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CLOSE CALL FOR TONASKET AREA; SOUTH COUNTY HIT HARD BY FIRE

Emerging from warrants

NVH takes big step in return return to financial health BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - When North Valley Hospital District officially emerged out of debt from Okanogan County for a day to kick off July, it was a landmark moment, but also only the beginning of the next stage of the hospital’s return to financial health. “We’ll probably go in and out of warrants a little for the next year,” said NVH Administrator Linda Michel. “That’s just the nature of the beast while you’re trying to get some cash in the bank.” Indeed, the hospital has been in and out of warrants several times since. “Last week we were able to pay over $65,000 of bills with our own money,” Michel said. “(At the start Monday, July 21) we were $53,000 in the hole.” By Tuesday morning, payments had come in that brought NVH $262 into the black. Warrants are intended to be short-term loans from the county, but which have been a long-term lifeline for all three of Okanogan County’s hospitals. The hospital’s debt to Okanogan County was at $2.955 million in late August, 2012, and was still at about $2 million last July. “At this point we’re determined to stay out,” Michel said. “You have to build up that cash in the bank, so it doesn’t happen all at once. We’re looking at every process we have - not to work harder, but smarter, trying to do some lean implementation.” Michel said she wouldn’t be against using warrants for their originally intended purpose - as a short term loan, as opposed to a line of credit. “We need to pay for our daily operations by ourselves,” she said. “Warrants should be used for big things where you have a plan to pay them down, not day to day operations.” Parts of the facility are aging and are in need of upgrades before they reach crisis stage. In the past year the call system in the nursing home failed, and one of the boilers had to be replaced after more than 50 years of service. “I won’t say we’ll never borrow,” Michel said. “Our facility is old. We have to go forward with the rest of the boilers, and the windows on the nursing home. We have a lot of stuff facing us.”

After watching a week of frightening images and stories of a destructive firestorm emerge from Pateros, Malott and the Methow Valley, Tonasket-area residents received a scare of their own Monday when a fire erupted on Bugg Road in the North Siwash Creek area, 10 miles east of town. Significant air support included a DC-10 Air Tanker out of British Columbia (above, dropping fire retardant), several smaller planes and a host of helicopters that had the 1,000-plus acre blaze mostly under control by sunset on Monday. Right, Pateros wasn’t so lucky after fire wiped out a significant section of its residential area on Thursday, as the Carlton Complex fire exploded to more than 240,000 acres by week’s end. That is now the largest fire in recorded state history, surpassing the Tripod Complex fire that burned in Okanogan County nearly a decade ago. The nation’s top priority wildfire, it was still being fought across the county on Tuesday morning. Stories of that fire’s local impact are on pages A2-3.

Oroville approves dock extension Council updated on Tumbleweed Film Festival BY GARY A. DE VON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council approved a request from Sandalia Beach Resort to extend their dock at the council’s Tuesday, July 15 meeting following the conclusion of a public hearing on the matter. The request was for a 224’ dock with 24 slips, each with a groundbased boat lift, as well as an extension of the shoreline permit. The public hearing was a continuance from the previous council meeting two weeks prior. The proponents from the resort added no additional information at the hearing. A rebuttal statement from Christian Johnson, Oroville’s Permit Administrator, was read by Chris Branch, director of Community Development. The rebuttal mostly addressed concerns raised by members of the Lake Osoyoos Association at the part of the public hearing held two weeks earlier. One Johnson comments disputed the LOA’s contention that the expanded dock would restrict the flow of navigable water. He

also talked about the resort’s miti- that the LAO perceived was most gation, which included a public detrimental. walking trail and a wetlands buf“I think they were worried fer, as well as shoreline plantings. about size and navigation,” said Councilman Ed Naillon asked Councilman Jon Neal. if Sandalia maintained “no div“After a week of having to coning” signs and he was assured that sider this issue I don’t set aside the resort did so. the concerns of the opponents, “I did go out there to look at but they don’t outweigh the facts the dock and measured in 16 as provided by our staff and the locations,” said Naillon, adding needs of summer residents are that under each not outweighed current slip the by those that sand had been live here year “...I don’t set aside the washed away around,” said and was about Councilwoman concerns of the oppoa foot deeper Neysa Roley. nents, but they don’t from prop Roley made wash. a motion outweigh the facts as He felt that to approve provided by our staff S a n d a l i a ’ s moving the dock further request with all and the needs of the out, as prothe conditions posed by the summer residents are laid out by resort would the staff at the not outweighed by improve this previous part issue. of the hearing. those who live here “I was surCouncilman year around.” prised when I Tony Koepke Councilwoman Neysa Roley think of a 164 seconded the foot dock (curmotion and rent size) this it was passed seemed huge… when you get out with all council members vottheir on the lake and look at it ing approval, except Councilman didn’t seem so big to me,” said Walt Hart who abstained. Naillon. “What I did see was that Tumbleweed Film Festival prop wash shows you do need Sandy Lorentzen and Vicki some additional depth.” Hinze appeared before the counNaillon asked what the impact cil to discuss the upcoming

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 30

Tumbleweed Film Festival and of how difficult it was to start the ask for its support. Lorentzen is a Ashland Shakespeare Festival in volunteer for the event and Hinze Oregon. Today it attracts over owns the Pastime Bar and Grill, 300,000 people and generates one of the event’s sponsors. $168 million... that’s quite a posiThey said the film tive economic impact festival, now in its fifth for businesses in the year will be held over area.” four days July 30 to Aug. She went on to say 2 with a total of about these types of events 60 short independent are generally run by films being shown. non-profits like the “The first year it was Tumbleweed, which in two locations, this was founded by Geoff year it is in five dif- Neysa Roley Klein and Mo Fine ferent locations,” said from Seattle because of Lorentzen. their love of the Oroville area. The festival starts off with “The Chamber endorses the an event on Wednesday at the festival and we’ve been grateful Pastime Bar and Grill with a to get Chris’ (Branch) advice. change for this year. Rather than Right now it is a labor of love. I showing the movies this year at believe supporting and helping the Pastime, ticket holders will the film festival to grow is good follow a special meal by going for Oroville and hope you’ll all to Vicki’s Back Door Club for attend,” said Lorentzen. the movies. On Thursday, there will be a family night at the high CONCESSION STAND school commons. On Friday Rosa Snyder updated the counit will be a 21-and-older event cil on the concessions stand at at one of the founding venues, Oroville’s Osoyoos Lake Veterans Alpine Brewing and on Saturday Memorial Park which she rents it will be at the other founding from the city. venue, Esther Bricques Winery “We’re doing fairly well I think. south of town. The Fourth of July was busy, we “Some of the most successful had to have three people working festival specialized... not everyone all the time to keep up. Breakfast likes chamber music, but there is is also going well on the weeka whole festival dedicated to it,” end,” she said, adding that they said Lorentzen. “And just think are trying to keep prices low in

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

order that everyone can afford something. Other than some problems with the electrical circuit breakers, the only issue she finds is that the stand is “complaint central” and many people bring their gripes, real and imagined, about park issues to her and those that work at the stand. “I can not say enough good about Rod (Noel) and his crew,” Snyder said, referring to the parks department head and those that work for the city at the lakeside park and campground. Snyder said in addition to the campers, families and kids, the park gets many agriculture workers in the afternoons. She also said they’ve gone through 60 gallons of ice cream since opening. “One thing we’ve done is start a program where parents give us $10 and then the kids are allowed to bring a code word to make purchases, rather than carrying money themselves,” she said, adding that when the money is depleted the parents can replenish the account. The concession stand is rented on a percentage basis and the previous month $506 was paid to the city, according to city clerk Kathy Jones. The business’ hours are 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday through Monday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday.

Fire Coverage A2-3 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9 Tractor Pulls A10

Obituaries Cops & Courts

A11 A12


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 24, 2014

OKANOGAN COUNTY FIRESTORM There is almost no way to wrap your mind around the immensity of what has happened in Okanogan County this past week. The Carlton Complex fire, which started as four separate fires but exploded Thursday to merge into one, is now considered the state’s largest wildfire since such things have been recorded, exceeding 243,000 acres (one measurement had it at nearly 300,000, but an improved infrared mapping assessment did drop the estimate back slightly). Though county communities are separated by geography, the connections between friends, relatives, schools, - and of course dozens of local men and women on the fire lines - run deep. What we’ve tried to do here is provide some snapshots, stories of what some of our local connections experienced over the last week. With somewhere around 500 people displaced (more than 100 homes destroyed) and the fire still being fought on multiple fronts from Malott to Pateros to Winthrop, we could probably fill more than a year’s worth of newspapers with people’s stories. For every one of these stories, there are dozens more just like them.

One long night Methow Valley native Orford spent night awaiting word of husband, relatives’ fate BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - For some, reacting to the firestorm throughout Okanogan County has meant adrenaline-fueled efforts to rescue relatives, friends, animals and belongings. For others, it’s meant seemingly endless hours waiting out spotty or non-existent communications for word of the fate of loved ones in harm’s way. Thursday evening, with the Methow Valley and Pateros on fire, Terri Orford waited to hear word from her husband Andy, who headed to the valley to fight the fire, as well as his uncle and aunt who were trapped in their home. “I was just pacing,” Terri Orford said. “I didn’t shut Facebook down for 10 hours. I didn’t know what to do. I sat on my porch. It was just me; the kids were sleeping. “I have never experienced being that distraught. That feeling of helplessness and not knowing. It was appalling but I have no idea how to truly describe it.” Terri grew up in the Methow Valley and Andy worked there for C2cWildfire. “That’s my hometown,” Terri said. “That’s where we met and fell in love.” Andy had quit firefighting at Terri’s urging, but when this one arose, she was quick to encourage him to go to the fire when his former boss, Mike Myers, called. “He’d never heard that sound of fear in Mike’s voice before,” she said. “In a moment where you can feel so helpless, he knew he could help and wanted to.” With main roads into the valley closed, Andy headed over unpaved Baldy Pass between Conconully and Winthrop, when he arrived, Terri was on the phone with Myers with news that his uncle and aunt, Ken and Vicki Orford, were trapped in their Buckhorn Mountain home northwest of Pateros. She’d gotten news through Facebook postings that fire had surrounded their home before they could evacuate. “They were laying in their bathtub,” Terri said. “They were under blankets they’d wet down and the house was completely filled with smoke. “I don’t know how they didn’t lose phone service, but we were basically up until 4:30 in the morning. Andy tried to get a truck up to them, but wasn’t able to until late the next day.” She said that the Orfords had

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Pateros Junior/Senior High School gym, lit with lights powered by generators, was filled with clothing and other items donated in one of many massive relief efforts around Okanogan County. Above, a group of Tonasket volunteers drops off toiletries and other supplies on Sunday, July 20.

High school girls step up BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Top, as the fire erupted out of control near Carlton and Pateros, Andy Orford’s aunt and uncle Ken and Vicki were trapped in their Buckhorn Mountain home, as flames (above) completely surrounded their property. Terri Orford waited in Tonasket for word on the fate of her husband, Andy, who drove over unpaved Baldy Pass to help friends and family fight the inferno. Top photo by Aaron Bevier; other photos provided by Terri Orford

a water tender that they’d used to wet down the area around the house that likely played a big part in it not burning down. “Their son, daughter-in-law and nephew were trying to get to them from the coast,” Terri said. “They got stopped at the road block in Pateros, but he’s tribal law enforcement and his badge got him through. They told him it was at his own risk.” She said she’s been amazed by the support the family has received - starting with her and Andy’s employer, North Valley Hospital. “He wasn’t planning on missing work when he first went but he called and let them know he was going,” Terri said. “Us as a hospital granting Andy an unpaid leave to help in the fire is incredible. When Andy told me I thought it meant for a cou-

ple of days, but Kelly (Cariker) told him to stay as long as he needed to, we’d make it work. “That brought me to tears, even though this fire is not in our community, that it would lend our resources to outside communities like that.” She said that her father-in-law’s construction company also lent an industrial generator to hook up to Ken and Vicki’s home to get them a few basic services on line in their home. “I grew up in the Methow,” Terri said. “I’m no stranger to wildland fires. My mom was the district ranger of the forest service and was incident command on fires. My husband has worked fires for 10 years; that was how we met, a fire in the Methow. So I’m no stranger to it. “But this ... this was completely different.”

TONASKET - There have been so many relief efforts, donations and offers to help fire victims in the area that it’s hard to reconcile the generosity with the fact that Okanogan County annual ranks as one of the most poverty-stricken counties in the state. None of that stood in the way of a number of Tonasket teens that took it upon themselves to start their own relief efforts for residents of Pateros, who saw a large chunk of their residential area obliterated by the fire. Jensen Sackman, Myra Gaytan and Kasey Silverthorn traveled to Pateros on Saturday to see what they could do to help, and have returned multiple times to aid in the relief effort. “There was something in the news that Pateros needed help with volunteers to take shifts,” Sackman said. “We had nothing planned for the day. We just decided to go down there.” They didn’t know what to expect, but went anyway, packing a some flats of water they purchased at Wal-Mart on the way. “We pulled up (to Pateros Junior/Senior High School), someone asked us our names and they just put us to work,” Sackman said. “Clothes were set up on tables, but there was so much there that the tables weren’t enough. We got permission to use the gym floor. We started setting things out on the gym floor. We and Kasey pretty much started the organizing. They set us out to pretty much decide where to put things.” They returned to Tonasket Saturday evening with a list of items that were needed for Pateros. Twelve hours later, they had collected enough donations that they filled the back of Mayor Patrick Plumb’s borrowed pickup truck and another vehicle and returned with a larger crew to help organize and distribute the

Brent Baker/staff photos

Top, Jensen Sackman (left) and Myra Gaytan mounted a collection drive that netted two truckloads of clothes and supplies in less than 12 hours. Above, Tonasket Schools Superintedent Paul Turner (left), Kasey Silverthorn and Myra Gaytan haul donations into the Pateros gym. items, and have continued going back and forth to Pateros over the last few days. “One thing that stood out were a couple of people that were helping also lost their own homes,” Sackman said. “But they were there helping, that was really cool. A lot of the people were pretty quiet and distant.” “People didn’t care what they got,” Gaytan said. “They just needed everything. It was amazing to be able to help.” One elderly woman, they said, didn’t leave Sackman’s side the whole time she was there.

Most of the people they dealt with that first day came from the Alta Lake area, which burned twice in two days. “They said they had no warning - they just saw the smoke and flames so they just got out without any idea they were going to lose their homes,” Sackman said. “Everybody just left everything behind, so they have nothing. “The elderly lady had been making cookies. I asked her if she wanted Craisins, and she was like ‘I was just about to put those in my oatmeal cookies. Of course I want some.”

Two of four family homes spared: ‘We’ll take that as a win’ BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Tina Holan thought she and her kids would follow her husband Tony from Tonasket down to the Patero/ Carlton area on Thursday to provide moral support after her parents’ home was lost in the fire. It turned into a much more harrowing experience than that. Tony Holan had spent most of Thursday, July 17, fighting to save Tina’s parents’ house from the raging fire. As it turned out, it was an unsuccessful battle. “Wednesday night at 10 my mom called and told me they were being evacuated,” Tina Holan said. “We were up all night, but in the middle of the night I realized that my dad wasn’t evacuating, he was going to stay and fight it.” Tony Holan, a seasoned firefighter, left at 3 a.m. Thursday to join the battle. “I’d rented a Bobcat, so I loaded it up and got down there,” Tony said. “But it was too late to save her folks’ place. And I watched her cousin’s house burn down as well.” He said that the lack of air support available at the time made the overall fight against the fire a hopeless one. “A lot of people, seasoned firefighters, it caught us off guard, the wind aspect,” he said. “It was something nobody really knew what to do with. It was making some extreme fire behavior we couldn’t

deal with. There was very little humans could do to stop it. “They probably could have done more with aircraft, but they didn’t have the resources at that time.” Tina’s mother had gathered some of her belongings and taken them to her son’s in Pateros, where Tina, son Jesse and daughter Sara met them. They figured they would be safe there. “Thursday afternoon we drove up the valley to Burma Road and stayed there a couple hours,” Tina said. “The fire was coming down; we were talking to the Sheriff ’s deputies.” Tony and his father had moved on to fight a fire at Tony’s cousin’s home. “Finally our guys came down and we realized what was going on ,” Tina said. “We went back to Pateros, and things blew up there.” The fire roared down the hill on the residential side of Pateros as sheriff ’s deputies ran through town urging people to evacuate before it was too late. “I didn’t know about any (evacuation) level because we’d been in the Methow all afternoon,” Tina said. “We weren’t thinking of being evacuated ourselves. We got to Ryan’s (her brother’s home), we’d been there for not long, and it was ‘get out now.’ “In just matter of seconds, it was Level 3 (mandatory evacuation),” Jesse said. “We saw it come over the hill,” Tina added “You think about fire moving

Lisa O’Hara/submitted photo

The Holans and extended family members had to make several escapes from the Carlton Complex fire, including this harrowing trip down Highway 153 as the flames closed in. downhill pretty slowly but it came really quick.” After evacuating, they were told that Ryan’s home had burned with much of the residential area, and more. “There we so many rumors all night

long - the school burning, businesses gone,” Tina said. “It was crazy. I grew up in Pateros. That’s my hometown, my teachers and friends. I wanted to see with my own eyes how bad it was. And it was bad, but I was equally relieved to see

what was still there.” That included her brother’s home, which stands intact at the edge of the devastation zone.” Tina said they’d had many offers to house her homeless parents; while their belongings are at Tina and Tony’s, they are living in a borrowed RV near Pateros. “People are trying to figure out how to rebuild their lives and it’s easier to be there,” Tina said. In the final count, two of four family homes survived the fire: Tina’s parents and cousins lost theirs; her brother’s and an uncle’s survived. “It’s tough, but we’ll take that as a win,” Tina said. Both Tina and Tony said they’d never seen a wildfire like this one, and that it was a reminder, despite their lifelong experience in the area, to be better prepared with emergency kits and keeping their property clear of fire hazards. “I’ve been around wildfires all my life,” Tina said. “My house burned down when I was five, so some of this isn’t new. But no, nothing like this, not to this magnitude.” “People just need to be more proactive about fire safety and their (emergency) plans,” Tony said. “We’ve gotten complacent - and that includes me. I’ve spent the past few days at our house doing things that we should have been doing all along.”


JULY 24, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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OKANOGAN COUNTY FIRESTORM Tonasket braced for firestorm

LONG, HOT WEEK

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Carlton Complex fire hadn’t come any further north than Malott, about 30 miles south of Tonasket, but the city did its best to prepare for that eventually after watching Pateros go up in flames on Thursday evening and seeing the fire march north at an alarming rate. A false alarm Friday afternoon - Omak was reported by multiple news sources to be at a Level 2 evacuation notice, though it never even was declared a Level 1 - had the community on edge. As the community cast a wary eye southward, a number of preparations were made: • Tonasket prepared contingency plans for response if the fire made its way north and threatened the town and surrounding areas. EMS director Michael Greene, Fire Chief Jim Rice, Police Chief Rob Burks, Police Sgt. Darren Curtis and several first responders were on hand. “We had the incident commanders responsible of the organizations responsible for (first response in) Tonasket,” said Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb. The group discussed which fire conditions would set off which level of evacuation warnings, assignments for incident command for city-wide issues, and fire (which would extend into county land), making sure communications were operational, how to deploy volunteers that came forward and where and when to establish a command center. Also discussed were encouraging residents to have their homes prepared. Plumb said that if power is lost, residents should put a high priority on conserving water. “The concern is that the pumps will not be able to re-fill the reservoirs with the power out,” he said. “That would limit the water needed for firefighting. We don’t want to drain the reservoirs and have the fire hit.” Another priority, he said, is mitigating fire hazards on personal property. “Take care of those now,” he said. “Don’t have things like old pallets, gas cans or firewood right up against your house.” • North Valley Hospital faced its own set of challenges, including the potential for taking on the patients of Three Rivers or Mid-Valley Hospitals if evacuees came northward. “We needed to make sure we had enough food on hand to feed our patients, and the nursing home,” said NVH Administrator Linda Michel. “We looked at things like linens, and blankets and bed pads, because if they had to leave the nursing home down there quickly we were afraid they wouldn’t have those things.” NVH itself, she said, needed to be sure it be able to receive necessities from vendors, as well as have access to blood. “We sat down with everyone I thought would be involved and brainstormed,” Michel said. “We knew we probably wouldn’t’ be in trouble, but what would our neighbors need if they evacuated from Brewster or Omak? “We just tried to be prepared for whatever people needed, and make sure our vendors could get through, bring us our blood, food and supplies” She added that the phone and internet outages forced the administrative staff to cancel their weekend plans in order to stay available, and on-call staff that didn’t live in town stayed on-site through the weekend. She added that they were prepared to cut hospital employees’ paychecks by hand in the event computer outages cut off access to their payroll system. “We just tried to be prepared for whatever people needed,” Michel said. • Tonasket School District prepared to be set up as an emergency evacuation center. At one point on Friday, Omak evacuees were rumored to be on their way to Tonasket, though that occurred as the result of a false alarm and never came to pass. “As the fire continued to grow and move toward our district, we looked at different aspects of possibilities,” said TSD superintendent Paul Turner. “I was in constant contact with Red Cross expecting the shelter in Omak to be transferred to Tonasket. We were looking at our facilities getting personnel and space ready if needed.” Turner himself was suffering from both and internet outages and assigned high school principal Jeff Hardesty to be the Red Cross’s emergency contact. “I also put transportation on alert just in case we needed buses and kitchen staff in case of that need. I had talked with a couple staff to be ready to seek volunteers if needed. “Thank goodness we weren’t needed.” That said, as of Tuesday morning DNR had set up camp in the field by the Middle School as 200 personnel were arriving to deal with the later stages of Monday’s Siwash Creek fire.

Theatre to aid fire victims SUBMITTED BY DOUG LEESE

OROVILLE - Dramatic Escape presents a readers theatre Production of “The Heidi Chronicles” by Wendy Wasserstein. Performances will be held at Esther Bricques Winery and Vineyard on July 25, 26, and 27 at 7 p..m. with Hors d’ oeuvres served at 6:30 p.m.. Tickets are $20 and include a glass of wine Hors d’ oeuvres, dessert and a fantastic show. “The Heidi Chronicles” follow Heidi Holland as she journeys from 16 to 40-years-old. Heidi is a baby boomer trying to figure out who she is in an ever changing world. She maintains close friendships and meets an array of characters along the way that eventually help mold her into the woman she becomes. Cast includes Sarah Kaiser, Marile Kunkel, Steve Kunkel, Doug Leese, Nicole Leese, Erin Meehan and Alexis Olmstead. The show is rated pg 13 for some adult language. With the recent tragedy and loss from the Okanogan County wildfires, Dramatic Escape will be donating it’s proceeds to the victims. Tickets can be purchased at The Cornershelf Bookstore in Omak, at Esther Bricques Winery or by calling Douglas Leese at (509) 429-8051.

Above, with the acrid smell of smoke and creosote still in the air the twisted steel of portions of the Cascade and Columbia Rail Road will keep the trains from running for an undetermined period of time. The tracks run from Wenatchee to Oroville. Left, helicopters scooped water from Razor Lake in the Siwash Creek area outside of Tonasket to dump on the 1000-plus acre fire that erupted there on Monday. That fire was mostly under control by Tuesday morning.

Photos by Jon Millard (top) and Brent Baker

Kretz applauds Gebbers, firefighters, pans IC decisions BY BRENT BAKER AND GARY DE VON

BREWSTER - Washington State Rep. Joel Kretz, District 7’s representative who lives in Wauconda, was on had at several fire fronts as the Carlton Complex fire burned out of control last week. His dramatic pictures of Gebbers Farms workers protecting both Gebbers orchards and the city of Brewster were both inspiring and concerning as Kretz criticized some of the deployment decisions of incident commanders, though not of the firefighters’ efforts. “”They (incident command) wouldn’t deploy at Gebbers and they had between six and 12 rigs sitting nearby at Pateros,” Kretz said. “Gebbers had everything like cats to dig fire lines, but they had no four wheel drive fire trucks. “If we can’t have your guys at least tell us,” Kretz said. “It was just incompetence on their part,” emphasizing his argument wasn’t with the firefighters themselves, but the commanders. After the Gebbers crew using their equipment, including 180 orchard sprayers spraying water, finished their work, the firetrucks were finally released. “That’s after the incident command got calls from (U.S. Senators) Murray and Cantwell and (U.S. Representatives) Hastings and McMorris,” Kretz said. “Gebbers literally got the last line into (Brewster),” Kretz said. “Or it would have taken the town again.”

Rep. Joel Kretz/submitted photo

Rep. Joel Kretz credited crews from Gebbers Farms for saving both the Gebbers orchards and the city of Brewster with their firefighting, but criticized incident commanders for not allowing actual fire crews to deploy.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 24, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Tumbleweed Film Festival rolls back to Oroville bigger than ever

Gary DeVon/file photo

Watching movies at Alpine Brewery, one of the founding venues, along with Esther Bricques Winery. Films will also be shown at a family night at the Oroville High School Commons and at Vicki’s Backdoor Club following a special event at the Pastime Bar & Grill . THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Washington’s most unique film festival takes place right in Oroville, Wash. The 5th annual Tumbleweed Film Festival (TwFF) is back in town with its biggest fest ever, covering four nights of different short films from this Wednesday, July 30 through Saturday, Aug. 2. Over the four nights, which take place at four different venues around Oroville, over 40 American and

“A great assortment of humorous and thought-provoking films” Mo Fine, Founder Tumbleweed Film Festival

international short films will be presented. What sets Tumbleweed apart from other film festivals is how the festival turns wineries, bars,

restaurants or resorts into theaters for a night. Attendees will also enjoy a film experience very different from that of a typical movie theater. At most of Tumbleweed’s venues filmgoers may sample local wines, beers and cuisine while they watch entertaining short films from

around the world. Filmgoers will even have an opportunity to meet up with some festival’s filmmakers. Venues for this year’s festival include the Pastime Bar and Grill, Esther Bricques Winery, Alpine Brewing and the Oroville High School auditorium. Each eve-

Dramatic Escape & Esther Bricques Winery present: A Readers Theatre performance of

The Heidi Chronicles July 25, 26, 27 @ 7:00 pm Doors open at 6:30 pm Tickets are $20 and include a glass of wine, hors d’oeuvres, dessert and a fantastic show. 3URFHHGVGHGLFDWHGWRÀUHYLFWLPV Tickets available at Esther Bricques Winery (42 Swanson Mill Rd, Oroville), The Corner Shelf in downtown Omak or by calling 509-429-8051.

ning will feature different films, and the festival line-up is always comprised of a mix of come-

dies, dramas, documentaries and where Tumbleweed kicks off animation. This year’s offerings again this year. This festival is include films from the US, Spain, important helps the economy and England, Germany, France, brings visitors to Oroville that Ireland, Denmark and Canada. we would not otherwise attract, “Each evenings short films “said Pastime Bar & Grill owner program is as different as are Victoria Hinze, who also believes the venues,” said Geoff Klein, it is vital to have more Tumbleweed Tumbleweed venues throughco-founder. out Oroville. “We think “Watching we’ve found just the films at “Each evening’s short right venue each of the films program is differ- the to show films venues really makes for a ent as are the venues” after the Pastime party, up Main completely Geoff Klein, Founder Street at Vicki’s fun movie Tumbleweed Film Festival Back Door, experience,” continuing the he adds. Festival’s tradi“And each venue offers a great assortment tion of showing films in unconof both humorous and thought- ventional settings and spreading provoking films,” said co-founder venues all over town.” The reception begins at Mo Fine. “People may check out each night’s film event on our 5 p.m. with films starting at 7 website at www.tumbleweedfilm- p.m. Tickets are $30 and may be reserved online at Tumbleweed fest.com.” This year Tumbleweed will or in-person at the Pastime Bar kick off the film festival on and Grill. On Thursday, July 31, Wednesday, July 30 with a special opening night reception at the Tumbleweed brings Family Night Pastime Bar and Grill, which is films to the Oroville High School creating a unique menu of deli- Commons, which offers a cool, cious small bites. Following the comfortable theater setting from reception, guests will enjoy a spe- which to enjoy short films that cial screening of films with pop- both kids and adults will enjoy. corn at Vicki’s Back Door. Films These films will include action include audience favorites from adventures, funny cartoons and the 2013 film festival, as well a even a love story. Movies start at few fan favorites from previous 7 p.m. Tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the door or on the years. “We’re glad to be the place Tumbleweed website.

Tasty kick off reception at

Pastime Bar and Grill 5 - 6:30 PM $XGLHQFHIDYRULWH¿OPVDW

Vicki’s Back Door 7 - 9:00 PM Join us opening night Wednesday, July 30

For details and to buy tickets go to ZZZWXPEOHZHHG¿OPIHVWFRPSDVWLPH

PASTIME B A R

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G R I L L


JULY 24, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER Investing in America’s workforce and competitiveness OPINION BY U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DOC HASTINGS WASHINGTON’S FOURTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

Millions of Americans continue to struggle to find work in today’s challenging economy. Many Central Washington workforce-training centers have successfully helped unemployed workers find jobs. However, on the federal level, much improvement can be made. Like with all federal programs, I believe Congress should routinely review them and make necessary improvements to meet the challenges of the 21st century. Job seekers currently face a maze of overlapping programs and an inefficient, bureaucratic training system, making it difficult to get the skills they need to compete for a job in today’s economy. With millions of Americans still out of work and nearly 4 million job openings unfilled, we must look for ways to modernize and reform our federal workforce development programs. Doc Hastings Last week, a good thing happened. House and Senate leaders from both parties came together and passed the “Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act,� sending it to the president’s desk for him to sign into law. This is a great example of what we can accomplish together when we listen to the American people. This bipartisan, bicameral legislation makes much-needed updates to America’s workforce training system and helps put Americans back to work. Now more than ever, valuable education and workforce development opportunities are critical to building a stronger working class. We need a system that prepares employees for the 21st century workforce, while helping businesses find the skilled employees they need to compete and create jobs in America. Too often, we hear of our soldiers returning from war and not being able to find work. The “Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act� better serves our veterans by providing support and equipping them with critical job training services in order to find good paying jobs. As a former small business owner, I recognize the challenges many employers face in finding workers with the proper qualifications to hire. This legislation streamlines the workforce training system by consolidating 15 existing programs and saves taxpayer dollars by cutting bureaucratic government red tape. The bill also gives Washington State more flexibility to tailor our job training programs to meet the needs for occupations in-demand. Most importantly, it prepares American job seekers with the skills and tools they need to compete in a 21st century workforce. Ensuring Washington state maintains a dynamic workforce is critical to growing our economy. The “Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act� is a common-sense bill that supports employers who seek skilled employees and expands opportunities for job seekers to achieve the American Dream.

Editor’s Note: $ELJKDQGJRHVRXWWRDOOWKHÀUHÀJKWHUVÀUVWUH sponders, other emergency personnel and volunteers who are workLQJVRKDUGRQWKHÀUHVDQGWKHDIWHUPDWK And to all those who suffered from the devastation and continue to struggle, you are in our prayers. Gary

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at (509) 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

The social media ‘firestorm’ What a great week for Managing Editor Gary DeVon to be down for the count, recovering (nicely, I’ll report) from surgery. And ad manager Charlene Helm, on vacation to the coast. And my wife Kim, visiting family in Michigan. Up until Thursday evening, I spent a lot of time whining about all sorts of things. The last few days have done a bit to change all our perspectives, haven’t they? As that ominous mushroom cloud rose in the south, signaling the firestorm that devoured part of Pateros, I tried to follow what was going on however I could. That evening, that meant listening to the radio and following HALF-BAKED Facebook. Brent Baker Somehow, some way - the grace of God, sheer luck, or the Herculean efforts of local firefighters and residents - the only death reported in this whole disaster came as the result of a heart attack. But the firestorm that erupted on social media was almost as scary and potentially as deadly as the actual flames and smoke. People were making life and death decisions based upon Facebook and Twitter posts. Some of the information was flat out wrong. Other information was dangerously outdated, not through anyone’s fault, but because of something as arcane as how Facebook sorts and time stamps its postings. Our readers that are connected via social media saw a lot - a LOT - of me these past few days. It wasn’t planned. But when I started seeing conflicting information about the same situation showing up on my Facebook

The Oroville Gazette

75 Years Ago July 21 - 28, 1939: The fruit drying plant, owned and operated by the Valley Evaporating Company, has been undergoing an almost complete remodeling project which will triple its capacity. The building has been almost doubled in size and with the newer equipment and will give employment to a larger number of people. This will give them the capacity to process 30 to 40 tons of apples daily. Theo Neal, son of Mr. and Mrs. Len Eisele, accompanied by Russell Parkhill of the Wenatchee Air Service, flew to Oroville in a new 65 HP Cub Monoplane. They returned to Wenatchee after a short visit where Theo is continuing his pilot training. The heat has been the main conversation in Oroville the last few days. Coming after a more or less cool spring and early summer, the weather man turned on the juice this past week with the thermometer showing 93.5 degrees on Monday, jumped to 100.8 degrees on Tuesday, for the hottest day so far this year. (from the Tonasket Times) The possibility of the creation of an important new local industry is seen in the announcement this week by C. A. Kearney, that he soon will be exploring the estimated two million ton deposit of gypsum at Epsom Lake on Whiskey Mountain about ten miles northwest of Tonasket. The first arrest in Oroville, under the new Washington Fair trade Law, was made when the Town Marshall, Andy LeMay, served a warrant on Meyer Prince, charging him with selling a case of milk under the limit of so much above cost. The warrant was turned over to the marshal to serve by the prosecuting attorney and was sworn out by Ben Prince of Oroville. Grocery Prices: Pink Salmon, $.10 per can; Oroville Tomato Juice, $.06 per can; Raisins, 4 lb. pkg., $.23; Coffee, 2 lb. can, $.53; Fresh ground beef, 3 lb. $.25.

feed at the same time, the thought of leaving my computer was almost scary. Sorting through and finding sources of official information to re-post and trying to make clear what was current and what just sort of ... happened. Others were actively trying to do the same - Patrick Plumb, Connie Maden, Kurt Danison and Ephraim Brown come to mind at the moment - frequently playing off each other’s posts and inspiring searches for additional sources of information to verify or enhance what was being said. Pictures and stories could wait. There were enough capable people with pens and cameras and recorders on site, and sharing the work (credited, of course) of reputable sources that didn’t conflict with emergency services’ announcements provided another key. Communications issues at “ground zeroâ€? meant that some agencies were able to update more consistently than others. Okanogan Sheriff Department, Chelan County Emergency Services, the firefighters’ incident command blog became required reading. At one point I had 15 browser windows open ... I cut back. A lot of people learned a lot about disaster response through this generational (we can only hope) event. And the recovery progresses, we’ll learn a lot more about how to be better prepared for similar future events. But on my end, there’s these few things to think about: • Social media can be your greatest friend or worst enemy in a crisis. Eyewitness accounts are great, but we don’t always see what we think we’re seeing in the heat of the moment. Don’t rely on the account of someone whose status was shared by your friend’s cousin in Florida to make a life or death decision. • I used both the G-T and my personal accounts to share information. Partly, there

was just so much; the newspaper’s feeds I used to share things pertinent to our specific situation in the Oroville/Tonasket areas. My personal feed, I used for the larger, multiple-county story. Anything from an official agency, I tried to share. Personal accounts, pictures, descriptions, I tried to keep to events that had already happened, and tried to stay away from the kinds of things that might encourage a risky choice (i.e. evacuate or not). • Beware when you Share. Or even Comment. These functions are great for passing along information, but they can also cause problems. Early on I posted a video of a fire nearly overcoming a fire crew that looked (from the time stamp on it) as if it had been filmed on Thursday. It turned out it was two years old and from a fire that wasn’t even in this state. What happened was, when someone “Sharedâ€? the video, it gave it a fresh time stamp and location, making it appear as if it had originated locally that day. The same held true for Comments on the Sheriff ’s feed. At one time I read posts that made it appear as if Pateros was under all three evacuation levels at the same time. So, especially on the G-T feed, I tried to copy the original post with it’s original time stamp, rather than use the “Shareâ€? function, to try to minimize that kind of confusion. • The best thing about all this was, just as friends and neighbors came together in firestricken areas to help each other in a time of disaster, the same was happening with my digital world efforts. Tons of new sources of information, good questions, lots of encouraging words and support. So as the weeks and months of recovery set in - hopefully without more catastrophes - let’s hope we can keep this same spirit of cooperation and generosity thriving. And please, be smart about what you believe on social media, crisis or not.

Gazette-Tribune ITEMS FROM THE 25 Years Ago PAST July 20 -27, 1989: For a community service COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY

FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago July 23 - 30, 1964: The 1964 May Festival Committee met last Monday evening for the purpose of closing out the festival business. The committee reported that this year showed a balance on hand after all bills had been paid, $13.96. Balance on hand prior to this year’s festival was $281.25. Receipts for this year are $713.74 collected at the barbecue, public dance, $181.00 and square dance, $5.00 for a total of $1,175.99. Bills, when totaled, came to $885.78 with the largest portion for the meat and paper supplies, totaling $716.03, leaving a balance in the Oroville State Bank of $295.21. Failing brakes were the cause of an accident Tuesday morning when a lumber truck heading down the Molson Grade ran off the side of the road. Driver of the truck, Wallace C. Turner, 18, of Chesaw, was only slightly injured. The truck, fully loaded, went off the road on a curve and plunged over a ten foot embankment into a field. Ghost Towns will come alive and homesteading days will be relived during an Okanogan County Historical Society tour of the Molson-Chesaw area this Sunday, August 2. From 11 a.m. until noon, the group will be at Chesaw and at 12:30 p.m., the societies first historic site marker will be dedicated at the Hee-Hee Stone site. At 1:00 p.m., a nominal charge lunch will be served at the Grange Hall. A picturesque old bank building, an assay office and a homesteader’s cabin, donated to the historical society, will be dedicated. The group will arrive at the former Okanogan Smith orchards, now owned by Mr. and Mrs. Dave Thorndike of Oroville.

project, the Hats and Halters 4-H Club will be presenting the buyers of the Grand Champion Lamb and Market Beef of the Okanogan County Fair with a special belt buckle. The award is to show their appreciation to the buyers at the fat stock sale that they are thankful for their support. One of the money makers of the club was selling worms on opening day of the fishing season at Spectacle Lake. “We would like to make this an annual award� stated the leaders, Marcia Henneman and Nancy Barnes. What would summer time be without a circus coming to town? Thanks to the efforts of the Kiwanis Club of Oroville, the children and “big kids� of Oroville were not disappointed this summer when the world famous Wenatchee Youth Circus put on their show on Ben Prince Field. Even though cool summer winds were whipping across the field, the young circus performers were true to the old motto, “The Show Must go on.� As you drive through Oroville and head east on 16th Street, you find yourself driving by a picturesque little park on the Okanogan River. What used to be a somewhat messy looking bend in the river is now a grassy park with three picnic tables and two barbecue grills. This is Riverfront Park. In 1966, the city leased the land from the DNR. At this time, the center of the park was filled with frog ponds, reeds, cattails and lily ponds. In 1967, the river was dredged out to make it deeper and in the early ‘70’s when Oroville’s Main Street was re-done, all of the blacktop, rocks and gravel from the street was dumped to fill it in. After settling for three or four years, the city was able to level the ground an install a sprinkler system. (Note: the park is now called Henry Kniss Riverfront Park.) Real Estate: Roomy 3 bdrm home on 19 acres with seclusion and a super view. Has power, water, phone and access off County Road. All of this for $22,000, owner contract; Family home in town, 3 bdrm, free standing fireplace, fenced yard with soft fruit trees, partial basement, $38,500.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 24, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Thinking of family and keeping touch Here we are nearing the end of one of the hottest July’s that Oroville has had, in quite sometime, like up over 105 degrees some days. Not too much rain fell, to damage the crop, so the folks at the cherry shed are having a fairly long run working long hours. As we grow older I believe most folks start thinking of family, relatives and reunions and keeping in touch becomes more important than it is to the younger generations. (They more than likely do it by Facebook.) I know that is the case with us, so we’ve been trying to do some “catch-up� visits this summer. This past week end took us to Colville for some long over due visits with cousins. Getting to Colville can be done by several routes and this time we chose to not go the usual way, over Sherman Pass, but by way of Curlew and Boulder Pass. A very scenic route! We met Betty (Engle) Garvey for lunch, then on to a care center to visit her sister, Dollie Mae (Engle) Barr, who had the misfortune of

falling, doing severe damage to her body, and is hoping to soon be able to return home, where her husband Scott Barr waits. Both of these gals are petite little numbers weighing probably less than hundred pounds, are avid gardeners and Betty continues ranching and are on the high side of eighty-years-old. Incredible people! Colville boundaries have really expanded making it a larger town, with many additional businesses and of course some no longer exist. We returned by a way you don’t even want to hear about. Let’s just suffice it to say, it was miraculous that the car still had four wheels on it when we finally arrived in Chesaw and I felt like kissing the ground in thanks for still being alive. Folks were hunting for and picking huckleberries along the way. Oh! and I forgot the wildlife! We saw one tiny fawn and a chipmonk. Whee! Word has come that Bob Garrett, formerly of Loomis and a longtime resi-

dent and business man there, have everything on display! passed away on Saturday. And in 1939 if you had a A memorial service will be quarter you could buy three held for him in Loomis at a pounds of hamburger‌if later date to be announced. you had a quarter. The older we get the more The out- of- control fires we talk to ourselves. Doesn’t up and down the valley are mean we’re crazy, could just reeking havoc, taking the mean we care less what anyhomes of many in the Pateros one else has to say. area. So sad! Remember the pond that Planes have been coming THIS & THAT was located between 17th to Lake Osoyoos, filling the and 18th streets, that the Joyce Emry huge water tanks they carry, mosquitoes thought was to drop water on the surtheirs, exclusively? Sitting rounding fires. It is interesting to watch above it was what was Oroville’s hos- the dangerous procedures, and when pital and they were both there, when I we lived on the lake the planes would came in 1943. There is a small house, fly over our house so low they would that still remains, and that was my first sometimes drip water on the patio and home here, and ultimately three other small houses were built to the south, we could wave at the pilots. Folks that have breathing problems facing Main St. but the pond was filled in and a very nice soccer field/park is are bothered by the smoke that drifts located there and the “old hospitalâ€? in and some have had to resort to their was destroyed. The small house on the oxygen tanks. The Larry Eder family have some new extreme south is being remodeled and I think it would be accurate to say that additions‌ three little buffaloes have the size has been doubled. And who says arrived and more to come. I am still pursuing the situation of nothing ever changes in Oroville? Another tid-bit about that time, is that whether there is to be (or not be) music there were thirteen gas stations operating in the K thru 3rd grade. I can at this and now there are three‌..and we can time, say that those I talk to for are highly in favor of having the program hardly afford to buy gas at any of them. My house isn’t really messy‌I just continue.

Honoring SPC Beau Swenson SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

USBP/submitted photo

Explorers ready themselves for Defensive Tactics training.

Border Patrol Explorers hold 9th annual academy SUBMITTED BY GERARDO REGALADO SPECIAL OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR SPOKANE SECTOR

OROVILLE - Oroville Border Patrol Explorer Post #0023 held its ninth annual Border Patrol Explorer Academy from June 22-27. The six-day academy, held at Lost Lake in the Okanogan National Forest, is a condensed version of the Border Patrol Academy course. Explorer cadets participated in classroom instruction combined with “hands on� experience in arrest techniques, defensive tactics, survival swimming, First Aid/CPR and physical training. In addition, cadets learned basic immigration and criminal law, crime scene investigation and vehicle stop techniques. Graduation was held June 27, 2014, at the Oroville Border Patrol Station. Nine cadets earned the title of Border Patrol Explorer, five from the Oroville Border Patrol Explorer Post and three from the Marion County, Oregon Sheriff’s Office and one was from the Pierce County Sheriff’s Office Explorer Post. Marion County Cadet John Mendrin was awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award during the graduation ceremony. Oroville Explorer Kambe Ripley received the Chief’s Award for integrity, leadership and heart. Oroville Explorer Bailey Griffin described the impact of the training, “The academy was both incredibly challenging and completely amazing. It’s those moments in life when we’re

pushed to our limits that teach us the most about who we are and show us how far we can truly go.� The academy taught me absolute strength is mental and showed me I can take on any challenge I put my mind to. I’m so grateful for the relationships I got to build with both the advisors and trainees, the strongest leaders I’ve ever met. I can’t wait until next year.� The 2014 Explorer Academy graduates are: Explorers Brandon Baugher, Nick ClasÊ, Bailey Griffin, Kambe Ribly and Nathan Rise, from the Oroville Station; Cadets John Mendrin, Nick Skelton and Grant Thommen, Marion County and Cadet Nathan Wick, Pierce County. Law Enforcement Exploring is a program for young men and women ages 14-21 that provides training on the purpose, mission and objectives of law enforcement. Exploring provides leadership opportunities for youth, and performs service in the community. For more information on Border Patrol Explorers, contact John Tafolla at (509) 476-3622.

We’ve Got You Covered Go Statewide or Target a Region

Coastal: Eastern: Metro:

CBP- U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of the nation’s borders at and between official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.

Call this Newspaper for Details

Aerie Accepting donations for fire victims SUBMITTED BY JAN HANSEN OROVILLE EAGLES

The Eagles is accepting donations for the Carlton complex fire. We will deliver to the Red Cross on Friday, July 25. If you have any items you would like to donate, you can drop them at the Oroville Eagle or call Jan at 509-476-3284. If you have lost everything but the clothes on your back, you need personal items (toothbrushes, razor, shampoo, soap, sanitary items) things you don’t think of when told to “Get out now!�. Any items would be appreciated by all those folks who have lost their homes.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Training Certificates in the job of Mechanics. It is reserved for those who show the most promise, and demonstrate the most skill. These specialists are trained to recover damaged and catastrophically damaged vehicles active service is up, they still under a variety of situations and have a four year window where combat environments. they can be called back to service During his four years of serif needed. It’s called the vice, Beau was based IRR (Individual Ready out of Fort Drum in Reserve) and these North Central New reserves are required to York. He deployed for attend an annual muster nine months to Bagram during those four years. Air Base in northeast Beau returned home Afghanistan where he to Chesaw around did recovery missions Christmas time and our throughout the surBeau Swenson county is now benefitrounding areas where ing from the specialized summer temperatures training he received as a Light reach as high of 120 degrees (F) Wheeled Mechanic and Recovery and winter temperatures get as Specialist from the Army. He low as 15F. is currently doing maintenance Thank you and your family for for the City of Okanogan. While your service, Beau! Your homein the Army, Beau was selected town of Chesaw and the Valley to attend Recovery Specialist is proud of you! We can be conSchool and completed one of tacted at 509-485-2906 or ncw. the most sought after Military bluestars@yahoo.com.

EAGLEDOM AT WORK The Auxiliary is starting a money pot. Every time a member attends a meeting, joint meeting, district meeting or State visitation, $1.00 will be added to the pot. We will start the pot at $25.00 and watch it grow. Your name will be added for each time you attend one of these functions. We will draw the winning name at our last meeting in May. So please come and get your name in the pot. The more times you attend, the more chances you have to win. Also the Auxiliary will be doing a 50/50 drawing every Bingo night to help support the club. This is the time of year when the Aerie sets up committees for such things as entertainment,

By-laws, special events, and others. You don’t have to be an officer to be on these committees. Every Eagle has ideas, suggestions, proposals or complaints. So come to the meetings, volunteer and participate in your club’s success. Our Aerie meetings are the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday. Happy hour is 4:30 to 7:00 every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Taco Night, and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Friday and Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what is happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

Smart Use of “Variables� Can Lead to Right Answers The Explorers put their skills to the test during Defensive Tactics exercises.

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For the month of July we are honoring Army Specialist Beau Swenson. We have honored Brandon and Cody Swenson of Oroville in past months but Beau and Bud Swenson, who we will be honoring this and next month, hail from Chesaw. The two sets of Swensons are not related. With two children serving, Beau and Bud’s mother Karin is a two star Blue Star Mom. Beau is a Yankee Doodle Dandy having just celebrated his 22nd birthday during the month of July (8th). Beau completed his four years of active service this past November and is now an Inactive Reserve. After a soldier’s

Did you ever notice that the people telling you to “calm downâ€? are the same ones that got you mad in the first place? Sometimes I pretend to be normal but it gets boring and I go back to being me. America and Louis Perez are enjoying a new experience, that of being grandparents for the first time. Congratulations to the families. The flavor of a garden fresh cucumber can’t be matched. Friends again sharing... Thanks Evelyn! To have a delightful sandwich, lightly toast a slice of bread, spread with mayo or butter, add cucumber slices and sprinkle with Trader Joe’s dill weed and yum! Sixteen innings of baseball is a bit much‌ I wouldn’t make a good sports player because I like to come out the winner, always. My neighbor vacuums her deck and I sit and read on mine. Puncture weeds (goat heads) are such a lacy, innocent looking little plant, with delicate yellow blossoms and yet they are such an awful, treacherous plant. Try and never step on one of the burrs‌ they make you hurt all over. Why do weeds flourish with no water put on them and if flowers get just a little bit dry they die. There’s something wrong with that picture, don’t you think? ‘Till Next Week.

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FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

If you think back to your math classes in high school or college, you may remember that many of the problems involved the use of variables. Changing these variables around in any fashion would change the outcome of the problem. Similar situations occur in life all the time. To illustrate: If you look at the need to manage your retirement income so that you can’t outlive it as a “problem� to be solved, you will need to adjust some variables to arrive at the solution you seek. That’s why it’s so important you be aware of the key variables involved in your retirement income planning.

ORZ UDWH RI LQÀDWLRQ VXFK DV ZHœYH KDG IRU a number of years, can seriously erode your purchasing power over time — which is why you need to consider owning at least some investments that provide growth potential. Of course, you can change your investment mix at any time: For example, you might want to shift to a greater percentage of incomeoriented investments as you move deeper into retirement. Your withdrawal rate — You’ll need to calculate how much you can afford to withdraw from your investment portfolio each year without depleting it prematurely. Your annual withdrawal rate will depend on a few different factors — such as your projected longevity, your investment mix and your other sources of income — but you’ll want to be careful not to take out too much too soon. As was the case with your investment mix, you KDYH WKH ÀH[LELOLW\ WR DGMXVW \RXU ZLWKGUDZDO rate during your retirement years.

OLYLQJIDPLO\DQG\RXKDYHVXI¿FLHQWLQFRPH apart from Social Security, you might want to GHOD\\RXUSD\PHQWVWRJHWWKHODUJHUEHQH¿W amount. Once again, you have a choice to make. Your earned income — Just because you’ve retired from one career, it doesn’t mean you’ll never again earn some income. Many retirees take part-time jobs, do some consulting or even open a small business. Whether you feel that you need to work, or you just want to work, the money you earn from employment can be an important component of your overall retirement income.

As you can see, all these variables involve choices on your part. And how you choose to exercise each variable will affect all the other variables. Consequently, as you manage and monitor your retirement income, you’ll need to make many important decisions. Still, this doesn’t have to be a scary prospect — because the very fact that you have choices Your Social Security — You can start means you also have a great deal of control FROOHFWLQJ6RFLDO6HFXULW\EHQH¿WVDVHDUO\DV over your situation. DJHEXW\RXUEHQH¿WVZLOOEHSHUPDQHQWO\ What are some of these variables? Consider reduced by up to 30% unless you wait until So, study your choices carefully, as you work the following: your Full Retirement Age (FRA), which is toward achieving the income you need to Your investment mix — You might think likely 66 or 67. However, your monthly checks enjoy the retirement you want. that once you reach retirement, you can FDQLQFUHDVHLI\RXGHOD\WDNLQJ\RXUEHQH¿WV This article was written by Edward Jones for invest solely in income-producing vehicles, beyond your Full Retirement Age, up to age use by your local Edward Jones Financial EXW\RXFDQœWIRUJHWDERXWLQÀDWLRQ(YHQD 70. If you come from a particularly long- Advisor.

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


JULY 24, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE OROVILLE Music and fundraiser SENIOR NEWS planned by CCC

Raffling off doll and & accessories SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Joy Lawson tells me the band with their Canadian friends will return to entertain us in September. They play many other gigs in the summer so it is difficult to fit us into their hectic schedules. Movie time at the Senior Center will be the fourth Friday of the month instead of the third Friday as previously announced. Tickets are for sale on the

PAGE A7

doll and blanket made by Doris Hughes and the doll’s bed put together by our president, James Gutschmidt. Doris said she did not make the doll, but did make the mattress and the quilt cover for the doll. She also said that the doll talks. The combination would make a great gift for a young daughter, granddaughter or great granddaughter. We are still trying to figure

out who the baby pictures presented will look like as adults. Sometimes we even guess right. The Senior Center has joined Smile.Amazon so that anyone ordering items through Amazon will receive a donation from this program. You must be registered and create an administrator account for your charitable organization. Raleigh Chinn is the contact person for the Center. He can be reached at the Senior Center at 509-476-2412. Pinochle scores for Saturday, July 19: Joe VanSant won the door prize; most pinochles was won by Boots Emry; Jim Fry was high scoring man and Beverly Storm tied for highest scoring ladies.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR NCRL PUPPET SHOW AT LIBRARY

OROVILLE - Puppet Show. The North Central Regional Library Puppeteers will present a puppet show at the Oroville Library on Wednesday, July 23 at 3 p.m.The show is part of the Oroville Library’s Summer Reading Program “Fizz, Boom, Read!� For more information call 509-476-2662.

UKULELE CLUB TO MEET

OROVILLE - The Ukulele Club will meet on Thursday, July 24 at Vicki’s Back Door 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. All levels of players are welcome to come and play for fun. We will learn to play together and more experienced players will help beginners. Meetings will take place every fourth Thursday of the month. For more information, call Reba at (509)560-4502.

FIRE FUND-RAISER AT WINERY

OROVILLE – This Thursday night’s performances, Thursday, July 24, at Esther Bricques Winery will be dedicated to raising funds for the needs of those involved in the Carleton Complex fire. Proceeds from wine sales will be dedicated to the fund. A variety of performers will be on hand. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

POETRY NIGHT IN CHESAW

CHESAW - On Thursday, July 24 at 7 p.m., Fiona’s in Chesaw is hosting a Poetry Night, so come and read and/or listen to poems on any subject, any author, original and/ or favorites. Refreshments are available. All proceeds from this event will go towards one of the funds for those affected by the county fires.

‘THE HEIDI CHRONICLES’ AT ESTHER BRICQUES

OROVILLE – Dramatic Escape will perform a Reader’s Theatre at Esther Bricques Winery on Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings, July 25-27. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with complementary hors d’oeuvres and wine. “The Heidi Chronicles� begins at 7 p.m., with dessert at intermission. Tickets are $20. Contact 509429-8051 or Esther Bricques Winery at 509-476-2861. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville, Wash.

OROVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, July 26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. The 2014 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: Aug. 2 and Aug. 30. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2662.

312 S. Whitcomb

SPIRITUAL MOVIE NIGHT

The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, July 26, at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509476-0200.

DEMOCRATS TO MEET

CHEWELAH - Seventh Legislative District Democrats will meet with Stevens County Democrats on Saturday, July 26 at Chewelah City Park at 10:30 a.m. Carol Eugene, 7th Legislative District Chairperson, has set the agenda to include Bylaws Discussion, Fundraisers and County Fairs. There will be a Silent Auction fundraiser and a picnic lunch. All Democrats are welcome.

COMMUNITY ACTION COUNCIL MEETING

The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board of Directors will hold their Regular Board Meeting Wednesday, July 30, 2014, at 5:15 pm at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization. We work with community members of all groups to raise the poor out of poverty, to feed the hungry, to provide affordable housing for all, to empower community members through education, and in the process to return prosperity and hope for the future to our county. For questions or additional info contact Lael Duncan at 509-422-4041.

CHELAN CO. PUD PRESENTATION

OROVILLE - The Chelan County PUD is coming to the Oroville Library on Thursday, July 31 at 11 a.m. The public utility puts on an electrifying show for children and adults alike. The library invites you to “come let science spark your interest!� The presentation is part of the Oroville Library’s Summer Reading Program “Fizz, Boom, Read!� For more information call 509-476-2662.

CCC BARBECUE DINNER

The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be having a barbecue dinner and dance on Saturday, Aug. 2. Donations will go toward our front of the building remodel. This Gala event begins at 4:30 with a silent auction, with dinner at 5 p.m. Dancing in the street behind the center will begin around 7 p.m. Call 509-486-1328 for more information or comments.

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL IN LOOMIS

Called By God.� Games, stories, crafts and music will be included in the program. For information or rides call 509 223 3902.

ROMANCING THE DESERT

OSOYOOS - On Saturday, Aug. 9 the Osoyoos Desert Society will once again be hosting its popular fundraiser, Romancing the Desert. The event showcases the area’s unique desert habitat along with the gourmet delights of local restaurants and wineries. This year’s Romancing, held under a full moon, celebrates a ‘Moonlight Serenade’ theme and features wine and food tastings along the Desert Centre’s iconic boardwalk, a specially-themed guided tour, main course dishes, dessert, the musical stylings of ‘Sax Among Friends’ and a silent auction. Proceeds support the Osoyoos Desert Society’s habitat conservation efforts. Tickets at $65 per person and are available by calling 250-4952470 or emailing mail@desert.org.

TONASKET FOOD BANK

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

LISTING YOUR ITEM

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to this limit. However, our online calendar at www. gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further info phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event� button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@ gazette-tribune.com or at GazetteTribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

MOVIES Oliver Theatre www.olivertheatre.ca

Summer Showtimes 7:00 & 9:00pm Oliver, B.C. Nightly (unless otherwise stated) 250-498-2277

Professional Jewelry Repair in Tonasket since 2001 — All work done on site.

TRANSFORMERS

$*(2)(;7,1&7,21 THURS.-FRI JULY 24-25. ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY @ 7 :30PM

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 -RLQRXUDHURVSDFHFRPPXQLW\

KDVRSHQLQJVLQWKH$YLDWLRQ0DLQWHQDQFH7HFKQRORJ\3URJUDP 1HZ&RPSRVLWH&HUWLÂżFDWHDYDLODEOH )$$FHUWLÂżHG$LUIUDPHDQG3RZHUSODQWSURJUDPV 12:$,7,1*/,673URJUDPFDQEHFRPSOHWHGLQPRQWKV 'RUPVDQGIRRGVHUYLFHDYDLODEOH 3KRQH HPDLOWLIIDQ\M#ELJEHQGHGX &ODVVHVVWDUW6HSWZZZELJEHQGHGX

Gala and Extravaganza Fundraiser Party

Music in the Park TONASKET – The next Music in the Park event will be Friday, Aug. 1 in History Park in Tonasket and will be full of music starting at 6 p.m. Chanon & Friends will be playing from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Randy Battle Bluz Band will play the remainder of the evening. Both of these bands are filled with upbeat energizing musicians with lots of originals and old time favorites--Rock and Roll, bluegrass, folk and country. La Ultima Mexi Deli will be serving up their usual delicious food for purchase. The CCC will have beverages and goodies. Bring a lawn chair or blanket, and come to relax in our beautiful

On Saturday, Aug. 2, the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be having a special party and everyone is invited--all ages, members or not, come one/come all. The evening begins at 4:30 p.m. when doors open. Barbecue chicken dinner with three kinds of salads, beverage and dessert for $10 ($5 for kids under 10), an ongoing Silent Auction from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., a “live� dessert auction with Tryg Culp doing the shout out, and Music, Music, Music from some of our favorite musicians The Hydes and friends and the Randy Battle Bluz Band. A street dance in the back alley

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES.-WED.-THURS.-FRI JULY 26-27-28-29-30-31- AUG. 1 SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY @ 7:00 & 9:25

22 JUMP STREET

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. AUG. 2-3-4-5 SHOWTIMES NIGHTLY @ 7:00 & 9:10PM

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL DAWN OF THE 130m PG13 PLANET OF THE APES

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship 6HUYLFH7LPH6XQDP z :HGSP (VWXGLRGHOD%LEOLDHQHVSDxRO0DUWHVSP 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ 6XQGD\:RUVKLSDP “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church 1715 Main Street Oroville DP(QJOLVK0DVVHYHU\6XQGD\ Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 6XQGD\DP Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater 90 min

R

SCI-FI/ACTION STARRING SCARLETT JOHANSSON, MORGAN FREEMAN, MIN-SIK CHOI

HERCULES

PG13

98 min

ACTION/ADVENTURE STARRING DWAYNE JOHNSON, JOHN HURT, IAN MCSHANE FRI. *6:30, 9:30 SAT. *3:45, 6:30, 9:30 SUN. *3:45, 6:30, 9:30 WKDYS. 6:30, 9:30

Church of Christ

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡:RUVKLS6DWDP Pastor Tony Rivera‡509-557-6146

1516 Fir Street‡3DVWRU5RG%URZQ‡476.2311 6XQ6FKRRODP‡:RUVKLS6HUYLFHDP Youth Activity Center‡607 Central Ave. 0RQGD\SP‡After School M-W-F 3-5pm RIÂżFH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ

LOOMIS

PLANES: FIRE RESCUE ADVENTURE/COMEDY/ANIMATION STARRING DANE COOK, ED HARRIS, JULIE BOWEN. PG FRI. 7:00, 9:15. SAT. *4:15, 7:00, 9:15. 83 min SUN. *4:15,7:00, 9:15. WKDYS.7:00, 9:15 Matinee $6.00

602 Central Ave., Oroville 6XQGD\6FKRRO 6HUYLFHVDP +RO\(XFKDULVWVWUG WK‡0RUQLQJ3UD\HUQG WK +HDOLQJ6HUYLFHVW6XQGD\ The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 :DUGHQ‡

Oroville Free Methodist

FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT. *4:00, 6:45, 9:45 SUN. *4:00, 6:45, 9:45. WKDYS. 6:45, 9:45

Adult $8.50

Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 WRSP2SHQWR&RPPXQLW\ Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Seventh-Day Adventist

MIRAGE THEATER

LUCY

Valley Christian Fellowship

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

SCI-FI/DRAMA/ACTION STARRING GARY OLDMAN, KERI RUSSELL, ANDY SERKIS. FRI. 6:30, 9:30. SAT.*3:30,6:30,9:30. SUN.*3:30, 6:30,9:30. WKDYS 6:30, 9:30.

The

will begin around 7 p.m. for a rockin’ out good time. The purpose of this summer fundraiser is to raise money for our building front facade to include new sidewalk and patio area, wheelchair ramp and ADA compliant doors, an overhang to provide shade and energy efficiency, new planter boxes, and signs. We are raising a certain portion of this remodel cost so that we can apply for matching grants. We now have a system to take credit cards at the CCC, so that is a donation option as well. If you cannot come to the party, please consider mailing a donation to P.O. Box 664, Tonasket, WA 98855 or bring it by on Tuesday or Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. We also are using the Community funding site “GoFundMe�. If you have questions or comments, please call 509-486-1328.

Okanogan Valley

Trinity Episcopal

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL MESH?

COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER

)LU2URYLOOH‡ 6XQGD\:RUVKLSDP Rev. Leon Alden

509-486-0615

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

shady park.

Come join us!

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

LOOMIS - Vacation Bible School is set for Aug. 4 through Aug. 8 (Monday through Friday) from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at the Loomis Community Church, Main Street in Loomis, Wash. All children, ages three through 12 are welcome to this free VBS. The theme is “Moses

SUBMITTED BY JANET CULP

Child $6.00

1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVĂ€OPLV*UDWHG 1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGĂ€OPVZLWKRXWWKHLU own parent. Photo ID required.

Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis DP6XQGD\6FKRRO 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO ,QIRUPDWLRQ

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome (YHU\6XQGD\DPWR1RRQ Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship Molson Grange, Molson 6XQGD\DP:RUVKLSDP :HGQHVGD\SP%LEOH6WXG\ “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street 6XQGD\%LEOH6WXG\DP 6XQGD\:RUVKLSDP SP :HGQHVGD\IDPLO\1LJKWSP Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Catholic Church 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 11 a.m. English Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket‡509-485-3342 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of *RGQRWE\ZRUNVVRWKDWQRRQHFDQERDVW´(SK

“To every generation.� Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave.‡Pastor George Conkle 6XQGD\DP (509) 486-2000‡FHOO  

Tonasket Community UCC 24 E. 4th, Tonasket‡486-2181 “A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People�

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m.

Whitestone Church of the Brethren 577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 DP3UDLVH6LQJLQJDP:RUVKLS6HUYLFH DP6XQGD\VFKRROIRUDOODJHV

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren 32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service “Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together�

509-486-2565

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A8

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JULY 24, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

Master Chief Hilderbrand retires from Navy THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

EVERETT – After more than 32 years in the U.S. Navy, Jeff Hilderbrand, from Oroville retired in a ceremony held at Smokey Point Chapel on June 20. Surrounded by family, friends and colleges, Hilderbrand, who graduated from Oroville High School in 1979, was Piped Over the Side, in a tradition passed on from naval ships from the 1500’s through today. The tradition was used to bring aboard or send ashore all ship’s company officers, visiting officers, dignitaries and VIPs. Command Master Chief Joshua J. Dugan was guest speaker at Hilderbrand’s retirement. Dugan is currently Command Master Chief at Naval Station Everett, Wash. The invocation was given by MACS(SW/AW) Ahmed Wiggins. Hilderbrand, the son of the late Jerry “Zeke� Hilderbrand and Marilyn Finsen, grew up in Oroville and after graduating from high school in 1979 attended

Health General

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TWR-822, YP-697 and YP-701. Hilderbrand then reported in March 1997 aboard USS Rainer in Bremerton. He worked in Fuels and Auxiliaries Division as A-Gang Work Center Supervisor and Leading Petty Officer. In April 1999 he reported to COMNAVBASE Seattle. He served on the Region’s Admiral Staff as ambassador for the Navy that interfaced with VIPs and foreign dignitaries onboard OLD MAN IV. Upon completion of shore duty he reported to USS Abraham Lincoln in Everett for a three-yer tour. During this tour, the ship set the longest record for a carrier at sea, completing a 10-month deployment that provided Humanitarian Relief in Bande Ache, Indonesia. In March 2006, he reported to Naval Recruiting District Seattle for recruiting duty. He was Zone Supervisor for six Recruiting Stations and one Naval Operational Support Center in Spokane.

Eastern Washington University for two years. In 1982 he enlisted in the Navy and reported to Recruit Training Center, San Diego, followed by Machinist Mate ‘A’ School at Great Lakes, Illinois. From his retirement program: His first tour of duty was aboard USS Kitty Hawk, where he was a Fireman “Hole Snipe.� After his initial three-year enlistment, he served four years at Naval Reserves Units, NRMTF, USS Fletcher and Subase Pearl Harbor out of Spokane. April 1989 was Master Chief’s second enlistment, and he reported to USS Nimitz in Bremerton. He worked in the Catapults and Aircraft Elevators Division. In 1993, he laterally converted from Machinist Mate to Engineman and was LPO for Reactor Auxiliaries Emergency Diesels Division. After completing his five-year prescribed sea tour, he reported to Naval Underseas Warfare Center, Keyport, Wash., in March 1994. He qualified Chief Engineer and served onboard

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After three years of enlisted recruiting and one year of officer recruiting, he finished his Bachelor’s Degree from Excelsior College and transferred in February 2010 to USS John C. Stennis as Engineering Department Leading Chief Petty Officer.The Master Chief reported to Naval Station Everett in April 2003 for his twilight tour of duty that encompassed a rewarding career of over 32 years. During his tenure he completed six Western Pacific deployments to include, Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Desert Fox, Enduring Freedom, Southern Watch and Iraqi Freedom. Awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and various unit and service awards. Hilderbrand is married to Cathy Williams of Mount Vernon, Wash. They have two sons, Jacob and Keith.

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Public Notices

Master Chief Jeff Hilderbrand

Public Notices

Public Notices

SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ MADEĂĽ WITHOUTĂĽ WARRANTY ĂĽĂĽ EXPRESSEDĂĽ ORĂĽ IMPLIED ĂĽ REGARDINGĂĽ TITLE ĂĽĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUMBRANCESĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ DEFAULTSĂĽ REFERREDĂĽ TOĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ 0ARAGRAPHĂĽ )))ĂĽ MUSTĂĽ BEĂĽ CUREDĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽĂĽ DATE ĂĽ TOĂĽ CAUSEĂĽ AĂĽ DISCONTINUANCEĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ DISCONTIN ĂĽ UEDĂĽ ANDĂĽ TERMINATEDĂĽ IFĂĽ ATĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ BE ĂĽ FOREĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SALE ĂĽ THEĂĽ DEFAULTĂĽ ASĂĽ SETĂĽ FORTHĂĽ INĂĽ 0ARA ĂĽ GRAPHĂĽ )))ĂĽ ISĂĽ CUREDĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽĂĽ FEESĂĽ ANDĂĽ COSTSĂĽ AREĂĽ PAIDĂĽ 0AYMENTĂĽĂĽ MUSTĂĽ BEĂĽ INĂĽ CASHĂĽ ORĂĽ WITHĂĽ CASHIERSĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ CHECKSĂĽ FROMĂĽ AĂĽ 3TATEĂĽ ORĂĽ FED ĂĽ ERALLYĂĽ CHARTEREDĂĽ BANKĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ MAYĂĽĂĽ BEĂĽ TERMINATEDĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ AFTERĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽĂĽ DATE ĂĽ ANDĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALE ĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ORĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ HOLDERĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ RECORDEDĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ LIENĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUM ĂĽ BRANCEĂĽ BYĂĽ PAYINGĂĽ THEĂĽ PRINCIPALĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ INTEREST ĂĽ PLUSĂĽ COSTS ĂĽ FEESĂĽ ANDĂĽ AD ĂĽ VANCES ĂĽ IFĂĽ ANY ĂĽ MADEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ TERMSĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽ ANDORĂĽ $EEDĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ ANDĂĽ CURINGĂĽ ALLĂĽ OTHERĂĽ DE ĂĽ FAULTSĂĽ 6)ĂĽ !ĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽĂĽ WASĂĽ TRANSMITTEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCIARYĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ ADDRESSES ĂĽ .!-%ĂĽĂĽ 0!42)#)!ĂĽ ĂĽ !ĂĽ 4/2"! ĂĽ !ĂĽ 7)$/7ĂĽĂĽ !$$2%33ĂĽ ĂĽ +%.7//$ĂĽ 34ĂĽ . ĂĽĂĽ /-!+ ĂĽ7!ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ BYĂĽ BOTHĂĽ lRSTĂĽ CLASSĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ MAIL ĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ WHICHĂĽ ISĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ WEREĂĽ PER ĂĽ SONALLYĂĽ SERVED ĂĽ IFĂĽ APPLICABLE ĂĽ WITHĂĽĂĽ SAIDĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽ WASĂĽ POSTEDĂĽĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽ CONSPICUOUSĂĽ PLACEĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ REALĂĽĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ INĂĽ 0ARAGRAPHĂĽ )ĂĽĂĽ ABOVE ĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ HASĂĽ POSSES ĂĽ SIONĂĽ OFĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ SUCHĂĽ SERVICEĂĽ ORĂĽ POST ĂĽ INGĂĽ 4HESEĂĽ REQUIREMENTSĂĽ WEREĂĽ COM ĂĽ PLETEDĂĽ ASĂĽ OFĂĽ ĂĽ 6))ĂĽ 4HEĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ WHOSEĂĽ NAMEĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADDRESSĂĽĂĽ AREĂĽ SETĂĽ FORTHĂĽ BELOWĂĽ WILLĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ WRITINGĂĽ TOĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ REQUESTINGĂĽ IT ĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ STATEMENTĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽ COSTSĂĽ ANDĂĽ FEESĂĽ DUEĂĽĂĽ ATĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ PRIORĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ6)))ĂĽ4HEĂĽĂĽ EFFECTĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ TOĂĽ DEPRIVEĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ ANDĂĽ ALLĂĽ THOSEĂĽ WHOĂĽ HOLDĂĽĂĽ BY ĂĽ THROUGHĂĽ ORĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ALLĂĽ THEIRĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ ABOVE DE ĂĽ SCRIBEDĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ )8ĂĽ !NYONEĂĽ HAVINGĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ OBJECTIONSĂĽ TOĂĽ THISĂĽ SALEĂĽ ONĂĽ ANYĂĽĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ WHATSOEVERĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ AFFORDEDĂĽĂĽ ANĂĽ OPPORTUNITYĂĽ TOĂĽ BEĂĽ HEARDĂĽ ASĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ THOSEĂĽ OBJECTIONSĂĽ IFĂĽ THEYĂĽ BRINGĂĽ AĂĽ LAW ĂĽ SUITĂĽ TOĂĽ RESTRAINĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽ &AILUREĂĽ TOĂĽ BRINGĂĽĂĽ SUCHĂĽ AĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ MAYĂĽ RESULTĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽ WAIVERĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ ANYĂĽ PROPERĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ FORĂĽ INVALIDAT ĂĽ INGĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ SALEĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ 4/ĂĽĂĽ /##50!.43ĂĽ /2ĂĽ 4%.!.43ĂĽ ĂĽ 4HEĂĽĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ ISĂĽĂĽ ENTITLEDĂĽ TOĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽ SALE ĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ AGAINSTĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ DEEDĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ TRUSTĂĽ THEĂĽ OWNER ĂĽ ANDĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ HAV ĂĽ INGĂĽ ANĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ DEEDĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ TRUST ĂĽ INCLUDINGĂĽ OCCUPANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ !FTERĂĽ THEĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOL ĂĽ LOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ THEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ HASĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ RIGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ EVICTĂĽ OCCUPANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ BYĂĽ SUMMARYĂĽ PROCEEDINGSĂĽĂĽ UNDERĂĽ #HAPTERĂĽ ĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ &ORĂĽ TEN ĂĽ ANT OCCUPIEDĂĽ PROPERTY ĂĽ THEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽĂĽ SHALLĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ AĂĽ TENANTĂĽ WITHĂĽ WRITTENĂĽĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ INĂĽ ACCORDANCEĂĽ WITHĂĽ 2#7ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 4()3ĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ )3ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ &) ĂĽ .!,ĂĽ 34%0ĂĽ "%&/2%ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ &/2% ĂĽ #,/352%ĂĽ 3!,%ĂĽ /&ĂĽ 9/52ĂĽ (/-%ĂĽĂĽ 9OUĂĽ HAVEĂĽ ONLYĂĽ ĂĽ $!93ĂĽ FROMĂĽ THEĂĽ RE ĂĽ CORDINGĂĽ DATEĂĽ OFĂĽ THISĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ TOĂĽ PURSUEĂĽĂĽ MEDIATIONĂĽ $/ĂĽ ./4ĂĽ $%,!9ĂĽ #/. ĂĽ 4!#4ĂĽ !ĂĽ (/53).'ĂĽ #/5.3%,/2ĂĽ

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE www.windermere.com

Feeling A Little Cramped?

The coffee is always on!

509/476-3378

Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

Sandy Peterson & Ron Peterson, Dan Coursey & Doug Kee

REDUCED! 1019 Golden St, Oroville, 2bd/1 -1/4 bath- Great starter home or could be rented right away. Freshly painted, repaired, new slider, some new windows, new tub surround ready for occupancy. Chain Link full fenced yard, close to town. NWML# 496168 $76,000 www.orovillelakeandcountry.net

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444

LAKE AND COUNTRY

Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Double income investment property! This recently remodeled home features a main living space with full kitchen, bath and bedrooms and a separate studio living space with private entrance. Can be easily converted to a single family residence or kept as dual rental! Separate backyards. Within walking distance of shopping and other amenities. MLS#662606 $110,000

Look for your new home in the Gazette-Tribune To Advertise Call Charlene Helm at

1-509-476-3602 ext 3050

HILLTOP REALTY HOME ON ACREAGE

Approx 15 miles NE of Tonasket on paved road. Lots of young Pine Trees. Private. Partially Fenced. School Bus & Mail. Great Views.2008 4-bdrm, 2-bath Manuf Home in Good Condition. Approx 1836 sq.ft. Big Living/Dining Room Comb. Open Kitchen w/Lots of Cupboards. Appliances. Pen and Lean-to for animals. Storage Barn. MOTIVATED SELLERS. $165,000.00 Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com z 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

Come get your map of all the Lakefront properties!

SUN LAKES REALTY

1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Tamara Porter, Joan Cool & Keith Kistler

TOP OF THE HILL See Oroville. Large 1 level w/ daylight basement, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths,  ÀUHSODFHV JDUDJH DQG PRUH%HDXWLIXOO\ÀQLVKHG

$328,900 ON GOLDEN POND Charming 3 bed, 2 bath, NLWFKHQ GHWDFKHG JDUDJH RXWXLOGLQJVH[WUDFRWWDJH w/ liv rm and bath + sm NLWFKHQ

$194,000

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 24, 2014

SPORTS

Tonasket Commancheros Truck and Tractor Pull RESULTS SMALL BLOCK 1. Carl Herriman, Riverside, WA 224.4 2. Lucas Vickers, Tonasket, WA 206.2 3. Travis Fox, Tonasket, WA 174.9 BIG BLOCK 1. Jimmy Dorhofer, Bonners Ferry, ID174.1 2. Colton Hampton, Bonners Ferry, ID172.0 3. Chuck Cone, Tonasket WA 128.4 MODIFIED DIESEL 1. Lorene Hill, Snohomish, WA 201.9 2. Jake Duquaine, Anacortes, WA193.0 3. Tricia Burton, Rockford, WA 153.3 UNLIMITED DIESEL 1. Jason Burton, Rockford, WA 195.1 2. Brian Whitney, Tonasket, WA 165.8 3. Sean Ehr, Richland, WA 123.5 COUNTRY MODIFIED 4X4 1. Dave Veenendal - The Intimidator, Jefferson, OR 240.8 2. Noel Kuzma - A Nitemare, Scio, OR 213.7 6200# PRO-MOD 4X4 1. Jason Gish - Double Ugly Too!, Tualatin, OR 255.8 2. Butch Phelps - Back Seat Driver, Dale, OR 228.4 3. Ralph Tramp - Agent Orange Pullin’ for the Vets, North Plains, OR 223.8 MODIFIED FARM TRACTOR 1. Fred Tjoelker - Renegade, Custer, WA 246.6 2. Brent Van Dalen - Barn Yard Special, Lynden, WA 217.0 3. Mick Van Dalen - Big Green Tractor, Lynden, WA 211.4

Clockwise from top, rigs of all sorts line up prior to Saturday’s Tonasket Comancheros Truck and Tractor Pulls; “General Chaos� provided a little showmanship as well as a runner-up finish in the Multi-Engine Tractor division; Fred Tjoelker clamed top honors in the Modified Farm Tractor by 30 feet; Tricia Burton of Rockford took third in the “Little Green Wienie� Modified Diesel.

SUPER MODIFIED 4X4 1. Chevy Forenpohar Bounty Hunter, Thorp, WA 249.6 2. Rick Thomas - Outlaw, Bonanza, OR 226.4

Photos by Brent Baker

SUPER MODIFIED 2WD 1. Steven Campbell - Bad to the Bone, Chilliwack, BC 248.6 2. Mike Charpilloz - Comin’ in Hot, Mt. Angel, OR 238.9 3. Frank Woelk - Special Delivery, Turner, OR 233.0 MULTI-ENGINE TRACTOR 1. Larry Pfennig - Alimony, Salem, OR 250.0+ 2. Russ - General Chaos, Thorp, WA 241.0 3. Jack Wheatley - Major Woody, Thorp, WA 223.8

Out On The Town

your guide to

EXHIBITION Roger Sawyer, Tonasket, WA 136.2 Rob Inlow, Tonasket, WA 69.1

    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

 

  

 E

Dining &

ntertainment

)(#($("))$&!("(%!())%!##(" 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Thurs., July 31 Thurs., Aug. 7 Wed., Aug. 13

$15.00*

*To be paid at the time of the physical Insurance will not be billed.

– by appointment only – Call 509-486-2174

| Family Medicine Sports physicals will be done by physician volunteers. All proceeds will be donated to Tonasket Athletic Booster Club. For Tonasket High School and Middle School Students!

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★   Main St., Tonasket z 486-2996

You need $250.00!!!

We Need A Name Branding Contest for Okanogan County Transit Authority, we will pay you $250 if we choose and use your idea.

Sahbualonuns oFnoo’ds! F

%#")&))'() &#''(()'&)(!(')&'') )%$ ) &)  )%$&%$ )

* Wednesday *

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

„ „ „ „

Breakfast Every Morning Steak Night on Wed. & Sat. Spaghetti Thursday Prime Rib Friday — We have WiFi — 626 Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2259

Advertise your specials and events here!

Steak Night

For ofďŹ cial rules and how to enter go to

(8 oz top sirloin)

EVERY WEEK

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JULY 24, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

OBITUARIES

Gerald Eugene Scholz

GERALD EUGENE SCHOLZ Gerald Eugene Scholz, age 83, was surrounded by his family and friends as he passed away peacefully from a courageous battle with cancer on July 16, 2014. Gerald was born to William (Bill) and Madeline Graham Scholz on October 29, 1930. He became the third generation to live and work on the ranch that was founded by his grandfather Daniel Graham, in South Pine Creek, in 1888. Gerald attended school in Riverside, Wash. and graduated in 1948. He was drafted into the United States Army in 1952 and was released with an honorable discharge. Gerald married Dolores R. Figlenski in 1952. Together

they raised four children; Debbi, Mary, Roberta and Gerald in the original home built by Gerald’s grandfather. He was a member of the American Legion, Eagles, Elks, U.S. Armed Forces Legacy, The Cattlemen’s Association and the NRA, among others. In 1977 he married Joyce Frink Hinger and lived out the remainder of his life in their home on South Pine Creek. Gerald was born into a life he loved; raising cattle, farming the land, hunting and fishing and spending time with his beloved family. A true cowboy, Gerald rode a good horse from the time he could walk. He was actively riding and working the cattle ranch up until shortly before his death. Gerald was a steward of the land and saw the beauty of the outdoors in the small details of every field, flower and sunrise. He worked continually to build a ranch to pass on to his descendents, a true testament to his strength and commitment. He was wise, kind and generous. He faced life head-on and had a way of making the best of everything life dealt him. Gerald is survived by his wife Joyce and her sons Tom (Sandy) Hinger and Doug (Mary) Hinger. And by Gerald’s children: Debbi (Gene) Burbery, Mary Scholz, Roberta Scholz (Tom Even) and Gerald Scholz (Bobbi Ayers). By nine grandchildren: Jenny (Nate) Kuske, Vanessa (Jason) Seldal, Shayne Freeman, Michelle (Casey) Silverthorn, Cody (Mandy) Scholz, Joseph Scholz, Jason Hinger, Kelsey Hinger, Kim Hinger, 13 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Gerald was preceded in death by his parents and two sisters Colleen Scholz Taylor and Delores Scholz Grubin Duty and

his nephews Hank Taylor and Eddie Figlinski. Graveside Services will be held 2 p.m. on Saturday July 26 at Riverside Cemetery followed by a gathering in his honor at the Riverside Grange. In lieu of flowers, please remember Gerald in kind words or deeds towards others. Donations in his honor may be made to the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy (P.O. Box 854, Tonasket, WA 98855). Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel is in care of the arrangements.

Linda Maxwell

LINDA MAXWELL Linda Maxwell, age 69 of Wauconda, died on Thursday, July 10, 2014 in Spokane. She was born December 18, 1944 in Seattle to parents Lisle and Donna Conger. Linda grew up in Seattle and graduated from Shoreline High School. She worked for a time as a beautician in the Seattle area

before moving on her own to Delta Junction, Alaska where she was a go go girl. She moved back to Washington State and in 1971 met her future husband Glenn (Max) Maxwell at a bar they both worked at. They dated for 12 years and in 1983 were married at a roadside chapel in Idaho. In 1984, they moved to Wauconda where she resided at the time of her death. She loved her home and her yard and made it into an oasis. She worked for a time as a cook at the Wauconda CafĂŠ, a job she enjoyed. Her last job was in sales for Odorite and had a route from Oroville to Leavenworth. Linda loved her community and was very active with the Wauconda Hall, she started the Mutt Show and every Christmas was Mrs. Claus. She enjoyed playing in the Cribbage Tournaments during the wintertime at the Wauconda CafĂŠ and taught her nieces and nephews to play cribbage and many other games. Linda kept in touch with her family and friends thru letters and cards. She was a member of the Republic Eagles. She is survived by her husband Max, at home; daughter, Michele Maxwell of Everett; two grandsons Chris and wife Allison of Everett and Jordan of Everett; one great granddaughter Harlow; one brother, Randy and wife Heather Conger of Wauconda and numerous nieces and nephews. Linda was preceded in death by her parents, one sister, Debbie and one nephew, Nickolas Conger A Celebration of Life with a potluck luncheon will be held on Sunday, July 27, 2014 at 2 p.m. at the Wauconda Hall. Memorials may be made to the Forget Me Not Animal Shelter, 49 W. Curlew Lake Rd., Republic, WA 99166 or Wauconda Hall, P.O.

Box 4 Wauconda, WA 98859. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Edna Schertenleib

EDNA SCHERTENLEIB Edna Grace Rounds Schertenleib, 86, passed away July 13, 2014. She was born July 11, 1928 in Aeneas Valley to Frank and Sue (Carter) Rounds. At twelve-years-old she moved with her family to Wauconda, Wash. While living in Wauconda, she met the love of her life, Les Schertenleib, whom she married on Dec. 18, 1942, at the age of 14. After they married, Edna and Les farmed and ranched at Wauconda. In the early 1960’s they purchased land south of Tonasket where they started an apple orchard. Edna managed the orchard until they sold it and retired.

Edna cared deeply about health care issues in her community which moved her to become a hospital board member for 25 years. She was passionate about baking and quilting. Sharing many of her pies and quilts with friends and family. If you didn’t find Edna in the kitchen baking one of her champion apple pies, you would find her fishing at Bonaparte Lake or fighting bears in a huckleberry patch. Edna is survived by her son, Marv (Karin) Schertenleib of Omak; great-grandsons, Brandon and Blaine Braunschweig; son, Mel (Patty) Schertenleib of Tonasket; grandson, Kory (Stephanie) Schertenleib of Tonasket; great-grandchildren, Tyson and Kara; daughter, Marcia (Steve) Henneman of Wauconda; grandson, Chad (Jamie) Henneman of Vanhorn, Texas; great-grandson, Beau; granddaughter, Lesli (Jeff) Koplin of Tonasket; great-granddaughters, Madison and Sydney; sister, Stella Windsor of Curlew; and brother, Sunny Rounds of Wauconda. She was preceded in death by her mother and father, loving husband of 69 years, Les Schertenleib; sisters, Louise Gerken and Elaine Anderson; and granddaughter, Stephanie Schertenleib-Braunschweig. A graveside service will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Wauconda Cemetery on Saturday, July 26, 2014. A lunch/fellowship will follow at the Wauconda Community Hall. In lieu of flowers, contributions are suggested to in honor of Edna to the Wauconda Cemetery, 3 Summer Rd., Tonasket, WA 98855 or the Wauconda Community Hall, PO Box 4, Wauconda, WA 98859.

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JULY 24, 2014

COPS & COURTS CRIMINAL

Alisha Ann Russell, 21, Omak, pleaded guilty July 15 to fourth-degree assault. Russell was initially charged with third-degree assault of a child. She was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,010.50. Deanna Jean Davis, 31, Omak, pleaded guilty July 15 to POCS (methamphetamine) and second-degree introduction of contraband. Davis was sentenced to 6.5 months in jail and fined $2,110.50 for the July 28, 2013 crimes. Dustin Cody Smith, 27, Omak, pleaded guilty July 16 to third-degree DWLS. Smith was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended and credited for three days served. He was fined $760.50 for the April 29 crime. The court dismissed a charge of possession of a stolen motor vehicle. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Daniel Valentine, 46, Okanogan, with intimidating a public servant, three counts of harassment (threats to kill) (DV), and one count each of harassment (threats to kill) and fourth-degree assault (DV). The crimes allegedly occurred July 7. The court found probable cause to charge Christopher Loren Anguiano, 26, Omak, with second-degree assault (strangulation) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred March 21. The court issued a warrant arrest on July 14. The court found probable cause to charge Clarence Marcel Desautel Jr., 50, Omak, with intimidating a public servant. The crime allegedly occurred July 8. The court found probable cause to charge Daniel A. Hester, 69, Okanogan, with two charges: one each of first- and seconddegree possession of depictions of minors engaged in sexually explicit conduct. The crimes allegedly occurred between April 2012 and April 2013.

JUVENILE

A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty July 16 to fourth-degree assault (with sexual motivation). The boy was sentenced to 20 days in detention and fined $100 for the Feb. 6 crime. A 17-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty July 16 to possession of marijuana by a person under 21 years of age. The boy was sentenced to 16 hours of community service and fined $75 for the April 28 crime. A 16-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty July 16 to MIP/C. The boy was sentenced to three days in detention and fined $100 for the May 30 crimes. A 12-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty July 16 to third-degree theft. The girl was sentenced to nine days in detention and fined $100 for the May 4 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Sept. 24.

CIVIL

The state Unemployment Security Department fined the following individuals for overpayment of unemployment insurance benefits plus fines: Jeffrey Babb, Loomis, $455.70; John Gelvin, Okanogan, $231.12; James E. Nyberg, Omak, $1,167.95; Michael R. Kostic, Okanogan, $2,832.50; Jason L. Allen, Omak, $517.92; Dacia L. Mackarness, Oroville, $3,643.11; Samuel D. Jiacalone, Tonasket, $1,927.56; James Williamson, Oroville, $1,047.51; Ryan J. Bradshaw, Omak, $2,842.80; Jessica Eberts, Oroville, $199.80; Scott McClure, Oroville, $231.08; Tami Johnson, Omak, $101.64; Travis A. Davidson, Omak, $1,466.53.

DISTRICT COURT Jared Patrick McLaughlin, 23, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. McLaughlin was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended, and fined $1,936. He also had two charges dismissed: reckless driving and third-degree DWLS. Yvonne Delene McMillan, 47, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. McMillan was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $808. Clayton Lewis Naillon, 29, Omak, guilty of disorderly conduct. Naillon received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $408. Shannon Ray Napier, 50, Okanogan, guilty of DUI. Napier was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,681. Napier also had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jack O’Bryan III, no middle name listed, 23, Omak, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. O’Bryan received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $1,058. He also had two charges dismissed: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device and thirddegree DWLS. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 42, Oroville, had a second-degree criminal

trespassing charge dismissed. Larry Leo O’Neil, guilty on eight counts of taking protected fish or wildlife. O’Neil was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and received no fine. He also had an additional charge of taking protected fish or wildlife dismissed, as well as two charges of unlawful use of traps. Ernesto Ramirez Palomares, 45, Tonasket, guilty of thirddegree possession of stolen property. Palomares was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 170 days suspended, and fined $558. Angelique Michelle Parker, 41, Omak, guilty of DUI. Parker was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Celia Amanda Paul, 30, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Paul was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined a total of $1,058. Frank Alexander Paul, 28, Omak, had a charge dismissed: deposit of an unwholesome substance. Jason Daniel Perez, 40, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Ralph Peterson, no middle name listed, 38, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Colton Matthew Price, 25, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Kevin Bert Priest, 48, Omak, guilty on two counts of first-degree DWLS. Priest was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 184 days suspended, and fined $2,116. He also had a charge dismissed: operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Walter Rauda Ayala, 21, Oroville, had charge dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID. Eugene Reliford, no middle name listed, 56, Okanogan, had a harassment (gross misdemeanor) charge dismissed. Robert Trevor Richardson, 33, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Richardson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. He also had a charge dismissed: unlawful display of a weapon.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, July 14, 2014 Drugs on Vinmar Lane in Okanogan. Trespassing on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Trespassing on Red Wing Dr. near Tonasket. Threats on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Loomis Ave. in Loomis. Public intoxication on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Drugs on S. Ash St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Jessey Kyle Tizapa, 18, booked for MIP/C. Serena Rae Smith, 21, booked on a probable cause warrant for second-degree rape of a child. Jason Eugene Braden, 40, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Tuesday, July 15, 2014 Alcohol offense on Ellemeham Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Assault on Granite St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Engh Rd. near Omak. Threats on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Mailboxes reported damaged. Assault on N. Main St. in Conconully. Harassment on Nickell St. in Okanogan. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash at Omak Lake near Omak. Assault on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Ash St. in Omak. Fraud on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Sleeping bag reported missing. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Harassment on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Public intoxication on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Clifton Robert Scroggins, 41, bond revocations for POCS (methamphetamine), first-degree

DWLS, resisting arrest and possession of a dangerous weapon. Jerry Lee Lane, 37, court commitment for DUI. Shayla R. Fitzhum-Schellert, 24, booked on two Superior Court FTA warrants: theft of a motor vehicle and POCS. John Watkins Jenkins, 59, booked on a Superior Court FTA warrant for first-degree criminal trespassing. Davis Henderson Tatshama, 30, DOC detainer. Misty Francine Ornelas, 33, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI. Justin William Nanpuya, 37, DOC detainer. Ezra Thomas Chapman, 33, DUI (revoked) and first-degree DWLS (revoked). Joseph Blake Stone, 22, booked for second-degree DWLS. Wednesday, July 16, 2014 DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Juvenile problem on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Van Duyn Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Disorderly conduct on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Rhodes Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Public intoxication at East Side Park in Omak. Theft on S. Granite St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Main St. in Omak. No injuries reported. James Jonathan McKinney, 29, booked on an OCSO and State Patrol FTA warrants, both for third-degree DWLS. Dennis Keith Johnson, 58, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree theft. Shelby Lynn Arias, 33, booked on a Superior Court FTA bench warrant for second-degree malicious mischief and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Salvador Ramirez Carrasco, 40, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for physical control. Timothy Robert Williams, 20, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Jeanie Kay Todd, 33, court commitment for fourth-degree assault. Jackson Wyllie Squetimkin, 26, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 23, booked for first-degree DWLS. Thursday, July 17, 2014 DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Juvenile problem on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Van Duyn Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. Disorderly conduct on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Rhodes Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Public intoxication at East Side Park in Omak. Theft on S. Granite St. in Omak. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Juvenile problem at East Side Park in Omak. Custodial interference on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on 14th Ave. in Oroville. DWLS on S. Fir St. in Omak. Theft on Apple Way on Oroville. Burglary on W. Jonathan St. in Tonasket. Martin Antonio Aguilar, 26, court commitment for third-degree DWLS. Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 20, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Alan James Wolfe, 52, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Darcy Kim Edwards, 42, booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. James Cody Barlow, 23, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for second-degree DWLS. Neal Blinn Hall, 40, DOC detainer. David Clark Hackett, 70, booked on three Superior Court FTA warrants: second-degree theft, second-degree malicious mischief and second-degree criminal trespassing. Patrick Lee Day, 44, DOC detainer. Molly Jo Condon, 42, booked for

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first-degree assault. Christine Marie Mix, 47, court commitments for POCS, use of drug paraphernalia, and two counts of third-degree DWLS.

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Saturday, July 19, 2014 Wildland fire on Larsen Rd. near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Injuries reported. Utility problem on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Power line reported down. Theft on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket.

Sunday, July 20, 2014 Wildland fire on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Queen St. in Okanogan. DUI on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on George Rd. near Omak. Mailboxes reported damaged. Malicious mischief on Johnson Creek Rd. near Omak. Mailboxes reported damaged. Two-vehicle crash on Crumbacher Rd. near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Trespassing on Sunrise Heights in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Caudill Rd. near Omak. Mailboxes reported damaged. Assault on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Wildland fire on Golden Rule Rd. near Okanogan. Burglary on W. Ridge Rd. near Omak. DUI on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Loitering on E. Apple Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Burglary on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Herman Cody Francis, 27, booked for DUI.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY DENTISTRY

Friday, July 18, 2014 Domestic dispute on Wagon Trail Rd. near Tonasket. Custodial interference on Oakes Dr. near Tonasket. Assault on Conconully St. in Okanogan. Fraud on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on S. Main St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Fir St. in Oroville. Trespassing on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Assault on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Lazaro Sanchez Ruiz, 60, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Larry Dewayne Smith, 63, booked for first-degree arson.

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Alfonso Cardenas, no middle name listed, 56, booked for DUI. Daryl Anthony McCraigie, 25, booked for DUI, third-degree DWLS and an ignition interlock violation. Radley J. Hastings, 62, booked for first-degree arson. Manuel Eduardo Lauriano, 25, booked for violation of a nocontact order and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV).

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 24, 2014  

July 24, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, July 24, 2014  

July 24, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune