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GIRLS GONE COUNTRY

TONASKET SUMMER FESTIVAL (More than just Garlic)

Oroville American Legion Friday, Aug. 22, 7:00 p.m.

Friday-Saturday, Aug. 22-23

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SUMMERTIME, SUMMERTIME, SUM SUM SUMMERTIME

Police seek man for attempted murder Burglary is suspected as motive in brutal stabbing of Oroville man last month BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN – The Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office is seeking assistance in locating a homeless man who is suspected in the brutal stabbing and robbery of an Oroville man at the end of

“Omer was stabbed several times during the attack...” Frank Rogers, Sheriff, Okanogan County

OCSO photo

Ryan P. Mulligan’s mug shot last month. Detectives are currently looking for Ryan P. Mulligan, 28 of Oroville. Mulligan, who has family in Oroville, is considered homeless but has been staying in the area since 2013. Detectives have requested an arrest warrant for Mulligan regarding this case. According to Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers, Mulligan is want-

It’s hot and Oroville’s Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park has been busy this summer, with campers and day park users taking advantage of the decidedly warm summer days. People can be seen swimming, water and jet skiing, boating, fishing and doing many of the wide range of activities made possible by the lake and in the park. Above, a group plays Bocce Ball in the green grass. Right, a water skier cuts through the still water off Oroville’s nearby Deep Bay Park. Below left, the park concession stand has been doing a brisk business, especially in ice cream and snow cones. Below, just jumping in is still the best way to beat the summertime heat.

ed for the following: attempted murder in the first degree, robbery in the first degree, residential burglary and theft in the third degree. “At this time robbery appears to be the motive of the stabbing,” said Sheriff Rogers. On July 31 a stabbing was reported

SEE STABBING | PG A2

Casey: not closing nursing home BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners Chair Helen Casey sought to quell rumors that the district’s Long Term Care facility was being targeted for closure, stating unequivocally at the Thursday, Aug. 14, board meeting that was not something that was on the table. There had been discussion at the last board meeting in July (see below) about the reduction of available beds in the nursing home that has been underway since November, to the current working level of 40, and whether or not to bank or relinquish the now inactive beds. “(Wednesday) I had a call and today I had a call, that said ‘Please do not close the Long Term Care,’” Casey said. “I said, ‘We’re not closing the Long Term Care.’

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

The rumor mill is out there, for whatever the reason.” CEO Linda Michel said she’d had a similar experience, though she’d also heard from a doctor that had heard that NVH would be adding beds to the nursing home. “There’s all kinds of rumors out there,” she said. “We are not closing the nursing home,” Casey said. “Be sure and tell your friends and neighbors that.”

LOOKING AHEAD Michel shared a presentation that gave an overview of the effects of changes in health care law, specifically referencing Washington State House Bill 2572 and Senate Bill 6312 that will dramatically change the structure of statewide public health care funding.

SEE NURSING | PG A2

Tonasket hires new police officer Unauthorized use of fire hydrants a sore issue with city BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket Police Department has is has returned to its full complement of officers with the hiring of Matthew Beard, reported Police Chief Rob Burks at the Tuesday, Aug. 12, meeting of the Tonasket City Council. Beard fills the position vacated by Audra Fuller, who resigned at the end of June. Burks said that, though Beard will need to attend academy to complete his training, he brings with him quite a bit of experience as a reserve. “He’s been a reserve in Republic for

the past couple of years,” Burks said. “Since he already has Reserve Academy, when you hire somebody full time you’re allowed to use them for up to six months before sending them to the Academy. “It’ll take about a month before he’s working shifts by himself. He was already at a level in Republic where he was able to work shifts by himself, so it’s just a matter of him learning how we do things here. “I think he’ll be a good addition. He seems to have a good balance about him.”

REPORT NIGHT Most of the meeting featured reports from the council members and city staff. The most discussion surrounded a couple of issues brought up by Mayor Patrick Plumb and City Superintendent Hugh Jensen - the unauthorized use of city water by out-of-area fire crews, and a WDOT error that resulted in a crosswalk being painted on a corner next to preexisting “no crossing” signs.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 34

The unauthorized use of city water by outside fire agencies was a particularly sore subject for Jensen. Trucks not equipped with backflow regulators could damage the entire system, he said; plus, the city has to account for water that is used and by hooking up to a hydrant without a meter, there was no way to track it. He also cited an instance in another city of what he called “back siphoning”, where a truck pulled so much water from the system that it sucked water out of residences and compromised the city’s entire water system. “This is so big,” Jensen said. “It happens in other parts of the country. It costs cities millions of dollars to replace pipes because someone wasn’t doing their job and it’s not going to happen here. If they want water, they need to notify us and we can put a meter on it, and put a backflow on it. I don’t want someone hitting our hydrants that aren’t qualified.” Jensen said there were at least four instances of unauthorized use, a couple

coming after he had delivered warning. He also commended the Tonasket Fire Department for alerting him to at least one such instance. Even more frustrating, he said, is that there was free water available for filling trucks at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds and the US Forest Service facility in town. “One way to alleviate this - because we will have other bad fire seasons - we create information packets,” said council member Jill Vugteveen, who is a USFS fire fighter. “That tells them the rules and expectations of our county, our district, and things that we can and can’t do. One of them could be that if you are managing an engine and you need to fill, these are the only places that you can do so. It wouldn’t be hard to add that for the outside (firefighting) resources come in.” The extra cross walk is at the intersection of Second and Whitcomb. That same intersection has the crossing signal,

SEE COUNCIL | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Miscommunication between the DOT and a contractor resulted in an extra cross walk being painted at the corner of Second and Whitcomb in tonasket, leaving pedestrians with a conundrum.

Cops & Courts A4 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Business Directory A7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports Obituaries

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 21, 2014

NURSING | FROM A1

PLAYING THROUGH

A little black bear was spotted on the links near the third hole at the Oroville Golf Club Sunday evening. He could be seen wandering around, standing up against a tree and generally enjoying the evening. To see a video clip, go to our facebook page at www.facebook.com/GazetteTribune Patricia Nelson/submitted photo

STABBING | FROM A1 at 1 Balmes Road in Oroville. The victim, John R. Omer, 58, of Oroville, was at home sleeping when he was woken up by an intruder in his residence. “Omer was stabbed several times during the attack, including wounds to his side, chest area

and head,� said Rogers. Although Omer was not able to get a look at the suspect and was first reported as being “uncooperative,� he has since been working with detectives and deputies on the possible suspect in the case. Detectives and deputies have also

interviewed several other witnesses in the case, according to the Sheriff. In anyone has information on Mulligan’s location or if you see him please contact the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Office at 509422-7232, said Rogers.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 installed just over a year ago, on the north side corners; there isn’t supposed to be a separate crossing on the south side, but after the road was chip sealed a new cross walk was painted onto the road there. “I found out who was in charge and told him he had a problem,� Jensen said. “They put too many crosswalks in. He looks at his sheet and he says - yep, nine of them (along Whitcomb). I said yes, that’s what you put in all right, but there were only supposed to be eight. So the state messed up.� Jensen said the DOT assured him it would be removed, but he wasn’t given a time table. “They also said they would give us back our real cross walk (at the lit crossing),� Plumb said. “The dried ones rather than the paint they just put on there. We spent a lot of money on that crosswalk. The DOT guys sat in here and said they would give that crosswalk back and we haven’t seen it yet.�

IN OTHER REPORTS: • Council member Claire Jeffko asked if the city could warn or fine those who have not cleaned up fire hazards around their properties, especially in light of the severity of this year’s fire season. Plumb said that the issue of private property right complicated matters, and that if warnings were given out, by the time one could judge of the offender had complied, the fire danger could well have abated. “Maybe we can use this as an

opportunity to educate,â€? Plumb said. “We’ve used social media during this time to talk about, if you have stuff laying against your house like firewood, pallets, tall weeds ...â€? Council member Scott Olson read the ordinance that applied to fire hazards. “I think education,â€? he said. “(Fire Chief Christian Johnson) knocking on the door, feeling it’s dangerous ... I’m just thinking, this could be a long term thing where we try to become as fire wise as we can, where we get people more ready for when the fire does come down the hill from the east or the west, where don’t have lots that catch on fire. A big part is educating people in town of what the hazards are in town.â€? She also said she’d been asked by a resident if “Children at Playâ€? signs could be put up to slow down drivers along Seventh Street. There was some discussion on the topic, but Burks said that he would not be in favor of such signs as it often gives parents a false sense of security that their kids would be safe playing in the street. • Olson complimented the city crew on their maintenance of the parks this summer. He also noted that, in light of Tonasket’s decadelong (and thus far futile) effort to get Whitcomb Avenue ground down and repaved (instead of just sealed over), that Omak and Okanogan had their main streets rebuilt this summer. (Those cities have far more local control over their own main streets, while Tonasket’s, being US-97, is a state-level issue.) • Council member Lois Rice

said she felt that “kids were taking over the town at night,� particularly in the area around The Junction. Chief Burks said that unless he receives complaints about their behavior, that the police couldn’t ask them to leave private property. “We do make contact with them,� Burks said. “But unless they’re breaking the law, what are we going to do with them? We do have the (closed) businesses ... on record, getting people off their property if they’re doing something wrong. “I enjoy it when they’re there because then I know where they’re at. It’s when I can’t see them that I’m more concerned... (Curfews) have been challenged, and it’s been declared unconstitutional... You don’t have the right, unless they’re breaking the law or doing something suspicious, that they have to go home.�

BUSINESS AS USUAL Agenda items approved by the council included: • the use of liquor permit by the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket for the Tonasket Summer Festival at History Park, Aug. 22-23; • payment of $2,542 for the purchas of new radar units; • approval of a contract for D&D Auction Sales to conduct the city’s surplus auction on Aug. 13; • and approval of Sharon Cox to take Stacey Kester’s position on the library board (after Kester resigned her position). The City Council next meets on Tuesday, Aug. 26, at 7:00 p.m.

Significant changes, she said, include a new method of funding that dictates will be shared by the various health care entities within communities; and that funding will be determined more by value (including communitywide levels of health) rather than fee-for-service. “They want to close the gap between preventative primary care, physical and behavioral health care, public health, social and human services, early learning education, and community development systems,� Michel said. “Right now they say we’re working in ‘silos’ (independent of one another)... They want us to collaborate so there is a more smooth process there, and each place that patient goes they know what’s happening. “It is hard to change people’s habits; we’re going to be paid on how healthy someone is. So it’s going to be an uphill battle.� Michel said that many of the details of executing the legislation have yet to be worked out by the state, making planning difficult. “It’s going to be a huge change,� she said. “What scares us is how we’re going to get paid ... “I had about an hour conversation with (state Rep.) Shelly Short. I told her my concerns about this plan. My concerns were that on a committee of 45, there’s only two rural health people on there. That bothers me. If there’s 50 on the committee I want 25 to be rural health. There’s as many or more rural hospitals in the state than there are tertiary centers. That is a huge concern of mine ... especially in the quality measures.� She was particularly concerned that where statistical quality measures were concern - which will

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Using the results of an online survey, as well as feedback from numerous community meetings, the Tonasket School Board engaged in a twoday strategic planning session last week to help crystallize its mission, vision and district-wide goals. While the work isn’t yet complete, the moderated sessions started with culling the survey results, breaking them down into related areas and focusing them into specific goals that plans could be developed around. Survey information included the community’s perceptions of strengths and needed areas of improvement in the district, as well as seeking suggestions for they kinds of things that would enhance Tonasket students’ education. Some of the areas cited as needing improvement included: • Communication, especially between the board and the community; • Replacing the Alternative/ Outreach School building; • Adding classroom space to alleviate overcrowding; • Focusing more on teaching

      



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OTHER ITEMS Casey also spent some time reflecting on the passing of former NVH board commissioner Edna Schertenleib. “She was very passionate about health care,â€? Casey said. “She leaves a legacy both to us and the community. She’ll truly be missed.â€? The district has been sliding in and out of warrants every several days and as of Thursday’s meeting was just over $9,000 in debt to the county. NVH had about $12,000 cash on hand at the time of the previous meeting in July. The commissioners next meet on Thursday, Aug. 28. CATCHING UP Highlights of the Thursday, July 31, Board of Commissioners meeting (as culled from approved meeting minutes): • There was a lengthy discussion, led by Michel, Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt and Long Term Care Director Linda Holden, on the topic of banking vs. relinquish-

ing beds in the Extended Care facility. The commissioners, last November, voted to reduce the number of available beds to around 40 from its previous level of 58, due to financial considerations. A big part of the issue is that the district is reimbursed by the state at rates set in 2007; a this point the legislature isn’t considering changes to those rates until 2016. No decision was made; the topic will be revisited at a future meeting. If the district were to “bankâ€? the empty beds, its occupancy rate will still be considered 58; relinquishing the beds would reduce the occupancy rate to the lower number. • Regarding the warrants, Michel shared an email received from Okanogan County Treasurer Leah McCormack. While NVH was commended for its progress in getting out of warrants, McCormack clarified that once the district had built up its cash reserves, borrowing money from the county will no longer be an option. Future loans will have to come from other sources, McCormack said. Commissioner Teresa Hughes inquired about the boiler replacement project, which involves a $500,000 grant that is tied to the hospital contributing other funds; Verhasselt said that topic would be addressed at a future meeting. • There was discussion regarding the commissioners’ public participation policy at its board meetings. The commissioners received a written proposal to amend the current policy; the topic will receive further discussion after the board has gone through Open Public Meeting Act training, outlining recent changes in public meeting laws.

Tonasket School District formulates strategic plan

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determine funding levels - the effects of one unsatisfactory measure are magnified at the rural level, where one patient represents a far larger percentage of the whole than at a suburban or urban facility. “Rural (facilities) need to be measured differently than larger tertiary centers.� As part of the presentation, Michel shared a short video put together by Dr. Barry Bittman regarding the state of U.S. health care (a functional, as opposed to political, discussion) that can be viewed at: http://youtu.be/y51eT1-BE8.

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175 Rodeo Trail ~ Between Omak and Okanogan ~ Just off Hwy. 97 509-422-1621 • www.okfair.org

and learning; • Adding opportunities for advanced learning. Areas cited as strengths included: • Dedicated staff; • Availability of technology; • Openness to new types of learning; • Parent engagement; • Diversity. Some of the desires for expanding opportunities included: • Career preparation • Technology training in nonApple technologies; • More community engagement; • Career exposure and exploration; • Community engagement. (Complete data from the online portion of the survey can be found at http://tonasket. thoughtexchange.com/) During the work sessions, district goals coalesced into six primary categories: teaching and learning; stewardship; district climate; college, career and life readiness; addressing poverty and diversity issues; and engagement with parents and the community. Language in all of those areas will be finalized during the next

several months. Thereafter, once the goals are prioritized, the plan is for Superintendent Paul Turner to formulate and present plans to the board for each individual district goal that could be put into effect over the next year or so.

REGULAR MEETINGS At the Monday, August 11, regular meeting the board approved its North Central ESD contract with Dave Arp, Executive Director of Administrative Services and Finance. Approved personnel changes at the July 28 included the resignations of Middle School teacher (and varsity basketball coach) Tim Cork and Preschool teacher Lauri Davisson; and the hiring of Patricia Dagnon (3rd grade teacher). Approved for hire at the Aug. 11 meeting were Middle School Title 1 paraeducator/ASB coordinator Teanna Wilson; High School art teacher Kevin Anderson; and Tyler Thrasher as High School assistant football coach. The board also approved its budget for the 2014-15 school year at its July 28 meeting. The Tonasket School Board next meets on Monday, Aug. 25, at 7:30 p.m.


AUGUST 21, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Tonasket Water Ranch North County man killed construction gets go-ahead in rollover car accident BY BRENT BAKER

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket Water Ranch spray park will begin to appear at Chief Tonasket Park in earnest on Sept. 8 after much of the summer was spent working permitting issues for water drainage. For a time it looked as if the park would need to be hooked up to the city sewer system, which would have added significant expense (as well as regulatory red tape) to the privately-funded project. Linda Black, who has coordinated the project from the start and spent much of the past two years fundraising, said she is almost ready to breathe a sigh of relief. “We’re ready to get it built and done,” she said. “I don’t have to raise any more money. I’m getting arthritis in my wrist; I’m having to re-learn how to socialize, how to shake hands without begging for money.” Black has raised more than $200,000 in cash for the project, plus nearly another $100,000 in donated materials and volunteer labor. Originally slated for construction in early July, the project was delayed thanks to a lack of policy in Central Washington regarding the drain-off from splash parks. Black’s husband Tom helped pull together a number of different parties, and together the group came up with an alternative that satisfied everyone involved. “Everyone was really cooperative,” Tom Black said. “They were throwing ideas back and forth. I was in charge of drainage, but everyone was very helpful and together we came up with the design.

OROVILLE – A Tonasket man was killed early Sunday morning when his Fiat convertible left County Highway 7 and landed upside down in a field throwing the victim clear of the car. The driver, Fred W. Cook, 53, a local north county business owner was pronounced dead at the scene. The accident was reported to the Okanogan County Sheriff’s office as a possible fatality near 1756 Hwy. 7, Oroville, around 6:45 a.m.

“Once on scene, the investigation shows that the owner of the residence had gone (outside) at around 6:30 a.m. when they saw the vehicle out in the field on their property. The vehicle was on its top and the driver was lying in the field south of the vehicle. They then called emergency personnel to the scene,” said Sheriff Frank Rogers. It appeared the driver was traveling southbound on Hwy. 7 and around Milepost 17.67 when the vehicle’s passenger tires left the pavement on the west side of the highway and

entered the gravel shoulder, according to Rogers. “The driver attempted to overcorrect his steering and entered back into the south bound lane of travel and then slid sideways, leaving the roadway and into the field. The vehicle traveled down a small embankment, through a barbwire fence and then began to roll,” the sheriff said. Cook was driving a 1972 Fiat 124 at the time of the accident. The investigation is being done by the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office and Washington State Patrol.

OHS CLASS OF ‘79 REUNION

Brent Baker/staff photo

Ayasha Ferrier - and other Tonasket kids - will soon see the water-spraying pig and other animals taking up residence in the Tonasket Water Ranch, which will start going in on Sept. 8 after drainage issues were resolved. “It’s called a ‘swale’ and it’s a passive method of draining from structures, like spray parks or parking garages. And there’s no pumps involved so it’s less expensive.” The Blacks, city superintendent Hugh Jensen, building and permit administrator Christian Johnson, contractor Ty Olson and two other city employees met last week to finalize the plan.

“Sept. 8 is our firm building date,” Linda Black said. “We had the time sketched out in July, but we weren’t ready, so whatever worked for Ty was going to be fine with us. We just wanted a firm date to go with. “Hopefully we’ll be able to open it for a bit this fall, but for sure it’ll be open as soon as the weather gets hot next summer.”

Submitted photo

The Oroville High School Class of 1979 held their 35th Class Reunion this past weekend. They posed for a photograph outside the Pastime Bar & Grill on Saturday evening. Pictured are (L-R) Fred Cook, Jerry Oakes, Gordie Cockle, Lana Loney Williams. Tom Acord, Diane Keleman Acord, Stephanie Herschlip, Gary DeVon, Joyce Henneman Forrester, Kelly Farver, Susan Robinson Cline, Steve Blackler, Clay Warnstaff, Dane Forrester, Jeff Buckmiller, Teresa Small Hawkins and Jackie Jameson.

Lots of entertainment on tap for Tonasket Summer Festival THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - Entertainment will be provided at the Tonasket Summer Festival at History Park, Friday-Saturday, Aug. 22-23, according to the following schedule:

FRIDAY

12:00-1:00 p.m. - John Phillips and Steve Pollard 1:30-2:30 p.m. - Julie Ashmore (possibly Harvey Swanson) 2:30-3:30 p.m. - Don Elliott 3:30-5:00 p.m. - Harvey Swanson 5:00-end - Denny Richardson

SATURDAY

10:00-11:30 a.m. - Steve Kinzie 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - “Fish” Cohoe 12:30-1:30 p.m. - Chuck Oakes 1:30-2:30 p.m. - Deb Vester 2:30-3:30 p.m. - Don Elliott 4:00-6:00 p.m. - Sonny Lanigan 6:00-end - Kyle MacConnell

One arrested for dealing drugs THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Comancheros traditional Demo Derby will be returning to the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds on Sunday, Aug. 31, but this year will feature flat track motorcycle racing as well.

Demo Derby returns Aug. 31 Motorcycle racing added to event THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - The Tonasket Comancheros will be hosting this year’s Demolition Derby on Sunday, Aug. 31. “It sounds like a good number of cars will be there,” said Comancheros spokesman Bud McSpadden. “There is still time and room for more; the war between the North and South is still going strong.” Prospective participants should contact Don Johnson at 509-4864118 for more information or to

register. This year’s event will also introduce flat track motorcycle racing for the first time, to take place between heats of the Demo. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. Racing classes will include: ages 8 and under; 9-11, 12-14, 15-17 and an open class. Top four will receive trophies and medals. Parents must be present for sign-ins. More information is available from Dyllan Gage (509557-9106) or Ruben Laurie (509429-5846). “The Rodeo Club has been very impressed with (Gage and Laurie) and their organization of this event,” McSpadden said.

“We need more young adults to continue the long tradition of public service the Comancheros have been doing for more than 75 years.”

312 S. Whitcomb

OKANOGAN – An Okanogan man was arrested Friday on several drug charges after a search of his tent revealed what authorities believed was heroin and methamphetamine, according to Sheriff Frank Rogers. At approximately 1 a.m. Okanogan County Sheriff’s Deputies were conducting a foot patrol in Legion Park. The park, which is part of the City of Okanogan, allows people to camp there overnight and is commonly patrolled, said Rogers. “The deputies encountered four people in a tent in the park. As they came up to the tent, which had a light on inside and they could see four subjects, one appeared to be injecting something in his arm, while one was smoking something, not tobacco and they were discussing the

509-486-0615

prices and weights for the drugs,” said the sheriff. Deputies contacted the four subjects and then later obtained a search warrant for the tent. In the tent they found suspected heroin, suspected methamphetamine, a large amount of paraphernalia and needles. Also found in the tent was a semi-automatic weapon, ammunition and $2380 in cash. “There were several baggies of packaged for sale of the suspected heroin and there were five syringes that had suspected heroin or methamphetamine in them. All the drugs will be sent to the lab for testing,” said Rogers. Arrested at the scene was David G. Ferrell, 32, of Okanogan. Ferrell was transported to the Okanogan County Jail and booked on several charges including possession of a controlled substance with intent to

deliver, heroin; possession of a controlled substance with intent to deliver, methamphetamine and possession of drug paraphernalia.

OCSO/submitted photo

David G. Ferrell’s booking photo

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 21, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT COURTHOUSE CORRESPONDENT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL The court found probable cause to charge Christian Kwaku Gyamfi, 40, Okanogan, with violation of a no-contact order (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 8. The court found probable cause to charge Troy John Robinson, 41, Oroville, with harassment (threats to kill) and harassment (first offense). The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 10. The court found probable cause to charge Emily Ann Wisdom, 22, Tonasket, with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 8. The court found probable cause to charge Donald Lee Thomas, 59, Tonasket, with POCS (heroin). The crime allegedly occurred Aug. 8.

DISTRICT COURT James Sidney Lucas, 65, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Amon Macaluso, 36, Oroville, had two charges dismissed: possession of dead wildlife and third-degree DWLS. Dean Reynolds Manring, 47, Tonasket, had a hit-and-run (unattended property) charge dismissed. Enrique Salinas Martinez, 20, Oroville, had an MIP/C charge dismissed. Craig Edgar McClure, 61, Tonasket, guilty of second-degree recreational fishing without a license or catch card. McClure received a 90-day suspended sentenced and fined $318. He also had a charge dismissed: avoiding a Department of Wildlife check station or inspection attempt. Daryl Anthony McCraigie, 25, Omak, had three-charges dismissed: DUI, third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. James Jonathan McKinney, 29, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. McKinney was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,786. Cory James Michels, 23, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Teresa Ann Moomaw, 37, Omak, had a first-degree criminal trespassing charge dismissed. Joseph Robert Moses, 30, Okanogan, guilty on three counts of third-degree DWLS. Moses was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,454. Andrew Chase Eugene Nigg, 20, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Lillian Winter Nomee, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Nomee was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Jessica Marie Osborne, 40, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Osborne received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Davie Lee Pierce, 43, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Dylan Everett Pier, 19, Oroville, guilty of second-degree criminal trespassing. Pier was sentenced to one day in jail and fined $608. He also had a disorderly conduct charge dismissed. Kimberly Ann Porter, 49, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Porter received a 90day suspended sentence and fined $468. Alan Forbes Price, 41, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Price was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 86 days suspended, and fined $858. Sandra Michelle Quick, 54, Tonasket, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Peter Imre Racz, 63, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: public disturbance by noise.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Aug. 11, 2014 Warrant arrest on Benton St. in Omak. Harassment on Queen St. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Loitering on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on Miller Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Oak St. in Okanogan. Theft on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Fuel reported missing. Assault on Elmway in Okanogan. Theft on Ellemeham Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on Benton St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Main St. in

Omak. No injuries reported. Loitering on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Fraud on Koala Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Granite St. in Omak. Theft on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Illegal burning on Jackson St. in Omak. Found property on Main St. in Oroville. Wallet recovered. Susan Alene Oestreich, 35, booked on two FTA warrants for non-payment of child support. Linda Ann Jackson, 50, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Andrea Candice Orlando, 39, DOC detainer. Rose M. Ferguson, 24, court commitment for ignition interlock violation. Keith Vernon Strickland, 59, booked on two counts of firstdegree arson. Hector Berry Cardenas, 40, booked for felony harassment and fourth-degree assault. Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014 DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. DUI on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Crofoot Lane near Riverside. Loitering on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Assault on Main St. in Riverside. Domestic dispute on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Freedom Rd. near Tonasket. Wildland fire on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Liquor reported missing. Two-vehicle crash on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Central Ave. in Omak. Cassandra Roberta George, 27, booked for DUI and failure to obey a flagger. Larry DeWayne Smith, 64, booked for attempted first-degree arson. Brandon Ray Valentine, 33, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI. Fernando Rosales Molinero, 22, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Bjarne Mathew Olson Jr., 35, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. James Cody Barlow, 23, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for second-degree DWLS. Tamara Kathleen Wilson, 53, court commitment for DUI. Shannon Tawney Simpson, 29, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI and two Tribal warrants, both for third-degree DWLS. Michael Patrick Connors, 56, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Theft on Orchard View Dr. near Omak. Tools reported missing. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Riverside Cutoff Rd. near Riverside. Warrant arrest at the Oroville Port of Entry. Theft on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Burglary on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on S. Ash St. in Omak. Theft at East Side Park in Omak. Domestic dispute on Fir St. in Oroville. Assault on Juniper St. in Oroville. Theft on S.E. State St. in Tonasket. Robert Wendel George, 45, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI and POCS (bond revocation). Mark Anthony Landa, 47, DOC secretary’s warrant for POCS. David J. Condon-Soderberg, 20, DOC detainer. Castina Lorene Jordan, 32, booked on an FTC warrant for theft of rental property. Jerry Lee Brown, 46, booked for fourth-degree assault with sexual motivation. Donald K. Maloney, 64, booked for second-degree criminal trespassing. Audel Garcia Huerta, 43, court commitment for DUI. Timothy James Mieirs, 50, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Thursday, Aug. 14, 2014 Theft on N. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Illegal burning on Hwy. 7 near Ellisforde. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Columbia St. in Omak. Assault on Omak Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ridge Place in Omak. Public urination on S. Main St. in Omak. Automobile theft on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak.

