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AUGUST 6-12, 2014 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 32

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

CLIMBING OUT OF HOMELESSNESS PAGE 7 | DINING IN THE DARK PAGE 74 | FEST BESTS PAGE 85

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news&comment 7

RISING ABOVE

BY MATT DRISCOLL | Helping the

homeless surmount Rainier—and their pasts. Plus: the bike of the future, and the Seahawks’ black swan.

11 BEST OF SEATTLE! BY SW STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

You chose your favorites, and we salute our city’s niche experts and specialists (who also list their bests). Plus all our top picks for eating, imbibing, exercising, and more. 12 | SPORTS & ADVENTURE 24 | PEOPLE & PLACES 30 | FOOD & DRINK 48 | SHOPS & SERVICES 55 | ARTS & CULTURE

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74 LIGHTS OUT

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | Trusting your

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten EDITORIAL Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Interns Terrence Hill, Reut Odinak Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, James Ballinger, Michael Berry, Sara Billups, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Dusty Henry, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Patrick Hutchison, Sara D. Jones, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, John Longenbaugh, Jessie McKenna, Jenna Nand, Terra Clarke Olsen, Brian Palmer, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti

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The CannaCon VIP pass is the full Cannabis Executive Experience. We promise you’ll have the time of your life mixing and mingling with the movers and shakers of the Cannabis Industry. As a VIP ticket holder you have full access to all official CannaCon events. Full access to the backstage Green Room at the MMJ Universe Music Festival and access to a VIP Lounge in the Expo Hall with free beverages and snacks throughout the open hours of the convention. In addition, you’ll be invited to all celebrity and featured

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news&comment

One Foot in Front of the Other Climbing out of homelessness with Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission.

Three Reasons the Denny Is Perfect for Seattle

BY MATT DRISCOLL

BY MATT DRISCOLL

I

mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

On Tuesday Mayor Ed Murray announced a “three-point plan” to bring high-speed broadband service to underserved neighborhoods in Seattle. The mayor will ask the City Council to vote on legislation allowing private investments in high-speed fiber networks, and as part of the plan CenturyLink says it will offer one-gigabit service to Beacon Hill, the Central District, Ballard, and West Seattle by the end of 2015. Naturally, the Internet reacted: “I hope it does open up to competitive services. Starting with CenturyLink doesn’t seem like a great choice.” —@anankaf, via Twitter. “Faster, please. It’ll be a happy day when I can rid myself of Comcast.” —@unclevinny, via Twitter. “What about First Hill and Capitol Hill?” —@gordonwerner, via Twitter.

1

The handlebars (aka bike lock)

Having your bike stolen sucks, and in Seattle it’s an all-toocommon phenomenon. Hell, the Seattle Police Department even maintains a Twitter account specifically designed to help reunite citizens with their stolen bicycles (the appropriately named @GetYourBikeBack). That’s why the Denny’s handlebar, which doubles as a detachable bike lock, is so damn brilliant. “I think the handlebar was the key unique feature that may have pushed the needle for us,” TEAGUE creative director Roger Jackson tells us. He’s probably right, because it’s genius.

2

The electric motor for hills

There are moments when getting your bike stolen doesn’t seem like such a bad idea—usually about the time you get halfway up one of our many hills and the lactic acid burning through your quads becomes unbearable. For times like these, the Denny smartly features an electric motor in the front wheel. Even better: The battery is easily detachable and rechargeable, and a computerized gear mechanism shifts automatically according to terrain. It’s just the kind of thing with the potential to convert even lukewarm cyclists into two-wheeled warriors. “That was really our goal,” Jackson says of designing a bike with all the bells and whistles. The lights Trust us: Before long, it’s going to be dark by 4:30 p.m. And that’s going to be miserable. And it’s going to be miserable for a long time. Such is the unfortunate nature of fall and winter in Seattle. The good news is the Denny is prepared for these cold, dark certainties. Featuring pre-installed lights that are sensitive to outside light and adjust to brightness accordingly, and adorned with brake lights and turn signals activated by simply flicking the brakes (for safety and style, yo!), the Denny seems specifically built for pedaling in Seattle’s dark months—and there are very dark months ahead. E

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mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

Sitting across from Johnson, 35-year-old Kristy Olmstead, one of this year’s two female climbers, speaks confidently, determined to join the list of UGM successes who have topped Rainier. Like this year’s other five recovery-program climbers, Olmstead’s story is one of addiction, despair, and—now, she assures—redemption. Olmstead says she spent a year in prison in Idaho on theft charges before coming home to Washington last year and finding her way into the UGM recovery program and onto the climbing team. “I liked it all,” Olmstead says of her history of addiction. Primarily, though, she admits, methamphetamine was her drug of choice. And it was meth—more specifically, an unresolved charge of possession with intent to deliver hanging over her head in Snohomish County—that put Olmstead back in prison earlier this year for three months, even though she was enrolled in

UGM’s recovery program and climb training. While others might have caved, Olmstead says the mountain was an inspiration. She remembers improvising workouts in the prison yard to keep her training on track: banging out pushups and running in a circle, because in prison you can’t run in a straight line for long. “I was offered drugs when I was in there, and I said no, and they asked why, and I said I have a bigger plan,” Olmstead recalls. The weekend after her release from prison, the UGM climbers took Mount Hood. And remarkably, Olmstead was right there with them. “I was just so proud of her,” Johnson says, admitting that he figured there was no way Olmstead would be prepared to climb after three months in lockup. Of this week’s Rainier trek, Johnson is far more certain. He says he knows Olmstead is ready. “When I summited Hood I was just bawling and laughing and crying and praying. And I was just so happy, because I knew if I summited Hood, then I could still do Rainier,” she recalls. “One thing I learned is that if I put one foot in front of the other, I was going to get there,” Olmstead says of her climbing mindset. “I wasn’t going to worry about 10 steps away. I wasn’t going to worry about how steep it looked. I just knew that if I put one foot in front of the other, that eventually I would end up at the top.” It’s a metaphor we could all learn from. E

LIGHTNING BY RYAN OKSENHORN AND IDEA BY TAKAO UMEHARA FROM THE NOUN PROJECT

get a hold of what our folks [at UGM] are going through. Because I was worried, and still am, that homeless folks have a way of becoming urban wallpaper,” Johnson explains, sitting in a room a floor above UGM’s Pioneer Square men’s shelter, sweaty and not long removed from an afternoon training session with this year’s climbers. “It’s not that if you can climb Rainier, then you can climb out of homelessness. It’s if you can climb out of homelessness and addiction, then you can climb Rainier. This is the hard one.”

instant reaction » Fast Takes on Faster Internet

T

his week we reported that the Denny—a locally conceived creation by design firm TEAGUE and Sizemore Bicycle—was named the big winner of the Oregon Manifest’s “Bike Design Project” competition, which paired design firms with bicycle developers to see which city could produce the bike of the future. After voting on entries from across the nation, the public agreed: The Denny is the shit. While it exists only in prototype at this point (and has no price), there’s a lot to be excited about regarding Seattle’s bike of the future. Here are three reasons to start saving for it:

Kristy Olmstead (left) summited Mount Hood in June. This week she’ll take on Mount Rainier.

COURTESY OF UNION GOSPEL MISSION

f you appreciate metaphors, they’re everywhere in the Union Gospel Mission’s annual Mount Rainier climb. Now in its fourth year, the program has taken 16 homeless men enrolled in UGM’s addictionrecovery program to Rainier’s summit. And from August 7 to 10, former Army Ranger Mike Johnson, who as UGM’s director of special projects spearheaded the program, will aim to get four more to the top—along with, for the first time in the program’s brief history, two climbers from UGM’s addiction-recovery program for women. “Immediately, the metaphor was really powerful, like climbing out of homelessness is like climbing Mount Rainier. It’s hard. It takes a team. You need a guide. You have to get stronger than you’ve been,” Johnson says of his inspiration to get people from society’s depths up a 14,000foot mountain. He remembers a 2010 day trip to Sunrise at which one of the men from the recovery program pointed toward the top and said, “I wish we could go up there.” Everything clicked, Johnson recalls, and with the help of sponsor Whittaker Mountaineering, UGM donors, and a handful of volunteer guides, an ascent of Mount Rainier became an August tradition. Johnson starts training would-be climbers in October, welcoming anyone enrolled in the UGM 12-month recovery program. This year he started with about a dozen—a list that slowly shrank as time passed and training intensified. “We have to start pretty gently. We have a lot of guys who haven’t been good to themselves,” Johnson says. “A couple guys usually fall off the team for relapse reasons. . . . It’s self-selecting. The group has always whittled itself down into a size I can work with.” By May, the climbers are ready for one final tall test before Rainier: “If you can’t climb Mount Hood, then you’re not going to climb Rainier. It’s just reality,” says Johnson, comparing the Oregon peak to “the sorting hat from Harry Potter.” This year he says five climbers got left on the side of the mountain. “We need people who are physically prepared,” he says simply. Hood, of course, is just the warm-up. In 2010, about 10,000 people attempted to summit Mount Rainier, but more than half failed, according to statistics from the National Park Service. But to hear Johnson tell it, the four days this week that UGM’s six remaining recovery-program climbers will spend tackling the most prominent mountain in the lower 48 won’t be so much a challenge as a celebration of something far bigger. In so many ways, these climbers have already made it. “What I loved about [the idea] was that it felt like it had a lot of handles—ways for people to

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Is the Seahawks’ D a Black Swan?

I

n case you haven’t been greedily devouring every blog post, newspaper article, and preview mag story about the 2014 Seahawks, here’s the preseason narrative in a nutshell: The Seahawks’ offense will have to be better in 2014, because the defense can’t possibly be as good. Maintaining an elite level of performance is very rare, #BecauseScience. For every U2, there’s a thousand Right Said Freds who never experienced the same success again. Regression to the mean, they call it. Or, put another way, what goes up must come down. No recent BY SETH KOLLOEN elite SuperBowl-winning defense has managed to stay elite the next season. But the Seahawks D is different. Even though it defies the laws of science, logic, and football, they could be just as good as they were last year—and if so, we’ll see the proof this week in the first preseason game against Denver. In the past 15 years, the three best defenses to win a Super Bowl were the 2000 Baltimore Ravens, the 2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the 2008 Pittsburgh Steelers. All three led the league in fewest points allowed that season; none did the next year. But when you look closely, those declines weren’t hard to predict. The ’00 Ravens avoided injury to an absurd degree in 2000—10 of their 11 defensive starters played in all 16 games. The ’02 Bucs relied on an aging core of players, like 29-year-old Derrick Brooks and 30-year-old Warren Sapp. The ’08 Steelers got a legendary performance from linebacker James Harrison, who was 30; he was never as effective again. The 2013 Seahawks D didn’t rely on career years or impeccable health. And they definitely didn’t rely on aging players. The three oldest starters on last year’s defense were defensive ends Chris Clemons (now 32) and Red Bryant (30) and cornerback Brandon Browner (30). All three are now gone, replaced by Michael Bennett (28), Cliff Avril (28), and Byron Maxwell (26). The Seahawks were already the youngest team to win a Super Bowl—and they’re getting even younger. Early returns from training camp show that the defense is dominant again—holding the offense without a touchdown in last Saturday’s team scrimmage. Now the games begin. Last year, the Seahawks played the Broncos once in the preseason and once in the Super Bowl, and beat them by a combined 83-18. No NFL team should be able to dominate another so thoroughly—let alone an AFC Champion. When they play the Broncos again this week, the game should be much more competitive. But if it’s not— if the Seahawks lay yet another beatdown on the high-flying Broncos—that’s your clue that the Seahawks aren’t playing by science’s rules. Maybe the Seahawks D is another kind of bird—a black swan. That’s science’s name for an event that can’t be predicted because it’s never happened before. Younger, more accomplished, and more talented than any other defense in the recent past, the Seahawks’ course may not be foreseeable based on prior events. This week’s preseason game may show just how high they’re going to fly. E

SPORTSBALL

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

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BEST OF SEATTLE 12

A

s we were putting together this year’s edition of Best of Seattle®, Microsoft went and laid off 18,000 workers. My first response was a deep, sustained groan. Our theme for this year’s parade of greatness was going to be Micro-City, after all; and for a moment, “micro” seemed like a disagreeable prefix. Perhaps sensing an approaching fit, my staff quickly reminded me of the reasons behind our theme. Slowly my blood pressure began to subside. They reminded me that it’s not just Microsoft and other industry giants that make Seattle great. Sure, they deserve a lot of credit, but it’s the small touches that make this an

enviable place to live right now. That’s what micro means to us. This year’s Best of Seattle still includes a lot of big categories, but it also sheds light on the city’s many micro-components—that adventurous start-up, this charming neighborhood, that band, this sandwich, that one defining moment. We’re also telling the stories of lesser-known heroes, micro-celebrities who are a big deal to smaller communities. It’s the spirit of these leaders, doers, thinkers, and makers that shapes the city’s soul. And it’s all these small things that keep the city going, through greatness and the occasional groan.

2014

Page 12

SPORTS & ADVENTURE Page 24

PEOPLE & PLACES Page 30

FOOD & DRINK Page 48

SHOPS & SERVICES Page 55

ARTS & CULTURE

MARK BAUMGARTEN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

THE LITTLE THINGS THAT MAKE A BIG DIFFERENCE. SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

ILLUSTRATIONS BY KELLY THOMPSON

11


SPORTS & ADVENTURE Heart and Soul Meet Seattle’s BEST UNSUNG ATHLETE—the rock the Sounders’ current success is built on. BY GAVIN BORCHERT

12

Scott: Fans call him “Man-Marker.”

“He’s a connection to the past, the player who can always be relied upon to explain the importance of beating the Timbers.”

“Now Zach is somehow enjoying his most effective season. The key seems to be realizing his own limitations. Once the first player out and the last player in from training sessions, Zach is doing a better job of not overworking himself. He’s proven himself a capable sidekick to MLS Defender of the Year candidate Chad Marshall, once again showing off an impressive aerial ability and generally playing the kind of sound, unflashy, but effective defense that has always been his strength.” But even beyond his skill, Scott’s experience and

role, second to none, as the team’s soul and institutional memory makes him invaluable. “He’s a

PHOTOS BY ANNA ERICKSON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

T

he string of upsets that ended what had been a pretty good 2013 for the Seattle Sounders resulted in an unprecedented house-cleaning; in the off-season, December to February, I hesitated even to visit the team website, dreading yet another headline about the departure of some favorite player or other. (The tactic paid off, since the Sounders have topped the standings with room to spare for most of this season, now halfway over. Still, every farewell stung.) Which makes the longevity of defender Zach Scott an even more remarkable achievement: Joining the team in 2002, this is his 13th season with the organization. Sounders fans know this, and revere him for it; more casual followers may not realize that such a long association with one team—especially one that bridges the Sounders’ jump from the USL First Division to Major League Soccer—is “definitely unheard of, ” as Scott, 34, readily admits. It’s particularly impressive considering the steady rise in quality in both the squad and the league as a whole. “If you’re not improving, you’re gonna get left behind,” he says, just as true for teams as for individual players. Growing up on Maui, for Scott soccer was just one athletic interest among several (he’s also an avid surfer), and youth soccer wasn’t yet the large-scale enterprise it’s become: “Your team was basically the 15 kids you grew up with,” he says. Though he says he never aspired to a pro career, he determined that “when the opportunity came, I was gonna make the most of it”—which he’s done again and again, starting with attending Gonzaga University after

an assistant coach, also from Hawaii, recruited Scott to come to Spokane. From there, the Sounders picked him up after a general tryout—”about a hundred college guys, mostly from UW,” he says. Another challenge he rose to was the team’s 2009 move to MLS, which necessitated another trial period under the eye of newly hired coach, and American soccer legend, Sigi Schmid: “Everyone in that lower division was given a tryout to prove themselves,” but just a handful were chosen. Since then he’s been a frequent starter, developing a reputation for up-close bedeviling of opposing teams’ forwards with a tenacity that’s earned him the nickname Man-Marker (ZS:MM for short). Sports writer Jeremiah Oshan, a curator of popular fan blog Sounder at Heart, remarks of Scott’s upward trajectory: “When Zach was one of six players to make the move from the USL team to the MLS team, he was possibly the one with the lowest expectations. And yet, he’s now the last one here, and, aside from Sébastien Le Toux [a former Sounder now with the Philadelphia Union], has probably had the best MLS career. He’s also managed to reinvent himself every year despite coming into the league as a 28-year-old.


gborchert@seattleweekly.com

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Best Sports Moment

Leading up to last season’s NFL playoffs, there was talk among fans of the rival 49ers about the lack of Lombardis in the Seahawks’ trophy case. Writing in the pages of this paper, though, local Niners fan Kevin Sur explained that it wasn’t the trophies that mattered so much as the “finally” moment that marked the franchise’s turnaround—which for the 49ers took the form of The Catch, famously sealing the team’s 1982 NFC Championship. The Seahawks got their “finally” moment just a few weeks after Sur’s piece was published in the closing seconds of their own NFC Championship against those very same 49ers. Trailing 23 to 17, the San Francisco team was marching downfield and looking determined to score. Seahawks fans flashed back to the previous year’s devastating playoff exit against the similarly late-marching Atlanta Falcons. Then, as the seconds ticked down, San Francisco QB Colin Kaepernick threw aloft a pass intended for Michael Crabtree in the back of the end zone. You know what happened next: Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman miraculously reached up and deflected the ball into the waiting hands of his teammate Malcolm Smith. The game clock expired, and “The Tip” was immortalized as the most memorable moment of the Seahawks’ first championship season. MARK BAUMGARTEN

206.623.2334 | www.sholdtdesign.com

seahawks.com

Best Coach

Let’s be brutally honest for a second: If Pete Carroll is not your coach, dude is downright

insufferable. There’s the gum chomping. There’s the boyish hooting and hollering. There’s the cheese-dick “Always Compete” mantras and the tendency to invite Macklemore into the locker room. From the outside looking in, it’s all a bit much. So what’s the good news? Carroll is your coach, at least as long as you’re a Seahawks fan, and what he (and GM John Schneider) have managed to do in four short years at the helm here is nothing short of remarkable: He’s turned a perennial NFL laughingstock into the best team in the league, and turned convention on its ear in the process. He’s reinvented the blueprint for success, proving you can win—and win big—with a quarterback who’s too small and a team of inspired players whom everyone else passed on. He’s gone from an NFL loser to a winner in Seattle, and he’s taken us all with him. Just ask the other 31 teams in the league that are feverishly trying to copy everything the Seahawks have built. Right now, no one’s doing it better than Pete Carroll. MATT DRISCOLL

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

connection to the past,” says Oshan, “the player who can always be relied upon to explain the importance of beating the Timbers, of making sure the team’s traditions aren’t forgotten.” Midfielder Brad Evans, Scott’s teammate since 2009, calls him a “role model and somebody that I’ve looked up to” for maintaining a career in top condition: “He’s five, six years my senior, but knowing that if I take care of my body now, I can still play beyond what people other might think is the expectancy of your career. . . .  I think for Zach [that’s the] key to where he is right now. I think he came into the league, to be honest, as a role player and was trying to find time and wasn’t finding time, his technique wasn’t quite there yet. But he’s gotten better and better every single year, and that’s a testament to the inner drive that he has. . . . For the past five years he stayed after every single training to work on his technique because he wants to play and knows he can play, and at the end of the day all of that extra work has paid off and he has become an invaluable part of this team. “That’s the leadership role—young guys see even him working hard after practice and guys feed off of that. Chad Marshall has even said that right now he feels that Zach is the best center back he has ever played with . . . he’s so mentally strong, which helps out, and completely fearless. These are attributes that are intangible and you just can’t teach.” For his part, Scott attributes his success to his family’s support. He and his wife Alana, a structural engineer, have been together since high school in Hawaii (she even followed him to Spokane—now that’s commitment); they now have three children, ages 8, 6, and 3. It’s they who have made his stability with the Sounders possible; there are “so many ups and downs in a professional career,” he says, “and my family keeps me grounded.” It’s a benefit Scott pays forward to the team. Asked if they’ll keep up their current record and earn some silverware this year, he’s unhesitatingly confident: “I don’t see what’s stopping us.” E

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SPORTS & ADVENTURE

MORGEN SCHULER

Wolff plays kickball for all the right reasons.

Serious MEDICINE

Big Red Balls BEST KICKBALL PLAYER Dana Wolff

Your team will work with you to identify and remove the

rules the diamond with abandon and a beer. BY MATT DRISCOLL

G

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

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rit. Passion. Desire. Oh, and a well-trained liver. The characteristics that helped us select 34-year-old Dana Wolff as Seattle’s best kickball player (more on that later) are obvious. With eight seasons under her belt, the cagey vet—a shortstop and captain for Team Leny’s of the Comeback Sports co-ed kickball league—isn’t shy when asked to share the keys to her game. “I’m pretty quick, as far as running goes,” the two-time league champ says simply. “And I’m not afraid of the ball. That’s important.” Indeed it is. This is kickball, after all, and the big red sphere plays a pretty prominent role. By all accounts, on the field and off, Wolff is downright fearless. That’s one of the reasons Comeback Sports League Manager Vanessa Eskelin pointed us in her direction when we asked whom she’d nominate as Seattle’s best player. “Dana is really what we look for out of a loyal team captain,” explains Eskelin after a brief chuckle. “She’s very competitive, but she keeps it fun out there. She’s excited, and she rallies everyone together every single season.” So what makes Wolff the best? Kickball, of course, is a game associated with elementaryschool recesses, and for good reason. At its core it’s a kids’ endeavor, best played by those who have yet to discover the joys of full-time

employment, mortgages, rent, cell-phone bills, or responsibilities. And for seven innings twice a week (unless one of her two teams has a doubleheader), that’s exactly the kind of abandon Wolff brings to the diamond. There are probably players with better stats (or who keep stats), and probably some who kick with more power, but Wolff embodies what kickball should be all about. At least we think she does. Some like kickball for the thrill of competition. Some enjoy playing a game they haven’t played since grade school. Some like the camaraderie and the friendships they forge. Some, like Wolff, play kickball for all of the above. Spend time with her, as we did on a recent sunny afternoon, and Wolff ’s intense love for the niche sport becomes obvious. Wolff competes for all the right reasons. And the booze. “There’s a lot of drinking involved in kickball,” Wolff explains of the sport she’s dedicated her summers to for nearly a decade. (In the fall she’s in a bowling league, naturally.) “I don’t like to play sober too much, or completely sober,” she says. “I don’t believe in adult sports that you can’t drink at anymore. There’s no point.” In other words, “Hydration is very important,” Wolff tells us. “I don’t know if I should say we


drink during the game, because technically we’re at a public park, but . . . ” Enough said. We’d expect nothing less from the “best.” And, yes, we’ll admit that some players take kickball more seriously than Wolff does. Surely we could have chosen one of them for this prestigious honor. With no fewer than 1,100 kickball teams* throughout the city, this wasn’t about stats or winning percentages. The truth is that we’ve met “serious” kickball players, and we’re pretty sure they’re doing it wrong. Wolff, on the other hand, is doing it right. So what advice does Seattle’s best kickball player offer to newbies? “Basically, I just tell them to kick it and run.” Sounds about right. E mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

*rough estimate

STAFF PICKS

» FROM PAGE 13 Best Sports Venue

With all due respect to the revamped Husky Stadium—which admittedly is the most picturesque college football stadium in the country—nothing beats a game at CenturyLink Field. And we’re not just talking about the Seahawks here. Sure, being at the Clink to see the 12th Man roar and the Seahawks soar is one of the most impressive sights in all sports, but to truly appreciate the stadium’s design and brilliance, it’s the Sounders you need to see. Nothing beats the unique intensity and camaraderie of 45,000 fans (on average) filling CenturyLink in Rave Green, cheering and chanting the Sounders to victory. Even during a nil-nil tie, it’s obvious there’s something special afoot at the Clink. MD centurylinkfield.com

Best Sports Figure

MORGEN SCHULER

In a world where professional athletes are so often dickheads, so often terrible, so often selfish and disgusting, the Seahawks’ Derrick Coleman is everything we all should strive to be. Chances are you know his story: He’s the first deaf offensive player in NFL history, a guy who exchanges letters with hearing-impaired kids and gives up his first-class airline seats to Marines. He’s not the fastest Seahawk nor the biggest, but on a team stocked with personalities and stars, Coleman just might be the best—because of the person he is and what he’s overcome to get to this point. Next time your kid wants a Seahawks jersey, you could do far worse than to order Coleman’s #40. MD

Best Sports Retiree

READERS’ POLL

BEST MARINER

Felix Hernandez BEST SEAHAWK

Richard Sherman BEST SOUNDER

Clint Dempsey BEST STORM PLAYER

Sue Bird

BEST REIGN PLAYER (TIE)

Hope Solo, Megan Rapinoe BEST PARK

Discovery Park BEST TRAIL

Burke-Gilman BEST PUBLIC POOL

Coleman Pool

Best Gay Athlete Role Model

Now 72, former University of Washington running back Dave Kopay was the first professional athlete to openly declare, after his playing days, that he was homosexual. That was 1975, when the media world was different, and though he later wrote a bestseller about his struggles and went on to a productive life running his family’s business in L.A., his coming-out wasn’t as noisy and controversial as the Internet/socialmedia response to Michael Sam’s drafting by the St. Louis Rams last year. Kopay, who plans

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

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Radio advertisements are annoying, an unfortunate side-effect of the fact that they are engineered to stick in your head. Advertisements on 710 AM during Mariners games are one step beyond; they are maddening. And yet whenever Jay Buhner’s voice appears to shill “Trucks, trucks, and more trucks”—well, it’s an oddly calming force. Buhner is like that. The former Mariners right fielder is a shill, yes, but he also radiates warmth and humanity, even when he’s doing some bad acting—a bit like the game itself. Nothing lifts a dreary evening at Safeco Field more than looking up at the big screen and seeing Buhner in the stands, suffering through the 1-0 affair along with you, smiling and sporting an unnatural April tan. Everyone cheers, everyone loves The Bone, and so often he is there to receive your love and to share baseball with you. His number 19 will never be retired, but you get the sense that the man will be a fixture at Safeco forever. MB

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SPORTS & ADVENTURE STAFF PICKS

to donate $1 million to the UW to support a LGBT center upon his death, offered Sam— the NFL’s first openly gay player—this advice in a letter: “I count the day I came out publicly, Dec. 9, 1975, as my real birthday, so that makes me 38. I love what you are doing in making yourself available as a real, down-to-earth man, who is open to the world, and is ready for the struggles ahead and that life will bring . . . just stay that way!” RICK ANDERSON

Best Sports-Beat Writer

When it comes to covering sports in Seattle, Bob Condotta has done it all. And that’s only a slight exaggeration. After covering the UW for 16 years, in 2013 he took over the Seahawks beat for The Seattle Times and didn’t miss a step. In fact, some have credited him with helping the Hawks earn their first Super Bowl victory (OK, not really, but can it be merely a coincidence?). In the age of the 24/7 news cycle that so often leaves traditional print journalists floundering, Condotta has prospered, his deep sports knowledge and affable demeanor making him both a friend and a trusted source for readers. Like all good beat writers, he’s tireless, and he finds the stories and angles in the day-to-day minutiae that others miss. In other words, Condotta is a pro’s pro. MD seattletimes.com

Best Sports Broadcast Personality

Steve Raible is a Seahawk—has been since the

beginning. Very literally. He played receiver in Seattle from 1976–81, amassing 68 receptions, 1,017 yards, and three touchdowns over six NFL seasons. But it’s from the broadcast booth that Raible has truly left his mark on the region’s football fans. Listening to him call Super Bowl XLVIII was enough to give any Hawk fan chills, and likely tears of joy. It’s no wonder Raible— just like Russell Wilson, Marshawn Lynch, and Richard Sherman—got a Super Bowl ring out of the deal. Dude earned it. MD

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Best Call

16

City of Seattle

The immediate response to David Sims’ call from Yankees Stadium on the night of June 2 was that it was a disaster. The next day Deadspin ran the headline “Mariners Announcer’s Brain Breaks in the Middle of Home Run Call,” and, yes, it had sounded like maybe the Root Sports personality was having an aneurism. The Mariners were up 7 to 2 in the top of the ninth with Kyle Seager at bat. On a 1-1 count, the third baseman swung, made contact, and then this came out of Sims’ mouth: “There’s a drive, deep right field. Say ‘Goodbye.’ Hey, Lloyd! Do some . . . delivery—for the truck—to the airport.” Now there is some context for this mouth garbage. At the moment that Seager hit that dinger, Sims later said, he was tangling with a couple thoughts. It was the ninth, and he was thinking about the team’s trip to the airport after the game to fly to Atlanta, and the fact that manager Lloyd McClendon often rewards his team with ice cream when they excel. When the homer flew, Sims was caught off-guard, and tried to stitch his disparate thoughts together with a delivery truck. Whatever. The call has

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MORGEN SCHULER

» FROM PAGE 15

GUEST BESTS Lorin “Big Lo” Sandretzky

Lorin “Big Lo” Sandretzky may be best known as the guy at Seahawks games holding the “SeaFence” sign. It’s a tradition “Seattle’s biggest sports fan” started back in 2002, when the Seahawks opened their new stadium. But his fandom goes back much further, to 1974 and the first Sonics game he ever attended—at age 8. Yes, Big Lo has seen a lot over the years, but in true Best of Seattle fashion, he says the past year—which of course included the Seahawks’ very first Super Bowl victory—has been as good as it gets. MD Best Super Bowl Play

Wow. I think the play that set the tone for us was Kam Chancellor’s hit [on Broncos receiver Demaryius Thomas]. It was a few plays into the game, and Kam laid him out. From that point on, it just made [Denver’s] receivers real timid, and it changed the whole game. Best Sports Bar

I’m going to get my butt chewed out if I answer this wrong. There are a lot of good bars in Seattle. I don’t do a whole lot of bar-hopping, but when I do it’s either Bleachers Pub in Greenwood or Henry’s on First. Best Concessions

I don’t eat during the games, man. That’s just one thing I don’t do. I’m afraid to eat. I started not eating at games five years ago, and we started winning. Superstition steps in. Best Seattle Sports Star Russell Wilson, just because of his class. He’s

such a genuine person. He takes time for people. His leadership. His want for more knowledge. The studying he puts in. The work ethic. Everything is top-notch with him. Best Seattle Sports Tradition

I think the ECS [Emerald City Supporters] is really setting the tone for that, with the March to the Match. The chants, the energy—every sport needs something like the ECS. I’m not for the swearing, but that’s just part of their energy. Best Thing About Being a Super Bowl Champion The way it brings the city together. That night

after the game, there were so many people in the street high-fiving and hugging. Everyone was smiling, and they still are. E


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» FROM PAGE 16

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Best Storm Player

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It’s been a disappointing season for the Storm, who will miss the playoffs for the first time since 2003. The team couldn’t absorb a second consecutive year without Lauren Jackson, the best female basketball player in history, who missed the year after her knee and Achilles tendon surgery. But veteran Camille Little deserves a toast for doing her best to mimic Jackson’s box-score-filling ways—Little led the Storm in points and blocks, was second in rebounds, third in three-pointers made, and fourth in assists. SETH KOLLOEN wnba.com/storm

Best Reign Player

Reign coach Laura Harvey knows to hold onto a good thing. When Seattle brought her over from a successful run coaching England’s top women’s club, Harvey targeted Kim Little, the best player from that team, to join her with the Reign. Little leads the NWSL in goals with 12, and is only one off the league lead in assists. Last year, without Little, Harvey’s team finished in seventh place. This year, with Little, they are comfortably in first, holding a nine-point lead. Good coaching? In a way, it sure is. SK reignfc.com

Best Mariner

Lloyd McClendon’s predecessors in the Mariners’ managerial chair touted “belief ” and “mind-set” as the keys to winning, and excused poor performance by the M’s young players as part of the learning process. McClendon’s message? Play well or get lost. “Just because you’re young doesn’t mean you can’t be good,” he said at the start of spring training. “That’s not an excuse. We develop in the minor leagues, we win at the major league level.” McClendon’s set high standards for the Mariners, and they’ve responded. Here he is assessing the performance of top prospect Taijuan Walker: “Five innings, 83 pitches, and one strikeout—that’s not a good outing, I’m sorry. Not for me. And you can write it. I don’t give a [expletive].” By telling it like it is instead of trying to spin every failure, McClendon has his players believing what he tells them—they can win. So far it’s working. SK seattle.mariners.mlb.com

Best Seahawk

The Seahawks won the Super Bowl with a legitimately historic defense. The most important

play of that Super Bowl performance—Malcolm Smith’s pick-six—illustrates perfectly how much of a team effort it was. Before Smith intercepted the ball, DE Cliff Avril caused an errant throw by bullrushing his blocker into Peyton Manning. How did Avril have the energy at the end of a 15-play Broncos drive? Because for the previous four snaps—three full minutes of game time— he’d been resting on the sideline while backup O’Brien Schofield manned his spot. Back to Smith: On a 3rd and 13 against the NFL’s greatest quarterback, how was Smith able to play such tight coverage in the flat? Because Richard Sherman was running stride-for-stride with the outside receiver, and Earl Thomas was helping

over the top. Even though the Broncos needed 13 yards, Smith kept position in the short flat. When Avril tipped the pass, Smith was right there to snag it. SK

Best New Sounder

Tough call, considering the extensive offseason turnover and new midfielders like Marco Pappa and Gonzalo Pineda who quickly became regular and invaluable starters. But what most needed upgrading after 2013, few would disagree, was the Sounders’ back line. Veteran centerback Chad Marshall, 29, who joined the team in December after 10 seasons with the Columbus Crew, has done just that as the keystone of the defense that’s helped secure the team’s spot at the top of the standings for the greater part of the season—and, at 6´3˝, earned the fan nickname “Air Marshall.” Being here has in turn refreshed his career—he was recently chosen for the third time (following 2009 and ’10) for the August 6 MLS All-Star game in Portland. (The downside of Marshall’s importance: The team has lost the three games he’s had to sit out, most recently due to a minor auto mishap. Get well soon!) GAVIN BORCHERT soundersfc.com

Best Basketball

So the Sonics aren’t coming back anytime soon, this year’s Huskies are not looking promising, the Seattle University’s Redhawks team is still getting used to playing Division I ball, and the Storm plays at the wrong time of the year (sorry, but basketball just feels better in the winter). So what is a Seattle hoops fan to do? Well, for a measly five or six bucks, you can witness some of the best basketball players in the country face off in Seattle’s Metro League. Sure, they’re a few years from the SportsCenter Top 10, but the players coming out of Seattle’s Metro League are, on average, more talented (and entertaining). Consider this: The 14 schools that make up the conference have more past players in the NBA than New York City’s 799 high schools. Last year was a great season with a top-tier team in Rainier Beach, a heated rivalry that culminated in a nail-biting state championship pitting Beach against Eastside Catholic, and a few players who are now preparing for their freshman seasons of NCAA D-I basketball. And, yes, there was plenty of dunking. This year is hard to predict, except to say it will bring something fresh and unexpected. MB metroleaguewa.org

Best High-School Athlete

Probably not a ton of room left on Budda Baker’s letterman’s jacket. Nor, because of him,

in the Bellevue High trophy case. Playing both safety and running back, Baker led his school’s football team to three straight undefeated state-championship seasons. Individually, Baker was state champion in the 100 meters and 200 meters—Bellevue won a state championship in track, too. You’ve got to look back to Nate Robinson to find a high-school athlete like Baker. After originally committing to play college football at Oregon, Baker reopened the process and chose Washington. He announced his decision live on KING-5 News. I wonder if there’s a letterman’s patch for that? SK

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» FROM PAGE 18 Best College Athlete

Slight and short seems to be the ideal size for a Husky pitcher. In the mid-2000s, it was Tim Lincecum rewriting the conference record books. This year, Tyler Davis led the Huskies to their best season since Lincecum left. Davis, who even UW’s cheerleading website admits is nowhere near his listed measurements of 6´0˝, 185 lbs., came into the year having gone 18 starts without a win. That streak didn’t last long. He finished the year 11-2 with a 1.60 ERA. Davis doesn’t have Lincecum’s velocity; with a fastball in the 80s, he’s never going to be a first-round pick. But he did manage something Lincecum never did—a win in an NCAA tournament game. Facing Georgia Tech in the Huskies’ first tourney appearance since 2004, Davis pitched a complete game shutout—the first of his career, and one of the best clutch performances in UW history. SK gohuskies.com

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In southwest Washington basketball playoffs, Evergreen High of Vancouver trails Camas by two points with two seconds left. Evergreen’s inbounding the ball under their own basket. A desperation baseball throw sails all the way to the opposite foul line, where one Camas player tips it, another Camas player tips it, and the ball drops into the hands of Evergreen’s Robert Franks. As he’s falling out of bounds, Franks flips the ball underhand behind his head . . . and right through the basket. The two Camas players stand anchored to the floor in shock. Evergreen won the game in overtime and advanced to districts. SK

