still improvement where we can communicate better, execute our schemes,” Hatchie said. Strausser said he didn’t watch much game film of last season, focusing instead on evaluating players’ performances during winter conditioning and spring practices. Hatchie and Charles were a bit behind in that regard. Both sat out the spring while recovering from offseason shoulder

NCAA files intent to appeal O’Bannon decision Associated Press INDIANAPOLIS — The NCAA has notified the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that it intends to appeal a judge’s ruling in the Ed O’Bannon case that it violated antitrust laws. U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ruled Aug. 8 that the NCAA broke the law by restricting schools from providing money beyond current scholarship limits to athletes. She said schools should be allowed to place up to $5,000 per athlete per year of competition into a trust fund for football players and men’s basketball players, which they could collect after leaving school. A formal appeal has not yet been submitted, but NCAA chief legal officer Donald Remy issued a statement Thursday. “We are appealing the Court’s decision because we do not believe the NCAA has violated the antitrust laws,” he said. “In its decision, the Court acknowledged that changes to the rules that govern college athletics would be better achieved outside the courtroom, and the NCAA continues to believe that the association and its members are best positioned to evolve its rules and processes to better serve student-athletes.” Remy also noted that the NCAA has been discussing ways to improve the “student-athlete experience” even before the lawsuit was filed, and through the recent decision to give the five richest football conferences more power over the rule-making process. What’s unclear is how the NCAA’s

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was impressive last week against San Diego, scoring on all four drives in building a 24-0 lead. The Seahawks rolled up 260 yards in the first half against the Chargers. The Bears are the only preseason opponent for Seattle that is not on its regular-season schedule. Chicago would like to see its run game get started after stumbling through the first two games. The Bears had 79 yards rushing last week against Jacksonville after running for 92 yards in the preseason opener versus Philadelphia. While his chances have been limited, Matt Forte has seven carries for minus-7 yards thus far. “I don’t think it is a concern for us right now.

We’ll get it going when we extremely need it,” Chicago quarterback Jay Cutler said. “We had an emphasis of getting Matt the ball, whether it was running or passing, he was a huge part of this offense. Offensive line, we’ll figure it out.” Chicago’s pass game has been just fine. Four quarterbacks combined to throw for 402 yards and four touchdowns against Philadelphia. Getting tested by Seattle and the top secondary in the NFL will only help heading into the regular season. “It’s a game to get ourselves better,” Chicago coach Marc Trestman said. “The environment’s going to help us, we look at it as an opportunity to help us.”

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season opener against Green Bay seven days later. That includes Marshawn Lynch, who coach Pete Carroll said would get some carries. “We just want guys to play. We want them out there and get them play time just to get adapted to the new season again,” Carroll said. “As we stage it, this is the game they will play the most.” Carpenter’s career has yet to match the expectations that came with being a first-round pick. He was supposed to be a tackle, but moved to guard after a major knee injury ended his rookie season early. Knee problems and a concussion ended his 2012

season early as well. Last year, Carpenter was still in recovery mode, but Seattle wanted to get him on the field. He started 12 games and played in 18 of 19 during Seattle’s run to the title. Most of that time was spent in a rotation at left guard. Thanks to having a full offseason and making changes to his eating habits, Carpenter is in shape to have the position all to himself. “I changed my diet, did a whole bunch of leg workouts trying to keep my legs strong, and ran,” Carpenter said. “Mostly that is what I was really focusing on. I missed being able to run all the time and that was my goal.” Carpenter and the Seahawks’ starting offense

legal team will attack Wilken’s ruling in a court that has traditionally been more favorable to labor, or in this case the athletes. A recent study from the University of Illinois shows the NCAA wins about 71 percent in the second and third rounds in court, and some believe this case could be headed the U.S. Supreme Court. Remy has promised to take it there, if necessary. Earlier this week, NCAA officials declined an interview request with The Associated Press to discuss the case. But antitrust and labor attorneys believe the NCAA’s strongest argument might be against the financial cap, a part of the decision the NCAA initially lauded. “If she’s right that these restrictions are an unreasonable restraint of trade then the cap doesn’t make any sense,” said Robert McTamaney, an antitrust lawyer with the firm of Carter, Ledyard & Milburn. “Then student-athletes should be able to negotiate for whatever they can get.” Labor attorney Joseph Farelli, who works for the New York-based law firm of Pitta & Giblin, said the NCAA had to file the appeal. Otherwise, he noted, it could open the NCAA or its member schools to more potential litigation for athletes who are not receiving additional money, including women’s athletes who could cite Title IX law. “I would expect them to appeal it because now you’re going to have a permanent injunction that says the NCAA can’t regulate what colleges do with their student-athletes,” Farelli said. “If they don’t appeal now you have federal court precedent.”

2014 FOOTBAL

Seahawks: Carroll says RB Lynch will get some carries versus Bears in Friday’s game From Page C1

surgery. When fall camp started, they worked with the No. 2 offensive line — Jake Eldrenkamp and Siosifa Tufunga took reps with the starters — but eventually played their way back to the starting roles most anticipated them to have. “We all communicate together well,” said Charles, a graduate of Stanwood High School. “We know how each other plays. We know how we can trust each other.” The most intriguing position battle, then, is at center, where most assumed Criste would maintain his starting spot. But coaches have raved about Tanigawa’s aggression and tenacity, despite the fact that he’s the smallest of the starting group at 6-foot-3 and 292 pounds. “He’s done a really good job this fall camp taking charge out there,” Strausser said. “Fundamentally, he’s done some things really well and I think center’s a better fit for him in the long run.” Strausser said both Tanigawa and Criste will play in UW’s Aug. 30 season opener at Hawaii. It’s likely some other reserves such as Eldrenkamp, Tufunga, junior Ross Dolbec or junior Shane Brostek might get some playing time, too. Not that Strausser is necessarily set on the starting lineup just yet. “I still think there’s room for some movement,” he said. “I think we’re close to having an idea of who they are, but even going into game one, I don’t plan on playing just five guys. There’s more than five guys that have a chance of getting in that game regardless of rotation.”

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Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

LITTLE LEAGUE WORLD SERIES | Roundup

Chicago holds of Philly to advance Associated Press SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. — Joshua Houston had a clutch two-run single, reliever Cameron Bufford pitched a tense scoreless sixth inning, and Chicago held off gritty Philadelphia 6-5 on Thursday night in a matchup of inner-city teams at the Little League World Series. The loss eliminated Philadelphia and prevented star pitcher Mo’ne Davis from getting one last shot to put another stamp on what had become her personal playground. Chicago’s Jackie Robinson West, comprised of all back players, is making its first appearance in 31 years in the Little League World Series. The victory sends the Great Lakes champs into the U.S. title game on Saturday against Las Vegas.

AUTO RACING UNOH 200 NASCAR Camping World Trucks Thursday At Bristol Motor Speedway Bristol, Tenn. Lap length: .533 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (4) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 200 laps, 148.9 rating, 0 points, $42,820. 2. (8) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 200, 115, 42, $25,135. 3. (3) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 116.8, 41, $18,751. 4. (11) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 200, 110.2, 40, $16,385. 5. (7) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 200, 103.6, 39, $12,835. 6. (13) John Hunter Nemechek, Toyota, 200, 97.7, 38, $11,410. 7. (19) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 200, 92.1, 37, $11,260. 8. (2) Cole Custer, Chevrolet, 200, 99.6, 36, $11,210. 9. (9) Ben Rhodes, Chevrolet, 200, 85.5, 35, $11,160. 10. (21) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 200, 81.5, 34, $12,685. 11. (15) Jeb Burton, Toyota, 200, 72.5, 33, $11,060. 12. (17) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 200, 75.3, 32, $10,910. 13. (14) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 200, 83, 31, $10,860. 14. (6) German Quiroga, Toyota, 200, 87.7, 30, $10,810. 15. (16) Caleb Holman, Chevrolet, 199, 72, 29, $9,310. 16. (24) Justin Jennings, Chevrolet, 198, 61.4, 28, $10,660. 17. (18) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, 198, 69.6, 27, $10,605. 18. (26) Tyler Young, Chevrolet, 197, 53.1, 26, $11,535. 19. (30) Jimmy Weller III, Chevrolet, 196, 48.8, 25, $10,485. 20. (10) Brandon Jones, Chevrolet, 195, 66.3, 24, $8,810. 21. (12) Ben Kennedy, Chevrolet, 195, 59.4, 23, $10,385. 22. (29) Mason Mingus, Toyota, 194, 45.2, 22, $9,110. 23. (5) Gray Gaulding, Chevrolet, 194, 69.9, 21, $9,085. 24. (1) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 194, 114.6, 0, $10,360. 25. (34) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 190, 35.2, 19, $8,160. 26. (20) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 190, 40.5, 18, $7,960. 27. (35) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ram, 187, 32.1, 17, $7,935. 28. (25) T.J. Bell, Chevrolet, 182, 43.7, 16, $7,910. 29. (23) John Wes Townley, Toyota, accident, 144, 59.3, 15, $7,860. 30. (27) Justin Boston, Toyota, accident, 144, 52.7, 14, $7,835. 31. (33) Jody Knowles, Ford, engine, 106, 35.2, 13, $7,900. 32. (22) Bryan Silas, Chevrolet, accident, 14, 40.9, 12, $7,335. 33. (28) Jake Crum, Chevrolet, accident, 14, 38.9, 11, $7,310. 34. (32) B.J. McLeod, Chevrolet, ignition, 7, 33.1, 10, $7,285. 35. (31) Blake Koch, Ram, vibration, 5, 30.4, 0, $7,255. 36. (36) Bryan Dauzat, Chevrolet, suspension, 4, 27.4, 8, $7,220. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 91.907 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 9 minutes, 39 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.776 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 27 laps. Lead Changes: 5 among 2 drivers. Lap Leaders: K.Busch 1-11; B.Keselowski 1252; K.Busch 53-58; B.Keselowski 59-60; K.Busch 61-124; B.Keselowski 125-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): B.Keselowski, 3 times for 119 laps; K.Busch, 3 times for 81 laps. Top 10 in Points: 1. J.Sauter, 487; 2. M.Crafton, 479; 3. R.Hornaday Jr., 470; 4. R.Blaney, 463; 5. D.Wallace Jr., 454; 6. G.Quiroga, 433; 7. J.Coulter, 425; 8. T.Peters, 414; 9. B.Kennedy, 412; 10. J.Burton, 393.

BASEBALL American League West Division W L Pct GB Los Angeles 76 50 .603 — 74 52 .587 2 Oakland 68 58 .540 8 Seattle 54 74 .422 23 Houston Texas 49 77 .389 27 Central Division W L Pct GB Kansas City 70 56 .556 — 68 57 .544 1½ Detroit 64 62 .508 6 Cleveland Chicago 59 68 .465 11½ Minnesota 56 70 .444 14 East Division W L Pct GB Baltimore 73 52 .584 — 64 61 .512 9 New York 65 62 .512 9 Toronto Tampa Bay 62 65 .488 12 56 71 .441 18 Boston Thursday’s games N.Y. Yankees 3, Houston 0 Minnesota 4, Cleveland 1 Tampa Bay 1, Detroit 0 L.A. Angels 2, Boston 0 Today’s games Baltimore (Gausman 7-4) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 6-4), 11:20 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 9-8) at N.Y. Yankees (Greene 3-1), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Peacock 3-8) at Cleveland (Carrasco 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Smyly 7-10) at Toronto (Stroman 7-4), 4:07 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 13-4) at Boston (J.Kelly 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (Ventura 9-9) at Texas (Lewis 8-10), 5:05 p.m. Detroit (Ray 1-3) at Minnesota (Milone 6-4), 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 3-7) at Oakland (Gray 12-7), 7:05 p.m.

Yankees 3, Astros 0 Houston New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Grssmn lf 4 0 1 0 Gardnr lf 4 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 Jeter ss 4 0 1 0 Carter dh 4 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 1 0 Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 Teixeir 1b 3 1 2 0 Krauss rf 3 0 1 0 Prado 2b 3 1 1 0 Singltn 1b 3 0 0 0 Headly 3b 3 1 1 2 Corprn c 3 0 0 0 Cervelli c 3 0 1 0 MDmn 3b 3 0 0 0 ISuzuki rf 2 0 0 1 MGnzlz ss 3 0 0 0 ZeWhlr dh 3 0 0 0 Totals 31 0 4 0 Totals 29 3 7 3 Houston New York

000 000 000—0 030 000 00x—3

DP—Houston 1. LOB—Houston 4, New York 3. 2B—Fowler (14), Krauss (6), Prado (4), Headley (4). SF—I.Suzuki. Houston IP H R ER BB SO Keuchel L,10-9 8 7 3 3 0 5 New York McCarthy W,5-2 9 4 0 0 0 8 T—2:07. A—41,767 (49,642).

Rays 1, Tigers 0 Detroit Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 DJnngs cf 3 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 1 0 Zobrist rf-lf 3 1 0 0 MiCarr dh 4 0 1 0 Guyer lf 3 0 1 1 Carrer pr 0 0 0 0 Kiermr rf 0 0 0 0 VMrtnz 1b 3 0 0 0 Longori 3b 3 0 0 0 JMrtnz lf 4 0 0 0 Myers dh 3 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 3 0 0 0 SRdrgz 1b 3 0 0 0 Avila c 2 0 0 0 YEscor ss 3 0 0 0 Suarez ss 3 0 2 0 Casali c 3 0 0 0 ARmn pr-ss 0 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 2 0 0 0 RDavis cf 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 26 1 1 1 Detroit Tampa Bay

000 000 000—0 100 000 00x—1

E—Suarez (8). DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB— Detroit 5, Tampa Bay 1. 2B—Tor.Hunter (24), Suarez (9). 3B—Guyer (1). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Price L,12-9 8 1 1 0 0 9 Tampa Bay Cobb W,9-6 7 2 0 0 2 6 Boxberger H,15 1 1 0 0 0 2 McGee S,14-15 1 1 0 0 0 0 WP—Cobb. T—2:34. A—19,189 (31,042).

Las Vegas, the West champions, beat Philly 8-1 on Wednesday and humbled Chicago 13-2 in four innings in a mercy-rule game last Sunday behind five homers, including a grand slam by Brad Stone and two home runs from Austin Kryszczuk. Davis, just the 18th girl to play in the Little League World Series and the only one to win a game on the mound, played first base the first two innings against Chicago before reentering the game at third base in the bottom of the fifth. She had become the darling of the sports world with her amazing success and poise. Bufford walked Scott Bandura to lead off the top of the sixth, putting the tying run at first. He then struck out Jahli Hendricks, induced Jared Sprague-Lott to hit into a fielder’s choice and walked dangerous Zion

Spearman before getting Jack Rice on a fly to right to end it. Philly trailed 6-2 after two innings but clawed back within a run on Tai Cummings’ long home run to center leading off the fifth.

Japan 12, Mexico 1 SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT, Pa. — Ren Takeuchi pitched into the fourth inning and drove in three runs, helping Japan beat Mexico to advance to the international championship of the Little League World Series. Suguru Kanamori homered twice and drove in four runs for Japan, which plays South Korea for the title on Saturday. Japan lost 4-2 to South Korea on Wednesday. Takeuchi allowed one hit, Juan Garza’s leadoff homer in the first, in 3⅔ innings. He also went 2-for-3 at the plate in the five-inning game. Japan also got a solo homer from Hayato Ueshima in the first inning.

Twins 4, Indians 1

Chicago

Cleveland Minnesota ab r h bi ab r h bi Bourn cf 3 0 1 0 DaSntn ss 4 0 2 0 Aviles ss 4 0 0 0 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 Brantly lf 4 0 0 0 Mauer 1b 3 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 0 1 0 KVargs dh 4 2 3 1 Kipnis 2b 4 0 1 0 Nunez pr-dh 0 1 0 0 YGoms c 2 0 0 0 Arcia rf 3 1 1 1 RPerez c 2 0 0 0 Plouffe 3b 4 0 1 2 Chsnhll 3b 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 0 0 Walters dh 3 1 1 1 Parmel lf 3 0 0 0 ChDckr rf 3 0 1 0 JSchafr cf 2 0 1 0 Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 29 4 8 4

DP—Chicago 1. LOB—San Francisco 9, Chicago 4. 2B—Pagan (16), Pence (26), Duvall (2), Arias (5), Rizzo (21), Alcantara (8). HR—Rizzo (29). S—Wada. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO Vogelsong L,7-9 4 3 2 2 2 4 Y.Petit 2 0 0 0 0 5 Machi 1 0 0 0 0 0 Affeldt 1 0 0 0 1 1 Chicago Wada W,3-1 5 6 0 0 0 3 Ja.Turner H,1 2 3 1 1 0 0 Strop H,13 1 0 0 0 0 1 H.Rondon S,19-23 1 2 0 0 0 1 T—2:50 (Rain delay: 6:31). A—31,064 (41,072).

Cleveland Minnesota

000 010 000—1 000 102 01x—4

E—J.Schafer (1). LOB—Cleveland 5, Minnesota 7. 2B—K.Vargas (3), Arcia (12), Plouffe (33), J.Schafer (3). HR—Walters (4), K.Vargas (4). SB—Nunez (8). CS—K.Suzuki (1), J.Schafer (1). S—Dozier. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Kluber L,13-7 7 6 3 3 4 8 Crockett 0 2 1 1 0 0 Tomlin 1 0 0 0 0 1 Minnesota P.Hughes W,14-8 7 5 1 1 0 8 Fien H,24 1 0 0 0 1 1 Perkins S,32-36 1 0 0 0 0 1 Crockett pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. HBP—by Kluber (K.Suzuki). T—2:54. A—28,033 (39,021).

Angels 2, Red Sox 0 Los Angeles Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi Calhon rf 4 1 1 1 B.Holt 3b-rf 3 0 0 0 Trout cf 4 0 1 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0 Nava rf-lf 4 0 0 0 ENavrr 1b 2 0 0 0 Cespds lf 1 0 0 0 JHmltn dh 4 0 1 1 Mdlrks 3b 2 0 1 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 3 0 Craig dh 3 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 1b 3 0 0 0 McDnl pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Bogarts ss 3 0 0 0 Aybar ss 4 1 3 0 Betts cf 2 0 0 0 Iannett c 1 0 0 0 Vazquz c 3 0 0 0 Cowgill lf 3 0 0 0 Totals 32 2 9 2 Totals 28 0 1 0 Los Angeles Boston

100 000 100—2 000 000 000—0

LOB—Los Angeles 10, Boston 3. 2B—J. Hamilton (19), Aybar (25), Middlebrooks (6). SB—Aybar (13), B.Holt (7). CS—Trout (2). SF— Calhoun. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Shoemaker W,12-4 72⁄3 1 0 0 1 9 1 Morin H,9 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Grilli S,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Boston R.De La Rosa L,4-5 62⁄3 8 2 2 3 8 2 Layne ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 2 Tazawa ⁄3 1 0 0 2 2 Mujica 1 0 0 0 1 1 HBP—by Shoemaker (B.Holt). WP—R.De La Rosa. T—3:10. A—36,160 (37,499).

National League West Division W L Pct GB 72 57 .558 — 67 59 .532 3½ 59 67 .468 11½ 53 75 .414 18½ 50 76 .397 20½ Central Division W L Pct GB 71 56 .559 — Milwaukee St. Louis 69 57 .548 1½ 65 62 .512 6 Pittsburgh Cincinnati 61 67 .477 10½ 55 72 .433 16 Chicago East Division W L Pct GB 73 53 .579 — Washington Atlanta 67 61 .523 7 63 63 .500 10 Miami New York 60 68 .469 14 56 71 .441 17½ Philadelphia Thursday’s games Washington 1, Arizona 0 Chicago Cubs 2, San Francisco 1, comp. of susp. game Atlanta 8, Cincinnati 0 San Francisco 5, Chicago Cubs 3 L.A. Dodgers 2, San Diego 1 Today’s games Baltimore (Gausman 7-4) at Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 6-4), 11:20 a.m. San Francisco (Hudson 8-9) at Washington (Fister 12-3), 4:05 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 15-7) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 5-11), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 5-8) at Cincinnati (Latos 4-3), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Locke 4-3) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-6), 5:10 p.m. Miami (H.Alvarez 9-5) at Colorado (F.Morales 5-6), 5:40 p.m. San Diego (Despaigne 3-4) at Arizona (Collmenter 8-7), 6:40 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-8) at L.A. Dodgers (Haren 10-10), 7:10 p.m.

Los Angeles San Francisco San Diego Arizona Colorado

Nationals 1, Diamondbacks 0 Arizona Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Inciart cf 3 0 0 0 Span cf 3 1 2 0 Pnngtn ss 4 0 0 0 Rendon 3b 4 0 1 0 DPerlt rf 4 0 0 0 Werth rf 1 0 0 0 Trumo 1b 2 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 0 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 WRams c 4 0 2 0 Pachec 3b 3 0 0 0 Harper lf 4 0 2 0 AlMart lf 2 0 1 0 ACarer 2b 4 0 0 0 Gswsch c 3 0 1 0 Espinos ss 4 0 1 0 Miley p 1 0 1 0 GGnzlz p 1 0 0 0 Stites p 0 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 1 0 Paul ph 1 0 0 0 Thrntn p 0 0 0 0 OPerez p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 EMrshl p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 27 0 4 0 Totals 30 1 9 0 Arizona Washington

000 000 000—0 000 000 001—1

One out when winning run scored. E—Pacheco (2), Harper (3). DP—Arizona 3, Washington 2. LOB—Arizona 5, Washington 12. SB—Span (27). CS—Trumbo (3). S—Miley, Span, G.Gonzalez. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO Miley 62⁄3 8 0 0 6 4 1 Stites ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 O.Perez L,2-3 11⁄3 1 1 0 0 1 E.Marshall 0 0 0 0 0 0 Washington G.Gonzalez 7 4 0 0 3 6 Thornton 1 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano W,4-1 1 0 0 0 1 0 E.Marshall pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. T—2:51. A—32,311 (41,408).

Cubs 2, Giants 1 San Francisco Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 0 2 0 Coghln lf 4 0 0 0 Pence rf 4 0 1 0 J.Baez 2b-ss 2 1 0 0 Posey c 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 1 2 2 Sandovl 3b 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 2 0 0 0 Morse lf 4 0 0 0 Valaika 2b 1 0 0 0 Duvall 1b 4 1 1 0 Valuen 3b 3 0 0 0 Arias 2b 2 0 2 0 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 Panik ph-2b 2 0 2 1 Alcantr cf 3 0 1 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 2 0 Sweeny rf 2 0 0 0 Vglsng p 2 0 0 0 Szczur rf 0 0 0 0 Y.Petit p 0 0 0 0 Wada p 0 0 0 0 Ishikaw ph 1 0 1 0 Hndrck ph 1 0 0 0 Machi p 0 0 0 0 JaTrnr p 0 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 Strop p 0 0 0 0 GBlanc ph 1 0 0 0 Ruggin ph 1 0 0 0 HRndn p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 1 11 1 Totals 26 2 3 2 San Francisco

000 001 000—1

200 000 00x—2

Giants 5, Cubs 3 San Francisco Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Pagan cf 5 1 2 0 Alcantr cf-2b 5 1 1 0 Pence rf 5 1 1 0 J.Baez ss 4 0 0 0 Posey c 4 2 4 1 Rizzo 1b 3 0 1 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 3 2 Ruggin rf 3 1 2 2 BCrwfr ss 1 0 0 0 Sweny ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Morse lf 2 0 0 1 Castillo c 4 1 2 1 GBlanc lf 0 0 0 0 Valaika 2b 3 0 0 0 Duvall 1b 4 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Ishikaw 1b 0 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0 Panik 2b 4 0 0 0 JoBakr ph 1 0 0 0 Arias ss-3b 4 1 1 0 BParkr p 0 0 0 0 Bmgrn p 3 0 1 1 Valuen 3b 4 0 1 0 MDuffy ph 1 0 0 0 Szczur lf-cf 3 0 1 0 J.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 Watkns ph 1 0 0 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0 T.Wood p 2 0 0 0 Casilla p 0 0 0 0 Coghln lf 2 0 1 0 Totals 37 5 12 5 Totals 36 3 9 3 San Francisco Chicago

101 110 100—5 300 000 000—3

LOB—San Francisco 8, Chicago 7. 2B— Posey 2 (21), Sandoval 2 (24), Arias (6). HR— Posey (14), Ruggiano (6), Castillo (10). SB— Rizzo (4). CS—Pagan (5). SF—Morse. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO 12 Bumgarner W,14-9 7 7 3 3 1 1 J.Lopez H,9 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 2 Romo H,4 ⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Casilla S,11-14 1 1 0 0 0 2 Chicago T.Wood L,7-11 6 8 4 4 1 6 Grimm 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 W.Wright B.Parker 1 2 0 0 0 2 HBP—by T.Wood (Morse). WP—T.Wood, Grimm. T—3:16. A—30,541 (41,072).

Braves 8, Reds 0 Atlanta Cincinnati ab r h bi ab r h bi Heywrd rf 4 2 2 1 BHmltn cf 4 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 Goseln 2b-lf 5 1 2 0 Phillips 2b 3 0 1 0 FFrmn 1b 2 2 0 0 Ngron pr-2b 1 0 1 0 J.Upton lf 3 1 2 3 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Bonifac lf-rf 0 0 0 0 Mesorc c 3 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 5 1 1 1 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 Gattis c 3 0 0 1 Heisey lf 1 0 0 0 ASmns ss 5 1 1 2 B.Pena 1b-c 3 0 0 0 BUpton cf 2 0 0 0 RSantg ss 2 0 0 0 Tehern p 2 0 0 0 Schmkr lf-p 3 0 1 0 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Holmrg p 0 0 0 0 Russell p 0 0 0 0 Villarrl p 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 Ludwck ph 1 0 0 0 R.Pena ph-2b Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 Hannhn 1b 1 0 0 0 Totals 33 8 8 8 Totals 31 0 5 0 Atlanta Cincinnati

015 110 000—8 000 000 000—0

DP—Atlanta 1. LOB—Atlanta 10, Cincinnati 5. 2B—Gosselin (1), C.Johnson (25), Phillips (20), Negron (3). HR—A.Simmons (7). SB—F. Freeman (2). SF—J.Upton, Gattis. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO Teheran W,12-9 6 4 0 0 0 3 Russell 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Avilan Cincinnati Holmberg L,0-1 22⁄3 5 6 6 4 2 Villarreal 21⁄3 3 2 2 2 2 Ondrusek 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 A.Chapman Schumaker 1 0 0 0 1 0 HBP—by Teheran (R.Santiago), by Villarreal (F.Freeman), by Holmberg (F.Freeman, Teheran). T—3:10. A—20,243 (42,319).

Dodgers 2, Padres 1 San Diego Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Solarte 3b 4 0 0 0 DGordn 2b 4 0 1 0 AAlmnt lf 4 1 1 0 Puig cf 3 0 0 0 Gyorko 2b 2 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 3 0 0 0 Venale pr 0 0 0 0 Kemp rf 2 0 0 0 Medica 1b 3 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 3 1 1 0 S.Smith ph 1 0 0 0 JuTrnr 3b 3 1 2 2 Rivera c 2 0 1 1 A.Ellis c 2 0 0 0 Grandl ph 1 0 0 0 Rojas ss 2 0 0 0 RLirian rf 3 0 0 0 Kershw p 2 0 0 0 Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 Ethier ph 1 0 0 0 Amarst ss 3 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 T.Ross p 3 0 1 0 Totals 29 1 3 1 Totals 25 2 4 2 San Diego Los Angeles

000 000 100—1 000 000 02x—2

DP—Los Angeles 1. LOB—San Diego 4, Los Angeles 2. HR—Ju.Turner (4). SB—Venable (7). CS—D.Gordon (15), C.Crawford (4). S—Rojas. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO T.Ross L,11-12 8 4 2 2 2 8 Los Angeles Kershaw W,15-3 8 3 1 1 2 10 Jansen S,36-40 1 0 0 0 1 2 WP—Kershaw. T—2:23. A—39,596 (56,000).

Northwest League North Division W L Pct. GB Tri-City (Rockies) 13 14 .481 — 13 14 .481 — Vancouver (Blue Jays) 12 16 .429 1½ Everett (Mariners) 10 17 .370 3 x-Spokane (Rangers) South Division W L Pct. GB 18 9 .667 — x-Hillsboro (D-backs) Salem-Keizer (Giants) 17 10 .630 1 13 14 .481 5 Boise (Cubs) 13 15 .464 5½ Eugene (Padres) x-clinched first half Thursday’s games Salem-Keizer 12, Tri-City 5 Hillsboro 4, Spokane 2 Eugene 8, Everett 4 Boise at Vancouver, late Today’s games Boise at Vancouver, 1:05 p.m. Tri-City at Salem-Keizer, 6:35 p.m. Eugene at Everett, 7:05 p.m. Spokane at Hillsboro, 7:05 p.m.

Pacific Coast League Pacific North Division W L Pct. GB Sacramento (Athletics) 74 59 .556 — 2 Reno (Diamondbacks) 72 61 .541 4 Tacoma (Mariners) 70 63 .526 64 69 .481 10 Fresno (Giants) Pacific South Division W L Pct. GB 74 60 .552 — Las Vegas (Mets) El Paso (Padres) 63 70 .474 10½ Albuquerque (Dodgers) 58 74 .439 15 56 77 .421 17½ Salt Lake (Angels) American North Division W L Pct. GB 69 63 .523 — Omaha (Royals) 1 Oklahoma City (Astros) 69 65 .515 Iowa (Cubs) 67 67 .500 3

Colo. Springs (Rockies) 52 81 .391 17½ American South Division W L Pct. GB Memphis (Cardinals) 72 60 .545 — 72 60 .545 — Nashville (Brewers) 6 Round Rock (Rangers) 66 66 .500 New Orleans (Marlins) 65 68 .489 7½ Thursday’s games Fresno 8, Nashville 4, 1st game Oklahoma City 9, El Paso 5 Memphis 7, Sacramento 1 Colorado Springs 9, Albuquerque 8 Round Rock 9, Salt Lake 8, 11 innings Nashville 7, Fresno 0, 2nd game Tacoma 7, Omaha 3 Reno 7, Iowa 2 Las Vegas 14, New Orleans 5 Today’s games El Paso at Oklahoma City, 5:05 p.m. Fresno at Nashville, 5:05 p.m. Sacramento at Memphis, 5:05 p.m. Albuquerque at Colorado Springs, 6:05 p.m. Round Rock at Salt Lake, 6:05 p.m. Iowa at Reno, 7:05 p.m. New Orleans at Las Vegas, 7:05 p.m. Omaha at Tacoma, 7:05 p.m.

Little League World Series At South Williamsport, Pa. Double Elimination Thursday’s games Tokyo 12, Guadalupe 1, 5 innings, Guadalupe eliminated Chicago 6, Philadelphia 5, Philadelphia eliminated Saturday’s games International Championship Game 27: Seoul vs. Tokyo, 9:30 a.m. United States Championship Game 28: Las Vegas vs. Chicago, 12:30 p.m. Sunday’s games At Lamade Stadium Third Place Loser G27 vs. Loser G28, 7 a.m. World Championship Winner G27 vs. Winner G28, noon

BASKETBALL WNBA CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-3) (x-if necessary) Western Conference Phoenix vs. Los Angeles Today: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Sunday: Phoenix at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. x-Tuesday: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 7 p.m. Minnesota vs. San Antonio (Lynx lead series 1-0) Thursday: Minnesota 88, San Antonio 84 Saturday: Minnesota at San Antonio, 4 p.m. x-: San Antonio at Minnesota, TBD Eastern Conference Atlanta vs. Chicago Today: Chicago at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Sunday: Atlanta at Chicago, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday: Chicago at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Indiana vs. Washington (Fever lead series 1-0) Thursday: Indiana 78, Washington 73 Saturday: Indiana at Washington, 2 p.m. x-Monday: Washington at Indiana, TBD

FOOTBALL NFL Preseason NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF PA 1 1 0 .500 60 30 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 57 35 Seattle .000 3 57 San Francisco 0 2 0 St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 31 47 North W L T Pct PF PA 2 0 0 1.000 54 47 Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 40 34 Minnesota 1 1 0 .500 39 39 Detroit Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 37 27 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 2 0 0 1.000 57 48 1 1 0 .500 23 42 Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 46 36 Carolina Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 24 36 East W L T Pct PF PA 3 0 0 1.000 64 55 N.Y. Giants 2 0 0 1.000 47 29 Washington 1 2 0 .333 94 97 Philadelphia Dallas 0 2 0 .000 37 64 AMERICAN CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF PA 2 0 0 1.000 55 16 Denver 1 1 0 .500 57 67 Kansas City 1 1 0 .500 33 36 Oakland San Diego 1 1 0 .500 41 48 North W L T Pct PF PA 2 0 0 1.000 60 33 Baltimore 1 2 0 .333 56 67 Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 56 66 Cincinnati Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 35 37 South W L T Pct PF PA 1 1 0 .500 35 30 Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 44 47 Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 32 39 Houston Indianapolis 0 2 0 .000 36 40 East W L T Pct PF PA 2 0 0 1.000 38 27 N.Y. Jets New England 1 1 0 .500 48 58 1 1 0 .500 30 30 Miami Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 49 54 Thursday’s game Philadelphia 31, Pittsburgh 21 Today’s games Carolina at New England, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, 4:30 p.m. Jacksonville at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Oakland at Green Bay, 5 p.m. Chicago at Seattle, 7 p.m. Saturday’s games Tampa Bay at Buffalo, 1:30 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 4 p.m. Tennessee at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Washington at Baltimore, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 5 p.m. New Orleans at Indianapolis, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Houston at Denver, 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 24 San Diego at San Francisco, 1 p.m. Cincinnati at Arizona, 5 p.m.

GOLF Barclay’s Thursday At Ridgewood Country Club Paramus, N.J. Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,319; Par: 71 (35-36) First Round Bo Van Pelt 32-33—65 Cameron Tringale 33-33—66 Hunter Mahan 33-33—66 Charles Howell III 32-34—66 34-32—66 Brendon de Jonge Ben Martin 34-32—66 Brendon Todd 31-35—66 Jim Furyk 33-33—66 Paul Casey 33-33—66 Ryo Ishikawa 32-35—67 Russell Knox 34-33—67 Danny Lee 34-33—67 Erik Compton 33-35—68 Steven Bowditch 35-33—68 Justin Hicks 36-32—68

Goalkeeper Howard taking break from U.S. soccer team Associated Press CHICAGO — Star goalkeeper Tim Howard is taking a one-year break from the U.S. national soccer team because of a “commitment” to his family. The three-time World Cup veteran asked U.S. coach Jurgen Klinsmann to not consider him for the roster until September 2015. The 35-year-old Howard will continue to play for Everton in the English Premier League. “Having played overseas for the last 12 years and missing out on spending time with my family, making this commitment to my family is very important at this time,” Howard said

Daniel Summerhays Rickie Fowler John Senden Hideki Matsuyama Bubba Watson William McGirt Kevin Chappell K.J. Choi Jason Bohn Seung-Yul Noh Justin Rose Zach Johnson Matt Kuchar Keegan Bradley Ernie Els Ricky Barnes Charl Schwartzel Chris Stroud Adam Scott Brian Harman Vijay Singh Retief Goosen Stewart Cink Troy Merritt John Huh David Toms David Hearn Ryan Palmer Jhonattan Vegas Jason Kokrak Scott Langley Russell Henley Jordan Spieth Kevin Na Brandt Snedeker Graeme McDowell Bill Haas Lee Westwood Gonzalo Fdez-Castano Morgan Hoffmann Robert Garrigus Phil Mickelson Will MacKenzie Martin Kaymer Patrick Reed Chris Kirk Jimmy Walker Michael Putnam Shawn Stefani Luke Donald Brendan Steele Angel Cabrera George McNeill Ryan Moore J.B. Holmes Sergio Garcia Luke Guthrie Jeff Overton Scott Stallings Ben Crane Jason Day Andres Romero Boo Weekley Tim Wilkinson Ian Poulter Andrew Svoboda Henrik Stenson Scott Brown Freddie Jacobson Matt Jones Camilo Villegas Sang-Moon Bae Brice Garnett Robert Allenby Robert Streb Brian Stuard Gary Woodland Stuart Appleby Brian Davis Martin Flores Louis Oosthuizen Carl Pettersson Billy Horschel Charley Hoffman Kevin Kisner Geoff Ogilvy Jerry Kelly Chesson Hadley Rory McIlroy Billy Hurley III Bryce Molder Harris English Webb Simpson Kevin Stadler Aaron Baddeley Pat Perez Marc Leishman Kevin Streelman Jonas Blixt Rory Sabbatini James Hahn Tim Clark Matt Every Nick Watney Justin Leonard Graham DeLaet Michael Thompson

33-35—68 33-35—68 36-32—68 34-34—68 34-34—68 34-34—68 33-35—68 32-36—68 34-34—68 34-34—68 31-37—68 35-33—68 36-32—68 33-35—68 32-36—68 34-34—68 34-35—69 31-38—69 35-34—69 32-37—69 33-36—69 34-35—69 36-33—69 33-36—69 35-34—69 34-35—69 35-34—69 34-35—69 36-33—69 34-36—70 33-37—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 33-37—70 37-33—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 38-33—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 33-38—71 34-37—71 35-36—71 33-38—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 34-37—71 37-34—71 35-36—71 37-34—71 36-36—72 36-36—72 33-39—72 35-37—72 34-38—72 38-34—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 34-38—72 33-39—72 37-35—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 36-37—73 38-35—73 37-36—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 38-35—73 35-38—73 38-35—73 38-35—73 38-35—73 36-37—73 37-37—74 37-37—74 34-40—74 34-40—74 35-39—74 39-35—74 37-37—74 38-36—74 38-36—74 38-37—75 36-39—75 37-38—75 39-36—75 41-35—76 38-38—76 38-38—76 37-39—76 36-40—76 38-38—76 37-41—78 37-41—78

Canadian Women’s Open Thursday At London Hunt and Country Club London, Ontario Purse: $2,250,000 Yardage: 6,667; Par: 72 (36-36) First Round a-amateur So Yeon Ryu 33-30—63 Na Yeon Choi 31-33—64 Anna Nordqvist 32-33—65 Danielle Kang 33-33—66 Xi Yu Lin 33-33—66 Azahara Munoz 31-35—66 Inbee Park 34-32—66 34-33—67 Laura Davies Cristie Kerr 32-35—67 Jennifer Kirby 34-33—67 Mi Hyang Lee 34-33—67 Caroline Masson 33-34—67 Lindsey Wright 35-32—67 Marina Alex 31-37—68 Julieta Granada 35-33—68 Brittany Lang 34-34—68 Pernilla Lindberg 31-37—68 33-35—68 Belen Mozo Haru Nomura 34-34—68 Jacqui Concolino 35-34—69 Laura Diaz 35-34—69 Felicity Johnson 33-36—69 Kim Kaufman 35-34—69 Mirim Lee 34-35—69 Amelia Lewis 33-36—69 Sydnee Michaels 36-33—69 Jane Park 35-34—69 Suzann Pettersen 34-35—69 Thidapa Suwannapura 34-35—69 Yani Tseng 33-36—69 Ayako Uehara 34-35—69 Mariajo Uribe 34-35—69 Karrie Webb 36-33—69 Amy Anderson 34-36—70 Dori Carter 36-34—70 Carlota Ciganda 36-34—70 Austin Ernst 37-33—70 Jaye Marie Green 37-33—70 a-Brooke M. Henderson 34-36—70 Sara-Maude Juneau 35-35—70 Haeji Kang 35-35—70 Christina Kim 36-34—70 I.K. Kim 36-34—70 Lydia Ko 35-35—70 Jessica Korda 37-33—70 Rebecca Lee-Bentham 35-35—70 Kristy McPherson 35-35—70 Ai Miyazato 34-36—70 Pornanong Phatlum 35-35—70 Morgan Pressel 38-32—70 Jennifer Rosales 33-37—70 Lizette Salas 34-36—70 Jenny Shin 34-36—70 Ashleigh Simon 32-38—70 Karin Sjodin 34-36—70 Lexi Thompson 35-35—70 a-Elizabeth Tong 35-35—70 Alison Walshe 37-33—70 Katie M. Burnett 35-36—71 Silvia Cavalleri 35-36—71 Paula Creamer 35-36—71 Paz Echeverria 35-36—71 Kathleen Ekey 35-36—71 Hee-Won Han 34-37—71

in a statement Thursday. “It’s the right decision at the right time. Jurgen has always been up front with all the players in saying you have to earn your place, which is something I agree with. So I look forward to coming back next fall and competing for a spot.” Howard starred in this year’s World Cup in Brazil, particularly in a secondround 2-1 loss to Belgium in which he made 15 saves. He is the United States’ career leader in appearances by a goalkeeper (104) and wins (55). He has played every minute for the U.S. in the past two World Cups. The main event he will miss is the Gold Cup next summer.

Charley Hull Karine Icher Jeong Jang Nicole Jeray Sue Kim Joanna Klatten Candie Kung Ilhee Lee Stacy Lewis Brittany Lincicome Catriona Matthew Stephanie L Meadow Hee Young Park Dewi Claire Schreefel Jennifer Song Line Vedel Chie Arimura Julia Boland Irene Coe Jodi Ewart Shadoff a-Jennifer Ha Maria Hernandez Pat Hurst Sarah Kemp Cindy LaCrosse Meena Lee Giulia Molinaro Paola Moreno Becky Morgan Madison Pressel Paula Reto Alena Sharp Angela Stanford Amy Yang Sandra Changkija Chella Choi Cydney Clanton Louise Friberg Sandra Gal Mi Jung Hur Eun-Hee Ji Jennifer Johnson Lorie Kane Maude-Aimee Leblanc Megan McChrystal Mika Miyazato Ryann O’Toole Reilley Rankin Beatriz Recari Erica D Rivard Sarah Jane Smith Kelly Tan Anya Alvarez Christel Boeljon Heather Bowie Young Moira Dunn Veronica Felibert Shanshan Feng Caroline Hedwall Tiffany Joh Ji Young Oh Lee-Anne Pace Brooke Pancake Samantha Richdale Kris Tamulis Nicole Vandermade Sun Young Yoo Natalie Gleadall Megan Grehan Mina Harigae Katy Harris a-Jillian Hollis Hannah Jun Medlock Moriya Jutanugarn Stacey Keating Jee Young Lee Lisa McCloskey

37-34—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 37-34—71 36-35—71 38-33—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 37-34—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 36-36—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 37-35—72 35-37—72 38-34—72 36-36—72 34-38—72 35-37—72 37-35—72 34-38—72 34-38—72 37-35—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 36-36—72 34-38—72 34-38—72 36-37—73 35-38—73 39-34—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 40-33—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 38-35—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 37-36—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 40-33—73 35-38—73 34-39—73 37-36—73 38-36—74 37-37—74 39-35—74 33-41—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 38-36—74 37-37—74 40-34—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 39-35—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 40-35—75 39-36—75 39-36—75 39-36—75 36-39—75 38-37—75 38-37—75 39-36—75 36-39—75 39-36—75

SOCCER Major League Soccer WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA 13 7 3 42 39 31 Seattle 11 4 9 42 38 28 Real Salt Lake FC Dallas 11 7 6 39 43 32 Los Angeles 10 5 7 37 39 26 Vancouver 7 4 12 33 33 29 Portland 7 7 10 31 39 39 8 11 6 30 37 39 Colorado 6 9 7 25 26 28 San Jose 6 11 6 24 21 36 Chivas USA EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Sporting Kansas City 12 6 6 42 36 23 D.C. 12 7 4 40 36 26 9 8 5 32 33 34 Toronto FC 7 8 9 30 32 32 Columbus 6 7 10 28 35 34 New York 8 12 3 27 30 36 New England Philadelphia 6 9 9 27 36 39 Houston 7 12 4 25 25 42 Chicago 4 6 13 25 29 35 4 14 5 17 23 41 Montreal NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Today’s game Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Saturday’s games Montreal at New York, 4 p.m. Chicago at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at New England, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s games Seattle FC at Portland, 2 p.m. San Jose at Philadelphia, 5 p.m.

NWSL Playoffs Semifinals Saturday: Portland at FC Kansas City, 10 a.m. Sunday: Washington at Seattle, 8 p.m. Championship Sunday, Aug. 31: TBD, noon

DEALS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned OF/1B Alex Hassan to Pawtucket (IL). Reinstated OF/1B Allen Craig from the 15-day DL. CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Released LHP Charlie Leesman. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Optioned OF Brennan Boesch to Salt Lake (PCL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Optioned RHP Chase Whitely to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Recalled INF/OF Zelous Wheeler to Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Sent OF David DeJesus to Charlotte (IL) for a rehab assignment. National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Gardner on a minor league contract. CHICAGO CUBS — Placed SS Starlin Castro on the bereavement list. Placed RHP Edwin Jackson on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Logan Watkins and LHP Zac Rosscup from Iowa (PCL). CINCINNATI REDS — Optioned RHPs J.J. Hoover and Carlos Contreras to Louisville (IL). Recalled RHP Pedro Villarreal and LHP David Holmberg from Louisville. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Recalled RHP George Kontos from Fresno (PCL) as 26th man. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent OF Steven Souza Jr. to Hagerstown (SAL) for a rehab assignment. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Released DT Anthony McCloud. ATLANTA FALCONS — Released WR Jabin Sambrano. Signed WR Eric Weems. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Traded G Rishaw Johnson to Tampa Bay for S Kelcie McCray. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released DL Marcus Forston and TE D.J. Williams. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released DE James Ruffin. Signed G R.J. Mattes. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLORADO AVALANCHE — Announced the retirement of G Jean-Sebastien Giguere. NEW YORK RANGERS — Agreed to terms with F Danny Kristo.


Baseball C5

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM

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FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

Postseason possibilities

MARINERS | Update

TONIGHT’S GAME

Seattle at Boston, 4:10 p.m.

OAKLAND A’S

TV: Root (cable) Radio: KTTH (770 AM) Probable starting pitchers: Seattle right-hander Felix Hernandez (13-4,1.99 earned run average) vs. Boston righthander Joe Kelly (0-1, 5.29)

Through Wednesday: 74-52, second place in the American League West, 11⁄2 games out of first place. Lead the wild-card race and have six-game lead on first team out of the race. Computer odds: 98.7 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .492 winning percentage. Play 18 of 36 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The A’s enter a 16-game run Friday that includes 10 against the Angels and three against the Mariners. Now is the time to pull out of their recent funk. Prognosis: Oakland has lost eight of its past 10 and hasn’t been the same club since making those two big deadline trades to bolster its rotation. The A’s are still well-positioned to reach postseason but appear far more vulnerable than those computer projections suggest.

Cano selected for All-Star team that will play in Japan By Bob Dutton The News Tribune

LOS ANGELES ANGELS Through Wednesday: 75-55, lead American League West by 11⁄2 games. Have 71⁄2-game lead on first team out of the wild-card race. Computer odds: 98.5 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .484 winning percentage. Play 17 of 37 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The Angels still have 10 games against the A’s, including seven of their next 10. We could find out in a hurry if and how they can weather the injury to right-hander Garrett Richards. Prognosis: Los Angeles, with a healthy Richards, might be baseball’s best club. His injury is a major blow. But while the Angels still have those 10 games against Oakland, they also have 15 against Houston, Texas and Minnesota. It’s tough to imagine the Halos failing, at minimum, to claim a wild-card spot.

BALTIMORE ORIOLES Through Wednesday: 73-52, lead American League East by nine games. Have 51⁄2-game lead on first team out of the wild-card race. Computer odds: 97.3 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .478 winning percentage. Play 21 of 37 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The Orioles have a reasonably easy schedule. They don’t play any of the other six top postseason contenders. But they close the season with seven road games — four at N.Y. and three at Toronto. That should only matter if they stumble, and stumble badly, before then. Prognosis: Stranger things have happened, but Baltimore is the surest thing on the board. Neither New York nor Toronto seems capable of closing what is a considerable gap in the division race.

DETROIT TIGERS Through Wednesday: 68-56, second place in AL Central, one game out of first. Have one game lead in race for final wild-card race. Computer odds: 69.3 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .490 winning percentage. Play 19 of 38 remaining games at home. Key stretch: Detroit has 11 games remaining against AL Central cellardweller Minnesota. Nice. After the Tigers complete a three-game series Sept. 19-21 at Kansas City, they close the season with seven home games (three against the White Sox and four against the Twins). Very friendly. Prognosis: These Tigers somewhat resemble their 2012 predecessors who underachieved for five-plus months. That 2012 bunch pulled itself together, charged down the stretch and reached the World Series. This club has that capability because of its star power, but there’s no guarantee that history repeats.

KANSAS CITY ROYALS Through Wednesday: 70-56, lead American League Central by one game. Have two-game lead on first team out of the wild-card race. Computer odds: 69.0 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .474 winning percentage. Play 20 of 36 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The Royals have 13 games left against last-place teams and, the numbers suggest, the easiest remaining schedule among contenders. Still, they’ve had problems in New York over the years. So their Sept. 5-10 trip to New York and Detroit for a pair of three-game series could be pivotal. Prognosis: The Royals appear more than capable of ending the franchise’s 28-year postseason drought. But most clubs, when making their first serious postseason chase in years, undergo a stressful September. It will be interesting to see if that happens to the Royals and, if it does, how they react.

TED S. WARREN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mariners manager Lloyd McClendon walks from the mound after making a pitching in a recent game.

Seattle Mariners have a tougher challenge than other contenders Analysis by Bob Dutton

BOSTON — The numbers through 126 games say the Mariners play better against winning clubs than losing clubs and better on the road than at home. Good thing. Because if the Mariners are to reach postseason for the first time in 13 years, they’ll need to do so by playing a tougher schedule and more road games than any other major contender. Didn’t think this was going to be easy, did you? The Mariners (68-58) had an open date Thursday before opening a three-game weekend series against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park. And with the September stretch run looming on the horizon, that makes this the perfect time to assess

The News Tribune

where the Mariners are positioned among the American League’s other postseason contenders. Our breakdown is limited to clubs with winning records. And we’ve listed them in order of their likelihood, though computer projections, to reach postseason. Our computer odds are an average of the simulations run by ESPN, Baseball Prospectus and fangraphs. com. The schedule difficulty was determined by an average of the winning percentage for a club’s remaining opponents. All stats and computations are prior to Thursday’s games. (So, no, Detroit’s 1-0 loss at Tampa Bay on Thursday, which helps the Mariners, is not included in the calculations.)

SEATTLE MARINERS

CLEVELAND INDIANS

TORONTO BLUE JAYS

N.Y. YANKEES

Through Wednesday: 6858, third place in the American League West, 71⁄2 games out of first place. Are one game behind in race for final wild-card race. Computer odds: 45.7 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .503 winning percentage. Play 15 of 36 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The Mariners, from Sept. 12-18, play three against Oakland at Safeco Field before opening an 11-game trip with four games against the Angels in Anaheim. If they’re still kicking after that, it gets real interesting. Prognosis: A franchise-resurrection season in Seattle has a chance to climax with a postseason berth. A legit chance, but not a great chance. The Mariners’ schedule is considerably tougher than the clubs they’re trying to catch.

Through Wednesday: 64-61, third place in American League Central, 51⁄2 games out of first place. Are 41⁄2 games behind in race for final wild-card spot. Computer odds: 10.8 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .488 winning percentage. Play 20 of 37 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The Indians have a chance to pull themselves back into the division race in a sevenday span from Aug. 29 to Sept. 4. They play three games at Kansas City before returning home for four against the Detroit. Prognosis: The Indians need a lot to go right to return to postseason because they must climb past multiple clubs. Their best chance is for Kansas City or Detroit (or both) to stumble through September, and for the Mariners to get worn down by a tough schedule. Oh … and the Tribe needs to play its best all of the season. That’s a lot to ask.

Through Wednesday: 6562, second place in the American League East, nine games out of first place. Are 41⁄2 games behind in race for final wild-card spot. Computer odds: 5.7 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .501 winning percentage. Play 22 of 35 remaining games at home. Key stretch: The Blue Jays’ final 14 games consist of six against the Orioles, four in New York against the Yankees and three against the Mariners. That’s like hitting a hill 24-plus miles into a marathon. Tough. Prognosis: The Orioles’ big division lead means the Blue Jays are, pretty much, playing for the wild card. And to get there, they probably need to climb past the Mariners and either the Tigers or Royals. That unfriendly closing schedule makes that a tall order.

Through Wednesday: 63-61, third place in American League East, 91⁄2 games out of first place. Are five games behind in race for final wild-card spot. Computer odds: 3.4 percent chance of reaching postseason. Schedule difficulty: Remaining opponents have a weighted .513 winning percentage. Play 21 of 38 remaining games at home. Key stretch: Not many soft spots for the Yankees over the final five-plus weeks, but there’s a particularly tough 15-game stretch from Sept. 12-25 that includes eight games against division-leading Baltimore. Prognosis: The Yankees have 22 games remaining against postseason contenders who currently have a better record. So there’s opportunity ... but little chance.

BOSTON — Second baseman Robinson Cano will part of a major-league all-star team that will head to Japan in November to play five games against that country’s national team in a renewal of the All-Star Series. The tour marks the first time since 2006 that Major League Baseball, in conjunction with the players union, has sent a select team to Japan for a series of games. Cano will be joined by, among others, Angels first baseman Albert Pujols, Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig and Orioles outfielder Adam Jones. The complete team will be announced at a later date. Texas manager Ron Washington will fill that role for the MLB team, which will play two exhibition games in addition to its five-game series against Japan’s national team (which is known as Samurai Japan). This will be the 11th All-Star Series between the two countries and is the 36th time that a collection of major-league players has toured Japan since 1908. This will be the 11th All-Star Series between the two countries and is the 36th time that a collection of major-league players has toured Japan since 1908. The tour runs Nov. 11 with an exhibition game at Koshien Stadium in Osaka against the Hanshin Tigers/Yomiuri Giants. The All-Star Series begins the following day at the Kyocera Dome in Osaka. The Series continues Nov. 14-1516 at the Tokyo Dome in Tokyo before concluding Nov. 18 at the Sapporo Dome in Sapporo. The tour ends Nov. 20 with an exhibition game against Japan’s national team at Okinawa Cellular Stadium on Okinawa.

Short hops Wednesday’s 4-3 loss in Philadelphia snapped the Mariners’ 15-game winning streak when they score at least three runs. … Mariners pitchers lead the majors with a 2.93 earned run average. No American League team finished among the top five in 2013.

AquaSox can’t erase huge deficit Herald staff EVERETT — A seven-run, ninth-inning deficit was too much for the AquaSox to overcome as the Eugene Emeralds defeated Everett 8-4 in Northwest League play Thursday night. After collecting just three hits through eight innings, Everett rallied for three runs on three hits in their final at-bat. A walk and an error put runners on first and third to leadoff the ninth inning. First baseman Kyle Petty doubled to center field to drive in both runners. Two outs later, Phillips Castillo drove in Martin with an RBI-single to left field.

Thursday’s box score Emeralds 8, AquaSox 4 Eugene ab r h bi Everett ab r h bi Goree 2b 5 0 2 0 Cowan ss 4 0 0 0 Del Castillo 2b 0 0 0 0 Mariscal 3b 4 0 0 0 Cordero ss 1 0 0 0 Martin c 3 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 Simpson rf 4 2 1 1 Epperson pr-3b Torres rf 5 3 3 2 Petty 1b 4 1 2 2 Davis 1b 4 1 3 0 Alfonso dh 3 0 0 0 Rosen lf 5 0 1 1 Peterson 2b 4 0 0 0 Santos dh 4 0 1 1 Castillo lf 3 0 2 1 Moreno cf 4 1 1 0 Plns-Art cf 3 0 1 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 Blanco 3b-ss 3 2 2 1 Totals 38 8 14 5 Totals 32 4 6 4 Eugene Everett

104 000 210 — 8 14 1 000 100 003 — 4 6 1

E—Goree (14), Simpson (3). LOB—Eugene 6, Everett 6. DP—Eugene 1, Everett 2. 2B—Davis 2 (21), Blanco 2 (8), Moreno (4), Petty (18). HR—Torres (3), Simpson (8). CS—Castillo (1). Eugene IP H R ER BB SO Jernigan 4 2 1 1 3 5 Santos W, 3-2 2 1 0 0 0 2 Beatty 1 0 0 0 0 1 De Horta 1 0 2 1 2 1 Holland 1 3 1 0 0 1 Everett IP H R ER BB SO Gohara 5 6 5 3 2 7 Kiel 3 7 3 3 0 2 Lindquist 1 1 0 0 0 1 De Horta pitched to two batters in the ninth. WP—De Horta. HBP—Cordero (by Gohara). T—2:44. A—2,633.


C6

Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald TODAY

Western WA Northwest Weather

72°53°

Sun and clouds today; pleasant on the Olympic Peninsula. Partly cloudy tonight.

Bellingham 74/53

Mainly dry, more clouds

TOMORROW

Mountains

76°55°

SUNDAY

Stanwood 72/49

Arlington Eastern WA 74/50 Granite Mostly cloudy today with Falls a shower or thunderstorm Marysvile 75/51 around. A shower or thun73/56 derstorm in spots tonight. Langley EVERETT Lake Stevens Partly sunny tomorrow. 72/53 69/53 75/51 Mukilteo Snohomish Gold Bar 69/54 75/53 76/54 Lynnwood Mill Creek Index Monroe Sultan 73/54 74/52 73/54 75/53 76/54 Kirkland Redmond 75/55 75/56 Seattle Bellevue 76/56 75/58

75°54° Partly cloudy

MONDAY

76°54° Partly cloudy

79°55°

TUESDAY

Mount Vernon 74/51

Oak Harbor 68/50

Partly cloudy, warmer

Mostly cloudy today with a shower or thunderstorm around. A shower or thunderstorm in spots this evening. Partly sunny tomorrow.

Port Orchard 77/53

Mostly sunny, warmer

Puget Sound

Wind northwest 3-6 knots today. Seas under a foot. Visibility clear. Wind light and variable tonight. Seas under a foot. Partly cloudy.

Tacoma 77/51

Everett

Time

High Low High Low

Almanac

2:38 a.m. 9:40 a.m. 5:02 p.m. 10:15 p.m.

Feet

9.4 0.3 10.3 5.8

Port Townsend High Low High Low

Time

1:52 a.m. 8:51 a.m. 4:48 p.m. 9:40 p.m.

Everett

Arlington

Whidbey Island

Air Quality Index

Pollen Index

Sun and Moon

Yesterday’s offender ....... Particulates

Today

Sunrise today ....................... Sunset tonight ..................... Moonrise today ................... Moonset today .....................

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 67/54 Normal high/low ....................... 72/55 Records (2009/1947) ................. 84/40 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 30.04 F 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.00” Month to date ............................. 1.45” Normal month to date ............... 0.67” Year to date ............................... 21.47” Normal year to date ................. 19.31”

Good: 0-50; Moderate: 51-100, Unhealthy (for sensitive groups): 101-150; Unhealthy: 151-200; Very unhealthy: 201300; Hazardous: 301-500 WA Dept. of Environmental Quality

More Information

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 72/48 Normal high/low ....................... 72/55 Records (2011/2013) ................. 86/45 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 30.05 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.00” Month to date ............................. 0.92” Normal month to date ............... 0.93” Year to date ............................... 34.59” Normal year to date ................. 26.92”

World Weather City

Road Reports:

www.wsdot.wa.gov

Avalanche Reports:

www.nwac.noaa.gov

Burn Ban Information: Puget Sound: 1-800-595-4341 Website: www.pscleanair.org Forecasts and graphics, except the KIRO 5-day forecast, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

Today Hi/Lo/W Amsterdam 62/52/sh Athens 95/74/s Baghdad 111/81/s Bangkok 92/79/t Beijing 88/71/t Berlin 70/53/pc Buenos Aires 71/62/t Cairo 97/76/s Dublin 60/44/pc Hong Kong 89/80/pc Jerusalem 84/66/s Johannesburg 61/38/s London 67/48/pc

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 62/52/sh 95/74/s 111/80/s 94/80/t 89/70/pc 67/50/sh 74/54/r 100/77/s 61/44/pc 89/79/pc 87/68/s 63/39/s 65/46/pc

7.0 0.3 8.0 5.2

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 63/51 Normal high/low ....................... 67/52 Records (1958/1955) ................. 88/40 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 30.04 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.00” Month to date ............................. 0.81” Normal month to date ............... 0.56” Year to date ............................... 13.63” Normal year to date ................. 11.16”

New Aug 25

Source: NAB

Feet

First Sep 2

Full Sep 8

6:13 a.m. 8:10 p.m. 3:35 a.m. 6:25 p.m.

Last Sep 15

City

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Madrid 86/59/s 88/62/s Manila 88/77/t 88/78/t Mexico City 72/55/t 73/56/t Moscow 73/49/sh 70/51/s Paris 71/53/pc 68/48/sh Rio de Janeiro 82/67/s 81/66/s Riyadh 109/80/s 109/80/s Rome 83/65/s 82/65/s Singapore 86/77/t 86/77/t Stockholm 65/51/sh 64/51/sh Sydney 65/49/sh 64/52/sh Tokyo 92/78/pc 89/77/t Toronto 77/62/c 75/61/pc

Vancouver

73/56

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W

Washington Bellingham Colville Ellensburg Forks Friday Harbor Moses Lake Ocean Shores Olympia Port Angeles Pullman Spokane Seattle Tacoma Walla Walla Wenatchee Yakima Idaho Boise Coeur d’Alene Sun Valley Oregon Astoria Bend Eugene Klamath Falls Medford Portland

74/53/pc 79/52/t 79/56/t 74/50/pc 72/48/pc 83/58/t 61/52/pc 78/49/pc 70/50/pc 74/50/t 75/54/t 76/56/pc 77/51/pc 80/60/pc 80/61/t 83/55/t 80/54/pc 73/52/t 66/44/t

78/55/pc 74/49/pc 65/45/sh

68/52/pc 74/45/pc 83/52/pc 77/44/pc 86/55/pc 80/59/pc

72/55/pc 77/46/s 88/55/pc 79/46/s 90/58/s 86/60/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W Albany 70/60/pc Albuquerque 77/59/t Amarillo 93/66/s Anchorage 66/52/sh Atlanta 94/76/pc Atlantic City 79/68/sh Austin 101/73/pc Baltimore 84/67/t Baton Rouge 95/74/s Billings 69/54/sh Birmingham 97/76/pc Boise 80/54/pc Boston 70/61/c Buffalo 78/63/c Burlington, VT 73/57/pc Charleston, SC 100/79/t Charleston, WV 87/70/t Charlotte 95/73/t Cheyenne 74/54/t Chicago 89/71/t Cincinnati 91/74/t Cleveland 80/65/t Columbus, OH 88/71/t Dallas 97/77/s Denver 73/56/t Des Moines 92/75/pc Detroit 82/65/t El Paso 79/67/t Evansville 94/75/pc Fairbanks 70/45/pc Fargo 79/63/pc Fort Myers 92/76/t Fresno 99/67/s Grand Rapids 87/68/t Greensboro 93/72/t Hartford 73/59/pc Honolulu 89/76/s Houston 96/77/s Indianapolis 91/74/t

Bellingham

Kelowna 71/47

Calgary 74/53 57/41 Everett Port Angeles 72/53 70/50 77/54/pc Medicine Hat Seattle 63/48 81/53/pc 76/56 Spokane Libby Tacoma 84/55/pc 74/48 75/54 77/51 74/50/pc Yakima Coeur d’Alene 83/55 73/48/pc Portland 73/52 80/59 Great Falls Walla Walla 84/56/pc Newport Lewiston Missoula 60/47 80/60 70/54/pc 62/49 78/57 69/50 Salem 84/51/pc 81/56 Helena Pendleton 72/51/pc 65/51 80/55 73/48/sh Eugene Bend 83/52 Butte 75/53/pc 74/45 58/43 Ontario 82/57/pc 79/56 Medford 82/52/pc Boise 86/55 81/59/pc 80/54 Klamath Falls 84/62/pc Eureka 77/44 Idaho Falls Twin Falls 84/55/pc 66/51 69/48 74/52

National Weather

Auburn 76/56

Tides

City

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 77/58/pc 84/62/pc 90/67/t 66/55/s 94/76/s 76/63/c 99/72/pc 77/61/sh 97/75/s 63/47/r 98/75/s 78/55/pc 72/59/pc 78/63/sh 78/58/pc 98/78/pc 86/69/t 92/72/t 76/51/t 85/70/t 89/72/t 79/65/pc 90/70/t 98/78/s 81/54/t 92/72/pc 82/65/c 88/69/t 95/75/pc 69/48/pc 72/62/t 92/78/t 94/66/s 86/68/t 87/69/t 77/56/pc 89/76/pc 97/77/s 90/71/t

Redding 92/62

Roseburg Salem Montana Butte Great Falls Missoula Alaska Anchorage

83/56/pc 81/56/pc

90/60/pc 87/60/pc

58/43/sh 60/47/sh 69/50/sh

55/34/r 53/41/r 63/40/sh

66/52/sh

66/55/s

Today Hi/Lo/W Jackson, MS 96/74/s Kansas City 94/76/s Knoxville 91/74/t Las Vegas 96/75/s Little Rock 96/74/s Los Angeles 82/65/pc Louisville 95/78/pc Lubbock 94/66/s Memphis 97/78/s Miami 92/78/pc Milwaukee 83/67/pc Minneapolis 87/71/pc Mobile 95/74/pc Montgomery 98/75/pc Newark 77/65/sh New Orleans 94/78/pc New York City 75/65/sh Norfolk 86/72/t Oakland 72/60/s Oklahoma City 98/74/s Omaha 93/74/t Orlando 95/75/t Palm Springs 99/75/s Philadelphia 80/68/sh Phoenix 98/78/s Pittsburgh 79/65/t Portland, ME 68/55/pc Portland, OR 80/59/pc Providence 73/61/c

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 97/73/s 94/73/pc 89/72/pc 95/73/s 97/74/s 84/65/pc 94/76/pc 93/68/pc 98/78/s 93/78/pc 76/66/t 84/74/t 96/75/t 99/76/s 77/63/pc 95/79/pc 75/63/pc 81/70/sh 73/59/pc 98/74/s 93/72/pc 96/77/t 99/75/s 77/64/c 99/79/pc 81/64/pc 71/55/pc 86/60/s 75/57/pc

City

Barrow 50/40/c Fairbanks 70/45/pc Juneau 68/51/pc British Columbia Chilliwack 79/57/pc Kelowna 71/47/t Vancouver 73/56/pc Victoria 73/51/pc City

Today Hi/Lo/W Raleigh 94/72/t Rapid City 78/58/t Reno 86/54/s Richmond 88/71/t Sacramento 85/57/s St. Louis 96/79/pc St. Petersburg 92/78/t Salt Lake City 85/58/pc San Antonio 100/75/pc San Diego 79/68/pc San Francisco 73/60/pc San Jose 77/58/s Stockton 89/57/s Syracuse 79/62/pc Tallahassee 98/76/t Tampa 92/79/t Tempe 97/77/s Topeka 99/76/s Tucson 93/70/t Tulsa 98/75/s Washington, DC 88/73/t Wichita 98/72/s Winston-Salem 92/72/t Yuma 101/77/s

50/36/c 69/48/pc 66/49/s 80/52/pc 77/46/pc 75/55/pc 74/52/pc Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 87/69/t 71/53/t 85/54/s 84/67/c 87/59/s 98/77/pc 94/80/t 71/54/t 98/76/pc 78/69/pc 73/59/pc 78/58/pc 88/59/s 79/60/pc 99/78/t 93/81/t 99/78/pc 99/74/pc 95/72/pc 97/74/s 81/68/sh 98/70/pc 87/69/t 101/76/s

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

National Extremes (for the 48 contiguous states) High: Death Valley, CA .................. 111 Low: Bodie State Park, CA .............. 32

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

After down season, Storm win No. 1 pick in WNBA lottery Associated Press SECAUCUS, N.J. — It had been 11 years since Seattle had been in the WNBA draft lottery. Coach Brian Agler and the Storm made the most of their return, walking away with the No. 1 pick Thursday night. “We fought hard to try and not be here down the stretch as did Tulsa,” Agler said. “If you can’t be in the playoffs you come here and make the best of it. We were going to leave here with a lot of optimism and direction. That’s why I like the lottery being held this close to the end of the

season. You can put that behind you and move forward.” Unlike some of the previous years when there was a definite choice for the top pick, Agler said he sees a lot of college seniors who could potentially help teams. “I don’t know if there is a clear cut decision as far as who will go No. 1 and No. 2,” Agler said. “There will be multiple players who will make a roster.” Seattle won the initial draft lottery in 2002 and drafted Sue Bird. The Storm also were in the next two lotteries, but didn’t get the No. 1 pick.

The Tulsa Shock will pick second with Connecticut getting the third and fourth choices. The Sun acquired the Liberty’s pick on draft night this past April in part of a package for Tina Charles. “We’re hopefully not going to be here next year,” Shock president Steve Swetoha said. “We have a really good young nucleus and this pick will help add to it.” The Shock have never had the No. 1 pick. The Storm finished tied with Tulsa for the league’s worst record at 12-22 and each had a 35.9 percent chance of landing the No. 1 pick. Connecticut, which finished

a game better, had a 28.2 percent chance when combining its chances with those of the New York Liberty, who finished 15-19. It was the second straight year that the team with the worst record won the lottery. Connecticut won the No. 1 pick last year and took Chiney Ogwumike. Before that it hadn’t happened since 2009. “I didn’t have as good a feeling as last year,” said Mitchell Etess, who is the CEO of the Sun. “Looking at the board and seeing 10 percent chance from the Liberty and 18 percent chance from us didn’t really seem like 28 percent.”

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Community Extra SECTION D

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM/LOCAL

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FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

OPPORTUNITIES Walk: Pump it Up for Platelets benefit A Pump it Up for Platelets benefit 5k walk in memory of Gracie Lindal will be held at 9 a.m. Aug. 23 at McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. Gracie died in December 2011 at 8 of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, a platelet disorder. The walking event honors her memory while raising awareness and funds for research, education and support. Cost is $20, $10 for children. Scholarships are available. To register for the event, go to pdsa.donorpages.com/ PumpItUpEverettWA2014. The Puget Sound Blood Center also will be on hand to take blood donations. Sign up via email to Jennifer Lindal at lovinggracie forever@gmail.com. More info: “For the Love of Gracie” on Facebook.com

Ride: Take the bus to the fair Community Transit offers stops at the Evergreen State Fair, with a special stop adjacent to the west entrance. The fair runs through Sept. 1 at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe. The fairgrounds are served by Community Transit Routes 270 and 275 Mondays through Saturdays. Community Transit does not operate on Sundays or Labor Day. Free parking is available at Everett Station, (3201 Smith Ave.) and at the Gold Bar, Snohomish and Sultan park-and-ride lots. Bus fares are $2, $1.50 ages 6-18 and $1 for those with a reduced fare permit. Younger than 5 is free. Fair parking is $10. More info: www.community transit.org/evergreen

Learn: Help offered for caregivers of mentally ill Starting in September, the Snohomish County Affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness will offer two signature courses for caregivers living with someone with mental illness. The “Basics” course meets weekly for six weeks and is for caregivers with a loved one younger than 18. The “Family to Family” course also meets weekly, for 11 weeks, and is for caregivers with a loved one older than 18. For more information, contact NAMI at 425-339-3620 or by email at nami.snohomish. county@gmail.com. More info: www.nami snohomishcounty.org

Apply: Openings on Council on Aging Openings are available for volunteers interested in senior issues in Snohomish County. Snohomish County’s Council on Aging seeks new members to serve three-year terms beginning in January. The Council on Aging manages local, state and federal funds targeted toward elderly residents and younger residents with disabilities, and helps advise the county’s Long Term Care and Aging office. The group meets from 10 a.m.noon the fourth Wednesday of each month except December. Applications are due Sept. 15. More info: Joyce Frasu at 425388-7377 or www.snohomish countywa.gov/COA

Enroll: Learn more about Lynnwood Lynnwood University, a free eight-week class about city government, is set to begin Sept. 4. Classes will run from 6-8:30 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 23 at various city locations. Try on firefighting gear and climb the 100-foot fire ladder. Learn to solve a criminal case. Tour the waste water treatment plant, and much more. More info: www.ci.lynnwood. wa.us/LynnwoodUniversity, 425-670-5023

MARK MULLIGAN / THE HERALD

Volunteers continue to restore the historic Camano City Schoolhouse, which was built in 1905. Though their efforts have yielded a remodeled building, donations to keep the place maintained and stirred interest from locals, they are looking for more volunteers and support now that the schoolhouse has been designated by the state as a historic location.

One for the history books Foundation working to preserve Camano City Schoolhouse By Kari Bray Herald Writer

CAMANO ISLAND — The little white building, tucked among the trees near Camano Island’s west coast, went up in an era when Washington cities were defined by railroad tracks and waterways. The Camano City Schoolhouse was added to the Washington Heritage Register of Historic Places in June. It’s the latest victory for the Camano Schoolhouse Foundation, a grassroots group of island history buffs aiming to restore the schoolhouse and preserve the history of Camano City. When the schoolhouse was built around 1905, Camano City was a small but flourishing community with a hotel, general store, several shingle mills, a post office, a busy logging industry and direct access to important Washington boat routes. But by the 1920s, the bustle of Camano City started to slow. The

Get involved The Camano Schoolhouse Foundation is looking for board members and donations. To contact the foundation or donate online, go to www.camanoschoolhouse.org. Donations can also be made to the Island County Historical Society, attn. Camano City Schoolhouse. schoolhouse remained open until the mid-1930s, then began to fade into the tranquil, woodsy backdrop of the island. More than 70 years later, Jim Turk learned that the “sturdy little building” he could see from his house up the hill was a classic one-room schoolhouse. Turk, a history lover and Camano resident at the time, decided something needed to be done to restore the schoolhouse. He rallied a handful of volunteers and formed the Camano Schoolhouse Foundation, which operates under the Island

County Historical Society but is working on becoming a separate nonprofit. “Talk about building from the ground up,” said Chuck Durland, the foundation’s development director. “He had this vision for saving the schoolhouse and creating this community gathering place and preserving the history of Camano Island.” The foundation purchased the schoolhouse and half an acre of land for $60,000 in 2012 from Camano Island Fire & Rescue, which owns an auxiliary station next to the schoolhouse. Since the purchase, they’ve been working on renovating the schoolhouse to make it usable year-round as a community event space. While there are historical items on display and information on the walls, Turk and Durland said they don’t want to create a museum. By 2020, the group aims to establish a Camano City Schoolhouse Heritage Education Center where people can host presentations and meetings or

Thrift worker reaches Nordstrom goal

INSIDE: Military Update, 2

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See HISTORY, Page D3

DeLorm honored by Lake Stevens Rotary

APPLAUSE

Mimi Wright’s days as a volunteer thrift store clerk are over. She is now an employee at the Nordstrom Rack shop in downtown Seattle. Until July, Wright worked for Arlington’s Community Thrift, which raises money for the nonprofit Sherwood Community Services in Lake Stevens. Wright is a client of Sherwood, which helps developmentally disabled Snohomish County adults. Shortly after graduating from Lake Stevens High School, Wright, now 25, made it clear to Sherwood officials that her life goal was to work for Nordstrom. Jolynn Rothrock, a job coach at Sherwood, said that goal never wavered. “Mimi has never let her disability stop her from reaching for the stars,” Rothrock said. In high school, Wright ran track and cross country. Since graduating, she has completed numerous marathons. She also

put on picnics and weddings, all in a historic setting. “Our idea is to re-create in the schoolhouse the ambiance of that early schoolhouse era,” Turk said. So far, they’ve cleaned the roof, put on new gutters, fixed the restrooms and stabilized the building with repair work in the basement. The group plans to put a fresh coat of white paint on the schoolhouse before the summer’s out. In the future, Durland said they hope to redo the floor, get a new water heater, install better lighting, put storm windows on the inside of the building and replace a wheelchair ramp. The most pressing need right now, though, is an energyefficient heating system, which they’ve estimated would cost $10,000. Without heat, the schoolhouse can’t be used in the winter. “We need to put all of our efforts into getting this space

MARK MULLIGAN / HERALD FILE 2013

Mimi Wright, 24, volunteered as a clerk once a week at Community Thrift in Arlington before being hired by Nordstrom Rack in Seattle.

loves horses. Her primary passion, however, is fashion. Wright gained retail experience while being coached by thrift store managers Peggy Marzolf and Patti Metz. After working at Nordstrom’s Santa Lane during two Christmas shopping seasons, Wright was encouraged by Nordstrom staff to apply for a permanent position. With the help of a Nordstrom

In Uniform, 2

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Vitals, 2

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human resources specialist, Wright participated in many job interviews, gaining more experience with each one, Rothrock said. Nordstrom employees who saw Wright’s potential began to lobby to get her hired. Wright now takes a bus from her home in Lake Stevens to work as a customer service greeter at Nordstrom Rack, Rothrock said.

Calendar, 3

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Tracy DeLorm was selected as the Rotary Club of Lake Stevens’ Rotarian of the Year for 2013-14. DeLorm has served as chairperson of the Community Services and AquaFest/Duck Dash committees and has been a leading member of the Wine, Beer and Silent Auction Committee as well. She dedicates countless hours on club activities, from selling poinsettias and wreaths during the holiday season to National Night Out. She has been a club member since 2002.

Groups show military their appreciation Beta Masters, a social and charitable chapter part of Beta Sigma Fi, along with the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society each year brings in a cake and all the fixings to local military recruiting stations. This year

Comics, D4

See APPLAUSE, Page D3

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Abby, 5


D2 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Civilian doc networks to backstop VA primary care

M

ore than two decades ago, when a shrinking military health care system saw patient demand exceed its capacity to deliver timely care, particularly for a burgeoning retiree population, the Department of Defense contracted with the private sector to provide alternative networks of civilian physicians to deliver managed care to military beneficiaries. The Department of Veterans Affairs is moving down a similar path of contracting for civilian provider networks. For the VA, however, the networks are to handle only an overflow of needed care, and not offer an alternative enrollment option to the VA’s integrated health care system. The networks also are helping to address an access-to-care crisis that, in recent months, shredded VA credibility and forced leadership changes. On Wednesday, less than a week after President Obama signed into law the Veterans Access, Choice and Accountability Act of 2014 to mandate that the VA offer more timely and convenient to veterans, the VA announced expansion of its new Patient-Centered Community Care contracts so they deliver primary care, too, to veterans when and where the VA cannot. The PC3 networks only started operating in January as a backstop to provide specialty care, mental health care, limited emergency care and also limited newborn care to infants of female veterans. With their new

TOM PHILPOTT MILITARY UPDATE responsibility to deliver primary care, these PC3 networks clearly have gained importance as tools the VA will routinely use over the next several years to restore timely access to care. These provider networks will be familiar to many veterans whose families relied on them for Tricare services while members were still served on active duty. The TriWest Healthcare Alliance, headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona, was support contractor for the Tricare West Region until two years ago. Now it will backstop VA care in 28 states and U.S. Pacific territories. HealthNet Federal Services of Arlington, Virginia, still manages patient care for Tricare North Region. It now will provide both primary and specialty backup care to veterans in the other 22 states when the VA decides it own facilities and staff can’t deliver timely or convenient care. The addition of primary care to PC3 contracts is “another example of how we are working to ensure veterans get the care they need, when they need it

and where they want to be seen,” said new VA Secretary Robert A. McDonald in a statement announcing the change. The press release also said the VA continues to review how PC3 “may be used to help implement the new law. It also emphasized, however, that all PC3 care to veterans will be “coordinated with their VA providers.” That’s a critical point for veteran service organizations. They favor the VA hiring more staff and building more VA clinics over any migration of health services into the private sector. The fear is that this could degrade the VA’s capacity over time to provide veterans, including those catastrophically injured in war, with full spectrum health care they will need for a lifetime. In a phone interview Wednesday, David McIntyre, president and chief executive officer of TriWest, was sensitive to this, emphasizing that PC3 networks will differ in a critical way from Tricare networks. Tricare providers offer beneficiaries a “stand alone, parallel plan” of enrollment to using military health care on base. By contrast, veterans who need occasional care through the PC3 networks will remain enrolled and have its care monitored by the VA health care system, McIntyre explained. “That’s the core of what the VA PC3 is. It’s not to serve as a threat, frankly, to the VA system. It’s really a wraparound network.” McIntyre also touted the value

IN UNIFORM To submit news and photos for this column, contact reporter Gale Fiege at 425-339-3427 or gfiege@heraldnet.com. Active Duty Air Force Airman Raymond Acuna graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. Acuna is the son of Angela Porr, of Lake Stevens, and is a 2013 graduate of Lake Stevens High School. Air Force Airman Joshua Sheard graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas. He is a 2012 graduate of Lynnwood High School. Sheard is the son of Tammy Sheard, of Lynnwood, and Offie Sheard, of Fredericksburg, Va. Coast Guard Cadet Megan Nicole Rice, of Snohomish, is attending the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut. She is the daughter of Bruce and Melanie Rice and granddaughter of Terri English, of Mountlake Terrace, and Don Rice, of Seattle. She Megan Nicole graduated from SnohomRice ish High School in 2011 and attended North Seattle Community College. Rice will graduate as a commissioned officer in 2018. She recently completed in intensive seven-week “swab summer” training at the academy. In sea trials last week Rice’s company came in first place out of eight. Elliot N. Choe, an Army Reserve Officer Training Corps cadet at Pacific Lutheran University, has graduated from the leader development and assessment course at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Choe is the son of Wayne Choe, of Federal Way, and nephew of Edward Choe, of Lynnwood, and Peter Choe, of Olympia. John C. Bartkowski, an Army Reserve Officer Training Corps cadet at Central Washington University, has graduated from the leader development and assessment course at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Bartkowski is the son of Steve and Kathy Bartkowski, of Edmonds. He is a 2010 graduate of Meadowdale High School.

Veterans calendar Fleet Reserve Association Branch 170: Branch meetings are held at 5 p.m. second Wednesdays, 6802 Beverly Blvd., Everett. 425-353-2600. The Military Order of the Purple Heart, Chapter 12: 7 p.m. fourth Tuesdays, Lynnwood Elks Club, 6620 196th St. SW. Call Keith Reyes, 844-4MOPH12. Disabled American Veterans, Martin T. Sofie Sunshine Chapter 13: 11:30 a.m. second Thursdays, Lynnwood Elks, 6620 196th St. SW. Call Gil, 425-742-1600. Coast Guard Auxiliary: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays, Port of Everett Conference Center, 404 14th St. Marie Porterfield, 425-629-3241, 509-949-6715 or Marie. Porterfield64@gmail.com. Fleet Reserve Association and Ladies Fleet Reserve Association Unit and Branch 18: Lunch noon, meeting 1 p.m. second Saturdays, 23003 56th Ave. W., Mountlake Terrace. 425-771-2774. Veterans: A group of veterans of wars in foreign lands (not associated with VFW) meets at 1 p.m., second Wednesdays, Carl Gipson Senior Center, 3025 Lombard, Everett. Call 425-257-8780.

American Legion Legion Post 76: Arlington Post 76 and auxiliary

meetings, 7 p.m. second Tuesdays. SAL meetings 6 p.m. first Thursdays. All meetings are downstairs at 115 N. Olympic Ave., Arlington. Call 360-435-2492. Legion Post 58: Arthur Kincaid Post meets 7 p.m. third Tuesdays, Odd Fellows Building, 610 Lewis St., Monroe. Call Bob at 360-863-3544 or go to www.americanlegion monroe.org. Legion Post 66: 6 p.m. third Mondays, 117 Sixth Ave. S., Edmonds. Call Les, 206-546-6831. Legion Post 234: 7 p.m. second Mondays, Legion Hall, 22909 56th Ave. W., Mountlake Terrace. Call Frank Martinez, 425-697-4102. Legion Post 37: 7 p.m. third Thursdays, Lynnwood Elks Club, 6620 196th St. SW. 425-585-0279. Legion Post 92: Stanwood offers prime rib dinner, 4:30 p.m., third Fridays. Legion and auxiliary meeting, 7 p.m., second Mondays, 26921 88th Ave. NW, Stanwood. Service office, 360-629-8021, open 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays to help veterans. Legion Post 96: 7 p.m. second Tuesdays, Legion Hall, 1201 First St., Snohomish. Call 360-568-5340. Legion Post 6: 6 p.m. second Thursdays, the Fleet Reserve Association Club, 6802 Beverly Blvd., Everett. Call Marvin at 425-923-8172. Legion Post 181: 7 p.m. second and fourth Thursdays, Lake Stevens Community Center, 1812 124th Ave. NE. Call Tom at 425-314-5865, Tony at 360-631-3242, or Vern at 425-343-9637; email info@post181.org; or go to www.post181.org.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Gold Bar Martin-Osterholtz VFW Post 9417: 6 p.m. first Thursdays. Auxiliary hosts a pancake breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m. July 26 at 301 Third St., Gold Bar. Suggested donation is $5. Call “Sarge” Watkins at 425-931-1638. Ladies Auxiliary: 3 p.m. first Thursdays. Call Arden King at 360-793-2786. Oak Harbor’s Whitehead-Muzzall VFW Post 7392: 360-675-4048 or go to vfwpost7392.org. Sultan VFW Post 2554 and Ladies Auxiliary: 7 p.m., second Thursdays, United Methodist Church, 211 Birch Ave., Sultan. Call 425-870-0235. Arlington Boyer-Daniel VFW Post 1561: 7 p.m. first Tuesdays. For meeting location, call 425232-8453, 360-435-6677 or go to vfw1561.org. Monroe VFW Post 7511: 7 p.m., second Thursdays, IOOF Hall, 610 Lewis St., Monroe. Call Ken, 425-315-3509. Edmonds VFW Post 8870 and Ladies Auxiliary: Lunch at 11:45 a.m., meeting at 12:30 p.m. second Fridays, Edmonds Senior Center, 220 Railroad Ave., Edmonds. Fred at 206-940-7502, email quartermaster@vfw8870.org or go to www. vfw8870.org. Snohomish Gay Jones VFW Post 921 and Auxiliary: 1 p.m. second Saturdays, Boys & Girls Club, 402 Second St., Snohomish. Call 425-3977111. Everett Old Guard VFW Post 2100: 6:30 p.m. fourth Thursdays, 2711 Oaks Ave., Everett. Ladies Auxiliary 2100: 6:30 p.m. second Monday. Call 425-337-1559 or go to www.vfwpost2100.org. Post 2100 will host a rummage sale 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 22, 23 and 24 in the lower hall of the post. Donations for the fundraiser will be accepted at the post each afternoon until the end of the sale. Lynnwood VFW Post 1040: 7 p.m., first Thursdays, Alderwood Youth Club, 19619 24th Ave. W., Lynn­wood. Call Martin, 425-774-7416, or Frank, 425-697-4102. Lynnwood VFW Post 1040 Ladies Auxiliary meets from 7 to 8 p.m. at the same location. Contact Myra Rintamaki, 206-235-0348 for more information.

to the VA of having consolidated networks of providers ready to serve as a “relief valve” when veterans can’t get timely, convenient care from inside the VA. He noted that discovery of thousands of veterans awaiting care through the Phoenix VA Health Care System “lit off the furnace” of the crisis over veterans facing long wait times for care. Yet last month, McIntyre said, civilian providers working under the TriWest PC3 network provided specialty care to about 3,000 veterans in the Phoenix area, as part of an aggressive VA effort to end patient backlogs. “Today,” he said, “every veteran who cannot be seen in the (Phoenix) VA on the specialty side gets care within standards downtown. … The backlog in specialty care has been worked off and 4,400 providers in Maricopa County surrounding the (Phoenix) VA medical center are that safety net.” Starting this month, under newly modified contracts, TriWest and HealthNet will begin to backstop the VA on primary care appointments at select locations. By December, primary care will be available in “all of the areas in which we operate,” McIntyre said. PC3 contracts also were changed to aligned networks to tighter “drive times” for care access set in the new law. McIntyre and Thomas Carrato, president of HealthNet Federal Services, testified before the House Veterans Affairs Committee in June and each of them

suggested expanding PC3 contracts into primary care. At the time Carrato said that while PC3 contractors continue to build out specialty care networks, they have met resistance in some locations from civilian providers who are reluctant to join a network while they have separate contracts with individual VA facilities also to provide backup care. “The communication is a lot better but that’s an issue that continues to linger,” Carrato told lawmakers. McIntyre, in our interview, suggested VA increasingly sees the advantages of using networks of providers for backup care rather than the VA cutting local deals. These include discounts off VA payment rates, prompt provider reimbursements and PC3 networks having responsibility for patient record transfer back into the VA system after every episode of civilian care. VA officials still must decide how to use a “Veterans Choice Card” that the new law requires be issued to veterans as a guarantee of timely access to care. McIntyre wouldn’t speculate on how it would be used. He did suggest, however, that PC3 contracts will result in fewer veterans having to find their own doctors out of frustration that the VA or its partner networks can’t deliver on timely, convenient care. Send comments to Military Update, P.O. Box 231111, Centreville, VA, 20120, email milupdate@aol.com or twitter: Tom Philpott @Military_Update

VITAL STATISTICS MARRIAGE LICENSES Gephart, Matthew Ryan and Gephart, Jamie Elizabeth Tecorral, Valeriano Antonio and Marshall, Rebecca Guinn Phan, Philip Duc and Le, Nam-Phuong Thi Gieseking, Bjorn Aaron and Kachele, Brianna Renee Neves, Kathleen Nicole and Long, Brian Peter Gordon, Sherri Ann and Root, Michael Lee Johnson, Benjamin Scott and Peterson, Markie Re Rockcastle, Lisa Elizabeth and Campos, Robert Larson, William Jeffrey and Usitalo, Sheryl Renee Noste, Joan Elinor and Kelley, Gail Diane Navas, Perez Daniel and Galaz, Chavez Pholett Adilene Meyer, Isaac Nolan and Moynihan, Kelly Maureen Tingley, Cary Vincent and Rhodes, Milissa Louise Cameron, Christopher Paul Jr and Olney, Katie Brianne Wise, Nikaelah Noelle and Zepeda, Luis Miguel Luebke, Katherine Amanda and Nelsen, Corey Michael Wang, Timothy Tsekit and Salerno, Angela Marie Yarin, Eduard Grigoryevich and Serova, Yelena Vasilyevna Jarosky, Brittany Marie and Nelson, Curtis Ross Carlson, Mark James and Alexander, Brenda Faye Beard, Branden Richard and Mohoric, Stephanie Kloss, Michael Brian and Roark, Jamie Rain Keene, Erica Rose and Mehl, Zane Michael Kielty, Martha Meiko and Thompson, Erik Walter Do, Renny Frank and Phong, Anh Cong Barkley, Paul Fredric Sr and Couch, Norah May McKinney, Bobbie Jo and Meissner, Saundra Ann Pulkrabek, Michael Jay and McClelland, Robin Kay Gasperetti, Stephen Joseph and Clark, Megan Elizabeth Chweya, Eric Lubusy and Nyale, Winnie Sidi Warburton, Cory Richard and Trautmann, Kailey Jean Danae Rios, Rodriguez Ramiro and Parra, Tellez Beatriz Gabriela Byron, Ashlee Lillian and Smith, Timothy Daniel Guyot, Michael James and Wesson, Jamie Lee Arnold, Kaylie Lynn and Fairbanks, Robert William Hudson, Joel Thomas and Collet, Jennifer Amber Sipma, Jennifer Lynn and Voigt, Jeffrey David Loera, Davi Miguel and Plymale, Diana Lynn Ramsey, Ryan Lee and Boughton, Wendy June Nordensson, Jonathan Ray and Schiessl, Lauren Marie Lebreton, Carrie Marie and Duprey-Ford, Joshua Glenn Sikorskiy, Oleg Victorovitch and Barbina, Victoriya Anatolivya Flolid, Derek John and Bower, Lindsay Katherine Landon, Randy Gene and Landon, Ivee Renae Wilder, Samantha Nicole and Nelson, Derek Steven Wills, Evan Jason and Kida, Mina Dosen, Kelsey J and Taylor, Justin Harrison Purcell, David Lewis and Gamman, Laurel Louise Salmon, Jessica Marie and Lesher, Todd Michael Ramos-Chavez, Jose Antonio and RamosSt Clair, Brynn Bettina Douglass, William Alexander and Christenson, Tanya Andrea Van, Vleet Darian Sky and Carson, Jacob Michael Toteva, Elena Milkova and Martinez, Aceves Jose Eduardo Gabriel, Jacob Daniel Ekblad and Croyle, Heather Michelle Isherwood, Jenna Wanda Dawn and Cooper, Michael Neal Jr

Worthen, Richard Gordon and Holmes, Alicelee Jo Peterson, Kalani Ua Lohe Ke Akua and Puff, Chloe Alexandra Hathaway, Cassandra Elizabeth and Delahunty, Corey Allen Perrault, Allison Joy and Garton, Jeremy William Berg, Angela Mastrallo and Wickstrom, Derek Russell Fesyuk, David Anatoly and Datskaya, Ulyana Vasiliyevna Ovena, Manuel Christian and Meyer, Michelle Patricia Pryor, Robert Breen and Earp, Kayce Lee Hughes, Beverly Dot and Sauer, Darin James Martin, Richard Lee and Dillan, Roberta Marie Rippee-Butler, Bailey Jordan and Bertram, Patrick Johnathen Ottmar, Michael David and Brantley, Heather Lynn Watson, Loni Diena and Mowbray, Dana Ray Tveit, Oliver Douglas and Crismon, Tezra Lee Allen, Aubrey Lee and Helgeson, Brenan Dale Eyster, Grayson Kelley and Malakhovskaya, Irina Vladimirovna Pilat, Vasiliy Ivanovich and Sklyarova, Snezhana Yevgeniy Jackson, Kendra Lorrie and Hardman, Todd James Sherbourne, Bruce Alan and Campbell, Thelma Andersen, Jeffrey Steven and Deonarine, Nazima Azmi Maddalena, Jennifer Elizabeth and Saucedo, Benjamin Edwards Mugge, Jeffrey Phillip and Webster, Ayla Louise Lemon, David Loren and Smith, Erin Marie Guthrie, Clifton James and Thompson, Susan Ashley Henderson, Jason David and Henderson, Katelyn Elaine Bartenbach, Joel William Ii and Scott, Melissa Rose Valley Derrick, Alyssa Kaylee and Owen, Evin Nathaniel Hendrickson, Michael Thomas and Henson, Jermaine Katura Allen, Melvin Gerald and Costanzo, Mary Martha Johnson, Krista Leanne and Lilly, Mickey Patrick Griffin, Nakwisi Leon and Setal, Eunice Abigail Hagen, Michelle Lynn and Spies, Jeffrey Lloyd Kask, Heidi Korinne and Haley, Tyler Robert Muresan, Constantin and Bernadette, Bulungu Mutombo Pierre, Everett Arthur and Pearson, Lydia Anne Nielsen, Vernon Hans Jr and Hale, Lauren Ann Jessen, Steven and Fu, Lily Kallow, Lamin B J and Oates, Tkayah Carmel Palmer, Kenneth Fredrick and Jorgenson, Eula Kaye Mansour, Waleed Abdellatief and Foster, Raejeanna Victoria Arnett, Raymond Lee and Davis, Sharon Elaine Moore, James Fred and Boone, Sherry Kemethia Tucker, Kendra Mae and Odom, Daniel Robert Smith, Richard Joseph and Krueger, Megan Elizabeth Everson, Lisa Marie and Dexter, Alexander Christopher Tshivuadi, Emmanuel Dieudonne and Medsker, Tarah Michelle Gustafson, James Douglas and Swint, Ginger Leigh Cravens, Charles Eric and McCloud, Majkin Lindsey Young, Debra Mae and Hendricks, Roger Scott Gaulding, David Emmett Lee and McConville, Jennifer Lynn Libbing, Jessi Kalina Scott and Wiley, Michael Mason Zaneski, Morgan Ann and Farrow, Cole Alan Cady, Jamie Leigh and Black, Joshua Michael Medley, Kelli Lynn and Chhetri, Basant Lake, Tobias Jonathan and Morris, Tiffany Rose

Fowler, Nicholes Edward and Moore, Mackenzie Ray

DISSOLUTIONS

Royce Glenn and Debra Glenn Richard Ortloff and Patti Ortloff Karen Townsend and Christopher Townsend Cassey Frisk and Jason Frisk Jennifer Hendrix and Brian Hendrix Shirley Nolton and Kevin Nolton Frank Simorjay and Holly Simorjay Brian Wick and Mariah Wick Jennifer Lowe and Sean Lowe Michael Goens and Tammy Goens Alanna St George-Lewis and John Joseph Lewis Melissa Bennett and Jeremy Bennett Martin Strand and Sharon Strand Kristin Dewitte and Daniel Dewitte Salvador Sanchez and Leticia Chavez Patricia Whitcomb and Trevor Whitcomb Susan Lorenzana and Mario Lorenzana Rosalie Heinrich and Richard Heinrich Rolana Wahlgren and Kevin Wahlgren Debra Anderson and Shelley Stanton Kaaren Sidoine and Abdurraouf Gseaa Meya Sanyang and Pa Sanyang Shari Trail and Steven Trail Michele Spaulding-Burns and Mathew Burns Sandra Moyers and Vernon Moyers Megan Grandez Quintana and Diego Grandez Quintana Tresia Hammonds and Eric Hammonds Susan Schneider and Frank Schneider Lea Tyo and Gerald Tyo Balbir Mann and Davinder Mann Rebekah Knapp and Randall Knapp Brenna Duarte and Aldaberto Duarte Hernandez Waleed Mansour and Winona FraserMansour Shellie Trudell and Cora-Jean Potter Douglas Hinds and Paula Hinds Chelsea Ackerman and Brandon Ackerman Jeremy Mcconnell and Rebecca Rickett

DEATHS

Adams, Nicholas, 21, Lynnwood, Aug. 2 Ami, Remedios, 63, Bothell, Aug. 10 Bulger, Paul, 67, Everett, Aug. 4 Bynum, Andrew, 34, Everett, Aug. 7 Carver, James, 79, Mountlake Terrace, Aug. 11 Champagne, Lena, 101, Mountlake Terrace, Aug. 7 Church, Julie, 54, Everett, Aug. 5 Contraro, Frances, 63, Tulalip, Aug. 10 Crain, Ruth, 85, Snohomish, Aug. 10 Dargoo, Mary, 89, Marysville, Aug. 6 DeLisle, Mary, 88, Lynnwood, Aug. 6 Dinger-Dickson, Cordice, 97, Arlington, Aug. 5 Doe, Betty, 88, Snohomish, Aug. 7 Egorova, Alexandra, 89, Lynnwood, Aug. 6 Flogo, Rolanda, 73, Mukilteo, Aug. 12 Fredericksen, Roy, 78, Edmonds, Aug. 5 Gilbert, Rodger, 70, Snohomish, Aug. 9 Graham, Fredrick aka: Fred, 73, Edmonds, Aug. 6 Halligan, Marcia, 66, Langley, Aug. 10 Hebert, Dorothy, 91, Marysville, Aug. 7 Hill, Deborah, 55, Stanwood, Aug. 7 Holden, James, 41, Edmonds, Aug. 13 Howell, Alica, 91, Monroe, Aug. 8 Hunter, Clydetta, 90, Arlington, Aug. 9 Huxley, Jane, 62, Snohomish, Aug. 2 James, Richard, 85, Edmonds, Aug. 11 Johnson, Kathleen, 55, Lynnwood, Aug. 3 Kahle, Donna, 66, Edmonds, Aug. 6 Keene, Eugene, 101, Stanwood, Aug. 9 Kwon, Choe, 49, Bothell, Aug. 13 Lafferty, Francis, 80, Snohomish, Aug. 11 Landburg, Dora, 87, Mountlake Terrace, Aug. 10 Lemke, David, 77, Snohomish, Aug. 10 Ligenza, Nancy, 74, Marysville, Aug. 10 Lowery, Helen, 88, Everett, Aug. 9 Matthews, Jean, 84, Sammamish, Aug. 10 McCrory, Francis, 87, Lynnwood, Aug. 10 McLauchlin, Mary, 81, Sequim, Aug. 7 Mead, Morris, 71, Edmonds, July 31 Minor, Edward, 89, Edmonds, Aug. 11 Nelson, Mildred, 73, Darrington, Aug. 7 Nesbitt, Nancy, 71, Everett, Aug. 8 Norvell, Donald, 80, Stanwood, Aug. 3 Nugent Horton, Mildred, 79, Lynnwood, Aug. 2 O’Neil, Ethel, 89, Everett, Aug. 12 Ogard, Elizabeth, 91, Marysville, Aug. 9 Oshie, Carol, 72, Everett, Aug. 11 Oswalt, Christine, 63, Greenbank, Aug. 12 Parrish, Mary, 88, Kirkland, Aug. 13 Partlo, Susan, 66, Everett, Aug. 6 Paulsen, Robert, 54, Arlington, Aug. 10 Wright, Byron, 53, Arlington, Feb. 19


The Daily Herald

EVENTS Rummage sale: Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2100 in Everett plans a rummage sale fundraiser Aug. 22-24 at the Post, 2711 Oakes Ave. Benefit sale: A garage sale fundraiser is set for 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 22-24 at 1723 93rd Drive SE, Lake Stevens. Proceeds benefit Sarah’s Hope, a team participating in the Susan G. Komen 3-Day 60-mile walk for breast cancer research. Monetary donations also welcome. More info: Kirk, 425-232-0756. Mini Comic-Con: A Mini ComicCon and Zombie Walk event is set for 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Granite Falls Library, 815 E. Galena St. More info: 360-691-6087. Board Bash: Watch skateboarders in action at Mill Creek’s Board Bash, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Mill Creek Sports Park, Skate Park, 13903 North Creek Drive. Free. More info: 425-921-5736. Heroine talk: Author and popculture historian Jennifer K. Stuller will explore the significance of superwomen, cinematic warriors and heroines in modern-day mythology, 1:30 p.m. Aug. 23 at the Granite Falls Library, 815 E. Galena St. Free. Raptor show: Kestrel SkyHawk of the Sarvey Wildlife Center brings a golden eagle called Hu Iyake and a supporting cast of several owls and hawks for “Raptors on the Wing,” 7 p.m. Aug. 27 at the Northwest Stream Center at McCollum Park, 600 128th St. SE, Everett. Cost is $7 for Adopt A Stream Foundation members, $10 for non-members. Proceeds benefit the Sarvey Wildlife Center and the Adopt A Stream Foundation’s Streamkeeper Academy. Registration required. More info: 425-316-8592. Pancake breakfast: The Mill Creek Senior Center holds a waffle and pancake breakfast fundraiser, 8:30-11 a.m. Aug. 28 at Emeritus at Mill Creek, 14905 Bothell-Everett Highway. Waffles, pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, coffee, tea, and juice. Suggested donation is $10. More info: 425948-7170. Art fest: The Mukilteo Arts Guild’s Waterfront Art Festival is set for 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Aug. 29 at the Rosehill Community Center, 304 Lincoln Ave. Meanwhile, artists are also sought for a Nov. 1 Art Mart. Vendor fees for both events benefit a scholarship fund. More info: www.mukilteoarts.org. Open house: Dragons of Heaven Tattoo Studio at 16108 Ash Way, Suite 104, Lynnwood, holds a grand opening party and fundraiser. Admission is $5, with proceeds benefitting the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. Also attending are local recording artist Champagne Honeybee; “Project Runway” contestant Joshua Chris-

COMMUNITY EXTRA

CALENDAR

Got an event or volunteer opportunity to share? Email newstips@heraldnet.com or leave a message for Melissa Slager at 425-339-3432. Include a contact phone number. For a complete listing of events, go to www.heraldnet.com. tensen; and stylist Clorae Baca. More info: 425-743-4188.

WAYS TO HELP Fill the Boot: Lake Stevens Firefighters’ Local 3235 concludes its Fill the Boot for MDA drive, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 22 at the intersection of Market Place and 91st Avenue. Supply drive: Members of Junior Girl Scouts Troop 44549 are earning their Bronze Award by collecting school and art supplies for the Seattle Children’s Hospital Child Life Department. Scout volunteers will be collecting donations of new and unwrapped supplies, games and gift cards 2-4:30 p.m. Aug. 24 and 4-6:30 p.m. Aug. 26-27 outside the Mill Creek Staples, 16232 Bothell-Everett Highway. A party and supply drive also will be held 1-4 p.m. Sept. 6 at North Creek Park, 1011 183rd St. SE. For the party, RSVP by Aug. 31 to corriewilder@gmail.com. Blood drive: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 28 at the Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. Call 800-398-7888 to make an appointment to donate. Vendors: The Stillaguamish Senior Center’s annual bazaar is set for Oct. 11. Potential vendors can contact DJ Winebrinner for rental forms. The Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington. More info: 360-6534551 ext. 228. Crafters: Crafters are wanted for the Assistance League of Everett, Kitty Young Auxiliary’s holiday bazaar, to be held Nov. 8 at Evergreen Middle School, 7621 Beverly Lane, Everett. More info: Shirley Olsen at contact@assistanceleagueofeverett.org. Bird Fest: The Puget Sound Bird Fest returns to Edmonds Sept. 5-7 and seeks volunteers to help at the registration table, to monitor speakers and help with kids activities. More info: Sally Lider, 425-771-0227, sally.lider@ edmondswa.gov. Camano Center: The Camano Center is in need of several volunteer drivers to provide seniors with rides to medical appointments, and some to deliver Meals-on-Wheels.

A volunteer with general medical knowledge also is needed for the Adult Day Program, and there are a few volunteer positions available at the Second Chance Thrift Shop. More info: Wendy, 360-387-0222. Soup kitchen, Everett: The Everett soup kitchen seeks volunteer drivers. Vehicle provided. Volunteers must be licensed and insured. Help is needed on various days. More info: Sandra, 425-3551042. Food bank, Everett: Hands of Hope, a Volunteers of America Food Bank, at 9021 Evergreen Way in Everett, seeks volunteers and donations. Send checks to P.O. Box 839, Everett, WA 98206. Food donation and client hours are 2-5:30 p.m. Wednesdays. More info: Leann Geiger, senior director of Basic Services, at 425-259-3191.

SENIORS Medicare 101: Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisor Hal Howard will discuss Medicare and the the various Medicare Advantage plans, Medigap and prescription drug plans, 1 p.m. Aug. 28 at the Stillaguamish Senior Center, 18308 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington. Find out what’s new for 2015 or changes that might be coming. Register by calling 360-653-4551 or sign up at the reception desk. Senior Center Month: The Stillaguamish Senior Center kicks off Senior Center Month (September) at 11 a.m. Aug. 29 with Snohomish County Executive John Lovick as guest speaker. The Senior Center is at 18308 Smokey Point Blvd., Arlington. More info: 360-653-4551. Balance class: Learn about fall hazards and change your thinking about inactivity at a free, eight-session “Matter of Balance” workshop, 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays through Sept. 8 at the Northshore Senior Center, 10201 East Riverside Drive, Bothell. Wear comfortable clothes and sturdy shoes. The class is designed for anyone who has become less active due to fear of falling, uses assistive devices or has had a fall. Registration is required. More info: Glen at 425286-1029.

Friday, 08.22.2014 D3

Applause From Page D1

they brought the party supplies to the Army recruiting office in Everett for its anniversary June 13. Next up is the Air Force. “We know how hard it is for them. We just want them to know we’re there for them,” said Barbara Campbell, a member of both charitable groups. If anyone wants to join Beta Masters, they are welcome. Members come from all backgrounds. “All that matters is that you have a good heart.” For more information, call Campbell at 425-337-4977.

Bothell officer receives award Bothell police officer Robert Buendia was presented with the 2014 Crisis Intervention Team Officer of the Year Award on Aug. 5. Buendia received the award based in part on his response to a call for service involving a suicidal woman. Buendia used his crisis intervention training to speak with the woman over the phone as well as through a partially open door. With some help from another officer, he was eventually able to convince the woman into putting the handgun into her gun safe and exiting her apartment. The awards were sponsored by the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission, the CIT-King CO program in partnership with King County Mental Health, Chemical Abuse and Dependency Services Division through the Mental Illness and Drug Dependency Plan, and the Marion County Crisis Outreach Response Team.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Claire Sorgen, of Sultan, is crowned July 27 in Nashville as the America’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization’s Jr. National Teenager 2015.

Sultan teen named Jr. National Teen Sultan High School freshman Claire Sorgen on July 27 was crowned the America’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization’s Jr. National Teenager 2015. Claire represented Washington as she spent a week in Nashville competing in the national pageant. Claire is the daughter of Dale and Gini Sorgen. Claire finished Sultan Middle School with a cumulative 4.0 GPA for all three years. In middle school, she was drum major, yearbook president and a mentor for incoming sixth grade students. In her community she is involved with Volunteers of America as well as a member of First Baptist Church Monroe where she is active in children’s ministries and youth activities. By capturing the 2015 ANTSO’s Jr. National Teenager title, Claire will travel all across America to speak and volunteer with various organizations, as well as be an ambassador for the Boys & Girls Club of America, ANTSO’s national philanthropy.

Kavan Dewar

Scout helps out Special Olympics Kavan Dewar, 18, a recent graduate of Mountlake Terrace High School, is now an Eagle Scout with Troop 304 in Lynnwood. Dewar’s Eagle Scout project involved building a portable 16-foot bowling alley for the Washington State Special Olympics. The new alley replaced an aging one that was hard to move and falling apart. Dewar’s design can be disassembled and moved more easily while being strong enough to handle heavy bowling balls crashing into its sides. Dewar is now enrolled at Washington State University where he plans to major in chemical engineering with minors in math and chemistry.

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An historic photo of teacher Maue Hayden is posted on the wall of the Camano City Schoolhouse.

History From Page D1

useable yearround,” Durland said. “We’re kind of singleminded in that right now.” They’ve had help from fellow board member Don Hopkins and from local business owners, including donated gutters from Ron Moore’s Gutter Factory, paint from Christie Connors of the Stanwood Camano Community Resource Center, lumber from Evan Holzknecht of Cascade Lumber and signs from local artist Mary McIntyre. As restoration efforts continue, the group also hopes to pay off its $60,000 mortgage long before the Dec. 15, 2022, end date. Durland and Turk expect the historic register

designation to help with fundraising and grant applications. “The Camano City School is historically significant as an intact example of an early one-room school house, directly linked to the early educational system of Washington State,” wrote Allyson Brooks, a historic preservation officer with the state, in a letter to Turk. Being on the state register can help organizations get property tax deductions for historic sites along with code waivers to protect the integrity of the building during renovations, Brooks wrote. “As a very small group, we’re been struggling with all manner of fundraisers to keep up with maintenance and upkeep,” Turk said. “Every month, we struggle with do we or don’t we have enough to pay the bills.”

He estimates the monthly costs are about $700 for mortgage, utilities and insurance. “Starting an organization from scratch is like getting a big ship going, or a train, it takes a lot of power to get it going,” Durland said. “We feel like we’re just getting it going.” The group’s next scheduled fundraiser is its second annual Heritage Preservation Award and Camano Schoolhouse Foundation Benefit Breakfast. The event is set for Oct. 9 at 8 a.m. in the Cama Center at Cama Beach State Park. The foundation plans to honor Carol Triplett, co-chair of the Friends of Camano Island Parks, for her dedication to preserving parks, trails and historic sites on Camano Island, including Cama Beach. Kari Bray: 425-339-3439; kbray@heraldnet.com.

Aug 27 FAMILY DAY

$30: Up to 6 Gate Admissions

Aug 28 KID’S DAY

FREE GATE ADMISSION 15 Years and under

(6+ yrs) All day

www.heraldnet.com

FREE GATE ADMISSION

Aug 29 ARMED FORCES DAY

FREE GATE ADMISSION

Aug 30 RODEO DAY

GET DISCOUNTED CARNIVAL

Aug 31 DEMO DERBY DAY

GET DISCOUNTED CARNIVAL

until 1pm with 3 cans of Armed Forces/First Responders with proper I.D. food per person WRISTBANDS at www.EvergreenFair.org by AUGUST 20

Sept 1 LABOR DAY

WRISTBANDS at www.EvergreenFair.org by AUGUST 20

www.heraldnet.com

Pro West

RODEO

7pm, Aug 29-31 Purchase tickets online, at the arena box office or at the gates on the day of show for $5.00. Fair admission required.

DISCOUNT GATE ADMISSION for Everyone (Fair Closes at 7pm)

Concert Series! EMBLEM 3

August 25 • 7:30pm

Charlie Daniels Band

with special guest The Marshall Tucker Band August 26 • 7:00pm

Bill Cosby

August 27 • 7:30pm

Chris Young

with special guest Courtney Cole August 28 • 7:30pm

Newsboys

with special guest Ryan Stevenson August 29 • 7:30pm

...Experience Animal Magnetism!

The Evergreen State Fairgrounds Buy Tickets Online or In Person

www.EvergreenFair.org

Monroe, WA 98272 • (360) 805-6700

1115840


D4 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

DAILY CROSSWORD

Baby doesn’t have ticket — who’s responsible? Q: Earlier this year, I booked tickets through Expedia.com for myself and my infant daughter to fly from Johannesburg, South Africa, to Billings, Mont., on British Airways. Our return flight was from Chicago to Johannesburg. I purchased an infant-in-lap ticket for my daughter, and the confirmation I received from Expedia showed a fare of $283 for her ticket. A few weeks later, I got an email from Expedia alerting me to the fact that it could not ticket my daughter’s reservation. Unfortunately, I didn’t notice this email from Expedia. I also later realized that Expedia had never charged me for the infant ticket. My Expedia profile showed that the itinerary was “booked and confirmed,” and my infant’s ticket was marked “ticketing in progress.” I arrived at the Johannesburg airport two hours before my flight, and the British Airways agent at the check-in desk told me that she could not locate a ticket number for my daughter. She asked me to go to the ticketing desk in the terminal. I did, and for more than an hour various agents worked steadily to try to ticket my daughter. I still do not understand exactly what the issue was, but my best understanding is that they were not able to modify the Expedia

CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER reservation, nor were they able to ticket my daughter separately from my reservation. At any rate, the flight closed while they were still trying to ticket my daughter, and I missed the flight. The British Airways agents insisted that it was Expedia’s responsibility to rebook me, so after 2½ hours at the ticket desk, I left the airport, checked into a hotel and called Expedia. After many hours on the phone, Expedia offered to refund the ticket. I had to buy another ticket, which cost nearly $1,000 more than the cost of my original ticket. I also incurred the costs of more than a day in a hotel, and meals. Neither company is admitting any responsibility, and neither one has done anything to reimburse me for the extra costs incurred. Can you help? — Allison Ruark, Corvallis, Oregon

SUPER QUIZ Subject: WORDS OF WISDOM With one word, complete the “words of wisdom” from the given play. (e.g., “Julius Caesar”: “Cowards die many times before their deaths. The valiant never taste of death but ___.” Answer: Once.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. “As You Like It”: “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a ___.” 2. “Hamlet”: “There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in your ____.” 3. “Twelfth Night”: “Better a witty fool, than a foolish ___.” GRADUATE LEVEL 4. “Cymbeline”: “Society is no comfort to one not ___.” 5. “All’s Well That Ends Well”:

CLASSIC PEANUTS

BIRTHDAYS “Love all, trust a few, do wrong to ___.” 6. “King Lear”: “Jesters do oft prove ___.” PH.D. LEVEL 7. “Romeo and Juliet”: “Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own ___.” 8. “Measure for Measure”: “The miserable have no other medicine but only ___.” 9. “The Tempest”: “Misery acquaints a man with strange ____.” ANSWERS: 1. Fool. 2. Philosophy. 3. Wit. 4. Sociable. 5. None. 6. Prophets. 7. Fingers. 8. Hope. 9. Bedfellows. Super Quiz is a registered trademark of K. Fisher Enterprises Ltd. (c) 2014 Ken Fisher North America Syndicate Inc.

Broadcast journalist Morton Dean is 79. Author Annie Proulx is 79. Baseball Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski is 75. Actress Valerie Harper is 75. Pro Football Hall of Fame coach Bill Parcells is 73. Writer-producer David Chase is 69. CBS newsman Steve Kroft is 69. Actress Cindy Williams is 67. International Swimming Hall of Famer Diana Nyad is 65. Baseball Hall of Famer Paul Molitor is 58. Rock musician Vernon Reid is 56. Actress Regina Taylor is 54. Rock singer Roland Orzabal (Tears For Fears) is 53. Rock musician Debbi Peterson (The Bangles) is 53. Rock musician Gary Lee Conner (Screaming Trees) is 52. Singer Tori Amos is 51. International Tennis Hall of Famer Mats Wilander is 50. Celebrity chef Giada DeLaurentiis is 44. Actor Rick Yune is 43. Rock musician Paul Doucette (Matchbox Twenty) is 42. Comedian-actress Kristen Wiig is 41. Thought for Today: “Life does not give itself to one who tries to keep all its advantages at once. I have often thought morality may perhaps consist solely in the courage of making a choice.” — Leon Blum, French statesman (1872-1950). Associated Press

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

TUNDRA

THE BRILLIANT MIND OF EDISON LEE

SIX CHIX

BUCKLES

DILBERT

WUMO

DENNIS THE MENACE

CORNERED

THE BETTER HALF

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A: When you’re acting as your own travel agent, you have to stay on top of things. On domestic flights, infants are not required to have their own seats. But on international flights, they’re charged a percentage of the adult fare. British Airways’ infant fare is 10 percent of the adult fare, when the baby sits on an adult’s lap. Expedia should have notified you about the failure to ticket your daughter, and simply sending you an email wasn’t enough. A phone call or a follow-up email would have helped. Its system should have been able to detect that you had tried, but failed, to buy a ticket for your baby and that you were about to fly without your daughter’s airfare. Certainly, British Airways could have had a more flexible system, too. Ultimately, a quick check of your itinerary at least a week before your departure date would have revealed the missing ticket, and then none of this would have happened. I contacted Expedia on your behalf. The online agency refunded most of the extra cost of spending the night in a hotel and rebooking a new ticket. Expedia also issued $400 in coupons to cover your other costs it couldn’t reimburse. King Features Syndicate, Inc.

ZIGGY


The Daily Herald

Family fears teen falling under boyfriend’s spell Dear Abby: My son’s wife passed away very recently. He works days, so I have been helping him by looking after his 15-yearold daughter, “Leyla.” Leyla recently told her father that her boyfriend, “Dylan,” has asked her to vandalize things — TV, Blu-ray player, etc. — if her daddy enrolls her in a private school or moves her to another school closer to his company for a better education. Leyla’s grades aren’t good, and she spends most of her time chatting or texting with Dylan. Abby, I’m really worried. The last thing Dylan asked her to do was kill her daddy because “he controls her too much.” Before school ended, Dylan skipped a field trip. He didn’t want Leyla to participate either because he feared that without him, she might have a chance to make friends with others, so she didn’t turn in her paperwork and stayed home. We plan to send her to a psychologist in the coming weeks. Should we bring this problem to the attention of her school principal? Thank you for your help. — Worried Sick In California Dear Worried Sick: I’m glad your granddaughter will soon see a therapist. I’m sure they’ll have a lot to talk about. Because Leyla is in constant communication with Dylan, take her cellphone away and monitor her activity on the computer. That he would ask her to damage property or cause physical harm to another person is something that should be immediately reported not only to the school principal, but also to his parents and the police. This young man could be dangerous to the adults in your family, RIP HAYWIRE

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS

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as well as to your granddaughter unless there is an intervention NOW. Dear Abby: I have been feeling super alone lately. I’m a full-time, stay-athome mom. My fiance and I have an 11-month-old son. Before he was born, I worked and my fiance didn’t. Then we moved away from my family to where his family is — a town of about 400 people — and he works while I stay home with the baby. This is a small town, and I have no friends here. I have been feeling extremely stir-crazy and trapped in my head. I don’t know how to handle it. I spoke to a psychiatrist. She said it’ll pass, but it hasn’t. Please, if you have any advice, I need some badly. — Stuck In South Carolina Dear Stuck: In many small Southern towns, the social life revolves around the church. If you and your fiance haven’t joined one, you should consider it. If you do, your chances of making friends — possibly with some other young couples — will be improved. Also consider volunteering or going to a nearby larger town to look for activities. I hope this will help to relieve your sense of isolation. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. Universal Uclick

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BRIDGE In a half-cent game at the club, today’s declarer was Joe Overberry, who thinks it’s nobler to go down in pursuit of overtricks than to make his bid. That approach causes his partners a ton of grief. Against five diamonds, West somewhat strangely led the jack of clubs instead of leading the unbid suit. The opening lead gave Joe a chance for a treasured overtrick: He took the ace of clubs, drew trumps and led a heart to dummy’s jack.

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from scolding parents Box Org. the Utah Stars belonged to Public Enemy and others Who wrote “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not” U.S. fraud watchdog Breadth ___ Arena (past Kings home) Needles Campus spot for Bluto, Otter and Boon Scuzz Motherland

If the finesse had won, Joe could have returned a club to his hand, repeated the finesse and pitched a spade on the ace of hearts. But as it was, East took the king of hearts and cashed the A-K of spades. Down one. “Some things never change,” North said gloomily. “The man chucks 700 points trying for a 20-point overtrick. After Joe draws trumps, he should take his club tricks and lead a spade from dummy. When East holds both the A-K, Joe is home. After East takes two spades, he must lead a heart to dummy or

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Washington Google browser Ted Danson hit series “Groovy!” “All right already!” Walk of Style locale Flavorings in some root beers Member of a loving trio? Person on a mission? Ordered George Clinton was its first gov. (for 21 years) K-12 grp. “Whoops!” Answers Lower

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concede a ruff-sluff. DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ 4 3 ♥ A Q J 2 ◆ Q 10 8 4 ♣ A Q 4. Your partner opens one heart, and you respond 2NT, a conventional forcing raise. (A raise to three hearts would invite game.) He then bids three hearts. What do you say? ANSWER: If partner wanted to play at game, he would have bid four hearts. His three hearts shows slam interest. Cooperate by cue-bidding four clubs to show your ace, but even if partner cue-bids four diamonds next, bid four hearts.

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Short Takes D6

THE CLICKER Among Friday’s best bets on television: In Season 4 of “Bering Sea Gold,” ambitious treasure hunters continue to brave frigid temperatures and brutal conditions — all as we watch from the warm comfort of our couches. 9 p.m., Discovery. Watch “Airplane Repo,” because it’s fun to watch people chase the repo man down the runway as their planes take off. Season 2 begins tonight. 10 p.m., Discovery. From Herald news services

TODAY IN HISTORY Today’s highlight: On Aug. 22, 1914, AustriaHungary declared war against Belgium. On this date: In 1485, England’s King Richard III was killed in the Battle of Bosworth Field, effectively ending the War of the Roses. In 1787, inventor John Fitch demonstrated his steamboat on the Delaware River to delegates from the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. In 1851, the schooner America outraced more than a dozen British vessels off the English coast to win a trophy that came to be known as the America’s Cup. In 1910, Japan annexed Korea, which remained under Japanese control until the end of World War II. In 1922, Irish revolutionary Michael Collins was shot to death, apparently by Irish Republican Army members opposed to the Anglo-Irish Treaty that Collins had co-signed. In 1932, the British Broadcasting Corp. conducted its first experimental television broadcast, using a 30-line mechanical system. In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Vice President Richard Nixon were nominated for second terms in office by the Republican National Convention in San Francisco. In 1972, President Richard Nixon was nominated for a second term of office by the Republican National Convention in Miami Beach. John Wojtowicz and Salvatore Naturile took seven employees hostage at a Chase Manhattan Bank branch in Brooklyn, New York, during a botched robbery; the siege, which ended with Wojtowicz’s arrest and Naturile’s killing by the FBI, inspired the 1975 movie “Dog Day Afternoon.” Associated Press

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THE DAILY HERALD

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WWW.HERALDNET.COM

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FRIDAY, 08.22.2014

TELEVISION

Pardo a link to TV’s past, says ‘SNL’ boss Producer Lorne Michaels selected Don Pardo in 1975 because “he just sounded right to me.” By Frazier Moore Associated Press

NEW YORK — Don Pardo was a timeless classic, and in selecting him as the announcer for the brand-new “Saturday Night Live,” Lorne Michaels must have known it. “When they gave me a list of NBC staff announcers and I saw his name, there was no hesitation,” Michaels, who remains “SNL” executive producer, recalled on Tuesday. On Monday, Pardo died at age 96, having served as an “SNL”

mainstay and through-line from its debut in October 1975 up through the close of its 39th season in May (apart from a year in the early 1980s when the show, under short-lived different management, rudely sidelined him). Michaels, just 30 when “SNL” premiered, masterminded a brash, counter-culture brand of comedy show. But he had grown up hearing Pardo’s rich baritone on such 1950s game shows as the original “The Price Is Right.” The voice still resonated. “He became our link to the beginnings of television on NBC,” said Michaels. “And radio. He joined NBC in June of 1944 — I’m not born yet!” No, not for another six months. So Michaels, however much the trail-blazer, chose to underpin his break-from-the-past new

enterprise with a seasoned, oldschool broadcaster. “In an emotional, intuitive sense he just sounded right to me,” said Michaels. “He was a really, really wonderful man, and, I suppose on some level, a paternal presence for each new cast.” Generation after generation, “SNL” players have come and gone, replaced by the next wave. Pardo, certifying each of them by declaring their names on the air, stayed put. But now, with the 40th season bearing down in September, Pardo has left a void. Who could ever replace him? “It’s a question I’ve asked myself for maybe the last 10 years,” Michaels said. “I don’t have an answer. I’m still kind of dealing with this. Fortunately, I have a month.”

TELEVISION

‘Good Wife’ not done with Will By Yvonne Villarreal Los Angeles Times

Last season, Josh Charles’ Will Gardner joined the inestimable Dead TV Characters Society. CBS legal drama “The Good Wife” got a shot in the arm in its fifth season, fired up by the decision of Alicia Florrick (Julianna Margulies) to break free from Lockhart/Gardner, the central law firm in the series, to start her own enterprise. Pushing much of the tension forward was renegade lawyer Will, played by Charles (“Dead Poets Society,” “Sports Night”), and his anger at what he deemed a betrayal committed by his former flame. Desks were manhandled, clients were fought over, etc. And then came the bombshell moment that had viewers searching for the rewind button on their remote controls: Will Gardner died. Gunned down by an unhinged client during a court proceeding. Here, Charles chats about that episode and his time with the show. Question: How often are people coming up to you and just saying, “Why?” Answer: I guess that’s happened a few times. But more often people just say they really were sad about it, but they’re also really excited about where the show’s going. And that makes me happy because that was the whole intent of this season. We knew going into this season it would be my last. We were able to plan for it and structure it and kind of knew where (the death) would lead the show.

Q: With Will and Alicia, it was more than sex — there was a deep, mutual respect there too. So you get a sense of the betrayal he’s feeling when he finds out she’s leaving, and we see it when he sweeps everything off the desk in anger. A: I hurt my hand really bad hitting the desk because it just sort of went to too much, too soon. I iced my hand between takes. Q: But that’s why we felt it. A: It was a great scene because it was so well written and because of these characters’ history and because it’s Julianna and I and, you know, she and Christine (Baranski) are just two of my favorite people to work with. I have most of my stuff with them, and I love working with her. Q: How about making this decision of “It’s time for me to move on”? A: I had a very short-term contract on the show, much shorter than it’s even been discussed in the press. I kept extending it because I love the show so much — it’s been a great job for me. When the opportunity came in year four to extend it another few years, I thought a long time about it and just felt that I was ready to experience new characters. But I wanted to make sure that I left (the show) in as good a spot as I could, so I was always willing to come back and do some this year. And we came up with doing these 15 (episodes), being able to give the character a more proper goodbye and really write something special for him. It’s a hard thing to articulate when you feel like you want to

Season premiere “The Good Wife” returns for its sixth season at 9 p.m. Sept. 21 on CBS. just have new experiences. You’re working long hours where you’re seeing people on the set more than you’re seeing your family. And sometimes it doesn’t allow you to really have other experiences. Q: Did you go in knowing that your end would be death, or had that come later? A: I knew before we finished the fourth season. Robert King was in town directing the finale of Season 4, so we were discussing a lot about what would happen and how he would do it, and he said, “I think it’s going to be a death. How do you feel about that?” And I said, “I feel good about it.” I mean, what are your options, really? Will leaves and then he’s always kind of still hovering. Q: It needed to be final, yeah. A: And I always told them, “If you want me to do one or two more. ...” and that’s how Episode 16 came about, you know. They were in the writers’ room and said, “You know, you asked us if. ...” Q: “We need flashbacks!” Was that weird to do? You’re dead and then to come back? A: No, because it actually made 15 easier. I knew I was doing these extra few days on 16. So in a way, my real memories of my last moments on set are doing the last scene of 16. Which actually is better, you know, in a way.

NBC / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Don Pardo, shown on the set of NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” on March 14, 1992, was a durable television and radio announcer whose resonant voice-over style was widely imitated and became the standard in the field.

SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 50 years ago (1964) Al Hascal and Fred Sjoholm, certified public accountants, were greeting friends and business acquaintances in new quarters yesterday. The firm of Hascal & Sjoholm held an open house during in the offices at 2510 Colby Ave. in a new structure erected by Pringles. Today was the grand opening of King Charley’s in-and-out hamburger stand at the intersection of Highway 1-A (now Highway 9) and John Jump Road. Owners Chuck and Mayme Bowen of Snohomish were giving away a 750-pound steer as a grand prize. There was also free ice cream for everyone and free balloons for the children. 25 years ago (1989) Jim Postler, owner and operator of Stanwood Feeds, displayed one of the few remaining turkey chicks he had for sale. Weighing just a few ounces, the big-breasted white bird would weigh 20 to 30 pounds by Thanksgiving. When asked if turkeys were smart, Postler responded that they were really dumb. Kings Table on Broadway in Everett and 196th in Lynnwood had Italian classics every Wednesday that included chicken cacciatore, deep pan lasagna, antipasto salad, minestrone soup, veal cutlet mozzarella, baked fish Italiano, fettuccine Alfredo salad and zucchini parmesan. By Jack O’Donnell from Herald archives at the Everett Public Library

The BEST deals from the BEST of Snohomish County!

DEAL STORE Where Readers’ Choice Winners & Finalists bring you the BEST local deals! Hurry! Limited Time to SAVE!

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The Daily Herald

Friday, 08.22.2014

www.heraldnet.com/entertainment

Cosby tops the Bill

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Beloved comedian leads star-packed fair lineup Page 10


2 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

UPCOMING EVENTS

ComcastArenaEverett.com

TICKETS ON SALE COMCAST ARENA

org/ticket-window or etix.com.

The Cannabis Cup: Sept. 6 and 7, with a performance by The Wailers on Saturday. Tickets, $50 to $120, available at www.cannabiscup. com/seattle.

EVERETT MUSIC INITIATIVE

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Super Circus Heroes, Sept. 18-21. Demi Lovato: World Tour, 7 p.m., Oct. 2; $29.50, $49.50, $69.50. Tickets at comcastarenaeverett.com or 866332-8499 or the box office at 2000 Hewitt Ave., Everett.

EDMONDS CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Christmas with the Gothard Sisters: 7:30 p.m., Dec. 11.

All shows at main grandstand at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe. Ticket prices includes fair admission. For information and tickets go to www.evergreenfair.org/concerts.aspx or call 800-514-ETIX, ext. 2.

Cascade Symphony Orchestra: Happy Holidays, 7:30 p.m., Dec. 15.

TULALIP RESORT CASINO

“Late Night Catechism”: 8 p.m. Sept. 12, $25.

Jim Jeffries: 7 and 10 p.m. Nov. 8; tickets start at $29.50; on sale Sept. 5.

New Blues Brothers: 8 p.m. Sept. 13, $12 to $25.

Ticketmaster: ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

Dr. Hook featuring Ray Sawyer: 8 p.m. Sept. 26; $30-$50. Midnight Rambler: Rolling Stones tribute, 8 p.m. Sept. 27; $12-$25. Randy Hansen: Jimi Hendrix tribute, 8 p.m. Oct. 4; $12-$25. Tingstad and Rumbel: 8 p.m., Dec. 13; $25. Heart by Heart: Heart tribute, 8 p.m. Dec. 20, $15-$30. Tickets at the box office, by phone at 425-2586766 or online at www.historiceveretttheatre.

ComcastArena

Wanda Sykes: 8 p.m. Sept. 5 and 6; tickets start at $45. Lisa Lampenelli: 7 and 10 p.m. Oct. 24; tickets on sale Aug. 22.

Petty Thief, Silver Blue and Gold and Main Street: 7 p.m. Sept. 20; $15.

All tickets subject to agency convenience charges.

Tulalip Amphitheater Summer Concert Series: Various artists through Sept. 7. Various artists. Next concert: Sept. 7: Creedence Clearwater Revisited and America, $30 to $70.

Tayla Lynn: 8 p.m. Sept. 6, $10 to $25.

Comedy Club with Susan Jones: 8 p.m. Sept. 19; $15.

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Bill Cosby: Aug. 27, $33-$58.

Vladimir Chernov Presents 10 Sopranos: 8 p.m., Oct. 24.

British Export (Beatles tribute): 8 p.m., Aug. 23; $12 to $25.

TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS CAN BE PURCHASED AT THE COMCAST ARENA BOX OFFICE

The Charlie Daniels Band with the Marshall Tucker Band: Aug. 26, $40-$53.

The Newsboys with Ryan Stevenson: Aug. 29, $23-$43.

Molly Hatchet: 8 p.m. Aug. 22; $20 to $50.

F O R G R O U P S O F 1 5 O R M O R E , V I P PA C K A G E S O R S U I T E S 4 2 5 . 3 2 2 . 2 6 2 9

Emblem3: Aug. 25, $25-$39.

Cascade Symphony Orchestra: Symphonic Dances, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20.

HISTORIC EVERETT THEATRE

1.866.332.8499 | ComcastArenaEverett.com

EVERGREEN STATE FAIR

Chris Young with Courtney Cole: Aug. 28, $30-$53.

Tickets at ec4arts.org or 425-275-9595.

TILTED THUNDER RAIL BIRDS - ROLLER DERBY . . . . SEPT. 13

My Goodness with Thunderpussy and Tango Alpha Tango: 8 p.m. Aug. 29, The Cannery, 2820 Oakes Ave. Suite C; $10; www. brownpapertickets.com/event/823660.

AROUND THE REGION Marymoor Summer Concerts: Various artists through Aug. 23, Marymoor Park in Redmond. Next concert: Aug. 23: 7 p.m., American Idol Live! 2014 Tour. AXS.com, or call 888-929-7849. Zoo Tunes: Woodland Park zoo summer concert series. Barious artists through Aug. 24; Next concerts: Aug. 24: Ziggy Marley, $32.50. zoo.org/zootunes. Chateau Ste. Michelle Summer Concert Series: Various artists, through Sept. 14; Next concerts: Aug. 22: Gipsy King’s 25th Anniversary Tour, 7 p.m., $42, $72. Aug. 23: Earth, Wind & Fire, 7 p.m., $50.50, $126. Aug. 24: Peter Frampton’s Guitar Circus featuring Buddy Guy, 7 p.m., $49.50, $79.50 ticketmaster.com. Sept.

What’s inside Movie reviews . . . . . . . . . . Movie times . . . . . . . . . . . . Dining. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wines, brews and spirits . .

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Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Family fun. . . . . . . . . . . . . Visual arts. . . . . . . . . . . . .

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5: Boston, 7 p.m., $59.50, $95. Sept. 12: Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons, 7:30 p.m., $47.50, $77.50. Sept. 13 and 14: Crosby, Stills & Nash, 7 p.m., $50.50, $86. Jack Johnson: 6:30 p.m. Aug. 23, Gorge Amphitheater; $71 and up. www.LiveNation.com. Eagles: “History of the Eagles” tour, Aug. 25, Tacoma Dome. Tickets, $49 to $189; ticketmaster. com. Dave Matthews Band: 6 p.m., Aug. 29, 30 and 31, Gorge Amphitheater; $50 and up. www. LiveNation.com. Nine Inch Nails and Soundgarden: Aug. 31, White River Amphitheatre; www.livenation.com. Bumbershoot: Aug. 30 to Sept. 1, Seattle Center; $55 to $550; bumbershoot.strangertickets.com. Diane Schuur Quintet: Sept. 11-14; Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley; $30.50; www.jazzalley.com. Katy Perry: Sept. 13, Tacoma Dome; ticketmaster.com. Drake vs. Lil Wayne: 7 p.m. Sept. 14, White River Amphitheatre; $30 and up; www.livenation.com. Yanni: Sept. 14; Benaroya Hall, $40-$125, www. benaroyahall.org The Australian Pink Floyd: 8 p.m. Sept. 19, McCaw Hall; $40 to $98; ticketmaster.com. Elton John: Sept. 27, KeyArena; ticketmaster. com. Loudon Wainwright III: Oct. 25, Beanroya Hall, $30-$40; www.benaroyahall.org. The Black Keys: Nov. 1, KeyArena; ticketmaster.com. Makana: Nov. 20, Benaroya Hall, $24-$30; www.benaroyahall.org. The Wailin’ Jennys: Dec. 4, $34-$44; www. benaroyahall.org.

TICKET VENDORS Comcast Arena: comcastarenaeverett.com or 866-332-8499. Edmonds Center for the Arts: ec4arts.org or 425-275-9595. Etix: etix.com. Live Nation: www.livenation.com. Seattle Theatre Group: stgpresents.org or 877-784-4849. Ticketmaster: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000.

Submissions

On the cover

Submit A&E calendar items to features@heraldnet.com. Deadline is noon Friday before publication.

Bill Cosby, without question one of the most beloved entertainers in America, is one of the headliners at the Evergreen State Fair. Story, Page 10


movies

The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 3

A tiresome return to ‘Sin City’ Unlike the first installment, ‘A Dame to Kill For’ is uninspired and unoriginal

ROBERT HORTON

I

n the hard-boiled narration describing the gnarly nighttime world of Sin City, people are constantly talking about how rough it is and how lethal the people are. They left out one thing: You could also die of boredom here. Or so it seems in “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For,” a sequel to the imaginative 2005 film. With its all-digital black-and-white world and retro-film-noir mood no longer a novelty, the second film comes up short in inspiration and originality. A batch of characters return from the first installment. One is Marv, the granite-faced strongman who idealizes a stripper named Nancy (Jessica Alba, also returning). Marv is played by Mickey Rourke, whose appearance has been freakishly altered by makeup and digital sculpting. We also re-encounter a crooked politician (Powers Boothe), a tough street chick (Rosario Dawson), and a cop — or his ghost, I guess — played by Bruce Willis. The stories collide, but for the long middle section of the movie we follow the ape-like Dwight (Josh Brolin), a none-too-bright

THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

A heavily CGI’d Mickey Rourke returns as Marv in “Sin City: A Dame to Kill For,” which, like the 2005 hit, was shot in stylized black and white.

private eye tormented by a green-eyed vixen named Ava (Eva Green, late of “300: Rise of an Empire” and TV’s “Penny Dreadful”). This plot line takes place before the events of the first “Sin City” movie, although the Marv/Nancy story takes place after that film. Good luck with that. There’s also a particularly mystifying thread about a gambler (Joseph GordonLevitt) who challenges the corrupt politician to repeated games of poker. Like much in the Sin City world, this one is awash in revenge fantasies,

ultra-violence, and images of women as either duplicitous hookers or innocents needing to be saved. The stories are drawn from Frank Miller’s graphic novels, and once again Miller co-directs the film with Robert Rodriguez. The movie’s got some snazzy 3D images (the actors play their roles in front of green screens and the detail is filled in later), but the stories themselves are flabby. Gordon-Levitt and the bounteously displayed Eva Green are the only performers with zip. Green’s

story could be described as a parody of adolescent misogynistic fantasies, but the movie’s grasp of humor is so uncertain I think it’s meant to be taken straight. The brutality from the first “Sin City” is intact, but this one’s shorter. It only feels longer. The fantasy world of Sin City is supposed to be full of sentimentally tough guys and dames, but really these characters just seem exceptionally dumb. That’s a recipe for tedium, as “A Dame to Kill For” proves.

“Sin City: A Dame to Kill For” ★½ Sequel to the 2005 film by Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez. Without the novelty of that film’s digital, graphic-novel approach, this one collapses in tedium. A mix of stories conjure up the corrupt world of Sin City, a film noir place where the people are supposed to be sentimentally tough guys and dames but really just seem dumb. With Mickey Rourke, Josh Brolin, Eva Green. Rating: R, for violence, nudity, language Showing: Alderwood Mall, Cinebarre Mountlake Terrace, Edmonds Theater, Galaxy Monroe, Marysville, Meridian, Sundance Cinemas Seattle, Thornton Place Stadium 14, Woodinville, Cascade Mall.


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4 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Grim teen drama ‘If I Stay’ leaves little in doubt By Robert Horton Herald Movie Critic

Young couples in movies are customarily given obstacles to overcome, but “If I Stay” seems unnecessarily cruel in its dramatic contrivances. Most of the film unfolds in the flashbacks that follow a terrible car accident; all the members of a family have been seriously injured, and our narrator, Mia (Chloë Grace Moretz), is in a coma. She’s also walking around the hospital as a sort of astral-projection, looking down at her unconscious self and listening to everybody else talking about her. Mia’s a promising cellist, with a shot at attending Julliard after she graduates from her Portland high school. The only problem with Julliard is that it would take her away from her boyfriend Adam (Jamie Blackley), the lead singer of a neo-punk band, who

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Jamie Blackley plays Adam, upperclassman alt rocker and dreamboat, in “If I Stay.”

plans to keep gigging around Oregon. Because who would want to take a punk band to New York City? The movie puts a great deal of dramatic weight on this Julliard decision, perhaps because somebody realized that despite the gravity of the car accident

hanging over everything, the script doesn’t actually have much in the way of suspense for the flashbacks. Mia’s got the world’s coolest parents, who can advise their classicalmusic-minded daughter about whether she should go to a Halloween party

as Debbie Harry or Patti Smith. (They’re warmly played by Mirielle Enos, of “The Killing,” and Joshua Leonard, from “Humpday.”) Mia and Adam get along great, and he has few flaws as musician or movie dream-catch. Even Mia’s brother isn’t as bratty as

little brothers are expected to be. Director R.J. Cutler gets a few pleasantly quirky line readings out of his cast, although there’s not much Moretz (the ineffable Hit-Girl from the “Kick-Ass” movies) or Blackley can do with their plywood roles. Aside from the movie’s structure, the film is most notable for its grimness. Based on a novel by Gayle Forman and scripted by “Whip It” scribe Shauna Cross, “If I Stay” is blunt about mortality when it comes to the accident’s toll. That makes it a tough spin as a summer movie, which could explain why some major revelations about death are given away in the trailer. These days trailers are like “trigger warnings” to prepare unsuspecting audiences — everybody needs to know the worst beforehand, lest the experience of actually watching a movie be too vivid. This

“If I Stay” ★★ While in a coma, a teen (Chloe Grace Moretz) ponders her life and her future — a grim set-up for this adaptation of Gayle Forman’s Young Adult novel. Not badly done, but the young characters are plywood and their situation doesn’t have much suspense. Rating: PG-13, for language, subject matter Showing: Alderwood Mall, Cinebarre Mountlake Terrace, Everett Stadium, Galaxy Monroe, Marysville, Meridian, Oak Tree, Varsity, Woodinville, Cascade Mall. means only the very ending is really in doubt. The finish is well executed, but you can probably guess it from here.

Zombie comedy ‘Beth’ could use stronger comic pulse By Robert Horton Herald Movie Critic

It is reassuring to know that even after the zombie plague begins in earnest, a strong vein of Jewish humor will thrive. This is the best news to come out of the superbly titled “Life After Beth,” a comedy that kneads together the relationship movie with the zombie genre. After opening with a brief glimpse of the title character (Aubrey Plaza) jogging into the woods toward a fateful encounter with a poisonous snake, the movie turns to the grief of Beth’s

“Life After Beth” ★★½ Aubrey Plaza plays the recently deceased girlfriend of grieving Dane DeHaan; when she returns from the grave, a fitfully amusing metaphor for relationship woes goes into effect. So does an undercurrent of old-school Jewish humor, which is the funniest thing about this uneven comedy. Rating: R, for violence, language, subject matter Showing: SIFF Cinema Uptown loved ones. Beth has died, and boyfriend Zach (Dane DeHaan, from “Chronicle”) can’t seem to let go. When she comes back undead — confused, but otherwise energetic

enough — they resume their romance. Because Beth’s parents (John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon) insist on not telling her about her death, Zach has a difficult time explaining

why Beth shouldn’t leave the house much or be seen by people. Writer-director Jeff Baena — who must be held partially liable for “I (Heart) Huckabees,” as he wrote the script — quickly reveals this movie’s organizing strategy: The zombie stuff stands in for the usual ups and downs of a relationship. The need to control, the sudden rages, the way one partner begins changing dramatically — everything’s heightened a little, but still recognizable. Having found this potentially amusing

metaphor, Baena deploys it in haphazard ways, getting sidetracked by less fruitful plot strands. And he doesn’t find good opportunities for “Parks and Recreation” deadpan master Plaza, although she is admirably game for Beth’s increasingly outrageous behavior. “Life After Beth” does have funny scenes, many of which are rooted in a certain splendid tradition of ethnic humor (for issues of tone, please consult “Seinfeld” episodes concerning Jerry’s parents in Florida). Paul Reiser and Cheryl

Hines, as Zach’s parents, understand this mode; even in the midst of a zombie outbreak, they’re trying to set Zach up with the daughter (Anna Kendrick) of their friends, the Wexlers — such a nice girl, and from a good family too. (I especially liked the cameo by veteran director Garry Marshall, as Zach’s uncle, returned from the dead but still possessing crack comic timing.) If only the movie had a stronger comic pulse, or maybe the nerve to push its dark tendencies all the way, it might’ve blossomed into something beyond shtick.


movies

The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 5

‘Alive Inside’ shows the power of music on the mind Herald Movie Critic

Everything you always suspected about music is true. Scientists can point to the parts of the brain that music stimulates, and talk about how this is where our deepest memories and feelings reside. The phenomenon even stretches back before birth, as the sound of a heartbeat establishes the sensory proclivity toward music. This scientific material is offered in “Alive Inside” to buttress the rather remarkable anecdotal evidence we see for ourselves on screen, in which the power of music is used to revive the personalities of people with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett tags along with Dan Cohen, a music-therapy proselytizer (and founder of the nonprofit Music & Memory), as Cohen travels to facilities for people living with dementia. Cohen’s method is frequently repeated during the

BOND/360

Dan Cohen, a music-theraphy proselytizer, watches as an elderly woman reacts to listening to music in the film “Alive Inside.”

documentary, but never wears out its welcome. He approaches people whose memory loss has put them in a dulled or lethargic state, and invites them to listen to music from an iPod shuffle.

SPECIAL FILMS

For more information, visit www. historiceveretttheatre.com. Next movie: Sept. 2, The Flying Deuces.

Outdoor movies

A yearlong series of 12 of Alfred Hitchcock’s best films will be shown on the last Wednesday of the month at the Evergreen Branch of the Everett Public Library, 9512 Evergreen Way, Everett; call 425-257-8250. A screening and discussion will start at 1:30 p.m. and a screening only will start at 6:30 p.m.

Movies Under the Stars at Swedish/Edmonds: Free, Friday nights at Swedish/Edmonds Hospital, 21601 76th Ave. W., Edmonds, on patio outside the second floor hospital cafe. Chair seating for 200 people or bring blankets for grassy area. Free popcorn and lemonade; swedish.org/ movies. Next movie: Sept. 5, 7:45 p.m., “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.”

Classic Movies Senior Movie Afternoons: The Everett Historic Theatre is hosting Seniors Movie Afternoons every Tuesday at 1 p.m. starting in September. Tickets are $5 and each month will have a theme: September is comedy; October is horror; November is musicals; and December is holiday films.

Dial H for Hitchcock

When the song begins, the change is almost immediate: eyes light up, limbs begin twisting, and stories pour out. If it isn’t a definitive argument in favor of using music as a

Nov. 26, “Vertigo”: A retired detective (Jimmy Stewart) becomes obsessed with a friend’s wife (Kim Novak) in San Francisco (1958).

Oct. 29, “Rear Window”: Jimmy Stewart, laid up with a broken leg, and Grace Kelly, in designer clothes, suspect a neighbor of murder (1954).

west”: A New York executive (Cary Grant) becomes embroiled with spies; he meets Eva Marie

“ THE COOLEST

Dec. 31, “North by North-

“Alive Inside” ★★★½ A stirring documentary look at music-therapy advocate Dan Cohen’s efforts to get the power of song into the treatment of people with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. The anecdotal results, captured here, are remarkable, and the movie also builds an activist case for more thoughtful eldercare in general. Rating: Not rated; probably PG for subject matter Showing: Varsity theater

pay attention to the part of our brain that values four-part harmonies, silly lyrics, and a danceable beat. If this movie’s evidence is to be taken seriously, those allegedly frivolous things are what remain at the human core even after the rest is lost.

Saint as he flees across the country (1959) (No 6:30 showing).

ACTION MOVIE

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Aug. 27, “Strangers on a Train”: A socialite plots a double murder; with Robert Walker and Farley Granger (1951). Sept. 24, “Dial M for Murder”: A tennis pro (Ray Milland) plans to murder his wife (Grace Kelly), but things go awry (1954).

therapeutic tool, it’s certainly dramatic. The film goes on to lobby in favor of getting such therapies into hospitals and retirement communities, painting a dire portrait of the pharmaceuticalindustrial complex that delights in ringing up thousands of dollars of drugs for patients every month but balks at a $40 iPod. Serious establishment voices are not much heard here, but then this isn’t really a documentary — it’s a work of activism, and a beautiful one. If “Alive Inside” helps change the culture of treatment for elderly people, that would be a very good thing. It becomes more than activism, too. Seeing the joyful transformation that erupts when an Alzheimer’s patient hears the Beach Boys’ “I Get Around” suggests we might need to reevaluate the generally accepted hierarchy of Important Things in Life. Material success and adult accomplishments are all well and good, but maybe we should

THE SEVEN SEES, GERRAD HALL

(425) 778-4554

www.TheEdmondsTheater.com Now Accepting Debit/Credit Cards

Friday 8/22 – Thursday 8/28 Now Playing

The HUNDRED-FOOT

JOURNEY (PG)

Fri & Sat:3:30, 6:15 & 9pm Sun: 3:30 & 6:15pm Mon-Thu: 4 & 7pm 1076944

By Robert Horton

Check our website for times.

www.theedmondstheater.com

STARTS TODAY AT THEATERS EVERYWHERE CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES • NO PASSES ACCEPTED

THE EVERETT DAILY HERALD

EVERET DAILY HERALD FRI 8/22

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Tuesday all seats $6 $3.00 ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT POPCORN WEDNESDAYS


movies

6 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

SHOWTIMES Snohomish County Alderwood, 425-776-3535 The Giver (PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:007:30-10:00 Hercules (PG-13) 12:10-2:40-5:107:40-10:20 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 12:40-3:40-6:40-9:40 Into the Storm (PG-13) 12:30-2:505:20-7:50-10:30 Let’s Be Cops (R) 12:20-1:00-3:203:50-6:50-7:20-9:30-10:10 Step Up: All In (PG-13) 3:30-9:50 Step Up: All In 3D (PG-13) 12:507:00 Alderwood Mall, 800-326-3264 The Admiral: Roaring Currents (Not Rated) 9:50-12:40-3:35-6:50-9:50 Another Me (PG-13) 10:40-1:003:20-5:40-8:00-10:20 Calvary (R) 10:10-12:50-3:30-6:008:30-11:00 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 8:05-11:00 Earth to Echo (PG) 11:20-1:40 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 11:102:10-4:10-5:10-7:10-8:05-10:1011:00 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 10:30-9:20 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 11:40-1:10-2:203:50-5:00-6:30-7:50-10:30 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 10:00-1:00-4:00-7:00-10:00 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 11:30-2:30 Guardians of the Galaxy: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 4:50-8:0011:00 How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG) 11:50-2:40 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:40-2:20-5:057:40-10:20 Island of Lemurs: Madagascar 3D (G) 11:00-12:15-1:30 Lucy (R) 10:40-1:20-3:40-6:10-8:4011:05 Magic in the Moonlight (PG-13) 5:20 A Most Wanted Man (R) 5:20 The Prince (R) 12:00-3:00-10:25 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG-13) 10:50-4:30-7:05-8:109:40-10:40 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 1:50-5:30 What If (PG-13) 7:45 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 10:20-1:30-4:20-7:20-10:15 Cinebarre Mountlake Terrace, 425-672-7501 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 12:553:40-7:05-10:00 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 4:10-10:05 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 1:15-7:30 The Giver (PG-13) 1:10-4:15-7:3510:15 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 7:15

Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 12:45-3:45-10:10 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 1:00-3:50-7:10-10:05 If I Stay (PG-13) 1:30-4:05-7:4510:20 Let’s Be Cops (R) 1:25-4:00-7:009:45 Lucy (R) 1:35-4:25-7:40-9:55 Edmonds Theater, 425-7784554 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 3:30-6:15-9:00 Everett Stadium, 425-353-3505 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 3:45-10:15 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 12:2012:55-3:30-6:30-7:00-9:30 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 12:30-8:15-10:05 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 11:45-2:20-3:054:55-5:40-7:30 The Giver (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-4:407:20-9:55 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 12:40-4:00-7:15-10:10 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 10:50-1:45-5:00-7:50-10:40 Hercules (PG-13) 4:25-9:25 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 1:00-3:55-6:45-9:40 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:10-1:50-4:307:10-10:30 Into the Storm (PG-13) 2:05-7:05 Let’s Be Cops (R) 12:00-1:10-2:405:20-7:25-8:00-10:45 Lucy (R) 12:10-3:10-5:30-8:0510:25 Step Up: All In 3D (PG-13) 4:1010:20 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 11:00-1:40-4:20-6:55-9:35 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 11:40-2:10-4:50-7:4010:00 What If (PG-13) 11:30 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 12:50-3:50-6:50-9:50 Galaxy Monroe, 360-863-0909 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 10:3010:30-1:20-1:20-4:10-4:10-7:007:00-10:00-10:00 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 11:45-2:25-5:10-7:4510:25 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 11:20-1:55-4:307:05-9:40 The Giver (PG-13) 11:15-2:00-4:507:35-10:05 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 10:30-1:25-4:20-7:15-10:10 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 10:35-1:15-4:00-6:50-9:55 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:25-2:05-4:457:25-10:05 Into the Storm (PG-13) 11:05-1:554:35-7:10-9:35 Let’s Be Cops (R) 11:30-2:10-5:007:40-10:15 Lucy (R) 11:35-2:20-4:55-7:20-9:50

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 1:30-6:55 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 10:45-4:15-9:45 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 11:00-1:50-4:40-7:30-10:20 Marysville, 360-659-1009 Earth to Echo (PG) 1:10 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 12:203:50-7:20-10:20 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 4:50-10:10 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 11:30-2:10-7:30 The Giver (PG-13) 12:10-3:10-7:4010:15 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 12:40-3:30-6:20 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 1:00-4:20-7:10-9:10-10:00 Hercules (PG-13) 1:30-7:50 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 11:50-3:40-6:50-9:45 If I Stay (PG-13) 12:30-4:00-7:009:50 Into the Storm (PG-13) 3:45-7:1510:40 Let’s Be Cops (R) 1:45-4:40-8:0010:30 Lucy (R) 1:20-4:30-6:45-9:20 Step Up: All In 3D (PG-13) 5:0010:35 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 12:50-4:10-6:40-9:40 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 3:20-6:10-9:00 Transformers: Age of Extinction (PG-13) 11:40 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 12:00-3:00-6:30-9:30 Stanwood Cinemas, 360-6290514 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 1:154:00-6:35-9:15 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 1:25-3:55-6:30-9:00 Let’s Be Cops (R) 1:35-4:05-6:509:10 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 1:30-3:50-6:45-8:55 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 1:20-3:45-6:40-9:05

King County Crest Cinema, 206-781-5755 Belle (PG) 4:30-6:45 Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13) 4:457:15-9:40 The Grand Budapest Hotel (R) 9:30 Maleficent (PG) 4:15-9:20 Maleficent 3D (PG) 7:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG-13) 6:30 X-Men: Days of Future Past 3D (PG13) 4:00-9:10 Guild 45th, 206-781-5755 Land Ho! (R) 5:00-7:20-9:40 Magic in the Moonlight (PG-13) 4:30-7:05-9:30 Harvard Exit, 206-781-5755 Boyhood (R) 4:30-8:00 Calvary (R) 4:45-7:05-9:15 Meridian, 206-223-9600 22 Jump Street (R) 2:25-5:10-7:50-

10:25 Another Me (PG-13) 11:30-1:554:40-7:00-9:30 Earth to Echo (PG) 11:35 Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13) 12:209:40 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 12:151:15-4:20-6:40-7:40-10:35 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 12:00-2:40-8:00 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 11:10-1:50-4:355:20-7:15-9:55-10:40 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 1:00-2:05-4:00-6:55-7:55-9:45 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 11:15-1:30-4:30-5:00-7:25-10:1510:45 How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG) 11:00-1:35-4:25 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:20-2:00-4:054:50-6:45-7:35-10:10 Let’s Be Cops (R) 11:25-2:10-5:057:05-7:45-9:50-10:30 Lucy (R) 11:50-2:15-4:45-7:2010:05 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 11:05-1:40-4:15-6:50-9:20 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 11:45-2:20-4:55-7:3010:00 What If (PG-13) 3:40-9:35 Oak Tree, 206-527-1748 Chef (R) 1:20-6:30 The Giver (PG-13) 10:45-11:302:00-4:05-4:45-7:15-9:40 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:00-1:30-4:306:45-7:30-9:20-10:00 Let’s Be Cops (R) 10:50-1:40-4:357:20-9:15 A Most Wanted Man (R) 10:501:15-4:15-7:00-9:50-9:55 Planes: Fire & Rescue (PG) 11:201:50-4:20 Pacific Place, 888-262-4386 Chef (R) 11:10-1:55-4:35-7:2010:00 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 1:15-4:20-7:20-10:20 Get On Up (PG-13) 12:50-4:057:10-10:25 The Giver (PG-13) 11:00-12:151:25-2:40-3:45-5:10-6:10-7:308:35-9:55-11:00 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 11:00-1:45-4:50-7:40-10:30 Into the Storm (PG-13) 11:00-2:207:25 Magic in the Moonlight (PG-13) 11:40-2:05-4:30-7:15-10:15 A Most Wanted Man (R) 11:252:15-5:00-7:50-9:45 Step Up: All In (PG-13) 11:45-4:4010:35 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 11:20-2:00-3:25-4:45-6:10-7:359:45 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG-13) 12:25-8:50 Seven Gables, 206-781-5755 A Most Wanted Man (R) 4:20-7:009:40 Sundance Cinemas Seattle, 206-633-0059 Boyhood (R) 1:15-4:00-4:40-7:30-

8:00 Calvary (R) 1:40-4:20-7:10-9:40 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 4:50-9:45 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 2:20-7:20 The Giver (PG-13) 2:00-4:45-7:059:20 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 1:30-6:50-9:50 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 4:10-9:30 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 1:20-4:05-4:30-6:45-7:15-9:25 Into the Storm (PG-13) 1:50 Lucy (R) 2:15-5:00-7:40-9:50 The One I Love (R) 2:10-4:25-7:009:15 What If (PG-13) 1:45 Thornton Place Stadium 14 + Imax, 206-517-9953 Boyhood (R) 11:40-3:10-6:40-10:10 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 11:25-1:40-4:30-7:5010:40 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 12:302:40-3:50-6:50-10:30-11:20 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 11:30-5:30-8:10 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 12:00-2:30-4:005:00-7:30-8:50-10:00 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 11:50-12:50-2:40-3:40-5:30-6:308:20-9:20-10:00 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 10:50 Guardians of the Galaxy: An IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 11:202:10-5:00-7:50-10:40 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 11:20-1:00-3:50-6:40-9:30 Into the Storm (PG-13) 11:10 Lucy (R) 11:10-1:30-3:40-6:00-8:2011:10 Magic in the Moonlight (PG-13) 2:50-10:40 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 11:15-2:20-4:50-7:10-9:40 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 1:20-6:30 What If (PG-13) 5:20-8:20 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 11:30-2:20-5:10-8:00-10:50 Varsity, 206-781-5755 Alive Inside (Not Rated) 5:30-7:209:15 Get On Up (PG-13) 5:10-8:00 If I Stay (PG-13) 4:45-7:05-9:30 Woodinville, 425-482-6538 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 1:00-6:30 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 11:202:10-5:00-7:40-10:40 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 10:50-7:10 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 9:45-3:00-5:158:00-9:00-10:30 The Giver (PG-13) 10:10-12:305:20-7:50-10:15 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 11:00-2:00-4:45-7:30-10:20 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 12:15-3:40 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG)

10:20-1:10-4:00-6:50-9:50 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:10-12:50-1:402:50-4:10-5:10-7:00-9:30 Into the Storm (PG-13) 9:40 Let’s Be Cops (R) 10:15-1:50-4:408:10-10:00 Lucy (R) 10:00-12:20-2:45-6:4010:35 Planes: Fire & Rescue (PG) 10:304:20 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 12:15-2:40-7:45 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 9:50-5:30-10:10 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 10:40-1:30-4:30-7:20-10:00

Skagit and Island counties Blue Fox Drive-In, 360-6755667 Hercules (PG-13) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG-13) Cascade Mall, 360-707-2727 Boyhood (R) 1:00-7:20 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 4:30-10:45 Earth to Echo (PG) 11:40-2:10 The Expendables 3 (PG-13) 10:401:45-4:45-7:50-10:50 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (R) 10:50-8:00 Frank Miller’s Sin City: A Dame to Kill For 3D (R) 1:40-4:20-7:009:45-11:00 The Giver (PG-13) 10:45-1:20-3:506:30-9:10 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 11:00-5:00-7:40-10:40 Guardians of the Galaxy 3D (PG-13) 2:00 The Hundred-Foot Journey (PG) 10:10-1:10-4:10-7:10-10:10 If I Stay (PG-13) 11:30-2:10-4:507:30-10:15 Into the Storm (PG-13) 11:25-1:504:20-6:50-9:10 Let’s Be Cops (R) 10:10-1:00-3:306:00-8:30-11:00 Lucy (R) 10:20-12:50-3:20-5:408:05-10:20 Step Up: All In (PG-13) 10:30 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 11:10-2:00-4:35-7:20-10:00 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 3D (PG-13) 12:00-2:30-5:00 What If (PG-13) 10:20-4:40 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 10:30-1:10-4:00-7:00-8:00-10:00 The Clyde, 360-221-5525 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 7:30 Lincoln Theater, 360-336-2858 Lucky Them (R) 7:30 Oak Harbor Plaza, 360-2792226 Guardians of the Galaxy (PG-13) 1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00 Into the Storm (PG-13) 1:50-6:50 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (PG13) 3:50-8:50 When the Game Stands Tall (PG) 1:40-4:05-6:40-9:05


dining

The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 7

New owners drop Anchor at venerable Everett pub By Quinn Russell Brown Herald Writer

QUINN RUSSELL BROWN / THE HERALD

Andrew Lange, 24, is one of the new owners of The Anchor Pub.

restaurateur Christina Riedel (Sol Food Bar and Grill; Cask and Vine) to join the project. They opened their Anchor on Aug. 2. The latest iteration of the bar is a mix of the old and the new. The Anchor has historically been known for “train beers” — $1 schooners of PBR when you hear the train going by — and that’s not going anywhere. “We still have the train beer,” said Lange, who is in charge of

IN THE CLUBS Alexa’s Cafe: 10115 Main St., Bothell; 425-4021754; www.alexascafe.com. Live music Saturdays at 7 p.m. Aug. 23: Douglas County Daughters. Aug. 30: Tweety and the Tom-Cats. The Anchor Pub: 1001 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425252-2288; open mic Thursdays; blues on Sunday; indie bands on Fridays and Saturdays starting in September. Angel of the Winds Casino: 3438 Stoluckquamish Lane, Arlington, 360-474-9740; www. angelofthewinds.com. Chris Eger Band. Aug. 22 and 23: Seatown Rhythm and Blues Players. Aug. 29 and 30: Classic Roads. Amici Bistro: 8004 Mukilteo Speedway, Mukilteo; 425-438-9544. Live music 7 to 10 p.m. Saturdays.

day-to-day operations. “My main goal was to keep as much of the traditions alive, and to keep as much of the history.” That said, Lange and crew aren’t just trying to be another neighborhood bar. They specialize in craft cocktails, with an emphasis on whiskey, rum and moonshine. “We have 10 specialty house drinks,” Lange said. “We have a lot of rye drinks. Rye is a type of

The Austin: 2820B Oakes Ave., Everett; www. theaustinbarandgrill.com; 425-212-9716. Buzz Inn: 1801 Main St., Lake Stevens; 425-3779599; www.buzzinnsteakhouse.com. Cafe Zippy: 2811 Wetmore Ave., Everett; 425-3030474. Live acoustic music. www.cafezippy.com. Aug. 22: 7 p.m. Paul Cataldo, $5. The Cannery: 2820 Oakes Ave Suite C, Everett; www.facebook.com/EverettMusicInitiative. Aug. 29: 8 p.m., My Goodness with Thunderpussy and Tango Alpha Tango; $10; www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/823660. The Conway Muse: 18444 Spruce and Main, Conway; 360-445-3000; www.conwaymuse.com. Aug. 22: 7 p.m., SiLM, $5. Aug. 23: 7:30 p.m., Bone

See CLUBS, Page 8

whiskey that isn’t very popular here yet, but it’s making a big resurgence.” They’re bypassing all flavored vodka from a bottle, opting instead to make their own using fresh fruit and even bacon. The process involves infusing a liter of 42 Below vodka with juices for seven days, then freeze filtering it to remove particulates. It’s not all drinking. A brand-new kitchen — the first the building

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The Anchor Pub is back again. The waterfront building, located at 1001 Hewitt Ave. in downtown Everett, has been a bar on and off since 1907. “Dry periods” and Prohibition got in the way of business in the first half of the 20th century. Economic downturns, bad luck and bad decisions have gotten in the way since. The Anchor that opened in January 2009 closed due to slow business last summer. New owners re-opened it this January, but that only lasted a week. Now three more owners are attempting to unsink The Anchor. Andrew Lange, 24, had been interested in renting the space last summer. He visited Washington to climb when he was going to college in Iowa. “I thought Everett was a really cool city,” Lange said. “There’s a lot of development potential here, a lot of people moving here. I decided to move here.” He arrived in January, the same week the most recent Anchor flopped, and leapt at the chance to take over the bar. He partnered up with his friend, Christian Sayre, and recruited Everett

has ever had, and a pipe dream of many past owners — will make The Anchor a seafood restaurant during the day starting Aug. 26. “It’s kind of like an elevated bar menu, plus a full menu,” coowner Riedel said. “We’re going to do crab and jalapeno poppers, crab mac n’ cheese, beer-battered salmon, parmesan-and-cornmeal-crusted cod.” They’ll also have gourmet burgers and vegetarian options. Downstairs bar seating is 21 and older. The upstairs area, where there is a stage and a dance floor, is all-ages. Thursdays are open mic nights. On Sundays, a blues group records a podcast live from the stage. Indie bands will play shows on Fridays and Saturdays starting in September. “On the days that we don’t have concerts, we’re going to have a DJ,” Riedel said. “It’ll be the only place you can dance other than Bar Myx or Tailgator.” The Anchor Pub is open 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Tuesday through Sunday and 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Sundays. It’s closed Monday. Quinn Russell Brown; 425-3393037; qbrown@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @quinnthology. Read The Bar Hop blog at www.heraldnet. com/barhop.


8 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald From Page 7 Yard Preachers, $7. Aug. 24: 6 p.m. Ben & Mia Starner, $7. Aug. 28: 7:30 p.m. R.X.Bertoldi, $5. Aug. 29: 7:30 p.m. Lane Fernando, $7. Aug. 30: 7:30 p.m. Mark DuFresne, $12. Aug. 31: 6 p.m. Jack Mattingly and Whiskey Fever. Sept. 4: 7:30 p.m. Drummerboy featuring Terry “Harmonica” Bean. Craving Cajun Grill: 2915 Colby Ave, Everett; 425-3742983; www.cravingcajunfood. com. Dezi’s Bar and Grill: 11605 State Ave., No. 105, Marysville;

360-659-9490. Marlin James, 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sundays. Eagles FOE: 19223 Highway 99. Lynnwood; 425-835-0890. El Tapatio: 803 Avenue D, Snohomish; 360-862-9530. Classical guitarist Paul Erickson, 6 to 8:30 p.m. second and fourth Fridays. Emory’s on Silver Lake: 11830 19th Ave. SE, Everett; 425-337-7772; www.emorys. com. Everett Live music 9 p.m. to midnight Fridays and Saturdays, per-person cover. Aug. 22: The Stackable Clowns. Aug. 23: Uncle Ernie. Aug. 29: Wings’N’Things. Aug. 30: Ventura Highway Revisited.

Engel’s Pub: 113 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds; 425-778-2900. Jam session with Lou Echeverri, 8 p.m. Tuesdays. Live music 8 p.m. Wednesdays and 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Aug. 22: Blues Playground. Aug. 23: Rafael Tranquilino Band.. Aug. 24: Steven Padilla. Flights: 7601 Evergreen Way, Everett; 425-347-6659; www.reverbnation.com/venue/flightspub. Aug. 29: 8 p.m. Gravel Hitch, Disciples of Dissent. Grazie Ristorante Italiano: 23207 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell; 425-402-9600; www.grazierestaurant.com. Live jazz 7 to 10:30 p.m. most weekends. Aug. 15: Edward Paul Trio. Aug. 16: The

Christel Trio. Aug. 22: Smoke & Honey. Aug. 23: Burnhard Blues Fusion. Aug. 29 and 30: Michael Powers Group. The Hawthorne: 115 Avenue A, Snohomish; 360-563-5243. The Irishmen: 2923 Colby Ave., Everett; 425-374-5783; www. theirishmen.com. Aug. 23: 9 p.m. Oliver Mulholland. Aug. 29: 9:30 p.m. JP Hennessy. Jimmy Jack’s: 13428 Evergreen, Everett; 425-745-1590; All ages jam hosted by Rick Bowen, Teri Anne Wilson and Robert Baker, 7 to 11 p.m. Thursdays. The Jet Bar & Grill: 800 164th St., Mill Creek; 425-743-4593; www.jetbarandgrill.com. Live music Friday and Saturdays, starts between 9 and 9:30 p.m. Aug. 22: 93 Octane, Hookerfist. Aug. 23: Aaron Crawford. Aug. 29: The Lou Echeveri Band. Aug. 30: Special guests. Kroakers: 3021 Rucker Ave., Everett; 425-258-9465. La Hacienda: 620 SE Everett Mall Way, Everett; 425-355-0858; www.lahaciendafmr.com. Live jazz Thursdays. Las Margaritas: 4131 Rucker, Everett; 425-252-3320; www. margaritasmexrest.com. Classical guitarist Paul Erickson, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturdays. Leatherheads Pub & Eatery: 10209 270th St. NW, Stanwood; 360-629-5555; www.leatherheadspub.com. Two Weeks Notice, 9 to 11 p.m. Fridays.

LLROOM 8PM IN THE ORCA BA

Lombardi’s in Mill Creek: 19409 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell⁄Mill Creek; 425-892-2931; www.lombardisitalian.com. Live music every Thursday. Madison Avenue Pub: 905 Madison St., Everett; 425-3487402. Live music Saturdays. Tommy Crook Trio, 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays. Unbound and guests, 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. Wednesdays.

STARTING AT $45

21 AND OVER 1097424

Mirkwood and Shire Cafe: 117 E. Division St., Arlington; 360-403-9020; www.mirkwoodshirecafe.com. $5 cover unless otherwise noted. Music begins at 7 p.m. Aug. 22: Blood and Thunder, Pray for Locust, Toarn, Built by Madness. Aug. 23: Southender, Lonely Drivers, Right Your Wrongs, Toxic Kid. Aug. 29: Destroy Lewis, A Sense of Gravity, Odyssey, Woodshed, Meraphoria. Aug. 30: Galaxy, The Rat Race,

Three Headed Cannibal.

Mondays.

Norm’s Place, A Bar & Grill: 7520 Beverly Blvd., Everett; 425374-8039.

Snohomish Eagles FOE: 606 Maple Ave., Snohomish; 360568-8406.

Old Stroker’s Cafe: 2816 Hewitt Ave., Everett; Saturday Night Showcase, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturdays. Local bands for all ages.

Sol Food Bar and Grill: 1405 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-2417111; www.solfoodbarandgrill. com. Live music various nights; no cover.

One Eyed Jacks Roadhouse: 14019 Highway 99, Lynnwood; 425-743-5570. Live music Fridays and Saturdays.

Stewart’s Place: 709 First St., Snohomish; 360-568-4684. Live music 9 p.m. to midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays.

Oxford Saloon: 913 First St., Snohomish; 360-243-3060. All ages jam hosted by Rick Bowen, Teri Anne Wilson and Robert Baker, 7 to 11 p.m. Wednesdays. Papa’s Tavern: 120 E. Main St., Monroe. 425-232-0771. Live music. Port Gardner Bay Winery: 2802 Rockefeller Ave., Everett; 425-339-0293; www.portgardnerbaywinery.com. Live music, 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Aug. 22: Nikki Schilling. Aug. 23: Glenn Cunningham. Aug. 29: Nikki Schilling. Aug. 30: Danny Ward. Red Petal Coffee House: 321 Main St., Edmonds; 425776-3778; www.redpetalcakes. com. Hours are 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. Edmonds Tunes music and comedy, 6 to 8 p.m. Fridays; no cover. The Red Sky Bar & Grill: 1508 Second St., Marysville; 360-386-8875. The Repp: 924 First St., Snohomish; 360-568-3928; www. therepp.com. Live music 7 to 11 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays. Rhodes River Ranch Restaurant: 22016 Entsminger Road, Arlington; 360-474-8313; www. rhodesriverranch.com. Aug. 22: 6 p.m. Kristen Palmer. Aug. 29: 6 p.m. George DeFransisco. Rocking M-BBQ: 1215 80th St., Everett; 425-438-2843; www.rockingmbbq.com. Old Strokers country jam, 7 to 10 p.m. Thursdays. Skagit River Brewery: 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon; 360336-2884; www.skagitbrew.com. Live music every Saturday. Snack Shack: 320 112th St. SW., Everett; 425-347-4225 or 509-308-0680; www.facebook. com/SnackShackEverett. Open mic and acoustic jam, 5 to 9 p.m.

Tony V’s Garage: 1712 Hewitt Ave., Everett; 425-374-3567. Live music on weekends. Tulalip Resort Casino Canoes Cabaret: Quil Ceda Blvd., Tulalip, 360-716-6000; www. tulalipresortcasino.com. Aug. 22: 9:30 p.m. Hit Explosion. Aug. 23: 5 p.m. West Coast Women; 9:30 p.m. Sway, $10. Aug. 24: 8 p.m. Randy Hansen Tribute to Jimi Hendrix. Aug. 29: 9:30 p.m. Mr. Pink. Aug. 30: 10:30 p.m. Notorious 253, $10. Aug. 31: 8 p.m. Journey Revisted. Under the Red Umbrella: 1502 Rucker Ave., Everett; 425-252-9193; www.undertheredumbrella.com. Live music 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays, $10 cover waived with food purchase. Aug. 22: Ron Thordarson & Family. Aug. 29: Big River Band. Viking Bar & Grill: 8820 Viking Way, Stanwood; 360-6299285. Live music 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays; no cover. Village Restaurant & Lounge: 220 Ash St., Marysville; 360-659-2305; www.villagepie. net. Live music 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays; no cover. White Horse Saloon: 304 N. Olympic Ave., Arlington; 360435-3122. Live DJ and karoke Friday and Saturday nights at 8 p.m. Wild Vine Bistro: 18001 Bothell-Everett Highway, Bothell; 425-877-1334; www. wildvinebistro.com. Most Wednesdays at 7 p.m. The Side Project. Aug. 22 and 23: 8 p.m. Greg Murat. Aug. 28: 8 p.m. Brad Russell. Aug. 29: 8 p.m. Amigos Nobles. Winter Court: AC3, 7314 44th Ave., Marysville. Live music, 7 to 9 p.m. Fridays; no cover.


dining

The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 9

WINES, BREWS AND SPIRITS American Brewing Co.: 180 W. Dayton St., Warehouse 102, Edmonds; 425-772-1192, www. americanbrewing.com. Arista Wine Cellars: 320 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds; 425-771-7009; www.aristawines.com; tastings 1 to 4:30 p.m. Saturdays. Back Porch Wine and Spirits: 11014 19th Ave. SE, Suite 20, Everett; 425-225-6755; www. backporchspirits.net. Big E Ales: 5030 208th St SW Suite A., Lynnwood; 425-6727051; www.bigeales.com. Broadway Liquor and Wine: 2027 Broadway, Everett; 425-2120519. DeVine Wines: 15224 Main St., Suite 107, Mill Creek; 425-3576200; www.de-vinewines.com; tastings 5 to 8 p.m. Thursdays and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays, $5. Diamond Knot Alehouse: 621A Front St., Mukilteo; 425-3554488; Diamond Knot Brewpub@ MLT: 5602 232nd Street SW, Mountlake Terrace; Diamond Knot

Camano Lodge, 170 E Cross Island Road, Camano Island; 360-3879972; www.diamondknot.com. Beer tastings, 5 p.m. Wednesdays; Cask Night, 5 p.m. Thursdays at Mukilteo Pub. Dusty Cellars: 529 Michael Way, Camano Island; 360-387-2171; www.dustycellars.net. Foggy Noggin Brewing: Brewing traditional English ales; 22329 53rd Ave SE, Bothell, www.foggynogginbrewing.com/brewery/. Furion Cellars: 1311 Bonneville Ave., No. 106, Snohomish; 425314-8922; www.furioncellars.com; visits and tastings by appointment. Gallagher’s Where U Brew: 180 W. Dayton St. Warehouse 105, Edmonds; 425-776-4209; www. whereubrew.com. Justice Brewing: 2414 Chestnut St., Everett; 425-835-2337; www. justicebrewing.com. Visits by appointment only; please call ahead. Lantz Cellars: 3001 S. Lake Stevens Road, Everett; 425-7702599; www.lantzcellars.com;

425-582-8474; salishbrewing.com.

Seattle International Beerfest

visits and tastings by appointment; open tasting times posted through email or on Facebook.

The Seattle International Beerfest is a three-day beer festival from Friday through Sunday at Seattle Center Fisher Pavilion specializing in rare, hard-to-find, exotic beers. Over 200 world-class beers from 16 countries will be on hand and there will be live music and food options. The festival runs noon to 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and noon to 7 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $30 and include an official SIB glass and 10 beer tokens. For more information, visit www.seattlebeerfest.com.

Lazy Boy Brewing: 715 100th St. SE, Suite A-1, Everett; 425-4237700; www.lazyboybrewing.com. McMenamin’s Mill Creek: 13300 Bothell-Everett Highway, Mill Creek; 425-316-0520; www. mcmenamins.com. Beer tastings once a month. Middleton Brewing: 607 SE Everett Mall Way 27-A, Everett; 425-280-9178; www.middletonbrewing.net.

The Scotsman Bistro, Wine & Spirits: 11601 Harbour Pointe Blvd., Mukilteo; 425-493-1191; mukilteorestaurant.com. Beer and wine tastings on Wednesdays.

River Time Brewing: http: 25909 Clear Creek Rd., Darrington; 267-483-7411; www.

rivertimebrewing.com. Salish Sea Brewing: 518 Dayton Street, Ste. 104, Edmonds, Bingo EH AUGUST 22

Patterson Cellars: 19501 144th Ave. NE, Suite D600, Woodinville; 425-483-8600; www.pattersoncellars.com; tastings noon to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

Scuttlebutt Brewing Co.: 1205 Craftsman Way, Everett; 425-257-9316; www.scuttlebuttbrewing.com.

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Port Gardner Bay Winery: 2802 Rockefeller Ave., Everett, 425-339-0293, www.portgardnerbaywinery.com; tasting room open 4:30 to 10 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; $7.50. Live music Friday and Saturday nights; no cover.

2nd St. Wine Shop and Tasting Room: 221 Second St., Langley; 360-221-3121; www.2ndstreetwineshop.com. Washington wine and cheese tasting 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily except Tuesdays; $1 a pour.

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10 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Plenty of music, laughs at the fair Bill Cosby, Newsboys and country music stars headline grandstand entertainment By Gale Fiege Herald Writer

Bill Cosby’s doin’ the Monroe. The longtime comedian, TV and movie star is one of the grandstand headliners at the Evergreen State Fair, on now through Labor Day. The big grandstand Bill Cosby brings his shows are brand of scheduled humor to the Monday Evergreen through FriState Fair on day. Ticket Wednesday, information Aug. 27. is available at www.EvergreenFair.org. Free entertainment inside the fairgrounds is offered throughout the run of the fair. Cosby will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27. Tickets for his show range from $33 to $58. One of the country’s best loved comedians, Cosby is sure to attract multiple generations of people who have enjoyed his comedy record albums, funny books, cartoons, television shows and films. Cosby, who grew up poor in a Philadelphia housing project, was a Navy veteran working as a

stand-up comedian when he was hired to be the first black actor to co-star in a dramatic TV series. “I Spy” won multiple Emmy awards. Arguably his biggest contribution to American culture was his top-rated situation-comedy series, “The Cosby Show,” about a close-knit, upper middle-class black family in the 1980s. Cosby is the winner of the Kennedy Center Honors, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor and the Marian Anderson Award. The Sequim-based pop rock band Emblem3 performs at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 25. Prices range from $25 to $39. After the group’s appearance on the “X Factor,” the TV music competition, Emblem3 released its hit album “Nothing To Lose.” Emblem3 won the Choice Music Breakout Group Award at the 2013 Teen Choice Awards. The band was a trio, but after Drew Chadwick left to pursue a solo career, brothers Wesley and Keaton Stromberg have stepped up to release a new song, “Love Will Be There.” Sure to draw a big crowd at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 26, is the Southern rock/country rock

PUBLICITY PHOTO

The Marshall Tucker Band performs at the Evergreen State Fair on Tuesday, Aug. 26.

Free shows The following are a few recommendations for the free concerts inside the fair: Aug. 21: The Fentons, country, 5:30 p.m. Courtyard stage; Wild Snohomians, 7:45 p.m., Family stage. Aug. 22: Jet City Players, pop rock, 2:45 p.m., and the Martin James Band, country, 8:45 p.m., Courtyard stage; The Bobbers, fishing music band, 5:45 p.m., Family stage. Aug. 23: Aztec Indian Dancers, 5:15 p.m., Courtyard; Roadstars Jazz Band, 2:30 p.m., Family stage. Aug. 24: Fiesta Sunday flamenco, folkloric and mariachi music and dancing all afternoon at the Courtyard; Cranberry Bog bluegrass band, 5:30 p.m., Family stage. Aug. 25: Cherry Cherrry, Neil Diamond tribute band, 5:45 p.m., Courtyard. Aug. 26: Snohomish High School Jam Club, 3:15 p.m., and Rocklyn Road, country rock, at 9:45 p.m., Courtyard. Aug. 27: Hankabillies, classic country, 3 p.m., Family stage. Aug. 28: Dakota country band, 6:30 p.m., Courtyard. Aug. 29: Monroe Concert Band, 6 p.m., Courtyard. Aug. 30: Cascade Range, country, 7 p.m., Family stage. Aug. 31: Playin for Pizza, fiddle band, 1:30 p.m., Family stage. Sept. 1: Applause Performance Dance Team, 2 p.m., Courtyard stage.

PUBLICITY PHOTO

The Charlie Daniels Band performs at the Evergreen State Fair on Tuesday, Aug. 26.

mega-concert by the Marshall Tucker Band and the Charlie Daniels Band. Ticket prices range from $30 to $53. Marshall Tucker’s hits include “Can’t You See,” “Heard it in a Love Song,” “Fire on the Mountain,” “This Ol’ Cowboy” and “Take The Highway.” Charlie Daniels’s top tunes include “Drinkin My Baby Goodbye,” “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” and “The South’s Gonna Do It Again.” Charlie Daniels, still touring at age 77, is an award-winning musician who is known for his work to support military families and children from families in need. The Marshall Tucker Band, with its blend of rock, rhythm and blues, jazz, country and gospel, helped establish the Southern rock genre in the early 1970s. At 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 28, country music artists Chris Young and Courtney Cole will

perform. Prices range from $30 to $53. Chris Young won the 2006 USA Television Network program “Nashville Star” singing competition. His hits include “Aw Naw,” “Tomorrow” and “Who I Am with You.” Courtney Cole will open the show with an acoustic set. She appeared on Country Music Television’s “Next Superstar.” This year’s grandstand shows end Friday, Aug. 29, with an appearance by the Australian Christian pop rock band Newsboys and their guest Ryan Stevenson at 7:30 p.m. Prices range from $23 to $43. The Newsboys’ wellknown songs include “God’s Not Dead,” “Born Again” and “Live with Abandon.” The Grammy awardnominated band includes front man Michael Tait, guitarist Jody Davis on guitar, Jeff Frankenstein on keyboards and drummer Duncan Phillips.


The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 11

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CALENDAR

Eric Miller plays the free summer concert series Everett Music on the Waterfront at the Port Gardner Landing on Sunday at 2 p.m.

CONCERTS Snohomish County

PUBLICITY PHOTO

7th Annual

Summer Aire: The eighth annual Summer Aire Concert and ice cream social begins at 3 p.m. Sept. 7 at First Presbyterian Church, 2936 Rockefeller Ave., Everett. Nearly 100 musicians from area churches and the Everett Chorale are set to perform “Ride that Gospel Train,” which includes traditional spirituals, Broadway tunes and works by Moses Hogan and John Rutter. Dessert follows. Tickets are $5 each, though any donation will be accepted. Proceeds will benefit Dinner at the Bell, a program sponsored by First Presbyterian that provides meals and other services for the homeless. Tayla Lynn: Loretta Lynn’s granddaughter Tayla Lynn performs a program of country music at 8 p.m. Sept. 6 at the Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave. Ticket prices range from $10 to $25. Call 425258-6766. More information at www.historiceveretttheatre.org.

August 29 to 31

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Doors open at 9am Saturday & Sunday

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Family-friendly festival with 65 vintage aircraft on display and flying!

HISTORIC FLIGHT FOUNDATION

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Arlington Music in the Park: The city of Arlington finishes its free concert series from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 28 at Terrace Park, 809 E. Fifth St. The group Silence, with guest DLA, will perform. Edmonds Concerts in City Park: Free, 3 to 4 p.m. Sundays at City Park, 600 Third Ave. S. On Aug. 24, hear the Second Hand Newz, a Fleetwood Mac tribute band. Edmonds Concerts in Hazel Miller Plaza: Free, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Thursdays, in the plaza, Fifth and Maple. Todo Es plays on Aug. 28. Everett’s Music at the Waterfront: The free summer concert series is 6:30 to 8:30 Saturday evenings, 2 to 4 Sunday afternoons and 6:30 to 8:30 Thursday evenings at the Port Gardner Landing, 1700 W. Marine View Drive. More information is at www.ci.everett. wa.us. Hear 20 Riverside play funky rock with a hip-hop twist on Aug. 23; Eric Miller, folk, rock, country and blues on Aug. 24; and the Randy Oxford Band finishes up the season on Aug. 28.

Everett’s Music at the Fountain: Free music from 5 to 7 p.m. Aug. 27 at Wetmore Theatre Plaza, 2710 Wetmore Ave. Hear Creme Tangerine, with the greatest hits of the Beatles. Mill Creek Town Center concert: Hear the Davanos, free, 6 to 8 p.m. Aug. 27 at the Forum, 151st and Main streets. Stanwood Summer Concerts: Free, 2 to 4 p.m. Aug. 23, with the Mark DuFresne Band at Viking Village.

BILLBOARD Pacifica Chamber Orchestra: Through Aug. 30, buy season tickets at discounted price of $90 general admission and $65 student/senior. Tickets for the five-concert season go up by $10 Sept. 1. More information is at www.pacificachamberorchestra. org or available by emailing infomypacifica@gmail.com or calling 425-743-0255. Music Hall Community Orchestra: Join the orchestra from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays beginning in September at the Music Hall, next to Macy’s inside the Everett Mall, 1402 SE Everett Mall Way. For more information, call 425-2526542. The orchestra plays for fun, relaxation and to improve skills. New conductor is Marcin Paczkowski, a doctoral student at the University of Washington. Friday Music Jam Sessions: For people with disabilities and their friends, the Village Music and Art’s Friday jam sessions, featuring live music by Jon Dalgarn and Voices of the Village, are 1 to 3 p.m. Fridays at 338 N. McLeod, Arlington. Musicians and other interested community members are welcome. Children younger than 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Call 360653-7752, ext. 14, for information or to sign up. Washington Old Time Fiddlers: The Snohomish County chapter meets at 6 p.m. Aug. 22 at the Sisco Heights Community Club, 13527 99th Ave NE, Arlington. Celtic jam is at 5 p.m. Workshop at 6 p.m. Circle jam at 7 p.m. Listeners, dancers and acoustic musicians of all ages and their instruments are welcome. More information is available by calling 360-631-5907.

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The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 13

British Export marks Beatles’ 50th in Northwest By Jon Bauer Herald Writer

Fifty years ago, Beatlemania arrived in Seattle, culminating with a Beatles concert for 14,300 people at the Seattle Center Colisium on Aug. 21, 1964. Jim Martin wasn’t in Seattle at the time. A young boy growing up in Chicago during The Beatles’ U.S. tours, Martin also missed the concert at Chicago’s Comiskey Park in 1965. At $5, that was a pretty pricey ticket for a Catholic family with eight kids, Martin said. “Biggest omission in my life was missing the shows they did at Comiskey Park,” he said. But Martin and three of his bandmates have found a way to relive those days as The Beatles tribute band, British Export. Martin does remember the excitement and the screams that surrounded The Beatles’ tours. “The girls wanted to get with The Beatles and the guys wanted to be a Beatle, and that’s what we’re kind of doing now,” Martin said. “The girls aren’t tearing our clothes off, but we’re rocking, and I get to feel what it was like. It’s really come full circle for me.” British Export will perform — two days after the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ Seattle performance — at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Historic Everett Theatre. Joining Martin, who performs as Paul McCartney, are Jon Fickes as John Lennon, Evan Gackstatter as George Harrison and Everett resident Derek

The Beatles tribute band, Britsh Export, is (from left) Jim Martin as Paul, Jon Fickes as John, Evan Gackstatter as George and Derek Hovander as Ringo.

Meet the Export British Export performs at 8 p.m. Saturday at the Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave. Tickets, $12 to $25 are availble at the door or online at www.etix.com or www. historiceveretttheater.org. To read more about Britsh Export and other tribute bands playing in the region, see The Herald story at tinyurl.com/ HeraldPlayingTribute. Hovander as Ringo Starr. Martin missed seeing The Beatles play live, but inspired by the music he learned to play drums and founded British Export 20 years ago in Chicago. He moved the group to Seattle in 2009. “I started out as Ringo, but then had difficulty finding a left-handed bass player when our Paul left, so I learned how to play bass and left-handed at the same time,” he said. “I think it made it much easier than if I’d learned to play bass right-handed and then tried to switch.” Martin still finds reason to put on his Ringo outfit, even donning a fake nose to attend the Ringo Starr and His All-Stars concert at Woodinville’s Chateau Ste. Michelle in July. “I was there in my Ringo regalia. He was great. I dressed up and people wanted to get pictures with me,” Martin said. British Export, more than just playing The Beatles’ hits, performs in costume and on

PUBLICITY PHOTO

instruments and equipment appropriate to the era. “It’s a recreation. We like to take it to the hilt, the look, the costumes, the amplifiers, the suits, the accents. We try and take people back,” Martin said. “We’ll do the early Beatles and take a break and change in to Sgt. Pepper’s gear and then into the later recording years.” For festival and casino shows, the band plays more “rocking dance tunes,” he said, but for shows like those at Historic Everett the band will perform songs that are more for listening and involve more orchestration. Of course, the baby boomers, as they did 50 years ago, show up for the concerts. “But I would say a great portion is an amazing collection of kids who just love the music and bring their moms and dads,” Martin said. “There will always be Beatles fans.”

SATURDAY, Aug. 23 6:30-8:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, Aug. 24 2-4pm

THURSDAY, Aug. 28 6:30-8:30pm

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music

14 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

Stanwood High student to perform benefit concert By Gale Fiege Herald Writer

STANWOOD — Peregrine Spane is on a mission to raise money for the Davis Carlson Memorial Foundation and Davis Place Teen Center run by the Stanwood Camano Resource Center. The Stanwood High School senior is playing a benefit concert at Spane 7:30 p.m. Friday in the Performing Arts Center at Stanwood High School, 7400 272nd St. NW. Doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 for students and $12 for adults. “We want to fill the

auditorium,” Peregrine said. “We need to sell 500 tickets.” A pianist and singer, Peregrine plans to perform a variety of music, including classical, blues, jazz and contemporary. During the concert he will be joined by his longtime piano teacher Jean Sparks in a duet. He also plans to accompany singer Ireland Woods and play another duo with guitarist Adryan Bartolome. The son of Marc and Catherine Sparks of Camano Island, Peregrine was a cast member of “Shrek,” last year’s high school musical.

Molly Hatchet to play Everett on Friday Herald staff The Southern rock band Molly Hatchet makes a stop at the Historic Everett Theatre on Friday. Doors open at 6 p.m. The Charlies band from Mukilteo opens the concert at 7 p.m. and Molly Hatchet comes on around 8 p.m. The theater is located at 2911 Colby Ave. More information is available at www.historiceveretttheatre.org or call 425-258-6766. Molly Hatchet is named for a legendary prostitute who allegedly beheaded and mutilated her clients. You can check out the band’s scary website at www.mollyhatchet.com.

PUBLICITY PHOTO

Molly Hatchet performs at the Historic Everett Theatre on Friday at 8 p.m.

Formed in 1975, the band is perhaps best known for its self-titled, platinum debut album as well as its next one,

“Flirtin’ With Disaster.” A tumultuous couple of decades for the band was followed with its resurrection in the late 1990s

and the release of several new albums, including “Justice” in 2010. Lead guitarist Dave Hlubek is the only original member of the six-piece band. The Charlies, begun in 2011, includes Justin Peterson on rhythm guitar, drummer Matt Martin, Char Bailey on bass and lead guitarist Matt Dickson. Peterson is a songwriter who records in his home-made Red Rose Studio in Mukilteo. Martin owns a business in Mukilteo and has played drums in church much of his life. Bailey, also with a church background, lives in Mukilteo. Dickson, who joined the band in 2012, hails from Bellevue.

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The Daily Herald Friday, 08.22.2014 15

Pair of Jacks — White, Johnson — playing area shows By Andy Rathbun Herald Writer

Jack White was wearing the black hat earlier this year. A Rolling Stone cover story made some small waves after White took a few potshots at the Black Keys — musical rivals also based in Nashville — and expressed frustration with his former White Stripes sidekick and ex-wife Meg White. Oh well. These things happen. White can bear a little bad press. After all, the guy, who is playing a pair of sold-out shows at the Paramount Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, wins only praise for his music. His sound, a gritty garage take on blues rock, has helped establish him as arguably his generation’s greatest guitarist. He’s touring now behind his second album, “Lazaretto,” another four-star album that, like his solo debut “Blunderbuss,” debuted at No. 1. Tickets are sold-out but can be found at a mark-up at stubhub.com. Jack Johnson, meanwhile, will headline the Gorge Amphitheatre at 6:30 p.m. Saturday. The Hawaiian singer, a former professional surfer, has turned into a remarkably enduring performer, winning fans with a laidback and tuneful sound that easily appeals. Though his biggest hits came early in his career with tracks like “Flake” and “Upside Down,” his albums remain successful even without chart-smashing singles. His latest, “From Here to Now to You,” debuted at No. 1. Tickets are $57 to $78.90 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

PHOTOS COURTESY AP

Jack White (left) performs at the Paramount Theatre in Seattle on Monday and Tuesday; Jack Johnson (right) plays the Gorge Amphitheatre on Saturday.

On this side of the mountains, the Eagles are coming to the Tacoma Dome for a career-spanning show at 8 p.m. Monday. The aging California group dominated the charts in the 1970s with a steady stream of hits, including No. 1 singles “One of These Nights,” “Hotel California” and “Heartache Tonight.” Other songs have grown in fame years after their release, like the heartsick ode “Desperado.” Expect to hear all of the group’s best-loved songs on this tour, billed grandly as the History of the Eagles. Tickets are $53.34 to $210.85 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Finally, a string of shows at the Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery will keep crowds coming to Woodinville from Friday through Sunday. First up is the Gipsy Kings, the well-loved flamenco-based pop group from southern France. The group has remained a force for a quarter of a

century thanks to songs like “Volare,” which topped the Latin charts in 1990. The group is touring now in celebration of its 25th anniversary. They play the winery at 7 Friday night. Fans can expect to hear old hits as well as newer songs from the band’s 2013 release, “Savor Flamenco,” which, like past releases, included a hodgepodge of World music flavors, including bossa nova, samba and jazz. Tickets are $52.80 to $84.05 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Then, Earth, Wind & Fire hit the winery at 7 p.m.

Saturday for a sold-out show. Arguably the most popular funk band of the 1970s, the group won fans over with tracks like “Shining Star” and “September.” The act, led by songwriter Maurice White and singer Philip Bailey, remained a potent force through the 1990s. While White no longer tours with the group — he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease more than a decade ago — Bailey remains on stage. Tickets are sold-out but can be found at a mark-up at stubhub.com. Finally, Peter

Frampton’s Guitar Circus will play the Chateau Ste. Michelle at 7 p.m. Sunday. The iconic guitarist sold millions of albums in the 1970s and established himself as a leading live act

with his album “Frampton Comes Alive!” and hit singles including “Baby, I Love Your Way.” Tickets are $61 to $91.70 at ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000.

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16 Friday, 08.22.2014 The Daily Herald

CALENDAR COMEDY

DANCE

Jet City Rollergirls Rolling on The Floor Comedy Night: Fundraiser featuring comedians Drew Barth, Geoff Brousseau, Susan Rice and Joe Vespaziani, 8 p.m. Sept. 5, Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave. More information is online at www. historiceveretttheatre.org or call 425-258-6766.

Pacific Northwest Ballet: The company raises the velvet curtain on its 2014-2015 season with George Balanchine’s “Jewels.” Costumed in emerald green, ruby red and luminous white, the trio of gems pays tribute to golden ages of music and dance. “Jewels” runs from Sept. 26 through Oct. 5 at Seattle Center’s Marion Oliver McCaw Hall. Tickets and more information are available at the box office, 301 Mercer St., by calling 206-441-2424, or online at www.PNB.org.

Shaquille O’Neal’s All Star Comedy Jam: 8 p.m. Sept. 5, McCaw Hall, Seattle Center. Tickets are on sale now at the KeyArena Box Office, Ticketmaster outlets, Ticketmaster.com or charge by phone toll free at (800) 745-3000.

Olympic Ballet Theatre: The Edmonds-based company offers its

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couples show up at the home of the deputy mayor of New York and his wife for their 10th wedding anniversary party. However, the host has shot himself in the ear lobe and his wife is missing. Performances are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays at 9673 Firdale Ave., Firdale Village, Edmonds. Ticket prices range from $12 to $18.50. Call 206-533-2000. More information at www.phoenixtheatreedmonds. org. Directed by Christine Mosere, the cast includes Larry Albert, Molly Brusewitz, Melanie Calderwood, Monica Chilton, Rebekah Dawn, Dan Jacoby, J. Woody Lotts, Asa Sholdez, Annie St. John and Christian Ver. Pay-what-you-can dress rehearsal is Aug. 28.

fall program at 2 and 7 p.m. Oct. 11 at the Everett Performing Arts Center. Information and tickets are at www.olympicballet.com.

THEATER Snohomish County “Anything Goes”: The Village Theatre KidStage summer stock show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 24 at the Everett Performing Arts Center, 2710 Wetmore Ave. Tickets are $14 for youth and seniors and $16 general admission. For tickets, call 425-2578600. For more information, go to villagetheatre.org. The classic Cole Porter musical takes place aboard the S.S. American at sea, where two unlikely pairs follow a collision course to true love. The tunes, made famous on Broadway, include “Anything Goes,” “I Get A Kick out of You” and “It’s De-lovely.”

“Night Watch”: Edmonds Driftwood Players will bring to its stage the murder mystery thriller “Night Watch” Sept. 19 through Oct. 5 at Wade James Theater, 950 Main St., Edmonds. Curtain is 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays. For ticket information, go to www.driftwoodplayers.com or call 425-774-9600.

Neil Simon’s “Rumors”: Phoenix Theatre presents the comedy Aug. 29 through Sept. 21. Four

Sky Performing Arts: Monroe’s community theater group

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Island County “Taming of the Shrew” and “Richard III”: Island Shakespeare Festival in Langley continues in repertory through Sept. 7 behind Langley Middle School. Free. Information at www. islandshakespearefest.org.

Seattle “A Chorus Line”: Tickets are on sale now to see the awardwinning musical Sept. 3 through 28 at the 5th Avenue Theatre. Go to www.5thavenue.org or order by phone at 206-625-1900.

OPERA Seattle Opera: The company celebrates the start of the new season with a free open house at

11 a.m. Sept. 21 at Marion Oliver McCaw Hall, 301 Mercer St., at the Seattle Center. Included is a live opera performance in the hall’s Grand Lobby and a backstage tour. More information is at www.seattleopera.org. Tickets are available by calling 800-426-1619.

BILLBOARD “Kinky Boots”: Tickets are on sale now for the Tony awardwinning musical written by Harvey Fierstein and Cyndi Lauper opening Oct. 9 through 26 at Seattle’s 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave. Charlie Price has reluctantly inherited his father’s shoe factory, which is on the verge of bankruptcy. Trying to live up to his father’s legacy and save his family business, Charlie finds inspiration in the form of Lola. A fabulous entertainer in need of some sturdy stilettos, Lola turns out to be the one person who can help Charlie become the man he’s meant to be. As they work to turn the factory around, this unlikely pair finds that they have a lot in common. Single tickets are available, starting at $29, at www.5thavenue.org or by calling 206-625-1900.

PUBLIC DANCES WORKSHOPS:

ANNIVERSARY

presents “Hello Dolly” directed by Alexandra Clark and Robin Hilt at 8 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sept. 19 through Oct. 5 at the Frank Wagner Auditorium,639 Main St. Monroe Community Band provides the orchestration. More information is at skyperformingarts.com.

info@hibulbculturalcenter.org 6410 23rd Avenue NE, Tulalip, WA 98271 Visit us online for more event dates.

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The 449 Club: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. every other Saturday, Zion Lutheran Church, 4634 Alger St., Everett. Alcohol-free R&B music and dance; $5 cover. Call 425-343-3232.

p.m. instruction, 7:30 dancing on the second Saturday; Mansford Grange, 1265 Railroad Ave., Darrington. 206-402-8646; $7 requested donation.

Ballroom dancing: 1 to 3 p.m. every fourth Saturday through October, Carl Gipson Senior Center of Everett, 3025 Lombard Ave., Everett. Must be 50 or better to dance to the music of Lauren Petrie. Admission is $4; call 425257- 8780.

Edmonds Senior Center: Fling dance with live bands, 1 to 3 p.m. Fridays, Edmonds Senior Center, 220 Railroad Ave.; $3 donations, no partners necessary; $5 for a sampler class of foxtrot, swing and waltz on Monday afternoons; 425-774-5555.

Ballroom dance: 1 to 3 p.m. Wednesdays, Northshore Senior Center, 10201 E. Riverside Drive, Bothell; dance lessons with extra charge and dancing with a live band; $4 members, $6 nonmembers; 425-487-2441; www. northshoreseniorcenter.org.

Everett Senior Swingers square dancing: 1 to 3 p.m. Fridays with caller Doug Coleman, Everett senior center, 3025 Lombard Ave., Everett; donation suggested; no summer dances; 425-257-8780, 425-334-2919.

Dance party classes: Learn the party dances you need to know for weddings, reunions and cruises; instructor is Eleanor Leight, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, Snohomish Senior Center, 506 Fourth St., Snohomish; all ages, no partners needed; $25 a month; 360-568-0934. Darrington Community Dances: 5:30 p.m. potluck, 7

Freewheelers Square Dance Club: Beginning Sept. 7, Freewheelers’ dancers will move to the Mountlake Terrace Community Senior Center, 23000 Lakeview Drive. Dances are 7 to 10 p.m. first, third and some fifth Sundays. Cost is $7. Partners are not required; singles and couples welcome. A beginner’s dance classes will be offered Wednesday nights, 7 to 9 p.m.

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The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe’s 2014 PowWow, “Celebration of Generations” and stick games competition is Aug. 22-24 at the tribe’s reservation on Highway 530 northeast of Darrington. Dancing includes the traditional “fancy dance” shown at left.

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CALENDAR MUSIC Tim Noah Thumbnail Theater: Open microphone for all ages beginning at 7:30 p.m. Fridays. Performer sign-up begins at 6:30 p.m. Suggested donation of $3 performers, $5 audience at 1211 Fourth St., Snohomish; 360-5689412; thumbnailtheater.com.

STAGE Seattle Children’s Theatre: Tickets are on sale for the 2014-15 season, which includes “The Garden of Rikki Tikki Tavi” on Sept. 25 through Nov. 9, “Dick Whittington and His Cat” on Nov. 13 through Dec. 21, “Mwindo” on Jan. 22 through Feb. 15, “Goodnight Moon” on March 5 through April 19 and “Robin Hood” on April 16 through May 17, all at the Seattle Center. Call the box office at 206441-3322. More information is at www.sct.org.

OUTDOORS Jetty Island Days: Through Sept. 1, take the foot ferry to Jetty Island, the sandy man-made beach off the Everett waterfront. Ferry runs 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. Passes are a suggested donation of $2 for adults and $1 for children. Get the passes at Marine Park boat launch, 10th Street and W. Marine View Drive, Everett. Return passes are available on the island. No lifeguards. Pack food and water, sunscreen, shoes and changes of clothing. Learn more about Jetty Island Days special events, camps and cruises at www. everettwa.org/parks.

Forest Park: Everett’s crown jewel public park, just off Mukilteo Boulevard, offers its annual animal farm, open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. until Aug. 24. See baby goats, sheep, alpacas, an albino turkey, ducks, geese, hens, rabbits, pigs and horses. Moonlight Beach Adventure: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Aug. 16 at Marina Beach, 650 Admiral Way S., Edmonds. Look at sea creatures brought to shore by volunteer scuba divers. Bring a flashlight. Free. More information at www. edmondswa.gov. Free Day at State Parks: Aug. 25 is a state parks “free day.” Day-use visitors will not need a Discover Pass to visit state parks in honor of the birthday of the National Park Service. The next free days are Sept. 27, in recognition of National Public Lands Day and Nov. 11, in honor of Veterans Day. The Discover Pass costs $30 for a year or $10 for one day.

EVENTS Sauk-Suiattle’s 2014 PowWow: The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe’s annual “Celebration Of Generations” is Aug. 22 through 24 at the reservation, located northeast of Darrington on Highway 530. See dancers from throughout the Northwest, enjoy food and a vending mall.

EXHIBITS Imagine Children’s Museum: 1502 Wall St., Everett; phone 425-258-1006; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sundays. Each third Friday of the month is the museum’s Free Friday Night Live. Play indoors with the kids from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at no cost; imaginecm.org. Check online for summer camps. Western Heritage Center: An interactive museum of mining, logging, agriculture, transportation, construction and wildlife. Kids will be entertained by noisy machinery, including an 1880s-era drill press powered by giant belts tied to a waterwheel outside the building. This exhibit shows how creative people had to be to survive without TV and cellphones. Seed drills, drag saws, potato diggers, gas pumps, vintage John Deere tractors, and more showcase the history of Snohomish County. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday on the east side of the Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe. Call 425-232-3493 for more information. Woodland Park Zoo: The zoological gardens are open 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at two entrances, Fremont Avenue and 50th Street or Phinney Avenue and 55th Street, Seattle. For information, call 206548-2500 or go to www.zoo.org.

BILLBOARD Red Curtain: An exciting lineup of performing arts classes for all ages. A complete list of offerings and registration information is available at www.redcurtainfoundation.org. Schack Art Center: 2921 Hoyt Ave., Everett; 425-259-5050; www. schack.org. Go to the website to learn about classes for kids and teens.

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Embracing color without fear Joan Pinney, an accomplished watercolorist from Snohomish, is the Schack Art Center’s Artist of the Year.

Schack’s Artist of the Year The paintings of Joan Pinney, Schack Art Center’s artist of the year, will be exhibited through Sept. 19 at the center, 2921 Hoyt Ave., Everett. During the exhibit, the Schack also pays tribute to retired Everett teacher Maryalice Salget, the 2014 Art Advocate of the Year, and retired teacher Saundra Westvang and her husband Robert Westvang, the 2013 Volunteers of the Year.

By Gale Fiege Herald Writer

EVERETT — Well-known Camano Island painter Jack Gunter says watercolor scares the pants off him. He’s not alone. That sort of fear makes watercolorist Joan Pinney just grin. Pinney, the Schack Art Center’s Artist of the Year for 2014, is the focus of the current show at the Schack in Everett. Maren Oates, a Schack spokeswoman, calls Pinney an accomplished watercolorist “who draws inspiration from her extensive travels in the Pacific Northwest. Dramatic skies, sunwashed houses, mountains, waterfalls, quiet harbors, lighthouses and sailboats across (the region) all contribute to her creativity and provide the themes for many of her paintings.” Since 1992, the Schack — formerly the Arts Council of Snohomish County — has annually honored one artist who is recognized by his or her peers for their considerable accomplishments and contributions to the visual arts in Snohomish County. Pinney, who lives and works in Snohomish, has produced paintings that have been selected by jury in regional and national shows, including the Northwest Watercolor Society’s annual show and the Frye Museum’s Puget Sound Area Exhibition.

KEVIN CLARK / THE HERALD

Joan Pinney, talking about one of her waterfall paintings last week, is the Schack Art Center’s Artist of the Year for 2014. “Ebey Landing, Whidbey Island” by Joan Pinney is on display at the Schack Art Center. COURTESY PHOTO

In 1999, Pinney received the Northwest Watercolor Society’s purchase award. Foss Maritime has selected her paintings for six company calendars. In the 2008 West Coast Paper Exhibition, one of her paintings was chosen for the third place award. Her commissioned work can be seen in many collections, including

on the eighth floor of the Providence Regional Medical Center in Everett. Pinney, 69, is a “signature” member of the Northwest Watercolor Society and a founding member of the Sky Valley Artists Guild and the Arts of Snohomish Gallery, where she maintains an exhibit of her work. The Schack gift

shop also carries numerous prints of her paintings. In the current art show at Schack, look for “Golden Light,” a seemingly impossible representation of the morning sun coming around the corner of an island ridge somewhere in the Salish Sea. Or find the glowing image of Mount Rainier.

In order to capture that light, “Watercolor must be planned and painted in stages, sometimes actually masking areas off while other parts are painted,” Pinney said. “You have to be sort of a scientist to know what needs to happen when.” Pinney, who starts painting early each morning, often uses a water spray bottle, a dribble of paint and the rotation of her paper to get her ideas flowing. “These scenes just come out of my head.” In one corner of the show, see a number of small vertical paintings, primarily of wilderness waterfalls, most of which had a start with that spray bottle. Along with paint

brushes, Pinney uses everyday household items such as an empty toilet paper roll to help shape her scenes, including the ledges of those waterfalls. Some of the paintings in the show are separated twins. “The good thing about painting on paper is that you are just a razor blade away from something new, like two paintings,” Pinney said. The show includes scenes of her trips to Europe, some portraits, florals and houses in historic Snohomish. However, her forte may be landscapes and seascapes. “I know I have succeeded with a painting if I can smell the air in the scene or I can hear the running water,” she said. Pinney was “dumbfounded” to be named the artist of the year. “It is a great honor and very humbling, considering all the great artists we have in this area,” Pinney said. Gale Fiege: 425-3393427; gfiege@heraldnet. com. Twitter: @galefiege.

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GALLERIES AND EXHIBITS Snohomish County 3231 Creatives Gallery: 3231 Broadway, Everett; 425-7405030; 3231creatives.wordpress. com; noon to 7 p.m., Tuesdays through Thursdays, noon to 5 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Artist interpretations of “The Portrait” through Aug. 30, including photos and collage by 17 artists. Art Loft Sisters at Fisherman’s Market and Grill: 1032 W. Marine View Drive, Everett. Bonnie Aubuchon of Edmonds shows colorful and creative mono-prints through August. “Art at the Island,” an art contest for the kids who make art on Jetty Island, is on through Aug. 24. Arts of Snohomish Gallery: 1024 First St., No. 104, Snohomish; 360-568-8648; www.artsofsnohomish.org; noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Through August see works by Geraldine Banes and Fran Martiny. Banes shows various mediums and styles with acrylics, sometimes including sculptural pieces. Martiny shows beaded jewelry, etched copper and brass. Brushstrokes Art Supply: 5702 172nd St NE, Arlington; 360-658-4044; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; www. brushstrokesartsupply.com. Cafe Zippy: 2811 Wetmore Ave., Everett; 425-303-0474; www. cafezippy.com. Various local artists. Christopher Framing & Gallery: 537 Main St., Edmonds; 425-778-5150; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Cole Gallery & Artist Supplies: 107 Fifth Ave. S., Edmonds; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday, noon to 3 p.m. Sunday; 425-697-2787; www. colegallery.net. Kate Steiger explores the secrets of history and the passage of time in her show at Cole Gallery from Aug. 21 through Sept. 21. Inspired by her travels to Pompeii and the archaeological treasures of Crete and Indochina, Steiger creates a rich and intricate painterly surface that illuminates the designs of a weathered fresco, the patterns of a mosaic wall, the contours of a Grecian vase, and the foliage of forgotten gardens.

Edmonds Arts Festival Gallery: Frances Anderson Center, 700 Main St., Edmonds; 425-771-0228; 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Drawings by Al Doggett and sculpture by David Varnau are shown through Sept. 11. Edmonds Community College art gallery: 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, until 2 p.m. Fridays and 1 to 5 p.m. weekends; third floor, Lynnwood Hall, 20000 68th Ave. W., Lynnwood; 425-640-1459; www. edcc.edu/gallery. Edmonds Library Gallery: 650 Main St., Edmonds; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Everett Community College: The Russell Day Gallery, 2000 Tower St.; 10 a.m. to 5 :30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fridays; closed Saturdays and Sundays; www.everettcc.edu. Gallery North: 401 Main St., Edmonds; 425-774-0946; www. gallerynorthedmonds.com; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday. The fifth annual Beauty of the Northwest Show in August includes 50 paintings. Glass Quest Studio: Glassblowing demonstrations, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 22 through 24, 31808 W. Lake Ketchum Road, Stanwood. More information at www.glassquest.com or by calling 360-629-7005. A Guilded Gallery: 8700 271st St., Stanwood; 360-629-2787; www.stanwoodcamanoarts.com; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. More than 40 area artists show work in a variety of mediums, including paintings acrylics, oil, watercolors, pastels, mixed media, blown glass, jewelry, pottery, wood and metalwork. The gallery offers classes. To enroll, go to the website. Lee Beitz, who does fused glass is the current featured artist. Hibulb Cultural Center: 6410 23rd Ave. NE, Tulalip; 360-716-2635; www.hibulbculturalcenter.org. Lynnwood Library Gallery: 19200 44th Ave. W.; 425-6705518; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m.

to 6 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Artist Jim Dixon creates movable art incorporating recycled wood and hardware in his “Coastal Kinetics Collection” through Sept. 19. Crab claws pinch, fish jump and boats rock with the waves. Mountlake Terrace Library Gallery: 23300 58th Ave. W., Mountlake Terrace; 425-7768722; www.sno-isle.org; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays. Through August, see Karen Leonard’s colorful silk paintings and learn about the process at the exhibit. An exhibit of paintings by Janie Olsen opens Sept. 2. Olsen, of Monroe, is a graduate of the Burnley School of Art, where she studied design and illustration. Olsen’s work also can be seen at the Schack Art Center in Everett and Matzke Fine Art on Camano Island. Ornamental Arts Gallery: 13805 Smokey Point Blvd., Suite 105, Marysville; 425-422-5232; learn about classes at OrnamentalArtsGallery.com; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. The gallery offers a variety of classes and first Friday free artist opening events. Rosehill Community Center: 304 Lincoln Ave., Mukilteo. For more information, call 425-2638180. Northwest Collage Society shows work by various members through September. Schack Art Center: 2921 Hoyt Ave., Everett; 425-259-5050; www.schack.org. Go to the website to learn about classes. Schack’s main gallery is filled with Northwest maritime scenes, seascapes and landscapes by Snohomish painter Joan Pinney, the 2014 Schack Artist of the Year. Through Sept. 18. The Sisters: 2804 Grand Ave., Everett; 425-252-0480; www. thesistersrestaurant.com; 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Burton Clemans shows landscapes and Keith Pace shows collage through September.

10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. The Loft at Terry’s Corner: 848 N. Sunrise Blvd., Camano Island, 360-654-6547. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Matzke Fine Art Gallery and Sculpture Park: 2345 Blanche Way, Camano Island; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends, weekdays by appointment; 360-387-2759; www. matzkefineart.com. Matzke has 75 sculptures in the 10-acre park. MUSEO: 215 First St., Langley, 360-221-7737, www.museo. cc. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Monday. Penn Cove Gallery: 9 Front St., Coupeville; 360-678-1176; www. penncovegallery.com; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Sundays. Raven Rocks Gallery: 765 Wonn Road, C-101, Greenbank Farm, Whidbey Island; 360-2220102; www.ravenrocksgallery. com. “Fire, Wood & Fiber” through August, with a reception from 1 to 4 p.m. Aug. 10. Rob Schouten Gallery: Greenbank Farm, C-103, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank; 360-222-3070; www. robschoutengallery.com. Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends. Whidbey Art Gallery: 220 Second St., Langley; 360-2217675; www.WhidbeyArtists.com; open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Island County

Skagit County

Artworks Gallery at Greenbank Farm: 765 Wonn Road, C102, Greenbank; 360-222-3010; artworkswhidbey.com. Hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, and Wednesdays through Fridays, and

Museum of Northwest Art: 121 S. First St., La Conner; www. museumofnwart.org. La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum: 703 S. Second St., La

“Island Rhythms” by Juanita Hagberg will be displayed during the Roaming Artists Show on Aug. 30 and 31 at the Camano Multipurpose Center on Camano Island.

hill Community Center is the new home of the annual Waterfront Art Festival. The one-day free festival, dedicated to promoting excellence in the arts, is set for 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 29, at the center, 304 Lincoln Ave. The festival includes a juried exhibition, artist demonstrations, live entertainment, activities for children and festival food. Proceeds from sales of paintings, glass, jewelry, sculpture, ceramics, wearable art, pottery and photography will benefit the Mukilteo Arts Guild student scholarship fund.

COURTESY PHOTO

Roaming Artists: Original artwork by 27 plein air artists who painted outdoors around Stanwood and on Camano Island, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 30 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 31 at Camano Multipurpose Center, 141 East Camano Drive. Featured artist is Juanita Hagberg. Landscapes, seascapes, and natural forms are suggested in her loosely realistic watercolors.

Conner; 360-466-4288; www. laconnerquilts.com. A show of Japanese quilts is displayed through Oct. 5.

Seattle/Bellevue/ Tacoma “Harmony”: A group show featuring 65 member of Women Painters of Washington, many from Snohomish County, is on display now through Sept. 5 at their Columbia Tower Building gallery, 701 5th Ave. Suite 310, Seattle. Awards for the show were juried by acclaimed painter, Alfredo Arreguin. More information is at www.womenpainters.com. Seattle Art Museum: Located at 1300 First Ave., Seattle. For information, call 206-654-3210 or go to www.seattleartmuseum. org. The museum’s big summer “Modernism in the Pacific Northwest” is on. Wednesdays through Sundays through Sept. 7. Bellevue Arts Museum: 510 Bellevue Way NE; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. First Fridays free. More information is at www.bellevuearts.org. “Folding Paper — The Infinite Possibilities of Origami” is on now through Sept. 21. Tacoma Art Museum: The Tulalip and Swinomish photographer Matika Wilbur shows the inaugural exhibition of her work from Project 562. The exhibit, up through Oct. 5, features 50 American Indian portraits accompanied by audio narratives from selected sitters. The museum is located at 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma. Call 253-272-4258.

EVENTS Waterfront Art Festival: Rose-

Puget Sound Bird Festival: Birds are the subject of several photo and fine art shows around leading up to Puget Sound Bird Fest, Sept. 5 through 7 in Edmonds. The Frances Anderson Center, the Edmonds Library, Walnut Cafe, ARTspot, Cline Jewelers, Ombu and Rogue will show work by artists including Bill Anderson, Terry Olmsted, Ken Pickle, Michael McAuliffe, Craig Smith, Debbie Lynn Chally, Dan Palmer, Leroy Van Hee, Douglas Chewning, Betty Udesen, Josey Wise, Leigh Gardner, Mona Fairbanks, Kim Brayman, Mary Peterson and Nadine Smith. More information at www.pugetsoundbirdfest.org.

BULLETIN BOARD Call for art: Mountlake Terrace Arts Advisory Commission seeks art for its 36th annual Juried Art Show. Prize money is available. Arts of the Terrace is Sept. 27 through Oct. 5. Deadline for entries is Aug. 30. To enter or to view the prospectus, go to www. cityofmlt.com. Citrine Gallery: The gallery, at 2940 W. Marine View Dr., Everett, is looking for artists to hang their works. Call 425-259-9899. Call for art: The Lynnwood Arts Commission seeks art for its 2015 art gallery exhibitions at the Lynnwood Library. The commission will select artists for six-weeklong exhibitions. To apply, go to www.ci.lynnwood.wa.us and look for “artist opportunities.”


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Everett Daily Herald, August 22, 2014  

August 22, 2014 edition of the Everett Daily Herald

Everett Daily Herald, August 22, 2014  

August 22, 2014 edition of the Everett Daily Herald