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families today July 2014

PENINSULA

volume 4, issue 3

A publication for families living on the North Olympic Peninsula. A supplement produced by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette Advertising Department.

SUMMER FUN ■ So many things to see and do before heading back to school ■ Healthy, tasty treats for children from locally grown produce ■ And more


contents

families today 5 PENINSULA

Teaching children how to give back A few suggestions about how to raise communityminded children. — 6

John C. Brewer, publisher and editor Steve Perry, advertising director Brenda Hanrahan, special sections editor Sara Farinelli, special sections editor

Summer fun

Peninsula Families Today is a family-focused publication and is inserted into both the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette. Please let us know what you’d like to see in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today. This publication welcomes input and new contributors. Educators, parents and professionals in their fields are invited to contribute informative and educational articles or columns for consideration. We cannot guarantee publication due to space and content considerations. If your submission is accepted, we reserve the right to edit it. Send articles, columns and photos (JPEGs at 200 dpi minimum) to section editor Brenda Hanrahan at bhanrahan@peninsuladailynews.com or Sara Farinelli at sfarinelli@peninsuladailynews.com. For more information, phone 360-452-2345, ext. 4072.

Port Angeles Back to School Event

Kindergarten-High School students

At Jefferson Elementary Scho ol 218 East Twelfth St.

Don’t miss out on a minute of summer with this list of things to see and do before children head back to school. — 8

<< ON THE COVER

6

Olympic Peninsula Humane Society

Planning for “Back to School” Already?!

Looking for a great family pet? Come in and Adopt a friend for life!

The annual Back to School event for Port Angeles families in need is scheduled on Saturday, August 23, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Jefferson Elementary. Free school supplies and school information will be offered to help students kindergarten through high school seniors - have a great start to the new school year!

67 years of helping orphaned and abused animals on the Olympic Peninsula.

Visit the Port Angeles School District website at www.portangelesschools.org to find school start times, bus schedules, student handbook, food services, enrollment info, athletics sign-up procedures, and school supply lists for the 2014-15 school year.

Desperately needed: Dog & Cat Food Non-clumping Cat Litter Donations always accepted and greatly appreciated!

Classes begin Tuesday, September 2, 2014. 471093984

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY

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Johnathan and Jasper Tipton of Sequim enjoy frozen treats made from tasty local produce. Photo provided by Olympic Nature Experience

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Get on Board Get on Board!

Providing a safe ride for local children First Step Family Support Center offers a program to keep children safe and secure in car seats. — 4

Published by the Peninsula Daily News and Sequim Gazette Advertising Department Peninsula Daily News Sequim Gazette 305 W. First St. 147 W. Washington St. Port Angeles, WA 98362 Sequim, WA 98382 360-452-2345 360-683-3311

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Peninsula College Foundation given gift for scholarships Students majoring in engineering, math are eligible for endowment story by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Peninsula College Foundation is the recipient of a gift of more than $17,000 to go toward an endowed scholarship for students majoring in mathematics or engineering. The money is from the Clallam Community Foundation administered by United Way of Clallam County. The gift, totaling $17,323.22, is from a charitable gift annuity established by Helen Miller of Sequim, who died in March. At the time the annuity was established, it was Miller’s intent to create a charitable remainder trust through United Way to benefit an endowed scholarship at Peninsula College, named the Richard A. & Helen M. Miller Endowed Scholarship Fund, according to foundation officials. The contribution is shy of the $25,000 minimum required to fund an endowed scholarship, said Getta Rogers, the foundation development manager.

But the gift will be kept intact and continue to grow through investment earnings and contributions from other donors who share Miller’s vision. United Way offers charitable gift annuities, with the final distribution to Clallam County charitable organizations such as Peninsula College as a service to the community, said Jody Moss, United Way of Clallam County executive director. In a charitable gift annuity, a donor makes a gift of cash or property to a charity in exchange for a partial tax deduction and income over the life of the annuity contract. At the end of the contract, the remainder of the gift can be used by the nonprofit beneficiary as directed by the donor. Helen Miller and her husband, Richard, were married for 37 years and lived in the Sequim area for several years following their retirement. He worked for Sundstrand following his graduation from the University of Washington, and she worked as an administrative assistant for several Seattle law firms. Her husband had preceded her in death. For more details about Peninsula College Foundation, contact Rogers at 360-417-6400 or Foundation@pencol.edu.

Port Angeles pool to offer free swim day story by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

William Shore Memorial Pool, 225 E. Fifth St. in Port Angeles, will host a “Picnic at the Pool” from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 24. The free event is intended to extend the pool’s appreciation to the community and will include free pool admittance throughout the day. For more information about the event or other pool activities, phone William Shore Memorial Pool at 360-417-9767 or visit www.williamshorepool.org.

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KEEPING CHILDREN SECURE, SAFE WHILE IN AUTOMOBILES First Step Family Support Center

program provides safety, education story by SARA FARINELLI, PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cites motor vehicle injuries as a leading cause of death among children in the United States. According to a 2011 CDC report, more than 650 children aged 12 years and younger died in motor vehicle crashes, and more than 148,000 were injured. Thirty-three percent were not even buckled up. In addition, in an observation study of children weighing less than 80 pounds, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that 72.6 percent of child restraint systems were installed improperly or being used incorrectly. To address this issue, First Step Family Support Center in Port Angeles has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the state Traffic Safety Commission to add a Child Passenger Safety Program to its menu of services to promote the healthy development of children and families. “We at First Step believe that parents are their child’s first and most important, teacher, protector and advocate,” said Nita Lynn, First Step’s executive director, noting that the emphasis is as much on education as distributing free car seats. With current funds, First Step plans to distribute 70 car seats to low-income families in Clallam County.

The rear- and forward-facing convertible car seats are rated for children from 5 to 65 pounds and 19 to 54 inches tall. The support center has already begun spreading the word to its clients at its drop-in centers and through its services such as the Parents as Teachers Home Visiting Program. Trained outreach educators are identifying families with a need and teaching them the importance not only of using a child car properly but ensuring that it is properly installed. In some cases, the family already may have a car seat. The volunteers evaluate the device and how it is being used and may replace it with a new one if it is deemed unsuitable. First Step’s Child Passenger Safety is the only program of its kind currently offered in Port Angeles. The Sequim Police Department offers a similar service to Sequim residents. First Step’s program is open to qualified Clallam County families. Aware that there may be a greater demand for car seats than the current funding provides for, First Step is seeking community partners to sustain the program as it has for previous programs. Last year, after a small grant to initiate Safe Beds for Healthy Babies, which promotes room sharing instead of bed sharing, First Step cobbled together community support to make the program self-sustaining. Thanks to community interest, it was able to distribute 21 cribs last year. “These car seats typically retail for around $100, which is a significant investment for struggling

families,” Lynn said. “We are excited to remove these barriers for some local families.” First Step Family Support Center served more than 1,000 Clallam County families last year. Its intent is to educate parents to be advocates and caregivers for their children, ensuring that they get a healthy start in life. SECURE AND SAFE continued on Page 5 >>

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July 2014

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<< SECURE AND SAFE continued from Page 4

Now Open! Stop in and say hello

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Photo by SARA FARINELLI

First Step Family Support Center executive director Nita Lynn, left, and administrative assistant Amber Hosken discuss program scheduling at the Port Angeles-based organization.

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First Step has drop-in centers at 325 E. Sixth St., Port Angeles, open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., Sequim, on Monday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Sequim facility provides services in Spanish. For more details about the Child Passenger Safety Program or other First Step programs, contact Amber Hosken at 360-457-8355 or visit www.FirstStepFamily.org.

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY July 2014

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Teaching children to give back story by BRANDPOINT

One of the most rewarding reasons to get involved in your community is to set a good example for children. Whether you donate money or time, giving back is beneficial, and not just for the recipients. The reward for your selfless acts can be a beautiful thing for both your community and your children’s future. But what are some of the ways you can teach kids to give back and what age should you begin encouraging them? Giving back is just as much about volunteering as it is about philanthropy. Dr. Lois Winchell, child and family therapist at Argosy University, Sarasota, Fla.,believes it should be a combination of both. “If we want our children to give back, our families need to be involved in multiple activities,” she said. “These include volunteering resources and time and giving money when possible. Learning how to donate time can be a very powerful lesson for children because it is a giving of ourselves. “This intimate experience can be significant and can often reap a more personal reward than the offering of money and things.” Children learn best by example. The closer you can bring a child to the recipient of the gift, the more personal the experience becomes. “Nurturing a sense of giving and making sure this is a value for your children starts as early as age 3 or 4,” according to Winchell. “At this developmental age, we can teach them that others have feelings and that your child has an impact on those feelings. This sense of empathy is the underpinning of charity. GIVE BACK continued on Page 7 >>

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<< GIVE BACK continued from Page 6

“The most significant impact on our children is what they actually see us doing as it relates to a giving spirit. As we engage in projects, we can have conversations with our children regarding why the project is important and who will benefit.” Start by expanding their sense of environment, from the immediate family to their local community and eventually the world around them. A sense of awareness of something greater than themselves is important in raising a compassionate individual. This sense of responsibility to others and the environment as a world citizen can be supported by making children aware of others’ needs whether in visiting a shelter or a food banks with family members or simply helping younger siblings. “From infancy to about 5 years old, children aren’t necessarily capable of thinking outside of themselves. Even so, parents need to foster their child’s sharing with others,” Winchell said. As children grow older they can begin volunteering and supporting community projects more directly. Whether they donate toys to a children’s shelter or simply participate in a walk for charity, these years are important for a child to learn the art of giving back. When they become teenagers, they can do even more for the community by assisting an elderly neighbor with his yard work or helping out at a local food bank or soup kitchen. Additionally, it is important to convey the message that “giving back” does not include an expectation of getting something in return. Instead, highlight the sense of joy in being able to make someone happy and how those feelings are the greater gift. “When a child experiences sharing and the serving of others, an internal sense of contentment and self-worth is experienced,” Winchell said. “This self-enhancement and sense of belonging is coincident with their giving and results in a benefit that cannot be gained any other way. This sense of happiness and accomplishment then contributes to their positive sense of self.” In other words, teaching children to give back is one of the best things a parent can do for the community and the child.

Ready to rock at free concerts story by PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Looking for a great way to enjoy a warm summer evening? Consider attending one of the North Olympic Peninsula’s free summer concerts. Concerts on the Pier are offered Wednesday nights from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. through Sept. 3 at City Pier off Railroad Avenue in downtown Port Angeles. Upcoming concerts: July 30 — Joy Mills Band; Aug. 6 — 4th Street Cats; Aug. 13 — The Soul Shakers; Aug. 20 — Porto Alegre Band; Aug. 27 — Joy in Mudville; and Sept. 3 — Ian McFeron. For more information, visit www.peninsuladailynews.com and click on “Things to Do/Calendar.” Music and Movies in the Park take place every Tuesday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. through Aug. 26 at the James Center for the Performing Arts, Reuse Demonstration Site, 563 N. Rhodefer Road in Sequim. Upcoming concerts: Aug. 2 — Stardust; Aug. 9 — Kevin Lee Magner; Aug. 16 — Deadwood Revival; Aug. 23 — Electric Blue Sun; and Aug. 30 — Old Sidekicks and a movie to be determined at a later date. For more information about Music and Movies in the Park, contact the City of Sequim at 360-683-4139. Port Townsend Concerts on the Dock are offered Thursdays from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. through Aug. 28 at the Pope Marine Plaza in downtown Port Townsend. The free music series, sponsored by the Port Townsend Main Street Program, also features a wine, beer and cider garden for concert goers at the plaza beginning at 4:30 p.m. Upcoming concerts: July 31 — Rippin’ Chicken; Aug. 7 — The Yacht Club featuring Kevin Mason; Aug. 14 — Ko Ko Jo; Aug. 21 — The High Council; and Aug. 28 — Dirty Beat Duo with Stars of Tomorrow. Visit www.ptmainstreet.org for additional concert series information.

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A THINGS-TO-DO LIST BEFORE SENDING CHILDREN BACK TO SCHOOL

s

still time for

u mm e r f u n

story by SARA FARINELLI and BRENDA HANRAHAN, PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Summer on the North Olympic Peninsula is a magical time. Extended daylight hours, mild summer weather and plenty of things to see and do make the area a destination for people from all over the world. Children have the added bonus of being out of school during the summer so savoring every moment of the Peninsula’s sunniest season is easy. From family-friendly hikes in Olympic National Park and berry picking opportunities at local farms to visiting area libraries and science centers for fun programs and presentations, the Peninsula serves as a paradise for children of all ages. Don’t miss out on these fun summer activities for children this summer. OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK Olympic National Park features a wide range of hikes suitable for children of all ages. From roaming around short trails at Hurricane Ridge and exploring the Hoh Rain Forest to strolling along coastal beaches, children will enjoy stretching their legs and learning about the animals, trees and plants that live within the park. Did you know children can become a junior Olympic 8

PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY

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National Park ranger? Simply pick up a free copy of the Olympic National Park Junior Ranger booklet at any visitor center in the park. When children visit the park, they can complete the steps in the booklet to earn an official junior ranger badge. If your youngster’s interests tend toward the sea, consider the park’s Ocean Steward Junior Ranger Program, a fun, hands-on program for children ages 4 and older. Children will explore the area’s coastal ecosystem, learn exciting new facts and understand how to help protect Olympic National Park’s wilderness coast and the Pacific Ocean. Download and print the Ocean Steward Junior Ranger book at www.nps.gov/olym. Click on “For Kids” in the left column, or obtain a free copy at any visitor center within the park. Children who complete the book according to instructions will receive an Ocean Steward Patch. A park pass may be required at entrance stations. An annual park pass costs $30 and is good at any Olympic National Park entrance station for one year from the month of purchase. A consecutive seven-day park pass costs $15 per vehicle, or $5 for individuals on foot, bicycle or motorcycle. Children 15 years old and younger are

admitted free of charge. Olympic National Park has teamed with the North Olympic Library System to offer Explore Olympic discovery daypacks, filled with discovery tools for exploring the park, including trail and field guides, binoculars and reading materials for children. The packs are available for check out from any library branch and park visitor centers. Families who check out a pack will receive a sevenday entrance to Olympic National Park thanks to a donation from Washington’s National Park Fund. A suggested donation of $5 is requested. Rainy day blues? Visit the National Park System’s WebRangers site at www.nps.gov/webrangers. Customize your virtual ranger station, solve mysteries, play games, share pictures and stories, earn rewards and more. Website visitors also can virtually hike national parks throughout the nation. DUNGENESS RIVER AUDUBON CENTER Dungeness River Audubon Center in Railroad Bridge Park, 2151 W. Hendrickson Road in Sequim, offers loads of fun and educational opportunities for children of all ages. SUMMER FUN continued on Page 9 >>

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<< SUMMER FUN continued from Page 8

The river center provides games and activities for the young naturalist, including scavenger hunts in the park environs and a mural in the center full of animals to find and identify. A suggested donation for the scavenger hunt is $2. Join the river center’s Dungeness Adventure Club on Thursdays between 10 a.m. and noon. This interactive club for children 6 and younger and their caregivers introduces kids to nature in fun and enriching ways. Participants are encouraged to dress in layers to keep warm or to cool off, and to bring an extra set of clothing, water and a snack and a sense of adventure. Cost is $5 per child; babies in arms are admitted for free. Parents or caregivers must stay on site. To register, contact the Dungeness River Audubon Center at 360-681-4076 or RiverCenter@olympus.net. Another way to explore Railroad Bridge Park is to join a free two-hour bird walk offered by members of the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society every Wednesday morning. Walks depart from the river center at 8:30 a.m. Walks are suitable for children 8 and older with a Photo by SARA SCHAEFER strong interest in nature and wildlife. Riley Schaefer poses for a photo on a bridge spanning Barnes Creek during a recent hike to Marymere Falls in Olympic National Park. The river center is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from noon to The well-maintained mile-long trail from Storm King Visitor Center on Lake Crescent, about 22 miles west of Port Angeles, leads to the spectacular 90-foot Marymere Falls and is a favorite hike for families with children. 4 p.m. The center is closed Mondays. FEIRO MARINE LIFE CENTER Feiro Marine Life Center, 315 N. Lincoln St. at City Pier in Port Angeles, provides a place for visitors to see and learn about the local marine environment. Hundreds of examples of marine life including intertidal creatures, fish and plant life are on display. The center’s touch tank provides a chance to meet marine life up close and personal. Staff and volunteer naturalists are on hand to guide visitors and answer questions. The center is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Labor Day. Cost: $4 for adults, $2 for children ages 3 to 17 and free for children 2 and younger For more information, phone 360-417-6254 or visit www.feiromarinelifecenter.org. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY There’s still time to catch some of the Jefferson County Library’s Fizz! Boom! Read! 2014 Summer Reading Program. Jefferson County Library is located at 620 Cedar Ave., at the intersection of Ness’ Corner Road and Cedar Avenue in Port Hadlock. Activities include: n Have you ever wanted to be inside of a soap bubble? Is that even possible? Come find out during “Supersized Bubbles” from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, July 28. This event is for children 5 to 12 years old. n Bring your wheels to the library from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Thursday, July 31 to learn basic bicycle maintenance, repair and safety from skilled ReCyclery bike clinic staff and participate in bike games and challenges. Children younger than 10 must be accompanied by an adult. Sign up at the library or phone 360-3856544 to register.

n Wednesday Science Cafe for all ages will be held between 2 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. July 30. The topic is robotics. n Boffer Club will be held between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 1, for children ages 6 to 18. Youth are invited to swing boffers — a foam weapon — with other energetic heroines and heroes. All activity will be outside, weather permitting. Dress appropriately. n A Hiking Club field trip will take place between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 5, for children ages 11 to 18. Participants will meet at the library and be transported to a trailhead selected by the group by van. Bring a lunch and have a picnic. Limited to 15 hikers. Parents welcome. Sign up at the library or phone 360-385-6544 to register. n Yak & Snack book group will be held between 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 6 for children ages 9 to 15. Children are invited to join others who love reading for an afternoon of book talking and snacks. n The Summer Reading Program finale will be held between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 7. This celebration of reading will also reveal who will win the “Peep-into-a-Classic” and “Spectacular Structure” contests. n Toddler Storytime will be held at 10:15 a.m. Monday, July 28 for children ages 12 to 30 months. This activity features movement, music, puppets and fingerplays as well as flannel-board stories and the reading of short books written with toddlers in mind. n Babytime will be offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 29. The 20-minute lap sit program for infants from birth to 12 months features action rhymes, baby sign language, songs and movement designed to

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stimulate brain development as well as the enjoyment of music, language and books. n Preschool Storytime starts at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 30. Bring your toddler for stories, songs, puppets, fingerplays and activities especially selected for children ages 3 to 5. PORT TOWNSEND MARINE SCIENCE CENTER The Port Townsend Marine Science Center, located in Fort Worden State Park, is a must-visit destination for families. The center features marine and natural history exhibits. On the pier, the marine exhibit has touch pools and aquaria to educate visitors about the diverse fish and invertebrates living below the surface in Port Townsend Bay and Admiralty Inlet. The natural history exhibit encourages people to learn more about the ancient marine life and the forces that shaped the landscape. Don’t miss the new exhibit “Learning from Orcas— the Story of Hope.” Both exhibits are open Wednesdays through Mondays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Sept. 1. Exhibits are closed on Tuesdays. Exhibit admission is $5 for adults, $3 for youth (ages 6 to 17) and free or children 5 and younger. Admission is free for Port Townsend Marine Science Center members. Fort Worden State Park features the well-maintained Point Wilson Lighthouse and more than two miles of saltwater shoreline lined with glacial bluffs and sand and cobble beaches. In addition, visitors can explore a historic 19th century fort that includes group residency, vacation housing and conference facilities. SUMMER FUN continued on Page 10 >>

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<< SUMMER FUN continued from Page 9

NORTH OLYMPIC LIBRARY SYSTEM The North Olympic Library System has an assortment of events running through the end of summer at its branches in Port Angeles, Sequim, Forks and Clallam Bay. n The Summer Reading Challenge for ages birth to 12 years old continues through Aug. 2. Participants can earn a free book and have a chance to win a tablet just by reading. They can qualify for a free book after just 14 hours of reading. For every 14 hours spent reading, participants are entered into a drawing for a computer tablet. All entries must be received by Aug. 2. Stop by or contact your local library for additional details: Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St., 360-417-8500, Ext. 7705; Sequim Library, 630 N. Ave., 360-683-1161; Forks Library, 171 S. Forks Ave., 360-374-6402; and Clallam Bay Library, 16990 state Highway 112, 360-374-6402. Or visit www.nols.org or send an email to Youth@nols.org for details. n Tears of Joy Theatre: “Tad & Fry” will be held at the Port Angeles Library at 6:30 p.m. Monday, July 28. A tadpole and a fry can become friends, but what happens when they grow up? Experience biology and the science of metamorphosis through this charming and interactive puppet performance that utilizes shadow puppetry, music and modified marionette puppets. n The Brian Waite Band “Planet of the Amps” will begin at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, July 29 at the Sequim Library and at 2 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library. In this rock and roll adventure two scientists have come up with what they call “The Universal Language Translator.”As they travel around the planet, testing it out on different creatures, they learn that working together makes things easier. n Glowing Goobleck will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 30 at the Forks Library for children ages 5 to 12. Participants will be treated to a reading of Dr. Seuss’ “Bartholomew and the Oobleck,” then experiment with non–Newtonian fluids. Children will be able to make their own “goobleck.” n Fizz Boom Read events continue at the Port Angeles Library with Science Storytimes for ages 4 to 5 at 10:15 a.m. Friday, Aug. 1; Fingerplay Camp at

11:15 a.m. Friday, Aug. 1 for ages birth to 5, and the all ages Pajama Math at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, July 31, 6:30 p.m. n Sequim Library, Summer Storytimes for all ages will be held at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, July 30. n Pool parties will be held in Port Angeles and Sequim to celebrate children’s summer reading achievement and wrap up the North Olympic Library System’s summer program. For more information, visit www.nols.org. n Saturday Movie Matinees at the Clallam Bay Library are offered at 1 p.m. through Sept. 27. This matinee series is a licensed showing of classic movies and new releases. Ratings vary from G to PG-13. For a schedule of movies, visit www.nols.org/ events/clallam-bay.html. SO MANY GREAT PLACES TO VISIT There are so many beautiful outdoor destinations to visit this summer. Here are just a few North Olympic Peninsula family favorites to add to your summer to-do list. n Fort Flagler State Park — The historic turn-ofthe-century Army base in Nordland features barracks, officers’ quarters and a hospital that were used in World War I and World War II. Tour the nine former gun batteries atop the bluff while taking in amazing views of the Olympic and Cascade mountains and Puget Sound. The park features hiking and biking trails, water activity opportunities, picnic areas, a museum, campsites, vacation home rentals and more. For directions and more information, visit www. parks.wa.gov/508/Fort-Flagler. n Dungeness Spit and Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge — The 261-acre refuge is home to more than 250 species of birds, 41 species of land mammals and eight species of marine mammals. Stretching 5.5 miles to the New Dungeness Light Station and several yards beyond, Dungeness Spit is the world’s longest natural sand spit. If planning to visit the lighthouse, be sure to check tidal charts and leave plenty of daylight hours to complete the hike. Visit www.newdungenesslighthouse.com for more information. A $3 per group fee is collected at the trailhead. n Cape Flattery — The short Cape Flattery Trail

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY

July 2014

features boardwalk, stone and gravel steps, and four observation decks offering breathtaking views of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Tatoosh Island and Cape Flattery Lighthouse. The trail is a Makah Wilderness Area, so stay on the trail and supervise children closely. A $10 per car Makah Recreation Permit is required to hike the Cape Flattery Trail. Permits can be obtained at the Makah Marina, Washburn’s General Store, Makah Tribal Center, Makah Mini Mart and the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah Bay. n LaPush — Made famous by Twilight movies and books, LaPush has been a summer destination for locals and visitors alike for decades. Home of the Quileute tribe, LaPush offers beautiful views of the Pacific Ocean, a busy marina, nearby coastal trails, a popular campground and resort and so much more. Don’t miss the opportunity to watch surfers bob in the choppy waves off First Beach or take in a colorful summer sunset with James Island in the background.

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Brenden Davidson gathers water in a bucket to build a sand castle at Salt Creek Recreation Area County Park near Joyce. The park features a sandy beach and seastack, tide pools, trails, World War II-era bunkers and campground.

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COOKING WITH KIDS

Healthy, easy recipes and suggestions to encourage children of all ages to eat delicious produce story by KIA ARMSTRONG AND PATTY MCMANUS, NASH’S ORGANIC PRODUCE

Children naturally have more energy during the long days of summer. Because they spend more time outside in the sun and wind, it is important to keep their fluids and vitamin intake high. Local mom Sarah Salazar-Tipton, director of Olympic Nature Experience, a nonprofit dedicated to deepening children’s connection with nature, has a great solution: the fruit/veggie ice pop. “After hours at the beach or a walk through our neighborhood, it’s easy to entice kids home with a ‘popsicle,’” said Salazar-Tipton. “It makes a great snack for any time of day, and they are getting fluids, proteins and veggies all at once.” FRUIT/VEGGIE ICE POP: • 1-to-2 cups water, herbal tea or juice • 1 cup leafy greens • 1-to-2 carrots • Large handful of seeds or nuts • 1-to-2 cups fresh or frozen fruit

Family

Photo by KRISTIN GONZALEZ

COOKING WITH KIDS continued on Page 13 >>

Julia Buggy and her children Amara, left, and Rayna pick organic strawberries for nutritious treats.

Create a family night for all to enjoy a game or each others company to stay connected. To place your ad in the next issue of Peninsula Families Today, call 360-452-2345

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY July 2014

11


The summer sun is still shining in August, and there’s plenty to do on the Olympic Peninsula. Whether you’re looking for some outdoor fun, some way to escape the fleeting heat, or something free or fun to do with the whole family, you’ll find the right entertainment right here.

T S U G U A

Olympic National Park has a plethora of guided walks and tours through the park, including the Marymere Falls Walk, The Hurricane Ridge Meadow Walk and the Sol Duc Campfire Program. More information can be found at www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/events.htm.

R E M M SU

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With the sun still high and the afternoons

still long and beautiful, there’s no better place on Earth to be than the North Olympic Peninsula. The waters across the Peninsula are warming up. Rent a canoe or kayak and head down the Elwha, or across Lake Crescent. Looking for calmer waters? Stop by a pool during open swim hours!

There are tons of fun to be had indoors, too. From catching a summer blockbuster movie, to skating and rollerblading at the local rink, to free bowling for children at our local lanes, there’s plenty to do.

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Now’s the time to start establishing healthy habits that will carry you through the cold winter months. Not only is it a great time to buy fresh, local produce at our local farmers markets, but you can also pursue a new fitness regimen—Crossfit, cycling, jogging, or just walking on our many trails.

Summer is a time for fresh-baked pies and being outside. What better way to combine the two than to go berry picking at one of our local berry farms! Lavender are also in season through early August!

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Each of these colors indicates the presence of different healthy nutrients that benefits the health of children and adults alike. If you can’t grow a garden, play a color game in the produce department of your favorite store. “Which green should we pick today? Which orange?” Give the children credit at the table for tonight’s delicious choice, and if they want, allow them to help prepare what they have chosen. You can even turn mealtime into a game to see who can “eat all their colors,” even if it is only a bite or two.

<< COOKING WITH KIDS continued from Page 11

Blend on high until smooth and creamy. Pour into ice pop molds or ice cube trays and freeze. If your child is particular about color, add red pepper or tomatoes instead of leafy greens. A banana or two adds sweetness to counter a “tooveggie” taste. If you are adding leafy greens, leave out milk products, but add some citrus for extra iron absorption. COLORS HELPS KIDS EAT VEGETABLES Kids are more likely to warm up to vegetables if they have something to do with choosing them, either at the store or in the garden. If your children help you to plant the seeds, water the plants and harvest the crops, chances are they will want to taste the “fruits of their labor.” If you plant a garden with your kids, try to plant vegetables and fruit in a variety of colors — green lettuces or zucchini, bright orange carrots and red tomatoes or peppers, and purple berries.

MAKE JUICE TIME FUN, HEALTHY Julia Buggy, local mom and holistic nutrition educator specializing in organic plant-based nutrition, knows that using a juicer is always a hit with kids. “If you combine naturally sweet items like carrots and apples, it’s easy to slip in a little spinach or beets and the whole drink is loaded with vitamins, minerals and immune-boosting goodness,” Buggy said.

Another trick she has learned for kids who may have an aversion to the color is to serve the juice in a fun colored cup with lid and straw. “If they have fun helping to make the juice, chances are they will be excited to drink it.” Here’s one of her daughter’s favorites. PIRATE PUNCH “VITAMIN C PREVENTS SCURVY AFTER ALL ... ARRRGH!” • 5 organic carrots • 4 organic apples, seeds removed • 3 handfuls organic local spinach • 2 leaves organic kale • 1 small lemon, zest peeled off Freeze any leftover juice in ice cube trays for use in smoothies. “Sometimes we are too busy to bring out the juicer on these warm summer days, so my blender becomes my back-up support,” Buggy said. “Smoothies are my favorite way to add veggies into my daughters’ diet. Plus they get all the fiber, too.”

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY July 2014

13


Summer safety tips story by METRO NEWS GRAPHICS

“Summertime, and the livin’ is easy …,” at least according to the lyrics by George Gershwin. Certainly, summertime is the time to kick back, relax and enjoy a slower pace for most of us. However, there are some inherent dangers to summer that can put a damper on plans for fun in the sun. From skin cancer to insect bites, summertime can be dangerous for those who don’t play it safe. With a greater number of people out and about enjoying the warm weather, the risk for accidents and injuries increases. The National Safe Kids Campaign says statistics indicate that children will be rushed to emergency rooms around the country nearly three million times this summer. Higher rates of drowning, motor vehicle accidents and bicycle injuries occur this time of year. There are a number of potential summertime hazards men, women and children can safeguard themselves against.

SUN-RELATED INJURIES

While skin cancer and sunburn are the most obvious dangers from the sun, there are other hazards as well. Failure to protect the eyes from UV sun exposure can result in photokeratitis, irreversible sunburn of the cornea. While it may cause temporary vision loss, recurrent incidences of photokeratitis can lead to permanent vision loss as well. SUMMER SAFETY TIPS continued on Page 15 >>

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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY

July 2014

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<< SUMMER SAFETY TIPS continued from Page 14

Individuals who are exposed to sunlight between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. without UV protection may become sunburned, increasing their risk for skin cancer. The American Cancer Society said more than one million Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer this year and about 9,500 people will die from it. Dehydration and heat stroke are other potential hazards. Drinking plenty of water and other hydrating fluids (not diuretics like alcohol) can keep the body cool and refreshed. Headaches, testiness, dizziness and excessive sweating or cessation of sweating may be signs of a serious sun-related health condition.

water hazards

Wildlife dangers

Tick bites are common when the weather is warm. The months of July and August are usually the peak time for exposure to ticks, which may carry Lyme disease or other dangerous parasites. Ticks are small and can be difficult to spot. People should do tick checks after coming in from outside, paying careful attention to the areas favored by ticks such as ears, in and around the hair, under the arms, behind the knees, around the waist and between the legs. Mosquitoes, biting flies, bees, wasps and other insects are also in full force. Using an insect repellent can help you keep them at bay and avoid getting bitten. In addition, animals like bats, squirrels, raccoons and bears are more active in the warm weather. People should pay attention to wildlife when driving, hiking or bicycling to avoid collisions

Why d id th to the e Cookie go Hospita l?

and altercations. Everyone can enjoy the summer months if safety is made a priority when planning recreational activities.

elt ! F Heummy Cr

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Drowning incidents increase 100 percent during the summer months. It takes only inches of water to drown a person, especially a young child. Every year the news broadcasts stories of children who fall into backyard pools or adults swept out to sea by choppy waves. People should never take bodies of water for granted. Swimming only where there is a certified lifeguard can make water recreation safer. Individuals should follow the guidelines posted regarding swimming and avoid oceans when storms are brewing because of rip tides and undertows. Children should always be carefully monitored around water. Self-latching gates around pools can help deter entry as well as safety covers and retractable pool ladders. Pool floats and water wings (swimmies) should never be utilized as a

substitute for a life vest.

Peninsula Families todayâ&#x20AC;&#x192; July 2014â&#x20AC;&#x192; 15


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PENINSULA FAMILIES TODAY

July 2014

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Special Sections - Peninsula Families Today, July 2014  

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Special Sections - Peninsula Families Today, July 2014  

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