Say, like SW ’s own Matt Driscoll, you don’t consider yourself a Wild Waves person. You don’t like the crowds, the huge fees, or the madness of it all. You do, however, like swimming, water slides, and other ways to live it up in the pool. More to the point, your kids like these things. What do you do? You head to Renton’s Henry Moses Aquatic Center, a city-run facility that’s a kinder, gentler, and definitely cheaper version of a water park. Fourteen bucks lets you in for a three-and-a-half-hour session ($8 if you’re a Renton resident), and a locker rental adds a mere quarter. Inside are two big pools. One is a lap pool, with many of the lanes opened for general splashing, Marco Polo games, and whatever crazy fun your kids want to get up to. The other is even bigger “leisure” pool. Here you’ll find two giant, twisting slides that you careen down on inner tubes, a lazy river, and an area engulfed by soaring, machine-made waves. It’s exciting and low-key at the same time, especially since you can repair to chaise lounges spread in ample supply in sunny and shady spots alike. Bring a picnic or buy reasonably priced food at the snack bar. NINA SHAPIRO

Most Determined Consumption of Stadium Concessions

Best Indoor Pool

Best Batshit-Insane Buzzer-Beater

INFO

116-win 2001 season. And those were the types of kids who swarmed Safeco Field during the clubs’ Macklemore Bobblehead promotion, which featured the pop star throwing out the first pitch (complete with selfie) and providing one fan with the thrill of her life by giving her the shirt off his back after a trivia contest. The promotion also marked the launch of a Mack/ Mariners anti-bullying campaign, which is a good thing. Baseball needs those kids, and Macklemore got them to the ballpark. Now its up to the M’s to get them to come back. MB

Washington State’s annual football game at CenturyLink Field is one to forget. The Cougs’ incompetence combined with heavy rain has driven most fans to the exit. But one sleepy drunk, caught on camera by ESPN, is determined to see the game—and his concessions purchase—to its conclusion. Horizontal in his seat, with his feet draped over the row in front of him, he throws his head back and spills half a bag of popcorn into his mouth—mostly— then chews contentedly like a cow at pasture. The cameras catch him a few moments later, tapping his toes, the collar of his jacket overflowing with misaimed popcorn bits. SK

Best Promotion

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South Enders like to grumble about getting the short end of the stick. And it’s true, residents there generally face more crime and fewer amenities. How delightful, then, that at an intersection known for rough activity, Rainier Avenue South and South Henderson Street, the city has planted a state-of-the-art pool complex that is drawing residents from all over town. The old Rainier Beach Pool was a dark place that made you feel as though you were swimming in a basement. The completely remade Rainier Beach pool is lined with windows, letting in light even during the height of winter. Like the best pool complexes these days, it boasts one pool for lap swimming and another for kid-oriented fun, with a slide, a lazy river, and a spray-filled toddler area. There’s also a sauna, a hot tub, and a nearby exercise room (the pool is part of a community center) so you can get more or less active, as you see fit. Warning: This place is popular. Pay close attention to the rather complicated pool schedule (there are several sessions of limited duration throughout the day) and get there

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


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early. The pool frequently maxes out and turns people away. NS 8825 Rainier Ave. S., 386-1925

Best Park

Kerry Park is a place that will make you proud

you call Seattle home. It’s the ideal green chunk of landscape from which to gaze upon the city’s shimmering skyline and watch ferries skitter across Elliott Bay—and, yes, there are days, perched here on the south side of Queen Anne Hill, when the silvery-white Mt. Rainier beckons. And at night, there are few better places to watch the Emerald City come twinkling to life. Grab a bench, bring a sandwich, and smile at the tourists pouring off tour buses to take postcard-perfect pictures . . . pictures that will remind them that once upon a time they stood tall above Seattle and filled their lungs with fresh Northwest air. ELLIS E. CONK-

LIN seattle.gov/parks

Best Urban Running Loop

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Much like identifying good real estate, when it comes to inspired running, the key is often “location, location, location.” For decades the preferred route for local runners (and joggers) has been the Green Lake loop in North Seattle. But given the influx of new residents, many of them carless, in South Lake Union, that’s just a little too far from their apartments and offices in Amazon-land. For that reason, we recommend the Lake Union Loop, an almost exact 10K (or 6.2 miles) that takes you across the University and Fremont Bridges, with the water always on your left. (Remember: You must run counterclockwise, as on a track.) The city is gradually developing the route—for runners, walkers, and cyclists alike—into the “Cheshiahud Lake Union Loop,” named in honor of a Duwamish Indian family of the late 19th century. Along the way are Gas Works Park, the new Lake Union Park, and numerous street-end parks— so you can stop and rest on a bench if so inclined. T. BOND seattle.gov/parks/ LakeUnionLoop

Best Bicycle Hill Climb

Too many donuts, too many IPAs, too much ice cream. We’ve all got our shameful secret calories to burn off, and that’s what weekend training rides are for. But the flat routes, like Lake Sammamish and the Burke-Gilman Trail, just don’t cut it. To really suffer and sweat, hill climbs are necessary (and preferably hill repeats, but that’s another subject). Thus we recommend Juanita Hill in Kirkland, which gains about 500 feet in four miles, conveniently located on the Lake Washington Loop between Juanita Park and St. Edward State Park. The shoulders are wide and smooth; there’s actually some crucial shade toward the top (also an espresso stand); and you can almost imagine the cowbells ringing as if on a snowy Alpine col. Then you plunge down to Kenmore, turn around, and repeat. BRIAN MILLER 7hillskirkland.org

Best Velo Guru

Judge not, lest ye be passed by a paceline of uniformed cyclists pedaling at 30 miles per hour on the Burke-Gilman Trail. It’s easy to be critical of those weekend riders squeezed into Lycra astride carbon-fiber mounts costing upward of $3,000, but more challenging to render judgments from within the peloton. That’s the task served, tongue somewhat in cheek, by Frank Strack and his fellow website editors, collectively known as The Velominati. (There’s also an amusing new book: The Rules, Norton, $19.95.) Everything about The Velominati and their rules is strict and unyielding. Dogma is the point, to carry things just a little beyond the serious and into the absurd. Their readers—disciples, if you will—are encouraged to submit to ever more severe edicts, which actually can be useful in distracting yourself from the hurt of a really big climb on a hot day. Thus Rule #40: Tires to be mounted with the label centered over the valve stem. You think it’s silly. Then you look down at your bike and say “My God, he’s actually right.” BM velominati.com

Best Gondola

Skiers know already that our state’s best gondola is also our state’s only gondola (and don’t get us started about that stupid waterfront gondola scheme; let the tourists walk—they could clearly use the exercise). But what non-skiers may not realize is that the Crystal Mountain Gondola rises 2,500 feet from the base (off Highway 410, northeast of Mount Rainier) all the way to the 6,872-foot summit, where there’s actually a restaurant used in the off-season (i.e., right now) for weddings, parties, and the like. You can also hike or bike off the top after making the 10-minute trip, but the panoramic view—from Baker to Adams, the Olympics included—will make you want to stay much longer. The 4-year-old facility shouldn’t just be a secret for skiers. BM crystalmountainresort.com

Best Driving Range

There are a lot of reasons to go to Jefferson Park, particularly since the park, in the Beacon Hill neighborhood, inaugurated its new levy-funded skatepark and Beacon Mountain playfield (with ziplines) in 2012. But the real attraction is an older one, the driving range connected to the Jefferson Park Golf Course, a 6,200-yard, 18-hole course that will celebrate its 100th anniversary next year. This is ostensibly a no-frills range with a soda machine, a handful of rental clubs, and a single level of stalls that aren’t heated or even that well-lit. What sets this range apart is its view. For as little as $5, you can smack a few dozen balls at the distant Seattle skyline, which at dusk looks like it’s either glowing or burning (depending on what kind of day you had). And if you can’t unload the kids to get a few swings in, just send them to the park to play while you contemplate the big picture and that little white ball. MB 4101 Beacon Ave. S., 762-4513 E


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PEOPLE & PLACES People

Best New Resident

Seattle Police are nationally known both for handing out Doritos at Hempfest and for brutally kicking suspects in the head for little to no reason. That’s why Kathleen O’Toole, Seattle’s first female police chief, is such a welcome addition to the city—she is surprisingly free of asshole-like tendencies, and seems genuinely likable (wow!). More than anyone before her, O’Toole seems capable of pulling our police department out of its excessive-force funk and toward a more Dorito- and peace-filled future. KELTON SEARS

Best Politician

Before there was a socialist in City Hall, there was Nick Licata. After 16 years on the City Council, this gentle, graceful man is the uncontested leader of the city’s progressive politics. An unabashed lefty activist at his core, this is a guy who lived in a Capitol Hill commune for two decades, who published the alt-weekly Seattle Sun in the 1970s, and who, upon his first election to the Council, instituted poetry readings in his committee meetings. Well known earlier in his political career for fighting new sports stadiums, he famously told Sports Illustrated in 2006 that the effect of losing the Seattle Sonics would be “close to zero.” But as he once said, “You can’t be a leader from the caboose. To be a leader you gotta be in the engine, and sometimes it gets hot in the engine.” The sponsor of the city’s paidsick-leave law, Licata is thoughtful, engaging and always entertaining. He’s not a screamer or a grandstander. He listens before he acts. There’s a reason he wins re-election by landslide margins. ELLIS E. CONKLIN

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Best New Mayor

24

Sure, Seattle only had one new mayor this year, but Ed Murray pretty much nailed it. And by nailed it, we mean he managed not to be Mike McGinn, which is just about all he had to do to make people happy. Shit, not being Mike McGinn was Murray’s whole platform, and since taking office on January 1, he’s delivered in spades. Murray tackled police reform head-on (with only a few hiccups), managed to massage a $15-an-hour minimum-wage deal (without making too many enemies), and persuaded the City Council to go along with his plan legalizing rideshares like Lyft and UberX (without injuring their egos). Also, no beard and no bike. Ed’s off to a good start. MATT DRISCOLL

Best Social Worker

The bearded, diminutive Pike Place Market social worker Joe Martin has been described as a leprechaun who looks like he fell off a

Best Organizer

A decade or two ago, unions looked like they were on the way out. Downsizing, off-shoring, the rise of a technical class awash in money and prone to individualism—none of it bode well for old-school organizing. But look what’s happened in and around Seattle over the past year. Against all odds, a huge minimumwage hike passed first in Sea-Tac and then in Seattle. While some see socialist Kshama Sawant as the face of the $15-an-hour movement, SEIU 775 President David Rolf played a much larger, hands-on role. He was a leader in Sea-Tac’s Proposition 1 campaign and then co-chaired the advisory committee to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray that produced a delicate compromise between business and labor interests. He comes across as thoughtful and reasonable, which is undoubtedly why CEOs and politicians feel as if they can deal with him. And he’s obviously got one heck of a tactical sense. NINA SHAPIRO

Best CEO

Microsoft used to be an undeniable giant. But with fierce competition from Apple, the company has struggled, and following the retirement of Steve Ballmer, the company faced an existential crisis. Satya Nadella, who took over in February, has been trying to turn the one-step-behind company into a place where innovation can flourish again—exemplified by the companywide “Hackathon” he set up last week, encouraging employees to band together to work on new projects by freely exchanging ideas across departments. If there’s one thing Microsoft could use right now, it’s new ideas. He also oversaw the company’s recent layoffs, totaling 18,000. On first blush that is a bad look, but good CEOs must make tough decisions like that. It’s a little premature to proffer the “best” title to Nadella, yes, but we’re hopeful that it will take. KS

Media & Politics Best TV News Anchor

KOMO’s Dan Lewis retired earlier this year, stepping down from the nightly news desk he’d manned since 1987. Long known for having the best hair in the business, during his 27 years at KOMO Lewis also set the bar by which all future TV news anchors in Seattle will be judged. While there may be a handful of younger anchors also deserving of this award, Lewis did the job better than anyone ever has in this town, and for longer. So we salute him into retirement in this year’s Best of Seattle, and remind readers that we’ll be lucky to ever again see a news anchor as good as him. MD

Best Reporter, TV/Radio

Honestly, we tried to give this award to someone other than Brandi Kruse this year. Why? Well, because we gave it to her last year, and variety is the spice of life. The trouble is, no one with a notepad pounding the pavement in Seattle right now comes close to matching Kruse’s tenacity and output. If there’s a press conference, Kruse will be there. If there’s a big story at City Hall, there’s a decent chance Kruse broke it. Whether it’s covering the Oso mudslide or the weed Pete Holmes snuck into City Hall, Kruse has become Seattle’s go-to radio reporter. Her KIRO Radio bosses must love her (and not just because she seems to routinely log about 80 hours a week). Sleep is for the weak, after all, and the scary part is that Kruse is only 26—meaning she’ll probably dominate the news game for years. MD

Best Meteorologist

Let’s be honest: Perennial winner of this category Cliff Mass is kind of a weather showboat. Sure, dude knows a lot about weather in the Pacific Northwest. He knows so much that he wrote an entire book about it—the appropriately titled The Weather of the Pacific Northwest. But that’s Mass’ main problem. He’s just too thorough, too much a smarty-pants. When I want weather, I don’t want 1,200 words on pyrocumulus clouds or virga or air particles smaller than 2.5 microns. I want a freakin’ five-day forecast with a lot of smiling sun faces wearing shades. And that is exactly the kind of light, friendly, easy-to-digest forecast that Q13’s Walter Kelley delivers. Here’s a guy who’s obviously having way more fun at his job than you are, and his job is to predict weather in Seattle . . . which has to be about as thankless as it gets. Kelley does it all with a smile on his face that says, “Sure, what I’m doing here is kind of a joke, but at least we’re all in on it!” Plus, he’s cute as a button. What more do you want out of a weatherman? MD

Best Twitter Feed

Stephanie Drury is not controversial Mars Hill Pastor Mark Driscoll, but on Twitter it’s sometimes hard to tell the difference. That’s because

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

ANNA ERICKSON

STAFF PICKS

charm bracelet. He’s in his 60s now, having spent more than 40 years in the social-services trenches and distinguishing himself as a most unselfish devotee of the underdog. He seeks homes for the homeless, help for the penniless, and teeth for the toothless. A onetime attendant at a Boston mental hospital, he found his way to Seattle and a job at a mentalhealth institute. He went on to co-found the Downtown Emergency Service Center and the Pike Market Medical Clinic, where he keeps his office to serve the mostly low-income and elderly clientele. He’s been honored as Operation Nightwatch’s Hero of the Homeless, and had a Low Income Housing Institute facility, Martin Court, named for him. He’ll take those honors in lieu of a big salary, saying he loves what he does and doesn’t need much to get by. “If you want to know what God thinks of money,” he says, “just look at who he gives it to.” RICK ANDERSON

GUEST BESTS Pete Holmes

Pete Holmes is not your average city attorney. Witness his appearance last month at the opening of Seattle’s first legal pot store, an occasion he used to buy a couple bags of weed for posterity and “personal enjoyment.” You’d expect nothing less of the man who stumped passionately for legalization. In addition to upending the war on drugs, what else does Holmes enjoy? Read on. NS Best Hangout Pizzuto’s in Seward Park, across the street

from the PCC, has been a family favorite since [current owner] Cory [Pizzuto]’s uncle, Vince, owned the place. The food is excellent, and it’s been wonderful to watch neighborhood families grow up over the years. Our kids had their first restaurant experiences there!

Best Park Seward Park. It’s where my kids learned to

ride their bikes and took ceramics classes at the Seward Park Clay Studio. I’ve personally racked up many miles jogging the 2.2-mile outer loop, and explored every nook and cranny walking our two family dogs (both now in dog heaven). We’d always stop at the beach halfway around the loop to skip stones. And the views of Mt. Rainier on a clear day—or any of the three nesting pairs of bald eagles—are second to none. Best Place to Splurge My wife and I like Il Terrazzo Carmine in Pio-

neer Square. But watching the M’s host the Orioles last week, where we paid $10 for a Pyramid ale, is pushing Safeco into the splurging category. Best Movie Theater

[Erstwhile] Columbia City Cinema, now Ark Lodge Cinemas. My son worked there dur-

ing high school and learned the secret of their popcorn, the best movie-theater popcorn. And it’s close enough to our home that the four of us could decide to race to the theater five minutes before showtime—which was the case more often than not!

Best Judge

As a young, impressionable civil litigator, I always admired [former] King County Superior Court Presiding Judge Robert Winsor. To this day I remember his trademark admonition to advocates at the conclusion of every hearing: “Go forth in peace.” E


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WI

for the past five years, Drury, a 39-year-old mother of two, has taken to Twitter as @FakeDriscoll in what’s developed into a sharp exercise in social commentary and brutal satire. While many people tell jokes on Twitter, the 140-character barbs Drury aims at Driscoll via social media cut so close to the bone that people often get confused. “I was about to tell you to fuck off and eat dick until I saw it was from Fake Driscoll . . . then I just laughed,” reads a typical response to one of @FakeDriscoll’s tweets. Some might call what Drury does silly, but we call it brilliant. Someone’s gotta do it. MD

NNER

Best Soundbite

If Seattle had any lingering questions about just how socialist its new City Council member was, Kshama Sawant answered them unequivocally on a rainy evening in November, six days after Boeing machinists rejected a contract that gutted their pensions. “The workers should take over the factories, and shut down Boeing’s profit-making machine,” Sawant told a cheering crowd. In other words, fresh off her victory over longtime City Councilmember Richard Conlin, Sawant boldly stood in Westlake Park and unapologetically called for a real-deal socialist revolution, suggesting that Boeing machinery could be used to make buses instead of “war machines.” So far, of course, the revolution has yet to materialize, and Boeing is still making airplanes. But when it comes to capitalism, we all know exactly where Sawant stands. MD

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Best Crack-Up

When it comes to grown-ass men parading around in ridiculous costume under the guise

of being a “real-life superhero,” Seattle’s Phoenix Jones is about as pro as it gets. He takes his make-believe seriously, and if you cross the ultimate fighter–turned–masked crusader, he’s not afraid to bust out the all-caps (or the pepper spray). So when some other (less megalomaniacal) members of Jones’ Rain City Superhero Movement failed to live up to PJ’s exacting standards back in May, it wasn’t shocking to see Jones go solo. “I LOVE BEING A SUPERHERO AND I BELIVE THERE IS A CERTAIN LEVEL OF PROFESSIONALISM THAT GOES WITH THAT,” Jones wrote on Facebook, throwing caution—along with spelling and grammar—to the wind. “I JUST CAN’T IN GOOD CONSCIENCE CONTINUE TO PUT MY SEAL OF APPROVE ON PEOPLE I FEEL ARE NOT LOYAL OR PROPERLY TRAINED.” With that, Jones officially became the Michael McDonald of real-life superheroes in Seattle. MD

Best Bad Press Conference

When Mayor Ed Murray made Kathleen O’Toole Seattle’s police chief, probably no one was happier than one Harry C. Bailey. Bailey, as you’ll recall, is the former assistant chief who retired in 2007 only to get called back into action by Seattle’s previous two mayors. Mike McGinn hired Bailey as a consultant on community relations in 2012. Then, in January, after only a week in office, Murray made Bailey interim chief, replacing Jim Pugel and calling Bailey “widely respected in law-enforcement circles and among the many diverse communities that make up the city of Seattle.” The trouble was that for all Bailey’s many lauded qualities, handling the press apparently wasn’t one of them—which he put on full display in

26

JOE MABEL

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Bike lanes on Broadway.


February while bumbling through what had to be one of the worst press conferences in recent memory. After a ridiculous chain of events that saw Bailey remove misconduct findings against SPD officer John Marrion only to have Ed Murray eventually reverse those reversals amid confusion and much embarrassment, Bailey met the press and tried to explain himself . . . which couldn’t have been a bigger train wreck. You know a press conference has gone wrong when a PIO has to step in at the end and try to salvage things. With O’Toole now officially in charge of the SPD, let’s let Bailey focus on enjoying his retirement for once. MD

pia” aesthetic the city should capitalize on (Bullitt Center, anyone?). Let’s put trees inside all our buildings, please. KS

Best New Civic Icon

The pace of Seattle’s transformation is mindboggling. Seems the entire city has been turned into one massive construction zone. Everywhere, cranes color the skies: Amazon’s glassy towers sprouting like dandelions on steroids above South Lake Union; a new 50-story skyscraper planned for downtown, next to the Rainier Tower; nearly 30 apartment buildings going up in Capitol Hill—while developers snap up parking lots and vacant spaces to construct four new hotels on Stewart Street. Yes, Seattleites, don’t leave home without your hardhat. Those cranes are here to stay. EEC

Best Political Move

Places Best Street Remodel

Best Building Plans

Yes—Amazon is evil and really shitty to book publishers. And yes, the triad of glass greenhouse biodomes the city approved the company to build in their future headquarters in South Lake Union will probably trap its employees in their offices for even longer hours than they’re now working by simulating being outside. But can we take a moment to applaud Amazon for moving the ugly “giant shiny box” aesthetic that’s plagued Seattle’s new development toward the way cooler “Ecoto-

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People & Places

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Ed Murray, Mike McGinn BEST PHILANTHROPIST

Bill & Melinda Gates BEST NEWSCASTER

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BEST BLOGGER

Dave O’Leary (daveolearyauthor.tumblr.com) BEST NEIGHBORHOOD

Ballard

BEST SUBURB

Bellevue

BEST WATERFRONT

Alki

BEST HOTEL

Grand Hyatt Seattle BEST LANDMARK

Space Needle

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

This year I started to notice I was able to bike to work without fear of dying, one of the great marks of a modern metropolis. That’s in part due to the wonderful new bike lanes Seattle has been installing—big, bright-green things that auto drivers can easily spot even if they are busy texting their friends about how much they hate bicyclists. Seattle also installed a snazzy protected bike lane on Broadway lined with strange blue sculptures that look like Smurf poop. Soon, protected bike lanes like this will line Second Avenue, Fourth Avenue, Seventh Avenue, and 23rd Avenue. Thank you, future/present Smurf poop, for making my commute infinitely safer. KS

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

NBBJ/STUDIO 216

One of the most admirable things about Gov. Jay Inslee’s decision to suspend all executions during his time in office is that it probably served him no political gain. Support for the death penalty is dropping, but it still stands at 60 percent of the country, according to a recent Gallup poll. Instead, Inslee’s action seemed to come from genuine wrestling with the complicated issues involved. As related in an interview at the time with SW, he was struck by the tremendous emotional and financial costs associated with executions, and the fact that only rich counties could afford to prosecute capital cases. A defendant might thus live or die depending on where he lived. That was inequitable, Inslee argued. He also could not ignore the high rate of court-ordered reversals—60 percent—in Washington’s death-penalty cases. Something was wrong with the system. Critics argued that Inslee’s decision didn’t achieve much; capital prosecutions are going ahead as planned because executions could still happen after Inslee leaves office. But his moratorium was a bold act intended to jump-start a needed conversation. Now the state needs to do its part and actually have that conversation. NINA SHAPIRO

27


PEOPLE & PLACES STAFF PICKS

Tag

Save 50 8/6 — 8/9 75%

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The vibe is good in Seattle’s most urban neighborhood. Dynamic, creative, chaotic, the place is buzzing. Still the center of the city’s LGBT community, Capitol Hill is getting a second wind. More than two dozen new apartment complexes are in the pipeline. There’s the Sound Transit remake around the Broadway’s light rail stationto-be. The Egyptian Theater will be revived by SIFF, which signed a lease to operate it yearround. Small, funky local business are thriving, while Elliott Bay Book Co.’s relocation from Pioneer Square some years back has done much to revitalize the the neighborhood’s south side. EEC

Best Bathroom

As The Comet Tavern’s longtime former owner Sam Wright described its storied, filthy bathroom, “You could hock a loogie on the mirror and put a cigarette butt out on it, and it would stay there the whole week.” While the Tavern’s postmakeover bathroom is nothing fancy, it earns this award for the fact that one can now sit on the toilet seat without risk of acquiring an exotic flesh-eating virus. Hooray for healthy butts. KS

Best Suburb

When people think of the suburbs, they think of freeway exits like Kent, Auburn, Federal Way, or Kirkland. They think of strip malls and four-lane thoroughfares, track housing and SUVs. But a little more than 30 minutes from Seattle via I-90, North Bend is the bedroom community many have never considered. Famous for Twin Peaks, Mount Si, and cherry pie, North Bend is the quintessential Northwest mountain town. Buddying up to neighboring Snoqualmie (the fastest growing city in the state for about a decade-plus), North Bend plays home to more well-off techie types and business execs than its quaint exterior lets on. By definition, the suburbs suck, but North Bend is different . . . just as all those commuters already know. MD

Best Place to Nearly Die

If you really have to have a heart attack, do it in Seattle. Your chance of survival is better than anyplace else in the U.S., according to King County officials. More than six out of 10 people (62 percent, to be precise) who suffered a cardiac arrest in the city and county during 2013 survived. Compare that to New York, Chicago, and other urban areas where the rate has been recorded in single digits. “People are alive today in King County who would not have survived in most other places in the country,” says King County Executive Dow Constantine. The key to beating death here lies in a coordinated regional response system—led by Medic One first responders and aided by dispatchers, fire crews, law enforcement, and urgent-care centers—working in life-saving concert. The system is constantly tweaked and has led to a dramatic rise in survival rates over the past decade—from less than 30 percent in 2002. Says Dr. Mickey Eisenberg, King County Emergency Medical Services Medical Director, “We like to say that it takes a system to save a cardiac-arrest victim, and it’s proven true again and again with every new survivor.” RA E

ANNA ERICKSON

Black

» FROM PAGE 27 Best Up-and-Coming Neighborhood

GUEST BESTS Best of Seattle: Geek Wire

Todd Bishop is sort of the minister of information in the land of geeks. As the co-founder of GeekWire.com, he is responsible for keeping tabs on all things tech in Seattle, be it seismic shifts at Microsoft or tremors of innovation on Kickstarter. And, naturally, he knows what’s best. MB Best Mode of Transport Uber and light rail. Still waiting for those jet-

packs, which might get here before the waterfront tunnel at this rate. Best App for Your Work Life Glympse, for sharing your location in real time,

so the person you’re meeting can see exactly where you’re stuck in traffic. Developed by a Seattle startup.

Best App for Your Home Life Fast Customer lets you automatically skip phone

trees to talk with a real person on customer-service and support lines. Like a virtual Jesse Jones.

Best Way to Stop Thinking About Work Stitcher Radio. My favorite app for catching up

on radio shows, podcasts, etc. Does that count as not work? Best Twitter

I almost always get a laugh out of Overheard in the Newsroom (@OHnewsroom). Best Tumblr Funny Google Street Views. Best Innovation Coolest Cooler. It’s a Bluetooth-enabled ice

chest with a built-in blender.

Best Place to Stroll Ballard Locks. A feat of engineering next to a

marvel of nature, in one of the country’s most beautiful settings.

Best Seattle Diversion Paul Allen’s Living Computer Museum. They

don’t just display classic mainframes and PCs— they have a crew of engineers who restore them, so visitors can try them out. Don’t even try to beat my pinball score on the Xerox Alto. Best Advice

Put your iPhone in airplane mode for a faster charge, and use the top volume button as the shutter when you’re taking pictures. E


FOOD & DRINK

The globe-trotting Johnson is hardly your ordinary beer geek.

STAFF PICKS

Dining

Best Food Intersection

The southeast corner alone makes 12th and Jackson in Little Saigon the best, as it has

perhaps the area’s top strip mall for food. Pho So 1 has some of Seattle’s best pho. Lemongrass offers more Vietnamese soups, and then there’s Huong Binh, with its grilled pork and vermicelli noodles, rice cakes, and star-quality soups that expand with weekend offerings like duck noodle soup. Speaking of duck noodle soups, they’re great at Hue Ky Mi Gia, where you’ll also find fried butter chicken wings on every table. Seven Stars Pepper does good Sichuanese, though some might prefer Sichuanese Cuisine on the northwest corner, where you’ll find more restaurants. Did I mention Saigon Deli in the northeast-corner strip mall? And look for new stuff on the southwest corner. JAY FRIEDMAN

Best Asian Noodles

Biang! (their exclamation point) might be my

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

MORGEN SCHULER

current pick for top dining destination in the area, largely due to one dish: the Hot Oil Seared Biang Biang noodles. You can get them topped with spicy cumin beef, chopped pork sauce, pulled stewed pork, or tomato and egg, but oilseared shows off the wide, chewy, and tender flour noodles best. It’s a typical preparation in the northern Shaanxi Province (capital, Xi’an), where a simple red-pepper topping provides comfort during cold winter days. At just $6.99, you might be tempted to have two bowls. JF 22315 Hwy. 99, Edmonds, 425-776-7847

Best Piece of Sushi

Breaking It Down The city’s BEST BREWER isn’t just one of the guys. BY MEGAN HILL

A

nnie Johnson may have chosen a maledominated hobby to pursue, but the decorated homebrewer has no problem going up against the guys. And winning. “I’m mostly brewing against guys, and I’m usually the only gal that wins,” says Johnson, who eventually earned the respect of the men in her Sacramento community. But she had to start over when she moved to Seattle last year. Male hobbyists have often been hesitant to take her advice on brewing-community message boards, 30 but they shouldn’t be—because Johnson knows

everything there is to know about beer. Johnson’s encyclopedic knowledge of hops varieties, beer styles and history, yeast strains, and barley types has earned her a high rank in the rigorous Beer Judge Certification Program, and her brewing chops have brought home more than 100 awards in 13 years of competitive brewing. In perhaps the biggest testament to her skills, Johnson also won the 2013 National Homebrewer of the Year award, beating 8,200 beers in the world’s largest such competition. Johnson, you could say, is a beer savant. Her most recent victory came when she was tapped as brewmaster for PicoBrew, the Seattle startup whose compact, sleek Zymatic automated brewing machine allows homebrewers to make beer with just the touch of a few buttons. Purchasers will have access to Johnson’s vast library of original recipes as well as her “clones,” recipes made to imitate popular commercial beers. Johnson is able to replicate beer from taste. “I have a real knack for tasting something and breaking it down,” she says. “If I like it, I can immediately go home and make it.” “Some people play music by ear, just hearing

it once,” says PicoBrew cofounder Bill Mitchell. “She does that with beer.” But Johnson’s success hasn’t come without trials, and her path to Seattle, she says, is the result of “a lot of personal tragedy.” An African-American born in Germany, Johnson is a far cry from your average beer geek. She was adopted by globe-trotting parents who worked for the Department of Defense and relocated to Abu Dhabi when she was 15; Johnson found herself in boarding school in Alexandria, Egypt, where she learned Arabic. She finished school in California, where she lived and worked for much of her adult life. There, she and her best friend became interested in the craft-beer scene and eventually homebrewing. “It wasn’t very good, but we kept at it,” Johnson recalls. She entered her first amateur brewing competition, the California State Fair, in 2001, and won first place for her American Amber. She later won the Queen of Beer award in 2004, with four first-place awards and best of show. Johnson

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

Seattle’s a good city for sushi. Of all the fine sushi restaurants, Kisaku, in Tangletown, is a favorite. It has the feel of a neighborhood restaurant in Japan, serving high-quality seafood at reasonable prices. Scour the menu for your favorites, and ask chef Ryuichi Nakano for his recommendations. Then ask if he can prepare you hotate konbu jime. Hotate means scallop, and konbu jime means sandwiching the scallop in kelp. The marination process takes time (approaching an hour is ideal), with the result being an umami boost that heightens the scallop’s sweetness into something special. JF 2101 N. 55th St., 545-9050, kisaku.com

Best Use of Beets

Throw a stone and you’ll hit a beet salad in a Seattle restaurant. Surely there’s a more innovative way to use this colorful and flavorful root vegetable? The answer is yes at Porkchop & Co. in Ballard. In the “Grilled Bread” section of the menu you’ll find smoked beet purée for just $5—a small bowl of vibrantly red beet purée topped with Point Reyes Original blue cheese. Adding flavor are garlic, almonds, sherry vinegar,

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 33


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FOOD & DRINK BREAKING IT DOWN

STAFF PICKS

rose to prominence in Sacramento’s homebrewing community, and was encouraged to take the difficult exam for the Beer Judge Certification Program, which tests for knowledge of beer styles, history, chemistry, and even specific breweries. She passed with flying colors. Johnson’s Sacramento chapter came to an end when a failed attempt to reconnect with her biological father in Philadelphia resulted in her quitting the job she’d held for 20 years as a business analyst at the California state legislature and left her jobless in Philly. “I was devastated,” she said. And just a few months later, she became seriously ill. Johnson says she had double vision for months, swelling in her legs, and so much muscle weakness she could barely get out of a chair. Her range of symptoms stumped doctors for months; after a battery of tests, she was finally diagnosed with Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid, leading to muscle weakness, heart problems, and behavioral changes. She

and smoked paprika. Want more beets? If you can resist the Flintstones-like bone-in pork chop sandwich, try the smoked-beet sandwich with blue cheese spread, pickled onions, frisée, and romesco on rye. JF 5451 Leary Ave. N.W., 257-

» FROM PAGE 30

“I could barely brew,” she says. “I was like, ‘How am I going to get this done?’ I couldn’t drink anything because I had no taste for alcohol.”

food@seattleweekly.com

5761, eatatporkchop.com

Best Fried Food

I’d do almost anything to get my hands on good tonkatsu (a breaded, deep-fried pork cutlet), and you can literally do that at Katsu Burger in Georgetown. Oh, they’re frying up beef, chicken, and even tofu there, but best is the pork, which stays remarkably juicy inside a panko exterior. Katsu Burger burgerizes the cutlet, putting it in a bun and offering an assortment of toppings. My favorite is the simple Tokyo Classic, substituting pork for beef and enjoying the mayo and tonkatsu sauce along with the standard toppings of cabbage, tomato, red onions, and pickles. JF 6538 Fourth Ave. S., 762-0752, katsuburger.com

Best Use of Dim Sum Baskets

I’m not thrilled about the quality of Seattle dim sum, but I do like the concept of carts and steamer baskets, which involves waiting for the waitstaff ’s reveal of what’s inside. And what’s inside the baskets at Northgate’s Isla Manila is quite delicious. Here you can get “flip sum,” Filipino food in small portions—a perfect application, since Filipino food is full of long-cooked, stew-like dishes. It’s a great way to experiment with a new cuisine, and since it’s all-you-can-eat at a great price, you can challenge yourself to try a little diniguan (pork-blood stew) or gorge on several baskets of more familiar adobo. JF 11740

15th Ave. N.E., 365-2500

Best Ramen There’s a big ramen boom in the area, with the best being the newest:

Hokkaido Ramen Santouka. This was

a known entity, as Santouka, based in Japan, has expanded to a number of other Asian countries and now the U.S. and Canada—though Bellevue is the first stand-alone location in America. Santouka is known for its tonkotsu broth, full of creamy, porky flavor due to its extended cooking time. My top pick here is the shio ramen, with just the right level of salt seasoning to let the broth’s pork flavor shine. It’s also the only ramen that’s served with pickled plum, adding color and a slight sourness. JF 103 Bellevue Way N.E., Bellevue,

425-462-0141, santouka-usa.com/bellevue

Best Japanese “Ippins”

Sushi Kappo Tamura is one of Seattle’s finest

sushi restaurants, but it’s also my favorite place for ippins—small plates, both hot and cold, that I typically eat before ordering sushi. SKT’s quality comes partly from its rooftop garden, which supplies greens for small salad plates (like mustard greens with Washington albacore tuna)

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

had half her thyroid removed in a surgery that left a large scar across her neck. While suffering the worst of her symptoms, Johnson entered a Pilsner Urquell brewing competition. “But I could barely brew,” she says. “I was like, ‘How am I going to get this done?’ I couldn’t drink anything because I had no taste for alcohol.” But Johnson won. “I could barely get out of the chair to accept the award,” she says. A few months later, she won the 2013 National Homebrewer of the Year award. Still without a job and on the mend from her health issues, Johnson moved to Seattle for a fresh start. “I love Seattle and I used to come here in the ’90s a lot to visit friends,” she says. She’s enjoyed getting to know the local brewing scene: Fremont Brewing, Maritime Pacific Brewing Company, Reuben’s Brews, Stoup Brewing, Georgetown Brewing Company, and Big Time Brewery. Johnson’s PicoBrew chapter began when she noticed a Seattle Times article about the Zymatic during a plane ride to visit her adoptive father, whose ailing health had put him in a nursing home. “I thought ‘This is a bunch of crap,’ ” Johnson says, echoing a common reaction among brewers skeptical of the machine’s ability to make great beer. Johnson’s brother encouraged her to write to the PicoBrew team, who invited her to visit their offices and taste their product. “The beer was good, it was pretty good! In my head I thought, ‘This is better than I wanted it to be.’ ” One thing led to another, and Johnson is now the company’s head brewer. “There were so many struggles,” she says of her journey. “But I’ve made it to the other side.” Lucky for her—and for Seattle. E

» FROM PAGE 30

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» FROM PAGE 33

and vegetables for dishes like tempura. At higher prices those ippins get more sophisticated, featuring a lot of traditional Japanese seafood preparations like kinki no yakimono (grilled rockfish) and kinmedai no nitsuke (simmered golden-eye snapper). This Eastlake restaurant’s ippin menu lets you enjoy high-quality seafood in a variety of ways. JF 2968 Eastlake Ave. E., 547-0937, sushikappotamura.com

Best Offal Dish

Bellevue’s Bamboo Garden offers a regular menu for the timid, but I recommend taking a look at the “Walk on the Wild Side” menu. Here you’ll find adventurous dishes like swimming fire fish, pork-tongue slices, and sour & spicy jellyfish. My favorite is the spicy cauldron called The Other Parts of the Pig, with pork intestines, pig-blood cubes, tofu chunks, basil, and pickled cabbage in a tangy broth. It’s spicy, earthy, spicy, tangy, spicy. Did I mention spicy? This is, after all, a Sichuanese restaurant, and the offal (other pig parts, in this case) only adds to the authenticity. JF 202 106th Pl. N.E., Bellevue, 425-688-7991, bamboogardendining.com

Best Falafel

My favorite falafel isn’t from a hole-in-the-wall Greek joint, but from Maria Hines’ Golden Beetle in Ballard. Instead of making it with chickpeas (the most common way), she uses fava beans, which may have something to do with the lighter consistency of her brightly flavored Herbed Falafel. It’s also surprisingly delicate, not overly greasy as is so often the case. Served with her cabbage slaw and tzatziki, I can easily make a meal out of this small plate, or eat it as an accompaniment to many of the other delicious Middle Eastern dishes here. NICOLE SPRINKLE 1744 N.W. Market St., 706-2977, goldenbeetle.com

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HILL Location changes. seattlebiscuit

company.com

Best Pasta Dish

Spinasse’s handmade pasta has achieved a level

of perfection that is elusive outside of Italy. The

ravioli di agnello is one of their best dishes, with

thin, delicate pillows encasing just three ingredients: lamb, mint, and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. You know you’ve got excellent Italian food on your hands when such simplicity can rise to such great heights. MH 1531 14th Ave,

251-7673, spinasse.com

Best Happy-Hour Menu

Shanik may be one of Seattle’s best-kept happy-

N., 486-6884, shanikrestaurant.com

Best Place for the Meat-andPotatoes Eater

Aside from a few iterations of kale on the menu, Manhattan is solidly meat and potatoes, with a soul food/Southern twist. Cheeseburgers, filet mignon, lobster tail, and crab cakes dominate the menu, complemented with sides like mashed potatoes and sautéed spinach. Traditionalists will also be pleased with the bar program, from the skillfully made Manhattan to the fireball whiskey shots available at happy hour. MH 1419 12th Ave., 325-6574, manhattanseattle.com

Best Dish Involving Oysters

Xinh Dwelley has gained notoriety for her Vietnamese-tinged seafood recipes at her Shelton restaurant, Xinh’s Clam and Oyster House. Thanks to Taylor Shellfish, you don’t have to travel outside Seattle to taste her delicious food. Dwelley’s oyster stew graces the menus at Taylor Shellfish’s Seattle stations and features plump Pacific oysters floating in a rich, creamy celery broth flecked with parsley. Simple but flavorful, with the briny oyster meat stealing the show. MH 124 Republican St., 501-4442, tayloroysterbars.com

Best Dish Involving Salmon

I’ve touted it before, but I have yet to find a challenger to the sockeye salmon crostini at Spur Gastropub. For $4 each, an ultra-fresh slab of salmon is layed with mascarpone, capers, and pickled shallot. The mascarpone adds a deft touch of sweetness, and its creamy texture calls out the lushness of the fish. I usually sit at the bar (the better to watch bartender Ken Gray work his magic) and share four of these with a friend before moving onto other small plates and tasty cocktails. NS 113 Blanchard St., 728-6706, spurseattle.com

Let’s just put it out there: We’d all go to The Willows Inn if we could get a reservation and afford it. Alternatively, there’s Doe Bay Café. It takes quite an effort to get there, but every step of the way is worth it, from the ferry ride through the San Juans to the winding country road through Orcas Island farms. The cafe sits on the grounds of Doe Bay Resort and Retreat, a dreamy place in its own right with views of a quiet cove and an outdoor spa built over a waterfall. The food here draws heavily from the islands and from the resort’s own garden, with generously portioned rustic dishes like buttermilk biscuits and gravy; nettle risotto; and king salmon with goat-cheese quinoa cakes, all served as you look out over the cove at kingfishers and sailboats. MH 107 Doe Bay

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

biscuit sandwich, marries the creators’ Southern roots with Northwest locavorism. A biscuit with just the right density cradles a fluffy egg, strips of bacon, Beecher’s cheese, a slab of honey ham with bits of caramelization, pickles, sweet-onion mustard, and globs of apple butter. You’ll be licking your fingers and maybe even the parchment paper underneath. MEGAN

hour secrets. The restaurant offers 20 percent off the bar menu, with miniature versions of the restaurant’s best dishes, like lentil and potato pakoras with sweet date chutney, spicy pura (miniIndian crepes), and the famous spice-encrusted lamb popsicle. As does the larger menu, the happy-hour offerings will shift slightly with the seasons, reflecting owner Meeru Dhalwala’s commitment to local sourcing. MH 500 Terry Ave.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

35

Best Restaurant Worth Traveling To

Rd., Olga, Wash., 360-376-2291, doebay.com


FOOD & DRINK READERS’ POLL

Food & Drink

BEST BREAKFAST/ BRUNCH

Salty’s on Alki Beach BEST BURGER

Red Mill Burgers

STAFF PICKS

» FROM PAGE 35 Best Place for a First Date

BEST COOKIE (TIE)

Nouveau, Grand Central, Hello Robin, Macrina

BEST HOT DOG

BEST FARMERS MARKET

BEST STEAK

BEST CSA

Po Dog

Metropolitan Grill BEST BARBECUE

Bitterroot

BEST FRIED CHICKEN

Ezell’s

BEST PIZZA, DINE-IN (TIE)

Pagliacci, Serious Pie, Tutta Bella BEST PIZZA, DELIVERY

Pagliacci

BEST NOODLE HOUSE

Green Leaf BEST DINER

Skillet

BEST BAR/PUB FOOD

The Bridge

BEST SEAFOOD

Ballard

Full Circle Farm BEST SPECIALTY GROCERY

PCC

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET

Mutual Fish

BEST BAKERY

Bakery Nouveau BEST BUTCHER

Bill the Butcher

BEST LOCAL CHEESE

Beecher’s

BEST PICKLE

Brit’s Pickles

BEST COFFEEHOUSE

Espresso Vivace BEST JUICEBAR

Juicebox

Salty’s at Redondo Beach

BEST COCKTAIL BAR

Mashiko

BEST HAPPYHOUR DRINKS

BEST SUSHI

BEST VEGETARIAN

Silence-Heart-Nest BEST DESSERT

Dilettante

BEST HAPPYHOUR FOOD

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Salty’s on Alki

BEST FOOD TRUCK

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Hot Cakes

Jemil’s Big Easy BEST CHEF

Canon

Bait Shop

BEST BREWERY

Fremont Brewing Company BEST DISTILLERY

Copperworks Distilling BEST WINERY

Chateau Ste. Michelle

Matt Dillon

BEST BARTENDER

Bakery Nouveau

BEST WINE SHOP

Cupcake Royale

BEST BEER MARKET

BEST PASTRY

BEST CUPCAKE BEST DONUT

Top Pot

Murray Stenson Wine World

Chuck’s Hop Shop

BEST LIQUOR STORE

BEST CHOCOLATE

Total Wine and More

BEST ICE CREAM

Molly Moon’s

Mark Ryan Winery’s Suicide Shift

D’Ambrosio

Manny’s

Theo

BEST GELATO

BEST CAKE/PIE

BEST LOCAL WINE

BEST LOCAL BEER

BEST LOCAL SPIRIT

Copperworks Gin

Award-winning interiors aside, Westward is a fun, casual new seafood restaurant and oyster bar with a fantastic outdoor seating area where you can get cozy with (provided) blankets next to a big gas firepit. Toast oysters and watch the sunset behind the city skyline. When you’re ready to go, grab some picnic goodies from Westward’s other half, Little Gull Grocery—perfect to take over to nearby Gas Works Park (assuming the date goes well). PATRICK HUTCHISON 2501 N Northlake Way, 552-8215, westwardseattle.com

Best Place for an Anniversary

Canon has perfected its dark, dramatic interior—including a bathroom cozier than my own home’s—that will enhance the mood of any special occasion, from secret meetings to romantic anniversaries. For the latter, Canon’s encyclopedic liquor library means you’ll probably be able to find a spirit aged as long as you and your significant other have been together. For your wallet’s sake, hope it’s one of your first anniversaries. PH 928 12th Ave., 552-9755, canonseattle.com

Best Place to Break Up With Someone

Safeco Field’s Ethan Stowell-inspired grub hub

has one thing going for it: exits. You can disappear in a throng of Mariner fans faster than your new ex can say “Who’s going to pay the tab?” But don’t leave before you scarf down some notso-typical ballpark food, like Parisian crepes and frites with garlic dipping sauce. When you’ve had your fill and done the deed, flee by light rail, taxi, bus, Amtrak, Sounder train, or pedal rickshaw. It wouldn’t hurt to leave with some garlic fries too. After all, you won’t be kissing anyone. PH 1250

First Ave. S., 346-4000, seattle.mariners.mlb. com/sea/ballpark/the_pen.jsp

Best Gluten-Free Dish

If there’s a better biscuit name than Butter Hole, I don’t know what it is. Honest Biscuit’s glutenfree offering is as rich and flaky as its glutengenerous flour counterparts, and are available fresh and frozen. If you tire of the Butter Hole (which may not be possible), you’ll be happy to know that Honest won’t let you down. They also offer gluten-free options for other biscuits: the Pike Place, with Beecher’s cheese, and the Macgregor, with bacon and onion. PH 200-5216, honestbiscuits.com

Best Post-Pot-Buzz Snack

It’s like a Malaysian street-food burrito: Kedai Makan’s roti filled with lamb, spices, mint, and pickled red onions, with a spicy dhal to dip into. While you’re there, take advantage of one of their daily specials, like black-pepper chili ribs (usually on Sundays) or the Ramly Burger, wrapped in an egg and topped with sweet chili slaw (usually available late-night on Fridays and Saturdays). The best part? You can order only at the window, so human interaction is at a minimum. PH 1510 E. Olive Way, kedaimakanseattle.com

Best Late-Night Dining

This one has to go to Brimmer & Heeltap, a restaurant that actually creates a bona fide “late night” weekend menu, on which one of the


choices is “Our Family Meal”—i.e., you eat whatever the staff cooked for themselves that night. Besides that quirky see-what-shows-up option are $3 pickled-oyster shooters, steak tartare, a veggie dish, and a nice selection of desserts, including a macaroon plate with divine orange-buttermilk ice cream that is sure to induce sweet dreams. NS 425 N.W. Market St., 420-2534, brimmerandheeltap.com

Best Pickled Item

The pickle plate at Bar Sajor is anything but mere bread and butter. It currently includes kohlrabi, asparagus, pak choy, pink radish, and sea beans, and showcases three styles of pickling: fermented pickles, vinegar pickles, and nukazuka Japanese-style pickles. The items are constantly rotating, with pickled strawberries and knotweed having made an appearance in past seasons. It’s likely even with a humble plate of pickles that you’ll be trying something very new. TIFFANY RAN 323 Occidental Ave. S., 682-1117, barsajor.com

Best Housemade Condiment

XO Sauce is a common Cantonese condiment made with dried seafood, chili peppers, garlic, and aromatics. The XO sauce at Kraken Congee, the brainchild of Shane Robinson, includes dried scallops, dried shrimp, Chinese sausage, ginger, shallots, garlic, chili flakes, and oil. The key is in the ratio, they say. The intensely savory and aromatic condiment has dressed congee topped with five-spice duck confit and acted as a dip for Chinese donuts, and it was on the menu at their August 4 pop-up at Grub. TR 1407 14th Ave.,

krakencongee.com

Best Pizza Topping

BEERS

ON DRAFT

KEGS TO GO

beers on draft

Breakfast

All Day

delanceyseattle.com

Best Dining Series

In its third year, Matt in the Market’s “Planes, Trains, and Traveling Chefs” continues to bring some of the very best chefs from outside Seattle to cook a six-course dinner (with wine pairings) with Matt’s chef Shane Ryan. The format is great: Each month throughout the summer and fall, the two chefs alternate courses and team up on one. This year’s lineup includes heavyweights like San Francisco’s Chris Costentino, winner of Top Chef Masters and competitor on the Next Iron Chef, as well as others from Portland and Memphis. I love that these chefs come to learn about how to use Seattle’s ingredients in their cuisine, and that the spirit is one of collaboration rather than Iron Chef-style competition. Plus, the

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download our app (206) 267-BIER (2437) 400 N. 35th St. Seattle, WA 98103 www.brouwerscafe.com

(206) 633-BIER 267-BIER (2437) 1710 N. 45th St. #3 Seattle, WA 98103 www.bottleworks.com

(206) 420-8943 2253 N 56th St. Seattle, WA 98103 www.burgundianbar.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

Rather than get into the heated debate over who makes the best pizza in town—especially considering it’s so subjective, based on what style you like—I decided to focus on pizza toppings intead. Just like craft cocktails, pizzas are getting increasingly signature, which means going out for a pie can be more of a dining “experience,” should you wish it. While Delancey always has options like their housemade pork-fennel sausage, Padrón chiles, Billy’s arugula, or prosciutto, they’ll often feature another “special”—preserved Meyer lemon. It’s very subtle, with the jam-like citrusy goodness embedded here and there in the cheese. It’s more sweet than tart, so if you like pineapple on your pizza, you’re sure to like this as well. NS 1415 N.W. 70th St., 838-1960,

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PIKE PLACE MARKET

93 Pike St. Seattle | 206.682.3049 | ilbistro.net

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

HOMEMADE

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FOOD & DRINK

Single and Loving It

Anne location is small and intimate, the newer Capitol Hill spot has a larger bar and huge windows that allow you to people-watch while you explore the nuances of different regions and types of agave. For the uninitiated, mezcal is made in a method similar to tequila, but largely in the state of Oaxaca and from a host of different agave species, not just blue agave. The flavor can vary wildly, but it’s often smokier and more rustictasting than tequilas, especially young tequilas. Inspired by Seattle’s Scandinavian heritage, Tom Douglas’s new Ändra Loft Bar will feature aquavit heavily. Essentially flavored vodka, aquavit generally tastes of caraway, dill, or both, with other traditional Scandinavian herbs and spices as well. While plenty is made in Europe, a booming domestic scene has emerged, including several local versions of the spirit from Sound Spirits and the Old Seattle Liquor Co.

The rise of specialty bars, Seattle’s BEST DRINK TREND. BY ZACH GEBALLE

A

s you might have noticed, single-spirit bars have become quite the cottage industry in Seattle. From relatively humble beginnings with a couple of whiskey-focused bars, we’ve reached a state where bars devoted to spirits as obscure as mezcal and aquavit are part of the local scene. It’s been a tremendous boon for

HAPPY HOUR

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Inside Renee Erickson’s Barnacle. A Barnacle drink.

PHOTOS BY JIM HENKINS

Happy Hour Daily 4:30-6:30pm 2026 NW Market St. Seattle, WA 98107

(206) 297-0507 In the historic Old Carnegie Library in ballard As Seattle grows into more and more of a cocktail city, there seems to be quite the appetite for niche bars and spirits. Douglas’ foray into the world is just one sign, as is Renee Erickson’s Barnacle, with its focus on amari and aperitifs. Could bars featuring brandy, gin, or shochu be that far away? It seems like only a matter of time before some adventurous and enterprising bar owner finds out. E

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com

Zach Geballe, our drink columnist, works as a server/bartender at a Tom Douglas restaurant.

16oz Micros! Domestic $3 20oz Imports $4 Wells $3

Wine $1 Off + 10 Delicious $5 Food Specials!

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

unabashed cocktail nerds like myself, but keeping track of all of them can be a bit difficult. Never fear, we’ve got your back. Speaking of whiskey, the king of the hill right now is Canon. While I might have questioned the utility of having hundreds of bottles of bourbon on your list, there’s nowhere else to go if you want access to endless options. Still, given that it’s a tiny bar that’s usually full, many alternatives present themselves. The Whisky Bar in Belltown boasts a strong lineup, and the crowd is often quite tolerable during the week. Radiator Whiskey in Pike Place and Fremont’s The Barrel Thief are also solid choices, while if Scotch is your preferred barrel-aged spirit, MacLeod’s in Ballard is the top local spot. Moving on to other spirits, Capitol Hill’s Rumba is, unsurprisingly, an excellent place to explore the world of rum, featuring a vast selection of light and dark rums and a cocktail list of both classic rum drinks and inspired originals. The decor is sort of like what I imagine Ernest Hemingway’s Cuban home would have looked like had he also really been into psychedelic drugs . . . besides absinthe, I guess. Moving inland from the Caribbean to Mexico, the two Seattle locations of Mezcaleria Oaxaca do an excellent job of presenting their namesake liquor in a variety of forms. While the Queen

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FOOD & DRINK

Brand New IN LOWER QUEEN ANNE!

Contemporary mexican cuisine

STAFF PICKS

agavecocina.com

» FROM PAGE 37

food is typically divine, and the view—well, it’s one of Seattle’s finest. NS 94 Pike St., #32,

467-7909, mattsinthemarket.com

When Spanish tapas restaurant Olivar was set to close earlier this year, one of the primary concerns of regulars was for the building’s murals, painted by Vladimir Shkurkin more than 80 years ago for the Loveless Building’s first restaurant, Russian Samovar. Upon Restaurant Marron’s recent opening, the local community breathed a sigh of relief to see the murals intact and in full glory. Diners now enjoy Marron’s carte-blanche menu hugged by the wall-to-wall scenes from a story by Alexander Pushkin. TR

806 E. Roy St., 322-0409, restaurantmarron.com

Best Food Trend

Half-portions! There’s a reason the average

American woman’s waist size is 37 inches (according to J. Crew), and I’m pretty sure it has to do with the whopping portions we can’t seem to break up with. Fortunately, many a Seattle restaurateur is now offering half and whole sizes of many lunch and dinner entrées, which not only keeps us from overeating, but also facilitates family-style sharing and is easier on our wallets. Keep it coming, please! NS

Retail Best Locally Made Condiment

Renee Erickson has excelled in pickle-making, using pickled raisins, apricots, and French plums to great effect in her restaurants. You can bring all these home via her Boat Street Pickles product line, but my favorite is her pickled figs. These plump and juicy Black Mission figs are pickled with red wine, cane sugar, balsamic vinegar, rosemary, and sea salt—and are fantastic in just about any meal. They work as a sandwich spread, a fruity addition to salad greens, a side to grilled steak, and an accompaniment to blue cheese (and most other cheeses). I especially love the figs on vanilla ice cream, and dream of someday putting them on a prosciutto and arugula pizza. JF boatstreetpickles.com

Britt’s naturally fermented pickles reliably come with a delightful crunch, but the Full Sour is

where Britt’s pickle genius shines brightest. The tartness is jaw-aching and bracing, but mellowed a bit by oak flavors and a hint of earthy funk. And hey, they’re good for you, with loads of healthy bacteria promoting good digestion—as if you needed such an excuse. MH 1500 Pike Place #15, 253-666-6686, brittsliveculturefoods.com

Best Prepared Item From Butcher

For those who can’t slow-cook their own pig head at home, Rain Shadow Meats has the fromage de tête (head cheese) covered. And for those who won’t, Rainshadow’s head cheese will be the gateway to the off cuts. While everyone is adoring Rainshadow’s signature Paris ham, their head cheese will be the one to surprise. Melt-in-mouth cheek and tender bits of snout and skin are suspended in well-seasoned aspic

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GUEST BESTS Join us for our Weekend Brunch! 9am – 3pm

Irbille Donia Irbille Donia has a lot going on. Locally, the cook

and entrepreneur is known as part of the Seattle Kraken Congee pop-up and the Lahi Filipino pop-up, in addition to his job as line cook at Aragona. Nationally he is now recognized as one of the successful participants in CNBC’s Restaurant Startup, where he won financial backing for Kraken Congee. So what food does he indulge in with his fleeting spare time? NS

LOWER QUEEN ANNE 100 Republican Street

OUTSIDE DINING!

Best Underrated Restaurant For me, Green Leaf. That food is more than the

typical Vietnamese dishes you see around town.

EARLY & LATE HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY!

Best Place to Send an Out-of-Town Friend Revel/Joule, to taste the dope twist of Korean

and French influences. Rachel and Seif are local heroes to a style of cuisine that just speaks to my Filipino immigrant/American upbringing. It’s the perfect melting pot of flavor and style. Best Pike Place Market Food Stall The Oriental Mart. Tita Lei and her family are

(next to Key Arena)

Seattle, WA 98109 206.420.8195

f

PRIME STEAKS. LEGENDARY SERVICE. Fine Wine • Private Dining • Exceptional Menu

trailblazers for us as one of, if not the first, Filipino entrepreneurs in Seattle. That stall is your quintessential Filipino mini-mart. Buy some soap, buy some clothes, buy some FOOD. The traditional turo-turo (point point) street-food stall has all the classics of one-pot mastery, like adobo and sinigang fish collars fresh off the boat. No pun intended.

Best Bar

Want to know what bar you can find me in? Just listen for the Hawaiian reggae jams at Ohana in Belltown. The drinks are cheap and so is the food. You can pretty much see me there with friends just having a good time. It’s nothing but love, so if you see me, say hello and let’s toast. By the way, the karaoke there is dope; there are some serious talents that get on that mike. Best New Restaurant None other than Aragona. I had the honor to

help open the place with an amazing team of chefs. It was an awe-inspiring experience to open and in such a short amount of time make the James Beard long list of nominations. That was a great accomplishment for us. For the first time in my career I cooked, tasted, learned what it meant to cook at the highest level. Learning an amazing array of techniques to create flavor and the attention to detail each ingredient is given was so eye-opening. I have never worked with so many talented people, both front and back of house. I’m excited to watch them continue to grow and represent for the Northwest. E

Downtown 1511 6th Avenue I Seattle, WA 98101 206.223.0550 mortons.com/seattle

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

Best Pickles

ANNA ERICKSON

Best Restaurant Artwork

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Capitol Hill

08-06-14 Captain Blacks_GROUP_TrpLStk_V_2014 Capitol Hill GRP • 3” x 7.08 • COLOR • Diana/

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Retail THE RAPY

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

905 E. Pike Street • Capitol Hill

42

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129 Belmont Avenue East, Seattle, WA 98102 | Open Daily from 4pm - 2am. facebook.com/captainblacks | captainblacksseattle@gmail.com

A HARDWARE STORE ON CAPITOL HILL

206-322-1717 1417 12TH AVENUE

(BETWEEN PIKE AND UNION)

WWW.PACSUPPLY.COM

Blue skies in December. A hardware store on Capitol Hill.


FOOD & DRINK STAFF PICKS

» FROM PAGE 41

like a mosaic, and you can take home the work of art sliced and ready to eat with that lonely jar of Dijon in the fridge. TR 404 Occidental Ave. S., 467 4854, rainshadowmeats.com

Best Prepared Item From a Seafood Market

Besides obscure Japanese candies, exotic produce, and aisles and aisles of Asian sauces, snacks, and other unfamiliars, Uwajimaya is also known for its seafood counter. Though I’m typically not a fan of pre-marinated meats and seafood from groceries, I make an exception for the black cod in the kasuzuke marinade. Also available to buy on its own, it consists of sake, sake kasu (a by-product of the sake-making process) mirin, brown sugar, and miso, and brings a distinctly Asian “umami” flavor, with a sweet note from the brown sugar. They recommend (and I second it) that you scrape off the marinade before broiling (four to five minutes on each side). It browns nicely—even caramelizes—and tastes like something you’d be served in a Japanese restaurant. NS 600 Fifth Ave. S., 624-6248, uwajimaya.com

Best Beer Selection, Retail

With 1,300 bottles from more than 50 countries, West Seattle’s The Beer Junction is beer-geek heaven, including mead and cider for those who sway that way. Add a staff with impressive knowledge of their selections and special brewers’

events that build a sense of community, and this shop is head and shoulders above the rest. MH

4511 California Ave. S.W., 938-2337, thebeerjunction.com

Best Local Soda

It’s not often that a soda can rise in the ranks to be comparable in flavor and complexity to our beloved cocktails. But Anna Wallace founded Seattle Seltzer Co. and did it with a recipe for a long-forgotten celery soda. Wallace’s is lightly fizzy and rich in celery and celery-seed flavors highlighted by a splash of lime juice. And because Seattle’s new favorite soda is also food’s favorite soda, Seattle Seltzer Co.’s celery soda is currently sold on tap at Rain Shadow Meats Squared, the Whale Wins, Delancey, and Essex. TR Multiple locations, seattleseltzer.com

Best Local Cheese

All the cheeses made at Mountain Lodge Farm are named after volcanoes, including the Tipsoo, which met with such positive reception that the farm has decided to extend its season. It’s a pasteurized, semi-soft cheese made with goat and Jersey cow’s milk. The rind is washed with hard cider from Rockridge Orchards, and the cheese is left to age to perfection. Funky in smell but mild and spreadable, the Tipsoo is a gateway cheese for washed-rind varieties, and can be found at cheese shops around Seattle including The Calf & Kid. TR Multiple locations, 360-832-1625,

mountainlodgefarm.com

Best Bread

It may come as no surprise that my favorite bread heralds from Columbia City Bakery; there’s a reason why it’s a staple on most restauarant menus in Seattle. While all their loaves are generally delicious, my personal favorite is their Walnut Levain, spontaneously leavened and studded with big chunks of walnut. It’s chewy with a thick hearty crust, and the nuts make it a perfect accompaniment for cheese or in a chicken-salad sandwich. Of course, it’s also delicious on its own.

be excellent spots to drink a frothy pint from the tap. Chuck Shin’s Greenwood location sports 38 taps, and his new Central District spot has a cool 50, with an astounding selection of cider and beer, from sours to IPAs to ambers and more. The beers are expertly selected, rotate frequently, and served by a bevy of knowledgeable and polite staff members who will patiently let you sample on your way to deciding from among all the choices. They also fill growlers, have TVs, and are dog-friendly. Oh, and they almost always have a food truck or two stationed outside. Game over.

NS 4865 Rainier Ave. S., 723-6023, columbiacity bakery.com

MH AND ZACH GEBALLE 656 N.W. 85th St.,

Best Paté

297-6212, chucks85th.com; 2001 E. Union St., 538-0743, chuckscd.com

For just $10.99 a pound, DeLaurenti’s brandied house paté is a delicious steal. Though the recipe

is “totally proprietary and totally secret,” according to cook Garrett Abel, he did divulge that it’s a mix of duck, pork, and chicken liver with sherry and a little brandy added—which really come through in the aftertaste. They whip this one up every day, so it typically doesn’t make it into the deli case until 11 a.m. or noon. A quarter pound is the perfect amount for two people sharing it with a crusty baguette, cheese, and wine. NS 1435 First Ave., 622-0141, delaurenti.com

Drinking Best Beer Selection, Tap

The two no-frills locations of Chuck’s Hop Shop are great places to buy beer, but also happen to

Best Beer Selection, Bottles

There’s no shortage of places to get great bottles of beer in Seattle, thankfully. What sets Uber Tavern apart is not just the depth of their selection, but its idiosyncrasy, meandering among local, American, and European beers—yet there’s always something new, interesting, and delicious to discover. ZG 7517 Aurora Ave. N., 782-2337, uberbier.com

Best Local Brew (Tied)

What I love most about Fremont Brewing’s Universale Pale is that it finds a middle ground between beer’s two main essences, malt and hops. Floral and aromatic on the nose, sweet yet bitter on the tongue—in the end I have to agree with

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THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO RUN THIS TOWN.

11. 30 .14

R E G I S T E R O N L I N E : S E AT T L E M A R AT H O N . O R G

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

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FOOD & DRINK » FROM PAGE 43

what Fremont Brewing itself says about it on their website: “This is beer.” Yes, yes it is. ZG 3409 Woodland Park Ave. N., 420-2407, fremontbrewing.com

In a city of damn good beer and many damn fine porters among them, the roasty, malty balance achieved by Stoup Brewing’s Robust Porter elevates it above the competition. Stoup’s brewers treat their beer like wine, paying close attention to the way its flavors develop along the palate and thinking carefully about how the beer looks, smells, and feels in your mouth. That level of detail shows in all their beers, but the Robust Porter is a masterpiece. MH 1108 N.W. 52nd St., stoupbrewing.com

Best Brewery Menu

The so-called Gastropod at Epic Ales in SoDo probably won’t win any awards for decor, but what it lacks in frivolity, it makes up for in flavor. Skilled chef Travis Kukull is at the helm of a tiny kitchen, crafting inventive dishes that use ingredients in astounding ways—like the recent spruce-tip chocolate-chip ice cream and the cold watermelon soup with flashes of wasabi and chunks of pickled watermelon rind. The food pairs well with the equally inventive brews from beer mastermind Cody Morris. MH 3201 First Ave. S., 403-1228, gastropodsodo.com

Best Craft Cocktail

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

The signature drink at what is perhaps Seattle’s signature craft-cocktail bar, the Canon Cocktail does two essential things right. First, it provides a delicious interplay of flavors: the sharpness of the rye whiskey, the herbaceousness of the Ramazzotti, the sweetness of the triple sec foam, and the, well, bitterness of the bitters. More than that, it’s about the textural layers that the ingredients provide: the amaro’s richness and body and the foam’s airiness. Consistently delicious, and intriguing, it’s a fitting drink for Jamie Boudreau’s bar, and for Seattle. ZG Canon, 928 12th Ave., 552-9755,

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canonseattle.com

Best Wine List, Local

Wild Ginger has a great wine list in general,

but their commitment to offering Washington wines made from just about every imaginable grape is what earns them this award. From the usual suspects like cabernet sauvignon and riesling to more esoteric grapes like graciano and carmenere, you’ll find wines from our state alongside many of the finest in the world. ZG 1401 Third Ave., 623-4450, wildginger.net

Best Wine List, Imports

David Butler’s creatively sourced French wines at Le Caviste are a must for anyone looking for an authentic experience. The list, exclusively French, features not just well-known regions like Burgundy and Bordeaux, but up-andcomers like Savoie and Jura. Butler and the rest of his staff are excellent at both finding a glass you’ll like and deflecting questions about why

there aren’t more recognizable names on the list. Sure, the red blend you end up with might be a grenache/cinsault/mourvedre blend, but you’ll probably love it. ZG 1919 Seventh Ave., 728-2657, lecavisteseattle.com

Best Cocktail Name

The Mustache Ride, because The Walrus and the Carpenter is located in Ballard, and there

are a lot of mustaches in Ballard (many of which are regularly found at Walrus). Plus, it’s a term for a relatively benign sex act, and also sort of a reference to Super Troopers. I’m not really sure what else you could possibly want from a drink name? ZG 4743 Ballard Ave. N.W.,

395-9227, thewalrusbar.com

Best Reinvented Classic Cocktail

Of the many classics, few get less regard than the mai tai. Viewed as a dated relic of the tiki craze, it mostly elicits confused looks from bartenders when ordered these days. Usually they don’t even have all the necessary ingredients. Yet when well made, as is the Libby’s Mai Tai at Sun Liquor, it’s a fun exploration of tropical flavors without being overly cloying and sweet. Plus it looks absolutely gorgeous. ZG 607 Summit Ave. E., 860-1130, sunliquor.com

Best Local Red

First of all, it’s one of the few wines actually made within Seattle city limits. Second of all, it shows off one of the great vineyards in Washington: Red Willow Vineyard in the Yakima Valley. Most of all, though, the 2010 Red Willow Blend is really delicious! The blend of cabernet franc, merlot, and cabernet sauvignon is both aromatically pretty and substantial on the palate, without being too rich and cloying. It’s eminently drinkable now, and can also be set aside for a few years. ZG 6122 Sixth Ave. S., 768-9463, fallline winery.com

Best Local White

One of the strengths of the Washington wine industry is that with so much land under cultivation, growers and winemakers have been able to experiment with a wide range of varietals. Grüner veltliner, native to Austria, is one that seems to have a bright future here. It’s bright and lively, with flavors of apple and pear, while retaining an acidic core that makes it excellent for pairing with most foods. W.T. Vintners’ has a bit more body than most sauvignon blancs, without the flabbiness that can sometimes accompany chardonnay. Plus it’s just fun to say! ZG 19501 144th Ave. N.E., Woodinville, 425-610-9463, wtvintners.com

Best Locally Produced Spirit

A truly tasty marriage of Scotch and bourbon,

Westland Distillery’s Westland American Single Malt uses malted barley as its base, imbuing it

with smoky, floral smells and a sharpness on the palate. Yet it’s aged like bourbon, mostly in new American oak casks, giving it a richness and sweetness on the finish that’s distinctly, well, American. ZG 2931 First Ave. S., Suite B, 7677250, westlanddistillery.com

Best Second-Date Bar

A second date doesn’t always get much respect. A first date is all about making a good impression, and a third is about seeing how far things might go, but that second date? It’s probably a hastily planned beer at a local tavern. Wanna class things up? Head to the intimate, sexy, and hard-to-find Bathtub Gin and Co., where you can impress your date with your knowledge of classic cocktails. Just be warned: There’s often a wait on the weekends, but that just makes it all the more special. ZG 2205 Second Ave., 728-6069, bathtubginseattle.com

Best Cocktail Over $12

The Ciudad Vieja, Spur Gastropub’s take on a Seattle original, packs an immense amount of flavor and complexity into one $14 package. The interplay of Laird’s Applejack and aged rum is inspired, and the dry Curaçao adds a citrus zing. Sure, the cost is steep, but you’re getting highquality spirits and a wonderfully layered cocktail. ZG 113 Blanchard St., 728-6706, spurseattle.com

Best Use of Ginger Beer Besides a Moscow Mule

Look, the Moscow Mule is an unrelenting juggernaut crushing all other cocktails beneath its copper wheels. I know this. Yet I’ll continue to be a voice in the wilderness, advocating for drinks like the Horse’s Neck (ginger beer and rye whiskey) or the Dark and Stormy (ginger beer and dark rum). In that vein is the Porch Swing, a blend of gin, Aperol (an Italian herbal liqueur), and Rachel’s Ginger Beer. Available at the flagship Pike Place Market location, it’s bright, crisp, spicy, and has a depth of flavor that a Moscow Mule can only dream of. ZG 1530 Post Alley, 467-4924, rachelsginger beer.com

Best Reason to Drink Vodka

Vodka rarely gets much respect from craft cocktail bars and bartenders. At best, it’s seen as a blank canvas to which many flavors can be applied; at worst it’s just added to some sweet crap and served with a sugared rim. Antoine’s Cocktail at Liberty, though, actually sort of lets you taste the vodka, and in an unsweetened drink! ZG 517 15th Ave. E., 323-9898, liberty

ANNA ERICKSON

STAFF PICKS

GUEST BESTS Kathleen Flinn

Kathleen Flinn is a Seattle-based author of several

food memoirs, including the just-published Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good: A Memoir of Food and Love From an American Midwest Family. She’s also the source of many-a recipe through her website cookfearless.com. For us, she sings the praises of some of her Seattle favorites. NS Best Romantic Restaurant The bar area at Il Terazzo Carmine in Pioneer

Square. Nothing says romance like Italian, and that’s where I first laid eyes on my husband. Best Place to Indulge/Overeat/Slum Chicken-fried steak from Local 360 or Jules Mae in Georgetown—total diet-killers. After a

tough day, I just must have the wild-boar sloppy Joe from Quinn’s. Best Underrated Restaurant Place Pigalle. It’s often dismissed as a tourist

restaurant given its stellar location at Pike Place Market, but they’ve been consistently executing excellent French cuisine for years. Best Place to Send an Out-of-Town Friend Matt’s in the Market. You get the fabulous view

of the Sound, the Pike Place Market experience, plus their wonderful combination of fresh Northwest produce artfully blended with Southern influences. Best Pike Place Market Food Stall Piroshky Piroshky, hands down. Their chicken,

bars.com

rice, and mushroom is my favorite.

Best Mimosas

Best Dish in Seattle Perfectly shucked fresh raw oysters at Taylor Shellfish, paired with a crisp oyster wine.

The four booths, corner table, and long, U-shaped counter at Georgetown’s Square Knot fill up fast on weekend mornings, so there may be a wait—worth it for the old-school diner breakfasts and even more so for the mimosas. Not girly mimosas served in girly flutes, these are MANMOSAS, served in pint glasses (!) for only $7: choose from pineapple, grapefruit, pomegranate, or classic orange. They don’t stint on the bubbles, either. On a recent Sunday, one probably would have sufficed; my second—which I swear was a glassful of Champagne with a mere splash of OJ for color—made me very glad I wasn’t driving. GAVIN BORCHERT 6015 Airport Way S.,

762-3242, facebook.com/TheSquareKnot

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 46

Best Ambience Serafina. The place manages to be both intimate

and romantic, yet lively, casual and formal.

Best Bar Poppy on North Broadway. The food is artfully

executed, the bartenders are great, and it has the best happy hour in Seattle.

Best New Restaurant

I can’t pick just one. So here are three: Joule for bold yet balanced flavors; London Plane for its sophistication; and Westward for the fabulous views, casual-chic setting, and lovely seafood. E


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45


FOOD & DRINK STAFF PICKS

» FROM PAGE 44 Best Place to Day-Drink

For most Seattleites, drinking at lunch on a weekday is still a bit taboo. Those who feel a bit more European seem to congregate at Matt’s in the Market, where you can enjoy a delicious meal, a great view, and a glass (or three) of wine without anyone batting an eye. Look around and you’ll see a bottle on most tables, or a cocktail, or both! The wine list is deep and well-curated, the cocktails thoughtfully chosen. So ditch that boring iced tea and live a little! ZG 94 Pike St #32, 467-7909, mattsinthemarket.com

Best Outdoor Drinking

Outdoor drinking, for me, requires two elements: sunshine and tequila. Yes, you can make an argument for rum or white wine, but let’s be honest: In the heat of a Seattle summer, what you really want is a well-made margarita, some chips, and something to stare at. Little Water Cantina delivers on all three counts, but their much-coveted picnic tables do fill quickly. ZG 2865 Eastlake Ave. E., 397-4940, little watercantina.com

Coffee and Confections

46

Ballard’s Slate Coffee Bar is unique: There’s no line of people at a counter contemplating a big blackboard of options, but instead table service with an explanation of a very short menu. The best way to experience Slate is to do a coffee flight. This can be customized to your desires, but on a recent visit, barista Kyle served his favorite introduction to coffee: first, a comparison of two house-roasted beans brewed pour-over style; next, one of those beans served iced to compare to the warm one; then a deconstructed latte, which highlights the quality of both the espresso and the milk; finally, a dessert tasting. Overall: quite the sweet experience. JF 5413 Sixth Ave. N.W., 701-4238, slatecoffee.com

Best Coffee Drink

Drinking the Café Nico at Espresso Vivace is a divine experience. The expertly made espresso, just four dainty ounces, carries an ethereal spritz of orange and vanilla syrups, and is buoyed by a splash of steamed halfand-half, topped with a shake of cinnamon, and finished with a fragrant garnish of orange peel. It’s a tiny cup of perfection, one that should be sipped slowly and with eyes closed. MH Multiple locations, espressovivace.com

Best Coffee Roast

After releasing Fonte Coffee’s first blend, the F1, Paul Odom and Steve Smith continued to tweak and improve upon the recipe to develop the F2 . It comprises primarily beans from Brazil for a dark-chocolate foundation; roaster

fontecoffee.com

Best Coffee Collaboration

The next time you get coffee to go, try it frozen. Caffe Vita and popsicle-pushers Six Strawberries joined forces to create the Caffe Vita Latte Pop, putting one of Seattle’s favorite beverages on a stick. More important, this popsicle is for everyone—it’s dairy-free, gluten-free, and vegan-friendly. With coconut milk, tofu pudding, and, of course, espresso as its base ingredients, this energy jolt disguised as dessert is fun for summer, but will be a hard habit to quit come winter. TR Caffe Vita, 1005

E. Pike St., 709-4440, caffevita.com; Six Strawberries, multiple locations, sixstrawberries.com

The Farmer Chef Jason Stoneburner takes to the field to find the BEST INGREDIENTS for his menu. BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

J

ason Stoneburner is a few minutes late for our phone call. When I finally get him, he is breathless and apologetic. He was on the roof of Bastille tending to his beehive during the recent July heat wave. I jokingly tell him I hope he didn’t get stung, to which he replies: “I just did, for the first time.” Oops. If you’ve ever had the pleasure of touring Bastille’s rooftop garden, you know that Stoneburner, owner of that restaurant and owner/chef of Stoneburner, just across the street on Ballard

me kind of have focus on what it is exactly I’m looking for so I know how it’s going to work on a plate. There’s some distance between what a farmer thinks is a perfect veggie versus what a chef thinks it is. It’s fun to look at things in the ground and envision it on the plate. I’m a very visual chef; I have to see these items before I plan a menu.” It’s creative control over menu items that he’s ultimately after, because, as he readily admits, this isn’t a cost-cutting measure, nor is it a way to get access to quality: “We’re blessed

The acre Stoneburner tends in Redmond.

Best Cupcake

Belltown’s Yellow Leaf Cupcake Co. creates a brilliant bacon ’n’ pancakes cupcake, melding sweet syrup with salty, fatty hickory bacon in the cake and sprinkling sugared bacon bits atop the maple Italian buttercream frosting. The cupcakes here are perfectly moist, just sweet enough, and strike a fine balance between cake and frosting—that is to say, there’s a big pile of frosting to ensure you get some with every bite. Who said bacon was over?! MH

2209 Fourth Ave., 441-4240, theyellowleaf cupcake.com

Best Donut

Top Pot makes great doughnuts all around, and their cakelike Old-Fashioned line is the real deal—fried to crispy perfection and retaining their über-dense interior. Their maple Old-Fashioned is coated with a sticky mess of maple glaze, super-sweet and begging to be washed down with a latte on a rainy day. MH Multiple locations, toppotdoughnuts. com

Best Fro-Yo Flavor

Pistachio is like Delaware. Until someone mentions it, you forget it exists. But at Yogurtland, I never forget. Their pistachio is perfect, especially in the summer, when a clean, green, nutty fro-yo is all you ever need. Pro tip: Add fresh strawberries and your favorite chocolate topper for an improvised spumoni. PH 1620 Broadway, 860-1386, yogurt-land.com

Best Ice-Cream Flavor

Molly Moon’s maple walnut is the sort of ice cream old retirees eat when they’ve run out of Werther’s Originals. Why? Because people who’ve been around that long know that both are delicious, and don’t have time for your fancy New Age nonsense. Maple and nuts are timeless but never tasteless. Molly Moon’s does it right. PH Multiple locations, mollymoon icecream.com E

HILARY DAHL

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Best Coffee Experience

Steve Smith added some Guatemalan beans for acidity, Kenyan for fruit notes, and Indonesian for body and structure. Its sweet and delicate fruit flavors are thoughtfully curated, making this roast Fonte’s go-to for espressos and Americanos. TR 1321 First Ave., 777-6193,

Avenue, cares about his ingredients enough to grow many of them himself—honey included. While he’s had the guys at Ballard Bees tending his millions of bees for the past three years, he recently became interested in the process, getting tutored in beekeeping enough to take it over completely. He doesn’t wear a beekeeper’s suit, though, “just some gloves and a mesh mask. I can’t do that whole suit—it’s a little over-the-top. Like diving with a chain-mail suit,” he jokes. It’s not the bees we’re here to talk about, it’s his latest garden—a rented acre in Redmond, which he farms with help from Seattle Urban Farm Company, where his neighbors are other restaurant’s farms, including The Herbfarm and Trellis, who’ve been there for a while and have many, many acres. Here the focus is on Mediterranean plantings that work in his Mediterranean-inspired Stoneburner restaurants. Besides his first bee sting, he also got his second garden haul today from the farm, including Italian varieties of escarole; a bright, light chard; a variegated zucchini; and an “opal” purple basil. As interested as Stoneburner is in gardening, however, he still maintains that “I’m a chef, not a farmer. My focus is still on the kitchen. Any involvement is added work for me. But it helps

agriculturally in this area.” And the bulk of the work is left to his farmers. “One of the most exciting things about working with Colin and Brad (of Seattle Urban Famers) is that in sussing out a lot of the seed stock, I kind of learned what works in that area just from shopping the local markets and talking to other farmers. We looked at heirloom varietals that are fairly traceable to countries of origin, so we’re doing a lot of French varietals for Bastille and Italian for Stoneburner.” What fruits of the labor can we expect to see at Stoneburner? “We’re gong to be serving zucchini crudo, very dense and crunchy, sprinkling it with some nigella seeds and some honey vinegar [made from honey from their hives], a little olive oil, and some Chinese radishes.” He’s also rolling out fresh pasta that he’s seeding through with the opal basil, which he says creates beautiful streaking and flavor. Also on the menu: “We’re planning on building a brick oven out there [in the garden] so that we can do some roasting and have some harvest parties, some dinners in the field.” If his Bastille garden tours and cocktails are any indication, we can expect them to be a hit. E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com


SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

47


STAFF PICKS

Fashion & Accessories

sweaters, tops, scarves, slouchy beanies, and even sock warmers that can be worn on their own or layered from season to season. These pieces are meant to last, and worthy of a permanent place in your closet. LC paychiguh.com

Best Clothing Store

Best Men’s Wear Designer

Since it opened in 2003, Totokaelo has become a Seattle institution, the place to go for the most coveted designs and fashion lines. The modern, light, open space it now occupies in Capitol Hill is like a beautiful art gallery, where the staff is incredibly knowledgeable and avant-garde. Shoes from the likes of Maison Martin Margiela and Acne Studios, and clothing from Isabel Marant, Dries Van Noten, and Junya Watanabe show Totokaelo’s commitment to being one of the city’s most carefully curated boutiques. Their online store is stellar. You can communicate directly with staff regarding specifics on pieces and get service as personal as you would in the store itself. With its selection of new pieces on the cutting edge and a fabulous sale section, this is one of the city’s crowning jewels of style. LISA COLE 1523 10th Ave., totokaelo.com

Best Women’s-Wear Designer

Paychi Guh’s gorgeous knitwear line is the

epitome of everyday luxury, with cashmere pieces that are gorgeous and eternally stylish. The appeal of the silhouettes is certainly in their modern take on a wardrobe staple, with cool graphics and beautiful texture. Founder Paychi Karen Gui has an extensive background in textile and design, as well as a love for modern art and architecture. These influences are seen in Guh’s

The sharp silhouettes and cryptic prints of local clothing line Actual Pain can be spotted up and down the West Coast. Their thick-billed caps, comfy sweaters, jackets, and loose tanks and Ts are mostly monochrome and casual yet edgy, making them easy to integrate into any outfit. This makes them perfect for a lot of men who may not be willing to sacrifice comfort or take chances with the cut of their clothes, but who want something that can still stand out in a crowd. Speaking of standing out, their leggings for women are painfully cool, too. T.S. FLOCK store.actualpain.org

Best Milliner

For those who want to keep the sun out of their eyes in style, Seattle has many options, but it’s milliner Kelly Christy who offers a range that exceeds the norm for both men and women. Her hats come in classic shapes, are made from fine materials, and, once in your closet, will have you looking forward to the right season to wear them, year after year. For those who want to make a bolder statement, Christy’s cocktail hats feature elegant embellishments that will turn heads in all the best ways. And for the truly daring, her unique pieces become whimsical sculptures, just right for parties al fresco. TSF Available at boutiques including Hitchcock in Madrona; kellychristyhats.net

Best Jewelry Designer

Joanna Morgan’s hand-cast pen-

dants, earrings, and rings have a softness and warmth that isn’t easy to achieve in silver and brass. Sometimes abstract, sometimes organic in shape, Morgan’s designs make a statement, but with such simple subtlety that they can be worn with any outfit for any occasion. Her latest Scavenger collection is inspired by natural forms that carry the vibe of our local ecology, giving them a timelessness and pride of place that is also on trend with current fashion, shining with urbane sophistication. TSF

48

joannamorgandesigns.com

Best Local Cosmetics and Skin Care COURTESY PAYCHI GUH

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Paychi Guh’s drapefront cardigan.

After noticing the abundance of toxic and hazardous chemicals found in skin-care products and cosmetics—even in high-end and “natural” brands—biochemist Dr. Jennifer Dietrich decided to make her own. Atomic Cosmetics and Xerion Skin Care were born, and

in 2012 they were made available to the public via Dr. Jen’s House of Beauty. Palettes range from edgy to classic, and Dietrich and her staff craft custom colors and tonics to protect and beautify based on individual complexions and chemistry. Nothing is tested on animals and the ingredients of every product are readily accessible, so customers can feel good in every way about what they are putting on their face. TSF 617 E. Pike St., colorsthatgoboom.com

Art Retail Best Art Pop-Up

Gallerist Beth Cullom closed her brick-and-mortar gallery last year, but undaunted and devoted to the arts as she is, she has taken Cullom Gallery on the road and staged mobile art viewings around town. Cullom specializes in works on paper, including antique and contemporary woodblock prints, lush and unique watercolors, and genrebreaking abstract works, including her recent staging of Ellen Ziegler’s series Vermilion at the LxWxH Gallery space in Georgetown. Cullom’s concept takes art outside gallery walls into more casual, lively settings. Even if you don’t walk away with a piece, you’ll walk away with some knowledge and maybe a new acquaintance or two. TSF cullomgallery.com

Best Place to Buy Art

Seattle’s highest concentration of art galleries is in Pioneer Square, and given the ease of perusing them all during First Thursday, it’s tough to choose a Best Place to Buy Art from this neighborhood alone. However, G Gibson Gallery stands out as an essential stop for active collectors and those just starting out. The gallery’s focus on photography makes it a natural choice for devotees of the medium; works by renowned artists, including Arbus, Cunningham, and Siskind, are frequently on display aside those by exciting contemporary fine-art photographers such as Julie Blackmon and Eirik Johnson. In addition, the gallery represents a diverse stable of painters, sculptors, and mixed-media artists, making G Gibson Gallery one of the best places to see a cross-section of disciplines in an inviting space attended by a friendly and knowledgeable staff. TSF 300 S. Washington St., ggibsongallery.com

Best Place to Buy Affordable Art

Curator Laurie Kearney staged shows in stores and restaurants around Seattle for years before setting up her permanent space in 2010. Tucked in the wedge between Denny and Olive on Capitol Hill, Ghost Gallery offers an eclectic mix of accessories and vintage treasures in addition to the monthly shows from emerging artists. The art is smart, but also affordable, and among the gallery’s furnishings and homey feel, it’s easy for first-time buyers to relax and picture how a piece of art will fit among other objects in their own home. Best of all, always on display are small artworks that can fit any budget and the smallest space, for those just starting a collection at any age. TSF 504 E.

Denny Way, ghostgalleryart.com

ANNA ERICKSON

SHOPS & SERVICES GUEST BESTS Laurie Kearney

Laurie Kearney went from a role as wandering

curator to Capitol Hill fixture quite quickly, her formerly roving Ghost Gallery now a lively hub of arts and fashion. As if running that show wasn’t enough, Kearney also just jumped on board with Riot Act PR, which will benefit from her charm and, as demonstrated in her list of bests, her excellent taste. MB

Best Recent Purchase

A gorgeous painting by Seattle artist Jody Joldersma called The First Encounter. [My husband Jacob James and I are] huge fans of Jody’s work, and having this piece in our collection will bring us years of happiness. Invest in local art! Best Clothing Shop/Boutique The team at E. Smith Mercantile in Pioneer

Square has impeccable taste in what they offer (clothing, jewelry, home goods), not to mention the wonderfully fabulous bar in the back. What a great experience, every time I visit.

Best Jewelry Maker Lyndsay Brown (Idle Hands Design) is always

pushing herself to create beautiful, one-of-a-kind pieces. Her work is thoughtful and unique, and there isn’t a designer in town making anything close to similar—she deserves recognition.

Best Visual Artist Chandler Woodfin continues to awe me with her

delicately rendered watercolors—I find that the most interesting artists are those who don’t get swept up in trends, and who move forward at their own pace. I always look forward to seeing what Chandler will create next. Best Lunch Spot Cafe Pettirosso is an excellent place to gather

with friends or colleagues for lunch, or even just on your own for coffee. Miki and Yuki are the best! Tip: Be there on Monday mornings for their weekly bake sale. You will not be disappointed.

Best Cocktail An Old Fashioned from Revolver Bar. Not only

is this place a cozy vintage-lamps-and-vinyl-LP haven, the drinks are well-crafted and delicious. Best Way to Stop Thinking About Work Get in a car, drive over to Cougar Mountain, hike

in for 20 minutes, and sit down on something mossy. Bring snacks in lieu of your phone. E


Cairo is not for shoppers who want to rummage

through lots of racks and shelves. The thoughtful selection of vintage clothing and wares at this little gem in a quieter corner of Capitol Hill invites one to relax and reminisce instead. Among the treasures, you’ll find jewelry from local designers that match the clothing; vintageinspired silk-screened shirts by local artists; and maybe a poster for one of Cairo’s next parties, often held in the store. What’s old is made fresh again with sophistication, youthful energy, and a sharp eye that knows that some things never go out of style. TSF 507 E. Mercer St., temple

ofcairo.com

Best Pop-Up Shop

Best Pacific Northwest Lifestyle Store

It’s rare for a boutique to create a complete story about a place and time with its inventory, but Capitol Hill’s Glasswing does just that with its carefully edited selection of decor, accessories, clothing, and art. Clothing and accessories for men and women include national brands, but also collections from some of the best local designers, including Wyatt Orr and Silvae of the Woods. Even the store’s website is dreamy, with

Ave., glasswingshop.com

Best Monochromatic Boutique

Is purple your favorite color? Mine is. If so, your mecca might be inside a nondescript Aurora Avenue storefront under a sign that looks like it was made from strips of masking tape. Inside The Purple Store, you’ll find purple ties, socks, shirts and underwear for him; purple hats, lingerie, purses, and bags for her; a purple food bowl and poop-scooper set for Fido. A purple teddy bear keeps watch over purple kitchen items: a colander, a teakettle, tableware. A purple ottoman looks to be straight out of a Gabor sister’s boudoir. Behind a discreet curtain of purple tissue paper lie a shelf-ful of purple marital aids. The online store, est. 2004, offers even more items in dozens of categories. UW tie-ins, which you might expect would be the motive, are rare. It’s simply a matter of purple passion. GAVIN BORCHERT 7616 Aurora Ave.N.,

thepurplestore.com

Best Shop for Seagoers

The ground floor of Captain’s Nautical Supplies—which can trace its roots, entwined

with Seattle’s long seaport history, to 1897—is jamGlasswing packed, a browser’s dream. Maps by the hundreds evoke the romance of the ocean (here’s one for the Leeward Islands, Anguilla to Dominica)—or maybe not (Lake Sammamish). Books cover the topic from Moby-Dick to cookbooks, including official maritime-regulations manuals and beautifully bound log books. You can find signal flags, state flags, even a rainbow flag for your big gay yacht; and all manner of outerwear, whether you’re a serious boater or just want to dress up as Capt. Merrill Stubing for Halloween. If downstairs is an attic, upstairs is like an art gallery, featuring exquisite clocks, barometers, telescopes, and other instruments in bronze, chrome, and rich woods. I could spend hours here, and I’m not even a water person. GB 2500 15th Ave. W., 283-7242,

captainsnautical.com

Best Downtown Bike Shop

This is a highly subjective category. Your best LBS (local bike shop) ought to be your closest bike shop. In Pioneer Square, that means Back Alley Bike Repair, located in Nord Alley between

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

BEST SEXY SHOP IN SEATTLE!

WHAT WOULD A BEST OF SEATTLE

edition be without talking about the best sexy shop in Seattle. Consistently when we think sexy stores we always end up at The Love Zone in Seattle’s Ballard / Crown hill neighborhood. Why you ask The Love Zone, well they have everything we want and need plus a couple of things we didn’t know we wanted or needed. They aren’t uptight or creepy and the place is just plain fun. They actually have everything you need to make good sex - great sex. So here is the list in no apparent order that makes Love Zone Seattle’s Best of Sexy Stores. We like their wide assortment of lubes, you are sure to find your brand or one you like, of course they carry plenty of edible fun stuff to make your partner super tasty. We also like that they carry enough DvDs that we can always find one we like, but it’s not a “video store”. I have only bought one game

t h e r e b ut it work e d o ut ve r y we l l (c r a z y f u n), a n d t h e y h ave pl e n t y to c ho o s e f rom t h at shou ld b e f u n. Of course they have the mandatory massage oils & Kama Sutra stuff. Probably the biggest deal is their fantastic toy selection with a bunch of styles of vibrators for solo or couple’s play, a great assortment of penis rings from vibrating to fetish, all the sizes of plugs, and beads you could want. Plenty of strap-ons, and boy toys. A very reasonable assortment of fetish playthings, ok so it is not a dungeon full, but enough to keep most people busy thru the night. Did we mention the one thing we like the most they actually carry lingerie & sexy clothes in our sizes from small to 3X, and styles that work for a real person not just a lingerie model. Sure Seattle has plenty of sexy places but of them all we think Love Zone is the Best of Sexy stores in Seattle. I’m sure that if you stopped in today, you would have a sexier night, tonight.

THANK YOU Seattle Weekly readers!

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

CHARLIE SCHUCK

Seattle has plenty of pop-ups, but the best examples are still the Seasonal Pop Ups in our own Nordstrom flagship. Rather than the bazaar-meets-trunk-show admixture that one sees at plenty of pop-ups, Nordstrom models how to unite a lot of different products under one concept that is timely, fun, and beautifully displayed. Yes, the store has a lot of advantages over independent vendors making a go in temporary spaces. But it’s still a Seattle institution, and it gives the pop-up shop a polish that ought to inspire independent merchants and buyers alike. TSF 500 Pine St., nordstrom.com

sophisticated photography and articles highlighting local creatives, travel destinations, and happenings. Glasswing makes one glad to live in the Pacific Northwest by bringing some of the best it has to offer under one roof. TSF 1525 Melrose

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SHOPS & SERVICES STAFF PICKS

» FROM PAGE 49

South Jackson and Main Streets. As befits the name, this is primarily a place to have work done on your downtown commuter rig, but the shop also rents bikes and sells reconditioned rides, and will even order and custom-build something to your exact pedaling style. More important, it’s a friendly social space, part of the First Thursday Art Walk, when the alley shuts down for music. Tour de France viewing parties are a regular feature. There’s a couch and things to read, and an accommodating vibe that says No, your questions are not too small or silly to answer. BRIAN

MILLER 314 First Ave. S., backalleybikerepair.com

Tech Best Start-Up

Planetary Resources? Is that

the name of a company from a sci-fi movie, you ask? NOPE IT’S A REAL LIFE GODDAMN ASTEROID MINING STARTUP FROM REDMOND THAT’S WHAT. Because the Earth is rapidly running out of stuff, Planetary Resources president

READERS’ POLL

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

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50

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Chris Lewicki decided to jump-start the inevitable and look into asteroid mining for water, fuel, and precious metals. James Cameron is one of the company’s major investors. This year, Planetary started 3-D-printing its “Arkyd 300” analytic asteroid data-collecting satellite. What did you do? KELTON SEARS planetary resources.com

Best Innovation

Tinder has the tendency to get creepy fast. Screencap after screencap of skeezy would-begentlemen’s overly forward messages have flooded the Internet, proving that online dating as a lady seems more about wading through fields of freaks than meeting nice people. Local digital artist Susie Lee teamed with designer Katrina Hess to remedy this by creating Siren, a new dating app that gives women the sole power to conceal/reveal their profiles, forcing suitors to actually, you know, charm potential partners with their personalities. KS siren.mobi

Best Game Maker, Analog

We’re a city of gamers, so we’re proud that Robot Turtles was the most-backed boardgame in Kickstarter history. Created by Seattleite Dan Shapiro, Robot Turtles is a game designed to teach children how to program. As a father, Shapiro was looking for a way to interact with his 4-year-old twins, and pondered how old a child needs to be to learn to program. He created a mockup game with robot clip art, and the kids took to it right away. Its simple design brilliantly teaches the fundamentals of computational thinking by using “Code Cards” to dictate the movements of your turtle to the jewel on the gameboard, which is how you win. Now readily available, the game has been making waves among families, gamers, and the educational system alike. Family board games often involve mindless luck, so Robot Turtles is much-needed—and also creating future coders and gamers. TERRA CLARKE OLSEN robotturtles.com

Best Game Maker, Digital

Seattle is known as a hub for independent game developers, so it might seem impossible to pick “the best”; however, I’m going to take that leap and say that Spry Fox deserves the title. Spry Fox has proven itself time and time again, creating games that are both beautiful and fun. They’re the brains behind hits like Triple Town, which was infamously copied, leading to a lawsuit; and Highgrounds, a deckbuilding game without cards. Although Spry Fox has created a multitude of games since its formation in 2010, it’s about to release its most intriguing title yet, the puzzle game Road Not Taken, out August 5 on Steam (PC & Mac) and Playstation 4. It’s not only breathtaking but thought-provoking; you’re only given one life, and no matter what, you’ll die (since, like IRL, life is limited). Go read more about Road Not Taken and watch the gameplay to see how Spry Fox is stepping up the standard for freemium and social-media games, which will in turn make the gaming community better as a whole. TCO spryfox.com E

Geek Picks Best Geeky Hangout

Geeks of all kinds will find sanctuary at Ada’s Technical Books. (Yes, it’s named after the one and only Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer.) As the name suggests, this place has every kind of technical book you could imagine needing or wanting, and then some! But Ada’s also offers other books for those times you’re craving less than technical reading. Brightly lit and thoughtfully decorated, with just the right amount of curiosities and technical gadgets placed throughout without creating a distraction, it’s a space that captivates its patrons. Plus, it’s perfected brewing a cup of coffee and serving delicious food. Great coffee and great books? Congratulations, Ada’s, you’ve created the perfect habitat for Seattle geeks. Check seattletechnicalbooks.com for book-club meetings, readings, and book recommendations. TCO 425 15th Ave. E., seattletechnicalbooks.com

Best Geeky Store

Greenwood Space Travel Supply Co. insists on

its website and on Facebook that it’s a real business, but you can’t blame people for asking, since it’s not everyday you’re confronted with a store that offers space-travel supplies and rocket parking. The quirky shop offers a wide selection of science gear and novelties; where else can you find a jar of Chaos, a globe of Mars, and a Cherry-Scented Diversion Deployment System (a raygun that shoots smoke rings)?! But best of all, this nerdy establishment hosts 826 Seattle, a nonprofit writing and tutoring center for “the young people of Earth.” In fact, all proceeds go to the center—so you really do need to buy that Diversion Deployment System, for your protection and for the children! And if that’s not enough, 826 Seattle publishes an annual anthology, What to Read in the Rain, that features well-known authors and selected pieces by the center’s students, giving them a place to share their voices. At Greenwood Space Travel Supply Co., patrons can shop with peace of mind, knowing that they’ll be ready for their next space exploration while also helping Earth’s future leaders. TCO 8414 Greenwood Ave.

N., greenwoodspacetravelsupply.com

Best Geeky Museum Known for its amazing collection of music stuff, Experience

Music Project Museum has been

a Seattle treasure since its construction in 2000. However, it doesn’t cater only to music geeks—within the metal bubblegum structure exists a haven for science-fiction and pop-culture geeks as well. EMP is home to Icons of Science Fiction, an exhibit dedicated to the genre’s great thinkers and ideas, including an interactive Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame and an impressive collection of geeky artifacts—such as Captain Kirk’s command chair from Star Trek and an Imperial Dalek from Doctor Who. But EMP doesn’t stop there; they persistently mount new and exciting exhibits with geeks in mind. Currently, it’s hosting Fan-

tasy: Worlds of Myth and Magic, displaying an impressive collection of iconic costumes from nerd favorites, like Xena’s armor and the Goblin King outfit that David Bowie rocked in Labyrinth. EMP mindfully involves itself in the local geek community, often partnering with nerdtastic organizations—for example, its collaboration with SIFF to present the Science Fiction and Fantasy Short Film Festival. All in all, it’s a place not only to appreciate and ponder our geeky past, but also to interact, enjoy, and learn about new and exciting happenings within the community, making it a must-visit for any geek. TCO 325 Fifth Ave. N., empmuseum.org

Best Geeky Eats

Step into Lunchbox Laboratory and you’re transported to a wonderful world of geeky nostalgia—a time when burgers and shakes were the ultimate dining experience and school conversations revolved around your G.I. Joe lunchbox. But nostalgia has never tasted so good. Using high-quality ingredients with a twist of whimsy, Lunchbox Laboratory creates meals that beg to be eaten. A popular (and personal) favorite is The Dork, a burger made with duck and pork, Monterey Jack cheese, onions, and garlic mayo. Get a side of tots and your favorite boozy shake to top off the euphoria. Cocktails more your style? Try a Kool Kollins (gin, soda, and the Kool-Aid of the week) or an Astronaut’s Mimosa (champagne and Tang). True to its geeky nature, Lunchbox Laboratory serves many cocktails in beakers or with glowing cubes, and the place is covered in vintage lunchboxes and toys. Also make sure to check out the upstairs Rumpus Room, filled with arcade games and a pool table. At its core, Lunchbox Laboratory offers the perfect dining experience for the kid and geek in all of us. TCO 1253 Thomas St., lunchboxlaboratory.com

Best Gaming Store

With wall-to-wall games and ample space to play, Card Kingdom is a gamer’s paradise. Even the maker of Cards Against Humanity delightfully declared to me that it’s the best place on earth, and I can’t argue. Not only does Card Kingdom keep the best games in stock, but it constantly brings in new titles to delight gamers. Not sure what game’s for you? Not a problem! Card Kingdom’s staff is beyond knowledgeable and friendly; they’ll ensure that you find the perfect game (noobs welcome!). And if they don’t have something you’re looking for, they’ll order it and will call or text you when it comes in. Card Kingdom also offers ample space for playing games, often hosting gaming events in addition to other awesomely geeky events. But to top it all off, a kickass cafe is attached to the store, so you can get your drink on while playing Magic the Gathering. Speaking of that, the shop also has an impressive chandelier made entirely of MTG cards (I have vowed to someday replicate it). It’s this level of detail that makes Card Kingdom the best gaming store in Seattle. TCO 5105 Leary Ave. N.W., cardkingdom.com E


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Garlic Themed Cuisine Artisans Craft Vendors Chef Demonstrations Kid’s Activities You don’t have to travel far to savour delicious Asian dishes. At the Night Markets in Richmond you can chose from 150 authentic street-food vendors, we’re also home to over 400 exotic restaurants and as many Western culinary experiences. It’s a touch of the Far East nearby in a wonderful West Coast setting.

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ARTS & CULTURE

STAFF PICKS Visual Arts

Best New Public Artwork

The city is full of traditional totem poles carved by Northwest tribal artists, who bear a distant kinship to the Polynesian creators of Easter Island moai. In SAM’s Olympic Sculpture Park, installed this spring, the 46-foot-tall white head that is Echo recalls both cultures of the Pacific. Its siting, gazing northward up Puget Sound, makes the elongated bust seem vaguely totemic—as if waiting for unknown voyagers (or even colonizers) to arrive. The Spanish sculptor Jaume Plensa based the figure on Greek myth (sad Echo is a nymph condemned to remain mute unless she mimics others’ speech), but her enthusiastic reception by tourists and other frequenters of the waterfront has rescued this figure from divine punishment. Today she’s adored. (Echo was gifted to SAM by local collector/ philanthropist Barney Ebsworth.) BRIAN MILLER seattleartmuseum.org

MORGEN SCHULER

Best Blue-Sky Arts Announcement

Making a Scene

Behind the scenes with the city’s BEST PROMOTER (PLUS). BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

When we spoke last month, Mitchell chatted about accompanying Mudhoney on its recent Australian tour—a rare vacation, she says: “I was just hanging out.” Our chat is squeezed between a lunch meeting and a coffee date (no big deal, just with Wu-Tang’s people). At the same time she’s planning a pre-Bumbershoot show at the Chihuly Cafe, followed by a set of local comedy at the Rendezvous. Mitchell waxes philosophical about her One Reel job titles—and her broader role in Seattle. “I felt if I kept my title solely to PR, people wouldn’t understand the full scope of my job, which is the opportunity to take ideas and see where I can go with them.” After freelancing for One Reel since 2011, Mitchell joined its full-time staff last year, bringing her wealth of connections and warm, self-effacing vibe not just to Bumbershoot, but to events like the Seattle City of Music Career Day. She’s also been organizing casual meet-ups among creative professionals in all disciplines who might not otherwise rub shoulders. Her goal: to strengthen Seattle’s creative community. Everyone from celebrated writers like Lindy West to KEXP DJs and arts reps from the Mayor’s office have attended. (You can only imagine what her digital Rolodex looks like.) “I’m a big fan of knowing the people behind the e-mail address. A lot of opportunities can be created when people actually get together,” Mitchell explains. “I started coming to Seattle in 1993 when I was working with [the band]

Sky Cries Mary. The arts scene was interconnected. It was an awesome group of people.” Without such constant networking, she says, “I wouldn’t actually have ended up meeting a lot of people who are close friends now.” Unsurprisingly, her friends say the same. “One

time a band made me write a bio for them several times and then refused to pay me,” says Chris Estey of Big Freak Media. “Barbara tracked them down and shook the fee out for me. If she gives you advice, listen to it. If you want to do anything in the music business, consider her a spiritual mentor. Don’t ask to pick her brain—pay her a big consulting fee for the best advice you will ever get.” Betsy Bolte, former publicist for Ice Cube and Snoop Dogg, is no less effusive. “She’s experienced, knowledgeable, and her commitment to the arts community is inspiring,” she says. “She’s superb at what she does—and a multitasking pro who believes in connecting people in the industry.” With Bumbershoot less than a month away, Mitchell’s inexhaustible drive is now humming even faster. “The incredibly fun thing is to see everyone else get excited” about the Labor Day festival, she says. “I think that’s what really draws me to event and backstage work: being part of the team that makes something happen. There are so many creative people in Seattle, and it’s awesome to be around them.” E

gelliott@seattleweekly.com

Best Gallery Show (Native)

Last month’s exhibit at Gallery4Culture by the Spokane-raised artist Scott Kolbo, recently transplanted to Seattle, was called Our Alley. Inspired by his own childhood, Kolbo recruited his own kids and their pals to play games in such an alley. Says Kolbo, “I asked them, ‘If there were no adults around, what would you do?’ ” He videotaped the scenes, added effects, then traced over them by hand, creating a busy lattice of pencil outlines and gestures into which the videotaped characters gradually settle. In his glowing light boxes, each time the video slows or halts, you see a new composition in the same frame. Childhood lasts a little longer. BM 4culture.org

Best Gallery Show (Visitor)

The Brooklyn duo of Stephen Nguyen and Wade Kavanaugh filled the Suyama Space

atrium with 900 pounds of black craft paper last summer. After much twisting and heaping the paper into a knotty, undulating mass of strands,

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

A

s manager of PR and “Special Ops” at One Reel, best known for organizing the annual Bumbershoot festival, Barbara Mitchell gives new meaning to the idea of wearing many hats. She loads up on extra scarves and gloves, too. A Fresno native, Mitchell came to Seattle in 1996 via the highways and back roads of the rock scene. Hopping between L.A., Portland, and Australia for months and years at a time, managing publicity for numerous record labels, including Slash, World Domination, and Triple X, she formed lasting relationships with members of the Posies, Mudhoney, Screaming Trees, and many more. Her CV includes managing communications for Poster Giant and Internet radio station Jet City Stream. She also fits in other gigs when she has time, including past freelance music writing for NPR, The Oregonian, the Portland Tribune, and The Stranger. (She even founded a short-lived record label, Roslyn Records, with Mudhoney’s Steve Turner.) On top of all of that, she also does backstage work for Ripe Catering and Tom Douglas.

Beyond Bumbershoot, Mitchell has made herself integral to the local arts scene.

Pioneer Square is, simultaneously, a struggling neighborhood and the center of the city’s arts scene—the latter anchored by the gallery/studio warren in the Tashiro Kaplan Building. But how many First Thursday art walkers have paid attention to the ugly, largely empty 1971 building just across the street? Led by curator Yoko Ott and bankrolled largely by Shari Behnke, The New Foundation Seattle bought it last fall for $2.75 million. The plan is to house the foundation in the renovated 13,000-square-foot building at 123 Third Ave. S., then relaunch it next year as The JANDS Center (as in John and Shari Behnke). The foundation’s purchase also included the adjacent parking lot to the west, where a new building—with galleries? lofts? performance spaces?—is expected to rise by 2017. Whatever the foundation has planned for the new complex, it can only help the hood. BM thenewest.org

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“THE CITY’S HOTTEST TICKET”


ARTS & CULTURE when Spence isn’t working, parenting, or scouring the film festivals in Toronto, Venice, and New York? For best family getaway, there’s only one option: Orcas Island, where a weekend home is devoted to cooking, crabbing, kayaking, and beachcombing. There’s even a hole-in-the-wall bar, The Barnacle, that Spence recommends. And even when he’s not supposed to be working, he’s working: He’s helping to launch the island’s first film festival in October. E

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

READERS’ POLL

Arts & Culture BEST MUSEUM

SAM

BEST GALLERY

ANNA ERICKSON

Roq La Rue

Even during his free time, Spence is launching new film festivals.

A Homecoming on Top of the Hill

S

night movies.“We’re gonna bring them back—it also helps that you can drink in them.” A Northwest native, Spence has lived all over Seattle—Fremont, Leschi, Cap Hill, the U District—but for the past dozen years he’s been settled in West Seattle, where he and his husband are raising their small children. So what are his Bests there and beyond? North Admiral is necessarily his favorite neighborhood. “It’s very walkable” to stores and shops, and the endangered Admiral Theater. His best neighborhood park? Alki Beach Park: “The beach is amazing,” and it’s a great place to let the kids explore. (A short drive east, his family is also partial to Jefferson Park on Beacon Hill.) Best place for a convenient dinner? “La Rustica is one of my favorites.” Coffee? Spence favors Caffè Fiore in the Admiral district. What about a family weekend meal? Easy Street Records in the Junction. “It’s a great place to have breakfast.” Spence spends most of his workday hours at the SIFF Film Center. Where does he go for lunch in Uptown? He’s partial to the Korean food at the tiny Cafe GoldinBlack on Queen Anne Avenue (“You wouldn’t even know it’s there”). And dinner? “My favorite place on Queen Anne is Crow.” Among the newer joints in LQA, Spence is keen on Taylor Shellfish. “Also, Triumph is a great new bar.” That’s where he recently entertained director Bong Joon-ho during a recent visit for his Snowpiercer (“That’s been our biggest hit of the year”) and where he recommends a cocktail made from A&W root beer and bourbon. Best place for eyeglasses? Ottica in Belltown. Shoes? Nordstrom, of course. What about dinner dates without the kids? La Spiga on Cap Hill, “and I just love Poppy.”And what about

First Thursday, Pioneer Square BEST MOVIE THEATER (TIE)

Central Cinema, Cinerama, Sundance Cinemas BEST THEATER (TIE)

5th Avenue, Balagan, The Paramount BEST DANCE COMPANY (TIE)

Pacific Northwest Ballet, Spectrum BEST LOCAL ARTIST (TIE)

Henry, Jim Woodring, Tracy Boyd BEST PUBLIC ART

Olympic Sculpture Park BEST CASINO

Snoqualmie

BEST BOWLING (TIE)

The Garage, West Seattle Bowl BEST LOCAL RADIO SHOW (TIE)

Audioasis, Brooke & Jubal in the Morning, Ron & Don BEST RADIO STATION (MUSIC)

KEXP 90.3 FM

The 206

BEST LOCAL BOOK STORE

Elliott Bay Book Co. BEST BAND

Bone Poets Orchestra BEST HIP-HOP ARTIST

Macklemore BEST DJ

DJ Mack Long BEST LABEL

Sub Pop

BEST ALL-AGES VENUE

The Vera Project BEST 21+ VENUE

Tractor Tavern BEST KARAOKE

Rock Box

BEST MUSIC FESTIVAL

Bumbershoot BEST RECORD STORE

Easy Street

BEST COMEDY CLUB

Parlor Live

BEST ARCADE (TIE)

Add-a-Ball; Flip Flip, Ding Ding; Gameworks; John John’s; Shorty’s BEST DANCE CLUB

Foundation

BEST GAY BAR

Neighbours

BEST CLUB NIGHT

BEST RADIO STATION (TALK)

KUOW Seattle

SUBstance Wednesdays at Foundation

BEST LOCAL NEWS STATION

BEST ADULT ENTERTAINMENT

KING 5

Dejà Vu

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

insufficient parking and lacking digital projectors), the nonprofit SIFF has actually been bucking the industry trend. First it began operating a year-round cinema beneath McCaw Hall in SIFF prepares to reopen the Egyptian, 2007. Four years later it leased office and screening space at extending its art-house reach to Seattle Center (in the former Seattle’s boomingest hood in the Alki Rooms) and reopened the BEST MOVE FOR THE ARTS. Uptown. This May it bought that triplex for $2.6 million, BY BRIAN MILLER an announcement paired with the signing of a 10-year lease at the Egyptian, IFF artistic director Carl Spence began expected to reopen in October. working for the festival in the early ’90s, “It’s turn-key to an extent,” says Spence as we not long after graduating from the UW, tour the theater, since SIFF is buying the projecwhen the festival’s parent business was tors from Landmark. Over $300,000 has been based at the Egyptian. Since then, the festival raised for improvements to the facility, including was mostly nomadic, with no permanent home, a new surround-sound system. More money will using borrowed screens during its month-long be raised for future upgrades, likely to replace the annual extravaganza. A quarter-century later, threadbare seats and add some angle to the notoSpence now runs a year-round enterprise that’s riously flat main floor, which presently accomexpanding its presence from Lower Queen modates about 400 viewers. Anne to Capitol Hill. Spence is bullish on the booming neigh“This is a taking-back. It’s our neighborborhood. Among SIFF members and ticket hood,” Spence tells me on a rainy July morning buyers,“this is our most popular zip code,” he tells as he produces a set of keys and lets us into the me. “There’s the light rail coming, all the new darkened theater—“originated by the people construction.” Just across Harvard Avenue, a huge who operated the festival. I started at the new block of apartments is being built where car Egyptian.” That was during 1980–89; then San dealerships and garages once stood. As with the Diego-based Landmark Theatres assumed the Uptown (or Northwest Film Forum, for that matlease from Seattle Central College, which owns ter), our new urban density brings filmgoers to the the former Masonic Temple. front door—no parking required. Another way to Landmark stopped showing movies at the cater to such city-dwellers? “We have a beer and Egyptian in June 2013. (It still operates the wine license,” says Spence—the same hybrid variSeven Gables, Guild 45th, Varsity, Harvard ety as at the Uptown that allows patrons to take Exit, and Crest.) As that chain, and others, have drinks inside the theater. And that leads to a fond struggled to show art-house and specialty movEgyptian tradition Spence intends to revive: midies in older single-screen cinemas (often with

BEST ART WALK

BEST LOCAL TV PROGRAM

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their installation Drawn From the Olympics alluded to the rainforest of our Olympic Peninsula, whence paper products are still extracted from wood pulp. Most of those mills are now closed, and logging there is greatly diminished. Yet Nguyen and Kavanaugh’s gnarled strands— suggesting unearthed tree roots, perhaps blackH to the rafters and enedTHR after a OUG fire—reached crept across the floors like charred tentacles. There was, in this processed, organic pulp, an eerie implication of life after death. BM suyama

AUG 30

petersondeguchi.com/art

Best-Loved Gallery to Close

Before the Wrights or the Shirleys or other local arts patrons began collecting in Seattle, the tiny postwar gallery scene was represented by the likes of Zoe Dusanne and Otto Seligman. And it was from the latter establishment that Francine Seders got her start in the ’60s. She took over Seligman’s artist stable following his 1966 death, moved Francine Seders Gallery up to Greenwood, and until last December represented the likes of Mark Tobey, Jacob Lawrence, Fay Jones, and Guy Anderson. Seders’ French accent and Continental manner set her apart from the new school of gallerists who followed her; she was not only a pioneer in promoting modern art in the Northwest, but also a pioneering woman in the field. BM sedersgallery.com

Best Unlikely Resolution to an Art Theft

It’s every artist’s nightmare: You’re invited to show your work in some important, far-off city—well, Salem, Oregon—and the truck transporting your art is stolen. That’s what happened with Whiting Tennis’ stolen paintings last December, resulting in the loss of seven works. Then the story got a little crazier, almost like a true-crime novel. His gallery, Greg Kucera, got a suspicious call from a guy who’d “found” two of the lost works. Kucera and an assistant then had to do a cash drop at a 7-Eleven in Federal Way—where else?—to recover the pair. Sadly, there’s been no word on the other artworks, but Kucera could now do some kind of group show with a criminal theme. BM gregkucera.com

Best Museum Exhibit (Visitor)

The winner of its biannual Gwendolyn Knight/Jacob Lawrence Prize, SAM brought young Pennsylvania photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier to town for her Born by a River, which presented both family portraits and vistas of industrial blight in her hometown of Braddock. Her family photos, in which she sometimes appears, are deliberate, intimate scenes of hair braiding, doll collections, sick men in bed, old and gnarled feet and hands. Later she hired a helicopter to hover over the scraped lots and empty fields where homes once stood. A few houses are encircled by industrial brownfields. There’s a startling micro/macro effect as we pull up high to these impersonal views. The people are conspicuously missing, remembered only in Frazier’s photos. BM seattleartmuseum.org

Best Museum Exhibit (Native)

Still on view through September 7, SAM’s all-native show Modernism in the Pacific Northwest: The Mythic and the Mystical focuses primarily on what I call the Big Four: Mark Tobey, Morris Graves, Kenneth Callahan, and Guy Anderson. We do see an important selection of their work, including some recent acquisitions on view for the first time. What Tobey and company brought to national attention during the war years and after was a fresh regional awareness and reverence for place. This meant not simple landscapes, but a deeper appreciation for the spiritual aspect of nature, traces of Native American culture, and currents from across the Pacific—including Eastern religion and Asian art. We also see the Big Four’s spiritual heirs in the show’s final gallery—figures like Paul Horiuchi, Tony Angell, and Leo Kenney. BM seattle

artmuseum.org

Best Museum News

Sylvia Wolf ’s position as museum director just got a little more secure, and the Henry Art Gallery’s budget gained a nice little bump, with the June announcement of John and Shari Behnke’s endowment of her position. John Behnke’s on the Henry’s board (as was his father), and the gift further solidifies the museum’s position in the contemporary art world. BM henryart.org

Film

Best Indie Cinema Fighting the Good Fight

Now 46 years old, The Grand Illusion Cinema is Seattle’s most venerable indie screening venue, a nonprofit largely run by volunteers and a staunch holdout in the U District’s (ahem) challenging retail landscape. This is the cinema’s 10th year under new management (since the spinoff from Northwest Film Forum), and it’s celebrating with programming as diverse as vintage Chris Marker, new Kim Ki-duk, and an exclusive engagement of the Nick Cave movie 20,000 Days on Earth that will sound all the better on the theater’s new surround-sound system. BM grandillusioncinema.org

Best Cinema Innovation

You like Transformers IV at the local mall? We prefer Snowpiercer with a nice IPA. Since reopening the Uptown, SIFF’s addition of beer and wine to its concession stand has further solidified the love from serious, grown-up filmgoers. Unlike strictly 21-and-over screening venues, SIFF allows adults to order spirits and take them into the show with a mixed clientele—meaning moms can enjoy a chardonnay while accompanying their teens to Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. If millennials are abandoning cinema in favor if iPads and Xbox, SIFF understands the intoxicating spell that a good movie still casts on adults willing to pay for the privilege. BM siff.net

Best New Movie Star

Opening here August 22 at the Guild 45th and Lincoln Square, the indie road-trip movie Land Ho! has already received strong notices. The New York Times calls the comedy, about two divorced

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ANNA ERICKSON

GUEST BESTS Jonathan Dean

Jonathan Dean is the author of all supertitles used for Seattle Opera’s productions since 1997. His devotion to making opera more approachable doesn’t stop there; he also heroically distilled Wagner’s 18-hour Ring into two fun participatory shows for school outreach performances. But how does he unwind after all that drama? GB Best Place to Stargaze After an Opera Ten Mercer is where opera singers (and assorted

hangers-on) go to unwind and refuel post-show. Best In-City Escape

Biking through the Arboretum. I’ll take any excuse to ride past those amazing trees and breathe deeply. Best Greek Yogurt Ellenos at Pike Place is made in Georgetown

and best consumed at the Market (or at South Lake Union’s Thursday market). Best Coffee Roaster

Find revelatory beans at Conduit Coffee’s Tuesday open house at the studio on Westlake; or buy them at Ophelia Bookstore in Fremont; or get them bicycle-delivered. Best Post-Kayak Nosh The mangodilla at Agua Verde is the perfect

reward for a vigorous trek around Foster Island, well worth any wait!

Ever since we randomly stopped by the farm in Carnation and were given an impromptu tour, I’ve been a satisfied subscriber to Full Circle. Best Bookstore

Celebrate Seattle’s voracious appetite for books at the Friends of the Library sale at Sand Point, a twice-yearly book binge. Many bring luggage or stolen grocery carts; I limit myself to two panniers and a backpack. Best Puget Sound Schooner

I’ll never forget the week I spent learning to sail the historic hundred-foot schooner The Adventuress around the San Juans. Best Exotic Locale Within City Limits The Indian vegetarian cuisine at Travelers Thali House, near the Beacon Hill Link light-rail station, proves God’s existence. E

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ARTS & CULTURE STAFF PICKS

» FROM PAGE 58

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older gents visiting Iceland, “delightful,” and the Village Voice’s Amy Nicholson had special praise for Paul Eenhoorn, writing, “He holds the screen with an unassuming humility, the kind of power Fred MacMurray used to have. He plays his crank with the affectionate, tough, selfmocking tone of a skeptic reluctantly pounding the bongos at a drum circle.” And here’s the kicker: Eenhoorn, dialing down his native accent in the film, is a veteran Australian actor who’s been based in Bellevue for the past 14 years since marrying a Northwest woman. And finally, after years in the trenches, he’s got his breakout role in this indie treat for the AARP set—first a hit at Sundance and now clicking nicely with the same demo that made The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel a long-running success. When I spoke recently to Eenhoorn—with more of our conversation to follow in two weeks— he was still stunned by Land Ho! ’s good fortune. “It’s a fucking miracle” to get into theaters, he says. “It’s nice to be appreciated.” BM landmark theaters.com

Best Source for Region 3 J-Horror DVDs

There are some things you just can’t find on the Internet. You can look up certain movies on IMDb, sure, but to actually watch them is a different matter (with subtitles, a sharp picture, etc.). In addition to being Seattle’s largest, best-loved, and most knowledgeably staffed video store, Scarecrow Video remains the region’s redoubt for obscure rarities from Seoul, Tokyo, and beyond. If you can’t find it on Netflix or Amazon, Scarecrow is still the best brick-andmortar repository for bloodthirsty witches and vengeful ghouls. BM scarecrow.com

Theater & Performance

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Best Stage Production

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Best Response to an Offstage Tragedy

Jerry Manning’s unexpected death this May, following a heart procedure, was a huge blow for the Seattle theater community—extending far beyond Seattle Repertory Theatre. He’d been there since 2000 and had served as artistic director since 2010. What to do? The company wisely promoted in-house, as the board had earlier with Manning. Thus the appointment of Braden Abraham, director of recent shows including Clybourne Park and Photograph 51, means he’ll steer the company after its unexpected succession drama. BM seattlerep.org

Best Stage Provocation

Jerry Springer: The Opera’s savage view of

American culture makes The Book of Mormon look about as audacious as a Full House episode, and the cast of Balagan Theatre’s January production took the full measure of the show’s outrage and bile. Most memorably: Brandon Felker as Springer himself in a skillful sendup of the trash-TV host’s faux-paternalism; Kevin Douglass, double-cast as (are you sitting down?) Jesus Christ and a diaper fetishist; and Lindsey Larson, who landed an emotional sucker punch as a stripper selling the hell out of an unexpectedly moving “I Just Wanna Dance.” GAVIN BORCHERT balagantheatre.org

Best Dance Production

Two of the works that Mark Morris Dance Group brought home to Seattle at the Para-

mount over Valentine’s Day weekend—Love Song Waltzes and its companion, New Love Song Waltzes—were excellent examples of Morris’ ability to capture the rhythmic heart of a score. But in Socrates, a movement essay illustrating the death of the philosopher, set to Erik Satie’s ultra-spare work, the choreographer found the simplest of kinetic analogies—as the cast gradually “dies,” they lay down on the floor like tired children. At the end, we were all silenced. SANDRA KURTZ markmorrisdancegroup.org

One of the lesser-known side stories in Superman comics concerned “the bottled city” of Kandor, which the evil half-man/half-machine Brainiac kept as a souvenir after taking both the city and its occupants hostage from Krypton via shrinking ray. Much in the same way—without the evil—Village Theatre director Steve Tomkins in November mounted a jewel-box-sized version of Les Misérables which, despite its small scale, never lost the power or epic grace of the original Broadway smash. KEVIN PHINNEY villagetheatre.org

Best Dance Moment

Best Stage Adaptation

The most-anticipated concert in Spring for Music, the most-anticipated classical-music festival in New York City’s season, the Seattle

Five hours, folks. That’s what we were in for at Book-It’s epic June adaptation of Michael Chabon’s epic Pulitzer-winner The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, which spans 1938–54 as two cousins build and destroy a comic-book empire. Extravagantly realized through dozens of sets, lush live music, and an addictive cast of 18, the show took us from comic page through social and professional lives all the way to an ice-filled outpost via a harrowing small-plane ride through a lightning storm. The hours vanished in a blink. MARGARET FRIEDMAN book-it.org

Salt Horse’s Color Field filled odd corners and back hallways at Northwest Film Forum in March with eccentric moments, but the final one was the most stunning. Belle Wolf was cocooned in a brilliant yellow sheet while the lights were on, only to flap it wildly when the lights were off. The snap of the fabric sounded like a sail torn from its rigging, a dangerous moment in the dark. SK salthorseperformance.com

Best Road Gig

Symphony’s performance in Carnegie Hall

in May got a thrilling but accidental publicity boost when John Luther Adams’ Become Ocean—an SSO commission that the orchestra had decided months earlier would be one of the pieces they’d show off to the Big Apple— won a Pulitzer just before the trip. More than 800 locals traveled alongside the SSO to help pack the hall for a festive evening that was not

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only the highest-profile triumph of conductor Ludovic Morlot’s first three seasons here, but a strong statement of his commitment to making contemporary music a programming priority. GB seattlesymphony.org

Best Legacy

If Seattle Opera’s founder, Glynn Ross, made a name for the company as improbably ambitious—presenting Wagner’s Ring, the genre’s vastest challenge, in what was in the ’70s still a bit of a cultural backwater—his successor Speight Jenkins established high standards in every other area: artistic excellence, a beautifully refurbished home, financial stability (only in a few recession-racked seasons has the budget remained unbalanced), and an uncommon drive to attract new and young audiences and push the art form forward. Nearing the finish line—the official last day of his 31-year tenure is September 1—Jenkins leaves a seemingly unshakeable foundation for his successor Aidan Lang. GB seattleopera.org

Books & Beyond Best Literary Reissue

CHUCK PROPHET

Wed, Aug 6, Two Union Square 601 Union St

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Thurs, Aug 7, City Hall Plaza

64

600 4th Ave

THE PAPERBOYS

Fri, Aug 8, Harbor Steps 1st Ave & University St

First published in 1956, John Okada’s debut novel was essentially forgotten twice. No-No Boy was hardly read in the ’50s, then rediscovered in the ’70s (thanks in part to a 1976 SW story by Frank Chin) and republished by the University of Washington Press in 1979. The Seattle author, who died in 1971, was a WWII veteran who imagined in the novel a nisei hero as a kind of refusenik—a Japanese American who refused to pledge a loyalty oath and who refused to fight for his country. Ichiro Yamada is an embittered young man who, like his creator, is interned during the war. The experience haunts and shapes him, makes him even more of an outsider in postwar society. He’s an angry, alienated product of his times—the first Japanese-American literary antihero, comparable in a way to Bigger Thomas in Native Son. Now, after another three decades of neglect, UW Press has brought out a new edition of the book. BM washington.edu/uwpress

Best Comics Incubator

had no idea it was going to change my life. By the end of the night I’d met some of the most inspiring local artists I’d ever come into contact with, and carried out an enormous haul of indie comics. I spent the next month or so poring over these artifacts—grotesque tales from Bellingham’s Neroglyphic Press; the meticulously drawn Castle & Wood series; piles of DIY zines that spurred me to try my own hand at the craft. Short Run fundamentally changed how I look at my community by illuminating all its scrappy, fabulous freaks who make incredible art with nothing but a Xerox machine, a stapler, and a decent pen. Mark the next gathering on your calendars: Sat., Nov. 15 at Washington Hall. KS shortrun.org

Best Local Internet Celebrity

Every day, Lindy West wakes up, trudges through hordes of horrifying baby-men who threaten her on the Internet, and proceeds to get her feminist on via her brilliant writing at Jezebel.com. Thank God she does—in a world where Hobby Lobby can steamroll through the Supreme Court at the expense of women’s right to their bodies, we need her now more than ever. Outside of Jezebel, her new Tumblr “I Believe You | It’s Not Your Fault” is providing an open, public platform to tell long-form stories in the vein of Yes All Women. If the landslide of responses it’s gotten so far indicates anything, it’s that West’s fearless ability to open crucial dialogues knows no bounds. Also, she’s funny as hell. KS jezebel.com

Music

Best Rock Band

As Hobosexual, Ben Harwood and Jeff Silva aren’t the only guitar/ drums duo in town, but they’re the most badass. With detuned fuzzy guitars and hard-grooving riffs, the pair has been pummeling the Pacific Northwest with their stoner rock since 2010. Though their sound is rooted in ’70s hard rock (Zeppelin, Sabbath, Skynyrd) they have a penchant for the lighthearted ’80s (Beastie Boys, BMXing, Stallone films). The band will follow up last year’s well-received sophomore album, Hobosexual II, and a supremely loud (and rocking) set at Sasquatch!, with a pair of similarly high-profile festival appearances this summer: Doe Bay Fest and Bumbershoot. DAVE J. LAKE hobosexualband.com

Best Metal Band

Led by its mustachioed editor Marc Palm, The Intruder quarterly comics compendium has become the clarion call of Seattle’s new guard of alt-comix masterminds. Not since the ’90s heyday of Pete Bagge and Jim Woodring has our city been blessed with such a glut of amazing illustrators. If you don’t take my word for it, the rotating cast of 12 or so young artists who make up the Intruder gang was recently granted a showcase at Fantagraphics. Seriously, pick up The Intruder now before one of its contributors becomes the next Lynda Barry—that way you can say you were there to watch it happen.

Over the years, metal has become so laden with heavy subgenres that it’s getting harder to apply the original term to any band. But no one in town is doing heavy better than Great Falls. The band’s 2013 release, Accidents Grotesque, is the perfect blend of sludge and technical jaggedness, abrasive and downright violent at moments. All momentum forward, the band is set to release a split 7-inch on Hell Comes Home, part of a series of Shellac covers from the label. In addition, Great Falls is recording a track for a fourband split 10-inch, and will record a new fulllength for release later this fall. JAMES BALLINGER

Best Comic Convention

Best Underage Band

KELTON SEARS intrudercomics.com

When I walked into Short Run last year, I

greatfalls.bandcamp.com

Tigerlily, Bird, and Emiko Cooley are Bleachbear,


bandcamp.com/album/lost-parade

Best Queer Band

Best of NW DISTILLERIES

ANNA ERICKSON

arguably the coolest teen girls in Seattle right now. Thoughtful, intelligent, and talented, it’s hard to believe they’re between 14 and 16. But a dead giveaway is their endearing enthusiasm (the band’s Facebook page lists their interests as “camping, hiking, music festivals, great vintage finds, social causes, basketball, chocolate, and mint chocolate chip ice cream!”). Then there’s the music: a style of dreamy pop/grunge/folk rock—as heard on Bleachbear’s superb debut, Lost Parade—and catchy melodies juxtaposed against Tigerlily’s tear-stained lyrics. Such adolescent angst has a body count—the hearts of hundreds of fans. DIANA M. LE bleachbear.

GUEST BESTS

Wishbeard have a self-proclaimed “boy band” following among queer teenage girls. Beyond lead singer Bryn Santillan’s cameo in Mary Lambert’s “She Keeps Me Warm” video, there’s good reason—these ladies aren’t only dreamy personalities, they also craft some of Seattle’s dreamiest music. Smartly mixing taut Joy Division bass lines with glittering synth, Wishbeard will make you float off the dance floor like the hypnotic, bubbling landscapes they project behind them when they perform live. KS wishbeard.com

Wayne Horvitz is known around the country for his inventive, multi-genre music. Once a staple of New York’s avant-garde jazz scene, the keyboardist and composer has long resided in Seattle’s South End with his wife, fellow musician Robin Holcomb. It’s also where, in 2011, he opened The Royal Room, an all-ages restaurant and club in Columbia City, the neighborhood in which he starts his own personal Best of Seattle. NS

Best Punk Band

Best Neighborhood

Black Flag’s masculine shirtless shouting be damned—with all the screaming and bodily fluids involved, nothing’s more punk rock than squeezing another human being out of you. Seattle supergroup Childbirth upped the punx on everyone this year by slipping on maternity gowns and putting out a cassette, with a fetus wearing shades on the cover, called It’s a Girl! With nary a song longer than two minutes and eight seconds, the album is a riffy, witty reflection on 21st-century ladyhood, sexual politics, and menopause. It also boasts incredible song titles, like “Crossbitch” and “I Only Fucked You as a Joke.” It’ll be the best 13 minutes you spend today, I promise. KS childbirth.bandcamp.com

Best Side Project

Best Musical Utility Player

While at Cornish, 24-year-old multi-instrumentalist Lena Simon dabbled in a little bit of a lot, studying everything from classical clarinet (her most proficient instrument) and composing music for Javanese gamelan while joining three widely respected indie bands: Pollens, Tomten, and Throw Me the Statue. Last year she added

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 67

I love my neighborhood, where Mount Baker intersects with Columbia City. It’s close to downtown. We have great parks, really great people from all walks of life, some great architecture, cheap food, and bad traffic—but not as bad as everywhere else. Best Park

We have probably gone to Seward Park over 3,000 times since we moved here. For years we walked around it, but lately I’ve been enjoying the interior as well. It’s like going to the rain forest. And the park is five minutes from my house. Best Place to Take Out-of-Town Guests I’d say a hike to the Second Beach near La Push

Raising Spirits.

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[on the Olympic Peninsula]. I use out-of-town guests as an excuse to get out of town. Best Restaurant to Splurge

For family celebrations, we go to Maneki in the ID. It is good, casual, and has a “West Coast city in the ’40s” kind of feel that I love. Best Venue (Other Than The Royal Room) The Tractor has just been such a lovely place for

so many years. [Owner] Dan Cowan has done a great job. Best Musician Seattle Hasn’t Heard Of

Well, I wish people had heard of saxophonist

Ivan Arteaga, but most people probably haven’t.

He is truly a unique voice, and I hope to work with him more in the days ahead.

Best Thing About Gigging Here Vs. New York The load-in/out. Playing in NYC is awesome,

but even if you live there—actually, especially if you live there—getting to and from the gig with any kind of gear is a hassle. Half the reason we bought the house we live in today is because I could load stuff into my studio straight from the driveway. E

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

Tendai “Baba” Maraire’s father Dumi singlehandedly brought the beautiful sounds of the mbira to U.S. shores in the ’70s during his time as an ethnomusicologist at the UW. Tendai carried on the legacy by blending the sounds of that haunting African thumb piano with avanthip-hop as half of Seattle’s celebrated Shabazz Palaces. But Tendai’s Chimurenga Renaissance project distilled that intoxicating infusion even further, creating riZe vadZimu riZe, an incredibly smart world/hip-hop album that soars thanks to its uniquely multinational roots. Never onedimensional, Chimuenga’s album works as both an ode to Tendai’s Zimbabwean home and as a wry and challenging observation of black America. KS chimurengarenaissance.cloudnice.com

Vashon Island | 206.463.0830 www.seattledistilling.com

Wayne Horvitz

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GOOD BOOKSTORES

ARTS & CULTURE

A Reader’s Guide

Ada’s Technical Books The 4% Universe

by Richard Panek

This overview of modern astronomy details theories that attempt to explain our universe following up to their culmination at the theory of dark matter. The title of the book is a reference to the 4% of the universe (now estimated to be closer to 5%) that consists of matter that we can actually see. The other 95% of the universe is dark matter, a type of matter we cannot yet perceive but that existence is theorized because of its gravitational effect on other objects.

Find the perfect book at your local bookseller and...

SPOTLIGHT ON

University Book Store Seattle Staff Favorite*

Delancey: A Memoir by by Molly Wizenberg

Let this be YOU!

This local bookstore is in love with the latest book by local food blogger Molly Wizenberg and the story behind her and her husbandís popular Seattle restaurant Delancy. Of course, it doesnít hurt that the intimate wood-fired pizza restaurant is also one of our favorite places to dine!

Four Local Favorites University Book Store

Staff Picks at Ada's Technical Books

Hedgebrook Cookbook by Denise Barr and Julie Rosten Modernism in the Pacific Northwest by Patricia Junker Shaping Seattle Architecture by Jeffrey Karl Ochsner The North Cascades Highway by Jack McLeod

Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer Little Brother by Cory Doctorow Make: Electronics by Charles Platt The Architecture of Happiness by Alain De Botton Dune by Frank Herbert

MATIKA WILBUR

SPOTLIGHT ON

GUEST BESTS Matika Wilbur

Matika Wilbur drove out of Seattle two years ago to document members from all of the country’s federally recognized tribes in her Project 562. Since launching the venture, the young photographer has received national recognition from The New York Times and NPR. She may be our region’s most famous photographer since Edward S. Curtis, whose Indian portraits presage her own. She returns to Seattle this month to buy a small RV, then she’s out on the road again. So what will she savor during her hometown visit? BM Best Coffee Shop

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“I always go and get a cup at Espresso Vivace.” She considers it the nation’s best—she should know, given all the places she’s visited. “I have a really educated sense of what’s good coffee.” Best Soup

“I love going to Café Presse at two in the morning and eating the squash soup.” Best Park Cal Anderson Park is a favorite walk of hers,

coffee in hand. She also cites the street-end park at East Aloha Street (aka the Melrose Trail): “It’s one of my favorite places to nap.” Best View

“When I fly back into town and see the city again” from I-5 into Seattle. “It’s very inspiring.” Best Running Loop The downtown waterfront. Wilbur once lived

on the Pike Place Hillclimb near ZigZag. Instead of running north through the sculpture park, she prefers the industrial views to the south. Best Bike Ride

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From Cap Hill, Wilbur likes to pedal over Madrona to Lake Washington Boulevard, sometimes connecting to the Burke Gilman Trail.

Best Way to Relax Salmon fishing with her family. Given that her

family fish commercially, it shouldn’t be surprising that “I feel really connected to fishing and the water” on Puget Sound.

Best Place for Buying Film or Lenses “There’s really only once place”—Glazer’s, says Wilbur. E

See her work at Tacoma Art Museum through Oct. 5 and at project562.com.


» FROM PAGE 65

Kairos, her new electronic project, to the load, and it’s since signed to the recently defunct Fin Records. But a small snafu like that isn’t going to throw this one off course. With all that, plus collaborating with Katie Kate, Pillar Point, and Thunderpussy and playing bass for surf-noir group La Luz, Simon enjoys a kind of freedom rare in the rock scene: the ability to pursue whatever sounds interesting, with hella chops to back it up. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT kairostime. bandcamp.com

Best Jazz Combo

Over the past year, there has been almost-unanimous praise for Industrial Revelation from the Seattle music press. After the release of the curt and courteous LP Oak Head last fall, the quartet became the first full-fledged jazz combo in a while to break out of the dark and dusty confines of jazzdom, edging its way into the slightly brighter lights of the local music mainstream. But IR did not appear out of nowhere; the city’s jazz scene has been making waves for some time now thanks to fresh venues like Lucid and Cafe Racer. Industrial Revelation is the child of the movement, flourishing under the husbandry of drummer D’Vonne Lewis, who has some serious Seattle musical heritage and culled some of the most adventurous and exciting players because, as he tells Seattle Weekly, he sensed in them a sort of “freedom.” That is exactly what the band sounds like—brash and ballsy and willing to try new things. What is next no one knows, and that’s a big part of what makes them the best. MARK BAUMGARTEN industrialrevelation.com

Best Club DJs

City-Soul-Club

Best Country Artist

We’ve dubbed him Seattle’s “man of pedal steel,” and for good reason. Country Dave Harmonson—when not playing with Cahalen Morrison and Country Hammer, Ganges River Band, Country Lips, Annie Ford Band, the Swearengens, Side Saddle, T & D Revue, Tequila Rose, Wes Jones Band, Papillion Saints, or Zoe Muth—leads his own group, Country Dave’s Pickin’ Crew, a twang-tinged country band of the highest order. Whether it’s a Waylon cover you’re craving or just the lively reverb of lap steel guitar, with his own group or one of his friends’, Country Dave delivers and then some. GE facebook. com/dave.harmonson

Though the pair has lately branched out in pursuit of other collaborations and solo work, the Seattle country-folk world would feel the loss should Cahalen Morrison and Eli West go their own ways altogether. Their latest release, I’ll Swing My Hammer With Both Hands, is the duo’s best yet, a string-filled (specifically banjo, mandolin, bouzouki, dobro, and guitar-filled) Pacific Northwest folk story with songs like the sprightly minor-keyed “Fiddlehead Fern” and the roving river chantey “Off the Chama.” Binding such tunes is the near-spiritual sonic glue of their effortless harmonies, a pleasing quality so instinctual and acute you’d think the pair were brothers. GE cahalenandeli.com

Best Cat Band

Here at Seattle Weekly HQ, we consider suggestions for this “cat-egory” with the utmost seriousness. Cats, as we know, rule the Internet, and such power (as we are often reminded by the Maru and Grumpy Cat vids that interrupt our workflow daily) is not to be taken lightly. This is why Tacocat has emerged this year as the champ. It’s not the clever juxtaposition of the world’s most web-ready pet with one of the world’s finest dishes (and then making a palindrome out of it), but the group’s latest album—NVM, a doowop, pop-rock, bubblegum-snapped honey— that clinched it. May it rule the airwaves—and the “Crimson Wave” (arguably the world’s only surf-rock track about periods)—for years to come. GE tacocatdotcom.com

Best Pop Band

Great pop music nods to the past, often in the form of certain musical tropes, while feeling like the future, often in the form of youthful enthusiasm. Enter Cumulus, an Anacortes-born band that in the past year has become a Seattle standard, playing shows that burst with bright, jangly joy while harkening back to the best indie pop of the ’90s. Bandleader Alexandra Niedzialkowski pens songs infused with musical history. In fact, pop is so ingrained in her being that, as she told me once, she didn’t even realize that her tremendous pop track “Do You Remember” contains an allusion to one of the genre’s great songs. “We walk through streets that have no names,” she sings as the song glows bops behind her, “but we knew our own, so it was all OK.” Blissful. MB cumulusband.com

Best Hip-Hop Artist

Raz Simone’s 2014 started with a bang, with the announcement that he was the first rapper to sign to Lyor Cohen’s new venture, 300 Entertainment. His meteoric rise to success might surprise some: Simone has released only two EPs and this year’s brilliant full-length Cognitive Dissonance: Part One. Yet Simone started writing poetry long before venturing into music, and his largely introspective lyrics feature complexity and depth hard to find elsewhere. Add to that his skills as a producer, graphic designer, and video director, all under his Black Umbrella label, and it’s clear that the sky’s the limit for this one. MICHAEL F. BERRY razsimone.com

Best R&B Artist

Otieno Terry was the winner at this year’s EMP

underage band competition, SoundOFF!, pull-

Wishbeard (see page 65).

Best Cover Band

ing the audience in from his first note to his very last. Of the two rounds he competed in, each began with a silent room accented only by his crystal-clear voice ringing and singing a spokenword melody out across the space. Soul oozes out of this musician as he moves through each song reaching for the audience with the desire to connect, to communicate hidden and not-so-hidden emotions. While some of the songs lack depth, that will come with time. His true talent lies in his voice, a natural talent that can’t be faked and one he handles with effortless grace. Otieno is definitely an up-and-comer; keep your eyes out for this one. MORGEN SCHULER otienoterry.

Does the world really need more Radiohead? Probably not. But one thing we could all use a little more of is the music of the Pablo Honeys, Seattle’s all-female Radiohead tribute band. In this five-piece (most members double as volunteers for Rain City Rock Camp for Girls), Thom Yorke’s androgynous whimper takes on a decidedly feminine tone thanks to Aileen Paron’s gossamer lead vocals, yet the songs themselves are performed faithfully close to the originals. From OK Computer to King of Limbs, these ladies have perfected the genre they call Radiohead— and it’s a little less creepy when they do it. GE

Best Busker

Best Electronic Artist

bandcamp.com

Categorizing herself as alternative soul, Whitney Mongé has poured everything, including her soul, into music. Spending most of her days, year-round, busking outside the choice spots at Pike Place Market (a position she worked hard for, after years performing on the Market’s lessdesirable cobblestone walkways), Mongé opens herself to every passer by hoping to make a connection. Stop for a moment to chat with her and you’ll understand what we mean. She isn’t limited to busking at the Market, either: She plays prolifically throughout the city, booking as many shows, events, festivals, and venues as possible, all in the name of the game. Whether she’s performing outdoors or playing a long-booked gig, Mongé’s music isn’t just a career, it’s a way of life. This singular artist takes all that on and pushes forward with tenacity. MS whitneymonge.com

Best Band Name

Toke up, Seattle! You legalized pot. In this duskygreen era in the Emerald City, we are blessed not only with the ability to freely purchase a multitude of marijuana varieties, but also the chance to listen to two different bands named Weed. And, thank God, they are both high-quality strains. Whether you prefer the smoky stoner rock of Bainbridge Island’s WEEED or the heroic lo-fi grunge punk of recent Seattle transplants (via Vancouver, B.C.) Weed, you can’t go wrong. Fun fact: Weed doesn’t actually smoke weed. Even funner fact: WEEED definitely smokes weed. KS weeed.bandcamp. com; weed.bandcamp.com

pablohoneys.com

At a glance, electronic music can seem at odds with the natural—which is why Manatee Commune, aka 20-year-old Grant Eadie, is such an interesting artist. Rather than pulling from the mechanic inspirations of mainstays like Aphex Twin or the cosmic leanings of more contemporary artists like Flying Lotus, Eadie infuses his beats with the lush sounds of the Pacific Northwest landscape that surrounds his native Bellingham. Clattering drums hum alongside the chatter of birds, the trickle of rain, and the billowing of wind chimes, creating gorgeous soundscapes that could score future episodes of Planet Earth. Leave it to a kid from Washington to make electronic music sound like plants growing. KS manateecommune.bandcamp.com

Best Collaborator

Technically he’s no longer a Seattleite. If you really want to be specific, composer and Bainbridge Island native Jherek Bischoff’s not much of a permanent resident anywhere these days, splitting his time among L.A., New York, and, in September, here, when he’ll take the Moore stage supported by a string quartet and other musicians like Zac Pennington of Parenthetical Girls. This one-off show (performed in two sets) is tucked in among projects with David Byrne (who contributed to his latest record, Composed), playing bass and writing songs for the Kronos Quartet, touring with Amanda Palmer, etc. In the music business, some people are just good to

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

For all Seattle accomplishes on the indie, folk, electro, and hip-hop circuits, its one Achilles heel is the largely lukewarm club scene. That’s why when the DJs of the Emerald City Soul Club roll into Lo-Fi the second Saturday of every month, toting crates upon crates of obscure soul records, tastemaking, dance-starved night owls freak out in the best way possible. Folks garbed in vintage threads pack—like sardine-can packed—the floor and groove to B-side singles from the ’60s and ’70s, with the occasional Aretha Franklin or Otis Redding hit thrown in for good measure. With its chill vibe and emphasis on fun, a friend describes the scene thus: “It’s like a party scene in a Vince Guaraldi show, where the Peanuts characters are hopping and bopping without a care in the world.” GE facebook.com/pages/Emerald-

Best Roots Band

COURTESY WISHBEARD

STAFF PICKS

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 68 67


ARTS & CULTURE STAFF PICKS

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work with—and Bischoff ’s clearly one. GE jherekbischoff.com

Best Collaboration

Named after a Star Wars assassin droid, local ambient artist IG88 detected the high midichlorian count in R&B jedi Shaprece, and

music coming out of the city right now; we’re excited to see what this duo does next. KS

the two have proceeded to become the most formidable musical duo in the Galaxy (or in Seattle, at least). Shaprece’s gorgeous, stirring vocals weave through IG88’s chopped-up tapestry of fluttering, orchestral rhythms on the duo’s incredible new Molting EP—a triumph considering the high bar the two had already set on their one-two punch of a debut single, “Tell Me/Her Song.” It’s easily some of the smartest

shaprece.com/ig88.bandcamp.com

Best Band From Everett

EMP’s 21-and-under music competition, Sound Off!, has an uncanny way of opening a window of sorts onto Seattle’s hottest bands of the future. Oddly, it’s not always the first-place winners who take off, as is the case with Fauna Shade, who lost in this year’s final round. But this young group didn’t let that get in its way, as it’s been hot-footing it around the Pacific Northwest ever since, performing at the Fisherman’s Village Music Festival in their hometown of Everett; Anacortes’ Catapult Music Fest (opening for The Lonely Forest); the Timber Music Festival just last month; and several venues around Seattle to boot. This “new old wave rock & roll” band, as it likes to call itself, is building a strong audience, tapping into a distortion-heavy niche that’s been missing on the scene for a while. Needless to say, these guys are spreading out past their hometown to bigger and better things. MS faunashade.

A typical scene inside the old Funhouse, documented in Razing the Bar.

bandcamp.com

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FUNHOUSEDOCUMENTARY.COM

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Best Music Variety Show

If you want to get to know a band, don’t ask “What’s your preshow ritual?” Instead, take them out on a lake in a goddamn hot-tub boat. That’s exactly the premise of Hangin Tuff, a wacky music variety show hosted by DJ Bobbi Rich, who during one episode deftly unearthed

Jarv Dee’s past as a tap dancer. The glory days of smart and funny MTV shows like Headbanger’s Ball and Yo! MTV Raps may be gone, but thanks to Hangin Tuff, getting to know local musicians in 2014 felt a hell of a lot like 1994—in the best way possible. KS facebook. com/hangintuffmusicshow

Best Local Music Doc

In a town that’s seen some of its most beloved watering holes and venues shutter to make way for urban development, local director Ryan Worsley’s worthwhile documentary, Razing the Bar, is an intimate portrait of yet another space to recently bite the dust: the Funhouse. The doc relates the legendary punk bar’s history as a gritty arts incubator, exploring not only the tightknit community that revolved around the club, but also gentrification, always a charged topic in booming Seattle. The film’s energy—and that of the many fans, punks, and musicians who frequented the club— gives it a certain kinship to the 1996 grunge doc Hype!, which Worsley cites as a strong influence. Ultimately, the flick renders poignant commentary on the power of music and the resilience of community. GE funhousedocumentary.com

Best Music Video

It is rare to see a music video that captures the spirit of a song without becoming a slave to it. Yet such is the case with the video for Iska Dhaaf’s song “Happiness,” directed by Stephan Gray. The video, like the two-piece band, is at


iskadhaaf.com, graymatterproductions.com

Best Record Label

Ballard’s Light in the Attic had a banner year. Rather than filling a niche or focusing on a genre, the 12-year-old label has continued to rely on quality above all else, releasing interesting compilations from a wide swath of artists, from the recent Mark Lanegan anthology to a collection of self-published New Age music spanning 40 years. At the same time, LITA has made sure to keep one foot firmly planted in the Pacific Northwest, issuing long-lost releases and obscure, out-of-print albums like the highly praised Wheedle’s Groove Vol. II, a collection of Seattle-based funk from the ’70s and ’80s, as well as the early synth-pop of Donnie and Joe Emerson. DJL lightintheattic.net

Best Producer

What qualifies Charlie Smith for this designation is the fact that he has produced four of the best albums to come out of Seattle in the past year—the debut full-length by Kairos; what could be a breakout for rapper/singer Katie Kate; a transfixing release from Cock & Swan; and the first album from Pillar Point, the infectious new project from Scott Reithermann (Throw Me the Statue). But it is the shared nature of those releases—all adventurous, sometimes difficult, albums that defy pop convention without sacrificing likability—that seal it for the emergent producer. A former jazz-band leader (you might have seen him at Tula’s a decade or so back), Smith entered the world of indie rock because he could write arrangements for horns—which were in demand in the mid-

lines to start an album with. In that regard Digital Wildlife, easily The Physics’ most relentlessly sexy album yet, never lets up. Featuring sensually subdued production that should make Frank Orange jealous and enough sultry come-ons to make Drake blush, Seattle’s veteran R&B/hiphop crew takes you through a smoky velveteen limo ride with full champagne service before whispering in your ear that at “5 in the morning I’m thinking ’bout you naked.” Damn, Physics, y’all are frisky. KS thephysics.bandcamp.com

Best A&R

OK, so technically Ishmael Butler has signed only one act to Sub Pop since becoming the label’s A&R man last year. Unofficially, his Shabazz Palaces collaboration with THEESatisfaction helped net Sub Pop the incredible awE naturalE, one of the best local releases in 2012, before Butler was on staff. Porter Ray, the jazzy Central District rapper Butler claimed as his first official artist for the label just last week, is a bastion of the local hip-hop scene, and we hope his selection is indicative of what’s to come—the molding of Sub Pop into a much-needed valve for Seattle’s incredible hip-hop scene that’s been bursting at the seams with talent for too long now. KS

Best Album to Break Stuff To

If at first the word “lovers” doesn’t have you entertaining thoughts of a dish-destroying rampage, by the time you’re through with Constant Lovers’ Experience Feelings, chances are you’ll be ready to rage. From the drone-steady sludge of opening track “Mush Teeth” to the axeshredding and urgent polyrhythms of “Cry Me a River,” this album pumps you up and inspires the absolute destruction of such things as: anything your ex gave you, any home furnishing you’ve grown tired of, and/or anything in your home that’s already broken (natch). Just how you go about breaking said items is completely up to you. GE constantlovers.com

Best Local Album

There are so many things to like about Katie Kate’s sophomore release, Nation. Her mixture

Best Good Idea to Die

of hip-hop, EDM backing beats, and that sultry voice, slipping through lyrics like silk off a shoulder, is hard to resist. In a 2013 SW profile, she mentioned that she feels “it’s really easy to hate me . . . without listening to what I do”—insight arrived at after no one ponied up to sign her and release Nation. Lucky for music lovers the world over, she self-released it just a few days ago, and its unique crossover makes it simply, perfectly Katie Kate. The rapper is as driven as the throbbing beats delivered here, featuring collaborations with musicians like Jarv Dee and Trent Moorman, with veteran producer Charlie Smith at the helm. The rapper’s true nature and sound has made its way into every track, each the best version of itself. MS katiekate.bandcamp.com

With both a world-class music scene and a large tech community, Seattle seemed like the perfect locale for Lively, a music startup that made live concert video and audio available on smartphones for a small fee. The company raised over $2 million, built out a large office and performance space in SoDo, and had strong support from the local music community, but despite offerings from the Pixies, Lisa Loeb, and Aer, the company simply ran out of cash and was forced to lay off the bulk of their staff. “We gave it a really good shot,” CEO Dean Graziano told The Seattle Times in June. “The [record] label deals took a little bit longer than we had hoped. And a few funders pulled out at the last minute.” DJL

Best Band to Break Up

Best Makeout Album

“I won’t even step on my own rug with my shoes/ But if you want to/Walk those pretty Jeffrey Campbell heels into my bedroom”—quite the

The end of The Lonely Forest is notable not for what the music world lost with the departure of the anthemically inclined and emotionally forthright pop band, but for the dashed hopes it signified. When the band announced, before its Sasquatch! appearance this spring, that it was going on “indefinite hiatus,” it spelled an official end to an optimistic run that started with a win at the Sound Off! under-21 band battle at EMP in 2006 and was quickly followed by its signing to a major label and some help from Death Cab for Cutie guitarist and noted producer Chris Walla. Back then the buzz was deafening, and the band’s strident songs, hopeful but tinged with a particular Pacific Northwest darkness, seemed headed for bigger arenas. Alas, that was not meant to be; after some disheartening wrangling with the major-label world (recorded for posterity in the band’s last album Adding Up the Wasted Hours), the band is no more. Or, rather, will be no more, following its Bumbershoot appearance next month. Catch The Lonely Forest while you can. MB thelonelyforest.com

Best Comeback

I once heard someone describe Blood Brothers vocalist Johnny Whitney’s voice as “Lisa Simpson

getting strangled.” Coincidentally, that’s also the sound the band’s grieving army of fans made when the beloved group announced its split in 2007 after releasing its brutally brilliant final album, Young Machetes. While they might not get the credit, Blood Brothers’ batshit-crazy take on post-hardcore puts them right up there in the PNW musical hall of fame with Hendrix, Nirvana, and Modest Mouse, which is why their recently announced reunion has so many frothing at the mouth. Thank the gods that we get to watch these nutballs set the room afire once more. KS (Fri., Aug. 22, The Showbox) thebloodbrothers.com

Best Venue

Sure, as of today, The Sunset Tavern is closed. But get a load of what owner Max Genereaux has in store for its long-planned renovation, slated to reopen in September: more floor space for live shows and a new lounge for those who just want to have a drink—and Sunset 2.0 is going to be better than ever. And that’s not even taking into account its current standing as a place where a cult songwriter like Bonnie Prince Billy can sneak in for a few songs then slip away into the night, and where up-and-coming bands of every size and stripe earn the chance to someday have the cred to do the same. GE sunsettavern.com

Best Live Show

I last caught Kithkin at the Crocodile for its CD release show with Master Musicians of Bukkake. That band’s psychedelic brand of goth doom metal coupled with the front man’s terrifying stage getup (which conjured images of an unholy tryst between True Detective’s Reggie Ledoux and Bob from Twin Peaks) prompted many to leave, a few muttering, “This is the scariest shit I’ve ever seen.” Those who stayed were rewarded to see this self-dubbed Cascadian treepunk band—which happens to count SW writer Kelton Sears among its members—absolutely slay. Tribal rhythms, ritualistic choruses, and inexhaustible energy are but a fraction of what makes these guys so great live. Bassist Sears can somehow play his four-string with a style typically reserved for an axe-slayer like Ronnie James Dio, all the while screeching at the top of his lungs, leg-kicking the air, and handing out either sprays of sweat or high-fives to anyone in the front half of the room. GE kithkin.bandcamp.com E

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THELONELYFOREST.COM

RIP, Lonely Forest.

’00s. He still produces the odd jazz album, but Smith has found his true calling with young indie artists in search of an identity. In the case of Lena Simon’s striking Kairos debut, that meant taking the multi-instrumentalist/singer’s old demos, stripping them down to just a vocal line and a single instrument, and then rebuilding them—not into commercial pop, but into something distinct and undeniable. MB

V2 RECORDS

once simple—shot almost entirely in black-andwhite—and emotionally complex, delving into issues of alcoholism, suicide, and death while the band sings “We will erase the slavery and hatred . . . To control the past is to control your future.” Gray does wonders with a limited palette, including a few underwater and in-car scenes. His power is in his use of overt symbols—a clear nod to Ingmar Bergman—and his deft editing, which has become the trademark of the up-and-coming director (who won the director’s prize at this year’s Sync Music Video Festival). The end result is an unlikely catharsis in less than five minutes. MB

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Dining in the Dark

FoodNews BY MEGAN HILL

The Blind Cafe turns out the lights on Seattle diners.

Newly opened upscale deli Porkchop & Co., which we recently reviewed, is teaming with Skylight Farms to bring you a Farm Dinner on Saturday, August 9. Produce will be picked from the farm and a goat raised by Boise Creek Boer Goats will be roasted. Laura Pyles (Parchment Pop Up Bakery) will provide dessert, and Reuben’s Brews will serve their craft ales. More details on the event can be found at brownpapertickets.com.

BY PATRICK HUTCHISON

San Francisco-based Paxti’s (pronounced PAHcheese) Pizza opened its doors in Ballard last week—its first location in the Pacific Northwest. Paxti’s specializes in deep-dish pizza “topped with a layer of extra dough and homemade tomato sauce and baked in a traditional rotating pan oven,” according to a press release. However, they offer an “Italian Thin” pizza too. Besides pizza, they’ll serve salads and antipasto plates, beer, wine, and cocktails. Delivery is slated to begin in a few weeks. E morningfoodnews@seattleweekly.com

TheWeeklyDish Port Cherry Sorbet & a Guilty Mom BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

would tell me later, “In a way, we’re setting up the environment to be uncomfortable. It helps people to connect.” And, perhaps counterintuitively, it did. Diners across from me who I’d never met started helping me, handing me bits of bread and olives when I professed I could not, for the life of me, find them anywhere on the

I pulled a fast one on my kid last week. When she asked for ice cream from Cupcake Royale, I told her we’d go to Menchies in Queen Anne instead for a slightly healthier frosty treat. But when the time came, I really didn’t want fro-yo. So while she contemplated her options at Menchies, I hopped across the street to Cupcake Royale (telling her I was checking out something for work) and covertly ordered a baby scoop of port cherry sorbet on a sugar cone. A baby scoop is so small that one can eat it in less than five minutes, which is what I did, with one eye on my child. (In my defense, she’d had ice cream the night before.) The thing about the port cherry sorbet is that it actually tastes like real cherries. In my opinion, cherries fare the worst of all in artificial versions, about as bad as watermelon. So when you get a cherry-flavored treat that really tastes like its namesake fruit, it’s a joyous occasion. This one gets even better after being drowned in port and spiked with black pepper and orange zest (wow!). While port cherry by the scoop ended August 1, Cupcake Royale says it will sell it by the pint this week while supplies last. Next up: peach! E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

COURTESY CUPCAKE ROYALE

PHOTOS COURTESY THE BLIND CAFÉ

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August 10 is National S’mores Day, so Hot Cakes is featuring the gooey campfire treat this Friday through Sunday, August 8–10. There’ll be s’mores cookies and milkshakes, a s’mores molten cake, and their classic s’mores. On Sunday, stop by for roasted to-order sidewalk s’mores hot off the grill.

ALIVESTUDIOS.COM

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

I

magine a dark room. Now imagine it’s darker. And then darker still. Whatever image you now have in your mind, whatever level of darkness you can imagine, it cannot compare to the utter void of light that The Blind Cafe exists in. It is dark at a level I could hardly comprehend. After an hour and a half in the room, I still could not make out a single shape or silhouette. Not a hint of anything was perceptible. There was food, and music, and a bottle of wine in my hand I didn’t dare risk pouring into a cup for fear of spilling it. Surrounded by strangers, I wasn’t exactly sure what I was supposed to be doing at The Blind Cafe. In 2007 musician Rosh Rocheleau found himself touring in Iceland. By chance he happened upon a cafe with all its lights off, but occupied nonetheless—a unique dining experience where patrons eat in complete darkness served by blind waitstaff. It was a life-changing experience, one he carried inside for years until he met a blind girl in one of his classes at Europa University in Diners at The Blind Cafe use the buddy system—and a lot of trust. Boulder, Colo. “I had an idea of involving music with a blind dining experience, and and sunny Sunday. A few dozen asked her if she thought the local people stood outside, grabbing blind community would be interested in particitheir tickets and anxiously awaitpating,” he says. A few months later, The Blind ing what was inside. Not knowing Cafe was born, guiding its first diners through what to expect, some diners asked the dark in Boulder in February 2010. probing questions, hoping to As Rocheleau will tell you, there are lots of maintain whatever sense of control blind dining experiences in existence, and The they could on the verge of entering Blind Cafe was neither the first nor the most a pitch-black room. “How cold is recent, but that doesn’t mean it’s not different. “A it inside? Should I put on pants?” lot of other dining-in-the-dark experiences focus on high-end food, and just the dining experience. one asked. I had not even considered wearing pants instead of You’re situated at a table with just your dining shorts, and began to grow nervous. partner and you eat and that’s it.” Before long, diners were split into The Blind Cafe today is far more than a meal with the lights off. Diners sit at communal tables, their respective communal-table groups, asked to form a conga line where they’re encouraged to share food and of sorts, and led into the venue. conversation with complete strangers; there’s a Blind waitstaff was instantly on Q&A with the blind waitstaff (mostly volunteers hand to lead us to our table, where from local organizations and community groups we awkwardly fell into our seats for the blind); and Rocheleau’s band serenades and waited, unsure of reaching or diners toward the end of the meal. It’s a myriad moving in any direction for fear of experiences whose goal isn’t entirely easy to of the unknown. Gradually, hands decipher, because The Blind Cafe doesn’t present crept out to the table to find Solo only an opportunity to eat some food in a dark cups filled with potato salad, a room. Rocheleau admits, “I just set up the atmojicama mint salad, and hummus in sphere and, to be honest, I don’t really control lettuce wraps, which were casually placed directly the outcome.” If I was confused about what he on the table, without the reassuring edge of a meant, I’d soon figure it out when I attended a plate or bowl to guide us. recent Blind Cafe in Seattle. This year’s event was held at LUCID, a modern lounge/restaurant on the less-visited northern Then something interesting happened. The fear end of University Way. My dining partner and I and anxiety of the darkness gave way to an anoarrived for dinner at 6 p.m. on a gloriously bright nymity that encouraged bonding. As Rocheleau

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table. Bottles of wine were opened and we drank, easing into the comfort and spontaneity that the darkness afforded. There was no judgment, no facial expressions to pick up on, and the din of voices rose and filled the room with a warmth and a sense of communal sharing. It was, for a moment, what I imagine The Blind Cafe strives to always be. As we finished dinner, a Q&A period began with the blind waitstaff. The sense of anonymity carried through. Diners asked honest questions about how they could approach blind people in the real world, how to act around them, and how to offer help: questions that many, in the light of day, might be too embarrassed or shy to ask. Rosh and his band started playing acoustic instruments, and for the first time all evening, the clatter of voices, my own included, finally died down. Halfway through the music, the absence of conversation allowed me to reflect. I didn’t know it, but we’d been in the Cafe for over an hour and a half. I had already experienced anxiety, comfort, and even deeper comfort that expressed itself in boisterous and at times rambunctious laughter and conversation—much, I imagine, to the chagrin of my fellow diners. And then the anxiety returned. How long would we be in here? What time was it? How long had I been in this room? Do I even remember what seeing is like? I started to feel claustrophobic, nervous, and cagey, wringing my hand to occupy myself and periodically feeling the table with my hands hoping to find something new to distract me. After what seemed an eternity, the music culminated in a participatory call-and-response that grew louder and louder as Rocheleau asked if we were ready to see the light. Like a group of the newly evangelized, we all shouted yes, and meant it. Rocheleau stood above us all and raised a lit candle above his head like he was the Statue of Liberty. We fed on that light with a voraciousness that could rival no hunger. Beautiful, beautiful light filled our eyes, and I felt tremendous. Then it grew brighter, and I grew aware of my loud, unrestricted laughter and raucous conversation. It had seemed so appropriate in the moment, but now, in the light, I felt extremely uncomfortable. The darkness offered protection, and now that protection was gone. It was the end of the Cafe’s last show in Seattle, at least for now. Though headquartered in Boulder, The Blind Cafe hits cities all across the country, Seattle being a usual stop. But it may not last forever. As a charitable event (proceeds go to support local organizations for the blind) with a lot of man hours involved, Rocheleau tells me that the ticket sales simply don’t add up—which is too bad, because I think it’s an experience most people should have, even if it doesn’t meet their expectations. For some, it’s a novelty dinner. For others, it can be so powerful as to be a spiritual experience. Rocheleau has even received e-mails from people telling him that the Cafe saved their marriage. But what’s for sure is that The Blind Cafe affects everyone who enters it, in some way, on some level. And if you aren’t sure of its effect at the beginning, you will be at the end, when the music stops and the lights come on. E

RMMCconsulting.com (206) 395-8280

AR T S AND 75


arts&culture

ThisWeek’s PickList

Conversion Experience

How a wandering actress found a new direction: directing, in a church basement. BY JOHN LONGENBAUGH

THURSDAY, AUG. 7

M

76

Taproot was founded in 1976 by a group of

young drama students, most of whom came from Seattle Pacific University. From its early days, it had presented a blend of straightforward drama and comedy with the occasional more-“churchy” piece: Godspell, C.S. Lewis adaptations, and the like. Yet even though this “theater of faith” tended to perform in church basements, Taproot had greater ambitions. Lund approached Taproot’s director, Scott Nolte, with more of a demand than a request. She recalls, “What I said to him was, ‘You need to cast

me in your next show.’ ” That was J.B. Priestley’s An Inspector Calls, and the only role left was that of a maid. Lund got rave reviews for her performance, making her a company regular. At the same time, her relationship with the UW MFA boyfriend dissolved. But it didn’t matter. Lund had found a new direction for her life. In early Taproot productions I’ve observed since the ’90s, the sincerity of passion didn’t always make up for weak and sometimes preachy scripts, like 1995’s Pilgrim, an earnest but clunky adaptation of Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress. But to the credit of Taproot’s founders, the scripts it’s tackled have become increasingly mainstream and secular. A typical season now includes musicals, comedies, and dramas with ecumenical appeal, like last season’s The Whipping Man, about the destructive effects of slavery, or this season’s In the Book Of, which dealt with small-town racism as an Iraqi refugee comes to live with the female soldier who rescued her. “When we talk about issues of faith these days, it’s more likely to be C.S. Lewis in conversation with Sigmund Freud,” says Lund, referring to 2012’s Freud’s Last Session. And while Lund was a Christian before finding Taproot, she feels that her place in her art and her faith have been strengthened by joining the company. Lund became a fixture on the Taproot stage,

but after a much-lauded 1993 turn as the lead in St. Joan, she felt her direction shift again. “I felt like I was reaching the borders of what I could do,” she says. “But then I thought, is this all?” So she began to assist in the directing of the productions, eventually stepping out on her own with the comedy Beau Jest in 1995. This was the beginning of a long run of comedies for Lund—a genre where she received master-class training from an industry pro, director James Burrows, on the L.A. set of Will and Grace in 2004. “I had received an ‘observer-

ship,’ and discovered that along with his comedy gifts, he was famous for running a great and efficient set,” Lund recalls. “Other aspiring directors, including actors from other shows Lund had, and has realized, like Friends, big ambitions for Taproot. would come over to watch how he did it. The entire crew had been working with Jim for years. I asked his props guy, who had been there for 20 years, why, and he said, ‘Look around. No drama. We’re all having a good time.’ I learned a lot about comedy from [Burrows], but I learned as much about leadership.” In the meantime, one of the “cute boys” from that early Taproot show turned out to be her future husband, actor and scenic designer Mark Lund, whom she married in 1993. “So it really feels to me my life has worked out as it should,” says Lund, who now balances directing with her marriage and two children. “I don’t feel like I missed out on my L.A. dreams either. I have an art that supports my family, and my family supports my art. That’s not the life that everyone wants. But it is what I wanted.” E

Most women I’ve met with a Tinder account have horror stories about creepy men skeezing on them via overly aggressive messages. That’s part of the reason why local digital artist Susie Lee created Siren, a new dating app that puts women in control of who can and cannot see their profiles. By purposefully shifting the power dynamic toward women, suddenly new possibilities for real, personal connections open up—since guys have to actually talk to potential matches rather than simply propositioning them right off the bat like a weirdo. To celebrate the launch of Siren, The Project Room is hosting a roundtable discussion about women and the state of online dating, featuring panelists Angela B. Ginorio from the UW Women’s Studies Department and Alina Hua, who manages privacy for Mozilla. The Project

Room, 1315 E. Pine St., projectroomseattle.org. Free. 6–7 p.m. KELTON SEARS

International Wagner Competition

stage@seattleweekly.com

JANE EYRE Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $20–$40. Runs Wed.–Sat. Ends Aug. 16.

In addition to some luscious singing, the great fun of Seattle Opera’s International Wagner Competition is the audience award. Even among opera fans, who tend to be opinionated, I’ve never heard such engaged musical conversation than the intermission chat at previous competitions, people earnestly discussing, arguing about, and agonizing over their favorites. Tonight’s IWC will run along the same lines: four male and four female finalists will each sing two Wagner arias with fullorchestra backing. The orchestra members get to pick their favorite, too, alongside the $60,000 in prize money to be distributed by the official panel of judges. This kicks off a grand weekend salut-

© ROZARII LYNCH

St. Louis, and had worked all over the country: Shakespeare festivals in Idaho and Kentucky; the Cincinnati Playhouse; the Theatre Factory in St. Louis. She only followed her then-boyfriend to Seattle, he pursuing an MFA at the UW, with the expectation that they’d continue to L.A. to work in TV and film. Then everything changed. “I was just starting to get work in town when I had a terrible summer filled with people dying. My father died. My grandmother died, and a dear friend died in a car accident, and I was losing friends from AIDS left and right. I lost a dozen people in that one summer, and my life just changed. Suddenly I wanted different things.” She found them, much to her surprise, in a small theater company doing shows in the basement of Fairview Church in Greenwood. A friend asked her to come check out a show in which a couple of cute boys were performing. “I’ll be honest: The boys didn’t even register for me,” says Lund. “But when I saw the show, something happened. I just knew that this company, Taproot, was who I wanted to work with. I said to myself ‘This is it, and I’m going to help them grow into a viable, real group.’ ”

Jessica Spencer and Art Anderson in Jane Eyre, directed by Lund.

WAYNE RUTLEDGE

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

Lund had been a professional child actress in

Women, Relationships, and the Internet

ERIK STUHAUG

ost artists don’t have careers. They have careens: Momentum drives them forward until they encounter an obstacle that sends them flying in another direction—or an opportunity that opens an unexpected path. Such was the case for Karen Lund, associate artistic director at Greenwood’s Taproot Theatre. Lund’s now recognized for an extensive directing resume with a particular strength in comedies and classics. (Her productions of Shaw, Wilde, and Arthur Miller for Taproot have won her critical acclaim, as has her current musical adaptation of Jane Eyre.) In the theater community, she’s known as the president of Theatre Puget Sound, the region’s service organization for theater artists, and also for her integral role in growing Taproot from a largely unpaid company to a respected professional outfit. (The theater was damaged by an arsonist in 2011, repaired by 2012, and has since expanded.) But when Lund first came to Seattle in 1989, it was as an actress—one who saw Seattle as only a brief detour.

Jenkins in a 2008 photo.

ing Speight Jenkins, the man who’s led SO for 31 years, as he prepares to step down. At Saturday’s Speight Celebration Gala Performance (concert only, no competition), favorites from The Pearl Fishers, Otello, Porgy and Bess, and Tosca—plus of course plenty of Jenkins’ beloved Wagner—will be sung by a dozen or so of the star singers associated with the company: Greer Grimsley, Stephanie Blythe, and many more. McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 389-7676, seattleopera.org. Competition: $46–$66. 7 p.m. (Gala concert: $99–$399. 6 p.m. Sat.) GAVIN BORCHERT


FRIDAY, AUG. 8

The Terminator

He’ll be back?

1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com. $6–$8. 9:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

SUNDAY, AUG. 9

Jim Woodring

studios, and even a drag competition in the Trailer Park. Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery, 1201 S. Vale St., 658-0110, fantagraphics.com. Free. 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Angels in America

For the first two years of its reconfiguration as a summer theater festival, starting in 2012, Intiman went the traditional route for summer stages: several plays and genres, selling both series and individual tickets, with an à la carte approach that meant if you didn’t like one thing, something else might appeal. This year Intiman is going all in, betting the house—well, it no longer truly has a house—on Tony Kushner. The playwright won a Pulitzer and two Tony awards (among others) for his two-part Broadway extravaganza in 1993–94, subtitled “A Gay Fantasia on National Themes.” (Part I is Millennium Approaches. Part II is Perestroika.) Kushner wrote the famously brainy, sweeping plays in response to, among other things, the AIDS epidemic and the Cold War. But now, with 20 years’ distance, how should we view the twinned works? Are they old history now, too tied to the times and Kushner’s peculiar passions (Mormons among them)? And given the length of both shows, about seven hours in total (with two intermissions each), will audiences have the endurance for such an ambitious revival? Millennium Approaches, if you need reminding, is set back in 1985, with the gay right-wing homophobe Roy Cohn (Charles Leggett), a figure now nearly forgotten, dying of AIDS and haunted by the ghost of Ethel Rosenberg, if not his conscience. Meanwhile there’s a Greenwich Village couple (Adam Standley and Quinn Franzen) whose relationship will founder because of AIDS; and, married to a closeted gay Republican husband (Ty Boice) is the pill-popping Mormon housewife Harper Pitt (Anne Allgood), into whose paranoid hallucinations we gradually enter. And overseeing both plays is Kushner’s famous, omniscient angel (Marya Sea Kaminski). Andrew Russell directs the whole daunting enterprise. (Previews for Part I begin tonight; opens Fri., Aug. 15; Part II opens Fri., Sept. 5; both end Sept. 21.) Cornish Play-

house, 201 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 441-7178, intiman.org. $25 and up. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Downtown Park and in between. bellevuewa.gov/bellwether2014.htm facebook.com/BellevueArtsProgram

ART WALK INTRODUCING...

PROUDLY POWERED BY YOU COULD A STARBUCKS GIFT CARD! THEWIN JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER SEATTLE OF GREATER SEATTLE J-Kick is a crowdfunding platform featuring innovative projects in the local Jewish community.

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www.jkick.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

In his new anthology JIM (Fantagraphics, $29.99), the local artist reaches back over 30 years into the phantasmagoric trove of his imagination, first manifested on paper with a 12-page zine in 1982. His is a world of everyday hallucination and unexpected transmogrification. Monsters are always at hand, woven into life’s ordinary texture (if anything can be called ordinary in Woodring’s art). Much of JIM riffs on the early reading matter of his youth, including comic books, ads, and Highlights magazine. Certain threads of autobiography are present, as we see a young artist taking classes and gathering material, gradually gaining confidence in his craft. Even so, disgust—at himself and the world in general—and self-doubt are pervasive. At one point in his misadventures, cartoon avatar Jim despairs, “I’m just a bloated bladder pulsing with appetites and shallow schemes.” Animals, including that famously quizzical, lopsided frog, are no help when they speak to cartoon Jim, who seems perpetually bedeviled, beleaguered, and forlorn. His creator, of course, is more in command of the evermutable situation. Woodring’s signing event coincides with this month’s Georgetown Art Attack, which includes live music, gallery receptions, open

An early issue of Woodring’s Jim.

TUESDAY, AUG. 12

ORION PICTURES

Thirty years ago, there was much less mileage on the machine. (Through Tues.) Central Cinema,

Bellevue City Hall, JIM WOODRING/FANTAGRAPHICS

James Cameron made a star of Arnold Schwarzenegger in this tremendously enjoyable and propulsive 1984 action smash, which has spawned three sequels to date, plus a fourth in the works, and influenced countless movies and video games. (In fact, The Terminator may have been responsible for combining those two industries.) In a masterstroke of casting, the Austrian bodybuilder plays a robot sent back in time to kill mankind’s future savior. His overmuscled stiffness and puny command of the English language become the movie’s strengths, of course, as Michael Biehn and Linda Hamilton (the chosen mother) battle a hulk that seems unstoppable—except for a telling inability to improvise. The Terminator launched Cameron to Aliens and from thence to the apex of the Hollywood pyramid. As for Schwarzenegger, the movie saved him from being typecast as Conan the Barbarian (too many musclemen before him had gone the sword-andsandal route). Here was a newer, better form of typecasting, brawn with a bit of humor, that made Arnold the biggest star of the ’80s (and, indirectly, the future governor of California). How he’ll fare in next year’s Terminator: Genesis is anyone’s guess.

77


arts&culture» Stage

Opening Nights Join us for the 2nd annual Pawz by the Sea 5K run/ walk on Sunday Sept 28, at 9am. The event begins on 2nd Street in Langley on beautiful Whidbey Island. Register at www.pawzbythesea.com

Animal Hospital by the Sea - 114 Second Street PO Box 236, Langley 98260 360 331-8090 - email info@animalhospitalbythesea.com

for Aug 7-10 Performances

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

with promo* code: DuckSoup

78

Aug 7–24

Buy tickets today or see it with an ACTPass! (206) 292-7676 • acttheatre.org

*Must purchase by Aug 10, 2014 to receive discount. Not available with any offer or discount. Other restrictions may apply.

Balconies ANNEX THEATRE, 1100 E. PIKE ST., 728-0933, ANNEXTHEATRE.ORG. $5–$20. 8 P.M. THURS.–SAT. ENDS AUG. 30.

With its huge cast and lofty ambitions to lampoon not only the gaming industry, but also celebrity, politics, and religious cults, Scotto Moore’s new comedy almost bites off more than it can chew. Yet by the time its Shakespearean end rolls around, the show has wheedled its way into your consciousness like some inane pop song. On a pair of adjoining condo balconies are two competing bashes: one a costume party to celebrate a new video game called Sparkle Dungeon 5: Assassins of Glitter ; the other a U.S. Senate fundraising cocktail event hosted by the candidate’s daughter. Competing agendas are compounded by the fact that much of the would-be senator’s support comes from a shady, controlling, unnamed church. The satire is slow to get underway, and the show is too long (a grueling two hours and 45 minutes, intermission included). The gamers could be castoffs from some TV pilot set at Burning Man; the cultists next door are sketchy enough to make Tom Cruise develop a nervous tic; and the obvious love story between the two neighboring condo owners is signaled as if by semaphore. That said, as both playwright and director here, Moore has a gift for setting up a great joke, then riffing on it; and by its conclusion, the farce finally delivers on its promise. At its best moments, Moore’s work reminds you of Joss Whedon’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer or The Avengers: He juggles an array of characters while still driving the plot forward and giving everyone a moment to shine. Having strong actors in key roles certainly helps. Katherine Karaus is warm and winning as Annalise, the condo owner whose mother’s political ambitions may be her undoing. Drew Highlands is the nerdy neighbor Cameron, who’s too timid to say hello until the night of their rival parties. The supporting cast is large and variable, one reason Balconies has difficulty maintaining momentum. It makes sense that in a show this long, the pace should be brisk, but to have an actor begin to speak as soon as another stops is unnatural. Rather than editing out the conversational pauses, Moore ought to have edited his own script. And that nod to Shakespeare—the postdenoument scene where everyone reappears to tie up loose ends and ruminate about what’s happened and what it all meant? Out, damned coda! KEVIN PHINNEY E stage@seattleweekly.com

OPENINGS & EVENTS

THE ANGELS PROJECT SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 77. CAUGHT ONE-HANDED Noah Duffy’s solo comedy

IAN JOHNSTON/DANGERPANTS PHOTOGRAPHY

Now is the time to register for this great community event!

The gamers are wary of the political donors next door.

Stage

about growing up gay, fundamentalist, and horny. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., annextheatre.org. $5–$10. Opens Aug. 12. 8 p.m. Tues.–Wed. Ends Aug. 27. 14/48: OUTDOORS Fourteen plays, that is, created from scratch in 48 hours, al fresco. Seattle Repertory Theater, Seattle Center. Various prices; see the1448projects.org. Opens Aug. 8. 8 & 10:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Aug. 16. GROUCHO RETURNS Back by popular demand, Frank Ferrante channels the slyly leering Marx Brother. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $25–$35. Preview Aug. 7, opens Aug. 8. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat. plus weekend matinees; see acttheatre.org for schedule. Ends Aug. 24. HELLO, DOLLY! That meddling matchmaker is at it again. WSHS Theater, 3000 California Ave. S.W., 800-838-3006, twelfthnightproductions.org. $15–$20. Opens Aug. 8. 7:30 p.m.Thurs.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 17. INTO THE WOODS Fractured fairy tales, with a dark Sondheim twist, via Aurora Theatre Company. Shoreline City Hall, Outdoor Amphitheatre, 17500 Midvale Ave. N., Shoreline, 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. Free. Opens Aug. 8. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Aug. 23. THE SCHOOL FOR LIES David Ives’ update of Molière’s The Misanthrope. Center Theatre, Seattle Center Armory, 800-838-3006, soundtheatrecompany.org. $15–$25. Previews Aug. 7–8, opens Aug. 9. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun., plus 7:30 p.m. Mon., Aug. 18. Ends Aug. 24. SUMMER SHORTS Preview readings of work from Studio4Seattle’s September short-plays festival. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, studio4seattle.org. Donation. 7 p.m. Tues., Aug. 12. THE TAMING OF THE SHREW A pirate-themed look at Shakespeare’s battle of the sexes, presented by Seattle Public Theater’s Youth Program. Bathhouse Theater on Green Lake, 7312 W. Green Lake Dr. N., 524-1300, seattle publictheater.org. Donation. 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8, 2 & 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9, 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. TOMFOOLERY A revue of satirical songs by the incomparable Tom Lehrer. Stop Gap Studio Theatre, Carlson Theater Building, Bellevue College campus, 3000 Landerholm Circle S.E., Bellevue, 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets. com. $10–$12. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7– Sun., Aug. 10. URINETOWN Balagan Theatre and Seattle Musical Theatre collaborate on this show about a city where “It’s a Privilege to Pee.” Seattle Musical Theatre at Magnuson Park, 3291050, balagantheatre.org. $5–$35. Preview Aug. 7, opens Aug. 8. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 24.

CURRENT RUNS

ACT ONE-ACTS A confident cast, savvy direction by R.

Hamilton Wright, and superior staging and effects boost this comely production. In Steve Martin’s Patter for the Floating Lady, a loquacious magician (David Foubert) attempts to charm (literally) his glamorous assistant (Jessica Skerritt) into loving him again, until her id (Hana Lass) sets him straight. Woody Allen’s Riverside Drive raises the stakes when a charismatic street person (a fantastic Eric Ray Anderson) corners a neurotic writer (Chris Ensweiler) rehearsing to break up with his mistress. In The Unseen Hand by Sam Shepard, we find Blue Morphan (a jovial Anderson) awaiting the return of his two brothers from at least one other time period, and the arrival of a creature named Willy from another galaxy. MARGARET FRIEDMAN ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676. $44 and up ($20 every Tues.) Runs Tues.–Sun.; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 17. THE AMISH PROJECT Jessica Dickey’s retelling of the 2006 Nickel Mines Amish school shooting. Isaac Studio Theatre, 208 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends Aug. 9. ATTACK OF THE KILLER MURDER OF . . . DEATH

“Agatha Christie meets Roger Corman” in this mystery sendup, set on a movie set in 1958. Theater Schmeater, 2125 Third Ave., 800-838-3006, schmeater.org. $18–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Aug. 16. BALCONIES SEE REVIEW AT LEFT. THE BOOK OF MORMON The touring production of the Broadway smash, from the creators of South Park, is back for a second visit, sure to sell out. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877-STG-4TIX. $45–$160. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see stgpresents.org for exact schedule. Ends Aug. 10. GREENSTAGE Othello, Love’s Labours Lost, All’s Well That Ends Well, and The Comedy of Errors free in area parks through Aug. 16. See greenstage.org for full schedule. JANE EYRE—THE MUSICAL Paul Gordon and John Caird’s show, based on Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel and here directed by Karen Lund, focuses on Jane’s middle period, after our heroine is hired to work as a governess by apparent bachelor Edward Fairfax Rochester. Too often


» Performance, Literary, & Visual Arts Jessica Spencer’s Jane seems bewildered and lost in her moral and spiritual upheaval; it’s difficult to see the spark that draws Rochester. Even so, in the song “Painting Her Portrait,” she gives a jaw-dropping performance. MARK BAUMGARTEN Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $15–$40. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends Aug. 16. THE WEDDING SINGER A musical version of the 1985-set Adam Sandler vehicle. Renton Civic Theatre, 507 S. Third St., Renton, 425-226-5529, rentoncivictheatre.org. $15. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Aug. 10. WOODEN O Seattle Shakespeare Company’s free outdoor productions of The Two Gentlemen of Verona and Julius Caesar. For the former, director David Quicksall creates a milieu defined by the tastes of mid-century America. Proteus (Jason Marr) and Valentine (Conner Neddersen) are best buds who spend their days joyriding through Verona. What ensues is a comedy of plotting, conniving, scheming, and cross-dressing, plus a clownish servant and his stoic dog. IRFAN SHARIFF Vanessa Miller’s Julius Caesar is an all-female production, with Therese Diekhans as the doomed overreaching tyrant, Suzanne Bouchard as Brutus, and Amy Thone as Cassius. BRIAN MILLER Performance locations through Aug. 10 include Volunteer Park, Seattle Center, Lynnwood, Edmonds, and Des Moines; see seattleshakespeare.org for full schedule.

Dance

CARMONA FLAMENCO Traditional music and dance, with

dancer Ana Montes. Can Can, 94 Pike St., thecancan.com. $15. 9:30 & 11:15 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. ALL RISE A site-specific dance series at the location of the future Seattle City Light electrical substation, in conjunction with Karl Burkheimer’s sculptural installation In Situ, Saturdays through Aug. 23. This week, Vanessa DeWolf. 1250 Denny Way, allrise.org. Free. 7 p.m. WANDERING AND WONDERING Dance and music dispersed throughout the Seattle Japanese Garden, 1075 Lake Washington Blvd. E., seattlejapanesegarden.org. Free w/admission ($4–$6). 2 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10.

Classical, Etc. •

INTERNATIONAL WAGNER COMPETITION SEE THE

PICK LIST, PAGE 76.

AUBURN SYMPHONY SUMMER CONCERTS String

• •

B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

Gallery Openings

SEAN DAVIS The Iraq War veteran and artist shares

• BELLTOWN ART WALK Galleries and venues include

from his memoir The Wax Bullet War. Ravenna Third Place, 6500 20th Ave. N.E., 523-0210, ravennathirdplace.com. 6:30 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. BENOIT DENIZET-LEWIS He shares from his road chronicle Travels With Casey: My Journey Through Our Dog-Crazy Country. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com. 7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. DAN RICHARDS He’s the children’s author of The Problem with Not Being Scared of Monsters. Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com. 7 p.m. Wed., Aug. 6. MARK EPSTEIN He’ll discuss The Trauma of Everyday Life: A Guide to Inner Peace. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 634-3400, bookstore. washington.edu. 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. BRIAN & JAN HERBERT Local author Brian Herbert (son of Frank Dune Herbert) has written a futuristic satire, The Little Green Book of Chairman Rahma, which takes the form of a totalitarian manifesto. His wife sets her eco-thriller Ocean: The Ocean Cycle Omnibus in the year 2024. Eagle Harbor Books, 157 Winslow Way E. (Bainbridge Island), 842-5332, eagleharborbooks.com. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. JACK STRAW WRITERS Contributors to the latest anthology are Raul Sanchez, Margot Kahn, Gigi Rosenberg, and Kristen Millares Young. University Book Store, 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. THERESA MICKEY MCCORMICK Raised in conservative Texas during the ’40s and ’50s, she reads from her memoir A Far Cry from Here: Growing Up and Out of Fundamentalism. Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. JEANNE MOREFIELD She’ll discuss Empires Without Imperialism: Anglo-American Decline and the Politics of Deflection. Ravenna Third Place, 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. A.K. SUMMERS She writes about, and illustrates, her experience with motherhood in Pregnant Butch. (Also: Third Place, 7 p.m. Mon.) Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. LAUREL BRAITMAN She’ll discuss her Animal Madness: How Anxious Dogs, Compulsive Parrots, and Elephants in Recovery Help Us Understand Ourselves. Also speaking is Andrew Bleiman, who created the Zooborns website. Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8. JUNE COTNER She’s written Garden Blessing: Prose, Poems and Prayers Celebrating the Love of Gardening. University Book Store, 7 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8. JOHN MOE The humorist reads from Dear Luke, We Need to Talk, Darth: And Other Pop Culture Correspondences. University Book Store, 5 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. SPENCER QUINN She combines crime fiction and pets in Paw and Order. (Also: Eagle Harbor, 3 p.m. Sun.) Third Place, 6:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. KAT RICHARDSON She concludes her Greywalker sci-fi series with Revenant. (Also: Seattle Mystery Bookshop, noon, Sat.) University Book Store, 7 pm. Mon., Aug. 11. EDAN LEPUCK She’ll discuss her dystopian debut novel California, a publishing sensation thanks to Stephen Colbert, with Seattle’s own Sherman Alexie, who pimped the book on Colbert’s show. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., 386-4636, spl.org. 7 p.m. Tues., Aug. 12. MARY DAHEIM The inexhaustible local mystery writer’s latest is Clam Wake: A Bed-and-Breakfast Mystery. (Also: Seattle Mystery Bookshop, noon, Thurs., Aug. 14.) University Book Store at Mill Creek Center, Bothell-Everett Highway & 153rd St. S.E., 425-3853530, 7 p.m. Weds., Aug. 13. JANICE STEINBERG A woman reflects on her youth during WWII in the novel The Tin Horse, which also involves a lost sister. Seattle Public Library, Northeast Branch, 6801 35th Ave. N.E., 684-4089, spl. org. 6 p.m. Weds., Aug. 13. IVAN DOIG Sweet Thunder, the latest Montana-set novel from the veteran local writer, is set in rough-and tumble Butte. Elliott Bay, 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 14. KATHLEEN FLINN The local chef and food writer has penned her third memoir, Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good. Ticket price includes food, wine, music, and a copy of her book. (Also: Third Place, 7 p.m. Mon., Aug 18.) Swedish Cultural Center, 1920 Dexter Ave. N., cookfearless.com. $39-$55. 6:30 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 14.

Art/Not Terminal, the Virginia Inn, and 2312 Gallery. See belltownartwalk.com for more info. 6-9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 8. CONTINENTAL SHIFT A one-night-only group exhibition takes a look at the realm of the stepfamily. Georgetown Castle, 6420 Carlton Ave. S., continentalshiftseattle.com. 6-9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. CURTIS ERLINGER Originally from St. Louis, Missouri, the local artists sometimes repaints the negative images of old photos—including his father’s wartime experiences in Vietnam. Punch Gallery, 119 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 621-1945, punchgallery.org. First Thurday opening reception, 6-8 p.m. Ends Aug. 31. GRETCHEN GAMMELL The Vancouver, BC artist shows new paintings in Muscle Memory. Hall Spassov Gallery, 319 Third Ave. S., 223-0816, hallspassov. com. First Thursday opening reception 5-8 p.m. Ends Aug. 31. GEORGETOWN ART ATTACK All the galleries and studios are open late, from Equinox Studios to LxWxH Gallery. See georgetownartattack.com for all locations. 6-9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. FEMKE HIEMSTRA & CASEY WELDON Hiemstra paints on found objects in Warten am Waldrand. Weldon tweaks nature scenes with bright, artificial colors in Novel Relic. Roq La Rue Gallery, 532 First Ave. S., 374-8977, roqlarue.com. First Thursday opening reception 6-9 p.m. Ends Sept. 27. ETSUKO ICHIKAWA AND YUKIYO KAWANO One Thousand Questions—From Hiroshima to Hanford is a joint exhibition examining the nuclear history of Japan and Washington State. In conjunction with the show’s opening, the artists will release floating lanterns on Green Lake (6 p.m. Weds, on the northwest side of the lake) to memorialize the A-Bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during WWII. Columbia City Gallery, 4864 Rainier Ave. S., columbiacitygallery. com, 760-9843. Opening reception 5–8 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. Ends Sept. 21.

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INTRODUCTIONS Meet artists new to the gallery,

including Susanna Bluhm, Linda Davidson, Gail Grinnell, and Blake Haygood. G. Gibson Gallery, 300 S. Washington Street (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 587-4033, ggibsongallery.com. First Thurday opening reception, 5:30-8 p.m. Ends Aug. 16.

IT IS A DOOR AND A WINDOW THAT MAKE A ROOM USEFUL Taoist works by Venetia Dale,

Christalena Hughmanick, Tia Kramer, Jovencio de la Paz, and Barbara Smith are featured. In the back space: Margot Quan Knight’s photos. SOIL Gallery, 112 Third Ave. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 264-8061, soilart.org. First Thursday opening reception 6-8 p.m. Ends Aug. 31. GUSTAVO MARTINEZ Agua es Vida presents his new little clay figures bearing water. Gallery4Culture, 101 Prefontaine Pl. S. (Tashiro Kaplan Building), 2967580, 4culture.org. First Thursday opening reception 6-8 p.m. Ends Aug. 28. REAL ABSTRACT A dozen artists are included in this group show, from Timea Tihanyi to Jaq Chartier. Linda Hodges Gallery, 316 First Ave. S., 624-3034, lindahodgesgallery.com. First Thursday opening reception 6-8 p.m. Ends Aug. 30. WILL ROBINSON The local sculptor discusses his work (on view through Sept. 3), gardening, garden art, and bonsai. Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., 6222833, fosterwhite.com. 2 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. SOULFUL TREASURES Come meet the makers of colorful quilts, made in the traditional African-American idiom of the Old South. C Art Gallery, 855 Hiawatha Pl. S., 322-9374, cartgallery.org. Artist reception 1-4 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. Ends Aug. 12. HEIDI STEINMAN She shows new paintings in Observations of substance. Zeitgeist, 171 S. Jackson St., 583-0497, zeitgeistcoffee.com. First Thursday opening reception 5-7 p.m. Ends Aug. 30. B Y K E LT O N S E A R S

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Psychic Medium

John Edward

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Seattle, WA

Sheraton Seattle Hotel

August 15, 2014 7:00pm Tickets Available at johnedward.net and etix.com or by phone 1-800-514-3849

BY B R IA N M I LLE R

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

music by Mozart, Rossini, and others. Mary Olson Farm, 28728 Green River Rd., Auburn, auburnsymphony.org. $10–$17. 7 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. JESSE OLSEN BAY This Bay Area composer presents Makings: Songs from Tillie Olsen’s Journals, a cycle on texts by his grandmother, feminist author/activist Tillie Olsen. With percussionist Paul Kikuchi and vocalist/composer Meghan O’Donoghue-Williams. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., waywardmusic.org. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 7. SEATTLE OPERA DAY Hands-on activities, performances, lectures, and demos for the whole family, with a preview of the 2014–15 season from incoming general director Aidan Lang. Museum of History and Industry, 860 Terry Ave. N., seattleopera.org. Free. 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. OLYMPIC MUSIC FESTIVAL Chamber music in a repurposed barn, 2 p.m. Sat. & Sun. through Sept. 7. This weekend, music by Haydn, Ravel, and Schnittke. Quilcene, Wash., 360-732-4800, olympicmusicfestival.org. $18–$33. SPEIGHT JENKINS FAREWELL GALA SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 76. FOREST SHOW Nature-responsive improv among the trees, from John Teske, Neil Welch, Sonja Myklebust, and Greg Campbell, in a wooded area TBA (e-mail john@ johnteske.com for directions). 7:30 p.m. Sat., Aug. 9. MUSIC NORTHWEST Sopranos Jordan Corbin and Jordan McLellan offer Argento, Puccini, and more. First Lutheran Church of West Seattle, 4105 California Ave. S.W., 9372899, musicnorthwest.org. $16–$18. 3 p.m. Sun., Aug. 10. SEATTLE BACH CHOIR Join them for their Summer Sing of Bach motets. Bethany Lutheran Church, 7400 Woodlawn Ave. N.E., seattlebachchoir.org. $8. 6:30 p.m. Tues., Aug. 12. EASTGATE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL Six concerts by Musicworks Northwest faculty and guests. Northwest University, 5520 108th Ave. N.E., Kirkland, 425-644-0988. See musicworksnw.org for repertory. $10–$20. Opens Aug. 12. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Thurs., Fri. Ends Aug. 22.

Author Events

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arts&culture» Film

RUNS FRI., AUG. 8–THURS., AUG. 14 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. RATED R. 96 MINUTES.

Plaza with Max Greenfield.

OPENS FRI., AUG. 8 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN. NOT RATED. 81 MINUTES.

When a feature’s title is the name of one of its actors, not his character’s name, you know the project is about more than its script. Taylor Guterson, son of novelist David Guterson, scored a hit at SIFF ’11 with the likable Old Goats, starring three geezers from Bainbridge Island whom he’d roped into making their acting debuts. Burkholder is essentially the sequel, which reconvenes its principal cast—mortality tugging ever more insistently at their sleeves. Pushing 90, Teddy (Bob Burkholder) is the long-time tenant and de facto BFF of Barry (Britt Crossley), long-divorced and equally indignant about enforced bachelorhood. Teddy’s libido is more intact, even as his wits are

Elena

Crossley (left) and Burkholder.

RUNS FRI., AUG. 8–THURS., AUG. 14 AT GRAND ILLUSION. NOT RATED. 80 MINUTES.

Double Play: James Benning and Richard Linklater RUNS FRI., AUG. 8–THURS., AUG. 14 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 70 MINUTES.

Watching two film directors play catch is not a guarantee of interest. Put Brett Ratner and Jean-Luc Godard in a field with a couple of mitts and a baseball, and things could get ugly fast. But when the players are Richard Linklater and James Benning, the back-and-forth tossing becomes contemplative, a spur to ideas, and a salute to the value of getting in a good groove. Plus, both men have baseball in their blood— they both went to college on baseball scholarships, and have made films on the sport—so they actually know what they’re doing. The simplicity of such a sequence fits the mood of this documentary by film critic Gabe Klinger. The film tracks a few days in Texas, as septuagenarian Benning comes to Austin for a tribute headed by Linklater. The two have known each other a long time; as Linklater says in an onstage introduction, Benning was the first filmmaker invited to visit the Austin Film Society (Linklater was one of the founders) in the late 1980s. Linklater would go on to make Slacker, Dazed and Confused, and School of Rock, but at that time he was a movie-mad film fan fascinated by Benning’s experimental work. Klinger shows clips from both filmmakers’ careers, including snippets of Benning’s long-take projects (13 Lakes, for example, composed of 10-minute unmoving shots of lake and sky). In their conversations onstage and off—they hang around Linklater’s ranch for part of the visit—there’s some implied tension between their choices: Benning has maintained a monklike devotion to his non-narrative aesthetic, while

Petra Costa’s very personal documentary is about her sister Elena, 13 years older, who during the late ’80s left Brazil to become an actress in New York. Costa was then a child, with limited understanding of her sister’s motives and mental state following the move. Eventually and unsurprisingly, Costa later becomes an actress herself, then sets out to make a dreamy, elliptical film about Elena’s fate in a strange, uncaring city. Costa narrates the movie in English, though the doc is somewhat vague about her family’s educated, privileged background and the chronology of events. The director as an infant, held by her older sister.

The greatest mystery any of us are likely to encounter in life is that of our own family: How did it form, what are its secrets, where are its hidden-in-plain-sight tragedies and betrayals? Sarah Polley made her remarkable Stories We Tell about her uncertain parentage—an enigma that was gradually, artfully resolved. Costa, in her first film, has much less experience behind or in front of the camera. She retraces Elena’s unhappy steps, shares old home movies and family photos, plays us audio postcards from her sister, then runs out of filmmaking ideas after the movie’s big revelation at its midpoint. “My fear is that I’d follow in your steps,” says Costa to her sister. “I drown in you.” That close identification and the film’s shadowy reenactments—Costa wandering through a blurry, wideaperture Manhattan—are a bit much: genuine, affecting, and somewhat self-indulgent. Costa goes overboard with the Ophelia imagery in this lyrical, unconventional documentary, which is

PHappy Christmas OPENS FRI., AUG. 8 AT VARSITY. RATED R. 82 MINUTES.

The writer (Lynskey, left) and the troublemaker (Kendrick).

VARIANCE FILMS

Burkholder

Linklater glides between his own indie projects and Hollywood. One of the best sequences, not surprisingly, has the two men looking at scenes from Linklater’s current hit Boyhood (then in the editing stage). Both artists are obsessed with time’s effect on film, and the conversation here is a real meeting of minds. One comes away wanting to see more of Benning’s world outside film, such as his painted copies of other people’s work or the two cabins he built on his property in the Sierra Nevadas—replicas of Thoreau’s Walden house and Ted Kaczynski’s Unabomber shack. Benning may be opposed to telling conventional stories, but there’s got to be a story there. ROBERT HORTON

SHADOWCATCHER ENT.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

SCREEN MEDIA

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Suicide attempt. Six college friends, not yet 30, converge for the weekend at a ramshackle country home. Oldies soundtrack. Generational angst. Can you guess the decade or the movie? The Big Chill comes first to mind, and there’s even a Big Chill joke or two in this stale debut feature from Jesse Zwick, son of 30-something co-creator Ed Zwick, who rose to Hollywood prominence from Glory through The Last Samurai. The younger Zwick went to Harvard and Yale, and he’s more the product of cosseted MFA-land, not the brutal TV trenches where a writer is told, If your script’s not good enough, look for another job. The script for About Alex isn’t good enough, the direction no better. The setup is a C-plus senior thesis of a stage play (motivating incident, confined characters, past sexual intrigue, blocked writer, secret pregnancy, etc.), and none of the typical characters ever comes to life. Aubrey Plaza is a discontented lawyer; Max Mingella is a dorky hedge-fund king; and everyone else likewise registers as a cliché. Why are these people still friends? There’s topical talk of Facebook and Instagram; the resident cynic (canned, insufferably written) is shamed into admitting he watched Friends; but this circle of friends is held together only by screenwriting contrivance, not conviction. The writer who’s black never mentions race. The actor who’s clearly gay turns out to be straight. There’s a cute stray dog and even a car crash (bloodless, of course), but Zwick doesn’t deviate from the playwright’s dusty old rulebook. Every conflict must be resolved. Every past hurt must be forgiven. Then everyone drives home, instantly forgetting what the whole fraught weekend was about, as do we. Maybe they’ll read the status updates later. As we won’t. BRIAN MILLER

Linklater (left) and Benning.

essentially an oblique essay on grief and loss. Still, whatever its shortcomings, Elena is unquestionably made out of love. Anyone who’s ever tried to understand a distant sibling will share in Costa’s heart-clenching incomprehension of a sister’s final act. BRIAN MILLER

KYLE CHRISTY/MAGNOLIA PICTURES

About Alex

BANDO À PARTE/FILMBUFF

Opening ThisWeek

declining. “I should do things while I still can,” he declares—chiefly photography and courting widows, neither with much success. Also returning from Old Goats is David Vanderwal (the best actor of the three), playing an inept and equally lonely New Age vision-quest leader who takes our main duo on a forest debacle. That this excursion comes at the movie’s midpoint hints at its gentle pacing; very, very little happens in Burkholder apart from discussion about, and evidence of, our inevitable decline. The film becomes almost a documentary about the perilous making of a movie. You sense the pressures weighing upon the young director of a fragile cast, the pathos of an actor portraying his character’s—and his own—future mental decline. Each scene could be a final scene for its stars. Burkholder never becomes lachrymose about the yawning grave, and it doesn’t force any profundity upon these three men shuffling against the clock. “Let’s make each day count,” says Barry. Even if that means only a photo excursion to Cle Elum, the wheels of Teddy’s walker etched into the warm snow, it’s better than the easy chair—or the coffin. BRIAN MILLER

I think of Joe Swanberg’s latest lo-fi indie comedy as less a successful movie than a successful situation that happens to take place in a movie. I like it, maybe more than his prolific progression from mumblecore to auteur-dom (Hannah Takes the Stairs, Drinking Buddies, etc.), but I increasingly doubt he’ll mature into a filmmaker who can tell complete stories. Or maybe that’s an obsolete notion in the age of Twitter, like talking about the Great American Novel. You get the sense that no one here is aiming that high. Happy Christmas is a genial but very low-stakes enterprise, where you can guess the last scene by the time the first scene’s done (and not much separates the two). Anna Kendrick, cast against her brainy, high-strung type (Rocket Science, Up in the Air) plays Jenny, a directionless and self-destructive 27-year-old who crashes at the Chicago homestead of her older brother. Jeff (Swanberg) and his wife Kelly (Melanie Lynskey) have a toddler (played by Swanberg’s own son, a wildly charismatic 2-year-old named Jude). The fun, or at least spontaneity, has gone out of this exhausted household. Jenny is the needy, disruptive force, a pothead and binge drinker, who’ll shake things up. Funny and dry, Lena Dunham is her comparatively restrained wingwoman, Carson. All these characters, genius Jude excepted, are operating well below potential, with Jenny the queen of the slackers. She tries to enlist Kelly, a frustrated novelist, into co-authoring a trashy romance novel, leading them into a long meandering talk about sexual euphemisms with Carson. Swanberg has a generous approach to such ordinary life fodder; the millennial-generation anxiety he gets right, but he never sharpens the writing to conclusive punch lines or plot points. (The cast actually improvised much of the script.) During the summer doldrums, that’s a relief from Hercules or The Expendables 3, where everything moves mechanically forward to the next scene (or


DI NI NG

W E E K LY

M US I C

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P explosion). Happy Christmas can’t be bothered with that. It’s too relaxed for its own good, too unambitious, yet it still leaves you smiling in the end. BRIAN MILLER

RUNS FRI., AUG. 8–THURS., AUG. 14 AT SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 108 MINUTES.

OPENS FRI., AUG. 8 AT ARK LODGE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG. 122 MINUTES.

If you were working from a menu of “crowdpleasing movie conventions,” you could do worse than to mark these boxes: the South of France, food, Indian culture, Helen Mirren. Mix with a generous amount of sugar and a

© FRANC?OIS DUHAMEL

Spain only seems to export its most beautiful movie stars to us, often via Almodóvar: Antonio Banderas, Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem, Paz Vega, etc. But then there’s the short, chubby, balding Javier Cámara, who is so much more worthy of your adoration. He was the chatty nurse in Talk to Her, the nelly flight attendant in I’m So Excited, a kindly drag-queen mentor in Bad Education. And whatever the role, he communicates such a direct, warm avidity for life, an obliviousness to what others think (or judge), that you feel his arms extending off the screen to embrace you. Beautiful people don’t care about you, don’t feel your pain or isolation, but his buoyant, nerdy schoolteacher Antonio knows exactly what you’re feeling. He may not know how to express those feelings himself, but he has some help in that department: John Lennon, his hero, his idol, his god. In 1966 Madrid, Antonio teaches his pupils English by having them recite the lyrics to “Help.” He gently chides and corrects their efforts; he confiscates the boys’ Playboy pinups (those tan lines!); and he has a secret plan for the weekend, perhaps the culmination of his life’s work. As actu-

The inside scoop on upcoming films and the latest reviews.

F I LM

HA PPY HO UR

Tim Robbins and Fernando Meirelles present

"Filmmaking at its finest. Stunningly beautiful." Indiewire

SHOWTIMES

HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN Fri -TUES @ 7:00PM / SAT & SUN @ 3:00PM AUGUST 8 - 14

AUG �–��

RYE COALITION

THE TERMINATOR

Friday - TUESDAY @ 10:00 PM

The Story of the Hard Luck 5

AUG � �pm Alejandro Jodorowsky’s

The leader and his acolytes: Cámara, de Molina, and Colomer.

AUG 10–13 845pm

GREASE: SING ALONG

THURSDAY @ 8:00 PM

MAP THEATRE : HARRY POTTER FILMS TRIVIA - WEDNESDAY@ 7:00PM

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ally happened, documented by newsreels, Lennon was then filming How I Won the War in southeast Spain. The bachelor—of course—Antonio packs up his green Fiat and heads toward the coast. En route he picks up 16-year-old runaway Juanjo (Francesc Colomer), who refuses to cut his Beatle bangs, and the slightly older Belén (Natalia de Molina), aglow with an unwanted pregnancy. Please do not expect a lot of complications or darkness here. Antonio is emphatically a good man, who can’t resist lecturing his hitchhiking students for every kilometer of their journey. (They roll their eyes but listen politely.) The Andalusian locals they meet are mostly decent folk (jokes about dialect and region you can ignore). And when Antonio finally attempts to crash the film set, protected by armed guards, well . . . that is not a moment I am going to spoil. This movie was written and directed by David Trueba, born three years after the events in ques-

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 82

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brief nod to social concern, and you’ll have a surefire profit machine that goes by the title The Hundred-Foot Journey. To be sure, this film doesn’t stumble into its formula by mere calculation. There’s a great deal of expertise involved: Director Lasse Hallström (Chocolat, The Cider House Rules, etc.) knows how to keep things tidy, and screenwriter Steven Knight has the fine Eastern Promises and Dirty Pretty Things to his credit. Two of the film’s producers are named Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey; last time I checked, their grasp of what the public wants has left no one in their immediate families noticeably lacking for basic amenities. Such skill is on the screen, and Journey is pleasant product, even if it seems as premeditated as a Marvel Comics blockbuster. The zaniness begins when the Kadam family, newly arrived in France from India, fetch up with car trouble in a small town. Restaurateurs by trade, they seize the opportunity to open an Indian place—in a spot across the street from a celebrated bastion of French haute cuisine, Le Saule Pleureur. This Michelin-starred legend is run by frosty Madame Mallory (Mirren), whose demeanor is the direct opposite of the earthy Kadam patriarch (Om Puri, a crafty old pro). It’s culinary and cultural war, but will the cooking genius of Papa’s 20-something son Hassan (Manish Dayal) be denied? Madame Mallory can recognize a chef ’s innate talent by asking a prospect to cook an omelet in her presence. You can already hear the eggs breaking in Hassan’s future—the movie’s like that. Daval is a good-looking and likable leading man, so it’s too bad he’s given an unpersuasive love story with Madame Mallory’s sous-chef, Marguerite—Charlotte Le Bon, a pretty actress who doesn’t look convinced by the love story, either; her facial expression perpetually conveys the silent question, “Are you sure this is in the script?” Mirren hits her marks, and the food is of course drooled over. In setting up its culture clash, the film is firmly on the side of the Kadams and their generous portions and against all those snooty-noses across the street. Nobody seems to realize that this airless fairy tale is made with the immaculate authority of La Saule Pleureur, not the freewheeling fun of Maison Mumbai. ROBERT HORTON

NEWSLETTER

With Eyes Closed

The Hundred-Foot Journey

More sugar? Le Bon (left) and Mirren.

FILM

PLiving Is Easy

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arts&culture» Film tion. It’s not a baby-boomer memory piece, but actually an evocation of the twilight years of Franco’s brutally repressive regime—its cracks beginning to show, Almodóvar and other cultural bomb-throwers just around the corner. But the film is equally comedy and critique. When Juanjo confesses he might actually prefer the Kinks or the Stones, Antonio screams, “Get out of the car!” He’s serious, and his two stunned passengers are left stranded by the road. But then, wait for it, the teacher has another lesson planned. BRIAN

MILLER

Magic in the Moonlight OPENS FRI., AUG. 8 AT GUILD 45TH, PACIFIC PLACE, AND LINCOLN SQUARE. RATED PG-13. 98 MINUTES.

• AUGUST 17, 2014 • JACK ENGLISH/GRAVIER PRODS

Mystic versus skeptic: Stone and Firth.

Be the first to hear these plays! Tickets - $12 each or $20 both plays. On sale now at Icicle.org or call (509) 548-6347 • NEW! •

Writer’s Workshops Icicle Creek Center for the Arts proudly offers workshops by two of America’s premier stage and screen writers as part of The Icicle Creek New Play Festival 2014.

Friday, August 15, 2014—Carly Mensch—

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

writer and producer for the TV series, Nurse Jackie and Weeds and plays including Now Circa Then and All Hail Hurricane Gordo.

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Saturday, August 16, 2014—Steven Dietz— prolific playwright of some of the most produced plays in America including Still Life with Iris, and with many playwriting awards and commissions to his credit. TO REGISTER CALL (509) 548-6347

7409 ICICLE ROAD, LEAVENWORTH

Some movie critics must secretly hope that Woody Allen dies soon—if not two decades ago—to spare us any more of his Continental nostalgia trips. He got lucky with Midnight in Paris, but he’s been at it too long. Let him retire to the Riviera, not make another movie there. Set in the interwar period in the South of France, Magic in the Moonlight isn’t Allen’s worst picture (my vote: The Curse of the Jade Scorpion), but it’s close. Colin Firth plays a cynical magician, who keeps repeating Allen’s dull ideas over and over and fucking over again. Emma Stone, in her first career misstep (Allen’s fault, not hers), plays a shyster mentalist seeking to dupe a rich family out of its fortune (chiefly by marrying its gullible, ukulele-playing son, Hamish Linklater). The recreations of this posh ’20s milieu seem curiously literal, like magazine spreads, so soon after seeing Wes Anderson’s smartly inflected period detail in The Grand Budapest Hotel, which both revered and ridiculed the past. Allen famously started in showbiz as a magician, then transitioned to writing jokes as a teen prodigy in the ’50s. Brooklyn and Broadway are where his heart resides. Magic in the Moonlight is more like his re-rendering of a thin prewar British stage comedy he saw at a matinee during his youth, now peppered with references to Nietzsche and atheism. It’s dated, then updated, which only seems to date it the more. Period aside, no one wants to see Firth, 53, and Stone, 25, as a couple. The math doesn’t work. It’s icky. Yet no one is in a position to tell Allen this; and every European mayor seems willing to extend him tax credits for his productions because of the local jobs and tourist bounce they supposedly provide. No less than Michael Bay and the Transformers franchise, albeit on a smaller scale, Allen has figured out how to reliably profit from making mediocre movies annually. His idol, Ingmar Bergman, retired at 86. So that means we have only seven more years and movies to expect from Allen? I wish him the best

of health. But that pool chair—with Mediterranean views, no less—looks awfully comfortable right now. BRIAN MILLER

What If OPENS FRI., AUG. 8 AT MERIDIAN AND LINCOLN SQUARE. RATED PG-13. 97 MINUTES.

CAITLIN CRONENBERG/CBS FILMS

» FROM PAGE 81

Radcliffe and Kazan.

The underlying subject of many romantic comedies is chemistry, the mysterious rapport that draws people together despite whatever circumstances—being already married, having different sexual orientations—might be working against them. It’s a tough thing to simulate in movies because, well, that’s the nature of chemistry. So What If has a sizable gift in the casting of Daniel Radcliffe and Zoe Kazan, who either have terrific chemistry together or are able to fake it expertly. In the opening scene, their characters, Wallace and Chantry, bond over refrigerator magnets at a party and he walks her home. She mentions her boyfriend at the usual moment for such things, and that becomes the major impediment to a quick resolution of this mutualattraction club. They are in Toronto, which actually plays Toronto here, not an unnamed U.S. city. Chantry is an animator, which unfortunately means there are cartoon episodes in the film; longtime beau Ben (Rafe Spall) is about to depart for a six-month work contract in Dublin. Wallace is working a dull job after dropping out of med school because he caught his girlfriend cheating; now he’s living with pal Allan (Adam Driver, from Girls), whose new affair with Nicole (Mackenzie Davis) isn’t helping Wallace’s mood. Élan Mastai’s script—based on a Canadian play—depends on keeping the two leads apart, which can be a labored ploy (one third-act delaying tactic isn’t remotely credible), but can also result in the occasional When Harry Met Sally rom-com success. If you can roll with said ploy, you will notice that the wisecracking zingers and cascading conversations rarely pause, and that when a quiet moment is required—a pause in the moonlight before deciding to skinny-dip, for instance—the film can handle it. The cast is crammed with people who can deliver dialogue. Driver is consistently droll, and Megan Park delivers sidekick laughs as Chantry’s sister, who would not be averse to a fling with Wallace if Chantry isn’t going to act. Radcliffe makes his somewhat pinched charm work nicely here, if there were still any doubt that he’s quite capable outside the Harry Potter universe. Kazan, late of Ruby Sparks, continues to impress, not least because she gives a very amusing physical performance. Director Michael Dowse’s previous film was Goon, a funny hockey picture, which suggests his Canadian corner is a lively place to make movies right now. ROBERT HORTON E

film@seattleweekly.com


is the best of the three pictures—largely because it THE DANCE OF REALITY Alejandro Jodorowsky was rests on the foundation of the prior two, much like already a veteran of wigged-out experimental theater Richard Linklater’s Before Sunrise trilogy. Xavier is when he devised El Topo (1970) and The Holy Mountain CHINESE PUZZLE In three agreeable films covering (1973), films that crammed together intense violence, forced to decamp from Paris to New York, following his about a dozen years for his main quartet of characters, spiritual searching, and preposterous grotesquerie. His ex, Wendy (Kelly Reilly), mother of their two children, now 40-ish, Cédric Klapisch has also grown up as a latest is an autobiographical look at the filmmaker’s now in the Big Apple. (Also on hand are series veterdirector. He still embraces the messy, multilingual, youth in small-town Chile. There’s something almost ans Cécile de France and Audrey Tautou.) Our heroes bed-hopping, city-jumping complexity of life, which heartwarming about the fact that this movie is—for seem equally unmoored from any country or ideology began in Barcelona with 2002’s L’Auberge Espagnole all its zaniness—almost a normal film. Jodorowsky beyond shared experience. That sense of commuand continued to St. Petersburg and beyond with 2005’s himself appears as the narrator, a dapper man given nity—including infidelities and rivalries—is what keeps Russian Dolls. Here Klapisch keeps the comedy, street to trailing aphorisms in his wake. His youthful self our foursome connected despite their travels. (NR) Film Center (Seattle Center), MAX (Jeremias Herskovitz) chases, and indecisiveness his novelist MAGGIE BRIAN MILLER SIFFMAX is a sensitive lad, coddled by AUBREY JANE that plague JASON NATE 324-9996, siff.net. $6-$11. 7 p.m. Mon. hero Xavier (Romain Duris), but I think Chinese Puzzle a Rubensesque mother (Pamela Flores, whose dia-

logue is entirely sung) and bullied by a hard-backed Communist father (Brontis Jodorowsky, the director’s son). Around this curved spine of plot, Jodorowsky brings in a carnival sideshow, sharp childhood observations, and frequent bouts of on-camera urination. But the overall impression is energetic and imaginative, suggesting that all his past insanity had done wonders for this octogenarian’s creative process. (NR) ROBERT HORTON Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org. $5-$8. 8:45 p.m. Sun.-Weds.

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’80s-defining level of Sixteen Candles, this is the thoroughly enjoyable Hughes flick that also made Ben Stein’s career. “Anyone? Anyone?” (PG-13) B.R.M. Seattle Center Mural Amphitheater, 684-7200, seattlecenter.com. Free. Movies begin at dusk. Saturdays through Aug. 23.

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BOYHOOD THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY JAMES CAMERON’S DEEPSEA CHALLENGE 3D WAR STORY ABOUT ALEX INTO THE STORM GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY 3D/2D LUCY

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Samuel L. Jackson joined Stellan Skarsgård, LL Cool J, Saffron Burrows, and Thomas Jane in battling intelligent sharks at a marine research base in this 1999 thriller, capably directed by Renny Harlin. This is a special “hecklevision” screening, so you can send your snarky texts up on screen. (R) Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com. $8-$10. 8 p.m. Thurs. FOR LAUGHING OUT LOUD From 1940, the bigamy comedy Too Many Husbands stars Jean Arthur as a young widow who marries the BFF (Melvyn Douglas) of her dead husband (Fred MacMurray), presumed lost at sea. You can see where this is going. (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $8 individual, $42-$45 series. 7:30 p.m. Thurs. Ends. Aug. 14. FREMONT OUTDOOR CINEMA Sure, it’s nice that the actors sing their own numbers in 2008’s Mamma Mia!—Meryl Streep has a fab set of pipes, and the fact that Pierce Brosnan sings like a bullfrog in heat is used to adorable effect. But without the originals’ multiply dubbed wall of sound, these ABBA tunes only get their due in the all-too-rare big production numbers, when Mamma Mia! finally rocks as a tirelessly nostalgic pub crawl through a narrow street of 1970s pop history. Otherwise, it’s little more than droopy ditties draped around a threadbare plot about the daughter (Amanda Seyfried) of a single mom (Streep) who secretly invites three men (Brosnan, Colin Firth, Stellan Skarsgård)— each of whom might be her father—to her Greek island wedding. (PG-13) ELLA TAYLOR 3501 Phinney Ave. N., 781-4230, fremontoutdoormovies.com. $30 series, $5 individual. Movies start at dusk. Sat.

HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN

In the third Harry Potter movie, released in 2004, the bespectacled wizard boy (Daniel Radcliffe) learns that Sirius Black (Gary Oldman), escaped from prison and somehow tied to the death of Harry’s parents, is hunting him down. The kid can’t catch a break as we watch him dodging werewolves, flying with llama-bird-like creatures (reminiscent of The Never-Ending Story), and coping with a screaming shrunken head and a monstrous self-devouring book. All this is conveyed via the seamless visual effects, expert cinematography, and first-rate casting that have helped make the series such a phenomenon. Director Alfonso Cuarón creates a darker, more sinister atmosphere that aptly represents both the struggle between good and evil in the magic world and the struggles of adolescence for Harry, Ron, and Hermione. (PG) HEATHER LOGUE Central Cinema, $6-$8. 7 p.m. Fri.-Tues. & 3 p.m. Sat. & Sun. KEATON AS FILM Local curator Robert Spector screens three classic silent comedies including Sherlock, Jr., with live musical from Jen Gilleran and Christian Pincock GRID. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 267-5380, nwfilmforum.org. $6-$11. 8 p.m. Fri. MOONLIGHT CINEMA The Coen brothers’ 1998 stoner-noir The Big Lebowski is Raymond Chandler filtered through dirty bong water, where almost every line of dialogue is a hazy, hilarious non sequitur. My favorite is when accidental P.I. Jeff Bridges (forever the Dude) is ambushed in his tub by nihilists bearing a ferret. “Hey, nice marmot,” he greets them, with his usual unflustered amiability. Nothing rattles Bridges’ Dude, not a lost rug, not a leering Tara Reid, not a lisping John Turturro, not a raving John Goodman, not a simpering Steve Buscemi, and not even shrieking performance artist Julianne Moore, who joins Bridges in a Busby Berkeley-style bowling fantasy that sums up the movie’s sweet, silly spirit. (R) B.R.M. Redhook Ale Brewery, 14300 N.E. 145th St., Woodinville, 425-4201113. $5. Outdoor movie screens at dusk. Thursdays through Aug. 14. MOVIES AT MAGNUSON PARK Author of Jurassic Park, the late writer Michael Crichton famously tutored President George W. Bush on the fallacy of global warming. He was no scientist, but the doctor-turnednovelist, from The Andromeda Strain forward, knew how to mix popular science into exceptionally good potboiler fiction. Steven Spielberg’s 1993 adaptation benefits from equally from the then-new magic of CGI and our old love of dinosaurs running amok. While Crichton warns us about the dangers of genetic engineering—in rather static debates among scientists Sam Neill, Laura Dern, and Jeff Goldblum—Spielberg keeps things moving at a wonderful pace. (PG-13) B.R.M. Magnuson Park, 7400 Sand Point Way N.E., moviesatmagnuson.com. $5. Thursdays. 7 p.m. MOVIES AT THE MURAL John Hughes’ often-quoted 1986 teen comedy makes excellent use of Matthew Broderick’s slightly corrupt charm (and a certain 1961 Ferrari 250GT California). Without rising to the

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MUSIC NEWSLETTER

H A P P Y H OU R

The inside scoop on upcoming shows

and the latest reviews.

RYE COALITION: THE STORY OF THE HARD LUCK 5 Director Jenni Matz will introduce selected screen-

ings of her fond documentary profile of the ’90s New Jersey band Rye Coalition. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$8. 9 p.m. Fri. STOP MAKING SENSE Jonathan Demme’s 1984 Talking Heads concert movie isn’t just a live recording of memorable performances by a trailblazing American band then hitting its stride. It is an unparalleled film experience, thanks to Demme (The Silence of the Lambs, Philadelphia, etc.). The film—being shown in celebration of its 30th anniversary—can be viewed as a sort of musical evolution, starting with David Byrne famously playing “Psycho Killer” to the sole accompaniment of a boombox. The concert progresses and the band, literally, builds behind Byrne as they play songs from Speaking in Tongues, the album that broke Talking Heads into the mainstream with “Burning Down the House.” And yes, you get to see Byrne in that big white suit, even bigger on the big screen. (NR) MARK BAUMGARTEN SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net. $6-$11. 9:15 p.m. Fri.-Thurs.

• 

Ongoing

• BOYHOOD Richard Linklater’s Boyhood was shot in

his native Texas in short bursts over a 12-year period— Linklater knew the shape of the film, but would tweak its script as time marched on, incorporating topical issues and reacting to his performers. This means that unlike most movies, which remake the world and impose an order on it, Boyhood reacts to the world. Protagonist Mason (Ellar Coltrane), tracked from first grade to highschool graduation, is learning that life does not fit into the pleasing rise and fall of a three-act structure, but is doled out in unpredictable fits and starts. Linklater doesn’t reject melodrama so much as politely declines it, opting instead for little grace notes and revealing encounters. Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke are terrific as the parents, and Linklater’s daughter Lorelei is distinctive as Mason’s older sister. Other folks come and go, like people do. As we reach the final stages, there’s definitely a sense of rounding off the story, and a few appropriate nods toward lessons learned—the movie’s not as shapeless as it might seem. (R) R.H. Harvard Exit, Sundance, Lincoln Square GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Give thanks to the Marvel gods for Guardians of the Galaxy. If you’ve ever had to suppress a giggle at the sight of Thor’s mighty hammer, this movie will provide a refreshing palate-cleanser. First, understand that the Guardians of the Galaxy tag is something of a joke here; this is a painfully fallible batch of outer-space quasi-heroes. Their leader is an Earthling, Peter Quill (Lake Stevens native Chris Pratt, from Parks and Recreation, an inspired choice), who calls himself “Star-Lord” even though nobody else does. In order to retrieve a powerful matter-dissolving gizmo, he has to align himself with a selection of Marvel Comics castoffs, who will—in their own zany way—end up guarding the galaxy. (His costars, some voicing CGI creatures, are Zoe Saldana, Bradley Cooper, Vin Diesel, and the pro wrestler Dave Bautista.) Director James Gunn (Super) understands that getting character right—and keeping the story’s goals simple—can create a momentum machine, the kind of movie in which one scene keeps tipping giddily over into the next. (PG-13) R.H. Majestic Bay, Sundance, Bainbridge, Kirkland Parkplace, Ark Lodge, Lincoln Square, Big Picture, others A MOST WANTED MAN Directed by Anton Corbijn, this this adaptation of a lesser 2008 John le Carré novel will, I think, be remembered as the best among Philip Seymour Hoffman’s posthumous releases. His rumpled Hamburg cop, Bachmann, is charged with the dirty work of counter-terrorism. He and his squad (including Daniel Brühl and Nina Hoss) follow a Russian-Chechen migrant named Karpov without arresting him, hoping he’ll lead to bigger fish. His bosses are dubious; and he’s got to negotiate with the CIA to allow Karpov room to roam. Will Karpov plant a bomb in the rush-hour subway or lead Bachmann to an important al-Qaida funding link? (R) B.R.M. Seven Gables, Kirkland Parkplace, Lynwood (Bainbridge), others

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PR O M O T I ONS

A R T S A ND E NT E R TAI NM E NT

• 

BY B R IA N M I LLE R

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended


arts&culture» Music

BECU

Best of the Fest

ZOOTUNES

What you need to know about Doe Bay and Summer Meltdown this weekend.

presented by Carter Subaru

TO N

IGH

T!

BY AZARIA PODPLESKY AND SW STAFF

producer Josh Clauson (who performs in funk band Flowmotion, also playing) says this year’s roster will get the crowd on its feet. “We’re always looking to find acts that bring out the moves in people,” he says. “We don’t favor one genre over another, which is why it’s called the Meltdown.” Clauson booked electronic quartet STRFKR (Main Stage, 11:05 p.m. Fri.), soul singer Allen Stone (Main Stage, 11 p.m. Sat.), and Sir MixA-Lot (Garden Stage, 8:10 p.m. Sun.) to get

the party started, and we at Seattle Weekly Music Factory wholeheartedly endorse those acts. But don’t miss Manatee Commune (Garden Stage, 2 p.m. Sat.), this year’s “Best Electronic Artist” (page 67), followed by Kris Orlowski (Main Stage, 3 p.m. Sat.), whose recent single “Believer,” from the album of the same name, “is filled with a booming, inspirational chorus, calling from a reserve of optimism” (read more about that on page 89). By now you also know both Doe Bay (in its seventh year) and Summer Meltdown (in its 14th) feature a variety of camping options, activities for children, and opportunities to explore the Pacific Northwest’s awe-inspiring natural surroundings (including yoga, natch). While we can’t make you go, we’re pretty sure you’re not offically a music-loving mossback until you do. So slather on the sunscreen and get out there— if you only hear about it from your friends, you can’t say we didn’t tell you. E

AUGUST 6

DOE BAY FEST 107 Doe Bay Rd., Olga, 360-376-2291, doebayfest. com. $310 and up (with only a few spots remaining). All ages. Thurs., Aug. 7–Mon., Aug. 11. SUMMER MELTDOWN FESTIVAL 42501 WA-530, Darrington, summermeltdownfest. com. Four-day weekend pass $165, with other options available. All ages. Thurs., Aug. 7–Sun., Aug. 10.

TAJ MAHAL TRIO / JOHN HIATT & THE COMBO

AUGUST 10

music@seattleweekly.com

MATT MCDONALD

Meanwhile in Darrington, Summer Meltdown

JASON NEUERBURG

S

ummer is heating up, and festival season is in full swing. With both Doe Bay and Summer Meltdown taking place this weekend—and with only so many hours in the day—we’ve got the scoop on what to do and when to do it. For Doe Bay, resort owner Joe Brotherton tells us he selects artists and bands as if they were friends he was inviting over for a waterfront jam session: “It’s got to be people that [I] would like to personally spend a weekend camping with.” Brotherton’s clearly a funky, eclectic dude, because he booked soul singer Cody ChestnuTT (8:30 p.m. Fri.) and folkrockers Thao & The Get Down Stay Down (8:25 p.m. Sat.) to headline the Big Field Stage. Brotherton says he also strives to feature upand-coming bands. “We’ve had bands signed by Sub Pop more years than not,” he says. On that tip, the Seattle Weekly music brain trust recommends two emerging acts also playing the Big Field Stage. Mark Baumgarten calls D’Vonne Lewis’ wild jazz four-piece Industrial Revelation “brash and ballsy” in his “Best Jazz Combo” pick (3:45 p.m. Friday; see page 67), while Dave Lake explains why Hobosexual’s “detuned fuzzy guitars and hard-grooving riffs” make the badass guitarand-drums duo Seattle’s “Best Rock Band” (6:50 p.m. Saturday; see page 64). So if we’re doing our math right, you can pretty much plant your butt in front of the Big Stage Friday and Saturday and have your mind blown in the process. No need to thank us, we’re happy to help!

Hannalee performing at Doe Bay.

THE

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arts&culture» Music

TheWeekAhead Wednesday, August 6

Irish singer/songwriter IMELDA MAY has been a fan of rockabilly and blues since she found an Elvis Presley cassette in her brother’s room when she was 9, and she’s since developed the voice of a performer, with the requisite ’50s-style ’do, to prove it. Her upcoming album, Tribal, highlights her ability to blend a spunky rockabilly style with blue-eyed soul (“Little Pixie”) and with jazz (“Wicked Way”), also including a bit of punk-rock aggression. With Black Mambas. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/neptune. 8 p.m. $21.50 adv./$25 DOS. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY A handful of bands started in the ’80s with a brand of music that could make you want to dance and cry simultaneously, and ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN led the pack. Fronted by Ian McCulloch, its lush, psychedelic gloom-wave and songs like “Lips Like Sugar” and “Bring on the Dancing Horses” heightened the senses while channeling a sense of impending doom, like a post-rock version of the Doors. Despite a storied legacy, its 12th full-length release, Meteorites, is receiving mixed reviews. With Prom Queen. The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents.com. 8:30 p.m. $29.50 adv./$32 DOS. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT Michael and Carissa Alvarado, aka US THE DUO, are so cute you wish you could just bottle them (or at least turn their act into a really catchy Internet meme). There’s something about the way their voices intertwine throughout their debut LP, No Matter Where You Are—particularly on “Make You Mine” and on the guitar and wordless-vocal track “Intro”—that will get you feeling upbeat. If driving, sticky-sweet acoustic pop is your thing, this is an act you’ll love. The Vera Project, 305 Harrison St., 956-8372, theveraproject.org. 7 p.m. SOLD OUT. All ages. BRIAN PALMER

Thursday, August 7

The last time CHVRCHES played Seattle, the Scottish electro-pop trio kicked off 107.7 The End’s Deck the Hall Ball at the un-rockly hour of 3 p.m., thanking the crowd for coming early to see its set. This time, after nearly a year of touring and the popularity of its debut album, The Bones of What You Believe, and singles like “The Mother We Share” and “Recover,” the band has expanded its Seattle stop to two nights. That’s two chances to hear this group’s synthy, layer-upon-layer rock, topped by lead singer Lauren Mayberry’s ringing, crystal-clear voice. Through Friday. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 6520444, showboxonline.com. 9 p.m. $30. All ages. ACP Austin, Texas, troubadour SHAKEY GRAVES, the nom de plume of Alejandro Rose-Garcia, has got that Shovels & Rope vibe—not just in the soulful twang of his songs, but in the way he plays a mean guitar while singing and keeping time with his feet via a modified bass drum/ suitcase combo. He’s been just as celebrated by the music press as well, with his first non-homemade record coming out in October. With Lydia Ramsey. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractor tavern.com. 9 p.m. $15. 21 and over. DAVE J. LAKE

Friday, August 8

Saturday, August 9

Killer Mike and El-P are the villains hip-hop deserves right now. Though the two had previously collaborated on their solo efforts, they officially joined forces last summer under the moniker RUN THE JEWELS with a self-titled debut. The two spit back and forth like they’re determined to murder each other, and throw out threats of shooting poodles and comparisons to the Chernobyl nuclear-plant disaster. But when they hit the stage, it’s one of the better bromances of the new century, complete with synchronized high-fives and matching gold chains. El-P sums it all up pretty well on their track “Twin Hype” when he says, “Run the Jewels is not for your children.” The Showbox. 9 p.m. $21.50 adv./$25 DOS. 21 and over. DH

Sunday, August 10

In April, Portland-by-way-of-Alaska rock quartet PORTUGAL. THE MAN created something unheard of: a song that would become extinct unless it was reproduced. In partnership with Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute, the band sent 400 copies of “Sumatran Tiger” on degradable vinyl to “influencers” including actors, musicians, conservationists, and journalists, each record representing one of the 400 Sumatran tigers in the wild. The song, which has slowly spread through hashtags like #EndangeredSong and #SumatranTiger, features P.TM’s psychedelic touch and the repeated line “You don’t have to worry.” Those words, we hope, predict a brighter future for the endangered-tiger population. With Grouplove, Typhoon. Marymoor Park, 6046 W. Lake Sammamish Pkwy. N.E., Redmond., 205-3661, marymoor concerts.com. 6:30 p.m. $35 adv./$40 DOS. All ages. ACP For its second studio album, After the Disco, musician and producer Brian Burton (aka Danger Mouse) and the Shins’ James Mercer, who perform together as BROKEN BELLS, were inspired by retro-futurism and the somewhat kooky way science-fiction books of yesteryear envisioned the future. Using instruments from the ’60s and ’70s to bring that retro influence to life, Burton and Mercer created what could be the soundtrack to a movie set in a mysterious, far-off galaxy, one featuring both synth-driven grooves (“After the Disco”) and darker ballads (“The Angel and the Fool”). The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org/moore. 7:30 p.m. $43.50. All ages. ACP

Monday, August 11

When ARCTIC MONKEYS first stepped out in the indierock realm with Whatever People Say I Am, That’s What I’m Not, its music felt like a precursor to the quirky guitar jams that fans would later learn to love from groups like Vampire Weekend. Arctic Monkeys could’ve been a fad band, but along the way they came across Queens of the Stone Age’s Josh Homme, and were never the same; he helped it evolve into the grimy and greasy group it is today. With the Distincts. Through Tuesday. The Paramount, 911 Pine Street, 877-784-4849, stgpresents. org/paramount. 8 p.m. $39–$43. All ages. DH Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for more listings.

2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

If you can imagine a cross between early Green Day and Modest Mouse, that’s DUDE YORK, a trio from Walla Walla toting a healthy balance of punk-style nostalgia and innovative, revved-up melodies. The fun is in the band’s refusal to categorize itself as any genre, labeling the music everything from “heavy pop” to “Teen Pop” to “jortscore,” whatever that means. But don’t take my word for how awesomely lo-fi and punky its sound is; once you discover that yourself, there’s no escape from Dude York. With Pony Time, Prom Body. Cairo, 507 E. Mercer St., templeofcairo.com. 8 p.m. $7. All ages. DIANA M. LE In many ways, SOULJA BOY epitomizes the criticism that hip-hop has become too focused on business rather than art. Even the title of his “seminal” debut album, Souljaboytellem.com, feels like a marketing ploy. The days of his hits “Crank That (Soulja Boy)” and “Kiss Me Thru the Phone” seem distant, but Mr. Boy has found ways to stay relevant—or at least available. At one point he was even selling verses for the blue-light-special price of $500. But, much like a business, the rapper is all about supply and demand. It’s easy to crucify such a figure, but at the end of the day he’s just giving people what they want—like the sweet tunes “Booty Meat” and “She Thirsty.” With Donte Peace, Spac3man, DJ Swervewon. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile. com. 8 p.m. $25 adv. All ages. DUSTY HENRY

In many respects, the Gorge can be an easy venue to play. Sure, the environment may not always work in your favor, but that stunning natural backdrop goes a long way toward setting a mood that is undeniably conducive to epic performance. There aren’t many acts whose force of personality or live chops can overwhelm that kind of setting, but ARCADE FIRE might just be one—a group that can turn a run-of-the-mill show into an event. Through sheer charisma, a dash of spectacle, and a wealth of epic material, the band might just overtake the beauty of its surroundings. With Dan Deacon. The Gorge Amphitheatre, 754 Silica Rd., Quincy, Wash., 509-785-6262, gorgeamphitheatre.net. 7:30 p.m. $61 and up. CORBIN REIFF FOXY SHAZAM’s brand of glam-pop-rock revivalism sounds fun on record, but live it becomes something far more dangerous. Frontman Eric Sean Nally appears meek and pleasant until he hits the stage, when he morphs into a raging punk titan. Often he’s known to climb on a bandmate’s shoulders, light several cigarettes, and shove them all into his mouth. Whatever the music sounds like, the band’s live show is the embodiment of teenage rock-&-roll dreams. With Stop Light Observations, Chrome Lakes. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9467, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv. All ages. DH

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AUGU ST 6 — 12, 201 4

movie mondays on tuesday :: pearl jam 20 next • 8/13 jenn grinels w/ zarni • 8/14 dirty bourbon river show • 8/15 - 17 ottmar liebert & luna negra • 8/18 mary mcbride band • 8/19 the peter and will anderson trio • 8/20 rafe pearlman with dust & gold • 8/21 brooks mcbeth w/ special guest joel mchale • 8/22 amy ray w/ phil cook (megafaun) • 8/23 the posies (acoustic duo) • 8/24 the brian nova big band • 8/25 movie mondays :: heavy metal: the movie

happy hour every day • 8/6 roy kay trio • 8/7 african dance party w/ yaamba and spirit of ojah • 8/8 happy hour: supersones / billy brandt • 8/9 fly paper • 8/10 hwy 99 blues presents • 8/11 crossrhythm sessions • 8/12 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: justin farren, josh schram (the modern relics) and eric miller • 8/13 paul benoit trio TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

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The Weekend That Was: Pickathon

D

uring Pickathon’s final day, a grinning Zale Schoenborn, founder of the forest-centered music fest, quietly and succinctly summed up his philosophy: “Good music wins.” By all accounts, last weekend’s festival did just that. Every year, Pendarvis Farm in Happy Valley, Ore., is transformed into an alternate plane of existence. This year’s three-day lineup of innovative sounds ranged from the veteran hip-hop group People Under the Stairs to the gritty four-guitar psychedelic ensemble Diarrhea Planet. With so many incredible bands embedded in the woods, you need only to walk a trail toward any sound that draws you. Here are some paths I took. Jonathan Richman opened the Mountain View stage on Saturday. His minimal setup—his acoustic guitar accompanied solely by a drummer behind a small kit—still enraptured the audience. His set shifted from one random story to the next (sometimes in French) in an overall narrative of awkward chaos that included three whole minutes of wild, abandoned dancing, which charmed the pants off everyone. On the flip side, Foxygen’s evening set in the packed, hot Galaxy Barn presented a different kind of chaos. The 20-somethings took the stage and the wall of noise began, ringing with feedback at every moment. Blasts of vintage psychedelic pop filled the room with blown-out, distorted beauty. Singer Sam France evoked Jagger in his dance moves, his poor (fake) British accent, and larger-than-life rock-star persona. Afterward, people piled out and spent time with the horses milling about next door. Performances by Gregory Alan Isakov showcased the way each set was a fully engaging experience. Amid technical difficulties, Isakov ditched the monitors and huddled with his banjo and fiddle players around two microphones, breaking everyone’s heart with his beautiful chamber-folk. Mike Taylor of Hiss Golden Messenger gave a stunning, intimate performance in the Workshop Barn. His confessional songs about his home in Durham, N.C., struck a chord with everyone and cast him in a vulnerable, inviting light. Straying late into the night, Steve Gunn took the stage at 1 a.m. Saturday with a half-moon behind him. Swaying in the simmering heat still lingering from the day, his ’70s-era folk-rock was the perfect soundtrack to the early hours. Amid a sea of huge festivals with corporatenamed stages and sponsors, Pickathon remains direct and simple. From a hip-hop show in a setting that feels like Ferngully to Courtney Barnett’s hell-raising psych-rock set in a barn, there are no egos or frills in any aspect of this fest. After such a surreal experience, dirtcovered and smiling, I also was left feeling that “Good music wins.” STIRLING MYLES E

music@seattleweekly.com


LOCALRELEASES

Sadistik, Ultraviolet (out now, Fake Four Inc.,

sadistikmusic.com) Sadistik packs a lot into his third album, a baker’s-dozen tracks that survey the deepest recesses of his paranoid psyche. Take for example the Orwellian “1984,” which includes references to Jackson Pollock, William S. Burroughs, Robert Frost, Vladimir Nabokov, Hunter

SUMMERSINGLES

As we welcome the dog days of summer, plant your butt on a stoop, have a popsicle, and check out some of these sweltering tracks. Kristin Chambers, “Eyes That Say ‘I Love

You’ ” (Everything Woman, 10/4, self-released, kristinchambers.com) On this rendition of the eponymous selection from Beck’s Song Reader, the vocalist takes her sweet time singing about love gone wrong in a bluesy voice over instrumentation that’s equally as unhurried. It’s “Summertime,” indeed. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY Tom Eddy, “Seeing Someone” (out now, selfreleased, tomeddy.bandcamp.com) This track hits all the summer-anthem essentials with a calypsoinfluenced bass line, jangling guitar riffs, and bright piano flourishes that feel beach-keggerready. B-side “Sunday Market” morphs similar elements into a lazy, low-key jam; fleeting moments of free jazz add a soothing vibe. DUSTY HENRY Kris Orlowski, “Believer” (Believer, out now, self-

STIRLING MYLES

S, “Vampires” (Cool Choices, 9/23, Hardly Art, hardlyart.com) This track from Jenn Ghetto’s forthcoming Chris Walla–produced album retains the jangly, meditative feel of earlier releases, but things are more melody-driven here—along with strong overtones of Death Cab’s polished indie rock. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

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El Corazon

Tomten, “Mother Minnow” (The Farewell Party,

8/19, Versicolor Records, tomtenmusic.bandcamp.com) There’s a little sadness, joy, revelation, and remorse to be found at every turn here, the second single to be released in advance of the band’s forthcoming LP. Skimming the surface of many different elements, the cool textures of ’70s AM radio bind it all together. If every song sounds like this, we’re in for one hell of a record. (Thurs., Aug. 14, The Crocodile) SM

Vox Mod + DGH, “New Concerns” (out now,

self-released, thetroublestarts.bandcamp.com) In this new collaboration between Vox Mod and Daniel G. Harmann, the latter wallows in existential crisis over rumbling electro beats with lines like, “We live/We love/ We grow/We die.” (Vox Mod: Sat., Aug. 16, Hollow Earth Radio) DH

www.elcorazonseattle.com

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 7TH Take Warning Presents:

NICK THUNE (A PARTIALLY SEATED COMEDY SHOW) with Derek Sheen, Emmett Montgomery, Hosted by Monica Nevi Doors at 8/ Show at 9PM 21+. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

FRIDAY, AUGUST 8TH

I DECLARE WAR

with Oceano, The Last Ten Seconds Of Life, Barrier, Invent, Animate and IDOLS Doors at 6 / Show at 6:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $12 ADV / $14 DOS

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9TH KISW (99.9 FM) Metal Shop & El Corazon Present:

YOB

The YOB after show party featuring a performance by: Lb! (pound) FREE Music begins immediately after the conclusion of the YOB show in the main showroom.

with Wounded Giant and Transient

ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. Doors at 7/ Show at 8PM 21+. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 10TH

THE AIR SEX WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

Lounge Show. Doors at 8 / Show at 9PM 21+. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

MONDAY, AUGUST 11TH

THE SPIRITUAL BAT with Legion Within, Accolade and

Post Rapture Party Doors at 8 / Show at 8:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

MONDAY, AUGUST 11TH

NOUVEAU EXPO

with Kelly Vaculin, Love Letters To France, Big Splash, Champion and SOVA Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

SUNDAY, AUGUST 10TH

TUESDAY, AUGUST 12TH

with Perfect By Tomorrow and The Baldhead Rooster Doors at 8:30 / Show at 9PM 21+. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

and Klaw Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

THE COURTNEY JOHN PROJECT

ALL HAIL THE YETI with Witchburn, Fallstreak, Reverend Bear

JUST ANNOUNCED 8/27 - COOPER & THE JAM 9/11 LOUNGE - SINGLE MOTHERS 9/14 - THE SCHOOL OF ROCK PRESENTS: METAL FEST 9/16 LOUNGE - THE LAST INTERNATIONALE 10/6 - SUFFOKATE 10/22 - STATE CHAMPS 11/2 - REAL FRIENDS 11/4 - MAYDAY PARADE 12/7 LOUNGE - COURAGE MY LOVE UP & COMING 8/12 LOUNGE - THE SINGLES 8/13 LOUNGE - CYBORG OCTOPUS 8/14 LOUNGE - THE AESTHETICS 8/16 - NOI!SE 8/16 LOUNGE - BLICKY 8/17 - CHARM CITY DEVILS 8/19 LOUNGE - ANNI PIPER 8/20 LOUNGE - HEALTH PLAN 8/21 - NORMA JEAN 8/22 & 8/23 - “THE LAYNE STALEY BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION WEEKEND AT THE OFF RAMP” FEATURING: JAR OF FLIES / OUTSHINED 8/24 LOUNGE - NEUTRALBOY 8/26 - EYE THE REALIST 8/26 LOUNGE - PROJECT WONDER BREAD 8/27 LOUNGE - HONOR AMONG THIEVES 8/28 - THE MAENSION 8/29 - SHE KEEPS BEES 8/29 LOUNGE - CAROUSEL KINGS 8/30 - EMERALD CITY ROCK PARTY 2 FEAT. AMBER PACIFIC 8/31 - CORROSION OF CONFORMITY Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AU G UST 6 — 12, 2014

released, krisorlowski. com) While recently on tour, Orlowski dropped a video to this single, which, in a general sense, is a paean to art and life. His earnest, personable vocals lead the way in his pristine folkpop balladry, and this song is filled with a booming, inspirational chorus, calling from a reserve of optimism. Check out how Orlowski brings his art to life on the road in the new vid, filled with footage from his group’s shared tour with Jamestown Revival. (Sat., Aug. 9, Summer Meltdown)

S. Thompson, and Frida Kahlo. While it has the catchiest hook on the album, you might keep Google open while you listen if you don’t have a degree in literature. Elsewhere, “Orange” examines his synaesthesia as he raps, “There’s orange and yellow on the paintbrush/It’s sort of mellow, but the same rush/I taste the ocean on my taste buds/But I can make a poem with the same tongue.” Overall, his generally sardonic delivery complements the cynical content of most of the lyrics, but at times it feels as though he tries to squeeze in too many tricks. The dense alliteration and internal rhyme on “Blue Sunshine,” for instance, seem to overshadow the lyrical content. Tech N9ne, Sticky Fingaz, Nacho Picasso, and the late Eyedea (one of the rapper’s biggest influences) contribute verses, and Lotte Kestner and labelmate Child Actor lend their voices as well. Sparse, ethereal production from SXMPLELIFE, Eric G., Maulskull, and Kid Called Computer evokes the inner world of the mind that Sadistik depicts in his lyrics, ably demonstrating the poet’s ability to transcend the newspeak that surrounds us in an age of paranoia and surveillance. (Fri., Aug. 8, Vera Project) MICHAEL F. BERRY

89


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The Daily Herald, Snohomish County’s source for outstanding local news and community information for more than 100 years and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, daily deals, event sponsorships and special publications as well as the daily operations of the Marketing department. Responsibilities include but are not limited to the coordination, updating and creation of marketing materials across a range of delivery channels, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and working closely with the Sr. Marketing Manager to develop strategies and implement the marketing plan. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem-solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com No phone calls please. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360-9021857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx


Appliances

AMANA RANGE Deluxe 30� Glasstop Range self clean, auto clock & timer ExtraLarge oven & storage *UNDER WARRANTY* Over $800. new. Pay off balance of $193 or make payments of $14 per month. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

Classified

Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad #1 INTERNET OPPORTUNITY Adult Ent. Website. (Recession proof business) Join the Billion $$ Industry. Everyone approved. E-commerce incl. Make over $100K + this year. CALL NOW: 888-682-2305

HAPPYHAULER.com Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted! HomeWell Senior Care Franchising is growing! Recession proof business. Only 8 available territories in Western Washington. $85K Initial investment includes Franchise Fee. Next Step: Visit www.HomeWell.biz

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM Severe Food Allergies or Autoimmune Disease? Earn $185 for qualiďŹ ed donors Donate Plasma plasmalab.com 425-258-3653

Singing Lessons

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

$ TOP CASH $

PAID FOR UNWANTED CARS & TRUCKS

$100 TO $1000

7 Days * 24 Hours Licensed + Insured

ALL STAR TOWING

425-870-2899

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

KENMORE FREEZER

Repo Sears deluxe 20cu.ft. freezer 4 fast freeze shelves, defrost drain,

interior light *UNDER WARRANTY* Make $15 monthly payments or pay off balance of $293. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

Appliances

NEW APPLIANCES UP TO 70% OFF All Manufacturer Small Ding’s, Dents, Scratches and Factory Imperfections *Under Warranty* For Inquiries, Call or Visit Appliance Distributors @ 14639 Tukwila Intl. Blvd. 206-244-6966

Automobiles $1000 & Under

REPO REFRIGERATOR Custom deluxe 22 cu. ft. sideby-side, ice & water disp., color panels available

UNDER WARRANTY!

was over $1200 new, now only payoff bal. of $473 or make pmts of only $15 per mo. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966 STACK LAUNDRY Deluxe front loading washer & dryer. Energy efficient, 8 cycles. Like new condition * Under Warranty * Over $1,200 new, now only $578 or make payments of $25 per month

1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible - Baby blue, w white leather interior. Amazing original condition, parade boots, only 58,900 miles. $10,000 obro. Whidbey. Call or text 360-320-0635.

☎206-244-6966☎ Bazaars/Craft Fairs

KENMORE REPO Heavy duty washer & dryer, deluxe, large cap. w/normal, perm-press & gentle cycles. * Under Warranty! * Balance left owing $272 or make payments of $25. Call credit dept. 206-244-6966

Automobiles Classics & Collectibles

EARLY BIRD SAVINGS Crafters/ Vendors apply now for Vashon’s All Island Bazaar $35; 6’ rectangular table / chairs. After 8/15/14 registration is $40. Held Sat 11/22, 10-4, McMurray Middle School. Applications email Holly Daze Registrar Diane Kajca at r.kajca@gmail.com Diane 253-579-4683. Molly 206-329-4708. Signe 206-353-6232.

$700 CAR HAULER; BRAND NEW! Used 1 time. Lacey 360-4593799 Pickup Trucks Dodge

Automobiles Cadillac

1983 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz - Bronze color, original leather int. Garage stored! 73,000 miles. Asking $5000 obro. Whidbey. Call or text 360-320-0635.

1976 DODGE TRUCK, slant 6. Good condition and reliable. $900. 206605-3963.

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Housekeeping Job Fair

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Programs and schedules vary by campus. For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website at www.everest.edu/disclosures.

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Profile for Sound Publishing

Seattle Weekly, August 06, 2014  

August 06, 2014 edition of the Seattle Weekly

Seattle Weekly, August 06, 2014  

August 06, 2014 edition of the Seattle Weekly