BIRTHS

Malicious mischief on Fourth Ave. in Oroville. Theft on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Threats on Main St. in Oroville. Patrick Lee Day, 44, two DOC detainers. Shane Christopher Devon, 24, court commitments for DUI and reckless driving. Brandon Olis Keele, 31, DOC detainer. Kallie Louann Thomas, 25, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI. Friday, Aug. 15, 2014 Assault on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Drugs on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Hart Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Similkameen Rd. near Nighthawk. Warrant arrest on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Public intoxication on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. DWLS on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on Ferry St. in Omak. Assault on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Threats on N. Ash St. in Omak. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Illegal burning on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Golden St. in Oroville. Burglary on Juniper St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Assault on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Kernan Rd. near Oroville. David Glenn Ferrell, 32, booked on two counts of POCS with intent (methamphetamine and heroin) and one count of possession of drug paraphernalia. Lamberto Valdovinos, no middle name listed, 25, DOC detainer. Gary Eugene Hendrickson, 32, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: second-degree theft and second-degree criminal trespassing. Ian Ray Tatshama, 45, booked for violation of a no-contact order (DV). Amy Elizabeth Tatshama, 30, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Joshua Michael Jimenez, 35, booked on three counts of second-degree child molestation and three counts of second-degree incest. Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014 DWLS on Omak Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. DWLS on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Threats on N. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Ferry St. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. near Omak. Theft on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Elm St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Central Ave. in Oroville. Bracelet reported missing. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Malicious mischief on Main St. in Oroville. Eric Allen Harbin, 24, booked for second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Cameron John Taylor, 20, booked for felony violation of a nocontact order. Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014 Alcohol offense on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. DUI on Hwy. 97 in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Cow Camp Rd. near Chesaw. Theft on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Vehicle prowl on Locust St. in Omak. Custodial interference on S. Ash St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Skyview Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Automobile theft on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Omar Vega Sanchez, 35, booked for DUI. Rigoberto Lopez Rojas, 24, booked for DUI. Joshua Micael Chapa, 23, DOC detainer.

KEY:

DUI - Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA/C - Failure to Appear/Comply (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Officer DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Isaiah Shane Michael Heisey Isaiah Shane Michael Heisey was born on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 to Rachel Morales and Shane Heisey from Oroville. The birth took place at 12:18 p.m. at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. He was seven pounds, one ounce and 20� long. He joins his brother Jr Garcia at home. His grandparents are Shirley and Eugene Ragsdale of Oroville. Submitted photo

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Come join us!

OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville 9:00 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th‡Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist 10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

Oroville Free Methodist 1516 Fir Street‡3DVWRU5RG%URZQ‡476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am‡Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center‡607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm‡After School M-W-F 3-5pm RI¿FH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Catholic Church 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.� -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000‡cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2565

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


AUGUST 21, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

We have ‘Dubya’s legacy, Obama’s nightmare’

Fred, we’ll miss your smile Normally a class reunion is a happy time, a time to catch up with classmates you haven’t seen in a long time, or at least since the last reunion. Last weekend’s OHS Class of 1979 reunion was a happy time, although as many of you may know by now, we lost a great friend and classmate, Fred Cook, in the early hours of Sunday morning. If there was one thing you could count on from Fred was he was fun-loving and quick to smile. You couldn’t help but have a good time when he was around. And the Class of ‘79 did just that on Friday and Saturday, having a few laughs, swapping “remember when” stories and catching up on each other’s lives – making promises to keep in better touch. At one point on Saturday, Fred, some felOut of low 79ers and I were recalling those Oroville My Mind classmates who couldn’t make it to the reunion. Gary A. DeVon Not because of distance or busy schedules, but because they were no longer with us except in memory – Lloyd Campbell Jr., Kathy Thornton and Ron Ficker were all we could come up with. Little did any of us know that in a few short hours Fred too would be part of that list. Most of us found out just before the Sunday picnic that a passersby had found our Fred thrown from his little convertible Fiat off the ‘Old Highway’ (County 7). He had never made it home. After it was announced we all agreed that Fred would have wanted us to have a good time with our friends and family and not to mourn. There was disbelief, some tears, anger, denial – and self-recriminations for letting him drive home. He seemed fine when he left Saturday night, turning down offers from those who had gotten motel rooms to sack out there with them. Sunday morning we had to realize what happened couldn’t be undone — was part of life. We consoled each other, but most of all we toasted Fred’s memory, laughed and carried on. When you come from a small graduating class like Oroville’s it’s different then going to a big school. You grow up together and everyone is an integral part of each others lives – at least until life post high school takes you somewhere else. Life is short, so cherish the good memories and if you have any not so positive memories of school let them go – make friends while you can. I’ll remember Fred most for his smile, his laugh and his good natured kidding. We will all keep his wife Jessie and Fred’s family in our thoughts and prayers. A memorial has been planned for Saturday, Aug. 30 at 11 p.m., the location is yet to be announced.

Dear Editor, What do you do if you have a horrendous mess to clean up – acres of floor --- left by a sloppy Grand Ol’ Party? An unplanned, unwanted gala for power hungry nincompoop hawks? With one pop and one buck of water, what do you do!? You mop until your bucket is full of mud and every attempt to clean just lays down more dirt! What do you do? Here we have Dubya’s legacy and Obama’s nightmare. Iraq continues and shall remain in chaos. Our actions don’t always come out as planned. This stupid show placed in everyones’ head 11 years ago is a lesson in leadership. A lesson that will never be learned. We sit home powerless, hoping and praying for sense and stability. Sit back and watch – our only option – it’s a Revelation to me. Folks who don’t believe in the Bible – that it’s fiction – have no knowledge of world history since 33 A.D. None. The Bible is a timepiece – chronologically telling – and boy has it taken a licen! And still tickin! About two-thirds of a day, right now, seems to be Rev. 8:12 Mark 13:20. Time is light – visa versa. Thanks, Dan Dixon Oroville

WDF&W lends a hand to county with vehicles Dear Editor, The last month has not only been hard on the victims of the fires, citizens of Okanogan County, law enforcement and fire fighters, it has been extremely hard on the aging fleet of the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office. Our patrol vehicles are old… we have two newer ones from 2013… the rest are from 2008 back to 1996. This month has put a strain on all of them, with two blown engines, over half a dozen in the shops for repair and the last 6 remaining line cars are being currently used. Almost all of the patrol vehicles have between 150,000 and 200,000 miles on

them. As of now the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office is out of cars…and with that said, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has loaned us two fully equipped trucks to use for the next two months, longer if needed. We have several vehicles having major mechanical problems, mainly from being old and how much they were pushed the last month. We have several that have melted parts and the engines have been pushed to their limits. Just having these two vehicles available for Deputies to use is huge for us and we can’t thank Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife enough. Not only have they helped us out with the vehicles but for the last month they have had their Officers helping us everywhere we needed, including the weekend when we had the Rising Eagle Fire and wind storm. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sent us anywhere from six Officers to assist us. They helped us with evacuations and handling calls and have been assisting us pretty much for the last month since the fire blew up. I just want to personally thank the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for everything they have done for us and continue to do and we are extremely grateful for the vehicles. We have been okayed by the Commissioners to order three patrol vehicles but they will not be here until November, it takes time to get a vehicle here and set up for patrol. We will get through this but without the two extra rigs I don’t know if we would make through summer… we still have two more months of fire season and still must handle the day to day

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at (509) 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

OCSO photo

These three officers drove over to Olympia and back to get the vehicles, 600 mile round trip. Pictured in the photo from left to right is Sgt. Dan Christensen with the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, Deputy Josh Petker and Sgt. Gene Davis with the Okanogan County Sheriff’s Office

calls that come in. If citizens need the help…we need to be able to get there…. Frank T. Rogers Sheriff Okanogan County

This is faith working through love Dear Editor, I know it’s been a long while since I last wrote and I will confess I’ve been a bit selfish. Although I’ve tried to write several times, I couldn’t because I know that without the grace of God words are simple, empty and vain. I’m so thankful for everyone who has been a part of mine and Jack’s life – whether in discipline, direction or encouragement, I have found the divine love everyone has for us. Yes, we have overcome voices that came against us and yes we have stumbled along the way, but for every falter we know that God is for us! Rom. 8:28 says, And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God and are called according to His purpose. Now to give any one person sole credit for our life together would not be fair to the one who gives life, Jesus Christ our savior. Only God knows the heart of man and if He loved the whole world enough to give His son Jesus as a sacrifice and if Jesus laid his life down willingly then I believe His grace is sufficient and His mercy will follow us all the days of our life. So then I hope everyone knows how grateful we are for everyone who has given a little of themselves in spirt and in truth; a loving sacrifice to love us through. This my friend is faith working through love. Remember one must first have hope before faith and the greatest of these is love. For whoever is born of God overcomes the world and this the victory that has overcome the world our faith. And who is the one that overcomes the world but he believes that Jesus is the Son of God. First John 5:4-5. I’m not here to dispute differences, that’s so beneath the Lord. I am here to seek and find what we all agree upon. In truth I see our community coming together in one accord and that’s a promise! What a lovely communion and offering unto the Lord. Thank you dad for giving me back to God. The fruit of the spirt is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, peace, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control against such there is no law. Gal 5:22-23. We thank you all for your part in John W. McAlpine and Sabrina Kay Rounds union of marriage. We love you all. God is not dead! Mrs. John W. McAlpine Oroville

Well, if you hate government so much Moreover, if we had a Republican led government right now I couldn’t wedge a critical word in sideways for all the frothing assaults Alright, 10-4, I hammer government often. on government being screamed by these same Is it even possible to be a sociopolitical writer critics. So stand by for the hammer. without hammering government when it needs My 16-year-old grandson’s father died it? Isn’t the task of exclusively praising government what a... press secretary... does? when he was an infant. Ergo one of the great joys of my life is that he has spent every sumHow’s that working out for America? “Well if you hate government so much...” mer since infancy with my wife and me. The go the opening salvos from some of my mer- last six years I’ve sent him to a summer camp elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest. cifully few critics. They proceed Recently, over supper, we discussed along sneered lines like: “... then the differences in his camp and the why do you accept social security or one my grandmother sent me to medicare!?” [Gotchaaaaa!!!] or “... in The Great Smokies during The then put out your own wildfires!” Pleistocene Era. [That showed him!]. The required equipment list for my Let’s set the record straight: camp included 1 belt knife, 1 plumb I don’t “hate” government. Only axe and 1 rifle, caliber .22 LR, with a cackling fool presumes to tell Bill Slusher six boxes of ammunition. another person what they “hate.” Suffice it to say grandson would For, absent a first-person declaration of what that other person “hates,” no one be ejected if not arrested were he to show could possibly know this about another person with same at his camp. Granted, campers are savagely asked not to bring electronic devices. except... yep... that other person. A great example is: “Republicans oppose Whoa. Now... that’s... roughing it. My camp taught me to kill, prepare and eat abortion because they hate women!” Really? Like... what? “Democrats support abortion formerly live animals. Grandson’s camp staff because they hate babies!?” C’mon. Say what would faint en masse at the thought. At my camp, despite excellent training and you hate, and leave the declarations of what other people hate to them, lest you play the supervision, a ten-year-old missed splitting political dunce. It does not reasonably follow wood and sunk his axe into one shin above the that a critic of government hates government. boot. Stuff happens. He was treated at a hospital, and his distant parents were appropriately In fact, no critic with any value does. I paid for my Social Security and Medicare advised by phone. Was he going to be OK? as a public servant all my working life and I Yes, Doc said. Ten stitches but no break. Sore, still pay taxes to support those valiant wildfire limping, but doing fine. The parents talked to fighters. Just because government is useful, the kid. Yes it hurt but no he didn’t want to even essential, in some capacities does not come home. OK. Bye sweetie! Have a good mean it is immune from valid criticism where time! End of story. At my grandson’s camp such an incident it is inefficient, wasteful, unconstitutional or has no damn business in a given field of our would likely result in the tragic mass autoslaughter of tort pirates fighting over who lives. OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

SOCIOPOLITICAL WRITER

would sue everyone from the axe maker to the doctor to the camp. My camp had a mandate every year to find a camp need, design a fix and build it. One year it was a fire tower, one year it was an infirmary building, one year a bridge to make it easier for parents to traverse a deep, 12 foot wide brook that cut through camp. Projects were proposed and voted on, plans were drawn, logs were cut, barked and hewn, and all summer long we constructed a vehiclebearing, forty-foot bridge, five feet over the brook. It’s still there. Grandson laughs. You know that creek at camp, Popop, he says, the one with the collapsed footbridge? I did. A tiny trickle about three feet wide runs through his camp toward the nearby lake. A simple, ten-foot, log footbridge there for decades had finally rotted away and dropped into the creek. Camp wanted to have a simple new footbridge built, grandson says, so we don’t have to trek clear around by the car bridge. But, turns out, we can’t even take out the old bridge without an EPA environmental impact study which it will take us at least three years to get and will cost more than the bridge itself, even if it approves the bridge, which EPA says it probably can’t do under current waterway guidelines anyway. The case against inefficient, overpriced, clumsy government intruding where it has no business... rests. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his newly reprinted down-and-dirty Southern murder mystery SHEPHERD OF THE WOLVES. (Amazon,cmppg.com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted atwilliamslusher@live.com.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 21, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Dropping music in the primary is outrageous I have been hearing rumors for quite a while, but wanted to be sure before I voiced my opinion, about the fact that there will not be any music program in the elementary school, kindergarten through third grade. I have official word from the superintendent’s office that it isn’t a rumor. It is a fact. I think it is outrageous! And I might add that there are many others who feel the same, because I’ve been questioned so many times. One look at my picture at the heading of my articles will tell you I don’t have any children in those grades. Even my great-grandchildren are beyond that, but that does not alter the fact that there are many other children entering school that are going to miss out on introductory music. It is a fact that those early years are the most formative years of a child’s life. One of the first things we do for a child is sing to them. Then we teach them little songs to sing. With a budget of over $8 million it would seem they could eek! out a little bit for a music program (if that is the reason, this time). I have been around for a lot of years and during those years how many times have I seen the music program get the “short end of the stick” due to funding or scheduling or some other reason. But there is always money and time for sports. I am not against sports. But

I am for music. Music is forever and sports are pretty much for the duration of school. So far I’ve never heard of a sports player being called on to help at a wedding, church, funeral and other functions, where music is needed. There! I’ve said just a little bit of what I think… I hope others say more! While I’m in a negative mood I might as well get this off my mind. There are plans in the making for the upcoming Okanogan County Fair to have a beer garden. Really! Now, there is nothing wrong with having a beer or two, but can’t we just keep the fair family oriented with emphasis on the children, as it has been in the past? Then, when you get home, after herding kids around at the fair, sit down, relax, cool off and then have your beer. (Editor’s note: the county fair board did consider a beer garden, but ultimately voted against it, at least for this year.) The Oroville Seniors had a pancake breakfast, fund raiser, recently, a first I think. It was successful, a lot of work, some fun, and perhaps now that they know how, maybe, there’ll be another(?) How smart is this? It was recently reported that the government spent $7000 on videos, teaching mothers how to teach their kids to eat vegetables. How about trying this? Put some on their plate, tell them to “eat it, or I’ll give you

some more.” Worked, for my sister-inlaw, Vivian. And I think her kids still liked her. Once again the Assembly of God Church has sponsored a youth work program, helping seniors, handicapped and others needing chores done. What a great project! And you know what? I didn’t see one cell phone. They were working! My Thursday pinochle ladies played cards at Wannacut Lake last week. They have done that once a year for several years and I’ve missed the last two or three times. Had a nice lunch, played cards, then dessert. One of their specialties is pie, called mounds. It is chocolate with a ton of coconut and huge. Yum! Last week I mentioned the serious illness of Velma Colbert Hill. Her time of suffering was cut shorter than it might have been as she passed away, at home, with family at her side. I had known Velma a lot of years. When she was in her prime she was one of the fastest apple packers in the warehouses. In later years, when her hands became very painful and disfigured, I’d tease her and tell it was her past catching up with her, from packing all the big apples away from her coworkers. Her family was so very important to her and sympathy goes out to them and she will be sincerely missed at lunch, at the Senior Center, where she had faithfully attended, until her health

failed. problems. Now it is being discussed as to The death of Dr. Russell Neff has been whether the media did overkill on reportreported to me. He and his family were ing his death. Sometimes they do that, or members of our community so it seems to me. during the time he was our Our good buddy, Bob Hirst, school superintendent. His is doing so-so. But he did get wife Margaret, helped make to go to the Molson School many a Raggedy Anne and Reunion and saw so many Andy dolls at the United friends, some from the past Methodist Church. and some from now. He is not Howard Cole has been a quitter, and is trying very diagnosed with severe kidhard to regain strength, but it ney infection, but with pow“Ain’t easy!” erful antibiotics that really How would you feel if you helped the situation, his found a bag with $5000 in it? wife, Roberta, was able to THIS & THAT Just wondered! leave on her Viking River Ya’ shoulda’ been at the Cruise, which she had been Joyce Emry Senior Center, after lunch looking forward to, for last Friday, and heard Harrell months. Rounds and Mike Chapple It is said that this has been the worst entertain us. See, the Rounds twins startfire season in years, in Washington. ed out as little boys singing and they’re We’ve had a smoke filled atmosphere at still doing it, but Darrell didn’t join them times, but of course not like down the last week. valley, south, where the fires were comIf you remember Lawrence Welk and ing from. Folks with breathing problems the Lennon Sister’s then you’re as old have had to resort to wearing masks, as I am. And guess what, they’re still which helps some. singing, and they’re still pretty. That was Mark Gordon, son-in-law of Shirley when they sang harmony and you could Moser, is facing multiple, serious health understand the words and they weren’t problems. The heart and brain are what four letter words like so many are now. keeps us “going” and he’s had infecSome things are better left unsaid, and tions in both areas. He is, as of Monday, maybe I’m just about there. in Spokane Sacred Heart Hospital, for Brad Roberts, his wife Sarah and treatment (or surgeries). The family is daughters, Morgan and Sylvia, were here grateful for prayers and well wishes from England, to attend their grandmothfrom friends and family. er, Ellen Roberts Memorial Service. The I guess by now just about everyone plans were to be here for her 104th birthknows of the death of Robin Williams. day but God had other plans for grandma. He was a funny guy in movies, on TV Life is not the way it’s ‘sposed to be. and just on the street, I guess. Depression It’s the way it is tho’. How we cope with is such an ugly thing and while he was it is what makes the difference! being funny, underneath he had serious ‘Til next week!

The living is easy, easy as pie that is

CYCLING FOR A CAUSE

SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD

TONASKET MARKET REPORT

TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

Summertime...and the livin’ is easy! It’s as easy as pie at Tonasket Farmers’ Market. Joanne Burch of Riverside, a new member of the market family, bakes 19 different flavors of fruit pie. Being a pie baker myself and a bit of a pie-snob, I was compelled to try one. The texture of the crust and the filling exceeded expectations, as did the pure fruit flavor. Best of all, I didn’t have to heat up the kitchen to bake and serve homemade pie. With 75 years of baking experience under her apron, Joanne modestly says she makes “plain homemade pies.” Humble pie indeed; one

Linda Black/Submitted photo

Tonasket sees an increasing number of groups of cyclists rolling through town thanks to its visitor-friendly bike camping spot behind the TVBRC downtown. Last weekend a group of more than 30 cyclists with the group Bike & Build came through town as part of their fundraising efforts for affordable housing. During their long-distance trip, the group will spend several days contributing to volunteer building projects. There were nearly 10 such groups riding 3,000-mile plus routes across the country; this group started in New Hampshire on June 12 and will complete their ride in Vancouver, B.C., on Thursday, Aug. 21. More information on the group can be found at www. bikeandbuild.org.

Tonasket Library fundraiser SUBMITTED BY MIRIAM CADDY TONASKET LIBRARY BOARD

TONASKET - The Tonasket Library Board and friends of the library are raising money for a storage shed for the Tonasket Library. A music/dessert fundraiser has been scheduled for Sept. 19, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket to support the project. Our main fundraisers are two book sales a year. One is during

Successful benefit for fire victims

the Founders Day celebration and the other is during the Winter Fest celebration. We appreciate the many books that are donated to the library for the book sales, but the library does not have space to hold all the books donated. For many years we have taken the books to Ellisforde to store and we appreciate Appleway Mini Storage for donating that storage to us. It has gotten more difficult and more costly to take the books there for storage. The Tonasket City Council has

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Hope everyone is enjoying their summer as it is winding down and school will be starting soon. We would like to thank everyone that brought desserts to the auction and to everyone that purchased items from the auction. What a great turn out and $1,175 will be going to the Carlton Complex Fire Victims. On Sunday, Aug. 31 we will be having a steak dinner from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. including 8 oz. steak, baked potato, coleslaw and roll for $10, there will be music (by Bad Habits) starting at 8 p.m. Don’t miss the Demolition Derby out at the Rodeo Grounds earlier that day. Tuesday is free pool day come on in and rack them there balls.

The first and third Wednesdays of each month is the Aerie meeting at 7 p.m. and first and third Thursdays is the Auxiliary meeting at 6:30 p.m. we would like to see more members come to the meetings and give suggestions how to make your club a even better place.

approved space on the north end of the library for us to put a shed to store books in. Alpine Sheds is working with us to build a storage shed to fit the space. It will be so much more convenient to have the storage right outside and easier to get ready for our book sales. We have received donations for this project and if you would like to contribute, the Tonasket Library can accept donations. More information will be forthcoming about the September fundraising event.

Joker Poker is still growing and is up to $2,684. You could win half (must be present to win) Saturday at 7 p.m. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Neil Fifer, second place Gene Michels, Low score to Leonard Paulsen and last pinochle went to Penny Smith and Cindy Byers. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727

Crazy weather we’re having SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Well, we are all talking about the weather again. It has been so crazy. The other day we were in Chesaw when it started to rain. Not just a regular rainstorm, it was a downpour. We had been visiting with friends and we all decided it was time to head home. We only live about five miles out of Chesaw so it was not a big thing to have it raining. Low and behold we only got about half the way home and the road became dry and dusty and not a drop of rain anywhere. Crazy weather. We are glad to see the rain as we are glad to have the sunshine also. Before we started with the new computer I was writing about my favorite places in Chesaw and Molson. Well, we all know what happened. Things have been better these past few weeks, so I am going to try again. Without a doubt the Chesaw Mercantile is my favorite place of all. The “Merc” is a good place to meet with your friends everyday of the week except on a Sunday. There is a library of books on all subjects so you can read a romance, mystery, science fiction or a good

flavor down, 18 more to go. Spicy hot food and hot summer weather go together. Try the banana peppers from Lu at Dharma Farm. She has “Big Jim” sweet peppers for the less adventurous, as well as beets, carrots and Thai eggplant. If making your own salsa appeals to you, stop at Fernando and Alma Capote’s booth to pick up all you need; tomatoes, onions and tomatillos. Babe Saulsbury, known best for her crocheted hanging kitchen towels and pot scrubbers is offering something new. She is making magnetic jewelry. Wrist

HILLTOP COMMENTS old Western. Take your pick. CDs and or DVDs are also available for your listening or viewing. It is known that a simple surgery has been preformed in the parking lot by a cowboy vet. No name or names are available. Band aids included. You might even learn something about animal husbandry. You can purchase a stamp, mail a letter, pick up a package from UPS, FedEx or just let Ruthie, the mail lady, take care of it for you. Saturday is Ladies Day. Come in and catch up with what’s going on. The last Saturday of the month is Book Club day. Read a chosen book each month and review it with other readers at the end of the month. You could attend a meeting about wool, once a month you can purchase Schwan’s products from “Farley the Schwan’s Man.” He is a real character. Just ask him. You can read the newspaper ads in the paper so you can shop the rest of the week. Handcrafted greeting cards are available for purchase, also handmade pot holders, lots of jewelry, necklaces and earrings and fine art is for sale.

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When You Invest Systematically If one of your worries is whether you’re investing

and ankle bracelets containing powerful magnets are decorative and are said to help alleviate the aches and pains of arthritis. Whether it is science, mind over matter, or a bit of both, they seem to work for many folk. I have had a pair for years. Enjoy the sweet summer treats offered by Godina Concession; refreshing fruit waters made from fresh fruit, fruit cups with spears of melon, pineapple, cucumber and the like, and a favorite with the kids; sno-cones. Sno-cones are available flavored with syrups or with the natural fruit waters. This big kid’s favorite flavor is strawberry kiwi. Speaking of kids, Thursday, August 28th is Children’s Day at Tonasket Farmers’ Market. There will be prizes, games, face painting and more. The young and the young at heart will enjoy summer fun on Children’s Day. See you there!

I am sure that I have left out someone or something about the “Merc.” Drop in and introduce yourself to Sandy and Bill Everly (owners). Until next week

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AUGUST 21, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Oroville Grange Dinner/Meeting OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange’s August Meeting and Dinner will be Wednesday, Aug. 20 at 7 p.m. A family-style dinner will be served at 6pm with all community and future Grangers welcome. If you are thinking about Grange, Call Betty Steg at 509-476-3878.

Preschool Story Time TONASKET - The Tonasket Library preschool story times are the first and third Thursday of the month. The next story time is Thursday Aug. 21 at 10:30 a.m. The stories are “Too Much Noise� and “Poppa, Get The Moon For Me.� The Library is at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. and the phone number is 509-486-2366.

Ruby Rust at Esther Bricques OROVILLE –Ruby Rust will perform their rock and roll magic in the North County on Esther Bricques Winery’s outdoor stage Thursday, Aug. 21. Doors open at 6 pm, with music to follow soon after. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, call the winery at 509476-2861.

Winery & Brewery at Summer Festival TONASKET–Tonasket’s annual Garlic Festival, now renamed “Summer Festival,� will feature a wine and beer garden area as part of the festivities. Esther Bricques Winery’s wines and Alpine Brewings’ beers will be available throughout the two-day festival on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 22 and 23. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Oroville Farmers’ Market OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Aug. 23 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. The

2014 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: Aug. 2 and Aug. 30. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2662.

Mood Swings to Perform OROVILLE–The Mood Swings with their hits from the 40s, 50s, and 60s, will be on stage at Esther Bricques Winery Thursday, Aug. 28, followed by Rick Braman on guitar and Chris Stodola on keyboard on Thursday, Sept. 4. Doors open at 6 p.m.; music begins by 6:30 p.m. For more info call the winery a (509- 4762861 or visit the Events page at www.estherbricques.com.

Stroke Support Group OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group meets next on Thursday, Aug. 28 at The Youth Center at 607 Central Ave. in Oroville. The youth center is adjacent to the Free Methodist Church. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a presentation and discussion. There will be refreshments.

Physical Therapy TONASKET - North Valley Health & Rehab will present a course on physical therapy on Thursday, Aug. 28 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. This course offers information on a variety of musculoskeltal conditions that individuals face every day and the causes of some of these injuries that may be overlooked. Topics that will be covered are low back pain, headaches, neck pain, knee pain, the young athlete, TMJ, Ankle/Foot pain and bladder health. The free course is being presented by Dr. Jeff Massart and there are 14 spots available. To register call 509-486-3163 or register online at www.nvhospital.org.

Farmers’ Flea Market OROVILLE - The Oroville Farmers’ Market will host a Flea Market and Yard Sale Saturday,

Lions ‘Tee’ off to raise funds on Sept. 13

Aug. 30 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Space is available and your booth fee will benefit the Oroville Public Library. Call 509-476-2096 for more information.

Emergency Prep Program OROVILLE - The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints is sponsoring an Emergency Preparedness Program on Saturday, Aug. 30 at their building on North 97 in Oroville. The program starts at 1 p.m. and is scheduled to end at 3 p.m. There will be handouts and it is open to the public.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event� button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com or at GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

SUBMITTED BY CARY TONASKET TONASKET/OKANOGAN VALLEY LIONS

OMAK - Join the Tonasket/ Okanogan Valley Lions Club Saturday, Sept. 13, for a great day of golf, food and great raffle prizes. The 1st Annual Lions Pride Golf Scramble will be held at the Okanogan Valley Golf Club, 105 Danker Cutoff Road, Omak. Sign up today and join us, registration will begin at noon with

LIONS CLUB

a shotgun start at 1 p.m. It will be a fun day of 18 holes, extra contests and a few twists and turns along the way. Sponsor a “hole� for $250, or better yet sponsor a “hole� and register your company team for $400. Dinner, awards and raffle will immediately follow the completion of the tournament. Registration will be Teams of 4, $45 per golfer, which includes golf, a pulled pork sandwich dinner and a few surprises throughout the 18 holes.

100% of proceeds raised for Lions Club giving projects go back to the community. Our tournament will provide for the Club Scholarship Fund, Relief and Recovery Fund for Okanogan County fire victims and for the Lions Club Vision/Hearing Screening Van for Children. You can register at the Okanogan Valley Golf Course, print the registration and fill it out at http://e-clubhouse.org/ sites/tonasket okanogan valley/ calender.php, or contact Tracie at 509-557-8611. You can mail your registration to 807 Omak Ave., Omak, WA 98841 or bring it in on the day of the tournament.

Tonasket School District releases Back to School info TONASKET - Tonasket School District’s first day of school for all students is slated for Wednesday, Aug. 27. Following is pertinent back-to-school information for each of the district’s main buildings.

TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL The Tonasket High School office opened Aug. 13. Hours are 7:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. • Fall Sports: Football practice begins on Wednesday, Aug. 20. All other fall sports practices begin on Aug. 25. • Locker Check Out begins Aug. 20 in the Commons. All outstanding fines must be paid prior to EARLY locker checkout. Checkout times are as follows:Seniors at 12:00 p.m.; Juniors at 12:30 p.m.; Sophomores at 1:00 p.m.; Freshmen at 1:30 p.m. • Open House is on Aug. 26, starting with a BBQ available for $3.50 purchase in the high school commons from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Parents and students can visit their classrooms and meet their teachers from 6:00-7:30 p.m. • First school day is Aug. 27 at 8:30 a.m. Back-to-School assembly in the gym at 8:30 a.m. • THS Fees: ASB-$25, Sports-$50, Art $15, FFA $20, Yearbook $45, Drivers Ed $393.

• Picture Day: Tuesday, Sept. 2.

TONASKET MIDDLE SCHOOL The office has been open starting on Aug. 13 from 7:30 a.m. 4:00 p.m. for new student enrollment. • Students will receive their locker number and combination, class schedule, and will be able to pay any fees needed for the coming school year. Parents are invited to come in with their children. • Sixth Grade OrientationAug. 26 - Sixth grade students and parents, please meet in the middle school gym at 6:00 p.m. where you will have a chance to meet the sixth grade teachers, school counselor and principal. We will give a short general orientation of the middle school and answer any questions you may have. Sixth grade teachers will then be in their classrooms until 7:30 p.m. • First Day of School- Aug. 27 Students should arrive and go straight to the gym for our Backùto-School assembly. • Picture Day ù Sept. 2 TONASKET ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Office hours are 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. for new student enrollment and for updating student information. Parents and students can visit classrooms and meet their

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teacher during the Open House on Aug. 26 from 6:00-7:30 p.m.

DEVELOPMENTAL SCREENINGS • Birth to 6 Years Developmental screenings will be provided at no cost for children from birth through six years of age for children living in the Tonasket School District. If you are homeless and in the Tonasket School District boundaries, contact the elementary school about preschool or early childhood screening programs in our area. To obtain more information, contact Brenda at Tonasket Elementary School, 509-4864933, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. • Child Find Notice If you have any concerns regarding your child’s development or success in school, from birth to age 21 years, please call for additional information or referral. If you are homeless and living in the Tonasket School District boundaries, contact the elementary school for information about preschool or early childhood screening and programs in our area. Your call will be referred to appropriate staff to answer your questions. (Tonasket School District, 35 DO Highway 20 East, Tonasket, 98855. Phone: 509-486-4933.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

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PAGE A8

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FALL CONSIGNMENT SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2014

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D & D AUCTION SALES

LLC

Crosswords

averaged over time

59. Living organisms and their environment 61. Enzyme secreted by the kidneys that affects blood pressure

ANSWERS

Across

62. Chop (off) 63. Cliffside dwelling 64. Daughter of Mnemosyne

1. Checked things 6. ___ cry

65. “Star Trek” rank: Abbr. 66. Cook, as clams

36. Having the capacity to return to health 38. Decide to leave, with “out”

43. Male household servant 45. Land 46. Sags 47. Sponges

14. Acquiesce

48. Bolivian capital

15. Trick taker, often

51. Give off, as light

16. Run off to the chapel 17. Person’s high standing among others (pl.) 19. Church part 20. Accommodate 21. Kill, in a way 22. Russian autocrats

1. Beanies 2. Shrek, e.g. 3. Length x width, for a rectangle 4. Exam 5. Undertake, with “out”

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44. Focal point

9. Blue-ribbon position

Down

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39. “Comprende?” 40. Always, in verse

52. Ashcroft’s predecessor 54. Put an edge on

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55. “Catch!” 56. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g. 57. Abound 60. ___ de deux

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AUGUST 21, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

SPORTS Finding room in my heart for a Green Bay Packer I spent Saturday afternoon with my phone turned off, tuned into ... an NFL pre-season game featuring the Green Bay Packers and St. Louis Rams? Yes, really. I’m not that much of a football geek, though it’s close. But this was a first for me. On the field for the Packers was a wide receiver, a seventh round draft choice, who happened to be my son A.J.’s kindergarten classmate, Little League teammate, and a three-sport athlete that I covered through his high school career at Tawas Area High School in Michigan. Much like North Central Washington has with Chelan’s Joe Harris, childhood friends, teammates, opponents, and most everyone with a sporting interest in that rural part of northern Michigan has been enraptured with Jeff Janis’ rise into the NFL. He’s gone from small town high school star to small college AllAmerican at Saginaw Valley State (a Division II school, like Central Washington University), to one

of the final picks in this year’s running back for his final high NFL draft. school games because of a broken Tawas and Chelan have a lot in finger that meant he could no common - resort-centric beach longer catch a pass). communities with That Tawas team high school graduneeded to win its final ating classes in the two games to qualify 125-student range. for the state playoffs. Harris, drafted by With the team’s startthe NBA’s Cleveland ing quarterback out Cavaliers (and a for the season with teammate of LeBron his own injuries, Janis James for as long as ran for touchdowns he remains there) was of 66 and 45 yards Washington’s basto lead his team to ketball player of the a 20-18 win in the year as a senior, and HALF-BAKED first game. In the ended up at Virginia final must-win game, Brent Baker of the Atlantic Coast he was sick but came Conference, adjustthrough with a 238ing to the highest level of colle- yard performance on 15 carries to giate competition there. key a 50-28 win over a bitter rival Janis wasn’t nearly so decorated that was another playoff-bound in high school. team. It’s debatable whether he was Still, this was like playing in even the best player on his high the Caribou Trail League. There school team until he was a senior. were plenty of large school He was an excellent receiver, he players from other parts of the had good speed, by all accounts state snapping up the scholarwas coachable as well as tough ships to places like Michigan and (he switched from receiver to Michigan State.

So, as many of that area’s best college-level athletes do, he ended up at a smaller school and didn’t really start drawing the attention of NFL scouts until he led the nation (Division II) in receiving yards as a junior and followed that up with an 83-catch, 1,572-yard season as a senior. That earned an invitation to the Senior Bowl, where he showed he could play with other NFL prospects. And an invitation to the NFL Combine, a “meat market� of sorts where athletes show off their physical skills. While considered a raw talent who hadn’t faced much of the type of talent found in the NFL, his Combine time of 4.42 in the 40-yard dash raised plenty of eyebrows (including mine - he was fast in high school and was an accomplished sprinter, but that?). That, folks, is speedier than the Seahawks’ Richard Sherman (4.54). So, Saturday, on the fourth anniversary of the day that he lost his dad to cancer, Janis took the field for an NFL team for the first

time, after missing the first week of training camp with shingles. I knew that, in the middle of Detroit Lions country, a growing legion of Green Bay Packer fans were glued to the TV, just as I was. I held my breath as the Packers sent Janis back to field punts which he did flawlessly on all three that he touched, including two fair catches and a nine-yard return. And then, out of nowhere in the third quarter, Janis caught a little slant over the middle from backup quarterback Scott Tolzien. Outran six defenders to the end zone for a 34-yard touchdown. I don’t often get that teared up over football games, but this time I did. For every small town kid that dreams of making it to the National Football League, Major League Baseball, or the National Basketball Association, here was one - THE one, in my couple of decades of covering high school sports - that is on the verge of achieving that dream.

(We moved to this area about two weeks after Harris graduated, so I didn’t see his high school career). I tried to figure out how many kids have populated the rosters of all the teams I’ve covered - state championship teams, winless teams, mediocre teams, teams with multiple Division I players, teams with no college-level talent whatsoever. It’s got to be more than 10,000 kids in football alone. So in all that time, Jeff Janis is the first that I saw as a high school player to play (even in the pre-season) a game for a major professional team. It’s that rare. It’s that special. Janis appears to have the inside track as the Packers’ fifth receiver. So if he sticks on the roster and by some miracle he takes a slant and beats Sherman to the corner of the end zone when the Seahawks host the Packers on NFL Opening Night, you’ll have to forgive me if I cheer. For Jeff Janis, for Joe Harris, and for every small town kid with big dreams.

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Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

4

8

1

9

7

9

3 2

7 6

7 9

3

7

2 4

5

5 6

6

2

3 5

7

9

1

9 2

3

5

Medium, difficulty rating 0.54

ANSWERS

4

8

7

1

5

2

6

3

9

6

3

7

8

4

3 8 9 4 2 5 1

2 5 3 8 4 9 7

3 9 6 1 7 5 8 2

8 7 5 9 4

2 8 1 3 6 9

2

7

3

4

1

5

6

3 4 7 2 8 5 1 6 9

5 9 6 4 7 1 8 2 3

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4

Public Notices

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509-476-3602

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REAL ESTATE Guide www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Well-kept manufactured home with beautiful lake views of Wannacut Lake! 1 lot off the water with nearby public access! This 1456 sqft, 3 bedroom/ 2 bathroom home features an expansive deck and large detached garage. MLS#622078 $139,000

Find The Right

www.windermere.com The coffee is always on!

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

2104 Summit Dr. Enjoy the views of the valley and the mountains from this well maintained home. Exterior of the home was just painted and a new water softener was just installed. This 3 bedroom 2 bath home sits on just over half an acre of fenced property. Home features a spacious living room with a bay window. there is a large master bedroom with a large master bath to go with it. Don’t miss out on this great home in a desirable Oroville neighborhood. NWML#682968 $198,000

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St. Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-3602

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Keith Kistler

SUN LAKES REALTY

DISTINCTIVE WOOD CRAFTSMAN/

Contemporary one level home grandly overlooking Lake Osoyoos! 3 bed 2 bath & extra multipurpose room for entertainment. Huge garage & Barn/Shop. 2nd Lakeview lot is included

$249,000

HILLTOP REALTY — WANTED —

Have Out of State Buyer for Nice Cabin on 20 Acres (maybe less). Trees. Water. Power. Good Access. Price Open. Need 20 Acres m/l with small modest home. Tonasket area. Up to $175,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com z 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Hi-Faulutin, NEW CONSTRUCTION ON LAKE OSOYOOS!

<RXĂ&#x20AC;QLVKWKHKRXVHWKHVWDUWKDV been deluxe! El Supremo Romantic, Exciting Property. Unique View to Water & Nature. 2 bedroom & 2 ½ bathroom + Den.

$324,900


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 21, 2014

OBITUARIES Assembly of God Church in Oroville. Refreshments will follow the ceremony of Velmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made in Velmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name to the Oroville Senior Center.

Even though Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s took a lot of his memories and took him from us, we are so thankful he still had his silly sense of humor. He will be greatly missed. We would like to thank the wonderful staff at Moses Lake Senior Living for taking such good care of our Dad. The family asks that donations be made to Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association at 225 N. Michigan Avenue, Fl 17, Chicago, IL 60601 or online at www.alz.org.

Velma Marie Hill

VELMA MARIE HILL

Shalonuns oFonodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s! Fabu

Â&#x201E; Â&#x201E; Â&#x201E; Â&#x201E;

Breakfast Every Morning Steak Night on Wed. & Sat. Spaghetti Thursday Prime Rib Friday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; We have WiFi â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 626 Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2259

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

OMAK: 6$VK6W2PDN 2IÂżFH+RXUV7KXUVGD\V Tel: 509-826-1930

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

Jack D. Wood

HEALTH CARE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.â&#x20AC;?

TONASKET

In Tonasket & Oroville

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509-486-2174

509-486-2174

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

www.wvmedical.com

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

OMAK

JACK D. WOOD Jack D. Wood, 86, longtime Moses Lake resident passed away peacefully in his sleep Monday, August 18th at Moses Lake Senior Living. Jack was born August 1, 1928 in Chesaw, Wash. to Don Wood Sr. and Hazel (Mooney) Wood. He was raised and educated in Chesaw, Molson and graduated from Oroville High School. Immediately following high school, he joined the US Navy and served until 1950 when he was honorably discharged in Boston, Mass. which is where he met and married the Love of his life Gerri Cusato (who was the sister of one of his shipmates). He was called back to serve in the Korean war from 1951 to 1953. They then settled in Oroville. They moved to Tonasket in 1958, to Spokane in 1967 before settling in Moses Lake in 1974. He always said being in the Navy allowed him to see the world for free. Dad loved his family and was always happiest when everyone was around. He loved to garden and teach his grandchildren how to plant seeds and watch them grow. In his younger years he was an avid hunter and fisherman, his favorite time was with his son Rick and his dad. Over the years he worked as a logger, roofer, milkman, truck driver and salesman. Jack was preceded in death by his wife of 43 years, Gerri, his grandson Bryan Koesterman, his parents, brothers Ben and Don Jr, sisters Florence, Maude, Helen and Georgia. He is survived by his children Merri Jayne Koesterman, Rick Wood, Teri Swindoll and Robin CusatoWood, sisters Betty and Mick, his grandchildren Brenda Taylor, Dawn Wood, Jeremy Wood, Colby Hurd, Kiley Hurd, Kimberly Swindoll and Kebra Swindoll, and his nine great grandchildren. His funeral service will be Friday, August 22 at Kayserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chapel at 2 p.m., with viewing from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Interment with Military Honors will follow at Pioneer Memorial Gardens. Dad was always the fifth kid in the family. He usually started the mischief and we all got in on it!

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Bonnie L. Smith

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

BONNIE L. SMITH

Developmental Disabilities

Bonnie L. Smith passed away on August, 2nd 2014 in her home. She was born in Scott county Arkansas on March, 28th 1937 to Rev. Clyde Hudson and Bonnie Hudson. Bonnie married John Louis Smith in 1955 in Tulare California. Bonnie was proceeded in death by one daughter Bonnie Deangelo Morrison; She is survived by her husband John L. Smith of Tonasket, Wash. and three sons Michael ¡ A. Smith of Oroville, Wash., Roger L. Smith of Bellingham Wash. and John D. Smith of Wenatchee, Wash.; one brother, Jay L. Hudson of Oroville and grandchildren and great grandchildren. Bonnie lived a very fulfilling life, she was a legal secretary in Handford Calif. in 1956 up until she became pregnant with her second son. In 1978. She became Vice President of Delta Land, and a controller in Smith Investments in Washington, California and Arizona. She worked at Princes Department Store for awhile. She was a wonderful wife and mother. She was a dear friend to all those who knew her and We want to thank all her friends who knew and cared for her. She was dearly loved by us all and will be greatly missed.

(509) 826-6191

(509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services Drug Prevention Victim / Survivorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

Toll Free (866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

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Velma Marie Hill passed away on Tuesday, August 12th at home surrounded by family, after a prolonged battle with Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Disease. Velma was born to Evan Colbert and Cora Smallwood on January 2, 1935 in Omak, Washington, the youngest of eleven children. The family lived in Chesaw and Velma attended school in Molson. In 1951, Velma married Richard Ray Hill and moved to Oroville where she worked in the apple warehouses for 36 years as a sorter and packer. It was often said she was the fastest apple packer in the valley. Velma and Richard were married for 32 years and enjoyed their time together in the mountains. In 1986 Velma met her long time companion of 27 years, Paul Gentry, who purchased her first horse. Horses and horseback riding became her favorite pastime over the next 20 years. Velma was a member of the Back Country Horsemen, she packed into the wilderness many times and rode most of the trails in the Pasayten Wilderness, fulfilling a lifelong dream. A special thanks to Tiny Gould and Gordie Geisen for helping make those dreams come true. In recent years, she was an active member of the Oroville Senior Citizens Center and the Red Hat Society. Velma was caring, generous and lived life to the fullest. She enjoyed all things beautiful, from taking drives looking for deer to the sparkle of dazzling garments. Velma was preceded in death by her husband, Richard Hill in 1983 and her long time companion, Paul Gentry in 2013, as well as her parents, Evan and Cora Colbert, brothers: Lloyd, Marvin, Melvin, Orin and David Colbert and sisters: Ruby Sherling, Eleanor Anderson and Retha Colbert. Velma is survived by her three children, Richard Milton Hill of Kalispell, Mont. and daughters Beverely Hill and Karen Tibbs of Spokane; granddaughters Rickayla Hill of Kalispel and Julie Tibbs of Spokane; grandsons Michael Reienes and Mitchell Tibbs of Oroville; daughterin-law Trish Tibbs, who was Velmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Angelâ&#x20AC;? always going above and beyond to help;greatgrandchildren Chad, Cody, Seth and Noah; sisters Leatha Melton of Spokane, Elizabeth (Betty) Grigsby of Airway Heights; as well as numerous brother-inlaws, sister-in-laws, nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 6, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at the

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Su Ianniello Licensed Massage Practitioner

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NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 21, 2014  

August 21, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 21, 2014  

August 21, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune