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Tonasket veteran John Jones

OROVILLE REUNION

returns to Cambodia

All-Alumni Reunion (over 21) Friday, Aug. 15, 7:00 p.m. Alpine Brewery & Pastime Bar/Grill

See Page A3

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Election Local primary election results in few surprises BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN – While few local candidates faced challengers in the recent primary elections, there was one race, that for Okanogan County PUD Commissioner District 1, that drew three candidates, as well as incumbent David Womack. Womack, who has served multiple terms in the position, got safely through to the upcoming general election by earning the highest number of votes at 441, according to the early, not yet certified, ballot count last Friday. That was enough to earn him 29.2 percent of the vote. His next closest competitor was Scott Vejraska, who will be sharing the ballot in November. Vejraska, an area rancher, got 408 votes, or 27.0 percent. Next was Steve Nearants with 340 votes and James Miller with 320.

SEE PRIMARY | PG A4

Rice fills vacant seat BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council appointed Lois Rice to fill the vacant council seat opened by Jean Ramsey’s resignation in June. Rice was approved by a 3-0 vote (council member Jill Vugteveen was absent) at the Tuesday, July 22, council meeting after a brief executive session to review the qualifications of Rice and fellow applicant Sandi Sunda. In other actions: • The council held its annual public hearing the Six-Year Transportation Plan, which was reviewed by city planner Kurt Danison, who added additional projects. The council later approved the plan, 4-0. • Danison was also authorized to draft a letter to the Economic Alliance with the city’s top three project priorities to apply for “.09 funds” that could move those projects along. Those projects included: a complete streets project to reconstruct Whitcomb Avenue (US-97) through the downtown core; infrastructure and annexation at the south end of the city; and the creation of south end

A Canadair CL-415 SuperScooper amphibious water bomber lands on Osoyoos Lake while swimmers, many from the airplane’s country of manufacturer, Canada, enjoy cooling off last week. The aerial firefighter, one of two making runs about every 15 minutes on Thursday, Aug. 7, would land on the lake, scoop up more than 1600 gallons of water and take back off headed for fires in the Methow. The water would then be released at designated points to help suppress the fire. The two flying boats would fly low and slow over Oroville and Veteran’s Memorial Park, appearing to nearly skim the trees as they made their approaches and take-offs. Gary DeVon/staff photos

SEE COUNCIL | PG A4

Denney will be new Oroville City Clerk Water request denied after much discussion BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Councilman Walt Hart, serving as mayor pro tem, announced that JoAnn Denney will be Oroville’s new city clerk/treasurer following the retirement of Kathy Jones at the end of October. The announcement that Mayor Chuck Spieth had selected Denney was made at the Tuesday, Aug. 5. Oroville City Council meeting to a round of congratulations from the council members, who confirmed her appointment. Denney, a 23-year employee of the city, was on hand as she was taking the minutes that night for the council. The first order of business was approval of the city’s six-year transportation plan. This plan, a requirement of the state, shows which roads the city would most like to see improved in the next six

years. Such a plan is drafted each year and aids a city when they apply for funding for things like paving and overlay projects. However, just because a road is not currently on the plan does not mean that it might be added or taken off as the need arises.

PROJECT UPDATES Rod Noel, Superintendent of Public Works, commented on several projects, including the North End Water Reservoir. The reservoir will serve people on the North End Water System, which is located mostly north of Oroville and west of Lake Osoyoos. The city felt it needed to be built if it was going to supply water to the new U.S. Border Patrol Station and much of the funding is coming from the federal government. “The project is complete and on line. It is functioning well and there are no major issues with the project as a whole, just a few issues that were mostly cosmetic and our crew handled those,” said Noel. He added that he had forwarded the

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 33

JoAnn Denney ”I’m excited about being selected and to move forward with the city as it continues to grow.” •

• • • •

Started as a part time employee in January 1991, moved to full time in October 1991 Secretary for the Planning Commission Secretary/Chief Examiner for Civil Service Board Married to Michael Denney Graduated form Oroville High School in 1988

information to the Border Patrol on cost overruns and problems with the contractor. “When we get the final costs tallied

SEE DENNY | PG A4

Gary DeVon/staff photo

JoAnn Denney, a 23-year employee of the City of Oroville, has been hired for the city clerk/ treasurer job upon Kathy Jones’ retirement next October.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Veteran A3 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9 Salmon People A10

Obituaries Cops & Courts

A11 A12


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 14, 2014

Considering a project on or near the water? “You may also find that there are a number of activities that are exempt from the permitting process,” said Chris Branch, director of Community Development for the city. The Oroville Planning Commission also wants to share some of the changes being considered in a recent draft of the Shoreline Management Plan, and has invited other regulatory agencies to share information about their management programs relative to Lake Osoyoos, the Okanogan and Similkameen riv-

Come talk to with the City of Oroville THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE – The City of Oroville is inviting people who are considering a project near or on the water tto the Oroville City Hall Aug. 20 between 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. to find out what kind of activity or development is allowed, and what permitting may be required. Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Oroville High School Class of 1979 will be having their 35th Reunion this weekend in Oroville. All OHS alumni (21 years and older) are invited to help them kick off the celebration with a no-host event at Alpine Brewery at 7 p.m. on Friday, followed by music and dancing at the Pastime Bar & Grill around 9 p.m. The big “79” can be barely be seen behind the school reader board on Number Mountain because of all the smoke caused by area fires. The class refreshed the paint job at their 20 year reunion 15 years ago. It hasn’t been determined yet who will go over the side on ropes for their 40th in 2019.

OHS Class of ‘79 Reunion All years invited to Friday event at Alpine and Pastime THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - The Oroville High School Class of 1979 is kicking off their 35th Class Reunion this coming weekend.

On Friday, Aug. 15 they are inviting fellow Alumni (21 and over) to celebrate with a no host event starting at Alpine Brewery at 7 p.m. and then around 9 p.m. heading to the Pastime Bar & Grill to listen to the North Half Band featuring the Class of 79’s own Steve Blackler on the drums. On Saturday, the Class of 1979 meets at the Pastime for games, snacks and pictures and more

from the North Half band at 9 p.m. On Sunday the 79ers are invited to the home of Tom and Diane Acord for a reunion wrapup barbecue featuring salmon, shrimp, hamburgers and hotdogs starting at noon. The Acords are at 10 Verbeck Road, look for balloons. For more information on the Class of 1979 reunion call 509- 476-2907.

Cross-border partnership launches ‘Discover Route 97’ tourism website TOTA AND NCWEDD JOINT RELEASE

OKANOGAN REGION - A cross-border tourism partnership launched an eye-catching website today giving visitors to North Central Washington state and British Columbia’s Thompson Okanagan region a rich new source of information and online links to learn about and explore travel destinations up and down the scenic Highway 97 corridor. The Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association (TOTA) and the North Central Washington Economic Development District (NCWEDD) have teamed up in a joint trans-border project to present a combination of new and existing tourism resources on the new Discover Route 97 website ñ route97.net. The goal of the site, with more than 30 attractive and informative webpages, is to make visitors aware of the amazing destinations along Highway 97, give them direct links to key organizations, places, and tourism resources in the area, and to promote travel on this important Canada-United States corridor. TOTA President & CEO Glenn Mandziuk says the new website demonstrates the benefits of two tourism regions working together to help expand visitor stays in both areas. “This is exactly the kind of initiative we envisioned in 2012 when TOTA and NCWEDD pledged to work together on ways to grow our tourism industries,” Mandziuk says. “By giving visitors to North Central Washington and the Thompson Okanagan a website full of information about the exciting destinations in both regions, we can help to draw visitors up and down Highway 97 for longer trips. This helps travelers and it helps our tourism industry stakeholders on both sides of the border.” NCWEDD Administrator Jennifer Korfiatis says this project recognizes that tourists don’t stop at the border. “We’re excited about this project. We believe that by working together, both

TOTA and NCWEDD can showcase our individual regions in a collective way and present compelling experiences that will help visitors to explore our regions.” Korfiatis and Mandziuk point out that this cross-border project has the support of elected officials from the cities, counties, and First Nations alliances in the regions on both sides of the border. The Discover Route 97 website project manager, TOTA Community Development Specialist Simone Carlysle-Smith, notes that the project was carried out by an experienced team of professionals who have created leading-edge tourism branding and marketing for areas in the Thompson Okanagan over the past two years. They include Roger Handling (Terra Firma Digital Arts), Teresa Nightingale (Attention Web & Graphic Design), and Kim Cameron (tourism marketing writer). “We are incorporating worldclass strategic tourism marketing elements to this project to make the new website as informative and useful for the visitor as possible,” Carlysle-Smith says. “It is being optimized for effective web searching and will be easily and attractively viewable on all mobile devices.” The website introduction notes: “Route 97 is the ribbon of highway that binds each community with the next, stretching from the Cascade foothills of the Wenatchee National Forest through Washington’s Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan Counties and crossing the Canadian border into British Columbia’s Thompson Okanagan Region, then onward to Alaska.” It includes lively and informative text, images and links about communities and destinations in areas such as Wenatchee National Forest, Lake Chelan, Leavenworth, the Channeled Scablands, Moses Coulee, the Omak Stampede, historic Winthrop, the Methow Valley, Osoyoos Lake, the Nk’Mip Desert Cultural Centre, Oliver wine country, Summerland, Kelowna, Kalamalka Lake, Vernon’s Sparkling Hill and

OHS Fall sports sign-ups THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Oroville Jr./Sr. High School will be holding a paperwork signing meeting in the High School Commons for all athletes that are planning on turning out for a Fall sport at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 19. Coaches for all fall sports will be handing out and collecting signed permission slips, physical

forms, and insurance forms from prospective athletes. All athletes and their parents are encouraged to attend. WIAA rules prohibit student athletes from participating in any practices until all forms have been signed and recorded. High school football starts Wednesday, Aug. 20; all other Fall sports start Monday, Aug. 25.

Predator Ridge Resorts, Salmon Arm, and Gold Country near Cache Creek. The website displays an interactive highlights map and notes 10 “signature experiences” noting outstanding destinations and activities on both sides of the border. It also includes special sections on Wineries, Agricultural Tourism, Events & Festivals, Entertainment, and Arts & Culture. There is a special page with information about crossing the Canada-U.S. border, as well as a Service Directory with links to listings of RV Locations, Accommodations, Electric Car Charging Stations, and Visitor Information Centers. Launch of the new Discover Route 97 website coincides with start-up of a new ground transportation shuttle service in the South Okanagan. The South Okanagan Chamber of Commerce, along with partners in the South and Central Okanagan including TOTA and Air Canada, have announced the new daily scheduled shuttle service from Osoyoos to Kelowna International Airport (YLW) with 10 inter-community stops along the way. The service begins Mon., Aug. 11 and offers four round trips per day. The Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association (TOTA) is a non-profit society governed by an elected Board of Directors who represent business and community tourism interests throughout the region. It is an industry-led organization that represents and supports all business and community tourism interests in the region, while also helping to implement provincial tourism policies. The North Central Washington Economic Development District (NCWEDD) is a federally designated economic development district for the region covering Okanogan, Douglas, and Chelan counties and the Colville Confederate Tribes. It is responsible for regional economic development strategy and planning and collaborates with various private and public agencies to accomplish this goal.

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ers, and their local tributaries. “This is a casual ‘open house’ style workshop designed to share information about existing regulations and proposed updates. City Hall is located at 1308 Ironwood. Those with questions about this upcoming workshopare encouraged to contact Branch at 509-560-3535, or e-mail him at chrisb.oroville@nvinet.com. Persons with special needs, including access and language assistance, should call or e-mail to make arrangements for accommodations.

Oroville looking for guidance on planning, Lake Osoyoos Development. The Planning Commission is currently working on a Shoreline Management Program update to be adopted by the end of 2014, and will be developing recommendations for updates to the City’s Comprehensive Plan in the near future. Occasionally, the Commission also reviews regula-

Alternate Planning Commission members wanted THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Oroville is asking, “Do have an eye on the future?” If you do and have a couple of hours available for two meetings every month you may be able to help guide the future for city and Lake Osoyoos. Oroville needs a couple of individuals for alternate Planning Commission members. Alternates participate in Planning Commission meetings but aren’t in a voting position unless there is a lack of quorum; however, they will take the next seat when it is vacated. This gives the alternate a chance to learn about the issues addressed by the Planning Commission, according to Chris Branch, director of Community

tion amendments and development proposals for recommendations to the City Council for their final decision on such matters. Call Branch at 509-322-0735 or e-mail him at chrisb.oroville@ nvinet.com, if you have an interest. He says he is looking forward to talking with you.

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AUGUST 14, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Full circle answered why we’re there, what we were there for. It was hard if you asked that question you wouldn’t get a straight answer.� When his military commitment ended, he says, “I was let go and back on the streets.� He was able to get credit for partial disability, went back to school on the GI Bill and got a job working at a VA hospital. That was also when he discovered that playing music was more than just a love of the art to him - it was actually a healing agent of sorts. “I had to learn music,� he says. “As part of my disability, my hand wasn’t working good because I got blown up. I was in physical therapy, putting my hand in sand and hot wax to stimulate it. This guy said I needed to get it working or they’d need to remove a finger or two. I went down to PX and they had a guitar there. So that’s when I learned to play the guitar. “So I went down and got this $10 guitar, which was a good one for $10, and learned how to go through and work through the pain and get my hands working again. I just kept playing. If I played, my hand doesn’t freeze up. When I stop playing, arthritis sets in when I don’t play much. My hand and fingers will lock up.� As for his anger, he says, “I just got busy. “I used the GI Bill to live on, raise a family and get an education. (I was) still living with the ghosts. You were just thrown on the streets. There weren’t a lot of support groups. I just did it myself, like a lot of vets did.�

Nam vet returns to village where he fought, was wounded BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Talk about a stranger in a strange land. John Jones, along with his wife River and his Cambodian interpreter (and self-proclaimed body guard) arrived in Memae Village last spring. Near the Cambodia/ Viet Nam border, the area is so remote that the sight of the American couple in the village was enough to bring life to a standstill. Jones had been there once before - in 1969, when he was wounded during a fierce battle with the Viet Cong in the midst of the Viet Nam War. Just finding the village meant stopping and talking to people, many of them working pepper and rubber tree plantations. What the reception would be once they found the village was an open question. “We talked to a bunch of people,� Jones says. “We finally found this Khmer woman. She knew what we were looking for, exactly. “We pull up (in the village) and here’s the pagoda. I said, ‘Go there. The way to do (make contact) is through their religion.’ And by God, out walks the monk who was there during the battle and a Viet Cong soldier who was there during the battle. The first two people that I meet. “We sat there, they looked at me, big smiles on their faces. I felt very safe, I felt really good. It was just an amazing, meant-to-be moment.� So, what does one talk about with a man that you may well have been shooting at 45 years earlier? For one thing, the Joneses were invited into the pagoda and participated in a Buddhist prayer of reconciliation. “I sat down with the one Viet Cong soldier,� he says. “He got shot at the same time (I did). He’d been wounded. We were talking about our war wounds. “He was a nice guy, pretty simple. He wanted to know why we were there. I said, I was there because I wanted to know how he felt, what his feelings were about what happened. And he said, ‘Oh, I don’t think about that any more.’ I go, ‘Really? Wow.’ “Their whole thing is just to get busy. Kind of like what happened to me. They had to replant their crops, rebuild their homes and their schools. They needed to go on. They got back to work. I think that’s how they think. They don’t harbor the animosity... (The Buddhists) don’t want to carry the baggage because it affects their life.� He said it took some time to get the villagers to understand why he’d taken the time to visit; in the time since the Viet Nam War, no one else had. “They were stunned,� he says. “They said no one had ever come back there. They had wondered why. But people just don’t know about it. It hasn’t been shared. Cambodia was different than Viet Nam. People have done a lot of work in Viet Nam. Unfortunately at the time, Cambodia was going through their pains, but America was already done with Southeast Asia. They weren’t going to go back to help Cambodia.� One reason Jones wanted to see the village was that he’d feared

Submitted photo

John Jones, right, shares his love of music with a Cambodian woman on his recent trip to visit the remote village where he once fought - and was severely wounded - during the Viet Nam War. what had become of the area in the wake of the war and, later, the atrocities inflicted on the Buddhists by Pol Pot (as depicted in the movie “The Killing Fields.â€?) “I just wanted to go the full circle,â€? Jones says. “I just had the feeling there was no life left. Boy, was I wrong. Very vibrant. Even though they went through all of what we put them through, that they put themselves through, that Pol Pot put them through, they are Buddhists. They believe in not carrying it on, and letting it go. That gave me a lot of faith.â€? That, despite the remote and impoverished life lived by the villagers. “There’s no cities even close,â€? Jones says. “It was like the poorest of poor in Cambodia. Kids wear the same clothes every day. One set of school clothes. Then they strip off everything to a pair of shorts, go barefoot. “We just spent the day there. We ate at a little sort of cafĂŠ. Very rudimentary. Mike (Stewart) can tell you, some of those places the hygiene isn’t the best, but you eat because they are eating and sharing. They bought the food for us. They were very hospitable. They would have put us up as long as we wanted to be there. They wouldn’t have charged us a penny.â€?

MEMORIES Jones’s previous visit to the village hadn’t ended well. Memae Village may have been remote, but it also was an area where the Viet Cong had set up headquarters. “They were dug in; we were at their home,� he says. “Being on tanks and tracks, they could hear us coming five miles away.� As Jones tells it, it was a case of being in the wrong place at the

wrong time. “We got caught in an L-shaped ambush,� he says. “They set it up and the tanks up front, the big boys got hit first... they hit them all. They knocked all the tanks out. “So we pulled up and went around the right hand side. My ‘60’ was red hot, firing. I’m seeing people pop up and down, right back down in the hole with RPGs. We get up just about to the front and I see the tanks all smoking and the medics trying to get to people while the battle is still going on. “I see a guy pop up with an RPG, so close I couldn’t swing to him fast enough. And it just came at me. It was like getting hit in the head with a baseball bat. It hit the shield in front of me. It took the brunt of it and sent off a billion pieces of shrapnel.� Jones took hits in the arm, shoulder and face, losing an eye. “A lot of small pieces of molten ... Pooosh ... coming at me, like Whoosh! I tell people it blasted me off the tank but what really happened was I went into shock. I crawled up and off the track and fell to the ground. “I don’t know why I did that, but I think it was because it was so hot. And I was on fire. So I just laid there. I couldn’t see. I went into shock.� Much of what happened after is a haze, though Jones said his sergeant, who was also wounded in the battle, filled in some of the details after both had been shipped to Okinawa for surgery. “I was taken and put on a track first,� Jones says. “During the

fighting they had to protect all the wounded. I remember hearing screams, gurgling and all sorts of weird stuff. Then I was put on a helicopter. I remember a little bit, somebody checking my nose to see if I was breathing. They took me to a MASH unit .... “I remember I was in this area because I could hear all these people. I heard them talking saying, ‘Take that one, (etc.)’ Priorities. It’s kind of a ghost world. “I remember going into surgery. Coming in and out. The surgeon saying, ‘You’ll be alright.’ Saying that to me, that stuck.�

THROWN INTO THE FRAY Jones was drafted in 1968, though unlike many of his compatriots, he says he didn’t think about not going, despite spending most of his formative years in the San Francisco Bay area, one of the epicenters of the anti-war movement. “I just thought it was something I was supposed to do,� he says. “I know a lot of other people weren’t doing that. I didn’t have that at that time of my life. I was still pretty conservative.� He originally intended to become a warrant officer and fly helicopters, even passed the test. “But when they told me I’d have to ‘Up’ (for six years), I said, ‘Oh, no, that’s not what I want.’ So I ended up going into Basic at Fort Lewis.� Jones ended up in the First Infantry Division - the Big Red One. “I was training in Fort Lewis, in the middle of winter - one

2

of the coldest winters on record at the time,� he says. “That was really great training for Viet Nam. When we landed it was like 105 degrees. The last stop we’d made was Anchorage. “So then I got in country. You go through that real short orientation and readjustment thing they do. Then I got put in the Second Mechanized Infantry, with tanks and tracks.� There wasn’t much time to get used to the new environs. “We’d head off on these missions, circle up (tanks and tracks) like the wagons used to, get in a big circle, butt to butt, point different directions,� Jones says. “Then they’d send out four people on observation points. That was my job as the new guy in country, you know. “I did a few overnights. I hated those. That’s where I learned not to sleep... You get pretty in touch with your inner self and your fears, especially ... “I grew up in a real protected area. There was no violence, no street gangs. It was just middle class America... Everything was peachy keen and then you get sent to the jungles of Viet Nam. It was like, AAAHHHH! Everybody’s trying to kill me! I have to take this serious!� Jones spent about three months total in Viet Nam. He still had more than nine months to serve after his injury, most of which he did as a cartoonist at the Sharp Army Depot, in Stockton, Calif. “I was starting to get pretty angry,� he says. “I never did get, like a lot of us, the question

A HELPING HAND Many people have headed back to the scene of their worst nightmares come true in order to help those from the other side. After all, many of the Viet Cong were caught in the same nightmare, not sure of what they were fighting for, other than for the lives of themselves and the guys beside them. One such man, Jones said, had invented a machine that he was using to detect and safely detonate unexploded land mines that had been killing and maiming innocent civilians decades after the conflict had ended. “He went over there to help, almost like a Peace Corps kind of thing,� Jones said. “He had this tech knowledge.... He’s got this machine with these chains and tires on the front of it, with these big long arms that go out. We talked to him and got to know him a little bit.� That contact paid off. Jones also met a former Cambodian soldier who had stepped on a mine while fighting Pol Pot. “He was telling me that the Cambodian soldiers get no help,� Jones said. “They have no VA. He gets nothing. He was working at this bungalow and they were getting rid of him because he was missing a limb. He couldn’t multi-task.� Jones made a video of the old soldier, and when meeting with the land mine detonator showed the video. “The guy who is building these land mine machines.... has an organization that helps people that have lost limbs,� Jones said. “So I was able to get them connected.� And if that isn’t reason enough to return to the scene of the nightmare once more, what is?

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 14, 2014

WATER | FROM A1 then we will talk again with the federal government about what they will pay,” said Noel. Noel also discussed the airport grant. “The documents have been signed, but we had to go back to have them reprinted because the FFA did not like the heading on them. Apparently the engineer had some title wrong and we had to have them redone and resigned by the mayor,” said Noel. Road Products Inc. of Spokane bid $89,323 to do the FAA financed project which will be make repairs to the runway, including crack sealing. The city is also receiving $5339 from the Washington State Aeronautics Airport Aid as a partial match on the project. About the Central and Cherry Street pavement overlay and waterline project, Noel said there was only one thing remaining on the “punch list” before it could be signed off on as completed. He said the city was waiting for the contractor do the Main Street crossing. He also said the state would be sending someone from the Department of Transportation to check the work that was done regarding the streets.

MOSQUITO DISTRICT Chris Branch, Director of Community Development, discussed the proposed Mosquito District, which would include several of the municipalities in the county, including Oroville, Tonasket, Riverside, Omak and Okanogan. “We had a public hearing scheduled with the commissioners to get it on the ballot. The fires caused the commissioners to cancel and reschedule for Aug. 26, so we won’t be able to get it on the general election ballot this year,” said Branch. He also said members of the committee had met with representatives from Grant County who encouraged them to do a more thorough assessment of what would be included in the district and what isn’t. He said that the Grant County district had found that some areas like alfalfa farms had been disregarded, even though they can be breeding grounds for the pests. “Rather than disease bearing mosquitos, at this point we are mostly concerned with nuisance mosquitos,” said Branch WATER SERVICE REQUEST After much discussion, a water service application from members of the DeVon family was

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The north end reservoir (right) was recently completed. You can see it here, looking up the new road to the new U.S. Border Patrol station. The reservoir was needed to ensure an adequate water supply for the station and north end customers. turned down. Ronnie DeVon and her brother Rocky approached the council with a request to hook on to the end of the water line at Gordon Robert’s property and bring city water up the OrovilleLoomis Road to the house she shares with Don Pickering. Like many of the wells in the area theirs has gone dry, most likely because the irrigation district has abandoned the ditch which used to help refresh area wells. City Superintendent Noel discussed the problems with allowing the request – he said he normally would make the final decision, but felt he should bring the request before council in this instance. Noel said Robert’s property was served by a very small line, which in turn was part of a 1948 vintage system of lines that serves properties on Summit Drive. Much of the pipe is on private property and the city does not have rights of way to service the line if something goes wrong with it. Noel said he felt the line could not adequately provide enough water because of its small size if another property was added on to it. Rocky DeVon assured the council that most of the properties served by the system had Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District water to meet any needs outside of the house. “Everyone up there has O-T for other water it would only be used for domestic purposes inside the house,” said DeVon. “The city was not involved in any of the construction of that system which was originally done in 1948, but we have installed meters. It ran out of pressure and

the city installed a pump station about 30 years ago, now it is part of the main booster station,” said Noel. “It’s one of those things that evolved over time and pre-dates most of us here. As customers kept adding on there was never enough water pressure.” Noel recommended that the applicants get together with the other people on that part of the system and see what they can work out, but staff felt that adding on to the line as it was would not be wise for the city. “If the city was to update that line all the way to Deerpath then we would have to negotiate all those easements. It looks like a capital public works project and big dollars... it may be in the future if the city were to annex those properties,” said Naillon. Branch pointed out that the city already has substandard lines on the west side of the lake after it took over the North End Water Users system. “What makes it worse is we have a substandard system on the west side of the lake and on the east side because of the new line we are encouraging standardized construction when people hook up to the main line there,” said Branch. “What we do on Eastlake is when people have property they want to develop we encourage them to get together with others and develop a main line.” “I think they need to get together with the other parties,” said Councilman Tony Koepke, adding that he felt the city had to deny the request. After much discussion the council voted to turn down the application.

COUNCIL | FROM A1 access to Chief Tonasket Park. • The council also awarded the US-97 pedestrian improvement project to Varela and Associates, one of three candidates who bid on the project. • The council appointed council members Rice and Dennis Brown to meet with prospective Eagle Scout Dallin Good about installing new signs at Chief Tonasket Park as his Eagle project; The council also met on Tuesday, August 12, after the Gazette-Tribune’s press deadline.

New Tonasket City Council Member Lois Rice takes her oath of office on July 22.

Learn more about the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Prescribed burn management, wildlife highlight Aug. 23-24 sessions SUBMITTED BY MADONNA LUERS WDFW PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER

LOOMIS - Learn about snakes and other reptiles and amphibians, geology, wildfire history and prescribed burn management, and more from experts Aug. 23-24 on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area as the celebration of the 75th anniversary of Washington’s first wildlife area continues. It’s the fourth summer weekend in the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) “Explore the Sinlahekin – Past and Present” series of free public field trips and presentations on the area’s fauna, flora, geology and history. All sessions begin at Sinlahekin headquarters, south of Loomis. Sessions are scheduled on both Saturday, Aug. 23, and Sunday, Aug. 24, about the Sinlahekin’s wildfire history and prescribed burn management by WDFW Okanogan Lands Operations Manager Dale Swedberg, WDFW fire manager Tom Leuschen, and retired U.S. Forest Service manager and researcher Richard Schellhaas. Geologic history of the Okanogan/Sinlahekin region will be presented by North Seattle Community College geologist John Figge on both days also. On Saturday afternoon, Okanogan district wildlife biologist Scott Fitkin will lead a session on snakes and other reptiles and amphibians of the Sinlahekin, including close-up views and handling.  On Sunday morning, local geologists Don Hruska and Gary Mundinger will provide a primer on Sinlahekin geology for independent exploring of the Sinlahekin’s geologic features. More details for the Aug. 23-24

Submitted photos

Valley garter snakes (top) and turtles are among the among the reptiles and amphibians of the Sinlahekin that will be highlighted by Okanogan District wildlife biologist Scott Fitkin. weekend sessions, a complete schedule of upcoming weekends (Sept. 6-7, and Sept. 27), and direc-

tions are available at http://wdfw. wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/ sinlahekin/75thanniversary.php.

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PRIMARY | FROM A1 The race for Okanogan County Coroner found David Rodriguez, Chief Criminal Deputy for the Okanogan County Sheriff ’s office the lead vote getter with 2,184 or 60.6 percent of the vote. He was way out ahead of the next highest candidate, Gary V. Reams with 1,021 votes, or 22.04 percent, but that’s enough to get him to the general election. Anthony Frey came in third with 797 votes. The Okanogan County County Assessors race had two candidates, incumbent Scott D. Furman, Democratic Party, and challenger, Les V. Stokes, Conservative Party. Furman garnered 3,062 ballots to Stoke’s 2,044. Both candidates will con-

Submitted photo

Prescribed burns and wildfire management will be a key topic during the next installment of celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area, Aug. 23-24.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

tinue on to the general election in November.

BUSINESS AS USUAL The rest of county government will remain much the same with several incumbents running unchallenged this go around. These include Jim Detro, Commissioner Position 3; Karl F. Sloan, Prosecuting Attorney; Frank Rogers, Sheriff; Laurie Thomas, Auditor; Charleen Groomes, Clerk and Leah McCormack, Treasurer. Okanogan County voters’ choice for Seventh District State Legislative office also carried few surprises. The county preferred incumbent state Senator Brian

Dansel over fellow Republican Tony Booth by nearly 1000 votes. They also prefer incumbent Position 1 Representative Shelly Short, a Republican, to Libertarian James R. Apker, by over 1800 votes. Incumbent Position 2 Representative Joel Kretz, a Republican from Wauconda, continues to be the county favorite, by over 2000 votes. Each will face each other in the general election on Tuesday, Nov. 4. The next ballot count was scheduled for Wednesday, Aug. 13 at 5 p.m. at the Okanogan County Auditor’s office. The ballot is set to be certified on Tuesday, Aug. 19.

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AUGUST 14, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER What if you held an election and nobody ran? I’m sorry, I just couldn’t get very excited about the recent primary election – what’s that you say there was an election? Yep, and in Okanogan County it’s business as usual as most of our county offices that were up for election didn’t even get contested. And those that did, well the incumbent usually came out on top. This in now way reflects on how I feel about any of the current candidates, but darn it, I at least want a choice between Brand A and Brand B. Our biggest battle was for Okanogan County PUD Commissioner Position 1 – a four way shoot-out between David Womack and three upstarts who wanted to unseat him. It looks like he’s in it for the general in November and up against Scott Vejraska, another well known name in county politics. That race at least gave us something to think about. Of course we also had a three-way fight for the newly created position of Coroner, so there was no incumbent. Chief Criminal Deputy Out of David Rodriguez came out on top and gets to face off against Gary V. Reams. So we can My Mind to get to know the candidates prior to Gary A. DeVon continue November and are not just faced with a onename ticket. Our friend Scott Furman, the current assessor, faced Les V. Stokes in the primary. Furman was top vote-getter – he will face Stokes in the general, something we knew before casting our primary votes. But at least there’s someone out there pushing Scott to do his best to keep his position. Like the candidate or not, everyone should have someone nipping at their backsides to keep the election interesting. As we write in the front page election story there were not any surprises for the state legislature either, at least as far as Okanogan County goes. We as a county like our two representatives, Joel Kretz, a local man, and Shelly Short. Brian Dansel in Republic isn’t local, but like Short, might as well be. They each had a challenger which is a good thing – keeps them on their toes. They blew the would-be legislators away in the primary, but anything can happen between now and November. As far as Jim DeTro, Frank Rogers, Charleen Groomes, Laurie Thomas and Leah McCormack at the County Courthouse and Granger Building, wouldn’t you rather have someone trying to fill your positions? Of course you wouldn’t, but it does make for a more interesting race. However, even when you have someone running against you it doesn’t always guarantee civic duty bliss. We’ve had recent city elections where the challengers seemed to go into hiding as soon as they announced. Many of them didn’t even bother to show up at council meetings to see how things were done. I’m guessing that might not be the case when the next batch of school board members go up for a vote. Anyway lets hope things heat up for the general election and we get to enjoy the democratic process the way it was meant to be. Let the mud slinging begin. Like the little girl in this year’s Best of Fest from last year’s Tumbleweed Film Festival said, “I’m kidding.”

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at (509) 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Car Dealer helping fire victims Dear Editor, I bought a car from Choice used cars in Okanogan last month so I stopped by a few days ago to see if my new plates were in yet. They weren’t but while I was there, a bunch of the sales force went out to take a picture with a young man and his new/used car. Nothing unusual in that. A couple of them got a pic with me she I got my car, too. But there seemed to be some emotion in this one so I asked what was going on. I was told that this young man had lost everything in one of the fires, had no insurance, and was trying to go to college. Choice’s employees decided they could help. They’ve been putting $200 per car sale into a “fire” kitty and when they hear about someone who needs help, they GIVE them a car! They’ve apparently already given away several cars! I asked if the papers were aware of what they are doing and the humble response was no, they’re just doing it for themselves! Charlie, the former Marine who helped me buy my rig, said he’s a little more well situated than most so he’s putting in an additional $200 of his own! Please don’t abuse these guys’ generosity by bombarding them with requests. But I wanted to acknowledge another shining example of how our community comes together to help when the

The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago August 4 - 11, 1939: Thursday, July 27th, was the hottest day at Oroville so far this season, When the reading a the government station on the east side of Lake Osoyoos at the E. R. Conover home, reached a maximum of 104 degrees. Maximum readings taken at 4 p.m. every day at the Oroville station for the past week are as follows: July 28, 100.2; July 29, 98.5; July 30, 96.8; July 31, 78.2; Aug. 1, 89.4; Aug. 2, 94.2 and Aug. 3, 91.2. Okanogan County was selected some time ago as a “demonstration” area for a range building program of erosion control and improved land use. Under the water facilities plan, Okanogan County farmers and ranchers now may apply for loans through the Farm Security Administration to finance spring and other stock water improvements, small irrigation facilities and similar water developments needed to put their operating units on a sounder economic basis. This county is one of a dozen other counties in the State of Washington. According to announcement made by the management, there will be a dance at the Lost Lake Pavilion this Saturday night. The Local Grange Jitter Bug Dance Band will furnish the music. People are invited to come to the lake, spend the weekend and take in the dance while there. Forest, brush and grain fires this year reflect the lack of moisture. Showers in May and June were a blessing, but their effect is now gone. The lack of precipitation, the steady wind and recent hot spell are now at their peak. An old landslide, which did considerable property damage but in which no one was injured, occurred at Oroville on Monday noon, when a section of earth in the Art Gjerde orchard, about a half mile south of town on Highway 10 (now County Road 7) pushed out a section of the oiled highway and spread over a low piece of ground along the river. The Oroville Canning Company will start the local cannery today fir a short run. The company has a large acreage under contract and should all conditions prove favorable, will pack out the largest pack in their history. The Oroville tomatoes are famous for their flavor and quality.

chips are down. I’m sure there are lots more stories of people just quietly helping where they can. God bless you all! Georgia Minick Oroville

Preventing the next Gaza-Israel War Dear Editor, There have now been three wars between Gaza and Israel in the past six years. If nothing is done to stop the protagonist - the Islamic resistance army more commonly known as Hamas - then the only certain future for the area is that there will be another war in the not too distant future. While many world leaders recognize the necessity of eliminating Hamas - both for the benefit of Israel and for the Palestinian civilians who suffer negatively both directly and indirectly from the decisions made by Hamas - few have the foresight or vision as to how to accomplish this task. The Palestinian Authority does not have the will or the capability to eradicate Hamas. The Arabs cannot be trusted to do it - with the possible exception of Egypt, which has been destroying terror tunnels in Gaza, enforces the necessary blockade to stop terror supplies reaching Hamas, and has thwarted an

ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago: August 6 - 13, 1964: The Okanogan County Historical Society’s first historic sites marker was dedicated Sunday at the remnants of the Hee-Hee Stone near Chesaw. The group attending the unveiling of a large routed sign, which outlines the Hee-Hee Stone legend, included George Nanamkin, representing the Colville Confederated Tribes and Mrs. Lew Pickering of Chesaw, representing old-timers in the Molson-Chesaw area. Mrs. Pickering has lived in the area since 1900. Robert Drummond, Superintendent of the Oroville Schools, announced last week that all vacancies in the teaching staff have been filled. Some kind of record is believed to have been set in that three teachers, who taught previously in the Oroville School District, are returning to teach in Oroville again. They are: Beverly Pearson, DeeLoris Sylvester and Grace Manor. New teachers are: Virginia Byers, 2nd grade; Neoma Vandiver, 3rd grade; Thomas Degenhardt, high school English and high school Speech and English. Workmen from the Sceva Steel Co. of Spokane began last week to build the new building for Prince & Son’s IGA Store on the corner of Central and Ironwood. Designed to be the largest one stop shopping center in the “Sunny Okanogan Country,” it doubles the floor space of the current building. Postmaster of the Tonasket Post Office, Chelsa D. Williams received word that during the period to Aug. 27, 1964, bids will be solicited, through open advertisement, for new construction on a site furnished by the bidder, or for existing buildings to be suitably for postal purposes. Lake Osoyoos State Park this year is witnessing its biggest season since being developed. After a slow start due to necessary improvements, the park is now overflowing each nigh in the week.

Islamic suicide bomber terror attack and rocket attacks aimed at Israeli civilians in the past month. Israel has the capability to get rid of Hamas, but the world accuses Israel of being too brutal in doing it. The western countries that could do it know full well that if they were to do it that they would behave as ‘brutally’ as they accuse Israel of in the face of Islamic terrorists using civilian human shields, and they would have to come to terms with their hypocritical stance towards Israel. Western countries also have no appetite to fight any Islamic terrorist group - especially one playing hostage to a civilian population. While it is, sadly, abundantly clear that the world is not actually prepared to do what is needed to stop the conflict reoccurring, the western world does have some control. Funds given to the Palestinians should be strictly controlled - it is irresponsible (if not downright murderous) to continue to look the other way while the Palestinian terrorists get rich, spare no expense on buying rockets and invest millions in terror tunnels. Without funds the terror trade of Hamas will die, even though the ideology of course will not. Perhaps this is the best solution that the western would is prepared to fathom for now. Michelle Moshelian Givatayim, Israel

Grocery Prices: Prime Rib Roast, $.79 lb.; Bologna, any size chunk, $.39; Sweet corn, 7 for $1.00; MJ Coffee, $.69 lb; Peanut Butter, 28 oz, $.69; #1 Potatoes, $.05 lb; Butter, $.47 lb; Round Steak, $.69 lb. Weather-wise, by Marge Frazier, Official Observer: Aug. 5, 80 degrees maximum and 41 degrees Minimum; Aug. 6, 85 and 45; Aug. 7, 91 and 45; Aug. 8, 86 and 62; Aug. 9, 79 and 57; Aug. 10, 84 and 51 and Aug. 11, 93 and 48. Total precipitation for the week, .07 inches.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago: August 3 - 10, 1989: The withdrawal of financial backing by an influential Taiwanese family, a small group of entrepreneurs plans on plowing ahead with the of manufacturing chopsticks in the Tonasket area. One of the first questions asked was, why, after expressing such a positive interest, did the Liu family withdraw from the project? It seems they required six cords a day but locally only two cords would be available. The Washington apple industry intends to distribute 1.3 million bushels of apples to charities, livestock feeder and ethanol producers under bids approved today by the United States Department of Agriculture. The package amounts to $9.1 million reimbursement to Washington apple growers. $15 million was allocated, however only the $9 million were approved by the USDA. “This smaller offering and approval in an indicator that the distribution system worked only to remove surplus apples without disrupting the normal market conditions,” said a spokesman. The selection of the 1989-90 Tonasket Jr. Miss will take place in mid September. Judging at the local, state and national levels is based on judge’s interviews, poise and appearance, youth fitness, creative and performing arts and scholastic achievement. All interested parties should contact Ms. Rhonda Colbert. Real Estate: Two bdrm house on corner lot in Tonasket, fireplace, garage, great location, $33,000.; Not many left on Lake Osoyoos, 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath home in good condition, fireplace, kitchen with eating area, full basement, 78 ft. excellent beach frontage, $79,000; 40 acres, fenced, well, spring, trees, livable trailer, electricity, secluded view, good access, 3 miles to store, $35,000, terms.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 14, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Give those fire bombers some room on the lake Another week of hot days has brought us to the middle of the month. Past records show that the fire season begins this month… so, what have we been having? This has been a bad season, already, with so many folks losing their homes. The latter part of last week kept the lake rippling with the going and coming of BIG airplanes, dipping up water to use as retardants on the nearby fires. Swimmers and boaters are foolishly staying in the areas where the planes come and go which could lead to an accident. As I glanced out a window and saw a moving object, I thought what a large dog and on closer investigating it was not a dog, but a deer right in the middle of 21st Ave.

Reliable sources tell me of the death of Howard “Howie” Chamberlin, who was a pharmacist, and son of Elaine (Sawyers) Chamberlin and the late Howard Chamberlin. Cancer strikes again! Velma Colbert Hill, long time resident of, Chesaw and Oroville is seriously ill. Hopefully the loving thoughts from friends, family and Hospice can help maintain a level of comfort for her at this time. Vivian Emry, who has recently moved to Vashon Island, to the home of her daughter, Joannie Raymond, for some TLC (tender loving care). Little did she know she would need hospital care, shortly after the move, as she had an

unfortunate fall which damaged her eye and nose, but is recovering without surgery as was initially thought to be necessary. She hopes to be able to return to Molson for the upcoming quilt show, Aug. 30. Definition of a flashlight: A case for holding dead batteries. Total darkness at 9 p.m. and such a short time ago I could still see to read on our deck. A drive to Lost Lake to see our grandson and family, who have started a tradition of coming there to camp, from their home in Snohomish, were enjoying good days, last week. There were quite a few folks but camping is not my style but if I lived in the city and fought traf-

Summer Festival upcoming Former Garlic Festival expanding its repertoire

fic all week, perhaps I’d have a different gift, just get hot wheel cars or some other attitude. Justin is a teacher and the three fully assembled toy.” boys will soon be back in school and A Memorial Service for our special Becky’s job with Boeing is Ellen Roberts which had famtaking her to a new location. ily, friends and co-workers in Monday of this week gave attendance and although she us welcome, cooler weather, said she didn’t want “people but we’re still going to have talking about her” I believe more hot weather according she would have been satisfied to the forecasts. with the service. How can My husband really likes you have lived so many years to keep up with the fore(103.9) years and been affilicasts, so a weather station ated with such a lot of folks seemed a great gift. Little and not have some of them did I know it would take want to share their thoughts. an “engineer” to assemble THIS & THAT She was indeed a delightful the said gift. It has been person and a special aunt! in the box, just waiting for Joyce Emry Family from as far away as the Wenatchee son-in-law to England were on hand to come and install this wonshare in all the memories. derful item. That happened this past It’s hard to understand how a cemetery weekend and let me tell you, we know raised its burial rates and blamed it on how fast the wind is blowing, what the the cost of “living.” rainfall is (when that happens) and all Last Sunday two baseball teams those other good things pertaining to played 19 innings before one, finally, weather. Parting words from said son-in- won. Can you imagine that? That is law, “Mom the next time you get dad a more than two full games.

Correction on date SUBMITTED BY JOSEPH ENZENSPERGER

Last week’s Oroville Grange News article in the GazetteTribune had the wrong date for the Oroville Grange’s August

SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD

TONASKET - Fasten your seatbelts: you’re in for a fun and exciting time at the Annual Tonasket Summer Festival, on August 22-23. You say you’ve never heard of the Summer Festival? How about the Garlic Festival? It is the same great event with a new title. Organizers at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, sponsors of the long running event, have chosen to change the name to reflect the expanded nature of the festival. Over the years the festival has evolved to celebrate all the produce of our local growers, not just garlic. Artists, musicians, great food, games, beer and wine add to the experience. The fun kicks off In History Park, located on the bank of the Okanogan River, on Friday, Aug. 22 at noon and continues until 7:00 p.m., with Saturday’s activities running from 10:00 a.m.7:00p.m. Plan on attending this family-friendly event both days, as the music and entertainment varies each day, and admission is free for all. Entertainers will include Steve Kinzie, John Phillips, Steve Pollard, Sandy Vaughn, Julie Ashmore, Harvey Swanson, Ruby Rust, Chuck Oakes, Deb Vester, Don Elliott, Kyle McConnell, Sunny Lanigan and Craig “Fish”

Don’t forget to renew your dues SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

It is still HOT and fires are all around us. Hope all of you are safe where you live and enjoying the summer. Don’t forget that you need to use your yellow door card as of Saturday, Aug. 16 to enter the building, so make sure it is in your wallet or purse. You also need to mail in or stop by and

Quilt Show and Hot August Nights Aug. 30 SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Were you ready for this latest Hot Spell? I think we could have done without the three digit days. The high 70s or low 80s are just right. The Highland Hooters of Chesaw/Molson are going to get together on Aug. 18 for lunch at Bonaparte Resort. If you are inter-

SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

Come celebrate the summer harvest! After several weeks hiatus from Tonasket, including a trip to the coast, where 70 degree temperatures felt downright cold to a body acclimated to triple digit heat, a surprise awaited me at Tonasket Farmers’ Market. The bounty of fresh, ripe fruits and vegetables is finally here. The culmination of a family farmers hard work; the tilling, the planting, the watering, waiting, weeding and praying has finally paid off and we, the customers, are the beneficiaries of this bounty. Manuel and Alma Casteneda are back, along with their family of young entrepreneurs. Their booth features the first of the sweet corn and watermelons. They also have both green and purple kohlrabi, an under appreCohoe. Bring your appetite along to indulge in a tasty array of local dishes available for purchase. Plenty of fresh fruit and veggies will be for sale from area farmers. There are activities planned throughout the festival for the children, and a beer and wine garden for the “older children.” And, yes, there will be garlic.

TONASKET EAGLES renew your dues if you haven’t already as you can not be signed in if dues haven’t been paid. The Auxiliary would like to thank State Madam President Donna Simonds for her visit, what a nice lady. On Saturday, Aug 16 at 6 p.m. there will be a celebration of life for Debbie Emond, she will be missed. Our Friday night bingo will be at 7 p.m. and is open to the public,

HILLTOP COMMENTS ested in going please let Kathie Hennig at 509-485-2427 know you want to go. We will try to car pool by 10:30 a.m.-11 a.m. from the Senior Center in Oroville and from the Community Building in Chesaw. We usually have a good lunch and a good time getting together. We will be planning our annual “ Tea Party”. Saturday, Aug. 30 is really going to be a big day for both Chesaw and Molson. The big Quilt Show

For those who don’t wish to frolic under the sun, the large old trees in History Park offer plenty of shade relief. People come from far and wide: Spokane, Canada, (even Loomis) to enjoy this annual celebration of the summer harvest. Don’t miss The Tonasket Summer Festival; sun or shade, you’re sure to have fun! Pick 8 is up to $13,900. You can’t win if you don’t play. Kitchen opens at 5:30 p.m. Saturday night is the Joker Poker drawing at 6:45 p.m. bar time and it is still growing, you have a chance to win half of $2,404. Must be present to win, also enjoy Karaoke with Linda Wood. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place William McKnight, second place Dale Byers, low score went to Penny Smith and last pinochle to Jerry Cooksey and Penny Smith. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little eagles in the State. will be held in Molson at the Grange Hall with lots and lots of quilts, demonstrations, ideas for just about anything you want to learn how to do. Just come and see. Again – that is at Molson. Over in Chesaw you will find the Hot August Nights Super Duper Classic Cars Show. Everyone is welcome. Come and see all of the great cars. The next BINGO night will be in Molson at 7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 15. The buy in is $10 for 10 games. Of Course you can purchase additional cards. Bring a friend and a snack to share at break time. Until next time.

Music this Friday SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

The breakfast held a the Senior Center on Saturday, Aug. 9 was classed as a success. The doll and bed put together by James Gutschmidt, President and Doris Hughes, who made one of her beautiful quilts, only in miniature, for the doll. She also made

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - The new school year is only weeks away. Tonasket High School has released key dates for students and parents to be aware of. • August 13 - Office opens for new student registration, (office hours are 7:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.); • August 18 - New student scheduling and class changes; • August 20 - First day of locker check-out. All outstand-

TONASKET MARKET REPORT ciated vegetable which is a favorite on our table. Daughter Maria made sure each passing customer knew about their plums, too. Ton of Leaping Sheep Farm drew me into his booth with a sample of melon; that was all it took! Sweet, juicy and perfectly ripe “Galia” (a honeydew cantaloupe cross) was the winner of the taste test. There were no losers. The other two varieties are “Rocky Ford” and “Haogen” (an Israeli variety.) Also making it into my market bag was “Ronde de Nice,” a round, light green French type of zucchini. Sliced, sautéed in olive oil along with

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS the mattress and pillow. She has quite a vocabulary and her own binkie (Not Doris! The Doll!). Could you guess who won the doll and bed? The winner – Jack Hughes. Music this Friday afternoon

ing fines must be paid prior to early locker checkout. Times: Seniors, 12:00 p.m.; Juniors, 12:30 p.m.; Sophomores, 1:00 p.m.; Freshmen, 1:30 p.m.; • August 26 - Back to School Open House. Barbeque, 5:30 p.m.; Classroom visits, 6:00-7:30 p.m.; • August 27 - First Day of School - begins 8:30 a.m. with back to school assembly in gym.; • September 2 - Picture Day.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

garlic and topped with a chiffonade of fresh basil, it is summer’s flavor at its best. Eggplant lovers are in for a treat here; check out five different varieties of the purple vegetable, some of which are not purple at all. Mariah has fresh garlic from her Heart of the Highlands farm. “Island Mountain” is the favorite soft neck garlic, and “Persian Star” is her favorite hard neck. Her seed packets are on sale as an end of season close out. Stop to see her dotted bergamot plants, a perennial that looks like a Dr. Seuss creation. Across the aisle, along side her marshmallow cheesecake and handmade pizza, Michelle of Mt. Top Bakery has fresh organic blueberries. Young Isabela performed her own two-thumbs-up taste test on the berries. Come to the market, taste for yourself. Enjoy the summer harvest. See you at the market! right after lunch, with Harold Rounds and Mike Chapple. They will join us at lunch and then play for an hour or so afterwards. An All Years Oroville High School Reunion will be held at Alpine Brewery (for those 21 and over) on Friday, Aug. 15. The event will move to the Pastime Bar and Grill at 9 p.m. Pinochle scores for Aug. 9: The door prize was won by Betty Hall. Leonard Paulsen was the high scoring man. More next time.

Lucky Buddhas from $2.99 to $648.00

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Meeting and Dinner. Meetings are regularly held at

7 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month, which would be the 20th of August, not the 13th as previously reported. A family style dinner will be served at 6pm with all community and future Grangers welcome. If you are thinking about Grange, Call Betty Steg 509-4763878.

Tonasket HS gears up for school year

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AUGUST 14, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR Local Talent Jam Session at Winery

Oroville Farmers’ Market

OHA Geology Tour

OROVILLE – Esther Bricques Winery brings a musical jam session organized by Sandy Vaughn to the patio this Thursday, Aug. 14. A variety of local talent will be on stage, offering a variety of musical genres. Doors open at 6 pm, with music to follow. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or check out the Events page on www.estherbricques.com.

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, Aug. 16 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. The 2014 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: Aug. 2 and Aug. 30. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509476-2662.

OHS All Alumni Reunion

Desert Park Races

Okanogan Highlands Alliance hosts its fourth geology tour on Saturday, Aug. 16, led by a team of speakers that each brings a different emphasis. This outdoor tour will touch on three major geologic processes that have shaped this area: glaciation, terrane accretion and volcanic activity. This is primarily a driving tour, though there may be some hiking on steep slopes and uneven terrain in order to get a closer look at certain sites. Preregistration is required: contact Julie Ashmore at 509-476-2432 or julie@okanoganhighlands.org. Details as to time and place to meet will be provided upon registration.

OROVILLE - There will be a no host All Alumni Reunion get together on Friday, Aug. 15 at Alpine Brewery starting at 7 p.m. All Oroville Alumni over 21 and older are invited to attend. The party then moves to the Pastime Bar & Grill at 9 p.m. to listen to the North Half Band.

OSOYOOS - Horse races return to Desert Park in Osoyoos on Saturday, Aug. 16. Parade to the post is at 1:30 p.m. Watch for direction signs on the road. Beer garden, concession stands. Admission is $5 and there is free parking. Check out the website at www.desertpark.org for more info. Special feature following the races

Clothing Exchange OROVILLE - The Fifth Annual Clothing Exchange will be held on Aug. 16 at the Church of Latter Day Saints in Oroville

UPWARD BOUND

Submitted photo

Left to right, Kaitlyn Grunst, Jessica Galvan, Leo Curiel, Tiffany Ferdon, Alissa Young were among those participating in the Upward Bound job shadow program at North Valley Hospital last spring. Also taking part, but not pictured, were Cruz Ortega, Ethan Bensing, Colton Leep, Hilda Celestino and Rosemary Luna.

WSU Upward Bound-North provides job shadow at NVH SUBMITTED BY DESIRAE COE AND STASSIA FELTES UPWARD BOUND ACADEMIC COORDINATORS

TONASKET - Washington State University Upward BoundNorth piloted its Job Shadow Program at North Valley Hospital last May. One of the primary goals of the WSU Upward Bound program is to expose students to career opportunities that will enable them to make strong decisions about their career and college path. WSU Upward Bound-North placed a mix of 10 Oroville and Tonasket High School students interested in the medical field within departments of North Valley Hospital related

to their specific career interest. The students were chosen for the pilot program as a result of their participation in an earlier online Career Survey conducted by WSU Upward Bound Coordinators Desirae Coe and Stassia Feltes and their completion of a Job Shadow Program Packet. Students shadowed professionals for up to eight hours over two days, observing and inquiring about the details of their profession. The students reflected on the value of this unique opportunity to gain direct insight into the career path they have selected. Nearly all the students agree they will continue to pursue their chosen career path and have a renewed motivation to set goals

and continue to develop the path they are on. WSU Upward Bound-North appreciates the time and effort of North Valley Hospital staff that helped make the first Job Shadow Program a success. A special thank you to Human Resources Assistant Diane Anderson and Director of Ancillary Services Noreen Olma for their coordination and groundwork, allowing for a smooth program and outstanding experience for the students. Upward Bound is a federal TRiO program, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, under Title 34, Part 645 of the Higher Education Act, in the amount of $250,000 per year for a period of five years.

Avoid Expensive Errors When Paying For College or savings account to a college savings vehicle. Not considering vehicles with growth potential â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The same Sallie Mae study found Sandra Rasmussen that more parents use a general savings account Financial Advisor than any other method of saving for college. 32 N Main St. Suite A But since most savings accounts these days Omak, WA 98841 pay only a minimal rate of return, you will have 509-826-1638 trouble getting the growth potential you need to www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC achieve your college savings goals. Consider Reported by Edward Jones working toward your college savings goals by Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just about Back-to-School time again - LQYHVWLQJ LQ D YHKLFOH VSHFLÂżFDOO\ GHVLJQHG IRU If you have young children, you might be college, such as a 529 plan or a Coverdell plan. hustling them to the store for backpacks and There are differences between these plans, binders. But if you fast-forward a few years, such as contribution limits and tax treatments, you can envision driving your kids a little farther but both allow you to invest for growth potential. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to their college dorms. And when that day As with any investment account, there are risks FRPHV\RXÂśOOZDQWWREHÂżQDQFLDOO\SUHSDUHG involved, including market risk. So youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to avoid making costly mistakes when preparing for, and paying, those big bills. Stopping your savings once your children Here are some of the most common of these are in college â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Unless your children plan to take an awful lot of credits, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to errors: ÂżQLVK FROOHJH LQ MXVW RQH \HDU &RQVHTXHQWO\ Not saving enough â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Only half of all families youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll want to keep investing in your plan or other with children under 18 save any money for college savings vehicle while your children are college, according to a recent study by Sallie in school. Mae, the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest originator of federally LQVXUHGVWXGHQWORDQV<RXPLJKWÂżQGLWHDVLHU Taking out 401(k) loans â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Your employer to save for college if you automatically move may allow you to take out a loan against your a set amount each month from your checking 401(k) to help pay for college. But this may not

FINANCIAL FOCUS

be a good idea for two reasons: First, when you remove money from your 401(k) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even if you plan on eventually paying it back â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you will slow the potential accumulation in your account, thereby depriving yourself of resources you will eventually need for retirement. Second, should you leave the company, you might have to repay the loan within a limited number of days. Not using available tax credits â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Depending RQ \RXU LQFRPH \RX PLJKW TXDOLI\ IRU WKH American Opportunity tax credit, which is worth up to $2,500, provided you spend at least $4,000 on college expenses. Check with your tax SURIHVVLRQDOWRVHHLI\RXTXDOLI\IRUWKLVFUHGLW and how to most effectively incorporate it. And be careful you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t waste the credit, because you may not be able to use it and your plan distributions at the same time. Paying for college can be challenging â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but if you can avoid making the above mistakes, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a better chance of getting your kids through school without derailing the progress \RXÂśG OLNH WR PDNH WRZDUG \RXU RWKHU ÂżQDQFLDO goals. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

on N. Hwy. 97. The exchange is from our house to yours. The hours are from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be clothing for all ages from infants to adults. So come early.

Daniels at 509-560-3589

at (509) 486-2192.

Ruby Rust, Mood Swings to Perform

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grangeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s August Meeting and Dinner will be Wednesday, Aug. 20 at 7 p.m. (not Aug. 13 as previously reported). A familystyle dinner will be served at 6pm with all community and future Grangers welcome. If you are thinking about Grange, Call Betty Steg at 509-476-3878.

OROVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ruby Rust will perform on stage at Esther Bricques Winery on Thursday, Aug. 21, with The Mood Swings the following week on Thursday, Aug.28. Doors open at 6 p.m., with music to follow. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, call the winery at (509) 476-2861 or check out the Events page on www.estherbricques.com.

Free Child Seat Safety Check

Tonasket Food Bank

OROVILLE -Free Child Car Seat Safety Check on Tuesday, Aug. 7. Sponsored by Oroville EMTS and Royal Neighbors at EMS Hall - 1311 Ironwood, Oroville. For more info call Jackie

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sargeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts

Oroville Grange Dinner/Meeting

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Calendar allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. Our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Include day, date, time and location, as well as an information phone number. Submit to gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844. Online click calendar and add event.


PAGE A8

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TONASKET HOME

Large Home, beautifully landscaped, fenced very private backyard, accents this home in established neighborhood. 2319 sq ft. with 4 bedrooms, 1 ¾ baths, hobby room, open spacious kitchen, Lots of parking, sprinkler system, all this within walking distances of schools and shopping. Price reduced to $249,500. Call 509-486-2295 for appointment.

Houses For Sale

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HILLTOP REALTY

HELPFUL HINTS TO SELL YOUR HOME 1. Fix what needs fixed! Finish all unfinished projects: Example - Patch holes, fix leaky sinks and toilets, etc... 2. Useable space is a key factor: Example - Make a junk room into an office. 3. Declutter! Put everything away and ready to move: Example - Family photos, knickknacks, etc... 4. Paint! It is amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do. Make it a soft, neutral color. 5. Open your rooms up! You want everything to look bigger! If you have too much furniture in a room, decide which pieces to keep and find a place to store the rest. Arrange the remaining furniture to make the room look larger. 6. CLEAN! CLEAN! CLEAN! Make everything sparkle!

— WANTED —

Have Out of State Buyer for Nice Cabin on 20 Acres (maybe less). Trees. Water. Power. Good Access. Price Open. Need 20 Acres m/l with small modest home. Tonasket area. Up to $175,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com z 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855 www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon LAKE AND COUNTRY Lake Osoyoos View Home and so much more! 7KLVKRPHVLWVRQDSSUR[DFUHVKDVDWHUUL¿FOD\RXW DQGLVEULJKW VSDFLRXV0DVWHUVXLWHKDVLWVRZQÀRRUDQG balcony. There is a 2 car garage, and newer shop/4 car garage, with attached guest quarters. A stable with fenced pasture too! Great location! MLS#680573 $285,000

www.windermere.com 509/476-3378 The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

5 Washington South -Great views from this 3 bed tri-level home in Molson, very well maintained. Spacious, open kitchen kitchen, living room. Kitchen recently remodeled, new refrigerator,microwave and dishwasher. Work shop wired with 110. plus storage shed for lawn equipment, all on .83 of an acre. NWML# 651285 $159,000

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

SUN LAKES REALTY

1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Keith Kistler DISTINCTIVE WOOD CRAFTSMAN/

Contemporary one level home grandly overlooking Lake Osoyoos! 3 bed 2 bath & extra multipurpose room for entertainment. Huge garage & Barn/Shop. 2nd Lakeview lot is included

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PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 14, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

The Salmon People at Depot Museum BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE - The Salmon People, Stories Tell the Past, the summer-long exhibit at the Oroville Depot Museum continues through mid-September. The exhibit, presented by the Borderlands Historical Society, is an attempt to tell the story of the Okanagan Indian Tribe, the indigenous people who called this part of the valley home. “Every year we’re going to try and do something different at the museum, this year we are doing the Okanagan Indians,” said Arnie Marchand, a local author and wealth of knowledge on the Okanagans. He and others have participated in a series of talks that took place at the museum to share their knowledge on these native peoples. “We had a strong committee of people to help us put together the exhibit,” said Marchand. “I told the historical society board this can’t be the ‘Arnie Marchand’ show.” There were five women on the committee, along with two men. “Those five women along with a couple of guys did the whole display,” he said. “I think they did a pretty good job. We also had help from the grade school and the seventh and eighth grades.” This help can be seen in many of the illustrations and drawings, as well as the reeds that were gathered to build the representation of a traditional pit house. “Last year the fourth graders picked the tules, they learned how to collect them and sew them together. They also learned how the hole was dug. The uprights were put in and then they laid in the mats. These mats could be three to four feet deep,” said Marchand. From pit houses then we moved to tule mat lodges, you could add more mats and insulate to last all winter. Lodges like the size of this building (the Depot) could house five families or serve as a meeting house.” Marchand said the pit house era predates the early 17th century, according to some very old Indian women that were interviewed after World War I. “One reason was because they became more mobile because of the horse... they weren’t nomadic, but were able to move to the fishing,” he said. The Oroville area was called Salti’lxu’ - “Heaping Stone House,” according to Marchand. He said it got its name because across the river there was a struc-

Clockwise from below: nineyear-old Miles Hefker, from Oroville examines the pit hut display from The Salmon People exhiibit at the Oroville Depot Museum; local author/ historian Arnie Marchand explains the significance of some artifacts (these are reproductions that were donated that kids are encouraged to handle); the museum is decked out in displays that tell the story of the Okanagan Indian Tribe.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

ture that was hundreds of feet long constructed of “rock, clay, rock.” “The walls were two feet thick... it was crumbling after the turn of the last century and then the railroad ran right through it. In its time it was a pretty substantial fortress that could protect the people for a lot of the year,” he said. “The structure protected the people against the Blackfeet and

Shuswap – traditional enemies that couldn’t sneak up on us.” Heaping Stone House had a door on the west end and window like openings on two sides. “We called them openings, it’s ironic we didn’t have words for door or window.” Marchand said the Okanagans’ main town was about 1.5 miles south of where Oroville is today where the Similkameen hits the

Okanogan. He says to the west of that there was a pit house site where hundreds of Okanagans live. He also talked about other nearby areas where his people lived. “By the time the white people got her most of the Indians were gone. Many went to the head of Lake Okanagan. The Nk’Mips went to the other end of Osoyoos Lake and stayed,” he said.

Marchand said there were many reasons the tribe moved, but one was because of 1782 small pox outbreak that killed many people. Since this was a major fishery among the Okanagan, they continued to return to the area for the next 200 years to fish. Okanagan Falls is another major fishery, he said. Marchand is the author of The

Way I Heard It: A Three Nation Reading Vacation, now in its second printing. The Depot Museum and Visitor Information Center is open 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday through Saturday. The special “The Salmon People: Stories Tell the Past” exhibit will be featured through Sept. 13. Special tours can be arranged by contacting the museum at 509-476-2739.

Highland Stitchers’ Molson Quilt Show THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

MOLSON – The Third Annual Quilt Show, sponsored by the Highland Stitchers, returns to Molson on Saturday, Aug. 30 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Molson Grange Hall. The show features quilts on display, demonstrations and vendors offering a variety of quilting supplies. There will also be food available. “This year we will be donating quilts to Morning Sun Ministries. We will be donating quilts to Morning Sun Ministries.

Morning Sun Yellow Pony is from the Cherokee Tribe. She wears many hats including, teacher, singer/songwriter, and minister/evangelist mainly focusing in the western United States. Her mission statement is to take a stand for the prevention of child abuse, promote education, health issues and to support the first nations people,” said Vicky Didenhover, with the Highland Stitchers. The donated quilts will be given to those with the greatest needs. The group is expecting Morning Sun to be present to

share more information about her ministry and the quilts be will on display. The Highland Stitchers will be demonstrating making your own fabric with shaving cream and ink at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. At 2 p.m. there will be demonstrations on crochet, knitting and crocheting a rag rug. “Quilts will be displayed for your viewing pleasure but we also have a wonderful variety of quilts for sale along with other sewing related items,” said Didenhover.

Did you know? We use...

z Soy Ink z Recycled Paper z Excess paper recycled for gardens, ÀUHVWDUWHU PRUH

“Local quilt makers, do you want to display or sell a quilt in the show? Your quilt does not have to represent any kind of specific theme or design elements.” Contact Didenhover for more information. Also contact her if you want to be a vendor at the quilt show. Those that have sewing, quilting, or needle art related items they would like to sell (item can

Shalonuns oFonod’s! Fabu

„ „ „ „

Breakfast Every Morning Steak Night on Wed. & Sat. Spaghetti Thursday Prime Rib Friday — We have WiFi — 626 Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2259

be made from a variety of mediums - but must have a sewing/ quilting theme), table are available for $10. “Many of our vendors from last year will be returning this year but we will also have new vendors. We are happy to be supported by Hughe’s Fabric Department this year and they will also be here with items to sell.

There will also be door prizes every half hour, as well as raffles. The group’s quilts and hand crafted items are for sale all year long at Marylou’s Gifts and More Street in Oroville\. “We greatly appreciate her support of our mission to support the community,” said Didenhover, who can be contacted about displaying or vending or for more information at 509-485-3020

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PAGE A11

COPS & COURTS CRIMINAL

Arthur Leroy Sims Jr., 45, Oroville, pleaded guilty Aug. 5 to two counts of distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and one count of unlawful use of a building for drug purposes. Sims was sentenced to 12 months in prison and fined $3,110.50 for the Dec. 12, 2011 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Oct. 13. Alicia Jonele Wilson, 20, Omak, pleaded guilty Aug. 5 to seconddegree TMVWOP and POCS (methamphetamine). The crimes occurred Feb. 21. In a separate case, Wilson pleaded guilty Aug. 5 to custodial assault. That crime occurred March 6. Wilson was sentenced to a total of four months in jail and fined a total of $3,221. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 15. The court found probable cause to charge Cheryl Marie Minarcin, 41, Oroville, with second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred July 29. The court found probable cause to charge Samuel Cormier Dube, 26, Laval, Quebec, with POCS (ecstasy) with intent to deliver, POCS (heroin), POCS (PCP) and POCS (cocaine). The crimes allegedly occurred July 26 and the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge David Toman, no middle name listed, 24, Lavel, Quebec, with POCS (ecstasy) with intent to deliver. The crime allegedly occurred July 26 at the Oroville Port of Entry. The court found probable cause to charge Larry Leroy Pauley, 57, Tonasket, with first-degree attempted murder (premeditated) and fourth-degree assault. The crimes allegedly occurred Aug. 2.

JUVENILE

A 12-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty July 16 to third-degree theft. The girl was sentenced to nine days in detention with credit for nine days served, and fined $100 for the May 4 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 24. A 15-year-old Tonasket boy pleaded guilty July 13 to third-degree theft, MIP/C and making false or misleading statements. The boy was sentenced to 12 days in detention with credit for eight days served, and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 24.

CIVIL

The state Department of Revenue has assessed the following businesses for unpaid taxes and penalties: Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auto Parts, Inc., Tonasket, $5,005.56; O.C. Autoworks, Tonasket, $1,100.97; Subway (Smith Brothers Enterprises, LLC), Tonasket, $7,625.76; A & C Electric, LLC, Oroville, $2,665.19; JAC LLC, Okanogan, $3,654.25; and Kamo Gun Works, Omak, $2,547.76. The state Department of Labor and Industry has assessed the following businesses for unpaid workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compensation taxes and penalties: Zosel Lumber Company, Oroville, $12,820.19; Mickeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chuckwagon Cafe, Omak, $805.76; Sapp, Inc., Okanogan, $5,204.96; The Shop Tavern, Oroville, $290.74; and High Mountain Farm, Oroville, $922.01. The state Department of Labor and Industry has assessed the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits: Cleveland Jones Jr., Okanogan, $2,011.44; Holli N. St. Clair, Okanogan, $537.68; Shane Wehmeyer, Okanogan, $5,923.34; Vanessa M. Bejar, Okanogan, $521.83; and Gamari Griffin, Omak, $1,071.

DISTRICT COURT Tyler Scott Fife, 20, Oroville, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Fife received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Russell James Cole Freeman, 43, Oroville, had a harassment charge dismissed. Abby Rae Gardner, 36, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Athalia Garfias, no middle name listed, 25, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Garfias was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Dawn Lynn Garton, 29, Tonasket, had three charges dismissed: third-degree malicious mischief, disorderly conduct and harassment. Kristopher Ray Emil Gattman, 35, Oroville, had a violation of a nocontact order dismissed. Justin Thomas Gentemann, 24, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Gentemann was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 165 days suspended, and fined $708. He also had a charge dismissed: resisting arrest. Eric Alan Harbin, 24, Tonasket, guilty of first-degree criminal trespassing. Harbin was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $808. Mitchell Ray Hofferber, 53, Tonasket, had a charge dismissed: no valid operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license without ID. Gerald Francis Holeman, 67, Okanogan, guilty of aiming or discharging a firearm. Holeman received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $468. Audrey Ann Huckins, 51, Omak, had an obstruction charge dismissed. Anastasia M. King, 21, Tonasket, had a third-degree theft charge dismissed. King was fined $3.79. Kyle Louis King, 22, Omak, had an obstruction charge dismissed. Tyler James Kion, 23, Tonasket, had a DUI charge dismissed. Jerry Lee Lane, 37, Oroville, guilty of DUI. Lane was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended and fined $1,381. Kory J. Lester, 45, Okanogan, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Lester was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,158. Lester also had a hit-and-run (unattended prop-

erty) charge dismissed. Warren Elmer Locke, 49, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Locke received a 90-day suspended sentenced and fined $818. Angelo Javier Lopez, 32, Omak, guilty of violation of a no-contact order. Lopez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $608. Carolyn Lee Lozano, 36, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Aug. 4, 2014 Illegal burning on Boundary Point Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief at City Park in Riverside. Theft on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. Utility problem on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Riverside Ave. in Omak. iPhone reported missing. DWLS on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Ash St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Ash St. in Omak. Burglary on N. Main St. in Omak. Threats on S. Granite St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Birch St. in Oroville. Fraud on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Adam Charles Luntsford, 39, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for fourth-degree assault. Brian Christopher Dick, 43, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Shannon T. Simpson, 30, booked for an ignition interlock violation and third-degree DWLS. Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2014 Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Wakefield Lane near Oroville. Fraud on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Facebook account reported hacked. Threats on Green Lake near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Alcohol offense on Hendrick Rd. near Omak. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on Golden Rd. in Oroville. Threats on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Fraud on S. Main St. in Omak. Counterfeit bill reported. Littering on S. Locust Way in Tonasket. Desiree Letha Shelton, 57, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Travis Jay Turley, 29, DOC detainer (fire crew). Ciara Marie Lasarte, 28, DOC detainer. Javier Lopez, no middle name listed, 26, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: first-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree DWLS. Domingue Gonzalez, no middle name listed, 22, booked on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, booked on a probable cause warrant for second-degree assault. Jeffrey Howard Herschlip, 57, booked on an Oroville Police Department FTC warrant for reckless endangerment. Wednesday, Aug. 6, 2014 Vehicle prowl on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Found property on Eastside Oroville Rd. near Oroville. Bicycle recovered. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Loitering on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Tools and fuel reported missing. Warrant arrest on Jackson St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Railroad St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Koala Ave. in Omak. Threats on N. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on S. Ash St. in Omak. No injuries reported. Trespassing on Columbia St. in Omak. Patrick Lee Day, 44, DOC detainer. Eli Paul Vanbrunt, 29, booked on three FTA warrants: second-degree theft, third-degree theft and second-degree burglary. Deena Jean Lazard, 25, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for possession of a legend drug. Chad Vanetta, no middle name listed, 28, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Lisa Diane Wolff, 34, booked on an FTA warrant for a controlled substance violation and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014 Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Railroad Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Pharr Rd. near Riverside. Juvenile problem on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Ladders reported missing. Warrant arrest on Brooks Tract Rd. near Omak. Theft on West Fork Cougar Rd. near Wauconda. Theft on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Vehicle prowl on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Prescription medication

reported missing. Theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. iPad and documents reported missing. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Rocks reported thrown. Custodial interference on Golden Rd. in Oroville. DWLS on Benton St. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 155 near Omak. Drugs on 22nd Ave. in Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Public intoxication on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on N. Locust St. in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-fence crash at East Side Park in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two alcohol offenses at East Side Park in Omak. Kane McKinsey Searcy, 31, booked on two Omak Police Department FTC warrants: fourth-degree assault (DV) and fourth-degree assault. Leslie Ann Edwards, 26, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief. Trudie Leigh Mapes, 26, DOC detainer. Thomas Gary Lazard Jr., 24, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Sandra Rose Moses, 27, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for second-degree DWLS. Tiffeney Marie Olson, 35, booked for obstruction, a Superior Court FTA warrant for POCS and two OSCO FTA warrants, both for thirddegree DWLS. Harvey Gregory Dick, 40, booked on a warrant for failure to register as a sex offender. Misty Dawn McCuan, 33, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of protection order (DV). Robert Edward Desautel, 22, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for third-degree theft. Friday, Aug. 8, 2014 Domestic dispute on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Lost property on Main St. in Riverside. Wallet reported missing. Loitering on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Found property on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Debit cards recovered. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Headphones and cell phone reported missing. Vehicle prowl on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Blue Lake Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on E. Fifth Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Wildland fire on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on Wildwood Dr. near Omak. Trespassing on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Locust St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Disorderly conduct on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Juniper St.in Omak. Obstruction on Asotin St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Asotin St. in Omak. Trespassing on Asotin St. in Omak. Theft on Edmonds St. in Omak. Firearm reported missing. Malicious mischief on Omache Dr. in Omak. Vehicle reported keyed. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Shoes and purse reported missing. Public intoxication on Omak Ave. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Illegal fireworks on Maple St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Trespassing at East Side Park in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Threats on Main St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on W. Second St. in Tonasket. Christian Kwaku-Agyei Gyamfi, 40, booked on two counts of violation of a protection order (DV) and a DOC detainer. Tyson Isaac Andrew, 31, booked on a prosecutorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warrant for failure to register as a sex offender. Emily Ann Wisdom, 22, booked for POCS (heroin). Donald Lee Thomas, 59, booked for POCS (heroin). Monte Louis Nicholson, 47, booked for obstruction. Jess Davis Lamoreaux, 29, booked for a drug court violation. Kristen Ann Bob, 32, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Fausto Solis Pena, 24, booked for no valid operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license without ID. Justine Christine Belgarde, 21, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree rendering criminal assistance, and an FTA bench warrant for four counts of distribution of a controlled substance. Michael William Craig, 23, booked on two OCSO FTP warrants: thirddegree malicious mischief (DV) and disorderly conduct. Robert Joseph Lawrence Parisien, 19, booked on three counts of second-degree vehicle prowling. Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 DUI on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. DUI on S. Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Automobile theft on W. River Rd. near Omak. Theft on Lemansky Rd. near Tonasket. Firearm reported missing. Trespassing on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville.

Possible drowning on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Victim reported breathing. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Harassment on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Omak Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Locust St. in Omak. Gas reported siphoned. Alcohol offense at East Side Park in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Sawtell Rd. in Oroville. Burglary on W. Sixth St. in Tonasket. Brandon Arnold McCraigie, 33, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Shimika Rosita Havier, 19, booked for attempting to elude a law enforcement officer and DUI. Nicholas Patrick Stanger, 25, booked for third-degree DWLS, hit-andrun (unattended vehicle) and DUI. Marnie Lynn Hunt, 48, booked for DUI, an ignition interlock violation, third-degree DWLS and failure to stop and give information. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Daniel Shane Nanamkin, 28, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Benjamin Chavez Delacruz, 29, booked for DUI.

DENTISTRY Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

Sunday, Aug. 10, 2014 Domestic dispute on Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Tonasket Airport Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. Cell phone reported missing. Malicious mischief on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Mailboxes reported damaged. Assault on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on N. Sixth Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Cat reported missing. Public intoxication on Main St. in Riverside. Boating crash on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. No injuries reported. Illegal burning on E. Old Anglin Rd. near Tonasket. Assault on Conconully Rd. near Omak. Assault at East Side Park in Omak. Alcohol offense at East Side Park in Omak. Alcohol offense on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft at East Side Park in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Assault on Ridge Pl. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Omache Dr. in Omak. Public intoxication at Civic League Park in Omak. Vehicle-vs.-bicycle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Disorderly conduct on E. Cherry Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on E. Central Ave.

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in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Illegal burning at East Side Park in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Threats on Elm St. in Oroville. Vehicle fire on Hwy. 97 in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Bonaparte Ave. in Tonasket. Trespassing on W. Third St. in Tonasket. Clint Thomas Black, 34, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Randy Lee Timentwa, 33, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: fourth-degree assault and unlawful display of a weapon. Aaron Thomas Allen, 31, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Austin Rosebomb, no middle name listed, 18, booked for MIP/C and obstruction. Gonzalo Cruz Vargas, 52, booked for DUI. Juan Manuel Ontiveros, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Keifer Lee Larsen, 25, booked for physical control. Emily Brooks Walden, 26, booked for DUI. Eugene Reliford, no middle name listed, 56, booked for fourthdegree assault (DV). Troy John Robinson, 41, booked for felony harassment. Travis James Holcomb, 21, booked for second-degree assault (DV). Joseph Daniel Wiggins, 40, booked for disorderly conduct. Gabriel Paredes Monje, 46, booked for DUI.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | AUGUST 14, 2014

OBITUARIES

Violet Utt

VIOLET MAY UTT

Sack of Hammers performed at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Saturday, Aug. 9, to help continue fundraising efforts toward the purchase of the building inhabited by the Tonasket Food Bank. More than $60,000 has been raised so far, with about $20,000 more needed to complete the purchase. Brent Baker/staff photos

BIG CATCH

Submitted by Gene Bussell

Prater Brookover from East Wenatchee caught this nice 1.5 pound 15 inch rainbow while fishing off of the end of the dock at Liarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cove. Sunday he also caught his limit while fishing off of a pontoon boat over by the dam. One of his rainbows was about the size of this one. Gene Bussell said most of his customers are fishing off of boat using worms or powerbait. Charlie Wines went up the upper Conconully Lake and caught his limit using night crawlers.

Violet May (Dorrel) Utt, 87, of Riverside passed away August 5, 2014. Violet was born on February 13, 1927 to Orel Everett Dorrel and Nellie Alanta (Woods) Dorrel in Tonasket, Washington. Violet was raised in the Tonasket area and graduated from Tonasket High School in 1945. She married Melvin Adrian Utt on May 19, 1945 in Okanogan, Washington and moved onto the family ranch in the Limebelt area west of Riverside, Wash. Daughter, Barbara Ann, was born in 1949. In 1955, they moved to Riverside so Barbara could start school. They built a home north of Riverside, and son, James Melvin, was born in 1960. Violet worked in the apple warehouses for over thirty years and at an Auto Supply store for eight years before retiring to help work on the ranch. Violet was an active member with the Okanogan County Cattlewomenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and was their President in 1991. She was State Cattlewomenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s President in 1995 and Regional V Director for National Cattlewomenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in 1997 and 1998. She was voted Okanogan County Cattlewoman of the Year in 1999. Violet was also active in the Okanogan County Historical Society and volunteered at the Okanogan County Museum. She enjoyed working in genealogy and was the author of several books on family history and assisted with local area books on Pine Creek and Tunk Creek history over the years. In her spare time she baked pies, cakes, and cookies for Melvinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweet tooth. She also

did a lot of canning of fruit and vegetables from their garden. She enjoyed quilting, and for Christmas 2013 she made quilts for both of her children and her three grandchildren. She loved to travel and attended several National Conventions for National Cattlemen and Cattlewomenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Associations all over the country. She made several trips to meet distant relatives and continue her genealogy research. Melvin and Violet also took two cruises to Alaska. In May 2014, Melvin and Violet celebrated their 69th Wedding Anniversary. Violet is survived by her husband Melvin, daughter, Barbara (Paul) Estep, son, James (Lorraine) Utt of Riverside, granddaughters Melissa (Dave) Watkins, Spokane, Jessica and Jamie Utt of Riverside, and great grandchildren, Adrian, Elisha, and Jacy Watkins of Spokane. Violet was preceded in death by both parents, her brother Robert Dorrel, her sister Doris Fisher and one great grandson Nathaniel Watkins. Visitation will be Friday, August 8, 2014 from 6-8:00 p.m., at Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel, 2547 Elmway, Okanogan, Washington. Graveside services will be held Monday, August 11, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Okanogan Valley Memorial Gardens, 214 Conconully Road, Okanogan, WA. Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel is caring for the arrangements.

positions the last being a transportation analyst at corporate headquarters. The lights of Kristinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life were her two nephews, Devin and Erik. She enjoyed all of their sporting events, visiting and camping with her friends, shopping and traveling. Her passion for traveling took her to England, France, Italy, The Netherlands, and Scandinavia. She was preceded in death by her father DeWayne, and her mother, Jeanette. Surviving relatives include her brother, Kelly, nephews, Devin and Erik, sister-in-law, Julie, and stepmother, Pat.

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KRISTIN DENISE SMITH Kristin Denise Smith was born May 5, 1967 in Lakewood, Washington to DeWayne and Jeanette Smith. Her family lived in the Puyallup area until she moved to Tonasket with her father and stepmother, Pat in 1980. Kristin attended Tonasket High School where she participated in Volleyball, Track and was the school mascot. She graduated in 1985. She attended Washington State University from 1985 to 1988 and then completed her education at University of Washington graduating with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Environmental Science in 1998. She started her career with Nordstrom in 1988 in retail sales. While there she held various

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 14, 2014  

August 14, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, August 14, 2014  

August 14, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune