Issuu on Google+

Darrington High team gets star treatment from Hawks

Give anchovies a chance Used right, they’ll win you over — really, D1

Page C1 WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

EVERETT, WASHINGTON

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

75¢ (HIGHER IN OUTLYING AREAS)

Compassionate canines

Paine Field Therapy dogs offer comfort to children, crime victims terminal proposed A New York-based firm wants to build a passenger-terminal and parking lot at the airport. By Dan Catchpole Herald Writer

work day at Dawson Place, the county’s child advocacy center. Dawson Place serves more than 1,000 abused children every year. The center provides medical care and counseling for young crime victims and their families. It also houses detectives and prosecutors who investigate crimes against children. Harper’s handler, Gina Coslett, is a child interview specialist at Dawson Place. She’s tasked with asking children about crimes they’ve witnessed or have had committed against them. Coslett often brings Harper, and now Lucy, to interviews. The highly trained dogs can break the ice when children are

EVERETT — As opponents try to foil Paine Field passenger air service in court, a private investment firm is trying to make it a reality. New York-based Propeller Investments has asked Snohomish County, which owns and operates the airport, to start discussions leading to construction of a terminal and parking facility at Paine Field. The private equity firm doesn’t have a formal proposal, but on Tuesday, its CEO and founder Brett Smith spoke about a possible arrangement in which it would shoulder the risk — leasing land from the airport, financing terminal construction and finding tenant airlines. “We’re very flexible,” though, Smith said. The company is “willing to work within the confines that work for the county.” In a short letter dated Monday, he asked county officials to start talks within 30 days. Passenger air service at Paine Field will encourage economic development and give travelers here a more convenient and cheaper alternative to SeattleTacoma International Airport and Bellingham International Airport, he said. Propeller Investments envisions four or five commercial flights a day to regional destinations, such as Spokane, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles or Long Beach, he said. Paine Field handles about 300 flights a day, ranging from small single-engine airplanes to big Boeing jetliners rolling out of the Everett assembly plant, which abuts the airport. That is about

See DOGS, Page A7

See PAINE, Page A7

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Gabrielle Sterbank, 9, plays momentarily with new courthouse therapy dog Lucy, a two-and-a-half-year-old yellow Lab, as handlers Kathy Murray (left) and Gina Coslett watch. Gabrielle, who is not a client, was in the office visiting her mom, a civil deputy prosecutor with Snohomish County.

By Diana Hefley Herald Writer

EVERETT — Lucy was on the job only a few days before she was led into a roomful of grief. Snohomish County deputy prosecutors and victim advocates were meeting with the family of a woman who’d been killed. Lucy, a petite Labrador and Golden Retriever mix, roamed among 20 or so people. Over the next two hours she often returned to the same woman — the victim’s mother. “Instinctively, she knew,” said the dog’s handler, Kathy Murray. Lucy is a compassionate visitor. She will sit next to a scared child for hours, soaking up the tears. She cuddles and presses

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Sterbank hugs Lucy, who is joining the other yellow Lab, Harper.

her nose into shaky hands. She leans into the hurt. Lucy is the county’s

newest courthouse dog. She joins Harper, another dainty Lab, who spends most of her

State revenue increasing, but not enough to cover costs OLYMPIA — Money Washington collects as taxes and fees is increasing, but perhaps not fast enough to stave off spending cuts for state agencies next year.

A new forecast issued Tuesday predicts the state will take in $157 million more in revenue in the next fiscal year than had been assumed three months ago. And it predicts the slowly growing economy will generate $238 million more for the next

50% OFF

Go to HeraldNetDailyDeal.com to purchase today’s deal from

Snohomish Sips VOL. 114, NO. 135 © 2014 THE DAILY HERALD CO.

INSIDE

Business . . . .A11 Classified . . . . B1

Comics . . . . . .D4 Crossword . . .D4

two-year budget than had been previously estimated. But even with those millions of additional dollars, Gov. Jay Inslee’s budget director said it won’t enable the state to cover the cost of existing public services and comply with a state Supreme

Phoning it in Explains why Jeff Bezos is wearing a black turtleneck: Amazon is expected to launch its own smartphone today. The phone will work primarily as a portal for shopping, including a 3-D camera that will allow users to photograph items at other stores, then buy them on Dear Abby. . . .D5 Good Life . . . .D1

Court order to meet the state’s constitutional obligation to fund public schools. “It’s a helpful step but it’s a pretty small step when you are looking at maybe a $2 billion budget problem to solve,” budget director David Schumacher said

Amazon (Page A11). After purchasing an item, the phone will recommend: “Customers who used Sears to try on a swimsuit before buying it from Amazon, also took advantage of Target, Wal-Mart and Nordstrom.” Not what we meant by “intel inside”: A German security firm says it has

Horoscope . . . B7 Northwest. . . .A5

Obituaries. . . .A7 Opinion. . . . .A13

discovered malicious intelligence software preloaded on cheap smartphones made in China that could allow hackers to easily steal data or turn on the phones’ cameras and microphones (Page A11). Amazon immediately filed a lawsuit claiming patent infringement. Don’t know much about Sports . . . . . . . C1 TV . . . . . . . . . .D6

after a meeting of the Revenue and Forecast Council, at which the latest forecast was presented. Last week Schumacher directed leaders of state agencies to identify ways to pare 15 See REVENUE, Page A4

history: On this day in 1964, President Johnson and Japan’s prime minister spoke by phone, the first call over the trans-Pacific cable (Today in History, Page A2). Sadly, without videophone technology, Johnson was unable to show the Japanese official the scar from his gall bladder surgery.

—Jon Bauer, Herald Staff

Summer-ish 64/51, C6

DAILY

Herald Writer

the buzz

By Jerry Cornfield

6

42963 33333

9


A2 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

Picasso painting covers another By Brett Zongker Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Scientists and art experts have found a hidden painting beneath one of Pablo Picasso’s first masterpieces, “The Blue Room,” using advances in infrared imagery to reveal a bowtied man, face resting on his hand. Now the question that conservators at The Phillips Collection in Washington hope to answer is: Who is he? It’s a mystery that’s fueling new research about the 1901 painting created early in Picasso’s career in Paris at the start of his distinctive blue period of melancholy subjects. Curators and conservators revealed their findings for the first time to The Associated Press last week. Over the past five years, experts from The Phillips Collection, National Gallery of Art, Cornell University and Delaware’s Winterthur Museum have developed a clearer image of the mystery picture. It’s a portrait of an unknown man painted by one of the 20th century’s great artists. “It’s really one of those moments that really makes what you do special,” said Patricia Favero, the conservator at The Phillips Collection who pieced together the best infrared image yet of the man’s face. “The second reaction was, ‘well, who is it?’ We’re still working on answering that question.” In 2008, improved infrared imagery revealed for the first time a man’s bearded face resting on his hand with three rings on his fingers. He’s dressed in a jacket and bow tie. A technical analysis confirmed the hidden portrait is a work Picasso likely painted just before “The Blue Room,” curators

THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

Picasso’s “The Blue Room,” painted in 1901. Scientists and art experts have found a hidden painting (below) beneath this painting, a portrait of a bow-tied man with his face resting on his hand, three rings on his fingers.

said. Conservators long suspected there might be something under the surface of “The Blue Room,” which has been part of The Phillips Collection in Washington since 1927. Brushstrokes on the piece clearly don’t match the composition that depicts a woman bathing in Picasso’s studio. A conservator noted the odd brushstrokes in a 1954 letter, but it

wasn’t until the 1990s that an X-ray of the painting first revealed a fuzzy image under the picture. It wasn’t clear, though, that it was a portrait. “When he had an idea, you know, he just had to get it down and realize it,” curator Susan Behrends Frank told the AP, revealing Picasso had hurriedly painted over another complete picture. “He could

not afford to acquire new canvasses every time he had an idea that he wanted to pursue. He worked sometimes on cardboard because canvass was so much more expensive.” Scholars are researching who this man might be and why Picasso painted him. They have ruled out the possibility that it was a self-portrait. One possible figure is the Paris art dealer Ambrose Villard who hosted Picasso’s first show in 1901. But there’s no documentation and no clues left on the canvas, so the research continues. Favero has been collaborating with other experts to scan the painting with multi-spectral imaging technology and X-ray fluorescence intensity mapping to try to identify and map the colors of the hidden painting. They would like to recreate a digital image approximating the colors Picasso used. Curators are planning the first exhibit focused on “The Blue Room” as a seminal work in Picasso’s career for 2017. It will examine the revelation of the man’s portrait beneath the painting, as well as other Picasso works and his engagement with other artists. For now, “The Blue Room” is part of a tour to South Korea through early 2015 as the research continues. Hidden pictures have been found under other important Picasso paintings. A technical analysis of “La Vie” at the Cleveland Museum of Art revealed Picasso significantly reworked the painting’s composition. And conservators found a portrait of a mustachioed man beneath Picasso’s painting “Woman Ironing” at the Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan.

TODAY IN HISTORY Today is Wednesday, June 18, the 169th day of 2014. Today’s highlight: On June 18, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Japanese Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda spoke to each other by telephone as they inaugurated the first trans-Pacific cable

completed by AT&T between Japan and Hawaii, and linked to existing cables between Hawaii and California. On this date: In 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride, 32, became America’s first woman in space aboard the space shuttle Challenger. Associated Press

SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY 50 years ago (1964) Duane Martina, of Marysville, had built a 280-cubic-inch class “runner” hydroplane. He was on Lake Stevens in anticipation of competing in races in Eastern Washington and British Columbia this summer. Mike Donovan, son of Mr. and Mrs. Emory Donovan of Monroe, recently was graduated from Monroe High School with a record of 13 years of perfect attendance, high school principal Robert Cole said today. Others with near perfect attendance were Jerry Lorenz, Fred Bosch,

Jeanne Zarana and Gayle Countryman. 25 years ago (1989) Snohomish County was changing from rural to urban, facing traffic congestion on a number of arterials. About 450,000 people lived in the county and another 150,000 were expected by the end of the century. Driving times were increasing dramatically. Among the solutions considered were buses, express-only lanes, carpools and light rail. By Jack O’Donnell from Herald archives at the Everett Public Library.

LOTTERY LOTTO: Monday’s drawing was for $4.7 million. Monday’s numbers: 9-18-19-22-30-44. The next drawing is today for $4.8 million. DAILY GAME: Tuesday’s numbers: 5-4-6. KENO: Tuesday’s numbers: 2-3-9-10-14-28-38-39-4154-58-61-62-65-67-70-76-77-78-79. HIT 5: Monday’s drawing was for $360,000. Monday’s numbers: 5-23-31-32-35. The next drawing is today for $390,000. MATCH 4: Tuesday’s numbers: 4-18-20-23. POWERBALL: Saturday’s drawing was for $40 million. Saturday’s numbers: 9-33-42-45-54, Powerball 30. The next drawing is today for $50 million. MEGA MILLIONS: Tuesday’s drawing was for $15 million. Tuesday’s numbers: 10-14-24-47-60, Megaball 3. The next drawing is Friday.

Retire like you mean it. You’re over 62? So what!? Nothing’s stopping you now. Over the hill? Not even close.

Limited Time Offer! 1 Bedroom Apartments

$2499

starting at (a savings of $450!)

2 Bedroom Apartments Just walking into Washington Oakes feels like home.

$2999

starting at (a savings of $900!)

Washington Oakes l iv i ng b e t t e r t h an e v e r

1717 Rockefeller Ave. • Everett, WA 98201 425.339.3300 www.leisurecare.com/washingtonoakes 1077151


Local News A3

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/LOCAL

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

Cruelty charges in horse attack Michael Aaron Brown, 46, allegedly threw rocks at two colts, which were injured. By Scott North Herald Writer

EVERETT — A Woodinville man with a history of assaulting people is now facing a felony animal cruelty charge for allegedly throwing large stones at a

pair of horses. The yearling colts sustained multiple injuries in the Oct. 16 incident. One of the horses had a gash to its face that required nine stitches, according to Snohomish County Superior Court documents.

Michael Aaron Brown committed first-degree animal cruelty when he got the horses in a stall and began attacking them, deputy prosecutor Cheryl Johnson wrote. The case was investigated by animal control officers working for the county auditor. In an affidavit filed along with the charge, they alleged Brown, 46, “lured” the colts into a stall on property

in the 23600 block of 75th Avenue SE. A witness reported hearing a commotion. Brown “was heard yelling at the horses, stating that they needed to learn a lesson. (He) was seen throwing the large rocks at the horses and the horses were frantically trying to See CRUELTY, Page A5

A sport for thrill-seekers

Sultan native lands a spot on competitive U.S. Parachute Team

“A lot of those are what we in the industry call work jumps,” he said, referring to training jumps with students or performing for video. When he’s not jumping for work, he’s training for competition. His thrill-seeking sport See PARACHUTE, Page A5

See MUHLSTEIN, Page A5

Herald Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF RANDY SWALLOWS

Gage Galle of Sultan competes at the recent Parachute Association National Skydiving Championships of Canopy Piloting, where he earned a spot on the U.S. Parachute Team.

the University of Hawaii, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in meteorology. “I didn’t really want to get a real job,” Galle said. So he started competing about four years ago. He soon went pro. Now he’s sponsored as a member of the Performance Designs Factory team. The

parachute manufacturer provides equipment that costs more than $8,000 for team members. “It’s made up of extremely experienced, extremely skilled parachute pilots from all over the world,” Galle said. He practices skydiving five to six times a day. Galle now boasts more than 6,500 jumps.

Partners become spouses June 30 I

n 2007, Gary Hatle and Lee Wyman were among the first Snohomish County couples to register with the state as domestic partners. Five years later, a Washington law gave them the green light to marry. On Dec. 11, 2012, five days after the state’s same-sex marriage law took effect, they were married at Everett’s Trinity Lutheran Church. The Everett couple have no major decisions to make this month. That can’t be said of many others in Washington who are registered as domestic partners. Under the law approved by voters, domestic partnerships will automatically convert to marriages on June 30 — unless the partnership is dissolved, is in the process of being dissolved, or at least one partner is 62 or older. “It was pretty widely discussed, and it was on the ballot. But it will still catch some people off guard,” said David Ammons, communications director for the Washington Secretary of State’s Office. The Secretary of State’s Corporations Division keeps a registry of domestic partnerships. With the deadline looming, the state updates the numbers of active and terminated partnerships throughout each day. By Tuesday afternoon, there were 6,654 active domestic partnership registrations, and 1,237 had been terminated. Because Hatle is over 62 — he’ll turn 70 next month — he and Wyman could have maintained their partnership if they hadn’t married. The law included the provision for seniors, regardless of gender, because of their risk of losing pension and Social Security benefits if they married. After June 30, there will be no legal domestic partnership for younger couples — regardless of gender. The intent of the law was marriage equality. “We’re not going to have a special thing off to one side,” Ammons said. Although Hatle and Wyman obtained a legal marriage license in Snohomish County and were wed in church, their names remain on the registry of

By Amy Nile SULTAN — He jumps out of a plane some 1,500 times a year. And he’s not just free-falling to the ground. Gage Galle is a canopy pilot. The Sultan native flies highperformance parachutes in competition for speed, distance and accuracy in an adrenalinefueled sport. Galle, 28, earned a spot on the U.S. Parachute Team last month at the National Skydiving Championships for canopy piloting in Zephyrhills, Florida. “It’s actually very difficult, as ridiculous as it sounds,” Galle said. “The U.S. is very competitive.” Galle beat out some 80 challengers for his spot on the elite U.S. team. Gage Galle Now, he’s set to compete against top international challengers at the World Championships in November. In canopy piloting, often called swooping, experienced skydivers generate speeds of around 90 miles per hour and glide very close to the ground, usually glide above a shallow pond, as far as 100 meters or more. Canopy pilots aim to touch down at precise spots on a course to earn points. “You can go super far, super fast,” Galle said. “That’s why I like it.” Galle said he set his distance record at 140 meters. That’s not far from the world record of 165 meters. Galle works and trains at Skydive Hawaii. He lives in Waialua, just north of Honolulu on the island of Oahu. Galle took his first jump at Skydive Snohomish when he was 21. Some 25 jumps later, he earned a licence to go solo. For about $1,000, he bought a parachute. “My first parachute was very cheap and used and crappy,” he said. He left the Northwest to attend

JULIE MUHLSTEIN

State ferries chief finalist withdraws; search begins anew By Jerry Cornfield Herald Writer

front porch

OLYMPIA — Transportation Secretary Lynn Peterson announced Tuesday that she will restart the search for a new leader of the state ferry system after one of two finalists withdrew. Peterson said Interim

Assistant Secretary George Capacci notified her over the weekend that he was pulling out of consideration. That left former Pierce County Executive John Ladenburg as the remaining candidate, and Peterson elected to not hire him. “While John Ladenburg has extensive experience as an elected official managing large

Goodwill expansion Goodwill Industries’ Job Training and Education Center is holding an open house and ribbon cutting to celebrate expansion. A $30,000-a-year donation funded the opening of a new and larger South Everett job training center, and a third classroom will allow enrollment in GED

government agencies, I have decided to begin a new recruitment process,” she wrote in an email to ferry workers. Peterson said she based her decision partly on what she heard from employees and community members about what they felt the ferry system needed in a new leader. Ladenburg, who ran

and other classes to increase to 180 students per session from 120. The open house will be from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday at the Everett Job Training and Education Center, 210 SW Everett Mall Parkway, Suite D, in Everett. Free classes, support and job placement services will be available. For more information or to RSVP to the open house, call

unsuccessfully for state attorney general in 2008 and state Supreme Court in 2012, has the skills to deal with the politics of the legislative process but less experience on the technical side of ferry operation. Capacci, who joined Washington State Ferries in 2009, served as the deputy chief in charge of operations and construction

206-726-5857. Broadway bridge closed to heavy vehicles: Weight restrictions on Everett’s Broadway bridge has been extended to all lanes of travel effective Thursday, the city says. Previously, the weight limits were limited to the right lanes of the bridge. Now all lanes of travel on Broadway between Hewitt Avenue and

until becoming interim assistant secretary when David Moseley retired from the job earlier this year. He will continue serving as interim ferries chief until a permanent manager is hired, Peterson said. Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@heraldnet.com.

California Street will be restricted, depending on the type of vehicle. The allowable weight limit will remain at 7 tons for singleunit trucks and buses, 9 tons for semi-trucks and 11 tons for tandem-trailer trucks. Typically, cars, minivans and pickup trucks are under the 7-ton weight limit. Parking on the structure will remain closed to all traffic.

CONTACT US Home delivery: Call 425-339-3200. News tips: Call 425-339-3451 or email newstips@ heraldnet.com. Share photos: Submit shots to our reader galleries at www.heraldnet. com/yourphotos.


A4

Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

Highway 522 crash victims identified By Eric Stevick Herald Writer

MALTBY — The two people killed in Monday’s head-on crash on Highway 522 have been identified as a Redmond couple in their 70s. Joan S. Kinger, 76, died at the scene. She was a passenger in a 2007 Ford Fusion. The driver, Stanley Kinger, 79, was transported to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle where he also died. The other driver, 24, was listed in serious condition

in intensive care at Harborview on Tuesday. His passenger, a 1-year-old girl, was listed in critical condition in intensive care. Both were listed as living in Monroe, according to a Washington State Patrol accident memo. The two-car collision occurred around 3:20 p.m. Monday east of Fales Road. A stretch of the highway was closed for about three hours while officers investigated. The crash involved the Ford Fusion and a Mitsubishi Eclipse.

Troopers believe that the driver of the Mitsubishi was heading east and crossed over onto the westbound shoulder. The Mitsubishi hit a traffic barrel that was in some grass beyond the shoulder. The driver overcorrected before crashing head-on into the other car. Drugs and alcohol are not believed to be factors in the crash, the State Patrol memo said. They also have ruled out the driver being distracted by texting or cellphone use. It is too early to know

what caused the car to cross over. “We still need to talk to him,” trooper Keith Leary said. “It’s still an unknown. It’s still under investigation.” Traffic barrels are used to shut down lanes. No construction was going on in the immediate area. The only construction happening was at the Snohomish River Bridge project well east of where the crash happened, Leary said. Eric Stevick: 425-3393446; stevick@heraldnet. com

Man shot by troopers on I-5 dies at hospital Associated Press SEATTLE — A man shot by Washington State Patrol troopers on I-5 in Seattle has died at a hospital. A nursing supervisor at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle

said the man died Monday night shortly after his arrival. He has not been identified. The southbound lanes of the freeway reopened about midnight after a five-hour closure at the Ship Canal Bridge

where the man stopped his truck, set it on fire and spray-painted a large green circle on the freeway. Seattle police said when troopers arrived the man displayed a knife. A trooper used a Taser, but

the man still advanced with his knife so two troopers shot him. The incident backed up traffic for miles. Troopers turned some cars around and diverted others. Some bus passengers got out and walked.

Revenue: Possible cuts to prisons From Page A1

percent from their budgets. Some of those ideas might find their way into the 201517 budget proposal Inslee is to deliver to lawmakers in December. “This is not a drill to impose across-the-board cuts,” Schumacher said. “This is a drill to give the governor options. We’re not expecting to do 15 percent in each and every agency.” Washington is midway through the 2013-15 budget cycle, and in January the governor and lawmakers will focus on approving a 2015-17 budget. State economist Steve Lerch said Tuesday that the state expects to take in $33.8 billion in this budget, up $157 million from his last report in February. And he said the state will collect $36.6 billion during the 2015-17 biennium. Those figures represent what the state collects and spends through a general fund and associated accounts, not federal dollars that pass through. If September and November forecasts for

Josh O’Connor, Publisher Neal Pattison, Executive Editor Peter Jackson, Editorial Page Editor Pilar Linares, Advertising Director (USPS-181-740) The Daily Herald is published daily by Sound Publishing Inc., 1800 41st Street, Suite 300, Everett, WA 98203. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Daily Herald, P.O. Box 930, Everett, WA 98206 Periodicals Postage Paid at Everett, WA and at additional mailing offices.

You have to shut down probably an entire facility, a large facility, to save that kind of money. — Rep. Ross Hunter, D- Medina chief House budget writer

revenue continue to rise, cuts might not be needed in the governor’s proposal. But that’s a tall order given that the state needs to spend $1 billion to $2 billion to make a dent in education funding obligations per the so-called McCleary decision by the Supreme Court, Schumacher said. And, he said, there are obligations for such things as employee pensions and health care for low-income residents, as well as pressure to provide teachers and state workers with a cost-of-living increase. The June 13 directive stirred concern in some quarters of state government. Corrections Secretary Bernie Warner shared the news with employees that it amounts to shaving $250 million in agency spending. It drew a sharp response from the largest union representing correctional employees.

“Cuts of this magnitude would likely mean more prison closures and the early release of prisoners into our community,” Tracey A. Thompson, secretary-treasurer of Teamsters Local 117, said in a statement “Public safety and the safety of correctional staff would be put at risk. We ought to allocate more resources to protect and retain prison staff, not make their jobs more difficult.” Rep. Ross Hunter, D-Medina, the chief House budget writer and chairman of the Revenue Forecast Council, said that where prisons are concerned, such a deep cut can’t be done without shuttering facilities and releasing inmates. “You can’t cut 15 percent out of (the) corrections budget and maintain anything close to a safe workplace, either safe for the inmates or safe for the staff,” he said. “To achieve that level of

savings in corrections, you have to let a lot of people out. You have to shut down probably an entire facility, a large facility, to save that kind of money.” Stephen Gehrke, a spokesman for the agency, said options will be prepared, though it’s too soon to know exactly what they might look like. “Any cuts are inherently difficult, particularly given that the agency just went through a difficult round,” he wrote in an email. “Right now it’s important to keep in mind this is a contingency exercise and is just getting under way.” Marty Brown, executive director of the state Board of Community and Technical Colleges, said it would be “catastrophic” to the system of twoyear higher education institutions. A 15 percent reduction is about $92 million and would require a 24 percent tuition increase as an offset, he said. But Brown, a former state budget director, said Schumacher is taking the right approach given the pressure to come up with money for the McCleary decision. “I thought it was a prudent thing for them to do,” he said. “It’s a planning tool. It’s not a budget.” Jerry Cornfield: 360352-8623; jcornfield@ heraldnet.com.

State residents rail against oil shipments By Nicholas K. Geranios Associated Press

SPOKANE, Wash. — Numerous speakers told a state Senate committee Tuesday that they oppose the rapid increase in railcars carrying crude oil from the Bakken fields of North Dakota and Montana through the state. The Senate Energy, Environment and Telecommunications Committee met in Spokane, a major railroad hub for the northern United States, to take testimony on a bill that seeks to improve the safety of those oil shipments. But nearly all the members of the public who spoke attacked the measure as too friendly to the oil and railroad industries. Numerous people referred to last year’s explosion of a rail car in Quebec, Canada, that killed 47 people, and worried that could happen in Washington. “I personally don’t believe we should send these ‘bomb cars’ through our community of almost half a million people,” said Mike Petersen of The Lands Council, a Spokane environmental group. An explosion like the Quebec blast would be catastrophic in downtown Spokane, where elevated railroad tracks run near or adjacent to office towers, hotels and hospitals, speakers said. But officials of the BNSF Railway noted there hasn’t been a rail accident involving hazardous materials in the Spokane region in decades, and said rail traffic is getting safer. Patrick Brady of BNSF said the railroad has had one flammable release this year in 900,000 shipments of hazardous material. “It’s pretty rare for them to occur,” he said. The oil boom in North Dakota and Montana has created a sharp increase in rail shipments to West Coast refineries and ports. There were no crude oil shipments by rail through the state in 2011, but that increased to 17 million barrels in 2013 and is projected to reach 55 million barrels this year. That has raised concerns in communities across the state about a derailment and explosion in a populated area. A bill to regulate crude oil shipments failed in the

Real Wood

Member of the Associated Press The Associated Press is entitled exclusively to the use for republication of all the local news printed in this newspaper as well as all AP news dispatches.

We carry desks and office furniture

EXCEL Dental & Dentures

49

$

Expires 6/30/14 Wednesday

Comprehensive Oral Exam, Necessary X-rays

For new patients only. Must present coupon at time of visit.

EXCEL Dental & Dentures

15%

Expires 6/30/14 Wednesday

OFF ANY DENTAL TREATMENT

(Offer cannot be combined with any other discount.) Must present coupon at time of visit.

EXCEL Dental & Dentures

Expires 6/30/14 Wednesday

FREE Denture Consultation

Must present coupon at time of visit.

EXCEL Dental & Dentures $750 Per Denture

549

$

ECONOMY QUALITY

$900 Per Denture

749

$

MID QUALITY

$1100 Per Denture

999

$

PREMIUM QUALITY

Must present coupon at time of visit. Expires 6/30/14 Wednesday

Benefits of FLEXIBLE PARTIALS 1. Comfort, light weight, thin 2. Durable, unbreakable 3. Natural aesthetics (gum color) (metal-free) 4. No metal allergy 5. Repairable & Relinable 6. One tooth or more, replacement without having implant

425-774-8590

• Dentures • Partials • Repairs • Relines • Extractions • Crowns • Bridges • Root Canals • Fillings • Cleanings • Lab on-site

COMPLETE DENTAL & DENTURE SERVICES IN ONE PLACE! Interest Free Financing, on approved credit (co-signers accepted!) Most Dental Insurance Accepted.

��� www.exceldd.com 20015 Hwy 99, Ste. D • Lynnwood, WA 98036 JAY CHOI DPD • GREGORY HERMSEN DDS

1075475

1058093

Delivery Times: Papers are due to homes by 5:30 a.m. Mon.-Fri., 7:00 a.m. Sat., 7:00 a.m. on Sundays and major holidays. Deadlines are one hour later on Whidbey Island and other outlying areas. Suggested Home Delivery Rates: 7-day delivery: $16.75 monthly billing, $48.75 for 3 months billing, $96.00 for 6 months billing, $186.00 for 12 months billing, $15.00 per month for Easy Pay. 5-day delivery: (Monday-Friday): $15.00 monthly billing, $45.00 for 3 months billing, $90.00 for 6 months billing, $180.00 for 12 months billing, $14.50 per month for Easy Pay. 3-day delivery: (Friday-Sunday): $12.75 monthly billing, $37.50 for 3 months billing, $73.50 for 6 months billing, $144.00 for 12 months billing, $11.50 per month for Easy Pay. Sunday Only delivery: $8.67 monthly billing, $26.00 for 3 months billing, $52.00 for 6 months billing, $104.00 for 12 months billing, $8.25 per month for Easy Pay. Rates are higher in outlying areas. Mail Rates: 7-day delivery: Snohomish, Island and King counties: $36.25/month, $435.00/year. Balance of Washington state, U.S., territories and possessions: $37.00/month, $444.00/year. Active military personnel are entitled to Snohomish Co. rate. Sunday Only delivery: Snohomish, Island and King counties: $14.50/month, $174.00/year. Balance of Washington state, U.S., territories and possessions: $16.75/month, $201.00/year. Prepayment required. Mail subscriptions do not contain advertising inserts. Mail service may not be available to some areas outside the USA. 1012013

Since 1975

rices Real Low P

Unfinished, Finished & Custom Finished Furniture

15115 Highway 99

1/2 mile South of Mukilteo Speedway, Lynnwood

425-582-2889

Tuesday thru Saturday 10am-6pm Closed Sunday & Monday

www.realwoodfurnitureonline.com

During a public hearing concerning the safety of the transportation of bulk crude oil by railroad, State Rep. Marcus Riccelli, D-Spokane, listens to public testimony from Katie Evans on Tuesday, in the Council Chambers of Spokane City Hall.

Legislature last year, but Senate Bill 6582 will be introduced in the next session. The measure calls for the state Department of Ecology to study the safety of the shipments. It also seeks to train emergency responders, and create caches of emergency gear in rail communities. It would be funded by an extension to rail of a 5-cents-per-barrel tax that currently applies only to oil shipments by sea. “We want to prevent something catastrophic, and to be prepared if something happens,” said state Sen. Mike Baumgartner, R-Spokane, a sponsor of the bill. Baumgartner noted the state’s ability to regulate the shipments is limited because interstate commerce is a federal issue. Critics of the bill included Katie Evans, of the local chapter of the Sierra Club, who said it spends too much money on accident response and not enough on accident prevention. “We want a moratorium on any increase in crude oil shipments,” she said. Bonnie Mager of Cheney worried that if an oil tanker exploded near her home, “we’d be incinerated.” Other speakers complained that BNSF should be forced to use only the most up-to-date rail cars for the shipments, and should be required to alert local leaders when shipments are coming through their towns. Kari Cutting of the North Dakota Petroleum Council told lawmakers that rail tankers are safe to contain the Bakken crude, which is not more volatile than other crude oil. But she acknowledged there was no way to ensure that an accident did not punch a hole in a tanker car. “You can’t reach zero percent probability,” she said. She said about 40 percent of the oil shipped by rail is transported in older cars that are not as safe as newer models. Johan Hellman of BNSF said about 5 percent of the railroad’s cargo was crude oil.

RV & MARINE SUPPLY

Come in through our backdoor and get...

15% OFF

ALL DAY SATURDAY

June 21st *excludes sale items, Interstate Batteries, and Amsoil. Expires 6/21/14. Does not apply to online sales.

1059691

The Daily Herald Information 425-339-3000 Circulation 425-339-3200 (Out Of Area: 1-800-422-6018) Hours: Monday-Friday 5:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Sunday, and Holidays 7:30 am - 11:30 am Classified Advertising 425-339-3100 (Out of Area: 1-800-854-4411) Retail Advertising 425-339-3030 News Department 425-339-3426 Sports 425-339-3470

Furniture Shoppe

COLIN MULVANY / THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

Luna says: See us for all your camping and RV’ing needs! RV ✢ BOATING ✢ TRUCK ACCESSORIES

1108 State Ave., Marysville

360-659-7833

Mon-Sat 9-5 • Sun 11-2 (Seasonal) Additional Parking Behind Store SHOP 24/7 Ships out next day! www.rvmarinesupply.com


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014

A5

Latest federal plan for Columbia salmon challenged By Jeff Barnard Associated Press

GRANTS PASS, Ore. — Conservation groups and salmon advocates have challenged the Obama administration’s latest plan for making Columbia Basin dams safe for salmon. The challenge was filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Portland against the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries Service, which oversees salmon protection, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which operate the dams. It was the seventh challenge since the lawsuit was originally filed in 2001. Joseph Bogaard of Save Our Wild Salmon said the plan is “virtually indistinguishable” from the one overturned by a federal court three years ago. A federal judge rejected

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dalles Dam along the Columbia River, in The Dalles, Ore., is seen in this 2011 photo. Conservation groups and salmon advocates have challenged the Obama administration’s latest plan for making Columbia Basin dams safe for salmon.

that plan because it relied too heavily on habitat-restoration plans that were not specific. Bogaard said efforts to develop a better plan through collaboration, rather than litigation, were rebuffed. NOAA Fisheries said in a statement that the agency has made “clear and demonstrable progress

in rebuilding salmon and steelhead runs throughout the Columbia Basin,” and it expects progress to continue. “We are not surprised, but we are disappointed at the prospect of yet another cycle of litigation, which only distracts from implementing projects on the ground,” spokeswoman Connie Barkley said in an

email. “We will continue to work collaboratively with our many regional partners to ensure the protection and restoration of these important fish and their habitats now and well into the future, and we encourage all to join in that effort.” The Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation had no immediate

comment about the new legal challenge. The plan, required by the U.S. Endangered Species Act and known as a biological opinion, is the fifth filed by the government since Columbia Basin salmon went on the endangered species list in the 1990s. It balances the protection of endangered salmon against the operation of the hydroelectric dams, which provide much of the power used in the Northwest. It acknowledges that the dams imperil endangered salmon, but it offers actions to make up for the losses. Four previous plans have all been rejected by a federal judge. While the return of adult salmon to the Columbia has surged in recent years, the great majority were bred in hatcheries, and thus are not covered by the Endangered Species Act. Some runs of wild fish have continued to struggle.

A decade ago, a federal judge ordered the government to increase the amount of water spilled over the dams, which increases the numbers of young fish that survive their migration to the ocean but reduces the amount of hydroelectric power the dams produce. The government has since resisted pressure from salmon advocates to increase spill even more, saying it wasn’t needed. “A 17-year scientific study demonstrates that spill is our most effective immediate measure to increase salmon survival across their life cycle,” Liz Hamilton, executive director of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, said in a statement. “The salmon are talking, and it’s hard to fathom why (NOAA Fisheries), the science agency charged with restoring them, isn’t listening.”

Muhlstein: Partnership dissolution Cruelty: Prior assault convictions From Page A3

domestic partnerships. Hatle said he thought county records would make it to the state. When he and Wyman got their marriage license in 2012, they checked a box indicating their domestic partnership would end. Like all other registered domestic partners in Washington, they recently received mail about the law, about dissolving a partnership, and how to get an updated marriage certificate. Hatle didn’t bother to respond because he’s already married. That’s not a problem for the Everett couple, said Pam Floyd, director of the Corporations Division for the Secretary of State. “A domestic partnership is null and void when they marry,” she said. County marriage license information eventually shows up in the state’s vital records, she said. Under the domestic partnership law, Floyd said, a dissolution must go through the courts and includes a 90-day waiting period, just like a divorce. If a dissolution is pending, it won’t be converted to a marriage June 30. The Department of Health is handling conversions using the Secretary of State’s data, Floyd said. Couples who will become newly married June 30 can request, for $20, a new Washington State Marriage Certificate. Hatle may be surprised that his legal date of marriage isn’t the day he and Wyman were wed in church. For couples who registered as domestic partners in Washington, Floyd said, the legal marriage date will be when they registered — for Hatle and Wyman, that’s July 23, 2007. The marriage certificate will

From Page A3

escape,” court papers said. The witness yelled at Brown to stop, reportedly distracting him long enough for the horses to run away. While he shouted threats, the witness ran to a phone and called 911. Brown, who has a history of living with mental illness, was arrested by sheriff’s deputies and taken to a crisis center in

King County. The defendant has prior convictions for felony assaults on people, including a June 2011 attack on a woman at a Seattle residential treatment home. He was sentenced to three months in jail after pushing her down some stairs, according to court papers. Scott North: 425-3393431, north@heraldnet. com

HERALD FILE PHOTO

Gary Hatle (right) and his partner, Lee Wyman, register an official domestic partnership in Olympia in 2007.

also include a place for the date and location of the ceremony. Kokie Adams, a trust and estates lawyer with the Purcell & Adams law firm in Lynnwood, said the legal date of a marriage matters greatly if a couple decides to divorce. Issues could arise involving children, property, and even wages and retirement funds, she said. “Some same-sex couples may not be of that mindset yet — this is real,” Adams said. Hatle said he and Wyman knew the legalities when they registered as domestic partners. He recalls saying to Wyman — half kidding, but half serious — “Do we still want to go through with this? It’s not one of those things you can just walk out of anymore.” In the eyes of the state, they will soon be married seven years. In their hearts, it’s been a dozen years.

Parachute: No safety concerns

Learn more Many Washington state registered domestic partnerships will automatically be converted to marriages June 30. Find out more at: www.sos.wa.gov/corps/domesticpartnerships/ Information on marriage certificates for converted partnerships available at: www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/ Documents/Pubs/422-107-CertificateMarriageForm.pdf

From Page A3

has taken him to faraway places including Russia, the Czech Republic and Italy. Galle’s family cheers him on from Washington. His father, Matthew Galle, lives in Sultan. His mother, Deb Galle, is in Puyallup.

“That’s how long ago we made a commitment to each other,” Hatle said. Julie Muhlstein: 425-339-3460; jmuhlstein@heraldnet.com.

Galle is set to travel to Dubai for a skydiving event later this year. He said he doesn’t ever worry about his safety. “You get more nervous from competing,” he said. “I want to win.” Amy Nile: 425-339-3192; anile@heraldnet.com.

JUNE

SPECIALS! Prices Good through 6/30/14 • While Supplies Last!

degrees, certificates, high school diplomas, and GEDs awarded Congratulations to the 2014 graduates of Edmonds and Everett community colleges.

We’re proud of you! Support your Snohomish County community colleges. Edmonds Community College and Everett Community College do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religious belief, sex, marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national or ethnic origin, disability, genetic information, veteran status or age. 1077099

New York Steak

8

$ 49

lb.

Extra Lean Ground Beef BULK $349 lb. / PATTIES

Baby Back Pork Ribs Pork Breakfast

Sausage

3

$ 99

3

lb.

ON SALE NOW!

$ 49

2

Tickets include Fair gate admission

lb.

$ 49

lb. Bulk

Quality Meat, Quality Price, No Gimmicks www.delfoxmeats.com Butcher Shop & Store • 360-629-3723 7229 300th St NW, Stanwood Monday-Friday 8-5:30 • Saturday 8-6:00

1076859

4,060

Creek Stone Farms

Store Only • 360-926-8369 848 N. Sunrise Blvd, Camano Island Mon-Thurs 8-6:00 • Fri-Sat 8-7:00 • Sun 10-4:00

The Evergreen State Fairgrounds Buy Tickets Online or In Person

www.EvergreenFair.org 1-800-514-ETIX (3849) Ext 2 Admin Office: 10am-4pm (Mon-Fri) Monroe, WA 98272 • (360) 805-6700

1073303


A6 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

ADVERTISING PAGE

R tales Re

PIZZA

The story behind your local neighborhood business.

Office Interiors is your one-stop for office supplies

I

t was the year of Richie and Fonzie on “Happy Days,” Barbra Streisand’s first number-one hit and Dorothy Hamill’s championship performance at the U.S. Figure Skating Championship. Richard Nixon was president and a new Benchley novel featured a rogue shark that fit the descriptor of black and white and read all over. It was 1974 and a young couple had their future hinged on the success of their new office supply business in Everett. Chuck and Doreen Lauby knew that starting Office Interiors, Inc. would be tricky, especially when it came to juggling family life alongside their startup aspirations, but Chuck had sold office products for a few years and the couple was ready to set out on their own. So they coordinated with the elementary school bus driver to drop off their daughter, Alisa, at their store after school. They set up a play area for four-year-old Darren who, after literally growing up in the business, is now a co-owner and instrumental in overseeing and choreographing furniture placement and installation. And a few years after the business was up and running, daughter Sarah inherited the play area while dad travelled from Everett to Lynnwood visiting clients and mom took care of the accounts payable. Along the way, the mister and the misses met up with a proverbial “man in a white hat” named Tom Rainville. “Tom was the president of Bank of Everett at the time,” Chuck Lauby explained. “He told me, ‘Chuck, you bring me the supplies I want on time and I’ll pay you each week as you start out.’” That he did. Forty years later, Lauby expresses ku-

and the latest compostable service ware, including utensils made from cornstarch. Healthcare supplies are top sellers and the Laubys have been rewarded with comments that the brand of rubber and latex gloves they carry last three to four times longer than other brands and cost about 20 percent less. Also on hand are 300-per-pass, crosscut shredders, multi-media necessities, uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems, ink and toner, A/V equipment and janitorial products. Lauby purchases products directly from manufacturers for the same price or a lower price than his company’s biggest competition, so he’s able to offer fair, competitive pricing. On Wednesday, June 18, the Laubys will host their own trade show, open to the public, in celebration of their company’s 40th anniversary. Several vendors will be represented, including Avery, 3M, General Binding Corporation and RFM Seating. New products, free samples, refreshments and door prizes will be featured from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Blue Heron room within Port of Everett’s Conference Center, 1205 Craftsman Way in Everett. Lauby notes his thanks to his family, clients, S.P. Richards Company, TriMega and staff members Nadlae, Dan, Bette, Karon, Steve, John, who have been with the company for more than 20 years, and Kelly who has 11 years of service. All are part of the company’s success and its ideal of community living, community buying and community friendship. Office Interiors, Inc., is located at 2002 Madison St. in Everett, and can be reached by calling (425) 355-3500. You can also visit their website at www.officeinteriorsinc.com.

Chuck and Doreen Lauby, co-owners of Office Interiors, Inc., invite you to visit their store. There you will find office supplies, office furniture and design, healthcare and medical supplies, breakroom and janitorial suppllies and more. They also offer green products and rebates.

dos to Rainville for “standing behind me, providing support as a mentor and being a good customer.” Today, Office Interiors, Inc. offers over 35,000 items to client companies, both large and small. Office furniture is a mainstay product and Office Interiors, Inc. has designers to plan out your space to be functional, ergonomically friendly and aesthetically pleasing. “We take all sorts of classes and online tutorials to learn what customers are demanding these days,” Lauby said. Part of that education helps the team

provide furniture and accessories to alleviate and help prevent back pain, leg pain and carpal tunnel. “Anything to make an office environment more customized to the productivity of its workers, that’s what we do,” he said. This year, the store continues to evolve. “Our buying group, TriMega, has challenged us to grow and given us good direction on what we should be looking at for our future product field,” Lauby said, noting his company now carries an extensive line of breakroom supplies – everything from microwave ovens to Keurig K-Cups –

office

DESIGNING WITH A PURPOSE CALL US TODAY: 360-794-8024

OFFICE SUPPLIES • FURNITURE BREAKROOM & JANITORIAL SUPPLIES

Competitive Pricing • National Buying Power In-House Furniture Specialist & Installation Team

o f fice INTE

Driver License Testing and Teen Drivers Education

We’re Here to Serve You!

19922 Highway 2, Monroe, WA 98272 | monroefireplace.com Monday - Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. | Sundays - Closed

1061348

1052224

Visit Our Designer Showroom! 2002 Madison St - Everett 425.355.3500 • www.officeinteriors.com

1036163

Local ow ers hip results in finn er service

A1 AUTO SERVICE

Adirondack Chair with Ottoman Chaise Lounge

COUPON SPECIAL!

49

$

99

SAVE OVER

$75

1052119

14

99

WHEN PREPAY FOR 5

A1 AUTO SERVICE

Exclusively instructed by police officers

“COMPLETE AUTO CARE • DOMESTIC & IMPORT” Vets enjoy a 10% discount every day on all other services @ A1 - simply present your military I.D. to redeem

(425) 259-6146 • 2201 36th St • Everett Mon-Fri 9am -7pm • Sat 9am -6pm Sun 10am -5pm

Appointments Recommended • Open Mon-Sat 8am-5pm

1014155

No appointment necessary for • Driver License Testing • Knowledge Test • Driving Test

$

Filter • Change Oil & Replace n • FREE Vehicle Inspectio & • Top-Off Engine Fluids Lubricate Chassis 30 5Wrts qua 5 to • Up Synthetic Blend • Applies to One Vehicle Exp. 6/29/14 any other offer. Cannot be combined with

4929 Evergreen Way Contact us at: 911DrivingSchool.com 425.299.8899 everett@911drivingschool.com

Walk-ins Welcome!

CHANG

PAY ONLY $14.99 PER OIL CHANGE!

Experience, Knowledge, Trust.

OIL E

12 month/12K Mile | Nationwide Warranty 406 SE Everett Mall Way #101 (Across from Target, Next to McDonald’s)

425.355.2900

1061659

RIORS

I N C

Ask about our selection of green, eco-friendly products!

Bring your fireplace back into focus.


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014

A7

Dogs: Canines start their training when they’re puppies From Page A1

asked to talk about sexual and physical abuse. They can close drawers and turn off lights. They hold their own leashes. They can offer the comfort that the child interview specialists must withhold to remain neutral. Additionally, Snohomish County judges have allowed the dogs, hidden from jurors, to sit with children as they testify in court. Some families also ask for the dogs to be with them as they watch the trials of people accused of killing their loved ones. Lucy also has been spending time at Denney Juvenile Justice Center, including Friday afternoons with teens involved with the county’s therapeutic drug court. Lucy, 2 ½, came aboard after the county’s first courthouse dog retired last year. When he came to the office in 2006, Stilson was only the second service dog in the nation used by prosecutors. The prosecutor’s office began looking for the right candidate when Stilson’s handler announced that she’d be leaving. Murray, a legal assistant in the civil division, was interested. She and her family raised and showed Staffordshire Bull Terriers for about 16 years. Once her two children were out of

the house and their last dog passed away, she and her husband decided they weren’t going to have any more dogs. She changed her mind when the opportunity came up to help crime victims. She also felt good about having a dog that she wouldn’t have to leave alone at home all day. Snohomish County Prosecuting Attorney Mark Roe selected Murray to apply for the program. She can do a lot of her job on a laptop and work wherever the dog may be needed. It took about a year for Murray to be matched with Lucy. The pooch started working in February. She’s been training for the gig since she was a puppy. Harper and Lucy were provided by Canine Companions for Independence, a private non-profit group that breeds and trains dogs mainly for people with disabilities. Volunteer puppy trainers receive the dogs when the animals are a couple of months old. For about a year the volunteers teach the dogs basic obedience and expose them to social settings, such as malls and restaurants. Then the dogs are sent to a facility for extensive, professional training. The dogs usually are about 2 when they are matched with a handler. Murray spent a week

DAN BATES / THE HERALD

Courthouse therapy dogs, Harper (left) and Lucy hang out with their handlers, Gina Coslett, (left) and Kathy Murray on Monday.

in Santa Rosa, California, to learn how to work with the dogs. She also learned that the dogs need specialized care, including daily grooming and strict diets. “A lot revolves around her bathroom schedule,” Murray said. The dogs can’t whine if they’re in the courtroom, Coslett said. They’re expected to be clean, quiet and well-behaved. The handlers don’t want to do anything to put the

program in jeopardy. “They take good care of others so we have to take good care of them,” Coslett said. Coslett and Murray took the dogs out to Cascade Valley Hospital in Arlington about a week after the deadly landslide in Oso. Staff there had treated some of the victims. It was the first time the dogs had been in a hospital. They went to work. Nurses cuddled the dogs,

sometimes in tears. The dogs visited with the sick, including an injured girl who’d had an accident at home. Both dogs curled up with the girl on her hospital bed. The women also took the dogs to visit the west side command center. There they nuzzled volunteers, some of whom hadn’t seen their own dogs in days. Harper and Lucy have become best buddies. They both love having their teeth

brushed and playing tug-ofwar with toys. Harper perks up whenever Coslett says it’s time to see “Lucy Lou.” “It was like they were separated at birth,” Murray said. She and Coslett try to bring the dogs together at least once a day during the work week. The animals’ blue work vests come off, signaling them that it’s time to play or relax. Earlier this week, the two dogs raced back and forth in Murray’s office. Her colleagues worked on, accustomed to canine play time. Her coworkers carry the dogs’ special treats and don’t seem to mind when Harper insists on closing an open desk drawer. The dogs curled up next to each other on a couch, two furry bookends. Coslett is grateful to have a second dog at work again. There were times when she was doing five interviews a day. That was a lot of work for Harper to do alone. The stress can weigh on a dog, Coslett said. “They love to work but it does take a toll on them,” she said. “They need down time.” Lucy is proving to be a good fit for her job at the courthouse. “She’s like an old pro,” Coslett said. Diana Hefley: 425-3393463; hefley@heraldnet. com.

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS

Paine: Focus on regional flights From Page A1

one-third of the airport’s flight capacity, said Dave Waggoner, the Paine Field director. Smith said, “The airport fits our business model of developing regional, niche airports.” Founded in 2008, Propeller Investments is developing an alternative to Atlanta’s commercial airport, one of the busiest in the world. Its executives and advisors have extensive experience in running, overseeing and working with airports and airlines, according to its website. The market could probably support two terminals with regional flights, he said. But “you’re never going to see flights to New York or Tokyo.” Opponents don’t want to see any passenger flights at Paine Field and were headed to federal court Wednesday to challenge a Federal Aviation Administration conclusion that noise, traffic and pollution from commercial flights would not hurt nearby communities. Mukilteo is leading the challenge in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, along with the city of Edmonds and an activist group of residents, Save Our Communities. If they succeed, the FAA would have to do further analysis, likely delaying attempts to bring passenger flights to Paine Field. It could take several months for the three-judge panel to issue a decision. In the meantime, Mukilteo Mayor Jennifer Gregerson said, “Proponents of air service should understand that it is important to let our case take its course.” Proponents include Everett Mayor Ray Stephanson, who issued a statement supporting Propeller Investments on Tuesday. “After years of debate, it’s time to take advantage of this opportunity and move forward with a plan that helps our economy, builds on our aviation foundation and provides easier access

The airport fits our business model of developing regional, niche airports.” — Brett Smith Propeller Investments CEO

to air travel,” he said in the statement. Snohomish County will contact Propeller Investments to discuss the proposal, said Rebecca Hover, a spokeswoman for the county executive’s office. Whether or not to partner with the company would likely be a decision for the Snohomish County Council. Talks about a passenger terminal last year between the county and Allegiant Air reached an impasse. The county proposed to build a publicly owned terminal for about $3 million and recoup construction costs from parking and concession revenue. The airline wanted to build, operate and own a terminal on lease-free land. The Las Vegas-based airline remains interested in Paine Field and other sites as well, said Jessica Wheeler, a company spokeswoman. Allegiant and Alaska Airlines are the only two carriers that have expressed interest in serving Paine Field in recent years. Alaska had said it would be interested only if another airline established service first. Today, “there are a number of airlines interested” in Paine Field, Smith said. But he couldn’t publicly name any, he said. “They’d kill me if I put their names out there.” Dan Catchpole: 425339-3454; dcatchpole@ heraldnet.com; Twitter: @dcatchpole.

Frain Byron Haug In Loving Memory

Fr a i n B y r o n H a u g d i e d peacefully at his home in Tacoma, Wash. on Saturday, June 14, 2014 surrounded by his family. Fr a i n b o r n o n J u n e 19 , 1927 in Grafton, N.D. to the parents of Olaf and Bertha Haug. He moved to Bellingham, Wash. at the age of nine. Frain graduated from Bellingham High School. He enrolled in the USAF in 1946 and was stationed from Florida to Alaska during the Korean War and was discharged in 1952. Frain earned a bachelor’s degree of education from WWU. He taught at Shoultes a n d Tu l a l i p e l e m e n t a r y schools for 28 years. Frain m a r r i e d M a r t h a To d d i n 1972 and moved to Camano Island where they raised four children. Frain is survived by his wife of 42 year s; son, Jeremy (Shelly) Haug of Tacoma, Justin (Cari) Haug of Tonasket, Wash., Joel Haug of Colville, Wash.; and daughter, Tara (Ron) Kuzina of Wasilla, Alaska; his grandchildren, Emma, Riley, A m ay a , E t h a n , S y d n ey, Elijah, Parker and Daron; his siblings, Duane Haug, Carol Dayton, Maurice (Joanna) Haug and Doug (Vera) Haug all of Bellingham, Wash. Fr a i n e n j oye d t r ave l i n g , g a r d e n i n g , p h o t o g r a p h y, classical music and loved spending time with his family. A memorial will be held Fr i d ay, J u n e 2 0 , 2 014 from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. at the Camano Center 141 N. East Camano Drive followed by a viewing at Edwards Memorial at 3005 Bridgeport Way in University Place from 5-9 p.m. A graveside service will be held Monday, June 2 3 , 2 014 a t G r e e n a c r e s Cemetery in Bellingham from 12-1 p.m. To s h a r e y o u r remembrance, please visit www.edwardsmemorial.com

Irene Constance Ryals Born October 23, 1922, Irene went to be with the Lord on June 6, 2014. She was the 6th of seven daughters born to Odin and Esther Olson. I r e n e w a s a n A i r Fo r c e wife, stay at home mom who spread her wings and learned to drive at age 50. She loved her Friday morning tri p s to Fr ed M eyer s a n d having cof fee with her friends. Irene will be missed by her many friends at Broadway Plaza. She was involved in several activities such as pinochle and bingo. Preceded in death by her husband, Archie, parents and six sisters. Irene is survived by daughter, Linda L. (Tom) Jones, sons: Richard J. (Nelia) Ryals, , Larry B. (Jeanette) Ryals. Also seven grandkids and one great-granddaughter. Many nieces and nephews will miss this gentle, kind, loving and caring Christian lady. There will be a celebration of life on Sunday, June 22, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Broadway Plaza in the View.

Jean Gienia Nestlerode Jean Gienia Nestlerode, 8 8 , o f M i l l C r e e k , Wa s h . passed away Saturday, June 14, 2014. A Visitation will be held Wednesdy, June 18, 2014 9 a.m.--5 p.m. at Solie Funeral Home; Mass will be held Friday, June 20, 2014, 11:00 a.m.at St. Mary Magdalene Parish (8517 7th Ave SE, Everett, Wash. 98208). The Graveside will be held at San Fernando Mission Cemeter y in Mission Hill, California on Tuesday, June 24, 2014.

Joseph B. Anderson Joseph B. Anderson passed away peacefully at Care Skills Adult Family Home in Lynnwood, Wash on May 25, 2014. He was born on July 24, 1940 in Everett, Wash. Joe attended school and lived most of his life in Monroe, Wash. An avid nature lover and outdoorsman, Joe primarily worked in the logging and construction industries. He designed and built log homes. He worked in the woods, did dir t work, and built foundations for mobile homes. In his younger days he also worked at various dair y farms. He was cofounder of Monroe Mat Monsters, a wrestling o r g a n i z a t i o n fo r k i d s . H e served in the military during the Vietnam War. Joe had six children, Cher yl, Dan, Randy, Mike, Joe and Shawn; 11 grandchildren, Anna, Ta u s h a , J e f f r e y, A l e x , Steven, Jake, Ryan, Brittany, Ivan, Shawn and Lucy. He loved animals, enjoyed riding motorcycles, car racing and travelinge s p e c i a l l y to L a t v i a . J o e inspired many of us by his positive attitude, zest for life, great sense of humor and willingness to help others. Joe will be deeply missed by Liene, his children, grandchildren greatg r a n d c h i l d r e n , a n d m a ny relatives and friends. A special thank you to Joanna Soresco, owner of Care Skills Adult Family Home, for her loving and compassionate care of Joe for the last 2 1/2 years. She is an amazing caregiver. A celebration of Joe’s life will be held on June 28, 2014, starting at 12 noon, at 17920 183rd Avenue SE, Monroe, WA 98272. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA).

Donna Mae Thom Murphy D o n n a M u r p hy, 7 8 o f Granite Falls, Wash. passed away on June 14, 2014 with her husband, Don and s i s t e r, R o s e m a r y b y h e r side. She was born September 26, 1935 in Iowa City, Iowa to Meta and Delbert Thom, one of seven children. Loving wife to Don Murphy for 49 ½ years; mother to Theresa Mathis, Theodore M u rp hy, T i m ot hy M u rp hy, Terr y Murphy and Tameria Patzer; grandmother to 20 and great grandmother to 25. Donna also leaves three sisters. She was preceded in death by one sister and two brothers. S h e wa s a n X - R ay Te c h a n d a n av i d g e n e a l o g i s t . She taught genealogy in the Everett Community and School Systems at Edmonds Community College. Visitation will be from 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. S a t u rd ay, J u n e 21, 2 014 followed by Funeral Service at 1:00 p.m. at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints – 18218 100th St N E , G r a n i te Fa l l s , Wa s h . 98252. Committal service will follow at Evergreen Cemetery, Everett, Wash. Arrangements by Evergreen Funeral Home and Cemetery.

Heather Betker H e a t h e r B e t ke r p a s s e d away June 3, 2014 in Bellingham. A celebration of life will be held this summer at a time to be determined.

Obituaries continued on Page A8


A8 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS Obituaries continued from Page A7

Josephine Jeffers Saunders Jurina Bruns Westphal J u r i n a B r u n s We s t p h a l , 103 of Mar ysville, Wash. passed away June 14, 2014. She was born April 2, 1911 in Ross, N.D. She was proud to say she reached h e r 10 0 t h b i r t h d a y a n d exceeded it by three years. She lived through the Great Depression and tornados which gave her lots of stories to tell. She was the fifth of thirteen children and had a lot of responsibility for raising eleven brothers and one sister. S h e m a r r i e d L e s t e r Westphal in 1937 in Minot, N.D. They moved to M a r y s v i l l e i n 19 47. T h ey were married for 51 years before Lester passed away i n 1 9 8 3 . S h e w o r ke d a t M o n te s C l ot h i n g S to r e i n Everett for many years. She ser ved 50 years on the election board, was a life time member of Order of Eastern Star; a member of Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Mar ysville; was a 4H leader; and loved doing family genealogy research before computers. She is sur vived by her daughters, Jeri (Larr y) Knowles, Bonita (Mike) Triff; five grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandson; and many other family members. Memorials may be to Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 7 215 51 s t Ave N E . , Marysville, Wash. 98270. The family wants to thank Hospice of Snohomish County for all their assistance and care of Jurina. A celebration of Jurina’s life will be held Friday, June 20, 2014 at 3:30 p.m. at the Bethlehem Lutheran Church. Burial at the Marysville Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to Schaefer-Shipman Funeral Home, Marysville.

J o s e p h i n e , a g e 9 4 , peacefully passed away in the early morning of June 7, 2 01 4 a t L u t h e r P a r k i n Sandpoint, Idaho. Jo, as she preferred, was born in Ephrata, Wash., July 25, 1919 to Clyde Garfield Jef fers and Ruth (Nye) Jeffers. She graduated from Ephrata High school and attended both Western Washington College and the U n i ve r s i t y o f Wa s h i n g to n where she earned a degree in elementary education. Jo taught kindergar ten during the war years in Everett, Wash. One of the b oy s i n h e r k i n d e r g a r te n class invited Jo to his home for a family dinner. Another guest that evening was a family friend, Stephen Saunders. A short time later Steve and Jo were married i n J a n u a r y 1 9 4 9 by J o ’ s father, Clyde, who was the Chief Justice of the Washington State Supreme Court. Jo enjoyed working at the hospital gift shop, serving in the First Presbyterian Church’s woman’s group, leading a Blue Bird group, taking bicycling trips with friends and family-and most of all being a great partner to Steve. She had a subtle but sharp sense of humor, a great sense of style, a love of adventure, a gif t for hosting others and an ability to paint- which she developed later in life. Jo is survived by her husband of 66 years, Steve; her daughter, Mary Snedden ( D r. J o h n ) o f S a n d p o i n t , Iaho; and six grandchildren: Stephen Snedden of Sandpoint, Anna Smith ( Peter) of Coeur d’Alene, Sarah Anaya (Dr. Samuel) of Austin, Texas, Erika Sargent (Ryan) of Oceanside, Calif., M a r i s s a S c h u h ( Tr o y ) o f Stanwood, Wash. and Michael Saunders of Montana. Numerous beloved nieces, nephews and their children also survived Jo. Jo was preceded in death by a son, Michael J. Saunders; two sisters, Jean Baxter and Betty Pickard; and two brothers, Dick Jeffers and Don Jeffers. There will be a memorial service in Everett at a later date.

Marjorie Shively M a r j o r i e S h i ve l y, 97 , o f Everett, died June 11, 2014. Marjorie Shively was born February 5, 1917 at Colman, S.D. She was a graduate of South Dakota State College. S h e t a u g h t I n te r n a t i o n a l Morse code at schools in Russell and Clarkfield, Minn. where she met her future husband, Glen. They were married in 1945. Af ter moving to Everett in 1954 she taught at Everett and Cascade High Schools. Glen preceded her in death in 1989. She leaves three children, Gar y (Annette) of Bothell, Lynn (Jeannie) of Bellevue and Glenda (Brooks) Atchison of Snohomish, 10 grandchildren and eight great grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Our Savior’s Luthern Church 215 Mukilteo Blvd, Everett. Our special thanks to her adult family home caretakers and Providence Hospice. Donations in lieu of flowers to Providence Hospice.

Maxine A. Kelley M a x i n e A . Ke l l ey, 9 6 , passed away peacefully on June 10, 2014 in Bothell, Wash. M a x i n e will be remembered for her easy laugh and beautiful smile. She loved to dance and celebrate holidays, travel and visit with friends, but was happiest when surrounded by family. She was preceded in death by her husband of 70 years, George. She is survived by her son, Gar y (Sher yl) Kelley; and daughter, Patricia Champlin; six grandchildren and fourteen great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Her memorial will be held at 2:00 p.m. on June 18, 2014 at Evergreen-Washelli Funeral Home, Bothell. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests making a donation in her name to the charity of your choice.

Alvin Paul Koetitz, Jr.

February 1, 1934 - June 14, 2014

Alvin “Sonny” Paul Koetitz,

Jr, 80, of Stanwood, Wash., passed away on June 14, 2014. Alvin was the eldest of four children to Alvin Paul Koetitz, Sr and Thelma Montana Lindstrand. He was born on February 1, 1934 in Circle, Mont. He grew up and graduated from high school in Ronan, Mont., where he met the love of his life, Beverly Jones. She sent him a secret Valentine when he was ill and it was love ever after. Following high school, Alvin e n l i s te d i n t h e U S N av y. Prior to his depar ture, he p ro m i s e d h i s s we e t h e a r t that they would get married when he returned home on leave. Within one week upon his return, they were married on December 8, 1954 at the LDS ward chapel in St Ignatius, Mont. After a short honeymoon, they moved crosscountry to his first assignment at the Patuxent River Naval Station in Mar yland where he served as an AD2 aircraf t mechanic. He was then honorably discharged to the US Navy Reserve in August of 1956 having earned the Good Conduct and National Defense Medals. Over the years, Alvin continued his service in the Coast Guard, Air Force, and Army Reserves retiring as a Technical Sergeant after 20 years of honorable service. As a civilian, he earned an Associate’s degree in Data Processing at the University o f Wa s h i n g to n w h i l e e m ployed with Boeing in Seattle, served as an accountant with G&D Logging Company in Darrington, and worked with Kimberly Clark in Everett. Together, Alvin and Beverly worked hard and shared a deep, unwavering faith in our Savior and an eternal love for each other for 60 years. On July 3, 1964, Alvin and Beverly were sealed to each other and their children for time and all eternity in the I d a h o Fa l l s L D S Te m p l e . They were inseparable! After a few years of moving between Oklahoma, Montana, and Washington, they settled in the Warm Beach area near Stanwood, Wash., where they raised their three children and established a homestead of over 40 years. Alvin was a dedicated member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who lived his beliefs, followed the rules, kept his covenants, and served with honor and dedication. He held various church callings i n c l u d i n g S u n d ay S c h o o l P r e s i d e n t , F i n a n c e Wa rd Clerk, pianist (he especially enjoyed playing for the Primary children), and serving in various LDS temples. Following retirement, he and Beverly ser ved a full-time m i s s i o n a t t h e A r l i n g to n Stake Family History Center in Smokey Point, Wash. Alvin was a devoted husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. He l ove d h i s fa m i l y, e n j oye d spending time with family, attending reunions and special family events, hot rods and antique cars, the outdoors, animals, hunting, boating, fishing, and the ocean. He was a skilled mechanic, a “sharp-shooter”, and a “fix-it-all” handyman. Though he was soft spoken, he had a fun sense of humor that made us all chuckle. Alvin was preceded in death by his parents, his son, (Randall Lee Koetitz); and brother, (Arvid Koetitz). He is survived by his wife, Beverly Jones Koetitz, Children: Jonathan (Tami) Koetitz (Kadis) and Laurel (Mark) Madsen; grandchildren: Jared (Ruthann) Koetitz (Kadis), Justin Koetitz, Tarissa (Dave) Gwilliam, Tasha (Nefi) Urena, Lacey (Michael) Allen, Kimball (David) Romney, Isaac (Maria) Madsen, Ryan Madsen, Tyler Madsen, and Kyle Madsen; great-grand-

children: Leo, Gavin, Christina, David, Rayna, Noah, Koi, J o rd a n , S k y l e r, Ad e l a i d e , Hyrum, Gabriel, Sawyer, and siblings: Carolyn (Temple) B e ave r s a n d G e n e ( J u d y ) Koetitz. Services will be held Friday, June 20, 2014 with a viewing from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and the funeral service starting at 1:00 p.m. at the Stanwood Ward LDS chapel, 795 Ell Rd, Camano Island, Wash. Arrangements under the direction of Gilbertson Funeral Home, Stanwood. A graveside ser vice with military honors will follow at the Anderson Cemeter y in Stanwood, Wash. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Wounded Warrior Project at woundedwarriorproject.org.

David William Grayson Remembering an outstand-

Joyce Remington 1930 - June 4, 2014

Joyce Remington left many friends sad at her passing. Joyce was born in 1930 in Minneapolis, Minn. She and her family moved to Pierce County, Wash. where she attended high school in Puyallup. Joyce married Gene Remington in 196 4 and they moved to Camano Island in 1966, where Gene was stationed with Fisheries Patrol. J o y c e w a s a n a v i d crocheter, she made dozens of intricate afgans, stocking caps, shawls, slippers and to o m a ny o t h e r i te m s to mention. At one time, she ran a yarn shop in Stanwood, along with her longtime friend, Joyce Hurlbert, who made and sold candles. The shop was c a l l e d “ J o y c e ’ s Ya r n & Candles.” Another favorite pastime was bottle digging. She unear thed several hundred collectibles, which she showed and won some prizes for, having some very hard-to-find whiskey bottles and medicine containers. Joyce loved selling things and she sold Christmas t r e e s a t h e r p ro p e r t y o n Cross Island Road. Another talent was planting shrubs and trees, which are in evidence as you drive by her home. It’s hard to see the house for all the foliage. Joyce loved to travel, and, as luck would have it, one of her best friends, Lynda Dreher, had a travel agency and the two of them traveled to many exotic places. Other trips were enjoyed with her husband in their motorhome. They also used other means of travel, such as motorcycles, boats, trains, hor seback and on foot. Joyce was a jogger and walker, entering local 10K races. She was a dedicated walker and Joyce and Gene covered many desert miles as they enjoyed wintering in Arizona the last 23 years. Joyce was involved in the local Red Hatters and very much enjoyed the good times and trips with her buddies. She is sur vived by her sister, Marilyn; niece, Annie; stepson, Pat; sister-in-law, Rosemar y Sedergrin; and her two daughters; sister-inl a w, L o i s E r a t h a n d h e r children; and daughter-inlaw, Robin Magor ty of Burien. There will be a celebration of her life Sunday, July 13, 2 014 a t C a m a n o I s l a n d Senior Center, 606 Arrowhead Rd., Camano Island at 3 p.m. (Directions to the Camano Island Senior Center: Come to C a m a n o I s l a n d to t h e second traffic light, turn right, go about 100 yards, then turn right again, take the first right to Elementary School Drive Way, take first left into the Senior Center.)

ing Policeman, Husband, Father and Grandfather. David was born in Shaunavon, Sask., Canada of American parents John E. Grayson and Maibelle Genevieve Olson, both of Lankin, N.D. Children born were Joe, Phyllis, and David. T h e f a m i l y m ov e d f ro m Canada to Glasgow, Mont. and John Grayson got work on construction of the Fort Peck dam. The family rented a 2-room log cabin in New Deal, Mont. and felt lucky to have it. Most workers were housed in temporary housing. When the Dam finished, the family moved to Tacoma and Dave’s dad got work at For t Lewis as a instructor teaching soldiers how to rep a i r a n d m a i n t a i n h e av y equipment. Tragedy struck the family when Dave’s mother died suddenly of a hemorrhage in 1946. Dave was only 16 yrs old. Joe joined the Navy and Phyllis, Dave and father tried as best they could to maintain the home. David remembers his father cooking a salmon every Saturday accompanied by split pea soup. Pea soup which he shunned eating for the rest o f h i s l i fe . H i s d a d w a s called by the Government to go to Alaska to do the same job, Phyllis and David moved back to Glasgow and lived with Grandma Grayson. Phyllis eventually married and moved with her husband to Texas. David lived with Grandma until he graduated from Glasgow High School in 1948. He had many jobs to help Grandma pay for their living expenses. He delivered newspapers, was a golf caddy, and a delivery boy for Buttrey’s grocery, a Wonder Bread delivery filling stock in area stores. And as a movie p ro j e c to r o p e r a to r i n t h e town’s theater. He sold tickets, ushered, and even popped the corn, anything to help himself and Grandma survive in a world that was not easy to live in at the time. Joe came home on Navy leave, David made the decision to join the Army. Joe helped him pack and get ready to board the early train the next morning, they took David out for a drink, and fe w m o r e , a n d t h e y h a d hangovers the next morning. A huge crowd was at the station, and David said “gee, do you think they’re all here to see me off”?. Just then a huge grey elephant came along side the tracks and people started yelling “here comes the circus, here comes the circus”! It made a sad farewell end in a l a u g h i n g f i t a s t h ey s a i d goodbye. It was years until they saw each other again. David’s father moved back to the states and took a job at Hanford, Wash. When David was honorably discharged from the Army, he decided to go to the U of W. He reconnected with his father who got him a laborer’s job at Hanford, and David made and saved his tuition and enrolled. Being an Army vet, he got living quarters in one of the several barracks that were on campus. But now he had to get money for books and board. He took any job he could find. At a local café he noticed their menus were all hand-written, he asked the owner if he could type their daily menus in exchange for evening meals. He pin-set at the campus

bowling alley. Hard work as every thing was set by hand. Dave got a job at Grandma’s Cookies on Lake Union loadi n g a n d u n l o a d i n g 10 0 # sacks of flour, so heavy for a skinny l45 pound kid that he suffered back trouble for months . If it weren’t for his aunt Grace Van Hee in West Seattle, who invited him to Sunday dinners, he would go hungry. She treated him like a son and was proud of him. He earned his B.A. in Business Adm. in 1957 and tried accounting, but did not find it rewarding. He saw an opportunity to do something in public ser vice, and joined the Seattle Police Dept. in 1957, starting out as a rookie in the Central district. He loved his job as a Policeman. He found it exciting and meaningful. He and his par tner, Robbie Robinson, won many letters of commendation from citizens of the Central District. David earned his Master of Public Administration in 1974 from University of Puget Sound. His work history is on facebook. Search David W Grayson, it will show his progression from rookie, to his appointment as Assistant Chief by Chief Patrick Fitzsimons, who saw the value of education in his men. David’s philosophy about work was always be on time, take advantage of opportunities to get further training. He loved the Law, and all kinds of politics. He had a sharp, analytical mind. He looked forward to getting up and going to work each day. He took only one sick day in 32 years on the job. In his last several year s he enjoyed meeting his buddies at RAP and having lunch and talking of old times, many men being in his Police rookie class 58 years ago. When he could no longer drive, his son Steve would drive him to RAP or some of his friends would come and get him. David retired after 32 years at SPD, and we moved to Stanwood, built a home, but did not “retire”. He continued as a director of Seattle Metropolitan Credit Union, and was appointed as a civil ser vice commissioner for Police and Fireman of Snohomish County, a volunteer job that he held for many years. D av i d m e t a n d m a r r i e d Charlene through the matchmaking efforts of fellow Patrolman Bill and his wife Ginny Lance, a marriage lasting 53 years until David‘s passing. David is sur vived by his w i fe , C h a r l e n e ; a n d t w o sons, David D.; grandchildren, David N. (wife, Santana) and Joscelyne aka Josie) and his youngest son, Steven J. (wife, Cindy); also by his beloved 26 lb Chihuahua, Cocoa; many nieces and nephews, by brother, Joe, who reside in Seattle and nieces and nephews of sister Phyllis who reside in Texas. Sadly, sister Phyllis passed away May 07, 2014, e i g h t d a y s b e fo r e D av i d passed. To Eva, Anthony and Aurora of Providence Hosp. who so lovingly attended to David, and to Eva and her husband a Snohomish County Deputy who sat with David on his final day before David’s family got to the hospital that morning, Your caring means so much to us. David will be laid to rest in Acacia Memorial 14951 Bothell way in Bothell, Wash. On June 20, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. If you wish to send memorials, David’s favorite charities are Paralyzed Veterans of America and Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission.

“Please sign the Guest Book at www.heraldnet.com/ obituaries” indicates that an online Guest Book has been established under the name of the deceased. This will allow friends and family to express condolences and share memories. All entries are at no cost. 948074


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014 A9

OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS

Margot Webb of Quincy, Wash., passed away on May 25, 2014. She was born on December 26, 1936 in Detroit, Mich. to James and Patricia Martin. She was preceded in death by her husband, Don; and brother, Alexander (Sandy) Martin. She is survived by her four children, sons, James (Cher yl) of Arlington, and Thomas ( Deni se) of Lake Stevens; daughters, Lynette Couls of Marysville, Nancy Caton of East Wenatchee; 10 grandchildren, six great grandchildren, and numerous nieces and nephews. Af ter graduating from Bellflower High School in Los Angeles, Calif., Margot met and married the love of her life, Don and soon started a family. They moved to Washington and settled in south Everett with four children. Margot worked as a checker at Safeway and later for Boeing. After retiring Don and Margot traveled in their motor home and settled in Crescent Bar until Don passed in 2006. She loved being around her family and her dog Daisy. M a r g ot a l way s we l c o m e d anyone who would stop by with a smile. A ser vice will be held at Beaver Creek Cemeter y in Twisp, Wash., on July 12, 2014 at 12:00 p.m. Join us af ter wards for cookies and refreshments at the Twisp Senior Center.

David A. Gordon David Andrew Gordon, 45, passed away suddenly on Sunday, June 8, 2014, he was born in Everett on February 18, 1969. Dave was a very kind, compassionate, big hearted person and loved his children, f a m i l y, a n d f r i e n d s v e r y much. He loved to sail on Puget Sound and loved Seattle. Telephony was his career, starting at GTE/Verizon when he was 19, and held m a ny p o s i t i o n s ov e r t h e years. Dave was still working for Frontier Communications when he passed for a total of 26 years. David is survived by his loving children, Courtney Gordon, and Samuel Gordon, also father, Stuar t Andrew G o r d o n ( L y n n ) , m o t h e r, Christie Bailey (Curt); grandmother, Edith Palo; brothers and sisters, Chad Gordon ( To s h a ) , A n d r e a W a u d (Chris), Sara Gordon, Brett Bailey (Karli) and Jennifer Bailey-Files (Joe); and many nieces and nephews that he dearly loved. Also his uncle Ross (Mary) Gordon, aunts, Margaret Tveraa, Theresa Stribling (Sandy), Linda Palo Waggoner (Mark); along with many loving cousins. D av i d w a s p r e c e d e d i n death by his grandparents, Clarence and Doreen Gordon, William (Bill) Palo, Dave’s Grammie Kate Hartz, his uncle, Scott Palo; brother, Justin Bailey, and step mother, Jane Gordon. Services in celebration of Dave’s life will be at the 92nd Street Church of Christ, 4226 92nd St NE, Marysville 98270 at 11:00 on Saturday June 21, 2014. Attendees are encouraged to share their stories and memories of Dave during the service. Coffee and cookies will be served following the service at the church.

To Place an In Memoriam or Obituary, please call

948072

425-339-3023

Office hours: 8am-5pm Monday-Friday Phone availability: 8am-5pm Monday-Friday and until noon Saturday Deadlines: 2pm day prior for Tues.-Sat. Pub. By email until noon Sat. for Sun/Mon. Pub. Email: obits@heraldnet.com

James Michael Caesar J a m e s M i c h a e l C a e s a r, 68, of Mill Creek, born in Tampa, Florida, to Bud and Davida Caesar, passed away peacefully in his sleep near Waimea, Kauai. He dedicated his life to his family and friends and relished ever y moment he spent with them. He was an extremely active and fit man who enjoyed marathoning, backpacking in the high Cascades, biking, woodworking, his 1967 Austin Healey and collecting and sampling fine wine. He loved jazz, classical music and opera, as well as rock and roll. Recently he had begun to study Italian and art history. Jim is sur vived by his beloved wife and best friend, Betsy; his three children and their spouses, Mona Caesar Johnson (Bryan), James Michael Caesar, Jr. (Cheryl) and Matthew Joseph Caesar (Zoe); and grandchildren, Lauren and Cameron Johnson, Charles and Nicholas Caesar and Ronan a n d S o p h i a C a e s a r. I n addition to his parents, he is also survived by his cherished aunt, Virginia Groh; and his brothers, Dan and Doug Caesar; and sister, Anita Kaplan. H e r e t i r e d f ro m t h e U S Army as a Lt Colonel. He served two tours in Viet Nam and was recognized for his ser vice with numerous decorations, including the Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross and Bronze Star ( Va l o r ) m e d a l s a n d t h e C ro s s o f G a l l a n t r y. H e earned the Combat Infantryman’s Badge and the Senior Army Aviation Badge. His name is inscribed on the memorial wall at The Smithsonian Museum for his contributions to militar y aviation. Following his army retirement, he had a second career as a senior manager with Boeing. Burial will be at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on June 23, 2014. The family will be hosting a celebration of his life September 14, 2014 at the Mill Creek Country Club. Visit Jim’s memorial blog: alohacougar36.blogspot.com for more information, also please post memories, photos there. In recognition of his love of the wilderness, the Caesar family requests friends and family plant trees in his memory.

Jeanne Frances Kurtz Rice Gilgan Jeanne Gilgan, 93, of Everett, Wash died May 23, 2014. She was born April 12, 1921 to Stanley Kur tz and Frances Baker Kurtz in Hazelton, N.D. Jeanne attended Hazelton High and graduated from Bismark School of Nursing as an R.N. She spent most of her career as a registered nurse working in hospitals and nursing homes. During WWII Jeanne taught in a one room schoolhouse. She had eight students for the school year. She met and married Earl Mor ton Rice in Sandusky, Ohio and later Max Gilgan in Reno, Nevada. Jeanne was a long time member of the Eastern Star in both Kansas and Washington. She loved to read and garden, and do crafts of all kinds including crocheting, counted cross stitch, sewing, and quilting. She also painted and made doll houses, miniatures and ceramics. Jeanne especially liked to watch the birds. “Her hands were never idle” Jeanne was preceded in death by both her husbands, Earl Rice and Max Gilgan; and her two brothers, Wayne and Howard Kurtz. She is survived by her children: Byron (Peggy) of Brewster, Wash., Barr y of Snohomish, Wash, Robin Rice Smith (Ron) of Ocean Park, Wash., Gordon (Cindy) of Mukilteo, Wash.; brother, Phillip Kurtz of Steele, N.D. and sister Ellen Fransen of Hazelton.; seven grandchildren and seven and one half great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, June 22, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Purdy & Walters at Floral Hills. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the charity of your own choosing.

Jeanne James Jeanne James, 66 of Tulalip, Wash., passed away June 15, 2014. Visitation will be held Wednesday, June 18, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. at SchaeferShipman with an Interfaith service following at 6 p.m. at t h e Tu l a l i p Tr i b a l G y m . Service on Thursday, June 19, 2014 at 10 a.m. at the Tu l a l i p G y m w i t h b u r i a l following at Mission Beach Cemetery.

Mary Ellen Egge Brothers Mary Ellen Egge Brothers passed away peacefully at home June 5, 2014. She was born to John D. Seager and Ruth Carlson Seager on April 27, 1921, in a maternity home located on Virginia. She attended W a s h i n g t o n E l e m e n t a r y, North Junior Middle School and graduated from Everett High School class of 1939. Mar y Ellen star ted her career with Everett Trust and Savings Bank in 1942 w o r k i n g i n m a ny v a r i o u s p o s i t i o n s . I n 1 971 M a r y Ellen became one of the first women to manage an allwoman bank branch in Everett and Snohomish County. During her 70 years of banking she had various positions. During her first 50 years she only missed two days of work. She finished her career at Columbia Bank at the age of 93 and is well known as the Cookie lady, in which she truly enjoyed. Mar y Ellen was ver y involved in her community. She was a member of Soroptismist Intl., Chamber of Commerce, Bethany Home, Everett Senior Center Advisory Board, United Way and Zonta. Mar y Ellen attended the Fir st Covenant Church of Everett since she was four years old. Many times she remembered her beret sailing down the aisle to everyone’s distraction. She married Lloyd Egge on Au g u s t 1, 19 5 2 a n d wa s married for 50 years. After Lloyd’s passing in November she married Jerry Brothers on August 7, 2004. She was preceded in death by her brothers, Byron Seager, Jack Seager; and sister-in-law, Gretchen Seager. Mary Ellen loved to travel. She and Lloyd took many trips to Peoria for the Mariner s Spring Training, and several other states. Their travels included visiting many European countries, Asia, Australia and New Zealand in which she loved. S h e i s s u r v i v e d b y numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and many many friends. Mary Ellen loved her friends and cherished each and every one. She LOVED life, her motto for life is to have fun. A memorial for Mary Ellen will be held on Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Fir st Covenant Church 4502 Rucker Ave. I n l i e u o f f l o w e r s , memorials can be made to Hospice of Snohomish County or the First Covenant Church of Everett.

Albert Stutzke Alber t Louis “Smokey” S t u t z ke p a s s e d aw ay o n June 10, 2014 in Bellevue, Washington at 89 years old. Al was born to Alber t Sr. and Mar y Stutzke on April 28, 1925 in Chicago, Illinois. He was a child protégé playing violin at an early age. His moniker was “Fiddling Al your musical pal”. He was inducted into the Navy in July 1943 and served during WWII on the USS General M.L. Hersey. Af ter being honorably discharged from the Navy as a pharmacist mate, he attended Cornish Institute of the Ar ts in Seattle, Wash. and had a long musical career, playing 22 different instruments. He was known for his fiddle tricks including imitating bag pipes, bird calls and harmonica. He played with lightning speed which sometimes made the rosin on his bow smoke which is how he got his nick name, Smokey Stutz. He played in many Seattle area stage shows with such legends including George J o n e s , B o b W i l l s , Way l o n Jennings Slims Whitman, M a r t y Ro b b i n s a n d eve n Gene Autr y. He played in many Seattle area country western bands most notably with the POWS, the Pioneers of Western Swing. He was inducted into the Western Swing Society’s Hall of fame in 1998. It was hard won honor for him of which he was very proud. Al was also a member of the Musicians Association of Seattle Local 76-493 A . F. of M. and a prior member of Teamsters local Union #117. Alber t is sur vived by his d a u g h te r s , L a u r e e n Kaye White and Anita Clare Stutzke; and many grandchildren and great grandchildren. He was preceded in death b y h i s d a u g h t e r, S h a r o n Louise Becker, his first wife, Eleanor Ruth Stetler and his second w i fe , Fr a n c i s Stutzke. A funeral ser vice will be held on June 19, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. at Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel located at 105 W. 4th St. Port Angeles, Wash. In lieu of flowers, please send any remembrances to the Nor thwest Western Swing Music Society, PO Box 14003 Mill Creek. Wash., 98082

Rosanna Marie O’Neill

Rosanna Marie O’Neill passed away suddenly at home on June 13, 2014 at the age of 55. Rosanna was born January 21, 1959 in Heidelberg, Germ a ny, w h i l e h e r p a r e n t s were stationed at Karlsruhe. She was raised in the Lakewood/Steilacoom area and graduated from Lakes High School in 1977. Rosanna graduated from Western Washington University in 1981 with a Bachelor’s degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology. She t h e n we n t o n to g r a d u a te from the University of Washington with a Master’s degree in the same field. Following graduation she worked as a speech pathologist for a year in Burns Lake, British Columbia, then ret u r n e d to Wa s h i n g to n to work as a speech pathologist at Mary Bridge Children’s Center in Tacoma and Federal Way, Wash. She received her Master’s degree in Business Administration from Pacific Lutheran University and proceeded to make a career change, becoming a pharmaceutical sales rep for Parke Davis. After several years, Rosanna changed careers again, this time becoming a financial advisor at Merrill Lynch, then Dean Witter, and Morgan Stanley in Tacoma. Rosanna was employed by Morgan Stanley at their Olympia office at the time of her death. Rosanna was preceded in d e a t h b y h e r f a t h e r, Clement. She is survived by her signif icant other, Colin Windows; her mother, Christine and stepfather, Harvey Conrad of Tacoma; brothers, Michael (Debbie) of Riverside, Calif., and Steven of Seattle, Wash.; sister, Mary of Lake Stevens, Wash; step-sister, Susan (Grant) Zenkner of Puyallup, Wash.; step-brother, Bill Conrad of Tacoma; niece, Erin; stepnephews, Zeb and Alber t; step-nieces, Anna, Lindsay, Alysse, and Jill; as well as several step-grandchildren. Ser vices will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, June 22, 2014 at St. Joseph - St. John Episcopal Church, 11111 Military Rd SW, Lakewood, Wash. 98498. Rosanna will be laid to rest at New Tacoma Cemetery in University Place. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the University of Washington, Mary Bridge, or the Boys and In Loving Memory Girls Clubs. Tommy Evans Visit the guestbook at We have so many wonder- www.newtacoma.com. ful memories, but we wish we still had you. We love and miss you so much. Your Family

Martha F. Keefe A celebration of life will be held June 22, 2014 from Noon to 4 p.m. at Everett Eagles, 1216 Broadway Ave, Everett, Wash. Come join us for food and memories.

James W. Oak J a m e s W. O a k 91, o f Mar ysville, Wash., passed away J u n e 14 , 2 014 . H e was born on December 26, 1922 in Munising, Mich. A private family graveside will be held at Cypress Lawn Memorial Park on Friday, June 20, 2014. A memorial service will be held Friday, July 25, 2014 1:00 p.m. at Purdy and Walters with Cassidy, 1702 Pacific Ave., Everett.

884770

Margot Martin Webb

Choice Cremation of the Cascades

Snohomish County’s Low Cost Cremation Professionals “No Hidden Fees”

425-345-7086

Cremation $795 INFORMATION & PRICES GLADLY GIVEN

Contact Us At

Purdy & Walters

Funeral Home and Cemetery 4504 Broadway, Everett

425-252-2191

425-252-2244

Purdy & Walters

sCHaeFer-sHIPMaN

www.purdy-walters-cassidy.com

at Floral Hills, Funeral Home & Cemetery 409 Filbert Rd., Lynnwood

425-672-1800

www.FloralHillsLynnwood.com

Funeral Home

Locally Owned & Operated People’s Memorial Members Welcome

327 North MacLeod Ave., Arlington

360-435-2509

Veterans Serving Veterans

1059664

www.evergreen-fh.com

Funeral Home 805 State Ave., Marysville

360-659-3711

www.SchaeferShipmanFuneral.com

Weller

GLEN JOHNSTON

VAUGHN VAN ZANT

eVerGreeN

with Cassidy 1702 Pacific Ave., Everett

www.WellerFH.com

1321 State Avenue 360-658-1921 www.funeralsandcremationswa.com

948129

To include your listing

Please Call 425-339-3023


Nation & World A10

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

Reprisal killings emerge in Iraq By Hamza Hendawi Associated Press

BAGHDAD — Nearly four dozen Sunni detainees were gunned down at a jail north of Baghdad, a car bomb struck a Shiite neighborhood of the capital and four young Sunnis were found slain, as ominous signs emerged Tuesday that open warfare between the two main Muslim sects has returned to Iraq. The killings, following the capture by Sunni insurgents of a large swath of the country stretching to Syria, were the first hints of the beginnings of a return to sectarian bloodletting that nearly tore the country apart in 2006 and 2007. During the United States’ eight-year presence in Iraq, American forces acted as a buffer between the two Islamic sects, albeit with limited success. The U.S. military is now being pulled back in — with a far more limited mission and far fewer troops, as President Barack Obama nears a decision on an array of options for combating the Islamic militants. In the latest sect-on-sect violence, at least 44 Sunni detainees were slaughtered by gun shots to the head and chest by pro-government Shiite militiamen after Sunni insurgents tried to storm the jail near Baqouba, northeast of Baghdad, police said. The Iraqi military put the death toll at 52, and insisted the Sunni inmates were killed by mortar shells in the attack late Monday on the facility. In Baghdad, the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Volunteers train at military base in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, 100 miles south of Baghdad, on Tuesday after authorities urged Iraqis to help battle Sunni insurgents.

bullet-riddled bodies of four men, presumably Sunnis, were found Tuesday in the Shiite neighborhood of Benouk, according to police and morgue officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk with the media. Also Tuesday, a car bomb in Baghdad’s Shiite Sadr City district killed 12 people and wounded 30 in a crowded outdoor market, police and hospital officials said. No one claimed responsibility for the bombing, but attacks targeting Shiite districts are routinely the work of Sunni militants. Obama has said he would not commit the U.S. to military action in Iraq unless the

government in Baghdad moves to “set aside sectarian differences, to promote stability, and account for the legitimate interests of all of Iraq’s communities.” In the absence of that type of political effort, Obama has said any American military action would not succeed. Late Tuesday, Iraq’s Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish leaders issued a joint statement stressing the importance of setting “national priorities” that adhere to democratic mechanisms in resolving divisions and condemning sectarian rhetoric. A U.N. commission, meanwhile, warned Tuesday that “a regional war in the Middle East draws ever closer” as Sunni

insurgents advance across Iraq. It said Iraq’s turmoil will have “violent repercussions,” most dangerously the rise of sectarian violence as “a direct consequence of the dominance of extremist groups.” In a move certain to exacerbate regional Shiite-Sunni tensions, the Iraqi government made a scathing attack on Saudi Arabia, accusing the Arab world’s Sunni powerhouse of meddling in its affairs and acquiescing to terrorism. The harsh words came in response to a Saudi Cabinet statement blaming what it called “the sectarian and exclusionist policies in Iraq in recent years” for the latest violence.

Prospect of Iraq fight turns hawks into doves By Donna Cassata and Bradley Klapper Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The prospect of the U.S. military returning to the fight in Iraq has turned congressional hawks into doves. Lawmakers who eagerly voted to authorize military force 12 years ago to oust Saddam Hussein and destroy weapons of mass destruction that were never found now harbor doubts that air strikes will turn back insurgents threatening Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s government. Fears of Mideast quagmire and weariness after a decade of conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan loom large for even those who talk tough on national security. More than 6,000 Americans died in those wars, which cost a trillion dollars. There is little unanimity in Congress on what the United

States should do despite some Republican voices — most notably Sen. John McCain — loudly calling for air strikes and stepped-up military action. The sectarian violence between the pro-government Shiites and Sunnis adds to congressional uncertainty. Obama will discuss the situation in Iraq with House and Senate leaders of both parties at the White House today. State Department and Pentagon officials will hold closed-doors briefings with lawmakers over the next couple of days. “Where will it lead and will that be the beginning or the end?” Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., said, when asked about air strikes. “We don’t know that. This underlying conflict has been going on 1,500 years between the Shias and the Sunnis and their allies. And I think whatever we do, it’s not going to go away.” Shelby was one of the 77

Senate Republicans and Democrats who voted to give President George W. Bush the authority to wage war. Casting the strong bipartisan vote on Oct. 11, 2002, were Democratic Sens. Joe Biden of Delaware, Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York and Harry Reid of Nevada. “After a decade of war, we’ve all had enough,” said Reid, the Senate majority leader. “It was one of the worst votes I ever cast,” added Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, another who voted yes. Asked about what the vote means as the U.S. ponders intervention anew, Harkin said: “It is weighing heavily on my mind.” Senators from both parties appeared almost unanimous in their view that al-Maliki should leave power, even as many called for assistance to his government in battling the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant insurgency. ISIL has conquered several

cities in Syria and Iraq. The administration is sending almost 300 American forces in and around Iraq to help secure U.S. assets. “I support almost anything that would curtail” ISIL, said Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. “That’s a very dangerous situation.” McCain said not many forces would be needed for an effective operation in Iraq. “That would be a handful of probably special forces, forward air controller people,” he said, expressing frustration that the administration hasn’t done more. The Senate’s top Republican, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, said Obama must offer a strategy and act quickly to provide the Iraqi government with assistance before “every gain made by the U.S. and allied troops is lost.” He didn’t outline a specific course of action.

Benghazi attack suspect in U.S. custody By Lolita C. Baldor and Nancy Benac Associated Press

WASHINGTON— U.S. special forces seized a “key leader” of the deadly Benghazi, Libya, attack and he is on his way to face trial in the U.S. for the fiery assault that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans, the Obama administration said Tuesday. It was the first breakthrough in the sudden overseas violence in 2012 that has become a festering political sore at home. President Barack Obama said the capture Sunday of Ahmed Abu Khattala sends a clear message to the world that “when Americans are attacked, no matter how long it takes, we will find those responsible and we will bring them to justice.” Administration officials said Tuesday that U.S. military special forces nabbed Abu Khattala. U.S. officials said Abu Khattala was being held on the Navy amphibious transport dock ship USS New York, which was in the Mediterranean Sea. The officials spoke only on condition of anonymity because they

ASSOCIATED PRESS

FBI Director James Comey, backed by law enforcement personnel and prosecutors, discusses the capture of Ahmed Abu Khattala Tuesday at the FBI Minneapolis field office in Brooklyn Center, Minn.

weren’t authorized to discuss Abu Khattala’s whereabouts. The Libyan was the commander of a militant group called the Abu Obaida bin Jarrah Brigade and is accused of being a senior leader of the Benghazi branch of Ansar alShariah in Libya, which the U.S. has designated a terror group. On Capitol Hill, Republicans urged the administration to get as much intelligence out of Abu Khattala as possible before anyone reads him his rights to remain silent, supplies him with a lawyer and prepares him for trial in a U.S. courtroom.

Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, top Republican on the Intelligence Committee, said interrogation already was underway and “we hope to find out some positive things.” Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said: “We should have some quality time with this guy— weeks and months. Don’t torture him; have some quality time with him.” Justice Department spokesman Marc Raimondi declined to comment on whether Abu Khatalla had been read his “Miranda rights” or when that might happen.

Abu Khattala is charged in U.S. District Court in Washington and will be tried like a civilian, the administration said. According to a criminal complaint unsealed Tuesday, Abu Khattala is charged with killing a person in the course of an attack on a federal facility and conspiring to do so; providing, attempting and conspiring to provide material support to terrorists that resulted in death, and discharging, brandishing, using, carrying and possessing a firearm during a crime of violence. Officials said he could face the death penalty if convicted of the first charge. The Sept. 11, 2012, attack in Benghazi, killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. With the presidential election near, Republicans accused the White House of intentionally misleading voters, portraying the attack as a protests over an anti-Muslim video made in America instead of a calculated terrorist attack on the president’s watch. Obama accused the Republicans of politicizing a national tragedy.

ACROSS THE U.S.

IRS lost more emails in tea party probe WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service has lost more emails connected to the tea party investigation, congressional investigators said Tuesday. The IRS said Friday it had lost an untold number of emails when Lois Lerner’s computer crashed in 2011. Lerner used to head the division that handles applications for tax-exempt status. On Tuesday, two key lawmakers said the IRS has also lost emails from six additional IRS workers, among them was Nikole Flax, who was chief of staff to Lerner’s boss, then-deputy commissioner Steven Miller. Miller later became acting IRS commissioner, but was forced to resign last year after the agency acknowledged that agents had improperly scrutinized conservative groups when they applied for tax-exempt status.

U.S. arms ban for Vietnam President Barack Obama’s nominee to become the next U.S. ambassador to Vietnam said Tuesday it may be time to consider lifting a ban on the sale and transfer of lethal weapons to the former American enemy. Ted Osius told his Senate confirmation hearing that the U.S. has made clear to Vietnam that the ban can’t be lifted without significant progress on human rights. But he said there has been progress in three or four of the nine areas where the U.S. is looking for improvements.

N.J.: Nanny rescues child Authorities said a nanny climbed into a 15-foot-deep septic hole and rescued a 3-year-old neighbor who was up to her neck in water. Luz Jimenez was at the Hackettstown home where she works when she heard Alison Machigua screaming around 5:30 p.m. Monday. Authorities say the child had walked into the yard and fell through the grasscovered hole. Jimenez grabbed a rope and entered the hole, which was about a foot across. She grabbed the child, who was holding onto a metal object near the bottom of the hole. They got out after firefighters arrived and put a ladder into the hole.

N.M.: Navajo wildfire A fast-moving wildfire near the Arizona-New Mexico border grew Tuesday as it approached two communities and threatened traditional grazing lands on the Navajo Nation, where sheep are a staple of life. The Assayii Lake Fire ballooned to more than 19 square miles in less than two days across winter and summer grazing lands in the Chuska Mountains. The flames destroyed at least four structures and threatened about 50 homes near the rural communities of Naschitti and Sheep Springs.

AROUND THE WORLD U.N.: 30 million lack school About 30 million primary schoolaged children in sub-Saharan Africa are not in class, partially because of conflict and poverty, and progress to get them back to school has stalled, two U.N. agencies said. The situation is especially dire in West and Central Africa, which has the largest proportion of children out of school of any region in the world, said a pair of reports published Monday by UNICEF, the U.N. children’s agency, and the statistics arm of UNESCO, the U.N. cultural and education agency.

Nigeria: Suicide blast A suicide bomber detonated a tricycle taxi packed with explosives at an outdoor World Cup viewing center in the northeast city of Damaturu on Tuesday night. Witnesses said several people were killed. Hospital workers said the death likely will rise with 15 people critically wounded and casualties still coming in. There was no immediate claim for the blast witnesses were blaming on Boko Haram fighters who have targeted football viewing centers and sports bars in the past. Two explosions in recent weeks killed at least 40 people in two northern cities.

Liberia: More Ebola deaths Seven people believed to have the Ebola virus have died in recent days in the first deaths reported in Monrovia, the capital, since the outbreak began. Deputy Health Minister Tolbert Nyenswah said Tuesday that brings to 16 the number of people believed to have died from the virus in the country. From Herald news services


Business A11

|

THE DAILY HERALD

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/BUSINESS

|

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

Amazon ready to debut smartphone By Mae Anderson and Ryan Nakashima Associated Press

NEW YORK — Amazon, a company of seemingly boundless ambition, appears to be venturing into yet another market: smartphones. The corporate juggernaut that started out with books and soon moved into music, video, cloud computing and Kindle e-readers is hosting a launch event today in Seattle, and media reports

indicate the product will be an Amazon phone — perhaps one with multiple cameras that can produce 3-D photos. Amazon declined to comment, but analysts said the goal is almost certainly a device designed to get customers to buy more things from Amazon. It might include an Amazon shopping app or other features tied in tightly to the products the company sells. “It’s Amazon. That says to me the core value proposition is

going to be about shopping,” said Ramon Llamas of the research firm International Data Corp. Amazon’s phone comes at a time when the nation’s largest e-commerce company is at a crossroads. Its stock, which surged for years despite narrow profits, has dropped 18 percent in 2014 to about $326, in part because investors have been losing patience with its habit of plowing revenue back into new ventures. Analysts said the move into

smartphones is a bit of a headscratcher, since the company is a late entrant into the highly competitive market. Amazon will be hard-pressed to compete with Samsung and Apple, the No. 1 and 2 mobile phone companies in the world. Globally, Samsung led mobile phone manufacturers with 31 percent of the 288 million units shipped in the first quarter, followed by Apple at 15 percent. See AMAZON, Page A12

Chinese Re-making manufacturing phone carries spyware By Raphael Satter and Frank Jordans

President Barack Obama pledges to maintain U.S. edge in innovation and offers entrepreneurs easier access to more than 700 research and development facilities, including at NASA and the Energy Department.

BERLIN — A cheap brand of Chinese-made smartphones carried by major online retailers comes preinstalled with espionage software, a German security firm said Tuesday. G Data Software said it found malicious code hidden deep in the propriety software of the Star N9500 when it ordered the handset from a website late last month. The find is the latest in a series of incidents where smartphones have appeared preloaded with malicious software. G Data spokesman Thorsten Urbanski said his firm bought the phone after getting complaints about it from several customers. He said his team spent more than a week trying to trace the handset’s maker without success. “The manufacturer is not mentioned,” he said. “Not in the phone, not in the documentation, nothing else.” The Associated Press found the phone for sale on several major retail websites, offered by an array of companies listed in Shenzhen, in southern China. It could not immediately find a reference to the phone’s manufacturer. G Data said the spyware it found on the N9500 could allow a hacker to steal personal data, place rogue calls, or turn on the phone’s camera and microphone. G Data said the stolen information was sent to a server in China.

Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — Surrounded by an array of gadgets and high tech equipment, President Barack Obama pledged to boost American manufacturing and to give entrepreneurs greater access to production tools that would help bring their ideas to fruition. Obama visited this venerable steel manufacturing city to showcase a workshop chain called TechShop, a variation on a tool lending library that provides high-end instruments to hobbyists, tinkerers and start-up businesses to help them realize their innovations. The tour was designed to draw attention to Obama’s own plan to make more government technology and assets available to the private sector. “I can’t rent the space shuttle out to you,” he joked. “But there are areas where we can in fact enhance what is already being done by companies like TechShop.” To maintain the U.S. edge in innovation, Obama said, “we’ve got to have basic research, we’ve got to have skills like math and science and engineering that that are developed, we also have to provide platforms for people who have these ideas to go out there and actually make stuff.” From Pittsburgh, Obama flew to New York City for a gala lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender fundraiser for the Democratic National Committee. The fundraiser comes a day after

Associated Press

biz bits

WASHINGTON — Your money or your life? Sovaldi, a new pill for hepatitis C, cures the liver-wasting disease in 9 of 10 patients, but treatment can cost more than $90,000. Leading medical societies recommend the drug as a firstline treatment, and patients are clamoring for it. But insurance companies and state Medicaid programs are gagging on the price. In Oregon, officials propose to limit how many lowincome patients can get Sovaldi.

Yet if Sovaldi didn’t exist, insurers would still be paying in the mid-to-high five figures to treat the most common kind of hepatitis C, a new pricing survey indicates. Some of the older alternatives involve more side effects, and are less likely to provide cures. So what’s a fair price? The cost of this breakthrough drug is highlighting cracks in the U.S. health care system at a time of heightened budget concerns. The Obama administration has a huge political stake in controlling treatment costs, but its critics may cry rationing.

Events Sponge, a children’s language school, invites families with children up to age 6 to celebrate the summer solstice from 12 to 2 p.m. Saturday at Playdate Café in Lynnwood. Festivities will include music, dancing and Spanish and Mandarin mini-classes. RSVP to events@

TORONTO — Canada’s government Tuesday approved a controversial proposed pipeline to the Pacific Coast that would allow oil to be shipped to Asia. Enbridge’s Northern Gateway project, along with the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, is critical to Canada, which needs infrastructure in place to export its growing oil sands production. The northern Alberta region has the world’s third largest oil reserves, with 170 billion barrels of proven reserves. The approval was expected but whether the Northern Gateway pipeline ever gets built remains in question as there is fierce aboriginal and environmental opposition in British Columbia and court challenges are expected.

Popeyes buys recipes

Dr. Oz gets scolding

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama shows his iPad case as an example of a product made by a small start-up company, while answering questions Tuesday during a tour of Bakery Square’s TechShop in Pittsburgh.

the White House said Obama will sign an executive order prohibiting federal contractors from discriminating against employees on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity. The trip combines important election-year tasks for Obama — maintaining a focus on the economy, raising money and nurturing an important Democratic voting and donor bloc. The Pittsburgh visit is part of

Obama’s renewed emphasis on how to create jobs and improve wages. During the next several weeks Obama is looking to cut through the current foreign policy flare-ups with an emphasis on working families, manufacturing, wages and the need for greater spending on infrastructure projects. That attention could be crucial See OBAMA, Page A12

The steep price for a hep C cure By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar

Canada OKs oil pipeline to Pacific Coast

The Atlanta-based company that franchises Popeyes fried chicken restaurants has purchased the recipes for many of its dishes for $43 million from a Louisiana-based seasoning company owned by the estate of Popeyes’ founder. Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen Inc. said the deal eliminates the $3.1 million annual royalty the company was scheduled to pay Diversified Foods and Seasonings until 2029.

By Jim Kuhnhenn

Associated Press

BRIEFLY

“People are going to want to try to dodge this hot potato,” says economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin. For insurers, there’s a frustrating twist: For each middle-aged person they pay to cure with Sovaldi, any financial benefits from preventing liver failure are likely to accrue to Medicare, not to them. More than 3 million Americans carry the hepatitis C virus, and many don’t realize it. It’s a public health concern since the disease can be transmitted by contact with infected blood, and

spongeschool.com or call 206-227-7138. The Master Builders Association of King & Snohomish Counties hosts the 2014 Housing Summit from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. Sept. 23 at Meydenbauer Convention Center in Bellevue. The event is free. Early reservations are suggested and can be

See CURE, Page A12

made online at www.MasterBuildersInfo.com or by calling 425-451-7920.

Kudos

The Everett Clinic has earned a Well Workplace Award for its employee wellness program from the Wellness Councils of America. The clinic earned 177.68 points out of a pos-

Under pressure from Congress, celebrity doctor Mehmet Oz on Tuesday offered to help “drain the swamp” of unscrupulous marketers using his name to peddle so-called miracle pills and cure-alls to millions of Americans desperate to lose weight. Oz appeared before the Senate’s consumer protection panel and was scolded by Chairman Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., for claims he made about weightloss aids on his TV show, “The Dr. Oz Show.” Oz agreed that there’s no long-term miracle pill out there without diet and exercise.

China, U.K. sign deals Chinese premier Li Keqiang oversaw Tuesday the signing of trade deals with Britain during an official visit marked with pomp and ceremony. Prime Minister David Cameron announced business deals worth $23.7 billion, saying Britain is a “strong and good friend of China and supporter of China’s rise.” One of the deals signed was between British energy company BP and Chinese state-owned oil company CNOOC to supply China with liquefied natural gas over 20 years.

GM used-car values, sales holding up Consumers looking for a used vehicle aren’t shying away from GM models— even though more than 20 million GM cars and trucks have been recalled this year. GM cars such as the Chevrolet Malibu have retained or increased in value, sometimes more than rival vehicles. And sales of new cars aren’t slowing either, up 13 percent in May.

The Hepatitis-C medication Sovaldi.

sible 180 for its CEO support, wellness teams, data, planning, interventions, supportive environment and outcomes. Biz Bits runs Monday through Saturday. Send your business news and high-resolution photos to businessnews@heraldnet.com. We post the complete list online every Monday at HeraldNet. com/bizblog.

From Herald news services

Amazon . . 325.62 -2.00 Boeing . . . 132.45 -0.09 Costco . . . . 115.45 0.02 Crane . . . . . 73.13 -0.24 FrontierCom . 5.70 0.01 HeritageFin 16.26 0.02 Microsoft . . 41.68 0.18 Nordstrom . 67.80 -0.06 Starbucks . . 75.31 0.22 WshFederal 22.83 0.06 Zumiez . . . . 27.86 -0.35 Market report, A12


Market Report THE DAILY HERALD

THE DAY ON WALL STREET U.S. stocks ended slightly higher as investors bid up banks and other financial companies. News that U.S. consumer prices jumped sharply in May drove up long-term interest rates, setting the stage for the turnaround as investors bought E-Trade Financial, Charles Schwab, Goldman Sachs and other stocks. On Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial average rose 27.48 points, or 0.2 percent, to 16,808.49. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 4.21, or 0.2 percent, to close at 1,941.99. — Associated Press

INTEREST RATES Last 3.25 0.75 .00-.25 0.04 0.08 1.75 2.65 3.44 0.23

Prime Discount Federal Funds Treasury 3 month Treasury 6 month Treasury 5 year Treasury 10 year Treasury 30 year Libor 3-month

CURRENCY Australia Britain Canada China Denmark Euro Hong Kong India Indonesia Israel Japan Malaysia Mexico New Zealand Norway Philippines Russia

Previous 3.25 0.75 .00-.25 0.035 0.07 1.70 2.60 3.40 0.23

U.S. dollar buys

Foreign buys

1.0713 .5898 1.0869 6.1533 5.5056 .7384 7.7516 60.332 11923.00 3.4594 102.18 3.2215 13.1085 1.1562 5.9998 43.88 34.8360

.9335 1.6955 .9200 .1625 .1816 1.3543 .1290 .0166 .000084 .2891 .009787 .3104 .076286 .8649 .1667 .0228 .0287

COMMODITIES Unleaded gas (gal) Crude oil (bbl) Natural gas (mm btu) Heating oil (gal) Copper (lb) Gold (oz) Platinum (oz) Silver (oz) Cattle (lb) Coffee (lb) Orange juice (lb) Corn (bu) Cotton (lb) Lumber (1,000 brd ft) Ethanol (gal) Soybeans (bu) Wheat (bu)

Last 3.09 106.36 4.71 3.02 3.06 1271.70 1443.10 19.72 1.47 1.69 1.61 4.39 .90 313.00 2.14 13.98 5.82

Previous 3.07 106.90 4.71 3.00 3.05 1274.90 1439.10 19.70 1.47 1.73 1.61 4.41 .88 313.00 2.16 14.22 5.81

MAJOR INDEXES

52-Week High

Name

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

Low

Dow Jones Industrials 16,970.17 14,551.27 Dow Jones Transportation 8,256.79 5,952.18 NYSE Composite 11,334.65 8,814.76 Nasdaq Composite 4,371.71 3,294.95 S&P 500 1,955.55 1,560.33 S&P MidCap 1,419.86 1,114.04 Wilshire 5000 20,748.50 16,442.14 Russell 2000 1,212.82 942.79

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

|

Last

Chg

%Chg

YTD %Chg

16,808.49 8,056.30 10,886.01 4,337.23 1,941.99 1,414.74 20,621.47 1,176.62

+27.48 +33.21 +22.79 +16.12 +4.21 +12.19 +65.66 +9.80

+.16 +.41 +.21 +.37 +.22 +.87 +.32 +.84

+1.40 +8.86 +4.67 +3.85 +5.07 +5.38 +4.65 +1.12

12-mo %Chg

+9.73 +26.70 +15.81 +24.56 +17.57 +19.05 +18.37 +17.66

GAINERS/LOSERS NYSE

Most Active ($1 or more)

Gainers ($2 or more) Last

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

Name

Vol (00)

Chg

S&P500ETF iShR2K BkofAm BostonSci iSh7-10yTB

743474 194.83 604865 116.97 562109 15.59 369674 12.60 332279 102.38

+.54 +.82 +.31 -.32 -.43

ForestOil MS CrOil31 YingliGrn Cheetah n AmiraNatF

89562 2.30 +.29 6 45.60 +5.60 208859 3.95 +.43 12768 23.64 +2.47 22615 14.47 +1.46

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

DmRsBW EKodk wtA Castlight n LightInBox ChicB&I

4656 9.77 45 9.87 7233 16.01 5346 4.84 136049 68.26

-1.22 -1.05 -1.42 -.38 -5.32

NASDAQ Most Active ($1 or more)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

Name

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Apple Inc s Intel Facebook MicronT

535974 289671 281218 273303 249660

3.37 92.08 29.95 64.40 32.25

+.04 -.12 -.06 +.21 +.34

GigaTr h QuantFu rs Biolase SolarCity AltairN hlf

Last

Losers ($2 or more) Chg

162327 3.36 +.91 33690 5.27 +.95 14883 2.25 +.37 239411 64.53 +9.65 1157 3.44 +.50

Name

Vol (00)

EscaleraR AthensBcsh UniPixel Inventergy AcordaTh

Last

1312 2.69 65 20.65 7702 7.53 630 2.99 23149 32.12

Chg -.40 -2.80 -.85 -.30 -3.16

AMEX Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Globalstar NwGold g TherapMD VantageDrl EmeraldO

Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

Name

89712 38582 34478 34023 21954

4.10 6.15 5.06 1.86 7.02

... -.03 -.01 +.05 +.23

TrnsEntx rs NewConcEn WirelessT AmShrd StrPathC n

Losers ($2 or more)

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

Name

4436 501 823 133 3163

6.16 3.24 2.45 2.69 9.98

+.47 +.21 +.15 +.15 +.53

RingEngy GTT Comm Daxor InspireMD Innsuites

Vol (00)

Last

Chg

4029 17.40 2197 9.81 278 6.50 1500 3.00 8 2.07

-1.99 -.85 -.45 -.18 -.08

25 BIGGEST MUTUAL FUNDS Total Assets Return%

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRt Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml Vanguard Admiral: TStkAdm Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx Vanguard Instl Fds: InsPl Vanguard Instl Fds: TSInst Fidelity Invest: Contra American Funds A: IncoA p American Funds A: GwthA p American Funds A: CapIBA p Dodge&Cox: IntlStk Vanguard Admiral: WelltnAdm American Funds A: CapWGA p American Funds A: ICAA p Dodge&Cox: Stock Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncomA p American Funds A: WshA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotlIntl American Funds A: BalA p Harbor Funds: Intl r American Funds A: FdInvA p Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv Vanguard Admiral: TtlBAdml Price Funds: Growth

OBJ

($Mlns)

4-wk

12-mo

IB XC SP XC SP SP XC LG BL LG BL IL BL GL LC LV BL LC IL BL IL LC SP IB LG

146,918 112,270 96,254 94,028 93,238 79,394 77,964 75,259 71,745 71,528 69,891 60,803 57,977 57,842 57,235 56,698 54,882 51,305 49,691 44,580 43,710 42,748 40,935 37,600 37,556

-0.3 +3.5 +3.2 +3.5 +3.2 +3.2 +3.5 +3.7 +1.7 +3.7 +1.4 +2.1 +1.8 +1.7 +2.9 +3.3 +2.0 +2.8 +2.2 +2.2 +1.5 +3.2 +3.2 -0.3 +3.9

+1.8 +21.5 +20.9 +21.6 +20.9 +21.0 +21.6 +21.7 +15.0 +23.3 +13.7 +24.7 +14.2 +19.6 +24.0 +24.8 +16.2 +20.0 +17.1 +14.5 +15.9 +19.8 +20.9 +2.1 +24.7

5-year

+35.5 +141.5 +136.8 +143.0 +136.9 +137.1 +143.0 +131.7 +102.9 +118.4 +80.6 +101.9 +93.8 +96.8 +118.1 +148.2 +97.6 +132.7 +69.5 +99.9 +92.1 +122.4 +136.6 +26.0 +144.1

Load

Minimum investment

NL 1,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 10,000 NL 10,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 200,000,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 2,500 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 NL 50,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL 2,500 4.25 1,000 5.75 250 NL 3,000 5.75 250 NL 50,000 5.75 250 NL 10,000 NL 10,000 NL 2,500

G = Growth. GI = Growth & Income. SS = Single-state Muni. MP = Mixed Portfolio. GG = General US Govt. EI = Equity Income. SC = Small Co Growth. A = Cap Appreciation. IL = International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Initial Investment: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA = Not avail. NE = Data in question. NS = Fund not in existence.

|

Heraldnet.com/financials

■ Form your own portfolio ■ Stock updates throughout the day ■ The latest news on your favorite companies

A12

NORTHWEST STOCKS NAME

TICKER

YTD

52-WK LOW

AlaskaAir Amazon Avista BallardPw BarrettB Boeing ColBnkg ColSprtw ConcurTch ConocoPhil Costco CraftBrew Cray Inc Data IO ElectSci Esterline ExpdIntl FEI Co FLIR Sys HrtgeFn Idacorp Itron KeyTech KeyTrn Lattice LithiaMot LaPac MentorGr MicronT Microsoft Microvisn Nautilus NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG NwstPipe Outerwall Paccar Penford PlumCrk PopeRes PrecCastpt RadiSys RealNetwk Rntrak SareptaTh SeattGen Starbucks TTM Tch TmbrlndBc TriQuint US Bancrp VerizonCm WashFed Weyerhsr Zumiez

ALK AMZN AVA BLDP BBSI BA COLB COLM CNQR COP COST BREW CRAY DAIO ESIO ESL EXPD FEIC FLIR HFWA IDA ITRI KTEC KTCC LSCC LAD LPX MENT MU MSFT MVIS NLS NKE JWN NWN NWPX OUTR PCAR PENX PCL POPE PCP RSYS RNWK RENT SRPT SGEN SBUX TTMI TSBK TQNT USB VZ WAFD WY ZUMZ

+29.4 -18.3 +11.4 +135.0 -49.6 -3.0 -3.9 +7.0 -9.1 +18.5 -3.0 -36.3 -3.3 +7.0 -31.6 +15.7 +.2 -1.1 +19.2 -4.9 +6.7 -1.2 -17.9 -2.2 +51.4 +27.7 -19.3 -10.8 +48.3 +11.4 +62.9 +27.5 -4.5 +9.7 +6.2 +1.9 -2.9 +7.4 -8.6 -5.1 -.7 -1.4 +38.0 +2.4 +33.7 +61.6 -1.5 -3.9 -5.8 +8.4 +101.3 +6.8 +.1 -2.0 -2.0 +7.2

50.31 265.00 25.55 1.25 41.96 96.31 21.77 55.58 74.43 58.71 107.38 7.56 19.21 1.76 6.43 69.16 36.45 71.04 24.54 13.66 45.62 32.30 10.75 9.60 4.17 48.18 13.73 18.80 12.31 30.84 1.03 6.15 59.11 54.90 39.96 26.02 46.25 51.13 10.82 40.57 60.07 207.47 2.02 6.83 19.77 12.12 28.15 63.18 7.24 8.05 6.68 34.85 45.08 17.08 26.38 20.68

52-WK HIGH

100.98 408.06 32.94 8.38 102.20 144.57 30.36 89.96 130.39 83.83 126.12 18.70 42.09 3.48 12.80 118.48 46.90 111.57 37.42 18.64 56.65 46.09 15.50 12.19 9.19 88.62 18.96 24.31 32.19 41.66 3.38 11.99 80.26 70.71 46.19 39.62 74.30 68.81 15.98 50.08 73.07 275.09 5.11 8.95 69.00 55.61 55.99 82.50 10.91 11.83 16.59 43.66 51.94 24.53 32.00 31.31

DIV

LAST

CHANGE

1.00 ... 1.27 ... .72 2.92 .48a 1.12 ... 2.76 1.42f ... ... ... .32 ... .64f 1.00f .40 .32a 1.72 ... ... ... ... .64f ... .20 ... 1.12 ... ... .96 1.32 1.84 ... ... .88f ... 1.76 2.60f .12 ... ... ... ... ... 1.04 ... .16 ... .98f 2.12 .40 .88 ...

94.94 325.62 31.40 3.56 46.75 132.45 26.41 84.30 93.77 83.75 115.45 10.47 26.55 2.75 7.15 117.98 44.34 88.42 35.89 16.26 55.31 40.92 11.77 10.78 8.31 88.68 14.93 21.48 32.25 41.68 2.15 10.75 75.09 67.80 45.49 38.46 65.31 63.52 11.75 44.13 66.52 265.49 3.16 7.73 50.66 32.91 39.29 75.31 8.08 10.43 16.79 43.13 49.21 22.83 30.93 27.86

+1.53 -2.00 +.07 +.26 -.06 -.09 +.33 +1.05 +1.05 +.06 +.02 -.12 +.95 +.10 +.23 +2.09 -.25 +.19 +.27 +.02 +.40 +1.26 +.20 ... +.23 +2.15 +.27 +.49 +.34 +.18 +.15 -.13 +.54 -.06 +.09 +.74 +1.19 +.19 +.22 +.18 +.67 +.69 -.09 ... +1.54 +.16 -1.16 +.22 +.15 ... +.38 +.38 -.10 +.06 +.07 -.35

Cure: Countries where governments set prices pay less From Page A11

sometimes through sexual activity. Health officials advise all baby boomers to get tested. The illness is complex, with distinct virus types requiring different treatments. While it progresses gradually, it can ultimately destroy the liver, and transplants average $577,000. An estimated 15,000 people died from hepatitis C in the U.S. in 2007, when it surpassed AIDS as a cause of death. “If it’s going to get me the medicine, I’ll put my hand out there with a tin cup,” said Stuart Rose, a hepatitis C patient in New York City. His insurance would pay only $4,000 a year for medications, but Rose was able to get assistance from charitable foundations. He recently started taking Sovaldi. Until the drug’s approval late last year, standard

Obama From Page A11

in an election year when some Democrats in vulnerable races are not embracing other top Obama issues like climate change and health care. Also Tuesday, the White House announced that the administration was giving entrepreneurs easier access to high-tech equipment at more than 700 research and development facilities, such as NASA’s National Center for Advanced Manufacturing in New Orleans and the Energy Department’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. In addition, five federal agencies will spend more than $150 million

treatment for the most common type of the disease required daily pills and extended use of interferon, an injection that can produce debilitating flulike symptoms. Taken once a day for 12 weeks, Sovaldi greatly reduces the length of interferon treatment, making things more tolerable for patients. Now, many more people might want to try the cure. A similar drug, Olysio, also approved last year, is priced a bit lower. The nation’s largest care provider for chronic hepatitis C, the federal Veterans Administration, sees promise. With 175,000 patients, the VA has started more than 1,850 of them on Sovaldi. “After 20 years in infectious diseases, I never thought we would be in a position to cure this disease,” said Dr. David Ross, head of the VA’s program.

By law, the VA gets drug discounts of more than 40 percent. Will the agency break even by avoiding the disease’s worst complications? Not necessarily, said Ross. “If it leads to cost benefits in the long run, that’s gravy.” Private insurers will probably introduce Sovaldi gradually. “Not everybody is going to get this all at once,” said former Medicare administrator Mark McClellan. Drug maker Gilead Sciences, Inc., reported Sovaldi sales of $2.3 billion worldwide in just the first three months of this year. Gilead will not disclose its pricing methods, but vice president Gregg Alton said the drug’s high cure rate makes it “a real huge value.” In many countries, the government sets drug prices. In the US, insurers negotiate with drug companies. Medicare is

forbidden from bargaining, a situation that critics say saddles U.S. patients with high costs while subsidizing the rest of the world. The Associated Press asked DRX, a technology company that researches drug prices for major insurers and government programs, to look at Sovaldi. The findings: ■■There aren’t many deep discounts. The midpoint — or median — discount that private payers are securing is about 14 percent off the average wholesale price of $1,200 a pill, bringing it down to $1,037. The biggest discount DRX found was nearly 36 percent, approaching the VA rate, and bringing the cost to $773. ■■How do other drugs compare? DRX compared the total drug cost of treating the most common type of hepatitis C with Sovaldi and three alternatives. The regimen included pills,

in research to support the Material Genome Initiative, a government and private-sector partnership designed to speed up the development of innovative materials. Obama touted technological advances that are putting production tools in the hands of anybody who has a good idea. He showed off his own iPad case that was made by DODOcase, a company that made its first prototype of the product at a TechShop in California. “Cost of a gym membership, you have access to all this equipment,” Obama said as he marveled at the output of the shop. The administration is paying special attention to manufacturing. A White House report released Tuesday said manufacturing output had increased 30 percent since the recession ended, growing at a

pace nearly twice that of the overall economy. In New York, Obama was to attend three big-dollar fundraisers, with the gay community gala as the centerpiece. Obama will also headline his first super PAC fundraiser as the main draw for the Senate Majority PAC, a Democratic group that takes unlimited donations. Obama’s appearance will cap what has been a gradual acceptance of the big-money groups he once decried. Obama concluded the night at a fundraising dinner at the home of Vogue editor Anna Wintour. The president is likely to get a rousing reception at the gala in response to his decision to act on workplace discrimination, even if it is limited to the federal contracting workforce. Obama lacks authority to extend that protection

to all Americans, but the order being drafted by the White House would affect about 14 million workers whose employers or states currently do not prohibit workplace discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender individuals. The scope of the measure was tabulated by the Williams Institute at UCLA Law School, which studies sexual orientation and gender identity law and public policy. Obama had resisted signing the order in hopes Congress would pass a non-discrimination measure that would apply to nearly all employers. While the Democratic-controlled Senate passed the legislation last year, the measure has languished in the Republican-led House and there is little sign that lawmakers will take it up in an election year.

interferon and an antiviral called ribavirin. Treatment with Sovaldi had the highest cost, a median of $97,376. The lowest was $48,084 for Victrelis, a somewhat older drug with a lower cure rate. Two others were about $8,000 less than Sovaldi. The total median cost with Incivek was $89,178. With Olyisio, it was $89,319. “While Sovaldi still is the most expensive, all of these are five-figure regimens,” said Jim Yocum, DRX executive vice president. “Sovaldi is an advance ... and it doesn’t seem to be priced completely out of whack.” But Dr. Sharon Levine, a top official working on drug policy with insurer Kaiser Permanente, disagrees. “There was never any question that we would cover and prescribe this drug,” said Levine. But she firmly believes the price is out of line. Countries

where the government sets drug prices are paying much less, she noted. U.S. insurers aren’t interested in price controls, said Levine, but “eventually the American public is going to start getting very uncomfortable” with high prices. Drug costs have moderated in recent years, but new medications in the pipeline for cancer and other diseases are expected to push spending up. The California Technology Assessment Forum, a private group that reviews medical treatments, recently voted Sovaldi a “low value,” because it would be cost-prohibitive to treat the high number of potentially eligible patients. But the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases issued clinical guidelines recommending that doctors use Sovaldi as a primary treatment.

Amazon From Page A11

In the U.S., Apple dominates with more than 37 percent of the 34 million units shipped, with Samsung at close to 29 percent. Some analysts have speculated that the 3-D feature might tie into an Amazon shopping app. Shoppers might be able to use the phone to take a 3-D picture of a product in a store, then search for the object on Amazon and buy it online. Analysts said the phone could also come with a data plan that could let owners use Amazon services without using up any data. “Anything that generates more repeat orders

and more frequent purchases is probably part of what they intend to do with this,” said R.W. Baird analyst Colin Sebastian. To compete, Amazon needs more than an expected 3-D viewing feature, which has been tried before by smartphone makers like HTC and LG, Llamas said. Competing on price won’t help if it leaves people with the impression that the device is cheaply built, and getting customers to buy a phone without being able to touch it first could prove difficult, he said. “If they sell it only online, as Amazon sells many of its goods and products, that could be a challenge,” he said.


Opinion A13

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/OPINION

|

Editorial Board Josh O’Connor, Publisher Peter Jackson, Editorial Page Editor Carol MacPherson, Editorial Writer Neal Pattison, Executive Editor

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

IN OUR VIEW | FISH CONSUMPTION STANDARDS

Fretting over the nonexistent The standards don’t exist. But were they to exist, they should un-exist. And so we wait. Cue Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot.” “There’s no lack of void.” Beckett-like absurdity was on display at Monday’s press conference with leaders of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and the Association of Western Pulp & Paper Workers. They, like many union honchos, said they worry that a rejiggering of Washington’s fish-consumption rate and water-quality standards will threaten jobs. So says Boeing and assorted industries. Never underestimate the power of industry fear-mongering over an unknown known.

“We want clean water but we believe this is just too extreme,” Greg Pallesen, international vice president of the paper workers union, said about the non-existent, updated standards. “We can have great intentions on this stuff but the extreme (policy) will have a negative impact on jobs.” Specifics on the nonexistent weren’t forthcoming. But nothing focuses the mind like “job loss.” The fish-consumption controversy was flagged last year by journalist Robert McClure and InvestigateWest. For more than a decade, the Washington Department of Ecology knew it had to update its paltry fish consumption estimates ­— 6.5

grams a day. The estimate is critical because it informs the acceptable level of carcinogenic discharge, specifically arsenic, mercury and PCBs. It’s an inverse relationship — low-ball consumption rates and ratchet up the permissible discharge of cancer-causing toxins. During the 2013 Boeing special session, the company agreed that the process Gov. Jay Inslee had laid out for fish consumption was just fine. That process includes DOE’s issuing of a draft rule with two elements: a new consumption standard and the tools for implementing it. While DOE will soon float its recommendation, it’s still a draft. Groups, including the city of Everett, specifically ask for

an incremental excess cancer rate of less than the current 10e-6, which is one in a million (they’re technically wrong to advocate “less than.” The incremental excess cancer rate goes up under their scenario). The business preference is 10e-5, which is a tenfold decrease in protection, or one in 100,000; or, Boeing’s recommendation of closer to 10e-4, another tenfold reduction, with a one-in-10,000 chance of catching the Big C. The draft recommendation will exist sometime soon, and here’s wagering the implementation regime is manageable. Let public interest and the health of Puget Sound families trump the alarmist clatter.

believe that the complaints of state legislators, including those of our own in Washington, in most cases, have little or nothing to do with helping businesses but to get the extra taxes themselves — which they have no intention of sharing with their citizens. That irks me and I would hope irks you as well. I have already contacted our state legislators with but one response. I would urge you to also contact yours to tell them we expect those taxes to be returned to us as citizens.

War was well underway before Congress found, and arranged, funding to establish an official army. Prior to that, the colonists/combatants would return home at their discretion for planting, harvesting, etc. We would embark on a dangerous precedent to start arbitrarily tampering with the Bill of Rights. I have no doubt that there would soon be those who would offer “justifications” to modify, and alter the intent of others. Perhaps those who are so quick to vilify the NRA, and demand sweeping restrictions on private gun ownership, would be better served by following the NRA’s insistence on strict enforcement of the 22,000-plus current gun laws, and that gun law violations be punished to the limit of the law. They might also look at what transpired in those countries which have outlawed private firearms, and at the gun homicide rates in the U.S. cities with the most stringent gun restrictions and prohibitions.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ■■EVERETT

Ways to fix debt, transparency Times are tense for residents and workers in Everett. The following are suggestions to increase transparency during the budgeting process and suggestions for sustainability and fiscal strength. To increase transparency, institute the following policy: If four or more council members congregate to discuss an agenda item, notes must be submitted to the official record on what was discussed. Additionally, the city should bring back the budgetary committee. Be transparent about where the money, such as car fees, will be appropriated. Suggestions for increasing revenue include: Accept credit card donations to Jetty Island and the animal farm; ease payments for library late fees with online options; allow Tier 2 and Tier 3 pot growers and distributors and institute a city fee, bring fees to par with other cities; end payments to the “rainy day fund.” In-depth considerations — conduct a cost-benefit analysis of payments to Comcast Arena’s debt, and study the regressive structure of the proposed tax burden by comparing the proposed increase to the state average of the ratio of tax to income. Also, if the cap on property tax is crippling our city and others, present evidence to Olympia and ask for a legislative solution. Finally, ask Boeing to pay a fair tax rate, on sales and new construction. Like many, I don’t want to see a loss of staff or services, and I understand it’s time to make important decisions. We need leadership to not only bring us out of this debt but prevent it in the future.

nonviolent offenders intense supervision instead of jail time. It also requires defendants get help with their problems such as homelessness, addictions and health care. Everett officials should talk with the city of Spokane to learn from their successes struggling with street-level nuisances.

Megan Dunn Everett

Sandra Kramer Everett

■■EVERETT

Community court can help I suggest that Mayor Ray Stephanson’s newly established task force to address street-level nuisances consider implementing a Community Court system similar to the one currently used by the city of Spokane. The Community Court would be a valuable adjunct to the establishment of an Alcohol Impact Area (prohibits the sale of certain low-price, high-alcohol content beverages) in the core of Everett’s downtown. I also encourage Everett’s mayor and City Council to request that the Washington State Liquor Control Board establish an AIA as soon as possible for the affected area(s). Spokane’s Community Court is a system that offers chronic,

Have your say Feel strongly about something? Share it with the community by writing a letter to the editor. You’ll need to include your name, address and daytime phone number. E-mail: letters@heraldnet.com Mail: Letters section The The Daily Herald P.O. Box 930 Everett, WA 98206 Have a question about letters? Call Carol MacPherson at 425-339-3472.

■■ONLINE TAXES

Collecting them no help to citizens In the Guest Commentary, “Make online businesses collect tax,” Ms. Klein, being general manager of Alderwood Mall has a conflict of interest. I have no problem with that having owned a small business for many years. What she doesn’t point out is that in local stores customers do not pay shipping, which is in most cases, part of the cost of purchasing online. More frustrating is the fact that should this Marketplace Fairness Act pass, the taxes collected will be a windfall for all the states. What will they do with that money? Since it’s a windfall will they return it to the states’ citizens in the form of lower taxes? I can almost hear you laugh. I sincerely

Sherwood Sage Mukilteo

■■FIREARMS

It’s citizens who make up a militia Readers have recently expressed the opinion that the Second Amendment meant that only a “well-regulated militia” and not individual citizens, was intended to have guns. Allow me to suggest that they might profit from a bit of historical research and a look at their dictionaries. My American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language defines “militia” as follows: “A citizen army, as distinct from a body of professional soldiers. The armed citizenry as distinct from the regular army. The ablebodied male citizens of the state who are not member of the regular armed forces, but who are called to military service in cases of emergency.” The authors of the Bill of Rights knew exactly what they intended the Second Amendment to mean, and it was definitely not to have a citizenry which was powerless against a tyrannical government. We learned in U.S. history class about the Minutemen who were private citizens who formed the first resistance to the British army. They were essentially the militia of the day, and like militiamen before and since, were expected to provide and maintain their own personal weapons. The Revolutionary

Lee Fowble Edmonds

■■MEDICAL TERMS

‘Elective’ isn’t ‘unnecessary’ Nice to have something minor to write about. Since two recent letters have used the term “elective surgery” incorrectly, I’d like to clear it up. “Elective surgery” doesn’t mean “optional” or “unnecessary.” It means non-emergency. Like scheduling your hernia repair for next week. Or even your coronary artery bypass. That’s what elective is. If you have a strangulated hernia, or an acute heart attack, and are rushed to surgery, that’s not “elective.” This is, of course, the opposite of a big deal. But I thought some people might appreciate knowing the definition, in case they’re considering joining the recent discussion. Sid Schwab, MD Mukilteo

Optimistic grads already well versed in economics

L

ast week I got to watch the seniors at Ballard High School graduate into the next phase of their lives. They were happy. They had more than just made it through their childhoods. Some graduates had learned differential equations. Some, perhaps almost all, now know how to write essays. Some students specialized in making top-rate videos. Others realized that knowing history is important. Whether they are good at arts, music, track, poetry, physics, journalism, or just being with their friends, students and colleagues, they have now joined the adult world, optimistic, fearful, and unknowing about the future. The class of 2014 has already lived through an JOHN BURBANK economic and political rollercoaster. Born in 1996, their first few years were in a country in which optimism was literally bubbling up. Wages were rising, the Internet economy was taking off, the federal government was running a budget surplus, taxes on the wealthy had been pushed up a little in 1993, and everyone was benefitting. That happy period lasted for about four years. Then the Supreme Court picked George Bush as president, contrary to the popular vote. At the same time, the Internet bubble burst, and the economy went into a tailspin. George Bush’s answer was to cut taxes on the wealthiest Americans. In our state, public revenue dropped as fewer homes were built, consumer spending dropped, and businesses cut jobs. In 2004 our state spent $1 billion less on public services than it did in 2002. $300 million was taken out of K-12 education, even as the number of kids in school was growing by the thousands Another $300 million was taken out of higher education. The University of Washington pushed tuition up 20 percent, adding another $1,000 to the cost, at the same time that middle class wages and family incomes flattened out. The 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center brought us together, in sadness and in solidarity. But instead of building a community of hope, George Bush told us to “go shopping,” even if we had less money, and led us, with false pretenses, into the quagmire of the war in Iraq, while cutting taxes on the wealthy even more. Then came the housing boom, built on an expectation that housing prices would continue to go up and up and up. Banks pushed home loans onto anyone who would bite. We know where that ended up. Washington Mutual, one of the major perpetrators of dishonest home lending, is a relic of history. The housing market fell apart, the financial instruments based on these loans turned out to be close to worthless, consumer confidence fell, businesses laid off workers, and the banks laughed all the way to the bank with their federal bailouts. We entered the Great Recession, and outside of the metropolitan corridor, we are still in it. What did the Class of 2014 take away from this? They saw their own parents laid off of work and having a hard time getting another job. They saw their education shrink, as in three years the state cut over $2,200 in support for every single K-12 student in the state. They saw their own future recede. When they were in middle school they could expect their tuition at the University of Washington to be $7,000. When they started high school in the fall of 2010, tuition was over $9,000. If they start at the University this September, their tuition will be $12,800. But the graduates of Ballard High School, and all the other high school graduates in the state, know this. And they remain optimistic, enthusiastic, and wondering ... wondering what the future portends for them, and how they can make a future for themselves. They have been through the worst cycles of our economy. They live in the results of a culture that endorsed selfishness and greed. They want to make sure that is the past, not the future. If they succeed, this will be good for our kids and our kids’ kids. And it will be good for us. Thank you in advance to the class of 2014. You are your brother’s keeper. John Burbank is the Executive Director of the Economic Opportunity Institute (www. eoionline.org). Email john@eoionline.org


. . . e r o M Buy MORE! E V A S

A14 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

A★ R T X E O AN T P U E ★ SAV

0 0 6 N O Y L T N A T S S IN

$

★ NOW THRU JUNE 22! ★

**

E C N A I APPL 014

7-6/22/2

/1 VALID 6

T INSTAN S SAVING

WHEN D EN $50 YOU SP $75 $ 749 $ 100 $ 499 $ 999 $ 150 $ 750 $ 1,499 $ 175 $ 1,000 $ 1,749 $ 200 $ 1,500 $ 1,999 $ 250 $ 1,750 $ 2,499 $ 300 $ 2,000 $ 2,999 $ 350 $ 2,500 $ 3,499 $ 400 $ 3,000 $ 3,999 $ 450 $ 3,500 $ 4,499 $ 500 $ 4,000 $ 4,999 $ 550 0 $ 4,50 $ 5,499 $ 600 $ 5,000 $ 5,999 ! E R 0 O $ 5,50 M - OR es prior $ 6,000 ns. Excludnair, n e at all locatio J s e s, c e ri rg p a E h L

Appliances

UP TO

UP TO

4498

$

$

IN SAVINGS ON QUALIFIED MODELS

Frost Free rs Refrigerato

FFU17F5HW FFU14F5HW

1000

FFU21F5HW

REBATE ON QUALIFIED MODELS

Bravos XL® 7.3Cu. Ft. Steam Dryer Extra-Large capacity to evenly dry your largest loads. Advanced moisture sensing.

HUGE

150 REBATE!

$

MEDB980BW

with Cold Wash Cycle

FACTORY CLOSEOUT

LARGER CAPACITY

Quiet wash noise reduction.Stainless steel wash basket. 11 Automatic cycles. 5 Adaptive wash actions. Quick wash cycle.

14 adaptive wash actions.

UTILITY REBATE+

749

$ WFW72HEDW

$ 799 – $50

599

$ WTW5600XW

$

Priced From

199

! E L A S ON

0 1V2ER 25 ST

® 3.6Cu. Ft. CABRIO Topload HE Washer

Chest al Defrost Free, Manu

L C HUGE SELE TURAL GAS • CHARCOA NA PROPANE • OVENS, L L A W F O 100s ANGES! R & S P O T COOK

INTERE

A

Ft. Duet® 4.2Cu. HE Front Load Washer

. 5CuFt&. Utporigh2t,5FroFtst.

! E L A S N SO Q B B L L SEMBLY! S A A E E R F ! TION

SAVINGS

NE LL W

MVWB980BW

526FW

GLFC1

FFFC05M4NW

LW

Best Cleaning in the industry enabled by PowerWash® System. Allergen Cycle.

SALE

Cu.

FGCH25M8

® Ft. Bravos XL 4.8 Cu. HE Topload Washer

FREEZER

S MONTH

Appliances

C N A I L P AP

SALE ON & DISHWASHERS

349 349 249 399 $ 9 . . . . . 44 . . . . . . From $

. acity Super Cap ashers From . . . . . . . . W s e Cloth $ . acity Super Cap ers From . . . . . . . . . Clothes Dry $ ergy Star . Tall Tub Eners From . . . . . . . . . . Dishwash $ Self-Clean . . . . . . . . . e x lu e D ” 0 . 3 m. . . . . . . Ranges Fro

UE L A V R SUPE ES

HUGE REFRIGERATORS

PER SA ry & installation c complete details. e r off our SU GS taken ed warranties, deliv nces. See store fo IN V A S T **INSTAN sales tax, extend acor & Asko applia s, purchase zero, Bertazzoni, D Wolf, Sub

!*

ANDS R B T C E L E ON S

WRIATNHDSOON DISPLAY! B

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS • DELIVERY • INSTALLATION • WE DO IT ALL!

judd & black Your Hometown Appliance Store!

juddblack.com

BELLINGHAM | 360-733-7722 MOUNT VERNON | 360-336-6515 MARYSVILLE | 360-659-0822 EVERETT | 425-258-2591 LYNNWOOD | 425-742-2233 LIQUIDATION CENTER - Everett | 425-258-4557 *OAC. Must be paid in full within 12 months. Min Purchase $499. See SERVICE CENTER | 425-258-4557 store for details. ** By a leading consumer magazine. Mon-Fri 9-5:30 | Sat-Sun 9-5 + Must be Sno. Co. PUD or PSE Service & Liquidation Centers are Closed Sundays. customer. See store for details.


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014 B1

OUTDOOR SALES REP.

Everett, WA

Work for the NW Largest Residential Tree Preservation Company.

Min. 5 Years direct sales exp. required & high integrity is a must.

Flexible Hours Outdoor Position

Top Reps. earn $90,000-$140,000/Year. Company Medical, Cell Phone, & Travel Allowances Provided. Company Vehicles Avail.

Our Reps Average $20/ hour with Top Reps earning up to $50/ hour Do you have a Vehicle, Driver’s License & Smart phone? Apply today! Set Your Own Hours.

We Deliver our Children, Safe, On-Time, and Ready to Learn Everyday

Travel Allowance, Cell Phone Incentive & Medical Allowances Available. Paid Orientation, Marketing Materials & Company Apparel Provided. Our employees love working outdoors! $500 Incentive Available after 60 days of Employment

If you are interested in becoming a School Bus Driver please apply in person

Apply at www.tlc4homesnw.com OR, Call our Corporate Office at 855-720-3102 Ext. 3304 or 3308

Durham School Services, 1304 80th St. SW | Everett, WA 98203

425-258-9251

Full-Time RN & LPN Full-Time PT

$17.97/Hour Job #2014-2091EH Performs minor repairs & maintenance in the Transportation department. Requires two years mechanical experience in automotive or truck repair shop or equivalent (service station work does not qualify). Also requires: valid WA State driver’s license; ability to obtain CDL Certification w/in 90 days; ability to obtain First Aid Card & CPR training; and ability to lift and carry 65 lbs. on a daily basis. Shift hours 3:30 pm – 11:30 pm (5 days/week). Preferred: Current CDL & ASE Certification; Automotive technical school.

We are seeking qualified candidates for various positions. • ARNP or Psychiatrists • Chemical Dependancy Adult Counselor • Clinicians I, II or III • Mental Health Technicians • Nursing Supervisors • Peer Counselors • Psychiatric Technicians • Secretary • Unit Clerks

Interested individuals should complete the online application and submit cover letter and resume at www.snopud.com (under “Careers”) by 5:00 p.m., June 20, 2014.

Visit our website at

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer of Minorities, Women, Disabled, and Veterans.

www.compasshealth.org/join-our-team

to learn more about our open positions. Send résume and cover letter to resume@compassh.org

Clinicians are the foundation of the homecare industry. No one understands or appreciates the importance of their role like Gentiva. Gentiva has been bringing great healthcare home for nearly 40 years and we couldn’t have done it without the dedication, compassion and skill of our Nurses and therapists.

Everett Branch NOW HIRING Call Christie Pedersen Today: 866-GENTIVA or 253-466-3560 Great Healthcare has Come Home www.gentiva.com AA/EOE M/F/D/V encouraged to apply SM

1075935 1075934

EOE

Sound Publishing Job Opportunities

WORK AT THE

Q

Call 800-684-8733 Ext. 3434 or 3321 for more info.

1056207

REPOSTING GARAGE HELPER, 2nd Shift

1075682

1075053

1063989

Must be at least 21 years of age, have a valid driver’s license and clean driving record. Must pass pre-employment drug screen, physical and criminal background check.

Advertising Sales Consultant

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE –

Whidbey Island’s community newspapers seek an enthusiastic, creative individual to work with local businesses. Successful candidate must be dependable, detail-oriented, possess exceptional customer service skills and enjoy working in a team environment. Previous sales experience a plus; reliable insured transportation and good driving record required. We offer a solid base plus commission, work expense reimbursement, excellent health benefits, paid vacation, sick and holidays, 401K and a great work environment with opportunity to advance. EOE. Send resume with cover letter in PDF or Text format to kgraves@whidbeynewsgroup.com or by mail to: PUBLISHER, Whidbey News Group, P.O. Box 1200, Coupeville, WA 98239.

Circulation Call Center The Daily Herald, a division of Sound Publishing, Inc., has a PartTime (24-26 hr/wk) CSR position available for the following shift: • Tues, Weds, Fri: 5 am - Noon, Sat 7 am - Noon

Reporter • Whidbey News-Times

The primary function of this position is to act as a company advocate, promoting positive public relations and company image while ensuring Customer Service standards are met when providing support to Carriers, internal staff members, and Subscribers within an active call center environment for the Daily Herald and Sound Publishing.

The award-winning newspaper Whidbey News-Times is seeking an energetic, detail-oriented reporter to write articles and features. Experience in photography and Adobe InDesign preferred. Applicants must be able to work in a team-oriented, deadline-driven environment, possess excellent writing skills, have a knowledge of community news and be able to write about multiple topics. Must relocate to Whidbey Island, WA. This is a full-time position that includes excellent benefits: medical, dental, life insurance, 401k, paid vacation, sick and holidays. EOE. No calls please. Send resume with cover letter, three or more non-returnable clips in PDF or Text format and references to kgraves@whidbeynewsgroup.com or mail to: HR/GARWNT, Sound Publishing, Inc., 11323 Commando Rd. W, Main Unit, Everett, WA 98204

Qualified candidates must possess strong customer service, problem-solving, organizational, and multi-tasking skills; excellent phone, data entry, verbal and written communication skills Must possess a strong working knowledge of Excel & Word programs and the ability to type 45 wpm.

Market Development Coordinator • Bellevue

Sound Publishing offers competitive salaries and benefits including 401K, paid holidays, vacation and sick time.

1035564

Sound Publishing, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website: www.soundpublishing.com to find out more about us!

1059735

To Apply: Email resume w/cover letter to: hreast@soundpublishing. com ATTN: CSR.

Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Development Coordinator to research, plan and implement market programs throughout the organization. This position acts as a consultant and resource to Sound Publishing’s National/ Regional Advertising Sales team and senior‐level management; and is responsible for developing and implementing brand, market, and account specific sales and marketing presentations. The successful candidate will bring extensive marketing/advertising experience in the print and/or digital media industry. Must be proficient in InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat Pro, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and html5; have the ability to communicate effectively; possess excellent presentation skills as well as basic math and English skills. Candidate will also be a problem solver who thrives in a fast‐paced, deadline‐driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. Position requires a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing or related field and three to five years of marketing/brand experience. Contact: Stephen Barrett, Director of National and Regional Sales, sbarrett@soundpublishing.com


B2 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

HIRING EVENT

Are you outgoing and competitive, personable and enthusiastic, consistent and motivated? If so...

PACKAGES! BUNDLE & SAVE!

Having a Job Fair? The Daily Herald & HeraldNet.com have it covered

selling subscriptions to The Daily Herald at special events, trade shows, retail and grocery store promotions and more!

Push Downs Banner & Half Page Web Ads Main New Print Positions Jobs Section | La Raza

• No Telemarketing • No Door-To-Door Sales • Complete Training and Field Support • Full & Part Time Hours • Flexible Hours • Evenings & Weekends Available • Transportation & Valid WA DL required

Print & Digital Exposure!

1072903

1075964

Call Today! Traci Harris 425-339-3074 tharris@heraldnet.com

REPORTER The Bellingham Business Journal, a division of Sound Publishing Inc. is seeking a general assignment reporter with a minimum of 1-2 years writing experience and photography skills. This position is based out of the Bellingham office. The primary coverage will be city government, business, sports, general assignment stories; and may include arts coverage. Schedule includes evening and/or weekend work. As a Reporter for Sound Publishing, you will be expected to: be inquisitive and resourceful in the coverage of assigned beats; produce 5 by-line stories per week; write stories that are tight and to the point; use a digital camera to take photographs of the stories you cover; post on the publication’s web site; blog and use Twitter on the web; layout pages, using InDesign; shoot and edit videos for the web. We are looking for a team player willing to get involved in the local business community through publication of the monthly journal and daily web journalism. The ideal applicant will have a general understanding of local commerce and industry, education, employment and labor issues, real estate and development, and related public policy. He or she will have a commitment to community journalism and everything from short, brief-type stories about people and events to examining issues facing the community; be able to spot emerging business issues and trends; write clean, balanced and accurate stories that dig deeper than simple features; develop and institute readership initiatives. Candidates must have excellent communication and organizational skills, and be able to work effectively in a deadline-driven environment. Must be proficient with AP style, layout and design using Adobe InDesign; and use BBJ’s website and online tools to gather information and reach the community. Must be organized and self-motivated, exceptional with the public and have the ability to establish a rapport with the community. We offer a competitive hourly wage and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Email us your cover letter, resume, and include five examples of your best work showcasing your reporting skills and writing chops to:

hreast@soundpublishing.com

or mail to:

Sound Publishing, Inc., 19426 68th Avenue S. Kent, WA 98032, ATTN: HR/BBJ Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Call John 425-478-1391

Please Call For Monthly Specials! To advertise, call Traci Harris at 425.339.3074 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Jobs

ISLAND TRANSIT FINANCIAL ANALYST Island Transit, located in Coupeville WA, is seeking a qualified applicant for the position of Financial Analyst. Visit www.islandtransit.org for more infor mation and application.Island Transit is an Equal Opportunity and M/F/D/V Employer. Position closes 7/11/14

Bookkeeper/Office Manager Lennon Crane and Equipment Company is s e e k i n g a B o o k ke e p er/Office Manager. Position is based out of our head office in Monroe. Please see full job description online www.heraldnet.com/jobs Apply w/ resume AND three (3) professional (not personal) reference s by e m a i l o n l y. N o ‘drop ins’ please. scott@lennoncrane.com CARPENTER’S HELPER/LABORER WANTED For small remodeling company. Reliable transportation & phone required. 360-435-5548

CARPENTERS Needed Remodeling and framing skills. Reliable transportation and phone. 360-435-5548 FISH PROCESSING onboard vessels in Alask a . Fa s t p a c e d , l o n g hours, heavy lifting. Apply in person Thursdays at 1:00pm @ 4315 11th Ave NW, Seattle. See our website at oharacorporation.com GOLDEN CORRAL Now accepting applications for all positions! Apply in person at 1065 State Ave, Msvl. HANDYMAN/MAINTENANCE/LABOR:

Home repairs, light construction & painting, build shed & decks, repair all areas of home, repairs including light plumbing & light electrical. Work year round. Building a crew in the Everett/Lynnwood area. Must have vehicle & valid Lic. Up to $15/hr. to start 425353-5558 425-773-7484

Maintenance Director Must have 2+ years exp in plant management. Wages DOE. EOE. Apply in person, Marysville Care Center, 1821 Grove St, Marysville, WA 98270

Severe Food Allergies? Earn $185 Donate Plasma plasmalab.com 425-258-3653

Aerospace/Metal Finishing shop in Monroe is looking for an AEROSPACE PAINTER. Must have painting exp in the Aerospace industry with textures, various substrates- metal and plastics/composites, read blueprints, and be familiar with BMS/MIL specifications. GED/HS equiv, exp in a NADCAP shop a plus. Wage DOE, Permanent, full time, benefits after 90 days. Email r e s u m e t o : employment@metaltechfinish.com

Hiring Full Time!! In Everett & Marysville Working with adults with disabilities. Please be flexible and eager to work. $10.50 per hour & KILLER benefits! EOE 1614 Broadway, Everett 888-328-3339 for info or employmentopps@servalt.net Local auto parts store is looking for experienced Counter help. Please apply in person with resume to Dan at 14911 H i g h way 9 9 i n Ly n n wood Wash during regular business hours, 9AM to 6PM. No phone calls.

Aerospace/Metal Finishing shop in Monroe is looking for a QUALITY CONTROL person. Prior finishing inspection experience is required, familiar with BMS/MIL specs. You will work out on the production floor, in governing and administering ISO/AS9100 and NADCAP guidelines. Document control regarding planning and ‘buy off’ of incoming purchase orders and subsequent internal workorders, spot inspection of jobs before they are final and released. GED/HS equiv, experience in a NADCAP shop a plus. Wage DOE, Permanent, full time, benefits after 90 days. Email resume to: employment@metaltechfinish.com

Journeyman Electrician * Service production electrical equipment per maintenance schedules * Repair manufacturing line electrical equipment Computer programing, electrical design and process * Record and document all electrical and repair records * Instrumentation * Fix/replace outlets, circuit breakers, motors, control systems, PLCs * Perform preventative electrical tasks on process and facility equipment to ensure efficient operation Please apply online www.heraldnet.com/jobs Plater - Chem/Anodize Finishing Aerospace/Metal Finishing shop in Monroe is looking for a Chem Conversion and/or Sulfuric Anodize PLATER. 6 mos p r i o r ex p e r i e n c e r e quired, GED/HS equiv, experience in a NADCAP shop a plus. Wage DOE, Per manent, full time, benefits after 90 days. Email resume to: employment@ metaltechfinish.com

CDL Driver/ Construction North Sky Communications, a Telecommunication Construction Company hiring CDL Drivers and Laborers for full time employment. Apply by faxing resume to: 425481-0306/email: rpeters @northskycomm.com

CAB DRIVERS Make up to $200 cash per day! • Fun job! Lots of •

money! We need Help!

Call Today:

(425) 609-7777

Class A CDL Route Delivery Driver Harbor Wholesale Foods is seeking a full time Route Driver based near E ve r e t t , WA . G r e a t benefits, Tuesday – Friday, returns daily. Delivery of grocery products to convenience stores, restaurants, and other customers made using h a n d t r u ck a n d w a l k board. Competitive pay with base pay plus “ P i e c e, C u b e, S t o p s, Miles”. Career opportunity with a great, growing NW Company established in 1923. More and to apply www.harborwholesale.com/aboutharbor/career

Caregiver needed for male quad PT work, Eves & weekend mornings $15/hr Lynnwood. 425-743-4510 Massage Therapist Pe r f o r m t h e r a p e u t i c massages of soft tissues and joints. May assist in the assessment of range of motion and muscle strength, or propose client therapy plans. Stillaguamish Tribe of Ind i a n s, P. O. B ox 2 7 7 , 3 3 1 0 S m o key Po i n t Dr ive, Ar lington, WA, 98223. Full job description & requirements at: www.heraldnet.com/jobs

NAC’s Marysville Care Center Driver - Taxi, Snohom- has PT, FT and On-Call opportunities available! ish County **BUSY*** Earn up to $250 + cash L o o k i n g fo r s p e c i a l dedicated individuals daily. 425-742-9944 who have the heart to serve the elderly. EOE *Competitive Wages *Great Benefits Pkg *Career Advmnt Oppty. Caregiver Needed- IP Apply in person, 1821 Grove St, Marysville for COPES 80#.Female client. Must be exp. NS, Car req, Call 425-2529640 5-8pm for details

Now Hiring!!

F/T Dietary Aide Nights Benefits available. If interested, please apply in person at: Delta Rehab, 1705 Terrace Ave, Snohomish, WA 98290. 360-568-2168 Stanwood/Arlington Area Selah AFH hiring motivated, exper ienced, caregiver with attention to detail. Requirements include personal care, cooking, cleaning and activities for 5 delightful residents in our lovely country home. Need day and/or night shift PT to full. Must be flexible.

The North Sound Mental Health Administration is seeking a qualified professional to function as a Quality Specialist. This position will primarily focus on adult care coordination, Wester n State H o s p i t a l a d m i s s i o n s, cross-system coordination, customer service and utilization management of regional mental health services. Starting salary range is $50,325 $55,517, DOE, plus a generous benefit package. Preference given to applications received by July 21, 2014. Position shall remain open until a qualified applicant is selected. NSMHA is an Equal Opportunity Emp l o y e r . V i s i t www.nsmha.org/jobs for full job description and application.

LOPEZ ISLAND SCHOOL DISTRICT Interim K-5 (1.0 fte) Principal/Special Services Director (SY 2014-15) For Lopez School District starting August 1, 2014. For information or an application packet, please contact Bill Evans (360) 468-2202 ext. 2350 or Stephanie Fowler (360) 468-2202 ext. 2302 or www.lopezislandschool.org AA/EOE Open until filled, screening begins July 7.

BE YOUR OWN BOSS!!! SALES PROS, CLOSERS AND ENTREPRENEURS NEEDED!!! THIS IS A GOLD MINE!!! We promote The Daily Herald at major retail and grocery stores throughout Snohomish County. College Students and homemakers also do well at this.

1073238

Bellevue-based Esterline Technologies seeks VP, Corporate Marketing and Strategy. Requires degree in industrial engineering and substantial aerospace and defense industr y management exper ience, including overseeing international sales & marketing. Position requires limited domestic and international travel. Apply at www.esterline.com/careers #1792BR.

POSITION: No Door-to-door selling No Telemarketing Flexible Hours Weekly Pay and Bonuses Management Opportunities

MUST HAVE: Professional Appearance Positive Attitude Reliable Transportation “Smart” Phone or Tablet

To interview call or email: 425-324-4066 or JROSATX@YAHOO.COM


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014 B3

7 DAYS!

SPECIAL OFFER! Open House Feature Ad

Call For Details!

10 Lines + Photo

Only

95

$

48

$

To advertise, call 425-339-3076

7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_ZZZ+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV

Wow! Free List of over 17 King County Homes. $86,100 to $377,292. Many with Low Down Payment FHA Financing. 206-650-3908; 425766-7370; R E A LT Y WEST 800-599-7741 www.realtywest.com

EVERETT

$257,950 3 Beds / 2 Baths 1,014 SF ad# 640877

425-348-9200

3 BD, 2 BA, 2 car garage, 1,650 sq ft, built 2004 custom rambler, level entry, many extras. Pinehurst neighborhood. Sell or lease option $265,000. Steven (425)338-2549

EVERETT

Arlington Awesome! Shy 5 acres 3bdr m 2 bath 1988 mobile with huge d e ck + RV G a ra g e + wo r k s p a c e 1 6 1 6 s q f t $220,0000 FHA Terms 425-766-7370 Realty West

$314,950 3 Beds / 2.5 Baths 1,658 SF ad# 650519

CAMANO ISLAND

425-348-9200

LAKE STEVENS

$270,000

3 Beds / 2.5 Bth 1,850 SF ad# 648692 360-659-6800

Lake Stevens TEN ACRES! Gorgeous 3bdrm 3bath Split 1987sqft $15,000 Under appraisal! $265,650. F H A Te r m s 4 2 5 - 7 6 6 7370 Realty West 206650-3908

Their Loss Your Gain! Hunting Cabin on 30 Timbered Acres Year Round Creek Minutes to Lake Roosevelt. County Road Frontage. $69,900 $500 Down $750 Month Also, 3 Bdrm 2 Bath Farmhouse on 10 Timbered Acres close to Spokane, WA. $173,000. $3000 Down $1480 Month

Frontier 509-468-0483

frontiernorthwest.com

Manufactured/Mobile Home Specialist

Listed And/Or Sold Over 500 Manufactured/Mobile Homes Put my Experience to Work for You!

$12,500

$342,000

Randy McMillan

S Everett Senior Park

Upgraded Double wide (1296 sqft) 3 bdrm, 2 bth in quiet cul-de-sac setting in Active Senior Park w/clubhouse, RV parking. Home features include new flooring, appliances, interior paint, covered parking, semiprivate deck, lot rent on 557 p/m wtr/swr/garb. Priced at $32,000. Others Available. Financing available w/ 10% down OAC. We Specialize Call Randy 425-327-9015

Preview Properties LMS, Inc.

FOR BUYERS AND SELLERS

MARYSVILLE DUPLEX! $20,000 Under Apprais a l ! $ 1 8 8 , 1 0 0 . Two 2 Bedroom 1 Bath units 2583sqf 1/4acre.Light fixer, hardwoods, fireplaces. Dbl garage Realty West Properties 425766-7370 Cozy, Older single wide 2 bdrm, 1 bth (810sqft) in Senior Park near shopping, services & I-5. Home features covered parking, large deck, upgraded windows, insulated roof & storage shed. Pets welcome and low lot rent $525 includes wtr.swr, garb. Others Available We Specialize Call Randy 425-327-9015

3 Beds / 2.5 Bth 2,026 SF ad# 623404 360-659-6800

Manufactured Home sites available. at Alpine Meadows family community in Goldbar. Minutes from unlimited recreational posibilities. Rent includes water & sewer. 3 months free rent for new homes moved in. Contact Mike 360-793-2341

Cash for Lots, Plats & Houses. Robinett & Assoc Inc. 425-252-2500

North Seattle, Now accepting applications. Studio apts: $526 HUD Senior Housing 62+. Rent incl/utilities. Income limits apply. Four Freedoms House 206-364-2440

Everett: 1 & 2 bd Apts

Preview Properties LMS, Inc.

Call Classifieds today!

425-339-3100

Waterfront Home Tulare Beach call 425-418-7352 or 360-654-0654

Brookside Motel Nightly $60 Weekly $200 Monthly $800

Furnished kitchenettes All utilities included On site laundry 19930 Hwy 2, Monroe

360-794-8832

Monroe:

4 bd Home

Commercial Space: Evergreen Way

The Rental Connection Inc

rentalconnectioninc.com

425-339-6200 EVERETT Garden Court 3410 Colby Ave. Lg 2 bd, 1ba, Must-see apts! Easy I-5, close to dwntwn. Easy access to bus lines. Dishwasher, lots of strge rm, W/D. Very clean with lots of natural light. Covered pkg incl. from $1100. Call Linda 425-420-4458 LAKE STEVENS

Apartment for Rent, near ECC & Providence Cobly Campus, 2bd, 1.5ba, 2 car ga, $1080, inc. water, sewer, garbage; quite neighborhood, no smoking. 2412 8th St. Everett, Ava. 6/1 Call 425-232-9708 or 360-653-8480 BRAND NEW 1, 2 & 3 BR Apts Call today for SPECIALS! 1-855-671-6162 Marysville quilcedacreekliving.com

mobilehomesrus@ outlook.com

425-327-9015

MONROE

3Bd/2.5 Ba. Crestline Estates! 2000+ft. 2620 112th Dr SE, Lake Stevens. 2 car gar. N/P, N/S. Great Area! Avail July,1st. $1900/mo.+ $1900 sec. references & cred check. 1 year lease preferred. Call 206-255-7066.

N Marysville/Arlington RV SPACE In nice park, 1995 or newer PROMO $295/mo W/S/ included. Beautiful Park Like Setting. No Pets (425) 404-2058

Everett- 2 Pvt rms in cozy hm, w/d, cable, util incl, $475/400 + $200 dep. call 425-879-6952 LAKE STEVENS Master bdrm w/view, Private bath. Rent nego. (425)737-3523

Lynnwood area. Kitchen privileges. Prefer nonsmoking, no drugs. $350/month, $175/ deposit & 1/4 utilities. References a must. Ready now! Call 425-774-2707

MARYSVILLE - Furn. rm, pvt hm, incl all utils, cable, wi-fi $495/$200 dep, ns, np. Clean/Sober h o u s e . Ava i l J u l y 1 s t ! 425-501-5677

Preview Properties LMS, Inc.

GREAT DEAL! 2 Inch Ad 30 Days Print & Online

7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_0RQ)UL30_ZZZ+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS: Washington State law (RCW 18.27.100) requires that all advertisements for construction - related services include the contractor’s current Department of Labor & Industries registration number in the advertisement. Failure to obtain a certificate of registration from L & I or show the registration number in all advertising will result in a fine up to $5000 against the unregistered contractor. For more information, call Labor & Industries Specialty Compliance Services Division at 1-800-647-0982 or check out L & I’s internet site at www.wa.gov/Ini.

Skagit City Trucking School, LLC

Gregco Excavating

Class A B & C Training

25 Years Experience Residential or Commercial *Site Prep *Clearing *Demo *Grading *Utilities *Drainage Solutions

lic#GREGCEL949CB

B to A upgrades. Nights & Weekends

360-982-2891 Visit:

skagitcitytruckschool.com

• • • •

Roberts Construction

Dozer Track Hoe Dump Truck Grading, etc.

425-743-6803

Lic#ROBERC*284BO

No Job Too Small

Call for Estimate 425-320-6283 Our Classifieds are the best deal around! Call us

COVER-ALL HANDYMAN All Types of *Home Repairs *Installations *Carpentry *Hauling *Cleanup *Pressure Washing *Painting *Drywall *Tile

No Job Too Small

425-244-6943 425-334-8028 bonded/insured lic# COVERAP897DH

425.339.3100

R MONTOYA LANDSCAPING A-1 Economy Gardening & Landscaping

•Pruning •Seeding •Mowing •Trimming •Weeding •Hauling •Bark •Rototilling

Complete Yard Work Year Long Maintenance Established in 1981

FREE ESTIMATES Call 425-344-7394 360-651-0971

Park’s Handyman Service Quality Work Reasonable Rates

* Carpentry

(install windows &

doors)

* Remodels * Plumbing No Job Too Small!

206-778-2238 Lic# 603-405-644

D&H Landscaping In Business since 1986 MOSS CONTROL-AERATION *Lawn Maintenance *Fertilize programs *Thatching “Weeding *Barking *Sod Lawns, etc Commercial & Residential Services

206-714-3816 425-743-1379 Free Estimate

Lawn Maintenance, Pruning, Aerating, Thatching, Yard Cleanup, Pressure Washing & More.

Commerical & Residential Free Estimates

425-622-2489

206-550-9019 SR22-DUI-NO PRIOR

THE BEST BROADFORM INSURANCE RATES IN TOWN Call now!

*Wallboard Installation *Taping & Finishing *Smooth Wall *Priming & Texturing *Drywall Repairs *Licensed *Bonded*Insured

360-659-9322

GEORGE’S HANDYMAN SERVICE Quality work Reasonable rates

FREE ESTIMATES! M.B.E

No job too small I do it all !!

“Locally Owned Since 1977�

Lic#GARYSGS131OS

Bonded * Insured

7305 43rd Ave NE Marysville

Lic# ORTHSCC 865BN

The Gutter Professionals

30 years Drywall Experience

*PRE-PAINTED GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS *STEEL & ALUMINUM & COPPER *VISIT OUR SHOWROOM

ORTHS CUSTOM CARPENTRY

Dale Orth

360-243-3433

Like us on facebook

360-436-1787 425-231-0249 Lic. GEORGHS951MR

Company Coming? Need that extra room painted? Your house Cleaned? Check our Service Directory for the best selection of Snohomish County businesses.

CALL 425.339.3100

Call Rod 425-773-5906 Lic.# CCPREUSPP918DL

All Phases Lawn & Garden Maintenance

AGL PAINTING

Use GreenMax Service for all your Lawn Care Needs! GreenMax specializes in quality lawn & garden maintenance at great prices. We are Fast, Friendly & Work hard to make you happy! Business Owner Operated Mowing, Edging, Trimming, Pruning, Weeding, Flower Beds, Raking, Plant shrubs or flowers, Mulching, Gravel, Beauty Bark & New Sod Installation, old grass removal, Thatching, Aereting & Overseed, Fertilizing, Moss & Weed Control. All Season Cleanup & Much More! Call Anytime for a free Estimate. No Job too big or small!

R&D

Small Jobs “OK�

425-530-0752

Warm Weather will be here soon! Now is the time to get your place cleaned up & looking great for Spring!

425-736-8291 425-343-7544 • • • •

Excellent Home Painting. Interior/Exterior Pressure Washing Lic/Bond/Insured. WA L&I AGLPAPL87CJ

To list your business or service call the classified department.

425.339.3100

FONCECA & SON’S PAINTING

Handyman Sevice

•PAINTING •ELECTRICAL •REMODELS •PLUMBING •CARPENTRY

G&S YARD CARE Residential & Commercial

Licensed/Bonded/insured

425-870-7422

A COMPLETE DRYWALL SERVICE

Haul Aways Projects Clean-ups & Pruning

Licensed & Insured

Professional, Licensed & Insured. Satisfaction Guaranteed

The Gene Poole Insurance Agency

150

$

Approximately 50 words!

G & D Landscaping

Free Estimates •Thatching •Weeding •Pruning •Hedge •Bark •Rototilling •Mowing •Sod & Reseed •Fencing •Retaining Walls •Pavers •Pressure Washing Family Owned. 27 + Years 360-659-4727 425-346-6413 Lic/Bond/Ins

#GDLANLC927MQ

WHISPERING Pines Custom Landscapes, LLC For all your landscape needs

•Retaining walls/paverpatios •Flagstone patio/paths •Yard renovations/design •Sod/Planting Installations •Irrigation systems/repair •Water features •Low voltage outdoor lighting •Yard clean-ups

425-353-5417

Spring Special 15% Off Interior/Exterior Commercial/Residential

425-334-9287 425-232-3546 Senior Citizen Special

Call for Free Estimate Since 1986

Lic # WHISPPC937KP

Lic # Foncesp141K2

Only

Needs House Painting This Summer? Free House Painting Estimates Exterior and Interior CALL TODAY Ryan Bradford 360-361-6967 or Email rabford@hotmail.com Lic/Bond/Insured

PIONEER HOME SERVICES

Quality Construction Since 1945 General Contractor Additions Repairs Remodeling, Wood Decks, Windows & Doors. Concrete Walks & Patios Plumbing Repair, Consulting Excellent References Landlords Welcome Call now for quality! Chuck Dudley 425-232-3587 pioneerhs@msn.com pioneerhomeservices.net Lic# PIONEHS999NM

STAMBACK

CONSTRUCTION & PAINTING REMODELS * REPAIRS Room Additions, Decks, Fences, Window, Door & Mill Work replacement, Interior & Exterior Painting, PRESSURE WASHING Roofs, Exterior of Homes, Driveways & Sidewalks

Greg Stamback

(425)760-2027 Licensed, Bonded and Insured WA Lic# STAMBCL889RK WA Lic# STAMBPL884LN


B4 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

Please Call For Pricing And Deadlines To advertise, call Karen Ziemer at 425.339.3089 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Classifieds

1VCMJD/PUJDFT

1VCMJD/PUJDFT

1VCMJD/PUJDFT

#JET 3'2T 3'1T

City of Everett REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS RFQ No. 2014-052 Fire Department Efficiency Assessment The City of Everett is requesting Statements of Qualifications (SOQ) from interested and qualified firms to provide an Operational Efficiency Assessment of the Everett Fire Department. SOQ’s will be received by the City of Everett, City Clerk, 1st Floor, 2930 Wetmore Avenue, Everett, Washington 98201. REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS INFORMATION Request for Qualification documents are available on the City’s Bid Pa g e a t w w w. c i . eve r e t t . wa . u s / c i t y b i d s o r by c o n t a c t i n g clangstraat@everettwa.gov. STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS DEADLINE All Statements of Qualification must be submitted to the City Clerk, 1st Floor, 2930 Wetmore Avenue, Everett, Washington 98201 no later than 2:00 p.m., Tuesday, July 29, 2014, and must be clearly marked: STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FOR Fire Department Efficiency Assessment RFQ No. 2014-052 Include in the submission package, (1) one unbound original Statement of Qualifications (SOQ), (4) four bound copies and one electronic copy in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. At the appointed time a register of Statement of Qualifications shall be prepared containing the name of each offeror and a description sufficient to identify the item offered. Clark Langstraat, CPPO Purchasing Manager Published: June 18, 2014.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington NOTICE OF ENACTMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on June 4, 2014, the Snohomish County Council enacted Ordinance No. 14-031. Background: The Puget Sound Regional Council (PSRC) has a process for designating regional centers, including manufacturing/industrial centers (MIC). The cities of Arlington and Marysville have identified a proposed MIC as a candidate for regional designation. The MIC must also be identified in the C o u n t y w i d e P l a n n i n g Po l i c i e s t o b e e l i g i bl e fo r r e g i o n a l designation. Snohomish County Tomorrow unanimously voted to recommend that the Arlington-Marysville MIC be included in the Countywide Planning Policies. This ordinance amended the Countywide Planning Policies by adding a new policy to the Economic Development and Employment Chapter identifying the Arlington-Marysville MIC as a candidate for designation as a regional MIC. The ordinance additionally provides a map showing the approximate boundaries of the proposed MIC and authorizes PDS staff to work with the cities of Arlington and Marysville to apply to PSRC for designation as a regional MIC. A summary of the ordinance is as follows: ORDINANCE NO. 14-031 RELATING TO THE GROWTH MANAGEMENT ACT, AMENDING THE COUNTYWIDE PLANNING POLICIES FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY TO IDENTIFY THE ARLINGTON-MARYSVILLE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIAL CENTER AS A CANDIDATE FOR DESIGNATION BY THE PUGET SOUND REGIONAL COUNCIL Section 1. Adopts findings of fact. Section 2. Adopts conclusions. Section 3. States that Council bases its findings and conclusions on the entire record. Section 4. Amends the Economic Development and Employment Chapter of the Countywide Planning Policies to add a new policy identifying the Arlington-Marysville MIC as a candidate for designation as a regional MIC. Section 5. Identifies the Arlington-Marysville MIC as a candidate for regional designation, provides a map with the approximate boundaries of the MIC, and authorizes PDS staff to work with the cities of Arlington and Marysville to apply to PSRC for designation as a regional MIC. Section 6. Directs the Code Reviser to update SCC 30.10.050 Section 7. Contains a severability clause. Where to Get Copies of the Ordinance: Copies of the full ordinance and other documentation are available in the office of the County Council. They may be obtained by calling (425) 388-3494, 1-(800) 562-4367x3494, TDD (425) 388-3700 or E-mail to: contact.council@snoco.org. Copies may be picked up at the Council office at 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, Washington, or will be mailed upon request Website Access: The ordinance and other documents can also be accessed through the County Council website at: www.snoco.org/departments/council. DATED this 16th day of June, 2014 /s/ Debbie Eco-Parris Asst. Clerk of the Council 104482 Published: June 18, 2014.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington NOTICE OF ENACTMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Wednesday, June 4, 2014 the Snohomish County Council enacted the following: ORDINANCE NO. 14-034 APPROVING AND AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY EXECUTIVE TO EXECUTE AN INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT FOR NATURAL YARD CARE PUBLIC OUTREACH AND EVALUATION PROGRAM THAT IMPLEMENTS ECOLOGY GRANT NUMBER G1400481 WHEREAS, Snohomish County (the “County”) is a Permittee under the Phase I Municipal Stormwater Permit (the “Phase I Permit”) issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (“Ecology”) pursuant to the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (“NPDES”) permitting program established under the federal Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. § 1251 et seq. (the “CWA”), and Washington’s Water Pollution Control Law, chapter 90.48 RCW (the “WPCL”); and WHEREAS, the City of Arlington (“Arlington”), the City of Marysville (“Marysville”), the City of Granite Falls (“Granite Falls”), the City of Mountlake Terrace (“Mountlake Terrace”), the City of Everett (“Everett”), the City of Mill Creek (“Mill Creek”), the City of Bothell (“Bothell”), the City of Monroe (“Monroe”), the City of Snohomish (“Snohomish”), the City of Mukilteo (“Mukilteo”), the City of Edmonds (“Edmonds”), the City of Lynnwood (“Lynnwood”), the City of Brier (“Brier”), the City of Olympia (“Olympia”), the City of Tumwater (“Tumwater”), and Thurston County, are each Permittees under the Phase II Western Washington Municipal Stormwater Permit (the “Phase II Permit”) issued by Ecology pursuant to the NPDES permitting program established under the CWA and the WPCL; and WHEREAS, for purposes of this ordinance, Arlington, Marysville, Granite Falls, Mountlake Terrace, Everett, Mill Creek, Bothell, Monroe, Snohomish, Mukilteo, Edmonds, Lynnwood, Brier, Olympia, Tumwater, and Thurston County shall together be collectively referred to as the “Participating Entities”; and WHEREAS, among other things, the Phase I Permit requires the County to engage in public outreach and educational activities related to water pollution prevention strategies and practices; and WHEREAS, among other things, the Phase II Permit requires each of the Participating Entities to engage in public outreach and educational activities related to water pollution prevention strategies and practices; and WHEREAS, chapter 39.34 RCW authorizes local governmental entities such as the County and the Participating Entities to cooperate and coordinate with one another to make more efficient and effective use of their resources; and WHEREAS, the County and Ecology have entered into that certain 2013-15 Biennial Municipal Stormwater Grants of Regional or Statewide Significance Funding Agreement Between the State of Washington Department of Ecology and Snohomish County, having an effective date of October 31, 2013, and an Ecology Grant Number of G1400481 (the “Grant Document”); and WHEREAS, pursuant to the Grant Document, Ecology will provide the County with grant funds in the amount of Two Hundred Fifty-Six Thousand Three-Hundred and No/100 Dollars ($256,300.00) (the “Grant Funds”) to enable the County and the Participating Entities to design, implement and evaluate certain public outreach and educational programs regarding natural yard care best management practices, as more fully described in the Grant Document (the “Natural Yard Care Public Outreach and Evaluation Program”); and WHEREAS, the objectives of the Natural Yard Care Public Outreach and Evaluation Program are (i) to improve water quality within the region by educating the public regarding best management practices for residential yard care, and (ii) to measure the understanding and adoption by members of the public of the targeted behaviors and evaluate the effectiveness of the educational programs in achieving desired behavior changes; and WHEREAS, the County and the Participating Entities have negotiated an Interlocal Agreement for Natural Yard Care Public Outreach and Evaluation Program, a copy of which is attached to this ordinance as Exhibit A (the “Agreement”), pursuant to which the County and the Participating Entities would work together cooperatively to undertake and implement the Natural Yard Care Public Outreach and Evaluation Program; and WHEREAS, as more fully described in the Agreement, the Natural Yard Care Public Outreach and Evaluation Program would be funded in part by the Grant Funds, in part by separate grant funds obtained by Olympia, and in part by monetary contributions from the County and each of the Participating Entities; and WHEREAS, the county council held a public hearing on June 4, 2014, to hear public comment and consider approving and authorizing the county executive to execute the Agreement; and WHEREAS, the county council has determined that it is in the public interest to approve the Agreement and authorize the county executive to execute same; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED: Section 1. The county council hereby adopts the foregoing recitals as findings of fact and conclusions as if set forth in full herein. Section 2. The county council hereby approves and authorizes the county executive to execute the INTERLOCAL AGREEMENT F O R N AT U R A L YA R D C A R E P U B L I C O U T R E AC H A N D EVALUATION PROGRAM, in the form attached hereto as Exhibit A. Where to Get Copies of the Ordinance: A copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the office of the County Council. It may be obtained by calling (425) 388-3494, 1-(800) 562-4367 x3494, TDD (425) 388-3700 or E-mailing to contact.council@snoco.org. Copies may be picked up at the council office at 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, WA or will be mailed upon request. Website Access: The ordinance can also be accessed through the County Council’s internet website at: www.snoco.org/departments/council. DATED this 12th day of June, 2014 SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington Randy Reed, MMC Asst. Clerk of the Council 107024 Published: June 18, 2014.

North Transfer Station Rebuild Project PW#2012-003AC GC/CM: Lydig Construction, Inc., 3180 139th Avenue SE, Suite 110 Bellevue, Washington 98005 Project Information: The North Transfer Station (NTS) project site is approximately 5.8 acres. The project consists of demolition of the existing structures and construction of a new solid waste transfer and recycling building, office spaces, employee facilities, scale house control and security systems. The new facility will include odor control systems, process instrumentation and new equipment for a modern facility to collect solid waste and recycle materials. Project Address: 1350 North 34th St. Seattle, WA 98103 Owner: City of Seattle - Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) In accordance with RCW 39.10.380, GC/CM (General Contractor/ Construction Manager) is requesting sealed bids from contractors for the above referenced scopes of work for North Transfer Station Rebuild Project.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION & SEPA DETERMINATION

Proposal: Huber Administrative Conditional Use Permit LUA2014-0038 Project Location: 7304 - 10th St SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 (Section 23, Township 29, Range 5E) Proponent: Dave Huber, on behalf of 10th Street LLC Lead Agency: City of Lake Stevens Proposed Project Description: Dave Huber has applied for an Administrative Conditional Use Permit (grading & clearing permit), to correct recent unauthorized earth moving activities at 7304 10th St SE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258. SEPA Review and Administrative Conditional Use Permits are issued for grading proposals over 100 cubic yards. The applicant’s engineer estimates that approximately 330 cubic yards of earth moving occurred (cut and fill) over an area of approximately 4,500 square feet. Specific activities included tree and vegetation removal in the upper (southeastern corner of the site), utility trenching in the lower portion of the site, adjacent to SR-204 and re-gravelling a large portion of the site. The site has been stabilized with straw to control erosion. As a condition of project approval, additional erosion control methods will be employed. The proponent has submitted a project narrative, environmental checklist and engineering report in support of the proposed Administrative Conditional Use Permit. The city has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance. As conditioned and subject to additional erosion control there will be no adverse environmental impacts. Permits Required: Administrative Conditional Use Permit (Grading & Clearing Permit) and SEPA determination Date of Application: April 24, 2014 Completeness Date: May 30, 2014 Notice of Application & SEPA Determination Issued: June 18, 2014 Public Review and Comment Period: Interested parties may view the project file at the Lake Stevens Permit Center (1812 Main Street) Monday-Friday 8 am to 5 pm. To receive further information or to submit written comments, please contact the Planning and Community Development Department. Phone number: (425) 212-3315 Email: rwright@lakestevenswa.gov Mailing address: P.O. Box 257, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Upon publication of the Notice of Application & issuance of the Mitigated Determination on Non-Significance, there is a 14-day comment / appeal period. The deadline for public comment & appeals is 5:00 PM, July 2, 2014. It is the City’s goal to comply with the American with Disabilities Act. The City offers its assistance to anyone with special needs, including the provision of TDD services. Published: June 18, 2014. NOTICE OF REAL PROPERTY SALE Notice is hereby given that Snohomish County Proper ty Management will conduct a public auction on Friday, June 20, 2014 at 3:00 p.m. in Room 6C09 on the 6th floor of the Robert Drewel Building located at 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, WA. BID(S) - All sales will be made by public verbal auction to the highest bidder. All parcels must be paid for in cash or cashier’s check only, payable at the time of purchase otherwise. the bidding will be re-opened. After the bid award the Successful bidder(s) must give Property Management the grantee’s name that is to be on the deed. NO CHANGES IN NAME CAN BE MADE AFTER THE SALE. All bids received must be by oral bid and it is requested that they be presented loudly and clearly. It would also be appreciated if private conversations would be held to a minimum in order that those individuals attending may hear all bids and give everyone an equal right to bid. According to SCC 4.46.260 the Council or Property Management Division, if it deems such action to be for the best public interest, may reject any and ail bids and withdraw the property from sale. DEED(S) AND WAIVER - A Quit Claim Deed will be issued upon receipt of full payment within thirty (30) days from the date of sale. The parcel is sold “where is” and “as is” without any representation or warranty, expressed or implied including, but not limited to, representations as to whether the parcel meets zoning or building requirements. In addition and without limiting the foregoing, purchaser will take responsibility for any hazardous material on site and for any wetland protection regulations on said property. DISQUALIFIED BIDDERS - No person who is a County employee or officer may submit a bid at this sale, nor may such person submit a bid as an agent or allow any agent to submit a bid on his or her behalf. EASEMENTS, COVENANTS, AND RESTRICTIONS - The sale is subject to any easements, covenants, and restrictions of record, if any. POSSESSION OF PROPERTY - The successful bidder/purchaser will take possession of the property upon recording of the deed by the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office. COUNTY AS BIDDER - If no bid is received, the County will retain ownership of the property The following parcel(s) of land will be sold. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: The North 20 feet of Lot 11, Block 43, Monroe Land and Improvement Co’s Plat of Monroe, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Volume 3 of Plats, page 57, records of Snohomish County, Washington. Together with that portion of the alley vacated December 31, 1900 in Volume 10 of Commissioner’s Records, page 246 that would attach by operation of law. Situate in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington Minimum Bid: $2,347.59 #21820 Published: June 11, 18, 2014. Public Notice Disadvantaged Business Enterprise FY 2015-2017 Goals Everett Transit has established a Disadvantaged Business Enter prise (DBE) goal of four percent (4%) in FTA funded transportation programs for FY 2015-2017. A description of this goal and its rationale are available for review during normal business hours for 30 days following publication of this notice. DBE businesses are encourage to inform Everett Transit of products and services which they have available. Public comments regarding the goal will be accepted for 45 days from the date of this notice. Any comments are for information purposes only and should be directed to Melinda Marine, Program Manager, Everett Transit, 3225 Cedar St., Everett, WA 98273; or to the Regional Civil Rights Officer, Federal Transit Administration, Region 10, 915 Second Avenue, Suite 3142, Seattle, WA 98174. Published: June 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 2014. PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County is authorizing the District construction crews to perform the following work as required by Section 39.04.020, Revised Code of Washington: • District crews will replace existing Getaways at the Ballinger Substation. Work is located at 7221 228th St. S.W., Mountlake Terrace. Estimated cost of work is $90,000. Work order 389126. If you desire further information concerning this work, please call: 425-783-5681 or toll free 1-877-783-1000, within the State of Washington. PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY BY: Steve Klein GENERAL MANAGER DATE: Wednesday, June 18th, 2014 Published: June 18, 2014.

PUBLIC NOTICE The Lake Stevens City Council will hold an initial ratification public hearing on June 9th, 2014 to receive public comment regarding the 2014 Comprehensive Plan Docket Proposals. Council will continue the hearing until June 23, 2014 to receive additional comment and take final action. Hearings will be held in the Lake Stevens School District Educational Service Center (Admin. Bldg.), 12309 22nd Street N.E., Lake Stevens at 7:00 p.m. Any person desiring to present testimony may do so at the above described hearing or may submit comments in writing prior to the hearing by sending them to City Hall, Attn: City Clerk, P.O. Box 257, Lake Stevens, WA 98258. Published: June 5, 18, 2014. SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON NOTICE OF ACTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN under the Growth Management Act, RCW 36.70A.290 that the Snohomish County Council took the action described in (1) below on June 4, 2014 1. Description of agency action: Approval of Ordinance No. 14-031. 2. Description of proposal: relating to the Growth Management Act, amending the Countywide Planning Policies for Snohomish County to identify the Arlington-Marysville Manufacturing Industrial Center as a candidate for designation by the Puget Sound Regional Council 3. Documents may be examined during regular business hours at the Office of the County Council, 3000 Rockefeller Ave., Everett, Washington. 4. Name of agency giving notice: Snohomish County Council 5. This notice is filed by: Debbie Eco-Parris Asst. Clerk of the Council Date: June 16, 2014 104482 Published: June 18, 2014.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF ORDINANCE AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Snohomish County Council will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, July 2, 2014, at the hour of 10:30 a.m., in the Henry M. Jackson Board Room, 8th Floor, Robert J. Drewel Building M/S 609, 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, Washington, to consider an ordinance to reenact a chapter of code relating to the Marine Resources Advisory Committee and to remove a sunset provision. A summary of the ordinance under consideration is as follows: ORDINANCE NO. 14-044 REENACTING AND AMENDING CHAPTER 2.800 SCC PERTAINING TO THE MARINE RESOURCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE Section 1. The county council hereby adopts the foregoing recitals as findings of fact and conclusions as if set forth in full herein. Section 2. Chapter 2.800 Snohomish County Code, adopted by Ordinance No. 04-091 on September 22, 2004, and reenacted and amended by Amended Ordinance No. 09-090 on September 8, 2009, is reenacted and amended, as follows: SCC 2.800.900, shown below in its entirety, is deleted: 2.800.900 Sunset. This chapter is repealed effective on the date five years following reenactment (September 2, 2014) unless reenacted prior to that date, as provided in Snohomish County Charter Section 2.115. Section 3. If any section, sentence, clause, or phrase of this ordinance is held to be invalid or unconstitutional by a court of competent jurisdiction, such invalidity or unconstitutionality shall not affect the validity or constitutionality of any other section, sentence, clause, or phrase of this ordinance, provided, however, that if any section, sentence, clause, or phrase of this ordinance is held to be invalid by a court of competent jurisdiction, then the section, sentence, clause, or phrase in effect prior to the effective date of this ordinance shall be in full force and effect for that individual section, sentence, clause, or phrase as if this ordinance had never been adopted. At said time and place anyone interested may be heard either for or against the above-described matter. Where to Get Copies of Proposed Ordinance: A copy of the full text of the proposed ordinance is available in the office of the county council. It may be obtained by calling (425) 388-3494, 1-(800) 5624367 x3494, TDD (425) 388-3700 or emailing to: contact.council@snoco.org. Copies may be picked up at the council office at 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, WA, or will be mailed upon request. Website Access: The ordinance can also be accessed through the county council’s internet website at: www.snoco.org/departments/council. Accommodations for persons with disabilities will be provided upon request. Please make arrangements one week prior to the hearing by calling Randy Reed at (425) 388-3901, 1-(800) 562-4367, or TDD (425) 388-3700, or email to randy.reed@snoco.org. Dated this 11th day of June, 2014. SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington DAVE SOMERS County Council ATTEST: RANDY REED Asst. Clerk of the Council 107024 Published: June 18, 2014. SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON NOTICE OF PLANNED FINAL ACTION TO CONDEMN PROPERTY FOR COUNTY PURPOSES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Snohomish County Council will hold a public meeting on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 at the hour of 9:00 a.m., in the Henry M. Jackson Board Room, 8th Floor, Robert J. Drewel Building M/S 609, 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, Washington. At said time and place the Snohomish County Council will consider taking final action on Motion No. 14-237 authorizing the condemnation of the following proper ty for the pur pose of constructing and operating a new County Courthouse: A portion of property generally known as 1809 Wall Street (Tax Parcel No. 00439068500901), 2923 Rockefeller Avenue (Tax Parcel No. 00439168500100), 2925 Rockefeller Avenue (Tax Parcel Nos. 00439168500300 and 00439168500401), 2927 Rockefeller Avenue (Tax Parcel No. 00439168500402), 2929 Rockefeller Avenue (Tax Parcel Nos. 00439168500500 and 00439068500500), and 2931 Rockefeller Avenue (Tax Parcel No. 00439068500600), Accommodations for persons with disabilities will be provided upon request. Please make arrangements one week prior to the meeting by calling Randy Reed at (425) 388-3494, 1(800)562-4367, or TDD # (425) 388-3700, or e-mail to randy.reed@snoco.org Dated this 9th day of June, 2014 SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington Randy Reed, MMC Asst. Clerk of the Council 107045 Published: June 11, 18, 2014.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON NOTICE OF ENACTMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Wednesday June 4, 2014 the Snohomish County Council enacted the following: ORDINANCE NO. 14-035 MAKING A SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION IN NONDEPARTMENTAL GRANT CONTROL FUND 130 TO PROVIDE EXPENDITURE AUTHORITY FOR PUBLIC ASSISTANCE DISASTER GRANT FUNDS FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA) FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING DISASTER RELIEF RELATED TO THE STATE ROUTE 530 LANDSLIDE WHEREAS, Snohomish County will be receiving Public Assistance Disaster Grant funds from FEMA, through the Washington State Department of Military, to reimburse Snohomish County’s costs of rescue, recovery, and restoration related to the State Route 530 landslide; and WHEREAS, Snohomish County will be receiving $7,500,000 in Public Assistance Disaster Grant funds immediately. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED: Section 1. The County Council makes the following findings of fact: a supplemental appropriation in Grant Control Fund 130, for the 2014 budget year, in the amount of $7,500,000, is necessary to provide expenditure authority for Snohomish County’s costs of rescue, recovery, and restoration related to the State Route 530 landslide. Section 2. The appropriation units and allocation detail are as follows: 130 Grant Control Fund EXPENDITURE: 130 57416 156 4101 Professional Services $ 6,500,000 130 57416 156 6401 Equipment $ 1,000,000 Total Supplemental Appropriation: $ 7,500,000 REVENUE: 130 37416 156 3383 FEMA Public Assistance Disaster Grant $ 7,500,000 Total Revenue: $ 7,500,000 Section 3. The County Council further finds that there is a need for such supplemental appropriation because the funds which support it were unanticipated at the time of adoption of the 2014 budget and have not been previously appropriated. Accommodations for persons with disabilities will be provided upon request. Please make arrangements one week prior to the hearing by calling Randy Reed at (425) 388-3901, 1(800)562-4367, or TDD # (425) 388-3700, or e-mail to randy.reed@snoco.org. Dated this 12th day of June, 2014. SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington Randy Reed, MMC Asst. Clerk of the Council 104473 Published: June 18, 2014.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington NOTICE OF ENACTMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that on Wednesday, June 4, 2014 the Snohomish County Council enacted the following: ORDINANCE NO. 14-033 APPROVING AND AUTHORIZING THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY EXECUTIVE TO SIGN AN AGREEMENT AMONG SNOHOMISH COUNTY, THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, AND THE CITY OF GRANITE FALLS RELATING TO THE JURISDICTIONAL TRANSFER OF THE GRANITE FALLS ALTERNATE ROUTE; AND AUTHORIZING THE COUNTY ENGINEER TO EXECUTE AND ACKNOWLEDGE A QUITCLAIM DEED TRANSFERING THE GRANITE FALLS ALTERNATE ROUTE RIGHT-OF-WAY TO THE STATE WHEREAS, Snohomish County (“the County”) and the City of Granite Falls (“the City”) partnered to design and construct the Granite Falls Alternate Route (“GFAR”), a new road alignment, that intersects SR 92 to the west of the City and connects with the Mountain Loop Highway, a County Road; and WHEREAS, from the project’s beginning the City, the County, and the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) intended that the GFAR would become part of SR 92 upon the completion of construction; and WHEREAS, construction of the GFAR is complete; and WHEREAS, WSDOT, the County, and the City have negotiated an agreement identified as WSDOT Agreement No. GCB 1289 whereby WSDOT will accept transfer of jurisdiction of the GFAR; and WHEREAS, WSDOT agrees to accept the GFAR as partially controlled limited access facility upon the fulfillment of the terms and conditions stated in WSDOT Agreement No. GCB 1289; and WHEREAS, the County Council held a public hearing on June 4, 2014, to consider approving WSDOT Agreement No. GCB 1289 and authorizing the County Executive to sign the agreement on the County’s behalf; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED: Section 1. The County Council hereby adopts the foregoing recitals as findings of fact and conclusions as if set forth in full herein. Section 2. The County Council hereby approves and authorizes the Snohomish County Executive, or designee, to sign WSDOT Agreement No. GCB 1289, a copy of which is attached to this ordinance as Exhibit A. Section 3. The County Council hereby authorizes the County E n g i n e e r t o exe c u t e a n d a ck n ow l e d g e a q u i t c l a i m d e e d transferring all of the County’s interest in and to the GFAR right-ofway to the State as required under Section 3.4 of WSDOT Agreement No. GCB 1289. Where to Get Copies of the Ordinance: A copy of the full text of the ordinance is available in the office of the County Council. It may be obtained by calling (425) 388-3494, 1-(800) 562-4367 x3494, TDD (425) 388-3700 or E-mailing to contact.council@snoco.org. Copies may be picked up at the council office at 3000 Rockefeller, Everett, WA or will be mailed upon request. Website Access: The ordinance can also be accessed through the County Council’s internet website at: www.snoco.org/departments/council. DATED this 12th day of June, 2014 SNOHOMISH COUNTY COUNCIL Snohomish County, Washington Randy Reed, MMC Asst. Clerk of the Council 107024 Published: June 18, 2014.

#JET 3'2T 3'1T INVITATION TO BID Bids for the following items will be accepted in the Business Office of the Lake Stevens School District until July 1, 2014 9:00am. DAIRY The Lake Stevens School Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Specifications may be obtained in the Business Office of the Educational Service Center. Teresa Main, Assistant Superintendent of Business Services Lake Stevens School District No. 4 12309 22nd Street NE Lake Stevens, WA 98258 (425) 335-1500 Published: June 18, 25, 2014. NOTICE OF TIMBER SALE City of Everett will accept sealed bids for the Uneven Cub Timber Sale # 124-9 on July 1, 2014. All bids must be received in the Everett City Clerk’s office, 2930 Wetmore, prior to 2:00 p.m. July 1, 2014. The timber sale will be awarded to the highest and best bidder. The City reserves the right to reject all bids. Bidding infor mation and complete contract ter ms are available by contacting Mark Hitchcock at (360) 766-6500. Uneven Cub Timber Sale is located approximately 10 miles north of Sultan and comprises approximately 4,416 Mbf of timber on four final harvest units. Minimum acceptable bid will be $2,060,000.00. This sale is export restricted. The sale will be sold as a lump sum sale. Published: June 4, 11, 18, 2014.

Bid Package #07 Concrete Unit Masonry Due: 7/9/14 @ 2:00 PM PST Bid Package Scope: Concrete Unit Masonry, Rebar Installation, Water Repellant Coating, Joint Sealants Engineer’s Estimate: $442,300 For Inclusion Plan purposes, this sub-bidding package has a 25% WMBE utilization rate Bid Package #10 Overhead Coiling Doors Due: 7/9/14 @ 2:30 PM PST Bid Package Scope: Overhead Coiling Doors Engineer’s Estimate: $ 207,000 For Inclusion Plan purposes, this sub-bidding package has a 0% WMBE utilization rate Bid Package #17 Truck Scales & Appurtenances Due: 7/9/14 @ 3:00 PM PST Bid Package Scope: Truck Scales, Weight Displays, Hoisting Engineer’s Estimate: $483,700 For Inclusion Plan purposes, this sub-bidding package has a 6% WMBE utilization rate Sealed Bids will be accepted prior to but no later than the date and time listed above for each bid package, at the offices of Lydig Construction, Inc., 3180 139th Avenue SE, Suite 110 Bellevue, Washington 98005. Proposals received after the time noted above will not be considered. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. The GC/CM and Owner reserve the right to reject any or all bids and to waive any informalities or irregularities on the bids received. Two optional pre-bid meetings and job walk for potential bidders to be held June 23, 2014 at 10:00AM and June 25, 2014 at 10:00AM. Meet at the offices of Lydig Construction, Inc., 3180 139th Avenue SE, Suite 110 Bellevue, Washington 98005. All bidders and interested par ties are strongly recommended to attend the meeting. All Bids must meet the Inclusion Plan requirements and any questions on the Inclusion Plan may be directed to Dee Riley (phone: 425-885-3314; email: driley@lydig.com). Bid documents may be examined at the following locations once the Ad is posted: Lydig Construction, Inc., 3180 139th Avenue SE, Suite 110 Bellevue, Washington 98005 Lydig’s On-line Plan Center - Smartbid - Link will be available through the company website under jobs available for bid section. http://www.lydig.com/subcontractors-partners/ Bid documents can be obtained from United Reprographics located at 1750 4th Ave South Seattle, WA 98134. Questions concerning ordering plans and specifications should be directed to United Reprographics at (206) 382-1177. Bidder is responsible for the cost of any reproduction. Contractor is an equal opportunity contractor and we encourage bids from disadvantaged, minority-owned, women-owned, and small businesses. Published: June 18, 19, 20, 21, 2014. NOTICE TO BIDDERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Commissioners of Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County will receive sealed proposals for the following material/equipment: Request for Quotation No. 6400 Steel Pole and Dead-End Structures at the District’s Operations Center Administration Building, 1802 75th Street SW, Everett, Washington, on Wednesday, the 9th day of July, 2014, at 2:00 pm (Local Time). Proposals received after this time will not be considered. The bid opening is public and all proposals will be read aloud. Each bid must be accompanied by bid security which guarantees the amount of 5 percent (5%) of the total amount bid, excluding tax. Contract documents for this purchase, including Instructions to Bidders/Proposal Form, are available for inspection at the District Office of Contracts & Purchasing, 1802 - 75th Street SW, Operations Center Administration Building, Everett, Washington, 98203. For additional information pertaining to this Request for Quotation, please visit www.snopud.com, select “Bids” and select “RFQ No. 6400.” If interested in receiving a packet please complete the Bidder’s Request Form. This Notice to Bidders, the Planholders List, Addenda, Bid Responses, Award Recommendation, and Bid Protest Procedures are available for viewing on the District’s website, in read only format. The electronic file is provided as a courtesy to the Prospective Bidders by the District. The Distr ict encourages minor ity and women’s business enterprises to request the contract documents and to bid on this material/equipment. PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS BY STEVE KLEIN, GENERAL MANAGER DATE: June 16, 2014 Published: June 18, 2014. SNOHOMISH COUNTY INVITATION TO BID ITB 053-14: Precast Concrete Box Culvert with Concrete Lid BIDS DUE: July 1, 2014 11:00 a.m., Exactly, Pacific Local Time Public notice is hereby given that Snohomish County has issued the above mentioned invitation for bid. Full notice and complete details of the bid are available on Snohomish County’s official website. Please follow the link below: http://www.snohomishcountywa.gov/bids.aspx Contact the County Purchasing Division, at 425-388-3344, directly if unable to access documents online. Snohomish County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 USC 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Depar tment of Transpor tation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. 107024 Published: June 18, 2014. SNOHOMISH COUNTY INVITATION TO BID ITB 054-14: Split Concrete Box Culvert with Concrete Lid (316th) BIDS DUE: July 1, 2014 11:00 a.m., Exactly, Pacific Local Time Public notice is hereby given that Snohomish County has issued the above mentioned invitation for bids. Full notice and complete details of the RFP are available on Snohomish County’s official website. Please follow the link below: http://www.snohomishcountywa.gov/bids.aspx Contact the County Purchasing Division, at 425-388-3344, directly if unable to access documents online. Snohomish County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 USC 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Depar tment of Transpor tation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. Don Wolfe, CPPO, CPPB Interim Purchasing Manager 107024 Published: June 18, 2014.

SNOHOMISH COUNTY REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL RFP No. 14-14 Automated Asset Maintenance Management System PROPOSALS DUE: July 23, 2014, 4:00 P.M., Exactly Pacific Local Time Public notice is hereby given that Snohomish County has issued the above request for proposal (RFP). Full notice and complete details of the RFP are available on Snohomish County’s official website. Please follow the link below: http://www.snohomishcountywa.gov/bids.aspx Contact the County Purchasing Division, at 425-388-3344, directly if unable to access documents online. Snohomish County in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 USC 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Depar tment of Transpor tation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally Assisted Programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all proposers that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit proposals in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against o n t h e gr o u n d s o f ra c e, c o l o r n a t i o n a l o r i g i n , o r s ex i n consideration for an award. Don Wolfe, CPPO, CPPB Procurement Contracting Officer 104474 Published: June 18, 2014.


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014 B5

Please Call For Pricing And Deadlines To advertise, call Karen Ziemer at 425.339.3089 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Classifieds

'PSFDMPTVSFT

'PSFDMPTVSFT

'PSFDMPTVSFT

'PSFDMPTVSFT

AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01-FWA-133145 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on June 27, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at ON THE STEPS IN FRONT OF THE NORTH ENTRANCE TO THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVENUE, EVERETT, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington: LOT 2 OF CITY OF EDMONDS SHORT PLAT NO. S-65-76, ACCORDING TO SHORT PLAT RECORDED MARCH 1, 1977 UNDER RECORDING NO. 7703010299, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. Tax Parcel No: 27043000106500, commonly known as 21710 80TH AVENUE WEST, EDMONDS, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 8/2/2005, recorded 8/22/2005, under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200508220919, records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from TERRI STOWERS AND SHAWN LIGHTNING, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Trustee, in fav o r o f W O R L D S AV I N G S B A N K , F B S , I T S SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., successor by merger to Wachovia Mortgage, FSB, formerly known as World Savings Bank, FSB. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 8/15/2008, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of May 21, 2014 Delinquent Payments from August 15, 2008 1 payments at $1,310.75 each $1,310.75 3 payments at $1,390.29 each $4,170.87 9 payments at $1,387.61 each $12,488.49 12 payments at $1,473.12 each $17,677.44 12 payments at $1,565.04 each $18,780.48 12 payments at $1,663.86 each $19,966.32 12 payments at $1,770.09 each $21,241.08 1 payments at $1,822.52 each $1,822.52 8 payments at $1,803.55 each $14,428.40 (08-15-08 through 05-21-14) Late Charges: $2,772.62 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES RECOVERABLE BALANCE $670.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $115,328.97 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $271,351.29, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on June 27, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by June 16, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before June 16, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after June 16, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: SHAWN LIGHTNING, 9527 5TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, SEATTLE, WA, 98117 SHAWN LIGHTNING, 21710 80TH AVENUE WEST, EDMONDS, WA, 98026 SHAWN LIGHTNING, PO BOX 1743, LYNNWOOD, WA, 98046 TERRI STOWERS, 21710 80TH AVENUE WEST, EDMONDS, WA, 98026 TERRI STOWERS, PO BOX 1743, LYNNWOOD, WA, 98046 TERRI STOWERS, 9527 5TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, SEATTLE, WA, 98117 by both first class and certified mail on 5/3/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 5/2/2013, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustees Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877894-HOME (1-877-984-4663) Web site: h t t p : / / w w w. d f i . w a . g o v / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Develo p m e n t Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 5 6 9 - 4 2 8 7 We b s i t e : h t t p : / / w w w. h u d . g o v / o f f i c e s / h s g / s f h / h c c / f c / i n dex.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and a t t o r n ey s Te l e p h o n e : 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 0 6 - 4 8 1 9 We b s i t e : http://nwjustice.org/what-clear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 5/20/2014 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: LISA HACKNEY, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com A-4461226 Published: May 28; June 18, 2014.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01FHH-129268 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on July 18, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at ON THE STEPS IN FRONT OF THE NORTH ENTRANCE TO THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVENUE, EVERETT, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington: LOTS 70 AND 71, BLOCK 39, HILLMAN’S BIRMINGHAM WATER FRONT ADDITION TO THE CITY OF EVERETT DIVISION NO 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME 8 OF PLATS, PAGES 21 THROUGH 23, INCLUSIVE, RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Tax Parcel No: 00394403907000, commonly known as 18701 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 9/3/2004, recorded 9/9/2004, under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200409090332, records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from GEOFREY E URBAN AND NANCY P URBAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor, to STEWART TITLE GUARANTY COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 7/9/2012, AND A L L S U B S E Q U E N T M O N T H LY PAY M E N T S, P L U S L AT E CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of March 19, 2014 Delinquent Payments from July 09, 2012 8 payments at $ 666.60 each $ 5,332.80 5 payments at $ 601.60 each $ 3,008.00 2 payments at $ 666.60 each $ 1,333.20 6 payments at $ 1,630.42 each $ 9,782.52 (07-09-12 through 03-19-14) Late Charges: $ 1,263.36 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TOTAL UNCOLLECTED $ 735.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 21,454.88 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $84,713.61, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on July 18, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by July 7, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before July 7, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after July 7, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: ESTATE OF NANCY P URBAN, 18629 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 ESTATE OF NANCY P URBAN, PO BOX 265, LAKEWOOD, WA, 98259 ESTATE OF NANCY P URBAN, 18701 9 6 T H AV E N U E N O RT H W E S T, S TA N WO O D, WA , 9 8 2 9 2 GEOFREY E URBAN, 18629 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 GEOFREY E URBAN, 18701 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 GEOFREY E URBAN, PO BOX 265, LAKEWOOD, WA, 98259 HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF NANCY P URBAN, 18629 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF NANCY P URBAN, 18701 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA 98292 HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF NANCY P URBAN, PO BOX 265, LAKEWOOD, WA, 98259 NANCY P URBAN, 18629 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 NANCY P URBAN, 18701 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 NANCY P URBAN, PO BOX 265, LAKEWOOD, WA, 98259 SPOUSE OF GEOFREY E URBAN, 18629 9 6 T H AV E N U E N O RT H W E S T, S TA N WO O D, WA , 9 8 2 9 2 SPOUSE OF GEOFREY E URBAN, 18701 96TH AVENUE NORTHWEST, STANWOOD, WA, 98292 SPOUSE OF GEOFREY E URBAN, PO BOX 265, LAKEWOOD, WA, 98259 by both first class and certified mail on 1/23/2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 1/23/2014, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-9844663) Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 3/13/2014 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Tr ustee By: BRIAN WELT, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.r trustee.com A-4447848 Published: June 18; July 9, 2014.

2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and G ra n t o r a t t h e fo l l ow i n g a d d r e s s e s : L AU R I E J. P U RV I S, 14808 228TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, MONROE, WA, 98272 MICHAEL PURVIS, 14808 228TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, MONROE, WA, 98272 by both first class and cer tified mail on 2/12/2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 2/12/2014, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-984-4663) Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 3/19/2014 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Tr ustee By: BRIAN WELT, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.r trustee.com A-4448486 Published: June 18; July 9, 2014.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON, CHAPTER 61.24, et seq.

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01FSL-118975 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on July 18, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at ON THE STEPS IN FRONT OF THE NORTH ENTRANCE TO THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVENUE, EVERETT, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington: LOT 1 COUGAR RIDGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER 200502235001, IN SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON. Tax Parcel No: 01024300000100, commonly known as 14808 228TH AVENUE SOUTHEAST, MONROE, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/12/2006, recorded 12/14/2006, under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200612140690, records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from MICHAEL PURVIS AND LAURIE J. PURVIS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor, to LANDSAFE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICA’S WHOLESALE LENDER ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon FKA The Bank of New York, as Trustee for the certificateholders of the CWABS, Inc., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006- II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 5/1/2009, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of March 19, 2014 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2009 39 payments at $3,364.15 each $31,201.85 12 payments at $4,105.54 each $49,266.48 8 payments at $3,648.44 each $29,187.52 (05-01-09 through 03-19-14) Late Charges: $8,205.68 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TOTAL UNC O L L E C T E D $ 1 , 6 9 9 . 8 0 S u s p e n s e C r e d i t : $ 0 . 0 0 TOTA L : $219,561.33 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $430,389.33, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on July 18, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by July 7, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before July 7, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after July 7,

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to R.C.W. Chapter 61.24, et seq. and 62A.9A-604(a)(2) et seq. Trustee’s Sale No: 01FHS-127741 I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION, will on June 27, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at ON THE STEPS IN FRONT OF THE NORTH ENTRANCE TO THE SNOHOMISH COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3000 ROCKEFELLER AVENUE, EVERETT, WA, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real and personal property (hereafter referred to collectively as the “Property”), situated in the County of SNOHOMISH, State of Washington: LOT 7, NORTH ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER 9906145002, IN SNOH O M I S H C O U N T Y, W A S H I N G T O N . Ta x P a r c e l N o : 00896400000700, commonly known as 100 167TH PLACE SOUTHWEST, BOTHELL, WA. The Property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/12/2005, recorded 10/20/2005, under Auditor’s/Recorder’s No. 200510200231, records of SNOHOMISH County, Washington, from IRAM MARTINEZ AND CRISTINA NAVA, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE COMPANY OF WASHINGTON, INC, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR FIELDSTONE MORTGAGE COMPANY ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which is presently held by U.S. Bank Trust, N.A., as Trustee for LSF8 Master Participation Trust, by Caliber Home Loans, Inc., as its attorney in fact. II No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III The default(s) for which this foreclosure is/are made are as follows: FAILURE TO PAY THE MONTHLY PAYMENT WHICH BECAME DUE ON 8/1/2009, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT MONTHLY PAYMENTS, PLUS LATE CHARGES AND OTHER COSTS AND FEES AS SET FORTH. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Amount due as of February 26, 2014 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2009 4 payments at $2,713.91 each $10,855.64 6 payments at $2,452.47 each $14,714.82 6 payments at $2,380.00 each $14,280.00 33 payments at $2,378.20 each $78,480.60 3 payments at $2,84 9.54 each $8,548.62 3 payments at $2,849.33 each $8,547.99 (08-01-09 through 02-26-14) Late Charges: $5,312.42 BENEFICIARY ADVANCES TOTAL UNCOLLECTED $3,792.14 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $144,532.23 IV The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $315,959.57, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expenses of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on June 27, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by June 16, 2014 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before June 16, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated at any time after June 16, 2014, (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: CRISTINA NAVA, 100 167TH PLACE SOUTHWEST, BOTHELL, WA, 98012 CRISTINA NAVA, 20406 LITTLE BEAR CREEK ROAD UNIT 176, WOODINVILLE, WA, 98072 IRAM MARTINEZ, 100 167TH PLACE SOUTHWEST, BOTHELL, WA, 98012 IRAM MARTINEZ, 20406 LITTLE BEAR CREEK ROAD UNIT 176, WOODINVILLE, WA, 98072 by both first class and certified mail on 1/7/2014, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 1/7/2014, the Borrower and Grantor were personally served with said written notice of default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII The Trustee’s Sale will be held in accordance with Ch. 61.24 RCW and anyone wishing to bid at the sale will be required to have in his/her possession at the time the bidding commences, cash, cashier’s check, or certified check in the amount of at least one dollar over the Beneficiary’s opening bid. In addition, the successful bidder will be required to pay the full amount of his/her bid in cash, cashier’s check, or certified check within one hour of the making of the bid. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all of their interest in the above described property. IX Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s Sale. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-9844663) Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 1-800-569-4287 Web site: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=searchandsearchstate=WAandfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/whatclear NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceeding under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with section 2 of this act. DATED: 2/26/2014 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Tr ustee By: BRIAN WELT, AUTHORIZED AGENT Address: 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.r trustee.com A-4445495 Published: May 28; June 18, 2014.

TO: Andrea M. Armstrong Curtis D. Armstrong 514 Emerson Street 514 Emerson Street Snohomish, WA 98290 Snohomish, WA 98290

Occupants Andrea M. Armstrong 514 Emerson Street 520 Kirkland Way, #103 Snohomish, WA 98290 Kirkland, WA 98033 Curtis D. Armstrong Andrea M. Armstrong 520 Kirkland Way, #103 1630 228th Street SE, #E107 Kirkland, WA 98033 Bothell, WA 98021 Curtis D. Armstrong 1630 228th Street SE, #E107 bothell, WA 98021 THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You only have 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save our home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: 877-894-4663 Web site: www.homeownership.wa.gov The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 800-569-4287 Web site: http://hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hcs.cfm?& webListAction=search&searchstate=WA The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 800-606-4819 Web site: http://www.ocla.wa.gov/ I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Anthony V. Harris, will on July 18, 2014, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., at the Snohomish County Courthouse, at the flagpoles in front of the north plaza entrance to the Snohomish County Courthouse, 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, in the City of Everett, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Snohomish, State of Washington to-wit: THE EAST 66 FEET OF THE SOUTH 89.0 FEET OF THE NORTH 305.94 FEET OF TRACT 1, THE LAKE ADDITION TO SNOHOMISH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF R E C O R D E D I N VO L U M E 5 O F P L AT S , PA G E 1 0 , RECORDS OF SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON. (ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 2 SNOHOMISH SHORT PLAT RECORDED UNDER RECORDING NUMBER 7707210268). SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH, STATE OF WASHINGTON Assessor’s Property Tax Parcel/Account No. 280607-003-081-00 which is subject to that certain Deed of trust dated May 16, 2008, recorded May 30, 2008, under Auditor’s File No. 200805300355, records of Snohomish County, Washington, from Andrea M. Ar mstrong and Cur tis D. Ar mstrong, wife and husband, as Grantors, to Fidelity National Title Ins. Co., as Trustee to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (‘’MERS’’), as nominee for Boeing Employees’ Credit Union, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MERS, under an assignment recorded under Auditor’s File No. 2 0 1 3 1 1 2 1 0 4 1 8 a n d r e - r e c o r d e d u n d e r Au d i t o r ’s F i l e N o. 201402190559. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrowers’ or Grantors’ default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: A. Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $13,868.91, plus interest, late charges and attorney’s fees which are continuing to accrue. B. Default Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure 1. None 1. None IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $223,949.33, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from May 16, 2008, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on July 18, 2014. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III must be cured by July 7, 2014 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before July 7, 2014 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after July 7, 2014, (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrowers, Grantors, any G u a ra n t o r, o r t h e h o l d e r o f a ny r e c o r d e d j u n i o r l i e n o r encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrowers and Grantors at the following addresses: Andrea M. Armstrong Curtis D. Armstrong 514 Emerson Street 514 Emerson Street Snohomish, WA 98290 Snohomish, WA 98290 Andrea M. Armstrong Curtis D. Armstrong 520 Kirkland Way, #103 520 Kirkland Way, #103 Kirkland, WA 98033 Kirkland, WA 98033 by both first class and certified mail on November 26, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantors and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantors of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants - who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. Dated this 4th day of March, 2014. Anthony V. Harris, Successor Trustee c/o BECU PO Box 97050, MS 1049-1 Seattle, WA 98124 (206) 812-5133 Published: June 18; July 9, 2014.

4VNNPOT State of Wisconsin Circuit Cour t - Door County Publication Summons - Case No. 14-CV-42 - The Honorable D. Todd Ehlers Case Code 30404 (Foreclosure of Mor tgage) - The amount claimed exceeds $10,000.00 - Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., 3476 Stateview Blvd., Ft. Mill, SC 29715, Plaintiff vs. Lena M. Negley & Keith A. Negley, 703 143rd Pl. SW, Lynnwood, WA 98087-6429 and Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. acting solely as a nominee for Lender, EverHome Mortgage Company, 1901 E. Voorhees St., Ste. C, Danville, IL 61834-4512, Defendants - The State of Wisconsin - To each person named above as a defendant: You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 40 days after 6/4/14 you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is 1209 S. Duluth Ave., Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235 and to Gray & Assoc., L.L.P., plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 16345 W. Glendale Drive, New Berlin, WI 53151. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the complaint within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated 5/23/14, William N. Foshag, State Bar No. 1020417, Gray & Assoc., L.L.P., Attys. for Plaintiff, 16345 W. Glendale Dr., New Berlin, WI 53151, (414) 224-1987. Gray & Assoc., L.L.P. is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt. Published: June 4, 11, 18, 2014.


B6 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

Super Seller! 4 Lines Text Free Photo

32

$

30 Days! OTHER PACKAGES AVAILABLE!

7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_0RQ)UL$030_ZZZ+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV

Cattle Pasture Wanted. Cash for Hay ďŹ elds. Call now. Baled Hay wanted, Cheap. 360-691-7576

Hay & Grain Bales or Truckloads. Bark, Garvel & Topsoil. You Haul or We Deliver It! 7 Days/wk. Call Sundays! Nella

AKC Havanese Puppies in Seattle 6/15 Video: dzhavanese.com,email:

reavissandra@yahoo.com AKC Golden Retrievers Also Golden Doodles. Wormed & shots, $800. Exc bloodlines, 360-652-7148

Getting New Furniture? Recycle your old furniture – place a classified ad Call us today 339-3100

Call (509)200-4107

360-435-3765 German Shepherd Pups, DNA traceable, $600. 360-435-2559. jimshelliandcj@frontier.com

Getting New Furniture? DACHSHUNDS: 2 Male Long Hair, 9 months, 1 red and 1 black and tan, up to date on shots, micro chipped, kennel trained and they love children. (425)350-7927

LABRADOODLES Chocolates, Ready 5/30/14. Health Guaranteed. www.blueribbonalabradoodles.com 206-491-5275

Purebred Shih Tzu Pups, bor n 3/17/14, S h o t s , Ve t C h e c k e d , Wormed, Paper training. Male/Females $600 Your Pick. 360-631-5989

Purebred Yor kie Puppies 2 Males. Very cute! 10 wks old. Call 425320-7957 Siberian Husky Puppies, Beautiful blue eyes, $1250 + up, AKC, health guar. 360-668-2496

Call Classifieds today!

Recycle your old furniture – place a classified ad Call us today 339-3100

425-339-3100

To Advertise call 425.339.3100

Publication Date: June 18, 2014. • Call the planner assigned to the project. • Review project file at Snohomish County Planning and Development Services (PDS) 2nd Floor Customer Service Center. • *NEW * Permit Center and Record Center Hours are o 8:00 a.m. to Noon & 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Mon, Tues, Wed and Fri o CLOSED on Thursdays o Please call ahead to be certain the project file is available. o Please Note: submittals of projects are now taken by appointment only

FREE 7 DAYS FOUND ADS 4 Lines

To comment on a project: • Submit written comments to PDS at the address below. All comments received prior to issuance of a department decision or recommendation will be reviewed. To ensure that comments are addressed in the decision or recommendation, they should be received by PDS before the end of the published comment period. • Comments, on a project scheduled for a hearing before the hearing examiner, may be made by submitting them to PDS prior to the open record hearing. • PDS only publishes the decisions as required by Snohomish County Code. Persons will receive notice of all decisions that they have submitted written comment on, regardless of whether or not they are published. • You may become a party of record for a project by: 1. submitting original written comments and request to become a party of record to the county prior to the hearing, 2. testifying at the hearing or 3. entering your name on a sign-up register at the hearing. NOTE: only parties of record may subsequently appeal the hearing examiner’s decision or provide written or oral arguments to the county council if such an appeal is filed.

Lost Dog: “Rummy� Blue Heeler/Aus Shep mix, 2 different eye colors, seen Tues eve in Crown Ridge in Arlington 425-239-5953

To appeal a decision: • Department decisions (including SEPA threshold determinations): submit a written appeal and the $500 filing fee to PDS prior to the close of the appeal period. Refer to SCC 30.71.050(5) for details on what must be included in a written appeal. • A SEPA appeal also requires that an affidavit or declaration be filed with the hearing examiner within seven days of filing the appeal, pursuant to SCC 30.61.305(1). • Hearing examiner decisions issued after a public hearing are appealable as described in the examiner’s decision. Notice of those decisions is not published. You must have submitted written comments to PDS or written or oral comments at the public hearing in order to appeal a hearing examiner’s decision. • Building and Grading applications associated with a Single Family Residence are not subject to the County’s appeal process. To file a judicial appeal in Superior Court, refer to WAC 197-11-680 and RCW 43.21C.075.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY & Reading Room

Sunday Service 10am. Sunday School 10am 1st & 3rd Sundays Testimonial Meeting 1pm 1st & 3rd Wednesdays Reading Room Hours 11am-2pm Tues & Thurs

How to Reach Us: The Customer Service Center for the Snohomish County Planning and Development Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Robert J. Drewel Building at 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett.

1718 Broadway, Everett 425-252-9182

Planning and Development Services

YORKIES: Born 4/21. 3 males $600 - 2 Females $ 7 0 0 . Ta i l s & D e w Claws done. 1st shots. Call 206-310-6285 or email aguilarid@Comcast.net

Participants Wanted for Research Study Yo u n g m e n & wo m e n are wanted for a study on health-related behaviors. Par ticipants must be ages 18-20. Earn $25 if eligible! Visit http://depts.washington.edu/uwepic/ or email Project EPIC at UWepic@uw.edu or for more information. ReNewWorks Home And Decor Store Consignments & Donations. Start w/ a photo! rwcontact@renewwrks.com

www.renewwrks.com 425.404.3462

Call Classifieds today!

425-339-3100

425-418-7482

Come to Scarsella Ranch For Great Prices & Service!

Top Quality HAY We guarantee our feed!

Many Varieties and..... Delivery Available.......

www.dayvillesupply.com

360-568-5077

Ask About Our Special Packages!

Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM

18

$

THANK YOU ST. JUDE, Thank you St. Jude, Lynn

Need Directors...Space Science Gallery...Astrob i o l g y “Only One in the World� 206-387-0888 or psgminc@gmail.com

Need Extra Cash?

To advertise, call 425.339.3100

10th ANNUAL NORTHWEST LARGEST GARAGE SALE Evergreen State Fairgrounds June 28th & June 29th 8-5 Sat. & 9-2 Sun A family friendly safe place to shop and sell. To o l s , h o u s e h o l d items, fishing/camping gear and more treasures await you! 425.876.1888 for spaces No Admission & Free Parking

Arlington

Classic Car Yard Sale

302 288th St. NW Cars, van, boats, go karts, car parts & wheels, yard eqp. and misc. furniture. Sat. (6/21) & Sun. (6/22) 11am - 7pm

Turn your unwanted items into extra cash! Place your Classified ad today! Call us at 425.339.3100

County Administration Building 3000 Rockefeller Avenue, M/S 604 Everett, WA 98201 Phone: 425-388-3311 TTY FAX: 425-388-3872 http://www1.co.snohomish.wa.us/Departments/PDS/default.htm ADA NOTICE: Snohomish County facilities are accessible. Accommodations for persons with disabilities will be provided upon advance request. Please make arrangements one week prior to hearing by calling the Hearing Examiner’s office, 425-388-3538 voice, or contact Anne Kruger (PDS) at 425-388-7119 voice, or 388-3700 TDD

Please Call For Pricing And Deadlines To advertise, call Karen Ziemer at 425.339.3089 | www.Heraldnet.com/Classifieds

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF APPLICATION File Name: David and Cheryl Porter File Number: 14-107628-ACUP Project Description: Administrative Conditional Use Permit for an over-sized 2,560 square foot detached private garage on 2.30 acres. Location: 18808 – 92nd Street SE, Snohomish Tax Account Number: 008285-000-013-00 Applicant: David and Cheryl Porter Date of application/Completeness Date: June 11, 2014 Approvals required: Administrative Conditional Use Permit Comment Period: Submit written comments on or before July 9, 2014. Project Manager: Jennifer Lenz, 425-388-3311, ext. 2823 Project Manager e-mail: Jennifer.Lenz@snoco.org NOTICE OF APPLICATION File Name: Elledge Short Plat File Number: 14-107696-PSD Project Description: 3 lot short plat on approximately 15 acres in R-5 zoning. Location: 22510 161st Ave SE Monroe Tax Account Number: 270627-004-020-00 Applicant: Todd and Kris Elledge Date of application/Completeness Date: June 12, 2014 Approvals required: Preliminary Short Plat Approval and associated construction permits Concurrency: This project will be evaluated to determine if there is enough capacity on county roads to accommodate the project’s traffic impacts, and a concurrency determination will be made. Notice of the concurrency determination will be provided in the notice of project decision. The notice of decision will be provided to all parties of record for the project. Comment Period: Submit written comments on or before July 9, 2014. Project Manager: Aaron Hollister, 425-388-3311, ext. 2938 Project Manager e-mail: Aaron.Hollister@snoco.org

Standardbred Gelding, 12 yrs old, 15 hands, $800.360-722-6063

Dayville Hay & Grain BREEDING BULLS FOR SALE OR RENT CATTLE FOR SALE Call Lee 360-691-7576

Only

Michelle E., funds are being raised on your behalf. Blueberries x3 425-501-0218

John

NOTICE OF APPLICATION File Name: Lord Hill Fish Passage Project File Number: 14-107606-LDA Project Description: Land Disturbing Activity to restore a stream channel that was compromised in part by catastrophic failure of beaver dams upstream; includes removal of barriers to fish passage and protection of two exposed natural gas lines. Subject to environmental review. Location: 13520 Old Snohomish-Monroe Rd, Snohomish Tax Account Number: 280633-002-018-00 Applicant: Kris Thorne - Williams-Northwest Pipeline Date of application/Completeness Date: June 10, 2014 Approvals required: Land Disturbing Activity Comment Period: Submit written comments on or before July 9, 2014. Project Manager: Frank Scherf, 425-388-3311, ext. 2725 Project Manager e-mail: Frank.Scherf@co.snohomish.wa.us NOTICE OF DETERMINATION OF NONSIGNIFICANCE File Name: Gene Rich Grading File Number: 11-102442-LDA, 09-102657-SM & 09-102659-LU Description of Proposal: Substantial development permit and zoning setback variance for structural development and associated land disturbing activities within the shoreline jurisdiction of Lake Stevens, a shoreline of statewide significance. Development activities include construction of boating facilites (including a boathouse, dock access,and 20-foot long floating dock extension), replacement of a 24-foot section of bulkhead; construction of a new 14-foot bulkhead; construction of approximately 70 linear feet of new retaining walls; replacement of a concrete access stairway to site; construction of a 150 square foot slatted cedar deck; replacement of a 200 square foot concrete slab; installation of a drainage system; and approximately 20 cubic yards of grading. The shoreline permit and zoning variance applications were submitted on May 8, 2009, and a subsequent land disturbing activity permit was submitted April 13, 2011. Required building permit applications to be submitted at a later date. Location: 517 S Lake Stevens Rd., Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Tax Account Number: 290619-001-008-00 Applicant: Gene Rich Date of application/Completeness date: April 13, 2011 Approvals required: Zoning variance, shoreline substantial development, land disturbing activity, and building permits. Lead Agency: Snohomish County Planning & Development Services Threshold Determination: The lead agency has determined that the requirements for environmental analysis, protection, and mitigation measures have been adequately addressed in the development regulations and comprehensive plan adopted under chapter 36.70A RCW, and in other applicable local, state, or federal laws or rules, as provided by RCW 43.21C.240 and WAC 197-11-158. Our agency will not require any additional mitigation measures under SEPA. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is NOT required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review by Snohomish County of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with this agency and such information is adopted herein by reference. This information is available for public review upon request. This Determination of Nonsignificance is issued under WAC 197-11-340 (2) and is subject to a 30 day comment period. Written comments may be submitted to the lead agency at the address below. Comments must be received by July 18, 2014. APPEALS: Pursuant to SCC 30.61.300(10) this DNS may be appealed to the state Shorelines Hearings Board together with the appeal of the underlying Shoreline Permit. Appeal of this DNS is not allowed as a separate appeal, but must be combined with the appeal of the underlying shoreline permit and filed within the time period specified for the appeal of the shoreline permit. The appeal must be received by July 18, 2014. Appeal of a shoreline permit shall be filed with the state shoreline hearings board pursuant to RCW 90.58.180. Project Manager: Jennifer Hagenow, 425-388-3311, ext. 2283 Project Manager e-mail: Jennifer.Hagenow@snoco.org

No. 14-4-00888-6 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH In re the Estate of: STUART MARK SCHEPMAN, Deceased. The Personal Representat i ve - A d m i n i s t ra t o r n a m e d below has been appointed and has qualiďŹ ed as Personal Representative-Administrator of this estate. Persons having claims against the decedent must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by a ny o t h e r w i s e a p p l i c a bl e statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal RepresentativeAdministrator or the Personal Representative-Administrator’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and ďŹ ling the original of the claim with the cour t in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The c l a i m mu s t b e p r e s e n t e d within the later of: (1) Thirty d ay s a f t e r t h e Pe r s o n a l Representative-Administrator served or mailed the notice to t h e c r e d i t o r a s p r ov i d e d under RCW 11.40.020(1 )(c); or (2) four months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate assets and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 18 ,2014. LAUREN V. SCHEPMAN Personal RepresentativeAdministrator Attorney for the Personal RepresentativeAdministrator: Brad Lancaster, WSBA #27071 Address for Mailing or Service: Brad Lancaster Lancaster Law OfďŹ ce 17503 10th Avenue NE Shoreline, WA 98155 (206)367-3122 Court of Probate Proceedings: Snohomish County Superior Court Cause Number: 14-4-00888-6 Published: June 18, 25; July 2, 2014.

Case No. 14-4-03089-1 SEA AMENDED PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 THE SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR KING COUNTY IN RE THE ESTATE OF: LEAH L. HUDSON, Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to t h e c r e d i t o r a s p r ov i d e d under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 11, 2014. Personal Representative: STEVEN K. HUDSON Attorney for Personal Representative: Rebecca King, WSBA #35019 NORTHWEST ELDER LAW GROUP Address for Mailing or Service 11300 Roosevelt Way NE Suite #101 Seattle, WA 98125 Court of probate proceedings and cause number: King County Superior Court Case Number 14-4-03089-1 SEA Signed this 9th day of June, 2014. NORTHWEST ELDER LAW GROUP REBECCA KING, WSBA #35019 Attorney for Personal Representative Published: June 11, 18, 25, 2014.

Case No. 14 4 00754 5 AMENDED NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT FOR THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH In Re the Matter of the Estate of: WILLIAM SHERMAN KARR, Decedent. The personal representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be b a r r e d by a ny o t h e r w i s e applicable statute of limitations, (1) present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative, or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below, a copy of the claim, and (2) filing the original of the claim with the Cler k of this Cour t. Such service and ďŹ ling must occur within the later of (i) thirty days after the personal r e p r e s e n t a t i ve s e r ve d o r mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (ii) four months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the c l a i m i s fo r ev e r b a r r e d , except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 or 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: June 4, 2014 /s/ Judy Ann Ingrum JUDY ANN INGRUM Personal Representative Attorney for Personal Representative DENNIS LEE BURMAN PO Box 1620, Marysville, WA 98270 Published: June 4, 11, 18, 2014.

Case No. 144006581 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SNOHOMISH In the matter of the estate of ROBERT LEE WETTER, Deceased. The person named below has been appointed and has q u a l i f i e d a s Pe r s o n a l Representative of this estate. Pe r s o n s h av i n g c l a i m s against the decedent must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, ser ve their c l a i m s o n t h e Pe r s o n a l Representative or the attor neys of record at the address stated below and ďŹ le a n exe c u t e d c o py o f t h e claim with the Clerk of this Court within four months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of t h i s n o t i c e o r w i t h i n fo u r months after the date of ďŹ ling of the copy of this Notice with the Clerk of the Court, whichever is later or, except under those provisions including RCW 11.40.011 or 11.40.013, the claim will be forever barred. This bar is effective as to claims against both the probate assets and nonprobate assets of the decedent. Sharyl Jackson 313 - 32nd Ave. Seattle, WA 98122 Published: June 4, 11, 18, 2014.

ABANDONED VEHICLES AUCTION SAT., June 21, 2014 Bidding starts at 10:00 a.m. SHARP Preview vehicles at 9:00 a.m. * CASH ONLY * SHANNON TOWING INC. 19106 B HWY 99 LYNNWOOD WA 98036 * TOW OPERATOR # 5113 * ‘99 Cadillac Catera AAM4658 ‘99 Dodge Durango AKB9646 ‘99 Dodge Intrepid ADJ3430 ‘93 Ford Aerostar ALD1533 ‘96 Ford Econoline VIN#37585 ‘93 Ford Explorer AMS7701 ABANDONED VEHICLE ‘98 Ford Taurus AOS9694 AUCTION ‘88 Honda Accord 348XXO Kristoff’s Inc ‘96 Honda Prelude AEL6607 8007 180th ST SE ‘06 Kia Spectra ANL7332 Snohomish, WA 98296 ‘94 Olds Bravada 544ZRA Phone (425) 754-5556 SPCNS Flatbed Trlr 4LL9331 Wednesday, June 25, 2014 ‘03 Toyota Camry AHV8103 Bidding starts at 10:00am ‘93 Toyota Corolla 868VZU Preview 9:00am ‘99 Toyota Corolla ANK7529 6 Vehicles - #4949, 4950, ‘02 Toyota Rav4 362ZLO 4939, 4938, 4915, 4947 ‘93 VW Passat ADP4283 Published: June 18, 2014. Published: June 18, 2014.

NO. 11 4 007090 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY Estate of MYRLYN J HERRING, Deceased. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Cour t has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070; (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of ďŹ rst publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. T h i s b a r i s e f fe c t i ve fo r claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: June 4, 2014. KIM CANNON Personal Representative 7713 318th St. NW Stanwood, WA 98292 Published: June 4, 11, 18, 2014.

We keep kids safe! Learn more about Safe Kids at :

www.snosafekids.org 1077042


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014 B7

Items Under

$250

FREE!

BUYING OLD COINS Collections, gold, silver.

425-252-0500

CASTLETON Turquoise 41 piece set of dishes approx 1950’s, incl oval serving platter. Exc cond, $250. (425)318-0833 Kissy Doll by Ideal, in box. $40; 425-346-7592

~BUDGET~ APPLIANCE

Large selection of Reconditioned Whirlpool, Kenmore & GE Washers, Dryers, Ranges & Frost-Free Refrigerators D Low cost service calls D New & used parts Serving Snohomish Co. for 20 yrs

1904 Broadway,Everett

~425-252-7776~

Kenmore Heavy Duty Freezer commercial 5 cb New Armchair w/cherub ft $160 425-418-3072 tapestry fabric, white/ TV - SAMSUNG 27� gold wood, french style, MODEL #TX-P2734 $199; ex cond X/XAA, with manual & 425-318-0833 remote, $20 obo. Call (425)876-8665 Packard Bell Radio Model 65A, sliding door $75, needs work; 425-346-7592 Sensor radio model 5420, $20; 425-346-7592

2 side by side Cemetery plots at Floral Hills Rose Garden $3900 both obo 425-268-2970

BEAUTIFUL SMILES

Denture & Dental Clinic AExtractions &

Dentures Placed Immediately (onsite) AIn-house Lab AImplant Dentures A1/hr Repair/Reline AFree Consultation

2-Unassigned Spaces in Floral Hills Cemetery, Lynnwood, WA, Evergreen Garden section, $2000/ea. For Sale by Private Party. 425-322-5211 or 425-241-0273

Bothell

425-487-1551

Very nice, lightly used maple crib w/mattress $35, Fisher Price Highchair $8, Peg Perago Highchair w/casters & L OV E S E AT: 5 4 � bl u e height adjustment $10. p l a i d f l ex s t e e l . F i r m All furniture is in good cushions in terrific condi- cond. 425-743-1877 (4) Cemetery Plots in tion! 425-483-9192 same area at Washellis Vita Master exercise $3000/ea OBO; Call bike, $25; Good Cond, Frank, 360-668-3980 All sales final 206-229-0672 Abbey View- Extension P E A B O DY M U S E U M of Evergreen Washelli in Purple glass bead neckBrier/Kenmore, 2 Plots lace, 36�, $45 OBO. Call $350/ea 206-284-8797 425-876-8665

Accordion, Camerano 60’s era Jr size, 12 bass, w/org leather strap/case. $200. (360)899-5225

37� Toshiba TV, heavy, works perfect! need two p e o p l e t o p i ck i t u p. (206)265-0846

BeautifulSmilesLLC.com

VICTORIAN Floor Lamp w/hand sewn silk beade d s h a d e, ex c c o n d , $235 425-318-0833

WHITE PICKET FENCE (NEW) 20 Sections, 8 feet long. Paid $1,700, Will Sell All for $1,200, Hardware Included. wfvanderbergjr@yahoo.com 206-818-3232

Getting New Furniture? Recycle your old furniture – place a classified ad Call us today 339-3100

Recycle your old furniture Call us today 425.339.3100

Vanity Bathroom Sinks new pair, Sherle Wagner, oval scalloped, design, off white $195 425-318-0833

Beautiful Oak Table- w/ six chairs and 2 leaves $240 text for pics 425.750.8600

Michael A. Salehi LD

Board Certified Denturist Gabriela Aluas DDS General Dentist

18521 101st Ave N.E.

Silvertone Upright Phonograph, $120; 425-346-7592

100% WOOL 7’6� Round Thick Area Rug, Beige w/rose floral border, exc cond, $245/obo 425-318-0833

DRY Firewood, $240 per cord, delivered. 360-691-7597

LOG TRUCK LOADS OF FIREWOOD Cords avail. 1-800-743-6067

14� SQUARE GLASS Table, new in box,w/umbrella holder, $30. Good Cond, All sales final 206-229-0672 Ceramic Canister Set w/ Salt/Pepper & Knapkin holder, $55; All Good Cond, All sales final 206-229-0672 Kraftware Ice bucket, $15; All Good Cond, All sales final 206-229-0672 Realistic Metal Detector. Works Great! $150 425-418-3072 Stihl chainsaw, Model 017; 14� bar, $150 425-418-3072

Need Extra Cash?

$250

Packages $ as low as

4 lines, publishes Mon., Tue. & Wed.

7RDGYHUWLVHFDOO_0RQ)UL$030_ZZZ+HUDOGQHWFRP&ODVVLĂ€HGV

(34) Amberol Records $120; 425-346-7592

Items Over

Hummingbird fish finder, 400TX, w/all par ts & manual, like new, $30; 425-337-5683 Antique Chickering Square GRAND PIANO Built about 1863. (84 keys) Completely repaired and reconditioned after purchase in 1979. It has been played frequently and tuned yearly. It is in excellent playing condition. It has a beautiful tone and good action. Currently in storage in Everett. Need to schedule appt to view. Price is negotiable. mark.aleta@comcast.net 425-228-6714

Toro self-propelled rear bagger, gas lawn mower, run great. $235 425-418-3072

HORNETS/ YELLOWJACKETS Wanted all Summer/Fall FREE non-toxic removal of most, from nonsprayed paperball type hives, around football size or larger. 425-485-0103 venomcollect4free@comcast.net

Black Acoustic Electric Guitar w/case $180 425-418-3072

8’ DINGHY, fiberglass, $60 w/oars 425-238-1667 B o b A l l e n Tr a p Ve s t , N av y bl u e w / l e a t h e r shoulder pads, like new, $25. 425-337-5683

Turn your unwanted items into extra cash! Place your Classified ad today! Call us at

425.339.3100

Crab pot, $40 425-268-2970 GIRLS BIKE, Schwinn , DeeLite, fancy, gift quality, $30; 8’ Dinghy, fiber glass, $60 w/oars 425-238-1667 Need Extra Cash? Call us at 425.339.3100

18

Includes FREE photo!

Estate/Antique-High End Furniture, Fine China. By appt only. Cash only! 425-478-5592

Oudean’s Willow Creek Nursery at Sorticulture June 6 & 7(10-6),8th (10-4). Legion Park 145 Alverson Blvd, Evt. Carnivorous plants from $6 Push Lawn Mower, 16�, $55; Good Cond, All sales final 206-229-0672

Need Extra Cash?

Turn your unwanted items into extra cash! Place your classified ad today! 339-3100

Your Battery Specialists for ALL your battery needs.

WE BUY LEAD-ACID SCRAP BATTERIES Everett 3729 Broadway 425.259.9260 Marysville 720 Cedar Av 360.653.8654 Monroe (NEW) 212 E. Main St. 360.805.5582 www.pacificpowerbatteries.com 864173

SPECIAL OFFER! 30 Days, 4 Lines + Photo

To advertise, call 425.339.3100 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Autos

Class A 03 Hurricane 32’ 2 tv’s, AC, 43k, newer tires, 1 owner clean exlnt cond 360.668.2496

OPEN ROAD RV

OPEN ROAD RV

09 Coachmen Prism 230 full body paint, elegant interior, Mercedes diesel sprinter chassis a must see! This coach is beautiful and well maintained. Contact Rob Troop for more details #PU110 $72,598 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785 OPEN ROAD RV 2000 American Tradition 36DS. This super clean American coach is loaded with great features like Spartan Chassis, Cummings ISC515 & Allison transmission. Beautiful maple cabinets and so much more! It’s a must see! Nice Coach Price! Call Nat or Jason #C0125 $69,890 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

Getting a new car?

Recycle your old car! Place a classified with us today!

425.339.3100

2000 Fleetwood Storm 34T. Please take advantage of our Huge Summer Sale on this very nice class A motor home. Very clean, great shape, Runs & Drives well. Call Madeson 425-501-6953 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785 OPEN ROAD RV 2004 Winnebago Minnie 24C. Wow! Only 7,000 miles on this beautiful little coach. Perfect size for the camp ground. Come see this coach for yourself. Call Nat or Jason for an appt. openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785 OPEN ROAD RV 2005 Nuwa Hichhiker 33RL Triple Slide. If you are in the market for a quality all seasons fifth wheel this is the Rig for you! Need I say more? This FW has three slides, w/d plumbing, king bed, tons of storage, slide in basement and much more. Call Nat or Jason. openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

OPEN ROAD RV 2006 Gulfstream Ultra SE C7F, Enjoy many years of economical adventures in this low mile late model class “C� coach. Call John for details. #SB103H $39,967 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785 OPEN ROAD RV

2008 Itasca Eclipse. Low Low Miles! Highly Recommended! Superior floor plan best in it’s class. 400hp Cummins. Call Robin for a showing or info. #C0117 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

Getting a new car? Recycle your old car!

425.339.3100

OPEN ROAD RV 2010 Jayco Greyhawk, 31Fk, Class C. This front kitchen floor plan is amazing you can reach the fridge from the front seat. Rear tv and walk around queen bed. Come check out this super clean 22,000 mile coach, loaded with options: Power awning, BBQ, Flat screen tv, generator and much more. Call Jason or Nat for appointment openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

OPEN ROAD RV

2014 Crossroads Z-1 This unit is a great example of “why buy used� Enjoy this lightweight unit today! Call John for details. #2N113 $19,982 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785 OPEN ROAD RV

OPEN ROAD RV

2012 Fleetwood Bounder 33C Like New Full body paint, fully loaded coach. Come take advantage of this beautiful motorhome. Everything like new except for the price tag. Call Nat or Jason for an appt.

2014 Thor Chateau 24C take advantage of our low pricing on one of Thor’s most popular class C models! Come see why call John for more information. #CH103A $74,987 openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2004 Buick Regal Stk B19892A $5,750 Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

ROY ROBINSON

1999 Audi A8 Stk 342457A $3,499

Looking for a car?

Happy Birthday: Don’t let emotions override common sense. Pick and choose your battles and focus on what will get you the most mileage. The grass may look greener on the other side of the fence, but do your research before you decide to make a switch. Your numbers are 3, 12, 25, 28, 30, 34, 41. ARIES (March 21-April 19): Observation will be your savior. Secrets will be kept, and deception is apparent. Initiate change before it is forced on you. Showing insight and fortitude will give you the upper hand. ��� TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Look for new projects or engage in a learning session that interests you. The introductions you encounter will turn out to be meaningful relationships. Contact someone who has been on your mind and share memories. ���� GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Someone will be waiting for you to make a mistake. Don’t let negativity or mixed emotions cost you. Focus on your goals and putting in a topnotch effort that will bring you recognition and advancement. �� CANCER (June 21-July 22): Take the road less traveled. Enjoy doing something unique or creative that stimulates your mind, body and soul. Getting involved in something that makes you feel good and brings you joy will enhance your life. ����� LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Money comes and money goes. Show restraint when it comes to spending. Luxury items will not define who you are. You cannot buy love. Don’t leave cash or valuables out in the open. ��� VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Reconnect

with friends and pick up where you left off. The information you gather will lead to an opportunity to do something different. Someone at work may not be as helpful as you are led to believe. ��� LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Let your creative imagination lead the way. What you present will be well-received and change your relationship with those you are dealing with. Focus on your peers and refuse to let personal matters slow you down. ��� SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Follow your creative dreams. Your desire and need to do something special will bring you satisfaction and make you feel proud. Now is the time to expand and explore, not to let life pass you by. ����� SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Watch your step. Deception and disillusionment will lead you down a dark path. Listen carefully and ask questions if you feel uncertain. Precision, moderation and due diligence will be required to win. �� CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Stay put. Let people come to you. Don’t take liberties that can lead to a precarious situation. Protect your money and your important relationships. Your home is your castle, and your family is your support system. ���� AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Expect to be burdened with matters concerning an older friend or relative. Your kindness will result in good fortune. A change in the way you earn your living is to be expected. ��� PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let your mind wander. Express your ideas and you will receive interesting feedback. Love and romance are on the rise, and plans can be made that will improve your lifestyle. ��� Universal Uclick

2003 CHEV Cavalier Stk 340972B $2,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

09 FORD FUSION SE V6 Stk 1411026A $10,495 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673 10 FORD FOCUS S Only 58 miles Stk 3488A $8,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

02 CADILLAC STS Hurry! 65 Orig Miles Stk P0524 $8,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

12 CHRYSLER 200 Stk P0527 $15,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2010 FORD FUSION HYBRID Stk 3346 $14,817 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

MagicNissanofEverett.com

KLEIN HONDA

2015 Cross Roads Zinger. 25ft Rear Bath, Super affordable, Nicest trailer for the nicest payment possible. Call Troop at 253-709-3102

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

1989 CADILLAC DEVILLE COUPE Leather, Loaded, New Tires, 1-owner Stk 30781A $9,986 USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

HOROSCOPE

ROY ROBINSON

2000 AUDI QUATTRO V8, Low 36K miles Stk 1410719B $13,500 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673 KLEIN HONDA 09 AUDI A4 QUATTRO Leather, Loaded, Great for the NW! Stk 13195B CALL FOR PRICE

32

$

OPEN ROAD RV

openroadrvcenter.com 360-217-8785

425.339.3100

1994 Corvette Wheels: 2 ea 17� x 9.5� chromeplated alloy wheels, 2 ea 17� x 10.5�, chrome plated alloy wheels. ltmom1@juno.com

Only

WE BUY RV’S We are always in need of Quality Used Inventory. Turn your RV Into Cash Now with our Fast, Easy & Reliable Program at openroadrvcenter.com Contact

Roy Rodgers 360-949-0980 For Fast Results!

WE BUY

LEAD-ACID SCRAP BATTERIES Pacific Power Batteries In Everett, Marysville, Monroe, & Mt. Vernon

800-326-7406

Looking for a car? 425.339.3100

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2013 MXR G.T. VIN DO232770 Stk 6413A $27,775 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

ROY ROBINSON

2002 BMW 3-Series Stk 342588A $13,999

ROY ROBINSON

2004 CHEV TAHOE Z71, Loaded, 4WD Stk 1410660A $11,994 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

2010 Chevrolet Cobalt VIN A7139541 Stk 6398A $16,444 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

2011 Crown Victoria 54K miles, Lthr, Window Sticker over 30K Stk 3354 $15,899 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

ROY ROBINSON

2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Stk T342045A $4,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718 ‘07 27’ POWER Catamaran, two 175 HP OB ’s . Perfect for fishing expeditions or family outings. $69,900. 916-542-0609. prokat2660@gmail.com.

2005 CHRYSLER 300T, Touring Edition Stk 3587A $8,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2012 FORD FOCUS WAGON VIN CL251519 Stk 7113A $14,888 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

2001 Dodge Caravan SE, fully loaded 127k mi.,$4,495 obo call 425-210-3609 HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2012 NISSAN ALTIMA SL, Leather Stk 1410909A $19,998 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

‘86 Ford Dually, clean straight body, Trick-out cruise Colby, $2695/obo; 425-231-2576 HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2006 Dodge Magnum Stk 19067A $10,690 2004 BMW 6-Series Stk 340842C $17,999

2006 CHEV HHR Great Mileage Stk 19759A $8,995

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

Getting a new car? 425.339.3100 Recycle your old car! Place a classified ad today. Call us!

2007 Ford Mustang Stk 19318A $11,713 Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

Looking for a Car? Classifieds have the largest selection in Snohomish County

425.339.3100


B8 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

SPECIAL OFFER! 30 Days, 4 Lines + Photo

To advertise, call 425.339.3100 | Mon-Fri - 8AM-5PM | 24/7 www.Heraldnet.com/Autos

KLEIN HONDA

2003 FORD THUNDERBIRD Bring back the Classic! Stk 30680A $14,990 USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990 KLEIN HONDA

Credit Problems?

ROY ROBINSON

2007 HONDA FIT SPORT Stk 331756A $11,999

02 INFINITI I35 “Luxury Edition” Stk 3347A $9,995 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

2006 Mazda MX5 SE VIN 60101717 Stk P1991 $18,424 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

05 NISSAN ARMADA LE, 4WD Stk P0502A $15,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718 200 HONDA ODYSSEY EX Stk T15870B $9,999

855-283-0990

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

02 HONDA CR-V Priced to Sell Fast Stk 3584A $8,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

06 HUMMER H2 Rare Find, Leather Stk 3331A $26,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

ROY ROBINSON

2001 Subaru Outback Stk 342120A $9,995

2006 VW Jetta Stk 350022A $13,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718 ROY ROBINSON

ROY ROBINSON

We can help! Check out our Specials All Vehicles Reduced www.kleinhonda.com *Available for Select Used Vehicles

ROY ROBINSON

05 INFINITI G35 Sexy Sports Coupe Stk P0489A $14,788 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2007 MAZDA 3 VIN 71636451 Stk 7267A $8,997 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

2000 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE, V6, New Battery, Brakes & Struts, Excell c o n d , $ 5 , 0 0 0 O B O, (425)238-9195.

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2011 Nissan Juke VIN BT027701 Stk 7089A $18,050 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

KLEIN HONDA

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2007 INFINITI G37 Sport Sedan All the Bells & Whistles! Stk 13175P $18,455

2009 MAZDA Speed3 VIN 91245734 Stk 7211B $18,955 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

2013 VW Passat 2.0L Stk 341740A $22,499

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718 2010 TOYOTA PRIUS Save Gas & Money! Stk 3801A $16,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

1999 NISSAN SENTRA Stk B18927B $2,995

MagicNissanofEverett.com

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

32

$

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2 0 1 0 To y o t a Tu n d r a Db. cab, 4x4, 5.7, 28k, tow/cold weather pkgs., $28,000. 425-754-1853

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2006 HYUNDAI SANTA FE Stk 19866A $8,500 Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

04 Chev Trailblazer Stk B19526B $6,938 Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

05 JEEP LIBERTY Cleanest Around! Stk 3221B $7,888 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

KLEIN HONDA 2008 Volvo S40 Low Miles! Sunroof Stk 13168P $15,893 USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

MagicNissanofEverett.com

Only

KLEIN HONDA 99 DODGE DURANGO 4x4Leather, 3rd Row Stk 13136BL $6,994 USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

KLEIN HONDA 2011 JEEP LIBERTY 4WD, PW, ODL Stk 13113C $17,746 USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

KLEIN HONDA 2010 HONDA ACCORD EX-L “Cross Tour” Stk 3027A $19,988 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

ROY ROBINSON

2012 MAZDA2 TOURING VIN CO141042 Stk P1975 $16,444 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2011 HONDA ACCORD LX 22K miles, Like New Stk 3785A $18,588 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

2011 TOYOTA RAV4 VIN BW100343 Stk 6523B $16,484 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777 KLEIN HONDA

02 NISSAN ALTIMA PW, PL, AC, CD Stk 30750A $9,951 2009 HYUNDAI SONATA 4 Door, Stk 3307B $8,498 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

2004 Jaguar X-Type Stk 330188CC $10,900

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

2013 MAZDA 5 VIN D0150322 Stk P2023 $20,468 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777 HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

MagicNissanofEverett.com

1998 TOYOTA CAMRY Limited, Leather Stk 30405BL $5,993

2006 PONTIAC SOLSTICE VIN 6Y108291 Stk 6590A $9,988 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

$TOP CASH$ PAID FOR UNWANTED CARS & TRUCKS $100 TO $1000 7 Days 24 Hrs Licensed/Insured

ALL STAR TOWING 425-870-2899

2005 Honda Accord Stk B19897A $10,995 Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

1998 LEXUS ES 300 85K Low Miles Stk 1410993A $7,449 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

KLEIN HONDA

06 MAZDA 6 ABS, A/C STK 19547A $8,840 Hyundai of Everett

425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com KLEIN HONDA 03 MAZDA MX-5 Hard Top Convertible Stk 30475A $9,470 USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

We can help! Check out our Specials All Vehicles Reduced

KLEIN HONDA 2001 SAAB Wagon Great Vehicle, Super Clean, Auto Stk 30523A $8,999

855-283-0990

KLEIN HONDA

www.kleinhonda.com *Available for Select Used Vehicles

USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

USED CAR CENTER

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

KLEIN HONDA

2011 Elantra Auto Stk 734 $15,200 2010 HONDA ACCORD Leather, Loaded, Great Car for the Price! Stk 13189P $16,977

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

USED CAR CENTER

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

855-283-0990

ROY ROBINSON 2006 LINC TOWNCAR LTD, Stk 3356 $16,779 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

05 FORD EXPEDITION Leather, Loaded, 4x4 Stk 30759BL $9,976

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

855-283-0990

Hyundai of Everett

KLEIN HONDA

2003 Mercedes Benz Stk 341500A $11,599 06 MAZDA 3 Grand Touring Edition Stk 3001A $9,995 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

ROY ROBINSON

855-283-0990

2011 VW JETTA Great Car! Stk 13194P $15,976

2004 FORD F-150 Regular Cab Stk 1411138A $10,988 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

ROY ROBINSON

2007 HONDA CRV VIN 7C063855 Stk 7116A $14,944 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

08 MITSUBISHI Fuso VIN 8K008630 Stk 6765A $19,988 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

ROY ROBINSON

855-283-0990

1999 SUBARU Legacy Stk 341111B $5,999

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

USED CAR CENTER

USED CAR CENTER

Credit Problems?

www.kleinhonda.com *Available for Select Used Vehicles

03 SATURN SL Alloy Wheels Stk 19761A $6,776

2009 VW CC Loaded, Luxury! Stk 1411110B $16,898 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

MagicNissanofEverett.com

2012 Elantra Touring Stk 19826A $8,995

KLEIN HONDA 12 HONDA ODYSSEY Leather, Loaded Stk 13222P Call for Price

USED CAR CENTER

425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

KLEIN HONDA We can help! Check out our Specials All Vehicles Reduced

USED CAR CENTER

855-283-0990

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

855-283-0990

03 HONDA ODYSSEY Leather, Navi Stk 30513BL $6,977

855-283-0990

01 DODGE DAKOTA Sport, Manual Stk 1411114B $4,990 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

2008 Hyundai Azera Stk 19067A $14,995

2003 HONDA CIVIC SEDAN Stk 13113C $17,746

KLEIN HONDA

2005 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer, 4WD, Stk 1310273 $12,379 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

Credit Problems?

Hyundai of Everett 425-258-2885 hyundaiofeverett.com

2013 Dodge Caravan VIN CR241785 Stk P1952 $17,999 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

KLEIN HONDA

HYUNDAI OF EVERETT

2007 Hyundai Accent Stk 19571B $8,995

06 FORD EXPLORER LTD, V-8, 1-Owner, Stk 60640 $14,994 1-800-NEW-FORD 1-800-639-3673

2002 MAZDA PROTOGE 5 JM1BJ246521636779 Stk 7049A $6,999 Mazda of Everett 1-888-871-8777

02 NISSAN SENTRA Best Value in Town! Stk 3750A $5,488 Magic Nissan 888-740-2932 MagicNissanofEverett.com

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

Looking for a car?

Looking for a Car?

Classifieds have the largest selection in Snohomish County

Classifieds have the largest selection in Snohomish County

425.339.3100

2000 GMC Jimmy S15 Stk T340713C $3,799

1997 HONDA PASSPORT EX Stk T15870B $9,999

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

royrobinson.com 1-866-662-1718

Looking for a car?

425.339.3100

Getting a new car?

425.339.3100

That’s how many people read The Herald and HeraldNet each week.

Isn’t it time to get your advertising message in front of them? To advertise call 425.339.3030

www.heraldnet.com


Sports SECTION C

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/SPORTS

|

World Cup Mexico holds off Brazil for 0-0 tie; Belgium rallies to defeat Algeria 2-1; Russia and South Korea battle to 1-1 draw, C5

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

TONIGHT’S GAME

Everett at Everett, 7:15 p.m. Radio: KRKO (1380 AM)

Tuesday’s result: Everett beaten 5-3 by the Hillsboro Hops, C2

Cousino shows Sox he’s not just speed, ‘D’ By Nick Patterson The Herald

was embraced by teammates and coaches while watching practice, despite his less-than-stellar attendance during the voluntary portion of the offseason. While coaches and players say every workout is important — why have offseason workouts if they don’t do any good? — Carroll acknowledged Tuesday that not every player’s situation is the

EVERETT — Austin Cousino doesn’t have the reputation of being a power hitter. Nevertheless, he managed to punctuate his professional debut in a big way. The Everett AquaSox outfielder marked his first game as a pro Monday by belting a home run in Everett’s 7-3 loss to the Hillsboro Hops at Everett Memorial Stadium. Cousino, the Seattle Mariners’ third-round pick in this year’s amateur draft out of the University of Kentucky, was selected largely based on his speed and his defense in center field. In his three years at Kentucky he was 48-for-51 as a base stealer and a three-time member of the SEC All-Defensive Team. In contrast, home runs were far more rare, as he hit just four in 61 games this spring— though the scouting reports suggested he had surprising pop for a player of his size (5-foot-10, 185 pounds). Therefore, homering in his first professional game wasn’t on Cousino’s mind. “I just try to go up there and put a good swing on the ball every time up and try to find barrel,” Cousino said. “When you’re first adjusting to these wood bats you’re not trying to do too much with it because when you do you’re going to get in trouble. I just go up there and look for a good pitch to hit, and when that happens good things happen.” That good thing happened in Cousino’s second at bat. During his first at bat Cousino belted a ball that would have been a homer, but it drifted just foul down the rightfield line, and he ended up striking out. But his next time up Cousino turned on the first pitch he saw, a low changeup, and this time it stayed fair as it just dropped into the homer porch in right. “I hit that first one foul and I was thinking it would have been cool if I could have got it around,” Cousino said. “Then I did the second time up. It was nice to get that first one out of the way, so now I can play ball from here on out.”

See LYNCH, Page C2

See COUSINO, Page C2

DOUG RAMSAY / FOR THE HERALD

ABOVE: Darrington High school quarterback Trent Green, a senior-to-be, is all smiles as Seattle Seahawk wide receiver Percy Harvin signs his hat after the Loggers football team watched the Seahawks work out during their minicamp session on Tuesday in Renton. BELOW: Darrington football head coach Doug Lenker (right) talks with Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll after the Super Bowl champs’ practice.

Championship treatment Darrington High’s football team, still working to erase Oso mudslide memories, enjoys a special day with the Seattle Seahawks, then heads to CWU, where the university invited the team to attend its football camp for free By Rich Myhre Herald Writer

RENTON — With the passing weeks and months, residents of Darrington are slowly putting the tragedy of the Oso mudslide behind them. And as members of the Darrington High School football team found out on Tuesday, plenty of good people in the Puget Sound area are still looking for ways to help that happen. On the drive to this week’s Central Washington University football camp in Ellensburg, the Loggers took a slight detour to

attend a Seattle Seahawks minicamp at the NFL team’s Renton practice facility. Darrington’s players and coaches were invited guests of the Seahawks, and the visit included a chance to get autographs and pose for pictures with many of Seattle’s top players. “The kids are on Cloud 9 right now,” said Darrington head coach Doug Lenker as he watched his players mingle with the Seahawks after the afternoon workout. “It is,” he added, “a heck of a day.” This is the second time the Super Bowl champion Seahawks See DARRINGTON, Page C4

Lynch does show up for Seahawks’ minicamp but doesn’t practice By John Boyle Herald Writer

RENTON— Marshawn Lynch was in attendance, but to borrow his own phrase, the Seattle Seahawks running back was not “about that action, boss.” By simply showing up at the Seahawks’ minicamp, however, Lynch ended the holdout that never actually happened, even if he did not participate in the

workout because of a sore ankle. “It was a big story,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said sarcastically of Marshawn Lynch’s much Lynch discussed decision to attend minicamp. “We expected him to be here and he’s here.” Lynch’s presence was anything

but a given before Tuesday, despite the minicamp being mandatory. He skipped Seattle’s voluntary organized team activities, then reports surfaced last week that he would miss minicamp as well because he is unhappy with his contract. A report on the league’s website even suggested Lynch was considering retirement if he didn’t get what he was looking for from Seattle, but for now at least, Lynch is back with his team and

Mariners overpower the Padres, sweep short home series Home runs by Montero, Cano spark Seattle’s 6-1 victory

TONIGHT’S GAME

Seattle at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.

By Bob Dutton The News Tribune

TV: Root (cable) Radio: ESPN (710 AM)

SEATTLE — OK ... the Seattle Mariners see the same thing you see. (Many of you, anyway.) That Jesus Montero, for all his still-substantial baggage, remains loaded with tantalizing potential as a run-production threat. And it was Montero who, on Tuesday afternoon, produced the game’s turning point with a tworun homer in the second inning that erased an early deficit and started the Mariners toward a 6-1 victory over the San Diego Padres

at Safeco Field. “Today was a fun day,” Montero admitted. “I saw that pitch he (Padres starter Eric Stults) was going to throw me, and I hit it really (well). I was using a big bat, too. I put a good swing on the ball, and I got to help the team.” It was Montero’s first bigleague homer in more than a year and ... OK, that’s deceptive; the drought was just 31 at-bats because he spent most of the past 13 months either in the minors,

INSIDE: NFL, C2

|

Baseball, C3

|

learning a new position or serving a drug-related suspension. Tuesday also marked the first time Montero, a former catcher, played first base in the big leagues. That he remains a defensive workin-progress was a point manager Lloyd McClendon hammered home in his pre-game remarks. But that bat ... yes, that bat, potentially, can erase a scads of shortcomings in other areas. “He’s had some obstacles along the way,” McClendon said. “We all know about those. He’s making amends, and he’s trying to come back, and he’s trying to do the right thing.” The Mariners also got a tworun homer from Robinson Cano in support of a strong bounceback effort by rookie lefty Roenis See M’S, Page C3

STEPHEN BRASHEAR / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Jesus Montero is congratulated by teammates in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run in the second inning against San Diego Padres on Tuesday. The Mariners went on to defeat the Padres 6-1.

College World Series, C6

|

Sounders, C6

|

Weather, C6


C2

Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

Seahawks QB Wilson wins Good Guy Award

CALENDAR WED THU 18 19

JUNE

Associated Press

San Diego 3:40 p.m. ROOT

San Diego 7:10 p.m. ROOT PSA Elite 7 p.m.

San Antonio 7 p.m. LiveWell Tri-City 7:15 p.m.

SEATTLE — Super Bowl-winning quarterback Russell Wilson has won the Good Guy Award from the Professional Football Writers of America for his professional approach to helping the journalists do their job. In leading the Seattle

Seahawks to their first NFL championship, Wilson was cited for being not only the face of the franchise, “but also the voice and conscience of it.” Wilson is the sixth quarterback to win the award in the past seven years, and the first Seahawk. The award was first given in 2005, to Pittsburgh

running back Jerome Bettis. Wilson became just the fourth second-year quarterback and the third-youngest QB to win a Super Bowl. He led five fourth-quarter or overtime comebacks in 2013, including a 62-yard touchdown drive in the NFC championship against San Francisco.

Tri-City 7:15 p.m.

AQUASOX | Update TONIGHT’S GAME

Everett at Tri-City, 7:15 p.m. Radio: KRKO (1380 AM)

Probable startering pitchers: Everett right-hander Rigoberto Garcia (0-0, 6.00 earned run average) vs. Tri-City left-hander Helmis Rodriguez (0-0, 1.69)

AquaSox fall victim to the Hops’ small ball By Nick Patterson Herald Writer

Thurston County 7:05 p.m. Home

Away

TELEVISION TODAY

BASEBALL ESPN2 L.A.Angels at Cleveland ESPN NCAA World Series ROOT Seattle at San Diego GOLF 2 a.m. GOLF Irish Open MOTORCYCLE RACING 5 p.m. NBCS Championship Series: Glen Helen 8:30 p.m. NBCS Hangtown MX Classic SOCCER 8:30 a.m. ESPN Australia vs. Netherlands 8:45 a.m. CBUT Australia vs. Netherlands 11:30 a.m. ESPN Spain vs. Chile 11:45 a.m. CBUT Spain vs. Chile 2:30 p.m. ESPN Cameroon vs. Croatia 2:45 p.m. CBUT Cameroon vs. Croatia 4 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m.

THURSDAY 5 a.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m. 7 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 a.m. Noon Noon 3:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 2 a.m. 8:30 a.m. 8:45 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 11:45 a.m. 2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

AUTO RACING NBCS Formula One practice BASEBALL ESPN NCAA World Series ROOT Seattle at San Diego BASKETBALL LiveWell San Antonio at Seattle BOXING FS1 Boxing GOLF GOLF Irish Open ESPN2 U.S. Women’s Open GOLF Travelers Championship GOLF Travelers Championship GOLF Travelers Championship GOLF Irish Open SOCCER ESPN Colombia vs. Ivory Coast CBUT Colombia vs. Ivory Coast ESPN Uruguay vs. England CBUT Uruguay vs. England ESPN Japan vs. Greece CBUT Japan vs. Greece

RADIO TODAY

BASEBALL 7:10 p.m. 710 Seattle at San Diego 7:15 p.m. 1380 Everett at Tri-City

THURSDAY

BASEBALL 3:40 p.m. 710 Seattle at San Diego 7:15 p.m. 1380 Everett at Tri-City

NFL | Notebook

Browns, Manziel agree on contract Associated Press

CLEVELAND — Quarterback Johnny Manziel agreed to a contract with the Cleveland Browns on Tuesday. Terms were not immediately available. The former Heisman Trophy winner enters training camp next month as Cleveland’s No. 2 quarterback behind veteran Brian Hoyer, who has been limited during offseason practices while recovering from knee surgery The Browns moved up in last month’s draft to select Manziel with the No. 22 overall pick. He went 20-6 in two seasons at Texas A&M, where he became the first freshman to win the Heisman and earned the nickname “Johnny Football” for his dynamic playmaking abilities.

Sankey, Titans reach deal NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The Tennessee Titans have agreed to terms with their second-round draft pick, University of Washington running back Bishop Sankey. Terms were not disclosed. Sankey started his last two seasons at Washington. He finished his Husky career with 3,496 yards and 37 touchdowns. He set a school single-season rushing record last year as a junior, running for 1,870 yards, which ranked fourth nationally. He topped 100 yards in eight games and finished with 2,174 all-purpose yards.

Texans’ Johnson a no-show HOUSTON — Houston receiver Andre Johnson skipped the first day of the Texans’ mandatory mini-camp. Johnson hasn’t participated in any of the team’s voluntary offseason workouts and said last month that he wouldn’t attend these workouts, either. On Tuesday, he missed the first of three days of practices that are the last workouts before the team begins training camp in late July. Johnson, 32, has said he has not asked for a trade, but last month he wondered if Houston was “still the place for me.” The Texans also were without No. 1 overall pick Jadeveon Clowney, who is recovering from surgery to repair a sports hernia.

DOUG RAMSAY / FOR THE HERALD

Seattle Seahawks defensive lineman Kevin Williams (left) participates in Tuesday’s first day of a three-day minicamp.

Williams adjusting just fine New Seahawks D-lineman used to playing more snaps than he’ll get with Seattle By John Boyle Herald Writer

RENTON — It’s rare that a professional athlete embraces a decrease in playing time, but for the Seattle Seahawks’ newest addition, a slightly smaller work load sounds ideal. Kevin Williams, the six-time Pro Bowl player who signed with Seattle last week, has been a starter and regular on the field throughout his 11-year NFL career with the Minnesota Vikings. But at this late stage in his career — Williams turns 34 later this summer — he realizes that playing on a defense that rotates linemen heavily could be the best thing for him. Asked what he thought when he watched the Seahawks in 2013, Williams said “Man, those guys have a nice rotation on defense.” Indeed the Seahawks do like to rotate their defensive linemen. Last season, the Seahawks didn’t have a single lineman play more than 600 snaps — Michael Bennett led the D-line in playing time taking just over 57 percent of the snaps — while Williams was on the field for 720 in Minnesota. “I looked at some stats about a month ago. I had like 700 snaps last year and nobody on the D-Line here even touched 650,” Williams said. “It’s an awesome chance to get in and play a limited number of snaps and maximize the ability I have.” Williams was a prolific pass rusher early in his career, registering 22 sacks in his first two

Lynch From Page C1

the same. Lynch is an incredibly physical running back and has averaged more than 300 carries per season over the past three years. The way Carroll sees it, the need for Lynch to recover physically trumps whatever he could gain going through a few extra workouts in May and June. “We have rested him a lot in the offseason,” Carroll said. “He takes a big pounding during the year, it takes him a long time to get his body back to where he doesn’t feel the rigors of the season that’s passed. In this case it’s unique, but he is a unique player and he has a unique role on our football team, so we have to do what we have to do to take care of him. You won’t see him get the ball a lot in preseason. We’ll work all the way to that opening day and see if we can have him right for then. That’s what’s most important.” Lynch was not available for

seasons. While those numbers have fallen off despite him still playing at a high level, Williams thinks in a more limited role that he could again be a pass-rushing threat. “Absolutely, he said. “I think if I’m playing 500 plays versus 700 plays at this age I can definitely still get after the quarterback.” And Williams’ decision to sign with Seattle of course came down to more than just his role with his new team. Heading into his 12th season, Williams wants to play for a team built to win now, something the Seahawks are obviously set up to do. On the flip side of that decision, the Seahawks were eager to add another veteran to a defensive line that lost several key players this offseason, including Red Bryant, Clinton McDonald and Chris Clemons. “We have tremendous respect for the person that he is, the competitor that he is, the leader that he is,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. “He’s a big man that plays tough. We want him to play good, physical football for us like he always has. We’re not going to ask him to do anything different than what he’s done. “We’re asking him to go in his role and see how much he can help us. … We feel very fortunate at this time to add to our team and the things that we’ve accomplished at this point, a guy like Kevin. He just brings a tremendous amount to our club.” Next up for Williams and the Seahawks is figuring out exactly how he fits in. Carroll talked mostly about Williams playing

the three-technique defensive tackle spot, which is where Tony McDaniel started last year. That could mean those two competing for a starting job, but there could also be times that Seattle wants to use them together. With Bryant gone, McDaniel has been playing some as a five-technique end (Bryant’s old position) during offseason workouts, and Carroll said he liked the idea of having both on the field together when the team wants to go big to stop the run. Williams also worked some as an interior pass rusher with Seattle’s nickel defense Tuesday. A spot is open there with McDonald leaving in free agency. Williams still has to earn his place on the team. Just last year, former Viking Antoine Winfield, came to Seattle with a Pro-Bowl résumé and didn’t end up on the final roster. But while he’ll face a challenge from players like Jesse Williams and Jordan Hill, a pair of 2013 draft picks trying to come back from injury-plagued rookie seasons, Kevin Williams, especially a more rested version of him, could be a big addition for the Seahawks. “He said, ‘Maybe in my career it might be time to do that,’” said Carroll on pitching the idea of Seattle’s line rotation to Williams. “ … I think it’s a real natural way for us to utilize his strengths, and obviously he took to it, because he’s here. He had other choices, he had other places to go, other deals to take, and he wanted to be a part of our program.” Herald Writer John Boyle: jboyle@heraldnet.com.

comment after practice—it’s standard policy for players who don’t practice to be unavailable to the media, and it’s also standard policy for Lynch to not be available in general—but Carroll wouldn’t address the reports that Lynch is looking for a new contract, saying the team’s practice is to not talk about “the business side of it.” “We haven’t talked about other guys in that regard, so we’re not doing that now,” Carroll said. As for that ankle injury, Carroll said, “He’s got a sore ankle, so we’re going to make sure we take care of him. As always, right now if there’s any question at all, we’re going to opt to give guys more time now. “There’s enough there that we don’t want to mess with it… I think he just tweaked it or something a while back and we’re just taking care of it and making sure he’s OK.” Carroll was also asked if he had gotten the sense that Lynch had any uncertainty about his role on the team going forward— the Seahawks have praised

second-year running back Christine Michael at every turn, and offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell even used the phrase “running back by committee” before backtracking—and said that wasn’t a question at all. “We expect him to come right back in battling and doing the things that he does,” Carroll said. “(Robert Turbin) and Christine, those guys want some time too and they’re battling, they’ve had great offseasons for us, but Marshawn has really been the guy for us and we love everything about the way he plays and what he brings to this team. He’s never taken a step backwards at any time for us in all the years he’s been here. From the day we went after him and got him, we had sights on him becoming the player he has become, and he’s never disappointed us. Hopefully he’ll be really healthy and ready to go at season’s start, and if we’ve accomplished that with this offseason, then that will be very successful for him and our team.” Herald Writer John Boyle: jboyle@heraldnet.com.

EVERETT — The Everett AquaSox were done in by a string of balls that didn’t travel more than 70 feet. Three consecutive bunts sparked a three-run rally as the Hillsboro Hops defeated the Sox 5-3 Tuesday night at Everett Memorial Stadium in the finale of their five-game series. Hillsboro trailed 3-2 going into the top of the seventh inning. But Galli Cribbs beat out a sacrifice bunt attempt for a single, Taylor Ratliff laid down a squeeze bunt that resulted in a play at the plate in which Justin Gonzalez was declared safe — drawing Everett manager Dave Valle from the dugout for a long and heated argument with the umpire. Then Sox pitcher Cruz Pereira fumbled Jordan Parr’s sacrifice bunt to load the bases. Two more runs scored courtesy of Todd Glaesman’s RBI single and Cesar Carrasco’s sacrifice fly. The three runs the Hops scored in the inning held up as the difference. Grant Heyman and Nate Robertson each went 2-for-4 for Hillsboro, which improved to 4-1. Luis Caballero hit a three-run double and Austin Cousino went 2-for-4 to lead Everett (1-4), which dropped its fourth straight. The Sox struck out 13 times Tuesday, the fourth consecutive game in which Hillsboro pitchers fanned at least 10 Everett batters. Tuesday’s game saw the professional debut of Sox pitcher Dan Altavilla, a small-college star who was the Seattle Mariners’ fifth-round pick in this year’s amateur draft, making him the highest-drafted player currently on Everett’s roster. The right-hander, displaying a fastball in the high 80s and a sharp breaking ball, pitched three innings. He allowed two runs on three hits and two walks, striking out three.

Short stays The Northwest League season is less than a week old, yet the Sox already have seen their first departures. Outfielder Arby Fields and pitcher Troy Scott both left Tuesday to join Pulaski of the rookie Appalachian League. Fields played in Everett’s first three games, batting 2-for-9. Scott appeared in one game, allowing three runs in three innings. Scott’s tenure was particularly short as he spent less than two full days with the Sox.

Tuesday’s box score Hops 5, AquaSox 3 Hillsboro ab r h bi Everett ab r h bi Ratliff cf 4 1 0 1 Cousino cf 4 1 2 0 Parr dh 4 1 1 0 Caballero ss 5 0 1 3 Glaesmann rf 4 0 1 1 Mariscal 3b 4 0 0 0 Carrasco 1b 4 0 0 1 Castillo lf 3 0 0 0 Heyman lf 4 1 2 0 Plns-Art. rf 3 0 0 0 Baker c 4 0 1 0 Thomas dh 3 1 1 0 Robertson ss 4 0 2 0 Brito 1b 4 0 1 0 Gonzalez 3b 2 1 1 0 Martin c 4 0 1 0 Cribbs 2b 4 1 1 1 Cowan 2b 2 1 1 0 a-Smart ph 1 0 0 0 Totals 34 5 9 4 Totals 33 3 7 3 Hillsboro Everett

110 000 300 — 5 9 0 000 030 000 — 3 7 2

a-Struck out for Cowan in the 9th. E—De Meyer (1), Pereira (1). LOB—Hillsboro 8, Everett 8. DP—Hillsboro 1, Everett 0. 2B—Parr (1), Baker (1), Caballero (2), Gonzalez (1), Robertson (2). SAC—Ratliff, Parr. SF—Carrasco. CS—Cribbs (1). Hillsboro IP H R ER BB SO Schultz 3 2 0 0 1 1 Savas W, 1-0 3 3 3 3 0 5 Loggins 2 1 0 0 2 5 Curtis 1 1 0 0 0 2 Everett IP H R ER BB SO Altavilla 3 3 2 2 2 3 De Meyer 3 2 0 0 1 4 Pereira L, 0-1 3 4 3 3 0 5 WP—Altavilla 2. HBP—Cousino (by Savas). T—2:49. A—2,078.

Cousino From Page C1

“When I hit it I thought (it was out), but then I saw the right fielder going after it I wasn’t so sure,” Cousino added. “It got out just enough so I could jog around.” Cousino is the highest draft pick currently on Everett’s roster, and he was happy not only with his debut performance, but to be getting his pro career started. “It went well,” Cousino said. “It’s just nice to get out there and play ball again, getting my feet wet here in pro ball and using the wood bat. It was an exciting day, I got some texts and calls from back home, which was nice. It was fun. “There was the draft and that process, but once you’re with a team it’s go time, it doesn’t matter about any of things that came before,” Cousino added. “I’m happy to be with the Mariners and I’m happy to get this thing started.”


Baseball C3

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

Gwynn’s death renews calls to ban chewing tobacco Sonali Basak and Mason Levinson Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — The death of Hall-of-Fame baseball player Tony Gwynn from mouth cancer has renewed calls to remove the use of chewing tobacco from its traditional place in the game. Gwynn, 54, died Monday after two surgeries to remove malignant growths inside his right cheek, where the former San Diego Padre said he chewed tobacco while he played. He was one of more than 40,000 people diagnosed with oral cancer yearly in the United States, according to the Oral Cancer Foundation. Only about half of these patients will be alive in five years, U.S. health officials say, mostly

because oral cancers are usually discovered only after they’ve spread to another location, such as the lymph nodes in the neck. It’s estimated that at least 75 percent of those diagnosed with oral cancer at 50 have been tobacco users. “We’ve decreased the rate of smoking tobacco but not the rates of chewing tobacco,” said Mark Agulnik, an oncologist at Northwestern University’s Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center in Chicago. Joe Garagiola, a former majorleague catcher and broadcaster who for decades has been an advocate against the use of smokeless tobacco, said the strongest steps should be taken to rid the game of the product. “The player’s association has

to vote on it,” he said in a telephone interview. “I just wish that they would take a more serious look at it and don’t wait for good people to die, good guys like Tony Gwynn.” Gwynn, who spent his entire two-decade career with the San Diego Padres team, was an eighttime National League batting champion and was named to the All-Star team 15 times. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007. Gwynn was on leave from his position as head baseball coach of San Diego State University, where he starred as a two-sport athlete, when he died. Gregory Connolly, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston who has worked to get chewing tobacco out of baseball for about 30 years, says

Sizemore designated for assignment Associated Press BOSTON — The Boston Red Sox have designated outfielder Grady Sizemore for assignment. Sizemore, a graduate of Cascade High School in Everett, returned to the major leagues this season after injuries sidelined him from September 2011 until this season. He made the American League

All-Star team three times with the Cleveland Indians, but has undergone seven operations since 2009, including surgery on both knees, his back and elbow. Sizemore hit .333 in spring training and started in center field on opening day when he homered in Boston’s 2-1 loss at Baltimore. But in 52 games, he hit .216 with two homers and 15 RBI.

Gwynn’s death may be a harbinger of future disease. “Even though we see few reports of deaths now, the form of chewing tobacco that he took up is relatively recent in our country,” Connolly said. The use of chewing tobacco began to increase among younger people in the 1980s. He said the use of smokeless tobacco has increased in the past several years. As a result, the number of people in their 50s, like Gwynn, being diagnosed with the disease later in life is on the rise, Connolly said. “We do know your risk factor greatly increases with age,” he said. “It’s devastating. The fiveyear mortality rate is 50 percent, and if you don’t die, you’re left totally disfigured.” The U.S. National Institutes

of Health has called smokeless tobacco one of the fastest growing detrimental health habits in North America as “sports figures promote the product in an attempt to erase the old, unsanitary image of (smoking) and replace it with a macho image.” Athletes, military personnel and people who find it difficult to smoke in their businesses tend to switch to smokeless tobacco, said Pamela Clark, a research professor at the department of behavioral and community health at the University of Maryland College Park. Clark is doing research work for the Food and Drug Administration on the use of smokeless tobacco. She also said men and people who live in rural areas are more likely to chew tobacco.

Locals in the pros

By designating Sizemore for assignnent, Boston removes him from the 25-man major-league roster and has 10 days to either trade or release him. To replace Sizemore on the roster, the Red Sox recalled third baseman Garin Cecchini From Class AAA Pawtucket. He played one game with Boston, on June 1, going 1-for-2 with an RBI double.

MARINERS | Notebook

Seager shining on offense at Safeco By Bob Dutton The News Tribune

SEATTLE —  Fact: Mariners third baseman Kyle Seager batted .238 with 13 homers over 638 at-bats in his first three seasons at Safeco Field. Fact: Seager is batting .311 this season in 36 games at Safeco and already has nine homers in 119 at-bats. Fact: Seager had 33 RBIs last season in 80 games at Safeco. This year, he already has 30. His onbase percentage at home is nearly 100 points higher than his career mark coming into the season. Fact: There are a bunch more facts in this vein, but you get the idea. Question (obvious): What’s going on? “I’m not doing anything different,” insisted Seager, who contributed a two-run double to Tuesday’s 6-1 victory over the Padres. “It’s just one of those things. But I’m going to ride the wave.” On reflection, he added: “The numbers weren’t really good (in the past), I guess, but it’s just one of those things. You get into a rhythm, and you start feeling good. It’s worked out that I’ve been in that rhythm at home.” Any explanation for the power surge? The fences, after all, were

shortened prior to last season. “Not that I’m aware of,” Seager said, shaking his head. “It’s just one of those things, but I’ll take it. I’m not giving them back.”

Iwakuma slowed Right-hander Hisashi Iwakuma skipped his regular between-starts bullpen workout Tuesday because of continuing problems with a stiff neck. Iwakuma did play catch from flat ground and did his regular running regimen in the outfield. He remains listed as the Mariners’ starting pitcher for Friday’s series opener at Kansas City. Manager Lloyd McClendon said “As I speak now, he will not miss a start.” Iwakuma’s ailment surfaced prior to his start Sunday against Texas, but he pitched eight innings and limited the Rangers to one run and six hits in a 6-1 victory.

Montero at first Jesus Montero started at first base for the first time in his big-league career —  and McClendon’s pre-game comments suggested expectations were modest. “We’ve got a left-hander going (Eric Stults for San Diego),” McClendon said, “and we need a first baseman. I’m not playing the left-handed first baseman (Logan Morrison).” Asked why he had the necessary confidence to put Montero at first base, McClendon responded: “I never said I had confidence. I said I need a first baseman. He’s available, and that’s who we’re going to put out there.”

The hope was Montero could deliver with his bat...as happened in the second inning when his two-run homer erased a 1-0 deficit. Montero, a former catcher, converted to first base last season at Triple-A Tacoma and played 64 minorleague games at his new position over the last two seasons. Even so, he was surprised to see he was playing first base on Tuesday. “The first thing I thought was…I got nervous,” Montero said. “But after that, I hit the homer and I felt better. I relaxed, and I got some confidence. I made a couple of plays in there.” And defensively? He handled eight chances with no problems, including one grounder, before Morrison entered the game as a defensive replacement in the seventh inning.

Short hops First baseman Justin Smoak, outfielder Michael Saunders and first baseman/outfielder Corey Hart are all expected to report Wednesday to Tacoma to continue their recovery from injuries. All three are expected to play by this weekend. Smoak is recovering from a strained left quadriceps muscle, Saunders from a sore right shoulder and Hart from a strained left hamstring...center fielder James Jones went 3-for-5 and is batting .349 (15-for-43) over his last 10 games...Kyle Seager had his third straight multi-RBI day when he blooped a two-run double in the seventh inning. He has 25 RBIs in his last 29 games....The Mariners’ starters have allowed one or no runs in each of the last five games.

M’s: Elias rebounds from tough loss From Page C1

Elias, who improved to 6-5 by limiting the Padres to one run and three hits in seven innings. Elias lasted a season-low 31⁄3 innings while giving up a seasonhigh six runs in his previous start, a 6-3 loss to the New York Yankees. “I had my control,” he said through an interpreter. “I went out and did what I was capable of doing and, thank God, it worked out well for us.” Dominic Leone and Danny Farquhar closed out the Mariners’ third consecutive victory, which concluded an eight-game homestand that started with five losses. “The Yankees beat us three games,” McClendon said. “We had an opportunity to win (the first two games) against Texas, and we didn’t take advantage of it. The Yankees just kicked our butt. It’s just that simple.” Stults (2-9) lasted just five innings but threw 102 pitches before exiting in a 4-1 hole. He gave up six hits, including the homers to Montero and Cano. “I thought his stuff was fine,” Padres manager Buddy Black said. “They stressed him a

little bit, and his pitch count was elevated, but he battled and competed like he always does.” The Mariners (37-34) got their final two runs on Kyle Seager’s two-out, bases-loaded bloop double in the seventh against reliever Tim Stauffer. Elias retired the first five Padres before teeing up a 1-1 fastball for Rene Rivera, who rocked it into the left-field seats for a two-out homer and a 1-0 lead. It was, pretty much, the only mistake that Elias made in an 87-pitch performance. He struck out six and walked none. And the Padres’ 1-0 lead didn’t survive the inning. The Mariners cashed a sloppy error by first baseman Tommy Medica, who couldn’t handle a routine throw from third baseman Chase Headley on Cole Gillespie’s one-out grounder. Montero followed by yanking a two-run homer to left for a 2-1 lead. It was Montero’s first bigleague homer since May 8, 2013, at Pittsburgh. (He did have eight this season in 59 games for Class AAA Tacoma prior to his June 12 recall.) “He’s strong,” McClendon said. “No question about it. It was

actually a hit-and-run, and the ball was up in the zone. He’s so strong he was able to muscle it out.” The ball seemed to float toward left field, but it found sufficient carry. “I just ran hard,” Montero said. “I didn’t know if it was gone or not. When I looked, it was over the wall.” It was still 2-1 when James Jones opened the fifth inning with a single, his third hit, and stole second — even though Stults guessed correctly with a pickoff throw. Jones simply beat Medica’s high throw to second. After struggling Stefen Romero failed to advance the runner, Jones went to third on a pitch in the dirt to Cano. The Padres then shortened their infield ... and it didn’t matter. Cano golfed a 3-1 slider into the right-field seats for a 4-1 lead. “It was good contact,” Cano said, “but in that situation, I just wanted to put the ball in play. I didn’t want a ground ball. I just wanted to hit the ball out of the infield. With Jones on, anything (out of the infield), he can score.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blaine Hardy pitches against the Kansas City Royals on Monday night in his major-league debut. Hardy is a graduate of Edmonds-Woodway High School.

Who’s hot Blaine Hardy, LHP. After seven seasons in the minor leagues, the graduate of Edmonds-Woodway High School was called up to the majors Sunday by the Detrot Tigers. Hardy, 27, made his big-league debut Monday night against the Kansas City Royals, thowing two scoreless innings in the Tigers’ 11-8 loss. Prior to his promotion, Hardy posted strong numbers at Class AAA Toledo, both as a starter and as a reliever. He was 3-2 with a 2.68 earned-run average in 20 games with the Mud Hens, including six starts.

In the majors The major-league statistics for players with Snohomish County ties. The statistics are through June 16:

Steven Souza, Cascade H.S.. Syracuse (AAA), Nationals .362, 8 HR, 31 RBI

Grady Sizemore, Cascade H.S. Boston Red Sox .216, 2 HR, 15 RBI

PITCHERS Aaron Brooks, Mountlake Terrace H.S. Clinton (A), Mariners 3-2, 24.2 IP, 2.55 ERA

Travis Snider, Jackson H.S. Pittsburgh Pirates .230, 3 HR, 12 RBI

Geoff Brown, Jackson H.S. Rancho Cucamonga (A), Dodgers 1-4, 44.2 IP, 4.84 ERA

PITCHERS

Stephen Fife, Everett C.C.* Albuquerque (AAA), Dodgers 1-2, 23.1 IP, 6.94 ERA

HITTERS

Blaine Hardy, Edmonds-Woodway H.S. Detroit Tigers 0-0, 2.0 IP, 0.00 ERA

Down on the farm The minor-league statistics along with the team, classification and major-league affiliate for players with Snohomish County ties. The statistics are through June 16: HITTERS David Amberson, Cascade H.S. Wichita (Independent) .280, 0 HR, 4 RBI Mitch Canham, Lake Stevens H.S. Harrisburg (AA), Nationals .186, 1 HR, 7 RBI Aaron Cunningham, Everett C.C. Reno (AAA), Diamondbacks .238, 0 HR, 17 RBI Kawika Emsley-Pai, Jackson H.S. West Virginia (A), Pirates .174, 1 HR, 2 RBI Bubba Jones, Edmonds-Woodway H.S. Staten Island (A), Yankees .000, 0 HR, 0 RBI Derek Jones, Snohomish H.S. Modesto (A), Rockies .262, 6 HR, 23 RBI Brent Lillibridge, Jackson H.S. Round Rock (AAA), Rangers .231., 6 HR, 29 RBI Danny Oh, Jackson H.S.* Tampa (A), Yankees .290., 0 HR, 4 RBI Ian Parmley, Monroe H.S. Lansing (A), Blue Jays .203., 0 HR, 7 RBI

Tyler Ihrig, Monroe H.S. Boise (A), Cubs 0-0, 5.0 IP, 0.00 ERA Keone Kela, Everett CC* Frisco (AA), Rangers 1-0, 14.0 IP, 1.93 ERA Josh Kimborowicz, Everett CC Hudson Valley (A), Rays 1-0, 2.0 IP, 0.00 ERA Chris Johnson, Meadowdale H.S.* Augusta (A), Giants 0-1, 2.0 IP, 9.00 ERA Owen Jones, Edmonds-Woodway H.S. Rancho Cucamonga (A) Dodgers 2-1, 28.2 IP, 6.28 ERA Tyler Kane, Archbishop Murphy H.S. Batavia (A), Marlins 0-0, 1.2 IP, 0.00 ERA Mason Tobin, Everett C.C. Fresno (AAA), Giants 1-0, 29.1 IP, 3.07 ERA Ryan Verdugo, Lake Stevens H.S. Omaha (AAA), Royals 4-1, 25.0 IP, 2.52 ERA Aaron West, Snohomish H.S.* Corpus Christi (AA), Astros 2-0, 22.2 IP, 4.76 ERA *—On the disabled list Have we missed someone? If you know of other Snohomish County athletes playing professional baseball, let us know by calling 425-339-3470 or by sending an email to sports@heraldnet.com.


C4 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

BASEBALL American League West Division W L Pct GB Oakland 43 28 .606 — Los Angeles 38 32 .543 4½ Seattle 37 34 .521 6 Texas 35 36 .493 8 Houston 32 40 .444 11½ Central Division W L Pct GB Kansas City 38 32 .543 — Detroit 36 31 .537 ½ Cleveland 36 36 .500 3 Chicago 34 37 .479 4½ Minnesota 32 37 .464 5½ East Division W L Pct GB Toronto 41 31 .569 — New York 36 33 .522 3½ Baltimore 36 34 .514 4 Boston 33 38 .465 7½ Tampa Bay 28 44 .389 13 Tuesday’s games Seattle 6, San Diego 1 Washington 6, Houston 5 L.A. Angels 9, Cleveland 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, Toronto 1 Kansas City 11, Detroit 4 Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 5 Boston 2, Minnesota 1 Chicago White Sox 8, San Francisco 2 Oakland 10, Texas 6 Wednesday’s Games Kansas City (Guthrie 3-6) at Detroit (Smyly 3-5), 10:08 a.m. Baltimore (Gausman 2-1) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-4), 10:10 a.m. Minnesota (Gibson 6-5) at Boston (Lackey 8-4), 10:35 a.m. San Francisco (Hudson 7-2) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-1), 11:10 p.m. Texas (Tepesch 2-2) at Oakland (Gray 6-3), 12:35 p.m. Houston (Feldman 3-4) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 3-4), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 7-6) at Cleveland (Masterson 4-5), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 10-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Whitley 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-2) at San Diego (Cashner 2-6), 7:10 p.m.

Angels 9, Indians 3 Los Angeles Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Calhon rf 5 3 4 2 Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 Trout cf 5 2 3 4 ACarer ss 4 0 1 0 Pujols 1b 4 1 0 1 Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 JHmltn dh 5 0 2 0 CSantn 1b 3 1 1 1 Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 Chsnhll 3b 4 1 2 1 HKndrc 2b 5 1 3 2 DvMrp rf 4 0 0 1 Freese 3b 5 1 1 0 Swisher dh 4 0 0 0 Ibanez lf 3 1 1 0 YGoms c 3 0 1 0 Cowgill pr-lf 1 0 0 0 Raburn lf 3 0 0 0 Conger c 4 0 0 0 Totals 41 9 15 9 Totals 33 3 7 3 Los Angeles Cleveland

100 041 102—9 010 100 001—3

E—A.Cabrera (13). DP—Los Angeles 1, Cleveland 1. LOB—Los Angeles 7, Cleveland 4. 2B— Trout (18), J.Hamilton (6), Aybar (18), H.Kendrick (11), Kipnis (8), Y.Gomes (9). HR—Calhoun (5), Trout 2 (16), H.Kendrick (4), Chisenhall (8). CS—H.Kendrick (4). IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles Shoemaker W,4-1 8 5 2 2 1 10 Frieri 1 2 1 1 0 0 Cleveland Tomlin L,4-4 51⁄3 11 6 5 0 4 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Crockett Lowe 12⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 Outman 11⁄3 2 2 2 2 1 Umpires—Home, Marty Foster; First, Rob Drake; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Joe West. T—3:08 (Rain delay: 0:11). A—14,639 (42,487).

Athletics 10, Rangers 6 Texas Oakland ab r h bi ab r h bi DRrtsn cf-lf 5 1 1 1 Crisp cf 4 1 1 1 Andrus ss 4 1 2 0 Jaso c 3 1 2 0 Choo dh 4 0 0 0 DNorrs ph-c 2 1 2 5 ABeltre 3b 3 0 2 1 Cespds lf 4 1 1 0 Rios rf 3 0 0 1 Moss 1b 5 0 0 0 DMrph 1b 2 0 0 0 Lowrie dh 3 1 1 0 Snyder ph-1b 2 0 0 0 Vogt rf 3 1 3 2 Gimenz c 4 1 0 0 Gentry ph-rf 1 0 0 0 Choice lf 2 0 0 0 Callasp 3b-2b 2 0 2 1 LMartn ph-cf 2 1 1 0 Punto ss 4 1 0 0 Odor 2b 4 2 2 3 Sogard 2b 1 1 0 0 Dnldsn ph-3b 2 2 1 0 Totals 35 6 8 6 Totals 34 10 13 9 Texas Oakland

100 011 300—6 021 113 02x—10

E—Rios (4), Odor (3), Donaldson (15). DP— Texas 1. LOB—Texas 4, Oakland 7. 2B—Andrus (18), Jaso (9), D.Norris (11). 3B—Odor (3). HR— Odor (3), D.Norris (8). SB—D.Robertson (1), Sogard 2 (6). SF—Rios, Crisp. IP H R ER BB SO Texas Darvish L,7-3 5 8 7 4 5 8 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Poreda 1 ⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 Sh.Tolleson Cotts 1 0 0 0 1 2 Frasor 0 3 2 2 0 0 S.Baker 1 0 0 0 0 1 Oakland Milone W,5-3 52⁄3 5 3 3 1 3 2 ⁄3 3 3 2 0 0 Otero H,8 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Abad H,7 1 Gregerson H,9 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Doolittle 1 0 0 0 0 2 Darvish pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Frasor pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. WP—Darvish. Umpires—Home, Andy Fletcher; First, Chris Segal; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Mark Wegner. T—3:28. A—21,288 (35,067).

Yankees 3, Blue Jays 1 Toronto New York ab r h bi ab r h bi Reyes ss 4 1 1 1 Gardnr lf 4 1 1 2 MeCarr lf 4 0 1 0 Jeter ss 4 1 2 0 Bautist rf 4 0 0 0 Ellsury cf 4 0 0 0 Encrnc 1b 3 0 1 0 Teixeir 1b 3 0 1 1 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 0 McCnn c 4 0 0 0 DNavrr c 4 0 0 0 Beltran dh 2 0 0 0 JFrncs dh 3 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0 Kawsk 2b 4 0 1 0 BRorts 2b 2 0 0 0 Gose cf 3 0 0 0 KJhnsn 3b 3 1 2 0 Totals 33 1 6 1 Totals 30 3 6 3 Toronto New York

100 000 000—1 002 010 00x—3

LOB—Toronto 8, New York 7. 2B—J.Francisco (10), Ke.Johnson (8). 3B—Kawasaki (1). HR— Reyes (5), Gardner (6). IP H R ER BB SO Toronto Stroman L,3-2 32⁄3 4 2 2 3 2 Loup 11⁄3 2 1 1 0 1 Redmond 2 0 0 0 1 2 Santos 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York Tanaka W,11-1 6 5 1 1 2 10 Betances H,10 2 0 0 0 0 3 Dav.Robertson S,17-19 1 1 0 0 0 2 HBP—by Tanaka (Encarnacion). WP—Loup, Redmond. Umpires—Home, Jordan Baker; First, Gabe Morales; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Chris Conroy. T—3:07. A—41,834 (49,642).

Orioles 7, Rays 5 Baltimore Tampa Bay ab r h bi ab r h bi Markks rf 5 1 2 0 DJnngs cf 5 1 1 1 Pearce dh 3 2 2 2 Hanign c 0 0 0 0 A.Jones cf 3 1 0 0 Joyce rf 4 1 2 0 C.Davis 1b 4 1 1 4 Sands ph 1 0 0 0 N.Cruz lf 4 0 0 0 Longori dh 5 1 1 0 Lough lf 0 0 0 0 Loney 1b 4 0 1 2 JHardy ss 4 0 0 0 Zobrist 2b-lf 4 1 1 0

Machd 3b 4 0 1 0 DeJess lf 2 0 2 0 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 0 Forsyth ph-2b 1 0 1 0 CJosph c 4 1 1 0 YEscor ss 3 0 0 1 JMolin c 3 0 0 0 Kiermr ph-cf 1 0 1 0 SRdrgz 3b 4 1 1 1 Totals 35 7 8 6 Totals 37 5 11 5 Baltimore Tampa Bay

005 000 200—7 002 020 010—5

E—A.Jones (4). DP—Baltimore 1. LOB—Baltimore 6, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Markakis (14), Pearce (7), C.Joseph (3), Joyce (13), Loney (18), Zobrist (12). HR—Pearce (5), C.Davis (12), De.Jennings (6), S.Rodriguez (7). SF—Y.Escobar. IP H R ER BB SO Baltimore M.Gonzalez W,4-4 5 8 4 4 2 5 R.Webb H,11 12⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 1 Matusz H,9 ⁄3 1 1 1 0 1 O’Day H,9 1 2 0 0 0 1 Z.Britton S,8-9 1 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay Bedard L,3-5 4 4 5 5 2 3 Yates 2 0 0 0 1 3 Boxberger 1 2 2 2 0 2 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 1 C.Ramos 1 1 0 0 1 0 Bedard pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Matusz pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by Bedard (A.Jones). WP—Bedard. PB—C.Joseph. Umpires—Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Pat Hoberg; Second, Ed Hickox; Third, Lance Barrett. T—3:31. A—10,803 (31,042).

Red Sox 2, Twins 1 Minnesota Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi DSantn ss 4 1 2 0 Holt cf-rf 4 2 2 0 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 Bogarts 3b 3 0 1 1 Mauer 1b 4 0 1 1 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 1 Wlngh lf 3 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0 KMorls dh 4 0 0 0 Napoli 1b 3 0 1 0 Arcia rf 4 0 0 0 Nava rf 3 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 1 0 BrdlyJr cf 0 0 0 0 EEscor 3b 2 0 0 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0 Fuld cf 3 0 0 0 Drew ss 3 0 1 0 D.Ross c 3 0 0 0 Totals 30 1 4 1 Totals 30 2 8 2 Minnesota Boston

000 001 000—1 101 000 00x—2

LOB—Minnesota 5, Boston 5. 2B—D.Santana (6), Mauer (11), Holt (12), Pedroia (22), Drew (2). SB—D.Santana (6), Holt (5). S—Dozier. SF—Bogaerts. IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota P.Hughes L,7-3 8 8 2 2 0 6 Boston Lester W,8-7 61⁄3 4 1 1 1 6 1 Badenhop H,4 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 1 Breslow H,2 ⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Tazawa H,7 1 0 0 0 0 3 Mujica S,2-3 1 0 0 0 0 2 Umpires—Home, Clint Fagan; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Tim Welke; Third, Todd Tichenor. T—2:48. A—36,835 (37,071).

Royals 11, Tigers 4 Kansas City Detroit ab r h bi ab r h bi Aoki rf 2 1 1 0 RDavis lf 4 0 1 0 L.Cain rf 2 0 2 1 Kinsler 2b 4 1 2 1 Infante 2b 3 0 1 3 AnRmn 2b 0 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 5 0 0 1 MiCarr 1b 2 0 0 1 BButler dh 4 2 2 0 D.Kelly 1b 0 0 0 0 AGordn lf 5 1 2 2 VMrtnz dh 4 1 2 0 S.Perez c 4 2 1 1 JMrtnz rf 4 1 3 0 Hayes c 0 0 0 0 Cstllns 3b 4 0 0 1 Mostks 3b 5 1 1 2 AJcksn cf 4 0 1 1 AEscor ss 5 3 3 0 Avila c 2 1 0 0 JDyson cf 5 1 2 1 Holady c 1 0 0 0 Suarez ss 4 0 1 0 Totals 40 11 15 11 Totals 33 4 10 4 Kansas City Detroit

070 030 100—11 020 010 010—4

E—A.Escobar (5), J.Martinez (2). DP—Kansas City 4, Detroit 2. LOB—Kansas City 7, Detroit 5. 2B—A.Gordon (21), J.Martinez (9). HR—A.Gordon (8), Moustakas (7), Kinsler (7). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Ventura W,5-5 7 8 3 3 2 4 L.Coleman 1 2 1 1 1 0 Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1 Detroit Scherzer L,8-3 4 10 10 10 1 5 Coke 1 2 0 0 1 0 E.Reed 2 2 1 1 2 1 B.Hardy 1 0 0 0 0 1 Alburquerque 1 1 0 0 0 0 Scherzer pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. HBP—by Scherzer (L.Cain). PB—S.Perez. Umpires—Home, Tom Hallion; First, D.J. Reyburn; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Eric Cooper. T—3:14. A—34,328 (41,681).

National League West Division W L Pct GB 43 28 .606 — 39 34 .534 5 34 37 .479 9 29 42 .408 14 30 44 .405 14½ Central Division W L Pct GB Milwaukee 43 29 .597 — St. Louis 39 32 .549 3½ Cincinnati 34 35 .493 7½ Pittsburgh 34 36 .486 8 Chicago 29 40 .420 12½ East Division W L Pct GB Washington 36 33 .522 — Atlanta 36 34 .514 ½ Miami 36 34 .514 ½ Philadelphia 31 38 .449 5 New York 31 40 .437 6 Tuesday’s games Seattle 6, San Diego 1 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 6, Houston 5 Miami 6, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 5, Atlanta 2 Chicago White Sox 8, San Francisco 2 St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 2 Milwaukee 7, Arizona 5 L.A. Dodgers 4, Colorado 2 Today’s games Philadelphia (R.Hernandez 2-5) at Atlanta (Harang 5-5), 9:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 2-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 4-2), 9:40 a.m. N.Y. Mets (Colon 6-5) at St. Louis (Lynn 7-4), 10:45 a.m. San Francisco (Hudson 7-2) at Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-1), 11:10 a.m. Cincinnati (Simon 9-3) at Pittsburgh (Volquez 4-5), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Feldman 3-4) at Washington (G.Gonzalez 3-4), 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Garza 4-4) at Arizona (Miley 3-6), 6:40 p.m. Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 6-2), 7:10 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-2) at San Diego (Cashner 2-6), 7:10 p.m.

San Francisco Los Angeles Colorado San Diego Arizona

Brewers 7, Diamondbacks 5 Milwaukee Arizona ab r h bi ab r h bi Gennett 2b 5 1 3 0 Gregrs 2b 4 1 0 0 Braun rf 4 1 1 0 GParra rf 5 1 2 0 Lucroy c 5 2 3 5 Gldsch 1b 2 2 0 0 ArRmr 3b 4 1 1 1 MMntr c 5 0 1 1 KDavis lf 4 0 0 0 Prado 3b 4 0 1 2 MrRynl 1b 4 0 0 0 DPerlt cf 4 0 0 1 Segura ss 4 1 2 0 Owings ss 3 0 1 0 EHerrr cf 3 0 0 1 Kschnc lf 4 1 1 1 Lohse p 2 0 0 0 Bolsngr p 3 0 0 0 Overay ph 1 1 1 0 EMrshl p 0 0 0 0 WSmith p 0 0 0 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Delgad p 0 0 0 0 RWeks ph 1 0 0 0 C.Ross ph 1 0 1 0 FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11 7 Totals 35 5 7 5

Milwaukee Arizona

010 001 500—7 300 010 001—5

E—Gennett (5), Prado (12). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Arizona 8. 2B—Gennett (17), Owings (14). 3B— Segura 2 (4). HR—Lucroy 2 (8), Ar.Ramirez (8), Kieschnick (1). SF—E.Herrera. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Lohse W,8-2 6 4 4 3 3 3 W.Smith H,16 1 0 0 0 0 1 Kintzler H,5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez S,22-24 1 3 1 1 0 2 Arizona Bolsinger 61⁄3 7 3 3 0 6 E.Marshall L,2-2 0 2 3 3 0 0 2 ⁄3 1 1 1 0 2 Ziegler BS,4-5 Delgado 2 1 0 0 0 5 E.Marshall pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. HBP—by Lohse (Gregorius, Owings), by E.Marshall (Braun). Umpires—Home, Ted Barrett; First, Alfonso Marquez; Second, Will Little; Third, Paul Schrieber. T—2:52. A—18,148 (48,633).

Reds 6, Pirates 5 Cincinnati Pittsburgh ab r h bi ab r h bi BHmltn cf 4 2 3 0 Polanc rf 4 0 1 0 Frazier 3b 5 2 2 1 SMarte lf 5 2 2 0 Votto 1b 5 0 2 3 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 0 Phillips 2b 5 1 2 0 I.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1 Bruce rf 5 1 1 0 RMartn c 2 1 1 2 AChpm p 0 0 0 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 3 0 2 1 GSnchz ph 1 0 0 0 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 Melncn p 0 0 0 0 MParr p 0 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0 CStwrt ph 0 0 0 0 Berndn rf 0 0 0 0 JHrrsn 2b-3b 5 0 4 2 B.Pena c 4 0 0 1 Mercer ss 5 0 2 0 Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 Cumptn p 1 0 0 0 Cueto p 3 0 0 0 Tabata ph 1 0 0 0 Heisey lf 1 0 0 0 JuWlsn p 0 0 0 0 JGomz p 0 0 0 0 Barmes 2b 2 0 0 0 Totals 39 6 13 6 Totals 37 5 13 5 Cincinnati Pittsburgh

100 200 201—6 011 000 300—5

E—R.Martin (1), P.Alvarez (17). DP—Cincinnati 1, Pittsburgh 2. LOB—Cincinnati 8, Pittsburgh 13. 2B—B.Hamilton (9), Bruce (10), A.McCutchen (22), I.Davis (9), J.Harrison (10). HR—Frazier (16). SB—B.Hamilton 3 (28), Frazier (7), J.Harrison (3), Mercer (1). CS—Tabata (2). S—Cumpton. IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cueto 6 7 2 2 4 2 1 ⁄3 3 3 3 1 0 LeCure H,10 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 M.Parra H,10 Odrsk W,2-2 BS,3-3 11⁄3 2 0 0 1 2 A.Chapman S,12-13 1 1 0 0 1 2 Pittsburgh Cumpton 6 8 3 3 1 4 2 ⁄3 3 2 2 0 1 Ju.Wilson 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 J.Gomez Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 0 Grilli L,0-2 1 2 1 1 0 0 WP—LeCure. Umpires—Home, Adam Hamari; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Jerry Layne. T—3:54. A—23,565 (38,362).

Marlins 6, Cubs 5 Chicago Miami ab r h bi ab r h bi Valuen 3b 5 0 2 1 Furcal 2b 5 1 2 2 Ruggin lf 3 0 0 1 Hchvrr ss 5 1 4 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 SCastro ss 4 0 1 0 McGeh 3b 2 1 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 1 1 0 GJones 1b 4 1 1 3 Lake cf 4 1 1 2 Ozuna lf 3 0 0 0 Grimm p 0 0 0 0 Mrsnck cf 4 1 2 0 Barney 2b 4 1 1 0 Realmt c 3 1 0 0 Whitsd c 3 0 1 0 Mathis c 0 0 0 0 JoBakr ph-c 1 0 0 0 DeSclfn p 2 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 1 0 0 1 SDyson p 0 0 0 0 Coghln ph 1 1 1 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0 Schlittr p 0 0 0 0 Bour ph 1 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 1 1 1 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 5 9 5 Totals 33 6 9 5 Chicago Miami

030 000 101—5 100 200 30x—6

E[--]Samardzija (3), S.Castro (11). DP[--]Chicago 1. LOB[--]Chicago 7, Miami 8. 2B[--]Valbuena 2 (19), S.Castro (20), Sweeney (3). HR[--]Lake (9), G.Jones (9). SB[--]Barney (1), Whiteside (1). SF[-]Ruggiano, Samardzija. IP H R ER BB SO Chicago Samardzija 6 7 3 2 3 8 Schlitter L,2-2 BS,2-2 1 2 3 3 1 1 Grimm 1 0 0 0 1 1 Miami DeSclafani 61⁄3 6 4 4 1 5 S.Dyson W,1-0 11⁄3 2 0 0 1 1 1 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 M.Dunn H,10 Cishek S,16-17 1 1 1 0 0 2 HBP—by DeSclafani (Schierholtz). PB—Whiteside, Mathis. Umpires—Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Marcus Pattillo; Third, Scott Barry. T—3:11. A—20,860 (37,442).

Dodgers 4, Rockies 2 Colorado Los Angeles ab r h bi ab r h bi Blckmn rf-cf 4 0 1 0 DGordn 2b 4 0 0 0 Dickrsn lf 5 0 3 1 HRmrz ss 3 1 1 2 Tlwtzk ss 5 1 3 0 Triunfl ss 1 1 1 1 Mornea 1b 3 0 0 0 Puig rf 4 0 1 0 Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 0 0 Kahnle p 0 0 0 0 Kemp lf 4 1 1 1 KParkr ph 1 0 0 0 Ethier cf 3 0 1 0 Rosario c 4 0 0 1 A.Ellis c 3 0 1 0 RWhelr 3b 3 0 0 0 Rojas 3b 3 1 2 0 LeMahi 2b 4 0 0 0 Greink p 1 0 0 0 Chacin p 2 0 1 0 JuTrnr ph 1 0 0 0 Rutledg ph 1 1 1 0 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Barnes rf 1 0 1 0 League p 0 0 0 0 BWilsn p 0 0 0 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 Totals 37 2 11 2 Totals 31 4 8 4 Colorado Los Angeles

000 001 100—2 002 100 10x—4

E—Tulowitzki (4), D.Gordon (7). DP—Los Angeles 1. LOB—Colorado 13, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Dickerson (10), Rutledge (4). HR—H. Ramirez (11), Triunfel (1), Kemp (7). CS—Ethier (2). SF—Rosario. IP H R ER BB SO Colorado Chacin L,1-5 6 7 3 3 3 5 Kahnle 2 1 1 1 0 4 Los Angeles Greinke W,9-3 6 6 1 1 2 5 1 ⁄3 2 1 1 0 0 Howell H,15 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 League H,2 B.Wilson H,11 1 1 0 0 1 0 Jansen S,20-22 1 2 0 0 0 2 WP—Greinke. Umpires—Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Gerry Davis. T—3:33. A—44,175 (56,000).

Phillies 5, Braves 2 Philadelphia Atlanta ab r h bi ab r h bi Rollins ss 4 1 1 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 2 1 Ruiz c 5 0 2 0 BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Byrd rf 5 1 1 0 FFrmn 1b 4 0 1 0 Howard 1b 3 1 1 2 J.Upton lf 3 0 0 0 DBrwn lf 4 1 1 1 Beato p 0 0 0 0 Mayrry cf 3 0 0 0 Smmns p 0 0 0 0 Brignc 3b 5 1 2 0 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 CHrndz 2b 4 0 2 1 Doumit ph 1 0 0 0 Kndrck p 2 0 0 0 LaStell 2b 4 0 0 0 Utley ph 0 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 4 1 1 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0 ASmns ss 3 0 1 0 Papeln p 0 0 0 0 Laird c 2 1 0 0 ESantn p 1 0 0 0 JSchafr lf 1 0 0 0 Totals 35 5 10 4 Totals 31 2 6 1 Philadelphia Atlanta

200 200 001—5 000 010 100—2

E—A.Simmons 2 (5). DP—Philadelphia 1, Atlanta 1. LOB—Philadelphia 11, Atlanta 4. 2B— Rollins (10), Ruiz (14), Brignac (5), Heyward (10),

F.Freeman (20), C.Johnson (12). HR—Howard (13). SB—Byrd (1). CS—C.Hernandez (1). S—K. Kendrick, E.Santana. IP H R ER BB SO Philadelphia K.Kendrick W,3-6 7 6 2 2 1 6 Diekman H,9 1 0 0 0 0 2 Papelbon S,16-18 1 0 0 0 0 0 Atlanta E.Santana L,5-4 6 8 4 3 3 5 Beato 12⁄3 1 0 0 3 2 1 S.Simmons ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 Avilan 1 1 1 1 1 0 PB—Laird. Umpires—Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Brian Knight; Second, Seth Buckminster; Third, Fieldin Culbreth. T—3:05. A—41,631 (49,586).

Cardinals 5, Mets 2 New York St. Louis ab r h bi ab r h bi Grndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Bourjos cf 4 0 1 1 DnMrp 2b 4 0 0 0 Jay rf 5 1 2 1 DWrght 3b 4 1 2 1 Hollidy lf 4 0 2 1 BAreu rf 4 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 0 0 0 Duda 1b 3 1 2 1 YMolin c 4 1 1 1 Recker c 2 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 3 1 1 0 Campll ph 1 0 1 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 Descals 3b 3 2 1 0 Niese p 2 0 0 0 Wacha p 1 0 0 0 CYoung ph 1 0 0 0 Wong ph 1 0 1 1 Matszk p 0 0 0 0 SFrmn p 0 0 0 0 Famili p 0 0 0 0 MAdms ph 1 0 1 0 dnDkkr ph 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0 EYong lf 4 0 1 0 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals 34 5 10 5 New York St. Louis

000 100 001—2 010 022 00x—5

E—B.Abreu (2), Dan.Murphy (8). LOB—New York 7, St. Louis 9. 2B—Granderson (11), D.Wright (15), Duda (16), Campbell (4), Holliday 2 (17), Jh.Peralta (18). 3B—Jay (2). HR—D. Wright (5), Duda (9), Y.Molina (6). SB—Wong (9). S—Wacha. IP H R ER BB SO New York Niese L,3-4 6 8 5 3 1 3 Matsuzaka 1 1 0 0 0 2 Familia 1 1 0 0 1 1 St. Louis Wacha W,5-5 6 5 1 1 2 7 S.Freeman 2 0 0 0 0 1 Motte 0 2 1 1 0 0 Neshek S,2-4 1 0 0 0 0 0 Motte pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. HBP—by Niese (Descalso). WP—Matsuzaka. Umpires—Home, James Hoye; First, Bill Welke; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, John Tumpane. T—2:36. A—42,209 (45,399).

Interleague White Sox 8, Giants 2 San Francisco Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi Blanco lf 3 1 0 0 Eaton cf 4 1 2 1 Pence rf 5 1 2 1 GBckh 2b 4 1 1 2 Posey dh 4 0 1 1 Gillaspi 3b 4 1 2 0 Sandovl 3b 4 0 2 0 JAreu 1b 4 1 1 0 Morse 1b 4 0 1 0 A.Dunn dh 4 1 1 1 HSnchz c 4 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 1 1 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 1 0 Viciedo rf 4 2 2 2 J.Perez cf 4 0 0 0 De Aza lf 4 0 0 0 B.Hicks 2b 2 0 0 0 Flowrs c 2 0 0 1 Totals 34 2 7 2 Totals 34 8 10 7 San Francisco Chicago

101 000 000—2 002 330 00x—8

E—B.Crawford (9), Al.Ramirez (7). DP—Chicago 1. LOB—San Francisco 9, Chicago 3. HR—Pence (10), G.Beckham (5), Viciedo (6). SB—Eaton (6). IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco M.Cain L,1-5 5 10 8 7 1 3 Petit 3 0 0 0 0 3 Chicago Joh.Danks W,6-5 61⁄3 5 2 1 3 4 2 Guerra ⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Putnam 1 1 0 0 0 1 D.Webb 1 0 0 0 1 0 WP—M.Cain. Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Vic Carapazza. T—2:42. A—25,278 (40,615).

Nationals 6, Astros 5 Houston Washington ab r h bi ab r h bi Fowler cf 5 1 2 1 Span cf 4 2 2 0 Altuve 2b 5 1 4 2 Rendon 3b 4 1 2 3 Springr rf 4 0 2 0 Werth rf 4 1 0 0 Singltn 1b 5 0 1 0 LaRoch 1b 2 0 0 0 JCastro c 4 1 1 0 Zmrmn lf 4 1 2 2 MGnzlz pr 0 0 0 0 Dsmnd ss 3 0 1 1 MDmn 3b 5 1 2 1 Espinos 2b 4 0 0 0 Villar ss 5 1 2 1 Loaton c 4 0 0 0 Grssmn lf 3 0 0 0 Roark p 2 0 1 0 Frnswr p 0 0 0 0 Stmmn p 0 0 0 0 Willims p 0 0 0 0 Hairstn ph 0 1 0 0 Carter ph 1 0 0 0 Storen p 0 0 0 0 Sipp p 0 0 0 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 Zeid p 0 0 0 0 Barrett p 0 0 0 0 Keuchl p 1 0 0 0 Frndsn ph 1 0 1 0 DDwns p 0 0 0 0 RSorin p 0 0 0 0 Presley lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 40 5 14 5 Totals 32 6 9 6 Houston Washington

000 100 040—5 202 002 00x—6

E—Rendon (8). DP—Washington 2. LOB— Houston 11, Washington 9. 2B—Altuve 2 (23), M.Dominguez (12), Rendon 2 (13), Zimmerman 2 (9). SB—Span (10). S—Span. IP H R ER BB SO Houston Keuchel L,8-4 5 6 4 4 4 4 1 D.Downs ⁄3 1 2 2 1 0 Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 Williams ⁄3 0 0 0 0 2 2 Sipp ⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 1 Zeid ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Washington Roark W,6-4 5 7 1 1 2 4 Stammen H,2 1 1 0 0 0 1 Storen 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Clippard ⁄3 5 4 4 0 2 1 Barrett H,3 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 R.Soriano S,14-16 1 0 0 0 1 0 WP—Farnsworth. Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Adrian Johnson. T—3:41. A—29,960 (41,408).

Northwest League North Division W L Pct. GB Spokane (Rangers) 4 0 1.000 — Vancouver (Blue Jays) 3 2 .600 1½ Everett (Mariners) 1 4 .200 3½ Tri-City (Rockies) 1 4 .200 3½ South Division W L Pct. GB Boise (Cubs) 4 1 .800 — Hillsboro (Diamondbacks) 4 1 .800 — Salem-Keizer (Giants) 2 3 .400 2 Eugene (Padres) 0 4 .000 3½ Tuesday’s games Boise 12, Tri-City 3 Eugene at Spokane, ppd., rain Salem-Keizer 4, Vancouver 3 Hillsboro 5, Everett 3 Today’s games Boise at Eugene, 7:05 p.m. Spokane at Vancouver, 7:05 p.m. Salem-Keizer at Hillsboro, 7:05 p.m. Everett at Tri-City, 7:15 p.m.

Pacific Coast League Pacific North Division W L Pct. GB Sacramento (Athletics) 41 31 .569 — Reno (Diamondbacks) 40 32 .556 1 Fresno (Giants) 37 36 .507 4½ Tacoma (Mariners) 32 39 .451 8½ Pacific South Division W L Pct. GB Las Vegas (Mets) 41 31 .569 —

El Paso (Padres) 34 39 .466 7½ Albuquerque (Dodgers) 32 40 .444 9 Salt Lake (Angels) 29 43 .403 12 American North Division W L Pct. GB Omaha (Royals) 41 31 .569 — Oklahoma City (Astros) 40 33 .548 1½ Iowa (Cubs) 34 35 .493 5½ Colo. Springs (Rockies) 29 42 .408 11½ American South Division W L Pct. GB New Orleans (Marlins) 38 34 .528 — Nashville (Brewers) 38 35 .521 ½ Round Rock (Rangers) 35 37 .486 3 Memphis (Cardinals) 34 37 .479 3½ Tuesday’s games Fresno 4, New Orleans 3 El Paso 8, Iowa 5 Round Rock 7, Sacramento 5 Omaha 13, Albuquerque 6 Memphis at Salt Lake, ppd., rain Oklahoma City 4, Reno 2 Tacoma 2, Colorado Springs 1 Las Vegas 8, Nashville 7 Today’s games Albuquerque at Omaha, 10:05 a.m. Memphis at Salt Lake, 4:05 p.m., 1st game Fresno at New Orleans, 5 p.m. El Paso at Iowa, 5:05 p.m. Sacramento at Round Rock, 5:05 p.m. Memphis at Salt Lake, 6:35 p.m., 2nd game Colorado Springs at Tacoma, 7:05 p.m. Nashville at Las Vegas, 7:05 p.m. Oklahoma City at Reno, 7:05 p.m.

College World Series At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. Double Elimination Tuesday’s games Mississippi 2,Texas Tech 1, Texas Tech eliminated Virginia 3, TCU 2 (15 inn.) Today’s game Game 9 — Texas (44-20) vs. UC Irvine (4124), 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL

Columbus 4 5 6 18 18 18 Houston 5 9 2 17 16 29 Philadelphia 3 7 6 15 22 27 Chicago 2 4 8 14 22 25 Montreal 2 7 4 10 13 26 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Wednesday, June 25 Montreal at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Friday, June 27 Toronto FC at New York, 5 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Portland, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 28 Seattle FC at D.C. United, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at New England, 4:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Columbus, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, June 29 Houston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.

Nat’l Women’s Soccer League W L T Pts GF GA Seattle 9 0 2 29 25 9 FC Kansas City 7 4 3 24 23 17 Chicago 6 4 2 20 18 12 Washington 6 6 1 19 21 24 Portland 5 4 2 17 12 15 Western New York 4 6 2 14 20 16 Houston 4 8 1 13 16 23 Sky Blue FC 2 6 5 11 13 23 Boston 3 8 0 9 15 24 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Today’s game Chicago at Western New York, 4 p.m. Thursday’s game Seattle FC at Boston, 4 p.m. Saturday’s games Portland at Washington, 3:30 p.m. Chicago at FC Kansas City, 4 p.m. Sunday, June 22 Boston at Sky Blue FC, 10 a.m. Seattle FC at Western New York, noon

DEALS

WNBA WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB Minnesota 9 3 .750 — Phoenix 7 3 .700 1 San Antonio 5 6 .455 3½ Tulsa 4 5 .444 3½ Seattle 5 8 .385 4½ Los Angeles 3 7 .300 5 EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB Atlanta 7 3 .700 — Connecticut 7 6 .538 1½ Chicago 5 5 .500 2 Indiana 5 5 .500 2 Washington 5 6 .455 2½ New York 3 8 .273 4½ Tuesday’s games Connecticut 89, Indiana 67 Minnesota 94, Los Angeles 77 Today’s games Washington at Atlanta, 9 a.m. New York at Chicago, 9:30 a.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

SOCCER World Cup FIRST ROUND GROUP A W L T GF GA Pts 1 0 1 3 1 4 1 0 1 1 0 4 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 3 0 Tuesday’s game Brazil 0, Mexico 0 Today’s game Croatia vs. Cameroon, 3 p.m. Monday’s games Cameroon vs. Brazil, 1 p.m. Croatia vs. Mexico, 1 p.m. GROUP B W L T GF GA Pts Netherlands 1 0 0 5 1 3 Chile 1 0 0 3 1 3 Australia 0 1 0 1 3 0 Spain 0 1 0 1 5 0 Today’s games Netherlands vs. Australia, 9 a.m. Spain vs. Chile, noon GROUP C W L T GF GA Pts Colombia 1 0 0 3 0 3 Ivory Coast 1 0 0 2 1 3 Japan 0 1 0 1 2 0 Greece 0 1 0 0 3 0 Thursday’s games Colombia vs. Ivory Coast, 9 a.m. Greece vs. Japan, 3 p.m. GROUP D W L T GF GA Pts Costa Rica 1 0 0 3 1 3 Italy 1 0 0 2 1 3 England 0 1 0 1 2 0 Uruguay 0 1 0 1 3 0 Thursday’s game Uruguay vs. England, noon Friday’s game Costa Rica vs. Italy, 9 a.m. GROUP E W L T GF GA Pts France 1 0 0 3 0 3 Switzerland 1 0 0 2 1 3 Ecuador 0 1 0 1 2 0 Honduras 0 1 0 0 3 0 Friday’s games Switzerland vs. France, noon Ecuador vs. Honduras, 3 p.m. GROUP F W L T GF GA Pts Argentina 1 0 0 2 1 3 Iran 0 0 1 0 0 1 Nigeria 0 0 1 0 0 1 Bosnia-Herzegovina 0 1 0 1 2 0 Saturday’s games Argentina vs. Iran, 9 a.m. Bosnia-Herzegovina vs. Nigeria, 9 a.m. GROUP G W L T GF GA Pts Germany 1 0 0 4 0 3 United States 1 0 0 2 1 3 Ghana 0 1 0 1 2 0 Portugal 0 1 0 0 4 0 Saturday’s game Germany vs. Ghana, noon Sunday’s game Portugal vs. United States, 3 p.m. GROUP H W L T GF GA Pts Belgium 1 0 0 2 1 3 Russia 0 0 1 1 1 1 South Korea 0 0 1 1 1 1 Algeria 0 1 0 1 2 0 Today’s games Belgium 2, Algeria 1 Russia 1, South Korea 1 Sunday’s games Belgium vs. Russia, 9 a.m. South Korea vs. Algeria, noon Brazil Mexico Cameroon Croatia

Major League Soccer WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Seattle 10 3 2 32 32 23 Real Salt Lake 6 2 7 25 25 21 Colorado 6 5 4 22 21 18 FC Dallas 6 7 4 22 28 28 Vancouver 5 2 6 21 25 20 Portland 4 4 8 20 28 27 Los Angeles 4 3 5 17 16 11 San Jose 4 5 4 16 15 14 Chivas USA 2 7 5 11 14 26 EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA D.C. 7 4 4 25 22 16 New England 7 5 2 23 21 18 Sporting Kansas City 6 5 4 22 21 14 Toronto FC 6 4 1 19 15 13 New York 4 5 6 18 22 22

BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Suspended Colorado RHP Nick Masset three games and fined him and Atlanta RHP David Carpenter undisclosed amounts for throwing at batters during a game last week. American League BOSTON RED SOX — Designated OF Grady Sizemore for assignment. Recalled OF Garin Cecchini from Pawtucket (IL). Agreed to terms with OF Derek Miller, C Alex McKeon, SS Hector Lorenzana, 3B Jordan Betts, 1B Sam Travis and RHPs Michael Kopech, Chandler Shepherd, Kuehl McEachern and Brandon Show on minor league contracts. CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with OF Bradley Zimmer, 1B Bobby Bradley and RHP Cameron Hill on minor league contracts. DETROIT TIGERS — Agreed to terms with OF Derek Hill and Michael Gerber; RHPs Spencer Turnbull, Jack Fischer. Gabe Hemmer Jacob Butler Nate Fury Gage Smith Joseph Pankake Paul Voelker Josh Heddinger and Adam Ladwig; SSs Will Kengor and Garrett Mattlage; LHPs Kenton St. John, Trent Szkutnik and Tyler Ford; Cs Grayson Greiner and Michael Thomas; 1B Corey Baptist; 3B Will Maddox; and 2B Brett Pirtle and Ross Kivett on minor league contracts. NEW YORK YANKEES — Optioned C John Ryan Murphy to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). Reinstated C Francisco Cervelli from the 60-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Placed LHP Drew Pomeranz on the 15-day DL. Optioned SS Jake Elmore to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Evan Scribner from Sacramento. Agreed to terms with SS Trace Loehr on a minor league contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Agreed to terms with 1B Carlos Pena and RHP Austin Pettibone on minor league contracts. Assigned Pena to Round Rock (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Optioned RHP Steve Delabar to Buffalo (IL). Recalled INF Munenori Kawasaki from Buffalo. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned RHP Will Harris to Reno (PCL). Recalled RHP Mike Bolsinger from Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES — Placed RHP David Carpenter on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Pedro Beato from Gwinnett (IL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Agreed to terms with RHP Trevor Oaks on a minor league contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Traded LHP Brad Mills to Oakland for cash considerations. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Sent 3B Cody Asche to Lehigh Valley (IL) for a rehab assignment. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Agreed to terms with C Kevin Krause, INF Erik Forgione and OFs Connor Joe, Jordan Luplow and David Andriese. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with 3B Danny Diekroeger on a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Optioned OF Daniel Carbonell to Salem-Keizer (NWL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES — Named Sam Mitchell assistant coach. FOOTBALL National Football League CLEVELAND BROWNS — Agreed to terms with QB Johnny Manziel. Released WR Earl Bennett. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed DL Seali’i Epenesa. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released OT Emmett Cleary and LB Steven Jenkins. TENNESSEE TITANS — Agreed to terms with WR Derek Hagan and RB Bishop Sankey. Released WR Lamont Bryant. Canadian Football League B.C. LIONS — Released DB Brandon McDonald. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES — Placed LW Ville Leino on unconditional waivers. DALLAS STARS — Bought out the contract of D Aaron Rome. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Agreed to terms with F Dale Weise on a two-year contract extension. SAN JOSE SHARKS — Signed G Alex Stalock and F Mike Brown to two-year contracts. VANCOUVER CANUCKS — Placed LW David Booth on unconditional waivers. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Named Sal Della Monica director of communications. COLLEGE ARMY — Named Kristen Waagbo women’s lacrosse coach. BALL STATE — Announced the NCAA has granted immediate eligibility to men’s basketball transfer Jeremiah Davis III. LA SALLE — Named Andrew Kroger women’s assistant volleyball coach. MARIST — Named Mike Maker men’s basketball coach. MINNESOTA STATE-MANKATO — Named Bryan Schmid defensive line coach. NORTHERN KENTUCKY — Announced women’s basketball G Shar’Rae Davis is transferring from Youngstown and F Rebecca Lyttle from Michigan. PENN STATE — Announced the resignation of athletic director David Joyner, effective Aug. 1. PRINCETON — Named Ron Fogarty men’s hockey coach. THIEL — Named Kelly Barzak women’s volleyball coach.

Darrington: meeting the Seahawks ‘a dream come true’ From Page C1

have reached out to the Darrington community. On March 31, and just nine days after the horrific mudslide, several Seattle players traveled to Darrington with members of the Seattle Sounders soccer team. That earlier visit started a conversation that led to the Loggers being invited to Tuesday’s Seahawks practice, which was otherwise closed to the public. “Just being around all these guys and getting (autographs), it’s a crazy feeling,” said Trent Green, a seniorto-be quarterback and defensive back. “I can’t even explain it. But it’s pretty cool to see all of them and be this close to them.” Making a great day even better for Green, he was able to say hi to

his favorite Seattle player, quarterback Russell Wilson. “I got a hug,” Green said with a grin. At one point during the workout, wide receiver Sidney Rice wandered over to a cluster of Darrington players and coaches. “Where’re you guys from?” he asked. “Darrington?” Told they were football players, he asked, “You guys going to win the championship?” Then, seeing one of the players wearing a Seahawks Super Bowl cap, he gave the bill a playful flick with his fingertip and said, “I like the hat.” The practice lasted about 21⁄2 hours, and when it was over several Seattle players lingered with the Darrington kids. Among them, Super Bowl MVP linebacker Malcolm Smith and wide receiver Jermaine Kearse, who were both

in the team contingent that visited Darrington back in March. Linebacker Bobby Wagner, wide receivers Doug Baldwin and Percy Harvin, and offensive tackle Russell Okung were others who came by to chat and sign autographs. Moments later, the team gathered around Wilson for a group photograph. At the last second, Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll, smiling broadly, ducked in to be part of the picture, too. Green ended up with a football signed by Carroll, Wilson, Harvin, safety Earl Thomas and several other Seahawks. The football “is going into a (display) case in my bedroom,” Green said. Teammate Mason McKenzie, who will be a junior linebacker and offensive lineman/tight end, was carrying a Super Bowl hat

signed by several Seahawks. The large signature right at the top belonged to Carroll. The entire afternoon, McKenzie said, “has been awesome. Seeing all the drills, you can learn stuff from them.” To his players, Lenker said, the Seahawks “are their heroes. They watch these guys on TV, and now they have a chance to get their signatures and shake their hands and be close to them. It’s a dream come true for most of them.” As it was for the Darrington coaching staff. “This is an experience for me, too,” Lenker said. “It’s awesome.” After several minutes of meeting and greeting, the Loggers headed for the parking lot and the journey on to Ellensburg, where they were to open their

four-day football camp with a Tuesday evening scrimmage. In an act of real generosity, Central Washington is allowing the Loggers to participate in the camp without charge. The school first had to get approval from the NCAA, said CWU athletic director Dr. Dennis Francois, “and they said yes, for this situation, they would allow the university to provide free camp for those individuals.” It was, Francois said, “the least we could do, and we were more than happy to do it. … (The mudslide) devastation changed a lot of lives and it’s something that’s not going to heal overnight, but hopefully this will help bring a little bit of normalcy back into the lives of these student-athletes.”


World Cup C5

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

USA | Notebook

FIFA World Cup

Klinsmann: Jozy Altidore may not be done

Today’s games Netherlands vs. Australia, 9 a.m. TV: ESPN, CBUT

Spain vs. Chile, noon TV: ESPN, CBUT

Cameroon vs. Croatia,3 p.m.

Associated Press

TV: ESPN, CBUT

Bench helps Belgium rally to beat Algeria Associated Press BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil — All too often, it sounds phony when a World Cup coach says all 23 players on the squad are equally important. On Tuesday, Belgium coach Marc Wilmots made it ring true. From the start against Algeria, Wilmots said the plan was to wear out the opposition with possession play and then bring in fresh substitutes to pounce. Instead of just an 11-man starting lineup, he was counting on the bench from the opening whistle. One substitute, Marouane Fellaini, used bulk and power to head home an equalizer to cancel out an early penalty. Another, Dries Mertens, finished off a counter in the 80th minute to give Belgium, the Group H favorite, a 2-1 victory. “I always said that the bench will make the difference and we showed it again today,” Fellaini said. His 70th-minute glancing, backward header finally brought the favored Belgians back into the game after a plodding first half. At halftime Wilmots had already brought on Mertens for more depth on the right wing. Even after he provided the winning goal, Wilmots showed the bench is not necessarily a happy place to be. “It was the choice of the trainer. A tough choice. But I was happy to come on,” Mertens said. He was able to use his speed ever more effectively against the rapidly tiring Algerians and he finished off a quick counterattack with a fiery right-foot drive for the clincher. If he had started, he might not have had such an impact. Wilmots is in a good position, however, as few coaches have those kinds of options. While most teams struggle to fill their starting lineup with top class players, he can leave many on the bench. “If we didn’t have the strength from our bench, it would have been different,” he said. So for 45 minutes, he set off with possession play, hoping to exhaust the Algeria players with running. What he hadn’t counted on was an error in his own defense. Jan Vertonghen dragged Sofiane Feghouli down in the area, conceding a penalty that the Algerian forward converted in the 25th minute. From there, Algeria’s plan was clear: park the bus in front of goal and hope to hang on. The Algerian fans became ever more rapturous and the Belgian players were sullen and downhearted heading into halftime. “I knew the moment would come. We had to stay calm,” Wilmots said.

Standings For World Cup standings, see the Scoreboard on Page C4.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mexico goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa (left) gives a lift to teammate Javier Aquino following a 0-0 tie with Brazil on Tuesday in Fortaleza, Brazil.

‘The match of my life’ Behind a spectacular effort by goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa, Mexico plays powerful Brazil to a 0-0 draw Associated Press FORTALEZA, Brazil — Fortaleza means “fortress” in Portuguese and Mexico’s defense certainly lived up to the name of Brazil’s northeast city on Tuesday thanks to the heroics of goalkeeper Guillermo Ochoa. Ochoa made a series of outstanding saves to help Mexico hold Brazil to a 0-0 draw. The result leaves each team with four points in Group A, but Brazil is ahead on goal difference going into their decisive final matches. Croatia and Cameroon meet today for their second games after both opened with defeats. Ochoa’s first remarkable save prevented Neymar from scoring in the 26th minute. The Brazil striker’s powerful header looked set to fly just inside the post when the goalkeeper dived to his right and pushed the ball wide. Ochoa made three other difficult saves to keep the hosts from breaking the deadlock — a shot by Paulinho in the 44th minute, a second-half effort by Neymar from inside the area and a closerange header by Thiago Silva in the 86th minute that produced a remarkable block by the Mexico goalkeeper. “It was the match of my life,” said Ochoa, who was visibly moved afterward. “To do it in a World Cup, in front of all the fans, it’s incredible.”

Mexico coach Miguel Herrera called Ochoa the “hero” of the match. “He did what we expected him to do,” Herrera said, “he came up with extraordinary saves.” After stopping Silva’s header, there was still time for a thrilling end to the game in the northeastern city of Fortaleza. The referee dismissed Brazilian claims for a penalty after Marcelo seemed to have been grabbed in the 88th minute. Mexico then had two great chances, first with Andres Guardado’s shot over the crossbar in the 90th and then with an effort by Raul Jimenez that was stopped by Brazil goalkeeper Julio Cesar in injury time. “In the end, the 0-0 mirrors what happened, it was a very hard-fought match,” Brazil coach Luiz Felipe Scolari said. “The draw wasn’t a good result because a victory would have already allowed us to advance, but we need to be able to respect our opponent, which played very well.” Herrera was clearly pleased with his side’s performance. “We had a great match against a great rival playing in front of its fans, in its stadium, in its country,” Herrera said. “We showed that we can play at the same level as any other team.” A win by either team would have guaranteed a spot in the next round if Cameroon and

Croatia were to draw in the jungle city of Manaus. “The only thing missing was the goal,” Scolari said. “We need to give credit to their goalkeeper. He was had a great day and that kept us from winning the match. He made some spectacular saves, was the best player of the match.” Brazil had won all three previous World Cup matches between the teams without conceding a goal, but the two teams hadn’t met in the sport’s showcase tournament since 1962. “We already expected a match this difficult,” Brazil striker Fred said. “We tried to score until the end but it wasn’t possible. We’ll have to wait until the next match to try to secure a spot in the next round.” Fans wearing Brazil’s green and yellow colors were the majority as expected, but Mexicans took over large sections of the stadium and at times were louder than the local fans. Among those in the crowd of 60,342 was NBA star Kobe Bryant, of the Los Angeles Lakers. Mexico had won six of its past 10 matches, including in the final of the 2012 London Olympics, keeping the Brazilians from earning their first gold medal in football. In their latest match, Brazil won 2-0 in last year’s Confederations Cup, also in Fortaleza and also in the second match of the group stage.

SAO PAULO — U.S. soccer coach Jurgen Klinsmann is optimistic forward Jozy Altidore will return during this World Cup. Altidore underwent an MRI exam on his injured left hamstring Tuesday after the U.S. squad returned to its Sao Paulo headquarters from Monday night’s 2-1 victory against Ghana. Results weren’t immediately available, and there is some doubt because hamstrings aren’t always quick to heal. “With Jozy, we’ve got to see how he now reacts the next couple days with his hamstring, and we’re full of hope that he comes back still in this tournament, and that’s what we kind of work on every day,” Klinsmann said. “The medical staff is doing a tremendous job ... so we still have to hope that Jozy will be back. How quickly? That is down to his healing process.” In the first half Monday, Altidore was running down a ball with Ghana’s John Boye when he lowered his head to attempt to control it. He immediately grabbed the back of his left leg and fell to the ground in pain. He was replaced by Aron Johannsson. “Obviously we all hope he’ll be all right,” midfielder Alejandro Bedoya said. “I’m sure if he’s able to work hard, we’re going to get him back. We have players that can play different roles and come in and do a job. Last night we had two subs come in and add something to the game. Aron is a good player and I think he did well last night under the circumstances.” The Americans’ next Group G match is Sunday against Portugal, a 4-0 loser to Germany. Central defender Matt Besler was replaced at halftime Monday as a precaution with right hamstring tightness, and he also underwent tests Tuesday. Klinsmann said Besler’s injury wasn’t serious and he would be fine for Sunday. Captain Clint Dempsey broke his nose but is expected to play Sunday. “Maybe he has the option if he wants a mask on,” Klinsmann said. “I don’t know how much a mask can protect him. Whatever he feels good with. I think a broken nose, yes, it was tricky during the game. He barely could breathe. He struggled with that. But once it’s broken, it’s broken. It will take time to heal completely ... He’s going to be all right.”

Goal time adjusted RIO DE JANEIRO — FIFA officially timed Clint Dempsey’s goal at 30 seconds into the United States’ 2-1 World Cup win over Ghana. Dempsey became the fifth fastest scorer in World Cup history on Monday in Natal. The goal was initially timed at 29 seconds before being confirmed at one second later by FIFA on Tuesday. The only faster goals at a World Cup were by Turkey’s Hakan Suker (11 seconds against South Korea in 2002), Czechoslovakia’s Vaclav Masek (16 seconds against Mexico in 1962), Germany’s Ernst Lehner (25 seconds against Austria in 1934), and England’s Bryan Robson (27 seconds against France in 1982). Dempsey became the first American to score in three World Cups.

Russia, South Korea battle to a 1-1 draw By Steve Douglas Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russia’s goalkeeper Igor Akinfeev reacts after letting in the opening goal during the Group H World Cup match between Russia and South Korea in Cuiaba, Brazil.

CUIABA, Brazil — Blundering Russia goalkeeper Igor Akinfeev was bailed out by teammate Alexander Kerzhakov in a 1-1 draw with South Korea in the World Cup on Tuesday that exposed both teams’ deficiencies. Akinfeev aready had looked suspect in dealing with long-range shots before spilling Lee Keun-ho’s speculative effort into his own net in the 68th minute, gifting South Korea the lead. Kerzhakov, though, came to Akinfeev’s rescue by turning in a shot from close range six minutes later — just three minutes after coming on as a substitute — to earn

Russia a point from a poor-quality Group H match. Akinfeev stayed on the ground inside his own net, head in his hands, after making his error, clearly embarrassed after dropping what was a routine save from a shot from about 30 yards. He was consoled by a couple of teammates, who patted him on the back. “It was a kid’s mistake,” Afinkeev said. “The goalkeeper of the national team shouldn’t make mistakes like this one.” Russia coach Fabio Capello has remained loyal to Akinfeev this season despite some patchy form, and stood by him again. “He is a great goalkeeper,” Capello said. “There can be mistakes, of course — some can get a penalty

wrong ... and it’s logical for a goalkeeper to make a mistake as well. “We were able to make up for that and we can accept a mistake by a great keeper like Akinfeev.” The explosive six-minute spell that featured both goals was not in keeping with the rest of a fairly mundane game characterized by slow build-up play, poor passing and wayward finishing. Having lost four of its last five games heading to Brazil, the South Koreans came into their eighth straight World Cup with concerns over their flimsy defense and a lack of goal threat. There was no hiding their toothless attack Tuesday. Russia was just as lifeless in its attack — at least until Kerzhakov came off the bench.


C6

Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald TODAY

Western WA Northwest Weather

64°51°

Low clouds followed by some sun today; however, clouds and sun near the Cascades. Partly cloudy tonight. A shower possible tomorrow.

Bellingham 67/52

More sunshine

TOMORROW

68°51° Warmer

FRIDAY

Mountains

Stanwood 66/49

Arlington Eastern WA 68/48 Granite Times of clouds and sun Falls today; warmer in the east Marysvile 68/48 with a shower in spots. 65/51 Partly cloudy tonight. Langley EVERETT Lake StevensWarmer in the east tomor64/51 65/52 68/48 row. Mukilteo Snohomish Gold Bar 65/53 70/50 71/51 Lynnwood Mill Creek Index Monroe Sultan 67/52 69/48 68/52 70/50 71/51 Kirkland Redmond 68/52 69/51 Seattle Bellevue 68/53 68/53

Slight chance of a shower

69°52°

Summer begins 3:51 a.m.

SUNDAY

71°52° Partly cloudy

Mount Vernon 67/49

Oak Harbor 63/50

66°53°

SATURDAY

Intervals of clouds and sunshine today; a passing shower across the north. Patchy clouds tonight. Periods of clouds and sunshine tomorrow.

Port Orchard 69/50

Everett Low High Low High

Auburn 69/51

Almanac

Time

4:13 a.m. 9:22 a.m. 3:42 p.m. 10:43 p.m.

Feet

4.3 8.2 0.9 11.9

Puget Sound

Wind west 7-14 knots today. Wave heights 1-3 feet. Visibility clear. Wind west 8-16 knots tonight. Wave heights 2-4 feet. Partly cloudy.

Port Townsend

Time

Low High Low High

Feet

3:29 a.m. 8:33 a.m. 2:40 p.m. 10:18 p.m.

4.2 6.0 0.0 9.1

Everett

Arlington

Whidbey Island

Air Quality Index

Pollen Index

Sun and Moon

Yesterday’s offender ....... Particulates

Today

Sunrise today ....................... 5:09 a.m. Sunset tonight ..................... 9:11 p.m. Moonrise today ................. 12:19 a.m. Moonset today ................... 12:07 p.m.

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 64/50 Normal high/low ....................... 66/52 Records (1969/1919) ................. 84/39 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 30.12 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.04” Month to date ............................. 1.01” Normal month to date ............... 1.43” Year to date ............................... 18.72” Normal year to date ................. 17.07”

Good: 0-50; Moderate: 51-100, Unhealthy (for sensitive groups): 101-150; Unhealthy: 151-200; Very unhealthy: 201300; Hazardous: 301-500 WA Dept. of Environmental Quality

More Information Road Reports:

www.wsdot.wa.gov

Avalanche Reports:

www.nwac.noaa.gov

Burn Ban Information: Puget Sound: 1-800-595-4341 Website: www.pscleanair.org Forecasts and graphics, except the KIRO 5-day forecast, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 68/52 Normal high/low ....................... 66/52 Records (2013/1976) ................. 75/45 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 30.13 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. ............... 0.13” Month to date ............................. 2.02” Normal month to date ............... 1.76” Year to date ............................... 31.91” Normal year to date ................. 23.53”

World Weather City

Today Hi/Lo/W Amsterdam 67/53/pc Athens 92/75/s Baghdad 108/84/s Bangkok 91/79/t Beijing 93/71/c Berlin 77/53/pc Buenos Aires 54/38/s Cairo 97/74/s Dublin 71/54/pc Hong Kong 92/84/r Jerusalem 82/65/s Johannesburg 65/43/s London 69/53/pc

through 5 p.m. yesterday High/low ..................................... 65/55 Normal high/low ....................... 64/50 Records (1958/1971) ................. 92/42 Barometric pressure (noon) ... 30.11 S 24 hours ending 5 p.m. .............. Trace Month to date ............................. 0.54” Normal month to date ............... 0.77” Year to date ............................... 11.59” Normal year to date ................... 9.35”

Last Jun 19

Source: NAB

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 62/55/pc 90/68/s 114/85/s 93/79/t 86/67/c 68/51/pc 55/44/s 103/79/s 66/47/pc 92/84/sh 86/68/s 59/34/s 76/53/pc

Washington Bellingham Colville Ellensburg Forks Friday Harbor Moses Lake Ocean Shores Olympia Port Angeles Pullman Spokane Seattle Tacoma Walla Walla Wenatchee Yakima Idaho Boise Coeur d’Alene Sun Valley Oregon Astoria Bend Eugene Klamath Falls Medford Portland

New Jun 27

First Jul 5

Full Jul 12

City

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Madrid 88/62/s 89/66/s Manila 90/79/sh 87/79/t Mexico City 73/55/pc 72/55/t Moscow 55/42/pc 61/48/sh Paris 73/52/s 72/57/pc Rio de Janeiro 78/67/pc 72/63/sh Riyadh 103/80/s 103/83/s Rome 76/61/t 77/61/t Singapore 89/79/t 89/79/t Stockholm 68/50/pc 63/48/r Sydney 67/42/s 68/46/pc Tokyo 75/66/sh 79/68/pc Toronto 78/59/t 76/53/pc

Vancouver

66/54

Today Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W 67/52/pc 76/49/c 78/50/pc 63/50/pc 66/48/pc 80/50/pc 59/54/pc 70/48/pc 62/49/pc 65/45/c 68/48/c 68/53/pc 68/50/pc 78/54/pc 81/57/pc 81/48/pc 72/51/pc 64/47/c 59/39/c

83/60/s 76/49/pc 73/48/s

65/51/pc 74/41/s 75/46/pc 75/38/s 85/51/s 73/53/pc

66/53/pc 80/43/s 79/50/pc 81/45/s 90/57/pc 78/56/pc

City

Today Hi/Lo/W Albany 87/64/t Albuquerque 87/59/s Amarillo 90/66/t Anchorage 60/50/c Atlanta 93/70/t Atlantic City 89/72/t Austin 91/74/pc Baltimore 97/73/t Baton Rouge 92/71/t Billings 64/48/sh Birmingham 92/72/t Boise 72/51/pc Boston 88/69/pc Buffalo 80/63/t Burlington, VT 82/58/t Charleston, SC 92/71/s Charleston, WV 92/68/t Charlotte 94/67/pc Cheyenne 74/42/t Chicago 89/70/t Cincinnati 91/71/t Cleveland 88/68/t Columbus, OH 93/73/t Dallas 91/77/pc Denver 83/47/t Des Moines 91/74/pc Detroit 85/68/t El Paso 96/74/s Evansville 93/71/s Fairbanks 58/51/r Fargo 84/64/pc Fort Myers 90/71/t Fresno 90/63/s Grand Rapids 83/69/t Greensboro 94/69/pc Hartford 91/65/t Honolulu 87/74/s Houston 92/74/pc Indianapolis 90/72/pc

Bellingham

Kelowna 80/47

Calgary 61/48 Everett 64/51 68/56/pc Medicine Hat Seattle 61/48 82/48/pc 68/53 Spokane Libby Tacoma 83/55/pc 68/45 68/48 68/50 63/51/c Yakima Coeur d’Alene 81/48 66/50/pc Portland 64/47 73/53 Great Falls Walla Walla 85/54/s Newport Lewiston Missoula 61/47 78/54 60/55/pc 62/47 70/51 59/45 Salem 73/51/pc 74/49 Helena Pendleton 63/52/pc 60/48 78/49 76/49/pc Eugene Bend 75/46 Butte 77/54/pc 74/41 53/38 Ontario 72/54/pc 76/48 Medford 72/51/pc Boise 85/51 84/60/s 72/51 Klamath Falls 84/61/pc Eureka 75/38 Idaho Falls Twin Falls 85/56/pc 63/46 59/40 68/48

National Weather

Tacoma 68/50

Tides

City

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 83/50/s 87/65/s 89/67/t 60/51/sh 92/72/s 84/68/t 92/73/t 90/64/t 91/71/pc 73/54/t 93/71/t 83/60/s 81/61/pc 78/53/pc 77/47/pc 93/73/s 87/66/t 94/67/s 76/47/pc 86/71/t 90/70/t 81/62/t 89/71/t 91/76/t 81/54/pc 88/70/t 83/64/t 96/74/s 92/71/pc 60/48/r 79/58/t 90/72/t 96/66/s 83/69/t 94/70/s 87/54/s 87/73/s 92/73/t 89/71/pc

67/52

Port Angeles 62/49

Redding 93/60

Roseburg Salem Montana Butte Great Falls Missoula Alaska Anchorage

80/50/s 74/49/pc

84/56/pc 79/52/pc

53/38/sh 61/47/r 59/45/sh

69/42/pc 71/47/c 76/45/pc

60/50/c

60/51/sh

Today Hi/Lo/W Jackson, MS 92/70/t Kansas City 91/73/pc Knoxville 91/67/t Las Vegas 89/71/s Little Rock 93/72/s Los Angeles 76/62/pc Louisville 93/74/t Lubbock 90/68/t Memphis 93/74/s Miami 87/74/t Milwaukee 79/63/t Minneapolis 84/70/t Mobile 91/70/t Montgomery 95/70/t Newark 94/73/t New Orleans 90/73/t New York City 90/71/t Norfolk 95/75/pc Oakland 73/52/s Oklahoma City 91/72/pc Omaha 94/74/pc Orlando 88/70/t Palm Springs 95/73/s Philadelphia 94/73/t Phoenix 100/76/s Pittsburgh 88/68/t Portland, ME 82/59/pc Portland, OR 73/53/pc Providence 90/67/pc

Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 92/69/t 87/72/t 91/67/pc 95/73/s 93/73/pc 79/62/pc 93/75/pc 88/68/t 93/74/pc 88/75/t 76/63/t 86/64/t 90/70/t 94/70/t 88/64/pc 89/73/pc 86/67/pc 95/74/t 68/53/s 89/72/t 89/64/t 89/72/t 100/76/s 87/67/t 100/79/s 84/66/t 79/52/pc 78/56/pc 85/56/pc

City

Barrow 38/31/c Fairbanks 58/51/r Juneau 57/40/sh British Columbia Chilliwack 68/51/pc Kelowna 80/47/pc Vancouver 66/54/pc Victoria 66/52/pc City

Today Hi/Lo/W Raleigh 97/70/pc Rapid City 76/48/pc Reno 80/54/s Richmond 98/72/pc Sacramento 91/52/s St. Louis 95/75/s St. Petersburg 90/73/t Salt Lake City 66/52/pc San Antonio 91/76/pc San Diego 70/62/pc San Francisco 72/52/pc San Jose 79/53/s Stockton 90/54/s Syracuse 83/64/t Tallahassee 94/70/t Tampa 88/73/t Tempe 99/73/s Topeka 94/72/pc Tucson 98/70/s Tulsa 91/74/pc Washington, DC 97/75/pc Wichita 94/73/pc Winston-Salem 93/70/pc Yuma 96/72/s

37/29/c 60/48/r 62/46/c 71/55/pc 85/50/pc 67/56/pc 66/54/pc Tomorrow Hi/Lo/W 98/70/s 77/52/pc 87/58/s 96/72/t 89/55/s 93/74/t 89/73/t 78/58/s 92/75/t 71/64/pc 68/54/pc 77/54/s 91/56/s 79/47/s 93/70/t 89/73/t 100/74/s 89/72/t 97/70/s 90/73/t 92/71/t 89/71/t 93/71/s 100/76/s

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

National Extremes (for the 48 contiguous states) High: Bullhead City, AZ ................. 108 Low: Burns, OR ................................ 27

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Sounders face young upstarts in U.S. Open Cup PSA Elite has something to prove against Major League Soccer’s best By Don Ruiz The News Tribune

TUKWILA — PSA Elite is an amateur soccer club with the mission of developing players for the pros. Now, those aspiring professionals are about to face the Seattle Sounders — the topranked team in Major League Soccer. The match is at 7 tonight at Starfire Sports Stadium. You don’t need a psychic to understand how much the PSA Elite players wants to prove themselves. “They’re going to be a team that’s really, really motivated,” Sounders coach Sigi Schmid said. “They’re almost like a college all-star team, with guys that are still in college, guys that have just recently left college. For them, this is the game of their lives. Some of them are trying to impresses you, that, ‘Hey I’m a kid you’ve got to draft next year.’

Others guys are saying ‘Hey, I’m somebody that you overlooked.’ So for them it’s a really big contest.” This is the kind of pairing that can be produced in the U.S. Open Cup — the 101-year-old club championship bringing together all levels of the United States Soccer Federation. Seattle, the three-time Open Cup champion Sounders and all other U.S.based MLS teams enter in the tournament’s fourth round. Meanwhile, PSA Elite climbed its way up to the fourth round with victories over the LA Misioneros of the Premier Development League, the San Diego Flash of the National Premier Soccer League, and finally LA Galaxy II of USL Pro. Now PSA Elite has reached the toughest challenge the tournament can offer: meeting an MLS team on its home pitch. “I’ve played a lot of cup games in Europe, and it’s the same thing no matter what,” Seattle goalkeeper Marcus Hahnemann said. “When we’ve played against the big teams — you’re going to Man United, or you have them coming to your place — they don’t really want to play you. And you go in there cruising, and you’re excited to be there, and you’re buzzing

100 miles an hour and you’re trying to get a result. That’s what they’re going to come here to do.” Sounders midfielder Lamar Neagle of Federal Way also knows what its like. He was playing with the USL-2 Charleston Battery in 2010 when it went to Chicago and eliminated the MLS Fire. “For a team in a lower league to come up and play an MLS team and to win away was huge,” he said. “… That was a thing that we definitely took seriously.” For all the Sounders’ success in the U.S. Open Cup — they won the title in 2009, 2010 and 2011, and cruised to the final in 2012 — they also know what it’s like to tumble early to a lower-level team. Last season, the Sounders opened the tournament at second-division Tampa Bay, and the North American Soccer League team sent them home 1-0 losers. The Sounders say they do not want a repeat this season — especially to an amateur side at home. “If we enter it we want to do as good as possible and do well and win it,” Schmid said. “Last year was a disappointment for us. … So it’s important for us to get off to a better start. We’ve always done well at Starfire, and hopefully we’ll get off to a good start again.”

HERALD FILE PHOTO

Seattle’s Lamar Neagle (left) knows what it’s like to be part of a lowerdivision team hungry for recognition and battling a more established pro team. He played for the USL-2 Charleston Battery when it defeated Major League Soccer’s Chicago Fire in a 2010 U.S. Open Cup match.

COLLEGE | World Series

Ole Miss scores in ninth inning, ousts Texas Tech Associated Press

1060638

OMAHA, Neb. — Pinch hitter John Gatlin’s single into short right field over a pulled-in, five-man infield in the bottom of the ninth inning gave Mississippi a 2-1 victory over Texas Tech in a College World Series elimination game Tuesday. The exciting finish came after Texas Tech had tied it in the top of the ninth on a couple daring steals and a sacrifice fly. Ole Miss (47-20) plays

Virginia on Thursday in another elimination game. The Red Raiders (45-20) were 0-2 in their first CWS. Ole Miss won after Colby Bortles walked with one out. Brantley Bell hit a comebacker to Cameron Smith, who tried to force out Bortles at second. But he threw high into center field, allowing Bortles to go to third. Aaron Greenwood then pinch ran for Bortles, Dominic Moreno came on to face Gatlin and Texas Tech shifted an extra player to the left side

of the infield and went with only two outfielders. Gatlin punched a 1-2 pitch over second base, Greenwood scored, and the celebration was on.

Virginia 3, TCU 2 (15) OMAHA, Neb. — Daniel Pinero’s sacrifice fly scored Thomas Woodruff in the bottom of the 15th inning to give Virginia a 3-2 victory Tuesday night in a game that matched the longest in the College World Series’ 66-year history. Pinero fouled off two squeeze-bunt attempts against Trey Teakell before he lofted a fly to center. Cody Jones’

throw toward home never had a chance. The Cavaliers’ bench and bullpen emptied, with everybody mobbing Pinero near second base. Virginia (51-14), which had a walk-off win against Mississippi on Sunday in nine innings, plays Friday in its bracket final. TCU (48-17) plays Ole Miss in an elimination game Thursday. Artie Lewicki (8-1) got the win and Teakell (6-1) took the loss. It was the longest game, as measured by innings, since USC beat Florida State 2-1 in 15 in the 1970 national championship game.


Good Life SECTION D

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM/LIVING

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

Supply stores are a cook’s dream By Daniel Neman St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BILL HOGAN / CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Anchovies are best known for being a pizza and salad topping as well as being feared by children and the squeamish. But it can be a secret ingredient bringing a pop of flavor to many dishes.

That little sneaky, salty fish Learn to love the flavor anchovy can bring to dishes By Cindy Dampier Chicago Tribune

You might not imagine the anchovy, that canned fish so reviled by children and the squeamish for its overpowering presence in Caesar salads and on pizzas, as a stealthy ingredient. Nevertheless, the anchovy crept up on me. I can pinpoint the moment it wriggled its way into my cooking. It was summer, a season of warm air, languor

— and collard greens. Paging through the “Southern Foodways Alliance Community Cookbook” one evening, I came across a method for cooking tender young collards with a quick saute, in a pan started with a shake of red pepper, olive oil and anchovies. I eyed the recipe with a healthy Southern-bred skepticism. Searched for the ham hock in this recipe. Searched for the bacon. The smoked turkey wing? Nope.

Craft brewers rolling out India pale lagers By Josh Noel Chicago Tribune

In the world of American craft beer, the answer is usually, “Add hops.” The question almost doesn’t matter. But in this case, hops helped answer a question that had vexed brewers for decades: how to bring lagers into the craft realm? Brewers had long favored ales, partly for the richness and complexity they offer compared with lagers, and partly as a reaction to the conglomerates that helped inspire the craft movement. Lagers were light, fizzy beers made by Budweiser and Miller, or so went the thought. In recent years, however, lagers have staged a craft comeback, with a hand from hops. That piney, citrustinged ingredient, central to craft beer’s most popular style — India pale ales — has been central to giving lagers a needed, and delicious, jolt. Breweries both large and small have taken stabs at what has become known as India pale lagers, including Victory Brewing (Prima Pils, whose label even features a hop cone), Firestone Walker (Pivo Pils, which also features a hop cone) and Magic Hat,

BILL HOGAN / CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Craft brewers rolling out India pale lagers, including Dream Machine IPL, Firestone Pils Pivo, and Victory Prima Pils.

Northwest IPLs Breweries making India pale lagers in the Northwest include Pyramid Breweries and Roslyn Brewing.

See LAGERS, Page D3

INSIDE: Comics, 4

|

And since cooking is, for me, a way to serve both my innate contrarian and her twin, the starry-eyed curiosity seeker, that was all it took. I might scoff at the notion that any Southern cook worth her cast-iron pan would try to flavor collards without a pork product. Then I might do exactly that, just to make us both admit those fish-flavored greens were delicious. Luckily, I was in possession of the tenderest, most perfect armload of collard greens I

had ever seen, grown in far northern Illinois (almost Wisconsin) at Kinnikinnick Farm, greens purveyor to some of Chicago’s finest restaurants. I had the cast-iron pan. One trip to the all-night grocery later, I had the fish. More fish than I needed, actually — in a fever of indecision, I bought fish in jars (old school, lurid, dubious packaging) and something called creme d’anchois (silly

For people who love to cook, it’s like Disneyland. We walk through the aisles, eyes agog, mouths agape. As with children, our hands reach out to all the shiny objects on the shelves. “I want,” we say. “I want.” For chefs, restaurant supply companies are part of the job, where they go to pick up the kitchen equipment, plates and assorted whatnots that they need for work. It’s fast, available, convenient and above all, cheap. Those same attributes are what make the stores Christmas to the home cook. There, spread out in front of you, is a wondrous array of delights, all shining and sparkly and well within your budget. The pots and pans you might buy at a typical kitchen store are sturdier and hardier than you will find at a restaurant supply company, and they are certainly more attractive. But why buy a gorgeous, heavy fry pan at one of those high-end mall stores for $150 when you can pick up a perfectly serviceable pan at a restaurant supply store for $12.95? And it’s not just serviceable, it is literally what the pros use. Chefs in working kitchens who cook food all day long use these same pans. The best food you’ve had at the best restaurant in town was cooked on a pan that costs less than 13 bucks - though, admittedly, the top-of-the-line pans go for a little more than that. Maybe $20. It is true that restaurants use their pans so much they wear them out. A cheap nonstick pan in a restaurant might only last six months, but that is with nearconstant use. At home, if you use it a lot, you might get five years out of it. But so what? It costs $12.95. In 25 years, you’ve spent only 65 bucks, less than half of

See FISH, Page D2

See STORES, Page D2

Portobello subs nicely in cheesesteak By Sara Moulton Associated Press

Like Philadelphia itself, there is a lot to love about the city’s signature sandwich — the cheesesteak. But that delicious combination of beef, onions and cheese isn’t the sort of thing you want to pack away every day, unless you’re looking to pack on pounds. So I decided to see if I could make a healthier sandwich that is inspired by the cheesesteak, but is a bit more suited to the everyday. I started by swapping out the beef in favor of that most steak-like of mushrooms, the portobello. Actually, it’s just the roomy cap of the portobello, filled to the brim with roasted red peppers, grilled scallions, olives and mushroom trimmings, then topped with melted provolone cheese, and lubricated with a little bit of rosemary mayonnaise. Finally, the whole thing is set on a slice of grilled rustic bread. It may be meatless, but it is not a punk. And heartiness aside, portobellos — like all of their mushroom brethren — are chock-full of nutrients. But these big mushrooms have to be cleaned before they can be savored. Start by removing the dark gills on the

Grandparenting, 4

|

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Open-faced stuffed portobello sandwich are a healthier alternative to the classic Philadelphia cheesesteak.

underside, lightly scraping them out with a teaspoon. Then simply rinse the cap on both sides under cold running water to remove any dirt. I know that some folks advise against rinsing, preferring instead to wipe away the dirt with a damp cloth to prevent the mushrooms from getting waterlogged. In fact, a quick rinse doesn’t harm them and it’s infinitely quicker and more thorough than wiping them clean. Just pat the caps dry afterward so they’ll be able to absorb the marinade. And that’s the amazing thing

Dear Abby, 5

|

about portobellos. Though they have a high water content, if you plunk them into a flavorful marinade, they still absorb it quickly. Topping-wise, I’ve gone the Mediterranean route, but you’re welcome to substitute the toppings of your choice. Maybe you’ll want to grill and chop up some complementary mushrooms — like shiitake or oyster — and put them on top of the portobello. Maybe you’ll opt to top it off with grilled broccoli, asparagus or onions. Likewise, See PORTOBELLO, Page D2

Television, 6


D2

Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

Portobello

Fish

Heat the grill to medium.

From Page D1

if you’re not crazy about provolone, you can swap in thin slices of mozzarella, cheddar or Italian fontina. Finally, if don’t like mayo on your sandwiches, don’t use it. Dijon mustard works very nicely in its place. But however you customize it, I urge you to try adding this super-satisfying vegetarian ringer to the menu the next time you’re grilling up hot dogs and burgers in the backyard, and see if you don’t win some converts.

Open-faced stuffed portobello sandwiches To remove the gills from the underside of the portobello mushrooms, use a spoon to gently scrape them out. 1 garlic clove, minced 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar 2 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil Salt and ground black pepper 4 large portobello mushrooms, stems and gills discarded 1 ⁄2 cup light mayonnaise 2 teaspoons finely minced fresh rosemary Olive oil cooking spray 1 ⁄2 cup medium chopped jarred roasted red peppers 1 ⁄2 cup pitted black olives, medium chopped 6 large scallions, bottoms trimmed 4 slices rustic wholegrain bread 4 thin slices provolone cheese (about 3 ounces total)

From Page D1

name, weirdly compelling yellow-and-blue tube). A sucker for packaging, I tried the fish paste first. It melted into a silky puddle in the pan, coating the garlic and red pepper flakes and then the greens, which I ate, standing up in the kitchen, by the faint light of the range hood. I was converted, and those speedy, spicy greens became a house recipe, enshrined alongside things like biscuits, chocolate chip cookies and pulled pork. The more pungent jarred fish made their debut a few weeks later. Smashed with a fork, they flavored first the greens and then attained secret ingredient status in the pulled pork, a braised chicken thigh recipe and more. Umami all over the place. If the recipe called for starting with bacon, I subbed the fish, with delicious, nuanced results. Anchovy haters never knew what hit them.

In a small bowl, combine the garlic, mustard, vinegar, olive oil, and a hefty pinch each of salt and pepper. Brush the marinade on both sides of the mushrooms, then transfer them to a zip-close plastic bag, along with any remaining marinade. Let them marinate at room temperature for 20 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl combine the mayonnaise and rosemary, then season with salt and pepper. In a medium bowl combine the peppers and olives, then season with pepper. Set aside. Spray the scallions with the cooking spray and grill them, turning often, until they are charred on the edges and crisp tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Transfer them to a cutting board and let them cool slightly. Medium chop the scallions and add them to the bowl with the peppers and olives. Mist the bread with cooking spray, then grill it until it is lightly toasted on both sides. Set aside. Grill the mushrooms, gill sides down, 3 to 4 minutes. Turn them over and grill on the on the second side until tender when pierced with a knife, another 3 to 4 minutes. Spoon a quarter of the olive-pepper mixture evenly on top of each mushroom. Top with a slice of cheese, cover the grill and cook until the cheese is melted, 1 to 2 minutes. Spread the mayonnaise mixture on each piece of bread. Transfer each mushroom to one slice of bread. Cut in half and serve right away. Servings: 4 Nutrition information per serving: 380 calories; 230 calories from fat (61 percent of total calories); 26 g fat (7 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 35 mg cholesterol; 26 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 6 g sugar; 12 g protein; 1,060 mg sodium.

Stores From Page D1

what a more prestigious brand would cost you. I recently bought my brother a cook’s knife for his birthday. It might be a weird birthday gift, but he needed a good knife that stays sharp, and besides, I’m a bit of a knife geek. So I went to a restaurant supply company and picked him up an 8-inch Dexter Sani-Safe cook’s knife. It only cost — well, I don’t want to say how little it cost, because there is a possibility he could read this column. But let’s just say it was cheap enough that I bought myself one at

Downtown Edmonds, Across from the Edmonds/Kingston Ferry Terminal

�aterfront �nti�ue �all

Anchovies in the pantry were like money in the bank. I was always looking for new ways to try them. By the time I noticed an online mention of a specific kind of anchovy, one that trumped the supermarket variety with superior taste and texture, my inner skeptic was mostly silenced. I wanted to try those fish. Adding to the urgency was another cooking project that had been canonized in our kitchen: pizza-making. After consulting with bread guru Jim Lahey for a story on homemade pizza, I was on the lookout for pizza ingredients that would deliver bigger, better flavor. Lahey’s advice was that the best ingredients are what truly elevate the pizza, not the ability to spin the dough into a perfect round every time. Online food gurus agreed: If you wanted great anchovies, the fish you wanted were from the Cantabrian Sea, caught by the fisherman of the Spanish town Santona, packed and sold by the Don Bocarte

company. Don Bocarte’s anchovies, they say, are caught only during April, May and June, scooped from the sea while migrating along the Spanish coast. Hand-packed in extra-virgin olive oil and with a touch of salt that renders them the height of fishy, creamy deliciousness. The more I read, the more my mouth watered. Those anchovies belonged on my pizza. I found them online but realized that the tin (less than 2 ounces for $13) would also cost $13 to ship. I called local grocers, looking for the brand, but was denied. Annoyed, I contented myself with lesser fish. Finally, on a trip to New York, I remembered reading about a Spanish foods importer that had opened a SoHo shop. They carried the Bocarte anchovies. After a panicked moment scanning the shelves at Despana Foods — the anchovies were in the refrigerated case, as it turned out — two tins of anchovies were mine, for roughly the price of one ordered online. In the

logic of travel shopping, this seemed completely reasonable. Back home, they lingered on the pantry shelf for a while, waiting to make their entrance. On the first run, I overfished the pizza — it was a touch too pungent for everyone but me. The second time around, I had a surer hand — Bocarte’s anchovies, broken and sparingly applied, were the perfect taste of buttery olive oil and the tang of the ocean, swimming with the other toppings of olives, pepper, tomato and cheese. My journey with the anchovy had reached its satisfying end. Maybe. There’s still a partial tin lingering in the fridge, and it’ll need to be eaten. Of course there are greens to cook, pulled pork to season, pizza to make. But we’ve been down that path. What about a little anchovy crostini? Or an anchovylaced pasta dish? Or soup with cannellini and kale? Let’s just say: if you’re going to be in SoHo, I could probably use another can of fish.

the same time. Together, they cost less than a third of my next favorite knife, a Zwilling J.A. Henckels chef’s knife that is heavier than most but that fits my hand the best. If you’re looking to stock up on your saucepans, you can pick up a 1 1⁄2-quart model for just $9.95. If you’d like a baking sheet (technically, it’s a half baking sheet - you won’t be able to fit a full size sheet in your oven, unless you have a BlueStar), you can buy one for $5.50. You might as well buy two. And if you plan to make a lot of frozen drinks, you can get a professional Waring blender for less than $75. Admittedly, some of the offerings at a restaurant supply company actually

cost more than you would spend on a similar item elsewhere, particularly if you like to bake, because the pros need a higher quality than the home cook. A springform pan at one company, for instance, costs a hefty $31.50, about twice what a decent version for residential use will set you back. But the ones you use at home are relatively flimsy because they are never going to get too much use. A professional baker cranking out cheesecakes every day is going to need the sturdier version. Most restaurant supply companies are happy to sell to the general public, though some (including Restaurant Depot and B&J Peerless) deal only

with restaurants. To answer the burning question that some of you serious cooks have, yes, restaurant supply companies do sell commercial stoves. But they will try to talk you out of buying one for your house. Commercial ranges are less insulated than residential ones, and they get much, much hotter. If you buy one, you will almost certainly lose your homeowner’s insurance. Even if you surround it in heatproof material, there is still a frighteningly good chance you will burn down your house. Stick with the knives and the pots, the ladles and the strainers, the whisks and the metal mixing bowls. You’ll be glad you did.

And the winner is...

CLOSING SOON!

425.670.0770 Hurry in for the Best Selection. Entire Store on sale Final Closing Date July 8th 1075716

Looking for family fun this summer? Check out The Herald’s summertime Splash! activity guide online!

Take our survey at

Find out on Friday, July 18.

and be entered to win a Kindle Fire!

EARLY BIRD OFFER!

1058523

www.heraldnet.com

Go to www.heraldnet.com/splash

we’ve

One Kindle Fire will be given away for survey responses between May 5th - June 30, 2014

1041976

www.pulseresearch.com/thedailyherald

Complete the survey within the first 7 days and be entered to win 4 tickets to an upcoming AquaSox game!

Look for our special tab section containing the area’s favorites in local businesses in the July 18 edition of The Herald.

www.heraldnet.com

1075252

The Daily Herald QFC Gift Card Giveaway

But, only a mile or so down the road.

Enter to win a $200 QFC Gift Card!

(1.5 to be exact.)

Stop by and visit us today!

Meet with your local Herald representative at one of the north Snohomish County QFC stores and you could win! Visit on Monday - Thursday 3p.m. - 7p.m. Contest is open to all QFC customers 18 years of age and above. No purchase necessary.

1058570

www.heraldnet.com

OUR NEW LOCATION IS... 1800 41st Street., S-300 Everett, WA 98203 425.339.3000

er noazga, enad eMM r s o t a . Tt oSm ayQQFFCC. iswtiathneeonnW u! ds esrse rgrm A h n yo h n a d i et e c E e v w s E o S thf ethe ratellr ard! lieeeCaH erno,fo ift c g SShuirz mAaunatugm C 0 QF $20 a n wo She

1074751


The Daily Herald Wednesday, 06.18.2014

D3

Putting on the Rosés super with Northwest cuisine Ritz for cocktails NORTHWEST WINES | Eric Degerman and Andy Perdue

By Bill Daley Chicago Tribune

Cesar Ritz was a Victorian era hotelier who did much more than open luxury hotels, many of which bore his name. His modern ideas about accommodations, including an insistence on the finest cuisine, so captured the world’s imagination that the word “ritzy” has become an enduring eponym for fashionable elegance. “He was the showman,” said Willa Zhen, a food anthropologist and instructor at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y. “He was the first to make hotels, and fine dining in the hotel an experience. He got the right set of people through the doors and got the rest of us imagining what it would be like to stay there.” Ritz’s philosophy was that the customer is always right. It was more than just a catchy line. So expertly did he anticipate, meet and exceed the expectations of his celebrity guests that England’s Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII, once told him, “You know better than I do what I like. Arrange a dinner to my taste.” That Ritz would enjoy such success that his name would come to symbolize luxury, glamour and wealth is all the more remarkable given he was the 13th child born to a peasant family in Niederwald, Switzerland. At 17, in 1867, he made his way to Paris and found work in a hotel, slowly and steadily moving up to better establishments and positions of greater

N

ow that we’re near the midpoint of 2014, we are starting to get a better handle on how the 2013 vintage will look. Based on the rosés we’ve tasted so far, we think the warm, often strange vintage will have much to offer. Rosés, which typically are made from red wine grapes (but occasionally have white wine blended in), are all the rage in the Pacific Northwest these days. And we’re not talking white Zinfandel, that California Kool-Aid that left the country awash in sickly sweet pink wines for more than a decade. Rather, the rosés we’re seeing are mostly dry and tend to pair beautifully with the bounty of cuisine the Pacific Northwest offers. We love drinking rosés all summer long with such dishes as salmon, halibut, scallops, crab, oysters, ham or egg salad sandwiches, quiche, grilled flatbreads, curries, salad Niçoise and more. Here are a few 2013 rosés we’ve tasted so far this spring. Look for them at your favorite wine merchant or contact the wineries directly. L’Ecole No. 41 2013 Alder

responsibility, serving an ever-grander roster of customers. Young Cesar paid attention. “These people he served were of far more use to him than he to them,” Madame Ritz recalled in her book. “And he learned to see everything without appearing to observe, to hear everything without appearing to listen, to be attentive, not servile, to anticipate needs without being presumptuous.” His name lives on through his eponymous hotels, the Ritz in Paris, opened in 1898 and is now owned by businessman Mohamed Al Fayed, and the Ritz in London, opened in 1906 and is now owned by the Barclay Brothers’ Ellerman Investments. The current Ritz-Carlton hotel chain, organized in 1988 and a subsidiary of Marriott International, lists Ritz as its founder.

Ritz cocktail ¾ ounce each: fresh orange juice, cognac ¼ ounce Cointreau 3 to 5 ounces chilled Champagne Shake all ingredients but the Champagne vigorously with ice. Strain into a chilled Champagne flute; slowly top with Champagne. Serves one.

Lagers

From Mittie Hellmich’s “Ultimate Bar Book.”

From Page D1

Ritz fizz

which recently released its first new year-round beer in eight years, an IPL named Dream Machine. At 50 international bitterness units, Dream Machine boasts as much hop character as many pale ales. Chris Rockwood, Magic Hat’s head brewer, said the brewery considered a handful of styles

Champagne, chilled 1 dash each: lemon juice, blue Curacao, amaretto Lemon twist Fill a flute with Champagne. Add remaining ingredients; stir. Garnish with a twist of lemon peel. Serves one. From “Mr. Boston Official Bartender’s Guide,” edited by Anthony Giglio with Jim Meehan.

Ridge Vineyard Grenache Rosé, Horse Heaven Hills, $19: The L’Ecole team reached into one of Washington’s top vineyards — a majestic site overlooking the Columbia River — for this gorgeous rosé. It is a bright, elegant wine with aromas of strawberry, watermelon, apricot and purple lavender, followed by crisp, dry flavors that hint at Rainier cherry, raspberry, apple and ripe strawberry. It’s a perfect summer wine. (14.5 percent alcohol) Spindrift Cellars 2013 Rosé, Willamette Valley, $16: This is a blend of Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris, with the result being a gorgeous pink wine with aromas of rose petal, cherry, watermelon and peach, followed by flavors of dried cranberry, apricot and white strawberry. (13.5 percent) Gård Vintners 2013 Lawrence Vineyards Grand Klasse Rosé, Columbia Valley, $22: This winery with tasting rooms in Woodinville and Ellensburg has crafted a delicious rosé using Grenache from estate grapes in Washington’s Frenchman Hills. It opens with beautiful aromas of cherry blossom, cotton candy, Rainier

cherry and baking spices, along with flavors of white strawberry, blood orange and a pinch of white pepper. (13.1 percent) Van Duzer Vineyards 2013 Pinot Noir Rosé, Willamette Valley, $18: Oregon Pinot Noir can make spectacular rosés, and this is another example. It brings aromas of cola, crushed herb, apricot and raspberry, followed by flavors that include peach and honeydew melon, which give way to hints of pink grapefruit in the finish. (13.1 percent) Julia’s Dazzle 2013 Pinot Grigio Rosé, Horse Heaven Hills, $16: This popular pink wine from Long Shadows in Walla Walla comes in a fun bowling pin-shaped bottle. It reveals aromas of kiwi, strawberry shortcake and peach taffy, followed by deliciously dry flavors of nectarine, honeydew melon and white strawberry. (13.7 percent) Ponzi Vineyards 2013 Pinot Noir Rosé, Willamette Valley, $20: Second-generation Oregon winemaker Luisa Ponzi’s rosé is as beautiful as it is delicate. This dry pink wine is perfect with smoked or grilled salmon. It reveals

aromas of pie cherry, rose petal and beeswax, followed by elegant flavors of rhubarb, pomegranate and strawberry lemonade. (13.2 percent) Sleeping Dog Wines 2013 Malbec Rosé, Yakima Valley, $18: Larry Oates runs this small winery overlooking the Yakima River near Benton City, and his rosé of Malbec opens with aromas of dusty cherry, strawberry and white pepper, followed by flavors of plum and Rainier cherry. (13.4 percent) Kaella Winery 2013 Ciel du Cheval Vineyard Rosé, Red Mountain, $18: This stunning rosé of Sangiovese comes from one of Washington’s top three vineyards. It kicks off with aromas of Jolly Rancher watermelon candy, strawberry, orange zest and rosewater. On the palate, it flashes flavors of cranberry, raspberry, white strawberry and Rainier cherry. Kaella is a small winery with a Woodinville tasting room. (12.6 percent) Eric Degerman and Andy Perdue run Great Northwest Wine, a news and information company. Listen to their podcast on iTunes or at www. greatnorthwestwine.com.

for its newest addition, but settled on an IPL both because he liked the beer and because the style is a smart investment. “I don’t think (the rise in IPLs) will be a quick flash,” Rockwood said. “The beer consumer is opening up to lagers, and what they bring to the table.” And what do they bring? Think of a cleaner, lighter pale ale or IPA, with bright hop lushness and bitterness, but with a lager’s clean finish. Rather than end malty, sweet or cloying

as some IPAs (or imperial IPAs) can, IPLs segue from their hop burst to a tidy crispness that makes them perfect for pairing with barbecue, ending the night as a refreshing palate cleanser or simply sipping on a summer day. With a lower alcohol content, they can also be consumed repeatedly without leaving the drinker in much of a fog. In that way, IPLs are similar to another current craft beer trend: session (or lower-inalcohol) IPAs.

It could be argued that just as craft beer was a reaction to mass-marketed beer, IPLs are a reaction to the last 20 years of craft beer, as bigger and boozier beers increasingly came into style. Suddenly there’s a place, for lighter, cleaner beers so long as they don’t sacrifice flavor. It’s little wonder that hops ended up as the key ingredient to a lager trend. “The industry certainly is not done exploring hops,” Rockwood said. “That hop-forward profile is still desired.”

.com

h n e t s g i I tak summer off!

Learn how to

SAVE $100s on your monthly grocery bill!

o por

Conducid

Maryanrn Colligerama de TLC

Look for it again each Wednesday beginning in September!

so pro

Del exito

e “Extreming” n Coupo

Washington state’s own Maryann Collier, from TLC’s hit show Extreme Couponing, will teach you how to save hundreds of dollars every month using her simple proven couponing technique. And just for attending, you will have a chance to win exciting HOLIDAY door prizes! RSVP today to attend one of our

Tuesday, July 22

FREE 1 HOUR events near you!

INN EXPRESS

8606 36th Ave. NE, Marysville, 98270

 4 p.m & 7 p.m

WIN

You could

A Kindle Fire 7” HD Tablet just for showing up!

Attendees at each seminar will be entered into a drawing to WIN a Kindle Fire 7” HD Tablet or a

50 Grocery Card!

$

Register now for this FREE 1 HOUR event! Go to www.heraldnet.com/smartshopper 1052202

www.heraldnet.com 1075718


D4 Wednesday, 06.18.2014 The Daily Herald

GRANDPARENTING

DAILY CROSSWORD

Step-grandchildren burn through money By Dee and Tom Hardie and Key Kidder Dear Grandparenting: I frankly never thought I would have any grandchildren. Mimi is my daughter and only child. She is a career girl who put in long hours for years and climbed into retail management. I told myself if she was happy then I was happy. Then she fell in love with a man she met at an industry conference. He had two daughters (ages 11 and 13) from his first marriage. Mimi up and got married nine months ago. So now I have two step-granddaughters. But things could be better, I guess. They argue about money mostly and how his two daughters spend it. I mean it’s like burn, baby, burn. Those two girls can burn through paychecks like there’s no tomorrow. Mimi didn’t sign up for that. Who would? I don’t want to see my Mimi sad. She is proud and independent and has not asked me for any financial help. I have two choices. Do I butt out or step up and write her a check?

— Joyce, Troy, Ohio Dear Joyce: You can blame the step-grandchildren for burning through the parental paychecks, but your daughter and her husband started the fire. Like many step-grandparents, your loyalty lies with Mimi, your flesh and blood. And although the husband actually seems to bear a greater burden of responsibility, your daughter certainly is complicit in this mess. The parents control the money, not the other way around. As a manager, why didn’t your daughter establish firm guidelines to manage the family budget? What we have here is a failure to communicate. It taxes us to imagine a more emotionally loaded topic among newlyweds than the behavior of stepchildren. If you’re a grandparent or have adult children, you stand a reasonably good chance of becoming a step-grandparent. Nearly 45 percent of all marriages involve one previously married partner, and two-thirds have children already. Those who enter into such

SUPER QUIZ

BIRTHDAYS

Score 1 point for each correct answer on the Freshman Level, 2 points on the Graduate Level and 3 points on the Ph.D. Level. Subject: THE OLD TESTAMENT (e.g., Who witnessed the burning bush? Answer: Moses.) FRESHMAN LEVEL 1. Who was the first shepherd mentioned in the Bible? 2. Which Bible story explains the variation in human language? 3. Who had a dream about a ladder that reached up to heaven? GRADUATE LEVEL 4. What was to be 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits high? 5. Which two cities were destroyed by fire and brimstone? 6. Which city’s walls fell after the blowing of trumpets? PH.D. LEVEL 7. God said of him, “Twelve princes will he beget, and I will make him a great nation”? 8. What crime was Joseph accused of by Potiphar’s wife? 9. Whose rod when cast down became a serpent? ANSWERS: 1. Abel. 2. The Tower of Babel. 3. Jacob. 4. Noah’s ark. 5. Sodom and Gomorrah. 6. Jericho. 7. Ishmael. 8. Attempted rape. 9. Aaron’s. SCORING: 18 points — congratulations, doctor; 15 to 17 points — honors graduate; 10 to 14 points — you’re plenty smart, but no grind; 4 to 9 points — you really should hit the books harder; 1 point to 3 points — enroll in remedial courses immediately; 0 points — who reads the questions to you? Super Quiz is a registered trademark of K. Fisher Enterprises Ltd. (c) 2014 Ken Fisher North America Syndicate Inc.

Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., is 77. Baseball Hall of Famer Lou Brock is 75. Rock singercomposer-musician Sir Paul McCartney is 72. Actress Constance McCashin is 67. Actress Linda Thorson is 67. Rock musician John Evans (The Box Tops) is 66. Sen. Mike Johanns, R-Neb., is 64. Actress Isabella Rossellini is 62. Actress Carol Kane is 62. Actor Brian Benben is 58. Actress Andrea Evans is 57. Rock singer Alison Moyet is 53. Rock musician Dizzy Reed (Guns N’ Roses) is 51. Figure skater Kurt Browning is 48. Country singer-musician Tim Hunt is 47. Rock singer-musician Sice (The Boo Radleys) is 45. Rhythm-and-blues singer Nathan Morris (Boyz II Men) is 43. Actress Mara Hobel is 43. Singer-songwriter Ray LaMontagne is 41. Rapper Silkk the Shocker is 39. Actress Alana de la Garza is 38. Country singer Blake Shelton is 38. Rock musician Steven Chen (Airborne Toxic Event) is 36. Actor David Giuntoli is 34. Actress Renee Olstead is 25. Actress Willa Holland is 23. Thought for Today: “The way of a superior man is three-fold; virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, he is free from perplexities; bold, he is free from fear.” — Confucius, Chinese philosopher (551-479 B.C.). Associated Press

CLASSIC PEANUTS

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

TUNDRA

THE BRILLIANT MIND OF EDISON LEE

SIX CHIX

BUCKLES

DILBERT

WUMO

DENNIS THE MENACE

marriages without establishing a budgetary construct regarding child expenditures are reckless. Grandparents who intervene with financial aid often miscalculate the costs. By enabling this financial dysfunction to continue unabated, grandparents set themselves up for long-term financial support of their adult children. We advise you to sit tight, at least until they come to grips with a situation entirely of their own making. Grand remark of the week “Busy Bee” from Eloy, Arizona, was talking with grandson Ricky about what he wished for. “I wish I had a big family, with three brothers and three sisters,” said Ricky. Busy Bee asked Ricky if he told his parents that. “Sure, but they just sit there and laugh and laugh.” Dee and Tom, married more than 50 years, have eight grandchildren. Together with Key, they welcome questions, suggestions and Grand Remarks of the Week. Send to P.O. Box 27454, Towson, MD, 21285.

CORNERED

THE BETTER HALF

...

ZIGGY


The Daily Herald

Free care-givers kit a must for families Dear Abby: Helping a parent or other adult relative handle their finances and health care can be a challenging gift to give. You want to honor their wishes and respect their boundaries, while at the same time acting in their best interest. But it can be hard to know where to begin and whom to trust, and you always wonder if you’re forgetting something. To help your readers carry out this important role, the Federal Citizen Information Center created the free Family Caregivers Kit. It features publications from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that explain how to manage a loved one’s money and protect seniors from scams. And it also contains publications from the FDA’s Office of Women’s Health to keep track of medications and learn to use them safely. The kit is full of practical tips that give caregivers the confidence they need to manage a loved one’s affairs. Thanks for sharing the free Family Caregivers Kit. From one daughter to another, you know how important it is to stand up and support family members through life’s challenges. — Sarah Crane, acting director, Federal Citizen Information Center Dear Ms. Crane: Thank you for offering this important information to my readers. It is important because accepting this kind of responsibility should not be done without fully understanding what it will entail. The publications you sent to me provide an illuminating overview of the responsibilities involved. Readers, this year’s packet is not to be missed, particularly if you have RIP HAYWIRE

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

17 20 21 22 23 25 27

aging relatives or a friend who may need you to handle his/her affairs, even for a short period of time. These booklets are offered free of charge and include the “Managing Someone Else’s Money” series of publications, which cover Power of Attorney and Managing Trusts, Property and Benefits. They are written in plain English and are in an easy-tounderstand format. Also included is a pamphlet on using medications wisely. Did you know that 125,000 people die each year because they didn’t take their medication as directed — and many more get sick because they didn’t properly follow the directions on the label? Another pamphlet shares information on recognizing and avoiding health scams, so you and your loved ones can watch out for miracle devices and cures that really ARE too good to be true. You will also receive a copy of the 2014 Consumer Action Handbook, which contains information you need to make the best decisions about what you buy and the service providers you use, and a sample complaint letter to help you get results. To order this free kit, go to promotions.usa.gov/ dearabby. You can also order the kit by calling 888878-3256 weekdays 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. — Love, Abby Universal Uclick

47 Part of many French

ACROSS 1 Does damage to 6 Little handfuls, so to 10 14 15 16

DEAR ABBY

Wednesday, 06.18.2014 D5

34 35 36 37 39 42 43

45

speak Put the whammy on Alternative to U.S.P.S. Securely hide Fig leaf wearer, in some art Words of resignation Son of 16-Across Advisers to players’ associations Actor Cariou “Dragnet” broadcast, for short Dick Tracy’s girl Barista-operated gadgets Old televangelism org. Food item in quarterpound sticks “This is looking bad!” “This is looking bad!” Gives kudos Like decalcified water Instrument on the Beatles’ “Norwegian Wood” Sushi bar quaff

surnames Governor elected in a 2003 recall vote Chicken-sized flightless bird “Yay!” Proof-ending letters Bird in the crow family Like poor losers Punny description of the circled letters in 17-, 27- and 48-Across “Pumping ___” (1977 docudrama featuring 48-Across) “Whip It” band What a metronome regulates Historic resignee of 2013 Drinks at sidewalk stands “Come on down!” announcer Johnny

48 52 53 54 57 60 64

67

68 69 70 71 72

1

A M O N G

A W E S

F E L L A

S P P I A X

S H I R T H O K M A I N N I T S A T H K E E E P I N T G A R I G A N O M E N

3

4

5

6

14

7

8

18

20

21 23 27

10

25 30

39

31

40

56

50

A S S R C O H O T A T T T H E B A L E R F O R U C T I N N O S U S K N C O L O R I E T T

BRIDGE Cy the Cynic, a fervent bachelor, says that the best argument against marriage is ... husband vs. wife. Cy’s advice about getting married is simple: Don’t. The best advice about trying to guess a missing queen is just as simple: Unless you must, don’t. But at today’s four spades, South took the ace of hearts and went after the trumps by cashing the K-A. The queen didn’t fall, and since South couldn’t salvage any of his side-suit losers, he

L I V E W I R E

E F T L I A I B E S C E I N D D T O U E F R R C A S A T T O A S N S H I N E E D A D A S I C G T O R E U T E

57

58

59

60

61

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

PUZZLE BY VICTOR BAROCAS, 06.18.14

4 5 6 7

Y D S

T A T A E P E E S

8 9 10 11 12 13 18 19 24 26 27 28 29

Bit of bad luck ___-mo “___ to differ” Drug smuggler’s courier “Chop-chop!” Bettor’s strategy Pres. Madison or Monroe Golden god, say File directory heading Comics foes of Magneto Old phone company nickname Piece of Bacon or Lamb Tour player Biathlete’s needs Set of principles Upside-down sleeper SpongeBob’s home

went down, off a trump, a club and two diamonds. How would you handle the play? South need not stake his contract on a guess for the queen of trumps. He should ruff a heart at Trick Two, take the top clubs and ruff a heart. He goes back to the ace of diamonds and ruffs the last heart. South then exits in a minor suit. The defenders cash their minor-suit tricks, but after 10 tricks, declarer is left with the K-8-6 of trumps in dummy opposite his A-J-10. With a defender to lead, South is sure of the last three tricks.

30 W. C. Fields persona 31 Horatian work 32 Send, as to a

54 Commercial swab 55 Two-tone coin

specialist 33 Old Air France fleet, for short 34 Face, slangily 38 Sharp-eyed sort 40 Brown who wrote “The Da Vinci Code” 41 Lampoon but good 44 “Spider-Man” director Sam 46 ___-surf (Google oneself) 49 Country with a gorilla on its 5,000-franc note 50 Did part of a slalom path 51 Staple Singers genre

DAILY QUESTION You hold: ♠ Q 7 3 ♥ K Q J 7 5 ♦ 10 9 4 ♣ 8 6. Your partner opens one diamond, you respond one heart and he bids one spade. What do you say? ANSWER: You must act again since game is possible — partner may have as many as 18 points — but you have no comfortable bid. A rebid of two hearts is possible but would suggest a six-card suit. A raise to two spades would suggest four-card support. My inclination, doubtless not shared by every expert, would be to bid two diamonds. Tribune Content Agency, LLC

56 Barely enough to wet

one’s whistle 58 ___ the way 59 N.Y.S.E. debuts 61 Resistance units 62 Towed-away auto,

maybe 63 School for Prince

Harry 65 180° from SSW 66 Ear-related prefix

North dealer Both sides vulnerable NORTH ♠K86 ♥ A 10 8 4 ♦ A75 ♣A94

WEST ♠Q73 ♥ KQJ75 ♦ 10 9 4 ♣86

North 1 NT

EAST ♠5 ♥ 962 ♦ KQJ3 ♣ Q J 10 5 2

SOUTH ♠ A J 10 9 4 2 ♥3 ♦ 862 ♣K73

East Pass

South 4♠

Opening lead — ♥ K

PICKLES

POOCH CAFE MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM

STONE SOUP

MARVIN

JUMBLE

63

53

DOWN 1 Takes an ax to 2 Friend en français 3 Long broadside

L A T E S T

62

47 51

65

64

33

42 46

52 55

41

45 49

48

32

26

36

44

43

13

22

29

38

12

19

35

37

11

16

24

28

34

54

9

15

17

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE B A H I A

2

SUDOKU

ZITS

RED & ROVER ANSWERS TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

West All Pass


Television D6

|

THE DAILY HERALD

|

WWW.HERALDNET.COM

|

WEDNESDAY, 06.18.2014

CNN’s eternal quest: A slow-news-day substitute “The Sixties,” a 10-part documentary series, is the network’s latest bid to attract viewers when airliners aren’t going missing. By Frazier Moore Associated Press

When CNN first signed on, it was greeted by a chorus of skeptics. Not just doubt about Ted Turner’s vow that his all-news network would be there long enough to cover the end of the world. A bigger question resonated: Was there really enough news to fill 24 hours of airtime, day after day? As CNN marks its 34th birthday this month, a harsh truth endures: No, there really isn’t, at least not enough to get viewers to stick around awhile. The flow of news doesn’t conform to the needs of TV programmers, and there are irksome stretches when nothing much is going on that can satisfy TV’s visual demands and keep viewers glued to the screen. CNN was able to finesse this in its early years since it had no cable-news competitors. Then

ASSOCIATED PRESS

CNN Worldwide president Jeff Zucker: “CNN is not and never will abandon our first and fundamental brand equity, which is news and breaking news.”

new arrivals MSNBC and Fox News Channel faced the same dilemma. But each packed its schedule with hosts who could

PRIME TIME

fashion news into opinion, opinion that would guarantee its like-minded audience a reassuring hour-after-hour TV refuge. Meanwhile, CNN clung to Turner’s mission statement that the news, not any news presenter, was the star. It really had no choice. Sandwiched between right-wing Fox News and left-wing MSNBC, CNN was forced to occupy impartial middle ground, even as it often sank to third place in the ratings. What corrective action could it take? Well, it could loosen its definition of news. And it tried. In 1998, the network rolled out an ambitious slate of prime-time documentary and magazine shows collectively titled “CNN NewsStand” — which promptly bombed. The current version of this strategy: goose the schedule with so-called “original series” from such promotable names as Anthony Bourdain, Morgan Spurlock, Lisa Ling and the Bible, and hope to make some noise and audience inroads. In the midst of that sizzle offensive, however, CNN got a lucky break: a gift of news-asbreakout-star in the form of the tragic March 8 disappearance of

Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. CNN crafted an obsessive narrative of missing-airplane coverage — breathless “Still Missing” news alerts, rounds of analysis and rank speculation, and any other flight-related filler it could think of. This made CNN a laughingstock in some quarters (fueling a “Saturday Night Live” spoof that billed CNN as the network to watch “When you want to know that they don’t know”). Never mind. Lots of viewers binged. At the same time, CNN continued its crusade to gin up must-see program “events.” The latest: a relentlessly hyped 10-part documentary series “The Sixties.” The first episode, focusing on ‘60s-era television, drew 1.39 million viewers for its first airing May 29, more than doubling the 493,000 viewers CNN had averaged in that weeknight slot (though falling far short of a typical Fox News Channel prime-time hour). The second installment, on the Cuban missile crisis, premiered to 866,000 viewers. This week’s chapter revisits the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. With its catch-all, (N) (s) (cc)

Channel numbers are for Comcast. For other cable systems, see Sunday’s TV Week or go to www.heraldnet.com/tvchannels.

= = =

been-there-seen-that topic, the series is a patchwork, with some episodes substantive and others featherweight. But more to the point: The ‘60s isn’t news. Hasn’t been for decades. Thus is CNN diluting its signature role as a news provider with the sort of docu-fare found on scores of other networks. Fox News chairman Roger Ailes, never one to miss the chance to bait an adversary, told The Hollywood Reporter in January that, with this game plan, CNN had decided “to throw in the towel and announce they’re out of the news business.” CNN Worldwide president Jeff Zucker, beginning his second year in the job, disagreed. “CNN is not and never will abandon our first and fundamental brand equity, which is news and breaking news,” he declared. But the questions remain. Can CNN stay true to its putative core mission, yet still find a loyal audience? How will “original series” stunts kick-start a viewer’s appetite for watching CNN the rest of the time? The network is struggling to find a drawing card that just may not exist for the CNN that people still recognize today. After 34 years, that’s not really news.

New Stereo Closed Captioned

12:00

Wednesday, June 18

Broadcast COM

5:00 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. 8:30 p.m. 9:00 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 10:00 p.m. 10:30 p.m. 11:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m.

5:00 p.m. News 5:30 p.m. News 6:00 p.m. Coronat’n 6:30 p.m. 7:00Nature p.m.of 7:30 9:30 p.m. 10:00 p.m. 10:30 p.m. 11:00 p.m. 11:30 p.m. St. The Thingsp.m. (N) 8:00 NHL-Ap.m. Season8:30 p.m. 9:00 NHL-Ap.m. Season The National (N) (s) (cc) CBC News George S CBUT (99) News CBC News CBC News Coronat’n St. 2014 FIFA World Cup (s) (cc) Republic of Doyle (s) To Be Announced CBC News World Cup CBUT (99) CBC News KOMO 4 ABC World KOMO 4 News 6:00pm Dan Wheel of Jeopardy! (N) Countdown to the Oscars Grey’s Anatomy Alex reacts Scandal Sally makes a KOMO 4 Jimmy KimKOMO5:00pm 4 NewsNews ABC World Lewis, KOMOMary 4 News 6:00pm Wheel of (N) For- Jeopardy! Familyabout The Goldbergs Angieannouncement. takes an aggres- KOMO KOMO (4) News Nam. (N) Dan Fortune (s) (cc) (N) The (N) Middle (s) (cc)(s) The Goldbergs Modern to the news his dad. Motive shocking News4 News Jimmy mel Kimmel Live (N) KOMO (4) 5:00pm News Lewis, Mary Nam. (N) tune (cc) (s) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (9:31) sive approach. (N) (s) Live (s) KING 5 News (N) (cc) NBC Nightly KING 5 News KING 5 News Evening (N) Community Parks and Hollywood Game Night Parenthood Julia’s siblings KING 5 News Tonight NBC Nightly KING 5 News (N) KING 5 News Evening (N) To KING KING (5) KING 5 News (N) (cc) News (N) (s) (N) (cc) (N)Be (s)Announced (cc) Recreation (9:01) (N) (s) (cc) offer support. (N) (s) (N) 5 News Tonight ShowShow KING (5) News (N) (s) (N) (N) (cc) (N) KIRO News KIRO News KIRO News CBS Evening EntertainThe Insider The Big The Millers Two and a The Crazy Elementary (10:01) “The KIRO News Late Show CBS Evening ment Entertainment Insider Five-0 “Pale ’la” DanMinds pair of(9:31) mur- CSI: Scene InvestigaShow KIRO (7) KIRO News KIRO News KIRO News News/Pelley Tonight The (N) (s) (cc) (N) Hawaii Bang Theory (8:31) (N) (s) Criminal Half Men (s) AOnes OneCrime Percent Solution” (N) KIRO News Late W/Letterman KIRO (7) News/Pelley Tonight (s) (cc) ny’s mother visits. (s) der suspects. (s) tion (s) (cc) W/Letterman Early News Global Nat. News Hour (5:59) (N) (cc) Ent ET Canada About a Boy The Millers Rake “Jury Tamperer” (N) Elementary (10:01) (N) (s) News Hour Final (N) (cc) CHAN Early News Global Nat. News Hour (5:59) (N) (cc) Ent ET Canada X-Men: The Last Stand (PG-13, ’06) ›› Hugh Jackman. Real Inglorious Bastards News Hour Final (N) (cc) CHAN Nightly Busi- World News PBS NewsHour (N) (s) (cc) Pie Tales From Foyle’s War Engineers find Midsomer Murders “Bad Celtic Woman: Songs From the Heart Music. Nightly BusiWorld News PBS NewsHour (N) (s) (cc) Red Dwarf Red Dwarf (7:40) “Fathers and Red Dwarf Red Dwarf Red Dwarf (9:40) Lister gets a Red Dwarf Ed Sullivan’s Rock and Roll KCTS (9) ness America the Palaces cash at a shipyard. Tidings” (N) (s) (cc) KCTS (9) nessReport Report America “Trojan” (N) Suns” (N) (s) (cc) (8:20) (N) (s) “Entangled” letter from an ex. (s) (10:20) (N) Classics The Middle The Middle The King of The King of Family Feud Family Feud The Vampire Diaries “No Reign “Royal Blood” Francis Seinfeld (s) Seinfeld (s) The Office (s) Rules of EnMiddle (s) (s) The Middle (s) Queens The King(cc) of Queens The King(cc) of (s) Family A man transports guns to The Armageddon survivors’ Seinfeld Office (s) Rules of En- (s) KSTW (11) (s)The (cc) (cc) (cc) Feud Family (s) (cc)Feud Arrow Exit” (N) (s) (cc) and100 Lola grow closer. (cc) (s) Seinfeld (cc) (s) The(cc) gagement KSTW (11) (cc) (cc) Queens (cc) Queens (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) the Glades. (cc) resources dwindle. (cc) (cc) (cc) gagement (s) Emergency! “Communica- The Rifleman The Rifleman M*A*S*H (cc) M*A*S*H (cc) Gilligan’s Is- Gilligan’s Is- Hogan’s He- F Troop Rhoda Rhoda The Twilight Perry Mason Emergency! Gage, DeSoto The Rifleman The Rifleman M*A*S*H (cc) M*A*S*H (cc) Gilligan’s Happy F Troop F Troop The Twilight KVOS (12) tions” land land Days Hogan’s roes He- Welcome Zone (cc) Perry (cc)Mason KVOS (12) rescue an elderly hermit. Island (cc) roes Back, Kotter Zone (cc) (cc) Q13 FOX News at 5 (N) (cc) Modern Fam- Modern Fam- The Big The Big American Idol Elimination; Rake “Jury Tamperer” A Q13 FOX News at 10 (N) The Arsenio Hall Show (N) Modern Modern The Big Bang The Big Bang So You Think YouJake Can Dance 4” Hopefuls per- Q13 KCPQ (13) Q13 FOX News at 5 (N) (cc) ily (cc) Familyily (cc) Family Bang Theory Bang Theory Candice Glover; Bugg. “Auditions woman No. sleeps with a juror. (cc)FOX News at 10 (N) (cc) The(s)Arsenio (cc) Hall Show (s) (cc) KCPQ (13) (cc) (cc) Theory Theory form for the judges. (N) (s) (cc) Who Wants/ Who Wants/ Extra (N) (s) America Now Inside Edi- Access Hol- Dr. Phil A wife struggles to KING 5 News at 9 (N) (cc) KING 5 News at 10 (N) (cc) Katie (N) (s) (cc) 2014 Stanley Cup Final New York Game From Staples husband acKING 5 News at 9 (N) (cc) KING 5 News at 10 (N) (cc) Katie Naomi Judd; beauty prodKONG (6) Millionaire (cc)Rangers at Los (N)Angeles (s) Kings.tion (N)7.(cc) lywoodCenter (N) Dr. getPhil pastCindy’s betrayal. (N) (cc) KONG (6) in Los Angeles.Millionaire (If necessary). (N) (S Live) (cc) cuses her of cheating. (s) ucts; apps. (s) (cc) Behind Joel Osteen Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord (cc) Holy Land Turning Best Praise Creflo Doll Book of Ruth The Prodigal KTBW (20) Behind Turning Prince By Faith Praise the Lord (N) (Live) (cc) Always Good J. Duplantis Marriage Creflo Doll Seattle Praise the Lord KTBW (20) American American Family Guy Family Guy The SimpThe SimpTwo and a Two and a Q13 FOX News at 9 Rose, Friends (s) Friends (s) How I Met How I Met American American Family Family The Simpsons a Half FOX at 9 (N) Rose, I Met I Met KZJO (10) Dad (s) (cc)Dad Dad (s) (cc)Dad (s) (cc) Guy (s) (cc) Guy sons (s) (cc) The sonsSimpsons (s) (cc) Two Halfand Mena Half (s) Two Halfand Men (s) Q13 Kelly andNews Levine. (cc) Friends (cc) (s) (cc) Friends (cc) (s) (cc) How Your MotherHow Your Mother KZJO (10) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) Men (s) Men (s) Kelly and Levine. (N) (cc) Your Mother Your Mother (s) Wild Kratts Northwest Changing NOVA (s) (cc) Superheroes Superheroes Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle (s) (cc) KBTC (12) Arthur Wild Kratts Start Up (s) Well Read Antiques Roadshow (cc) Antiques Roadshow (cc) Lark Rise to Candleford (s) Last Tango in Halifax (cc) Last Tango in Halifax (cc) KBTC (12) Wild Kratts Law & Order: Criminal In- Law & Order: Criminal In- Law & Order: Criminal In- Law & Order: Criminal In- Law & Order: Criminal In- Criminal Minds The team Criminal Minds A kidnapped Law“All & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Law & Order: Criminal Intent Cold Case “The Promise” A Cold Case A letter sheds light Law & Order: Criminal Intent & Order: Criminal Intent KWPX (3) tent In” (s) (cc) tent “Major Case” (s) (cc) tent “Alpha Dog” (s) (cc) tent An overseas conflict. tent An illegal arms deal. tracks an arsonist. (s) (cc) Law Russian immigrant. KWPX (3) “In Treatment” (cc)

Cable TV

“Faithfully” (s) (cc)

“Astoria Helen” (cc)

Cable TVMission: Impossible III (PG-13, ’06) ››› Tom Cruise, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ving

coed dies in a frat house.

on a random act. (cc)

“Folie a Deux” (cc)

“Family Values” (cc)

Face/Off (R, ’97) ››› John Travolta, Nicolas Cage, Joan Allen. An FBI agent and a vio- Road House (11:01) (R, ’89) Ghostbusters IIEthan (3:30) Hunt (PG, faces Timothy Olyphant. (R, ’07) ›› Mark Wahlberg, Croft TombSwayze. Raider: (cc) The Hitman (R, ’07) ›› AMC (67) Rhames. the toughest villain of his career. An (cc)assassin becomes Shooter lent terrorist switch identities. (cc) Michael Peña, Danny Glover. A wounded sniper plots re- Lara ›› Patrick AMC (67) ’89) ›› Agent embroiled in a political conspiracy. (cc) venge against those who betrayed him. (cc) Cradle of Life (11:01) ›› Bill Murray. (cc) The First 48 A teen is mur- The First 48 “When a Duck DyDuck DyDuck DyDuck DyDuck DyDuck DyWahlburgers Wahlburgers Bad Ink Bad Ink The First Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Big Smo Duck Dynasty Dynasty Big Big(11:01) Smo (cc) Duck Dynasty A&E (52) dered and 48 leftAinmotorcycle his car. club Stranger Calls; Sweet 16” nasty (cc)(s) Duck nastyDynasty (cc) nastyDynasty (cc) Duck nastyDynasty (cc) Duck nastyDynasty (cc) Duck nasty (cc) Duck (s) (cc) (s)Smo (cc) (11:31) (cc) A&E (52) president is shot. (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (N) (s) (10:32) (N) (11:04) (cc) (11:34) The Millionaire Matchmak- The Millionaire Matchmak- The Millionaire Matchmak- The Millionaire Matchmak- The Millionaire Matchmak- The Millionaire Matchmak- What Hap- Matchmaker Million Dollar Listing The Real Housewives of Or- Million Untying Happens Million Dollar BRAVO (66) erMillion (s) Dollar Listing New erMillion (s) Dollar Listing New er “Workaholics” (s) New er (s) er (N)Dollar (s) Listing New er (s) the Untying the What pens BRAVO (66) York “I Dream of Jeanne” York York ange County (cc) York “Reunion” (N) Knot (N) Knot Listing Cooper 360 (N) And the Oscar Goes To... And the Oscar Goes To... Anderson Cooper 360 (cc) Forensic File Forensic File CNN (44) Anderson Anthony Bourdain Parts CNN Tonight (N) (Live) Anderson Cooper 360 (cc) Anthony Bourdain Parts CNN Tonight Forensic File Forensic File CNN (44) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Sunny Sunny South Park Tosh.0 (6:29) Colbert Rep Daily Show Tosh.0 (cc) Tosh.0 (cc) Tosh.0 (cc) Tosh.0 (cc) Sunny Sunny Daily Show Colbert Rep COM Futurama (s) Futurama (s) South Park Tosh.0 (6:22) Colbert Rep Daily Show Key & Peele Key & Peele South Park South Park South Park South Park Daily Show Colbert Rep COM Mafia (s) (cc) The Fighters (s) (cc) Epic Houseboats (s) (cc) Epic Homes (s) (cc) Epic Homes (s) (cc) Epic Homes (s) (cc) Epic Homes (s) (cc) DISC (8) Amish Dual Survival (s) (cc) Dual Survival (s) (cc) Dual Survival: Untamed (s) Dual Survival (N) (s) (cc) Naked and Afraid (N) (cc) Dual Survival (s) (cc) DISC (8) Alaskan Bush People (cc) Jessie (s) I Didn’t Do It Jessie (s) Austin & Ally A.N.T. Farm Austin & Ally Camp Rock 2: The Final Jam (NR, ’10) › Demi Lovato, Jessie (s) A.N.T. Farm Dog With a Austin & Ally Dog With a Dog With a (cc) Liv & Maddie (s) Liv(cc) & Maddie (s) Good Jessie a Joe Jessie Jessie I Didn’t Do It Austin & Ally Jessie Luck Austin Ally Farm DSY (41) (cc) (cc) (cc)Luck (s) (cc)(s) (cc) Dog KevinWith Jonas, Jonas. (s) (cc) (cc) (s) (cc) Good (s) (cc) Blog&(s) (cc)A.N.T. (s) (cc) DSY (41) Blog (s) (cc) (s) Blog (s) (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) Charlie (cc) Blog (s) (cc) gets a job. (s) (cc) (s) (cc) Charlie (cc) (s) (cc) (s) (cc) Striking Distance (4:35) (R, ’93) ›› I Spy (6:20) (PG-13, ’02) ›› Eddie Mur- Once Upon a Time in Mexico (R, ’03) ›› Original Sin (9:45) (’01) › Antonio Banderas. A Cuban Half Past High Willis, FidelitySarah (4:25) Jessica (R, ’00) ››› John TalesOwen FromWilson. the Darkside: Devon (s) Sawa, (9:45)seeks (R, ’92) ››››onClint Gene Hackman. Clint Destination (R, Salma ’00) ››Hayek. ENC (518) Bruce Parker. (s)Cusack, (cc) phy, (s) (cc)The Movie (6:25) (R, Final Antonio Banderas, (cc)Ali Unforgiven businessman revenge hisEastwood, deceitful bride. DeadEast(11:45) ENC (518) Iben Hjejle, Todd Louiso. (s) (cc) ’90) ›› Deborah Harry. (s) (cc) Larter, Kerr Smith. (s) (cc) wood’s Oscar-winning portrait of an aged gunman. (s) (cc) College Basketball (4) College Basketball Iowa at Indiana. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) College Baseball NCAA(N) World Series, Game 9: Teams TBA. From Omaha, Neb. (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (cc) ESPN (31) Arkansas at Kentucky. ESPN (31) Basketball College Basketball Oregon at UCLA. (N) (Live) Olbermann (N) (Live) (cc) Olbermann (cc) Basketball NASCAR Olbermann (N) (cc) ESPN2 (32) College Baseball Tonight (N) (cc) Olbermann (N) (Live) (cc) World Cup Tonight (N) (Live) ESPN FC (N) (Live) ESPN2 (32) MLB Baseball: Angels at Indians The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Sydney White (PG-13, ’07) ›› Amanda Bynes, Sara Pax- John Tucker Must Die (PG-13, ’06) › Jesse Metcalfe. The 700 Club (s) (cc) Melissa & Melissa Melissa & Melissa Melissa & Melissa & a home Melissa Daddy Cyberbully (9:02) learn (’11) Emily Kelly Rowan. A teenager FAM (39) “The (s) (cc) & “The Name” (s) (cc) & ton. A college coed finds with &seven Baby outcasts. Three students they Osment, are all dating the same guy. The 700 Club (s) (cc) FAM (39) JoeySmile” (s) (cc) Joey (s) (cc) Joey (s) (cc) Joey (s) (cc) Joey (s) (cc) Joey (s) (cc) Joey (N) (s) (8:31) (N) (s) becomes the victim of online bullying. (R, ’87) ››› Richard Dreyfuss. (s) (cc) Another Stakeout (PG-13, ’93) ››› Richard Dreyfuss. (s) 8 Million Ways to Die (R, ’86) ›› Jeff Bridges. (cc) Jesus’ Son (R, ’99) ››› (s) FLIX (586) Stakeout Boat Trip (’03) › Cuba Gooding Jr. (cc) Never 2 Big (9:35) (R, ’98) ›› Ernie Hudson. (s) (cc) Meet-Appl FLIX (586) Ernest Scared Stupid (’91) ›› Jim Varney. Ernest Goes to Jail (6:35) (PG, ’90) ›› (s) O’Reilly Factor (N) The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor (cc) The Kelly File Hannity Greta Van Susteren FNC (48) The The Kelly File (N) Hannity (N) The O’Reilly Factor (cc) The Kelly File Hannity Greta Van Susteren FNC (48) The O’Reilly Factor (N) Wo. Trisha’s Sou. Cupcake Wars Chopped Chopped Chopped Canada (N) Cutthroat Kitchen Diners, Drive Diners, Drive FOOD (35) Pioneer Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant Stakeout Restaurant Stakeout (N) Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible FOOD (35) Pioneer Wo. Southern Captain America: The First Avenger (5:01) (PG-13, ’11) ››› Chris Step Brothers (R, ’08) ›› Will Ferrell. Two spoiled men Anger Man- Taken (10:01) (PG-13, ’08) ››› Liam Neeson, Maggie Two and a HalfAtwell. Thor (PG-13, ’11) ››› Chris Hemsworth, Natalieorganization. Portman, Anthony Hopkins. Jack and (PG, ’11) › Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes. A man(N) Jack and Slavers Jill (10:02) (PG, the ’11) daughter › Adam Sandler. A manspy. dreads FX (53) Hayley Capt. America battles the evil HYDRA become rivals when theirJillparents marry. agement Grace. kidnap of a former FX (53)Evans, Men (s) Cast out of Asgard, the Norse god lands on Earth. dreads a visit from his passive-aggressive twin. a visit from his passive-aggressive twin. True Grit (PG-13, ’10) ››› Jeff Bridges. A crusty lawFXM PreTrue Grit (PG-13, ’10) ››› Jeff Bridges. A crusty lawFXM PrePlanet of the Apes (’01) ›› Mark Wahlberg. An astronaut What Happens in avenge Vegas (’08) Cameron Diaz.(cc) Two strangers sents What Happens Vegas (’08) › Cameron strangers (R, ’08)sents › Hugh Jackman, Ewan McGregor. An ac-against Deception ’08) ›(cc) Hugh FXM (506) man helps a teen her ›father’s death. (7:12) in man helps a teen avengeDiaz. her Two father’s death. Deception (cc) (9:42) leads a human uprising ruling (R, simians. FXM (506) awake together and find they are married. awake together and find they are married. countant joins an underground sex club. (cc) Jackman. (cc) House on the Prairie The Waltons (cc) The Waltons (cc) The Waltons (cc) The Waltons “The Hawk” Frasier (cc) Frasier (cc) Frasier (cc) Frasier (cc) HALL (19) Little The Waltons “The Pursuit” The Waltons (cc) The Waltons “The Move” The Middle The Middle The Middle The Middle Golden Girls Golden Girls HALL (19) The Waltons (cc) The Orgasm Special: A Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (5:15) (PG, ’02) ››› Daniel Radcliffe, Ru- Girls “Inciden- Looking (s) Now You See Me (PG-13, ’13) ›› Jesse Eisenberg. In Good Company (4:30) (PG-13, ’04) ››› Admission (PG-13, ’13) ›› Tina Fey. A college admissions ofMaking: The The Conjuring (R, ’13) ››› Vera Farmiga. Paranormal investiReal Time With Bill(s)Maher HBO (551) pert Grint. A malevolent force threatens the students at Hogwarts. (s) (cc) tals” (s) (cc) Agents track a team of illusionists who are thieves. (s) (cc) Real Sex Xtra (cc) HBO (551) Dennis Quaid, Topher Grace. (s) (cc) ficer thinks an applicant is her son. (s) (cc) Leftovers (N) gators confront a powerful demonic entity. (s) (cc) (s) (cc) Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Rehab Hunters Hunters Int’l Crwd House Hunters Int’l HGTV (68) Property Brothers (cc) Property Brothers (cc) Property Brothers (cc) Property Brothers (cc) Property Brothers “April” Hunters Hunters Int’l Brother vs. Brother (cc) HGTV (68) Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Pawn Stars Vikings “Brother’s War” Vikings (11:02) (cc) HIST (37) Pawn American Pickers (s) (cc) American Pickers (s) (cc) American Pickers (s) (cc) American Pickers (s) (cc) American Pickers (11:02) HIST (37) Underwater Universe Deadly ocean zones. (s) (cc) Wife Swap A self-described Wife Swap Ex-beauty Project Runway: Under the Project Runway: Under the Project Runway: Under the The Good Mistress (10:01) (NR, ’14) Annie Heise. A Parking Wars(s) Parking The Fantasia Barrino Story: LifeGunn Is Not“Hit a Fairy Tale (NR, Tyler Perry.Chic” A matri- A woman Day Latehas anda aone-night Dollar Short (’14)with ››her Whoopi Goldberg, Ving Family Reunion (PG-13,Gunn ’06) ›› LIFE (51) “supermom.” (cc) Wars queen, blue-collar mother. the Stage” (cc)’06) Madea’s Gunn (cc) “Steampunk stand friend’s husband. LIFE (51) (cc) (cc) arch must keep the peace through family strife. ›› Fantasia Barrino, Loretta Devine. (cc) Rhames, Mekhi Phifer. (cc) The Bourne MAX on Set Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13, ’11) ›› Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (8:15) (R, ’12) › Ben- Natural Born Killers (R, ’94) ››› Woody Harrelson. Savages (3:05) True Crime ’99) ››› Clint Eastwood. reporter triesRapace. to Runner (7:45) (R, ’13) ›Dominic Ben Affleck, Payback A betrayed thieflovers launchBanshee Consequences follow MAX (561) Legacy (cc) (R,Robert Downey Jr., Jude ALaw, Noomi (s) (cc)Runner jamin Walker, Cooper. (s) (cc)(9:15) (R, ’99) ›› Mel Gibson. Bloodthirsty young become instant celebrities. (s) MAX (561) (’12) ››(3:30) (5:45) save an innocent man from execution. (s) (cc) Justin Timberlake. (s) (cc) es a single-minded quest for revenge. (s) (cc) the bloody shootout. All In With Chris Hayes The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word All In With Chris Hayes The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball Chris Matthews MSNBC All In With Chris Hayes The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word All In With Chris Hayes The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Hardball Chris Matthews MSNBC Fact. Fantasy Fact. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Ridiculous. Fantasy Fact. Cameras Ridiculous. MTV (63) Fantasy Catfish: The TV Show (s) Catfish: The TV Show (s) Catfish: The TV Show (s) Catfish: The TV Show (s) Catfish: The TV Show (N) Catfish Catfish MTV (63) Catfish: The TV Show (s) Basketball (N) (Live) NHL-A Season NHL-A Season NHL-A Season NHL-A Season NHL Top 10 NHL Top 10 NBCS (34) College Kurt Busch: 36 (s) NHL Motorcycle Racing NASCAR’s Motocross Highlight Series NBCS (34) Motorcycle Racing SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob Paul Blart: Mall Cop (’09) ›› Kevin James. SpongeBob Full House Full House Full House Full House Friends (cc) Friends (cc) NICK (40) SpongeBob Sam & Cat Thunder Hathaways Full House Full House Full House Full House Full House Full House Friends (cc) Friends (cc) NICK (40) SpongeBob SpongeBob Webheads Maid in Manhattan (PG-13, ’02) ›› Jennifer Lopez. The Back-up Plan (PG-13, ’10) › Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin. Maid in Manhattan (’02) ›› Jennifer Lopez. OXY (50) Housewives/Atl. Bad Girls Club: Chicago Bad Girls Club: Chicago Burlesque (9:45) (PG-13, ’10) ›› Cher, Christina Aguilera, Eric Dane. OXY (50) Burlesque (5:10) (PG-13, ’10) ›› Cher, Christina Aguilera, Eric Dane. Planet X Mark Few College Basketball Portland at St. Mary’s. (N) (Live) College Basketball Santa Clara at Loyola Marymount. (N) College Basketball Portland at St. Mary’s. MLB Baseball (3:30) San Diego Padres at Se- Mariners Pre- MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at(Live) San Diego Padres. From PETCO Park in San Diego. (N) (Live) Mariners Post- MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at San Diego ROOT (30) Square ROOT (30) attle Mariners. Show game (N) game (N) Padres. Barbershop The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 (PG-13, ’12) Beauty Shop (PG-13, ’05) ›› Queen Lati- Alex Cross (9:15) (PG-13, ’12) › Tyler Perry, Matthew Fox. Gigolos (N) Byzantium (R, Cowboy Election (5:35) (R, ’99) ››› Matthew Broderick. A teacher tries David Beckham Into the Unknown Beckham Penny Dreadful “What Death Californication SHOW (576) 2:The Back ›› Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. (s) (cc) fah, Alicia Silverstone. (s) (cc) A serial killer pushes Cross to the edge. (s) Nurse (cc) Jackie The(s)Dirties (cc) (NR, ’13) ’12)Matthew ››› (s) SHOW (576) Way (3:45) ›› to take a student overachiever down a peg. travels through the Amazon jungle. Can Join Together” (s) (cc) (s) (cc) Johnson. (s) (cc) 2 Fast 2 Furious (4:30) (’03) ›› Paul Walker, Tyrese. Two Cops (s) (cc) Cops “Liar Cops (s) (cc) Cops (s) (cc) iMPACT Wrestling (N) (s) (cc) Rampage4Re Ink Master Mission: III (3) agent andNo. a deputy Law Abiding Citizen (NR, ’09) › Jamie Foxx, Gerard Butler. A prosecutor gets The Departed (R, ’06) ››› DiWalking ’04) ›› The Rock. A sheriffLiar SPIKE (57) friends andImpossible a U.S. customs try to Tall nail(PG-13, a criminal. 5” al (N) (s) Leonardo (s) (cc) SPIKE (57) (’06) ››› try to rid their town of thugs. (s) caught up in a vengeful prisoner’s twisted scheme. (s) Caprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson. (s) Tom Cruise. Jersey Girl›› Brave (5:35) (PG, ’12) ››› (s) (cc) Monsters University (7:10) (G, ’13) ››› (s) (cc) Mission to Mars (PG, ’00) › Gary Sinise. (s) (cc) After Earth (’13) › (cc) STARZ (534) Here Comes the Boom (4:40) (’12) ›› (cc) Identity (6:45) (R, ’03) ››› John Cusack. (s) (cc) Next (8:20) (’07) ›› Nicolas Cage. (cc) Power (10:05) (s) (cc) Thor: The Dark World ›› STARZ (534) Red: Werewolf Hunter (NR, ’10) Felicia Day. A descendant Underworld: Evolution (R, ’06) ›› Kate Beckinsale. Vam- Underworld: Rise of the Lycans (R, ’09) ›› Michael 30 Days of Night: Dark Planet XXXHood (PG-13, ’02) werewolves. ›› Vin Diesel, Asia Argento, Marton Csokas. A spy tries to revenge Indiana and the(cc) Kingdom Sheen, of the Crystal SkullRhona (PG-13,Mitra. ’08) ›› Harrison Ford, Cate Contact ››› Jodie SYFY (59) ofRed Little Red (3) Riding hunts (cc) pire warrior Selene seeks for Jones her betrayal. Bill Nighy, Days (PG, (’10)’97) Kiele Sanchez. SYFY (59) (’00) stop an anarchist with weapons. Blanchett. Indy and a deadly Soviet agent vie for a powerful artifact. (cc) Foster, James Woods. › The King of The King of Seinfeld (s) Seinfeld (s) Seinfeld “The Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy The Big The Big King of the Nerds Navigat- Conan (N) (cc) Friends (cc) (s) (cc)Queens Friends (cc) (s) (cc)(cc) Seinfeld (s) (cc) Seinfeld “The Bris” Seinfeld (s) Seinfeld BigTheory Bang The BigTheory Bang The Bangmaze. The Big TBS (55) Queens (s) (cc) (s) Family (cc) Guy Family (cc) Guy The Bang Bang ingBig a laser (N) Bang Conan (N) (cc) TBS (55) (cc) Deal” (cc) (cc) (cc) (s) (cc) Theory Theory Theory Theory Sin of Madelon Claudet (NR, ’31) ›› Emma (NR, ’32) ››› Marie Dressler. (cc) The Guardsman (NR, ’31) ›››› Alfred Lunt. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (NR, ’31) ››› The Champ (11:15) (’31) ››› TCM (501) The A Nous la Liberte (6:45) (NR, ’31) ›››› Le Million (8:15) (NR, ’31) ››› Annabella. The Grand Maneuver (9:45) (’55) ››› Michèle Morgan. It Happened TCM (501) Sous les Toits de Paris (NR, ’30) ››› Medium Long Island Medium (cc) Welcome to Myrtle Manor Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Here Comes Welcome to Myrtle Manor Here Comes Here Comes TLC (38) Medium American Gypsy Wedding 19 Kids 19 Kids 19 Kids and Counting (cc) 19 Kids and Counting (cc) A Duggar Leaves Home (s) 19 Kids and Counting (cc) TLC (38) Toddlers & Tiaras (s) (cc) Crazy for Love (4:45) (’05) The Perks of Being a Wallflower (6:15) (PG-13, ’12) The Look of Love (NR, ’13) ›› Steve Coogan. Paul Ray- Java Heat (’13) › Kellan Lutz. An American Killing Them Salmon in the (cc) Yemen ››› ›› Watson, Chris Pine. A young Sin (R, ’01) › club Antonio A Cuban businessThe Canyons (R, ’13) ›inLindsay Lohan, James Sinister PeopleLogan Like UsLerman, (6:05) (’12) TMC (591) ›› DavidFishing Krumholtz. Emma Ezra Miller.man (s) sud(cc) Original mond builds a porn, andBanderas. real estate empire. (s) looks for a terrorist Indonesia. Softly(11:40) (11:45) TMC (591) (4:15) (’11) ›› (cc) denly discovers the existence of a sister. (cc) man seeks revenge on his deceitful bride. (s) Deen. (s) (cc) (’12) ›› NBA Basketball New York Knicks at Miami Heat. From the AmericanAir- NBA Basketball Brooklyn Nets at Denver Nuggets. From the Pepsi Center Inside the NBA (N) (Live) Castle “Last Call” A body is Castle Martha and Castle a ghost (N) (Live) Castle(cc) A woman is shot with Castle (9:01) Investigating a Castle Hawaii “Ma Ke TNT (54) lines in Miami. (N) are (Live)Castle (cc) A casino owner is mur- Castle Investigating in Denver. (cc) (10:02) The team foundFive-0 in the(11:03) East River. TNT (54) held Arena hostage. (s) dered. (s) (cc) hunter’s murder. (s) Ryan’s stolen gun. (s) murder and a theft. (s) searches for a sniper. (s) Kahakai” (cc) Regular Johnny Test Regular Gumball Steven Univ. Teen Titans Johnny Test King of Hill Cleveland Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy Family Guy TOON (42) Regular Advent. Time Regular King of Hill King of Hill Cleveland Cleveland Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Family Guy Family Guy TOON (42) Advent. Time Advent. Time Teen Titans Gumball Isle Gilligan Isle Everybody Loves Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond King The King of Queens (9:12) King King Roseanne (s) Roseanne (s) TVLAND (163) Gilligan Raymond Cleveland Jen. Falls Cleveland Jen. Falls King King Cleveland Jen. Falls Raymond Raymond TVLAND (163) Roseanne (s) Roseanne (s) Raymond Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Law & Order: Special Vic- Suits Cameron continues to LawUnit & Order: Special(cc) Victims tims Law Unit & Order: Special Victims tims Law &Unit Order: Special Victims Law &Unit Order: Special Victims Suits Harvey and Mike are on Graceland (10:01) Briggs digs Modern Fam- tactics. Modern FamUSA (58) tims “Svengali” “Blinded” (cc) “Fight” (s) (cc) tims “Annihilated” (s) tims Unit “Paternity” (s) tims Unit “Snitch” (s) (cc) use dodgy USA (58) Unit “Bully” (s) (cc) Unit “Totem” (cc) Unit “Bang” (s) (cc) Unit (s) (cc) opposite sides. (N) up an old connection. ily (s) ily (s) of ’90s Anger Management (5:25) (PG-13, ’03) ›› Adam Sandler. (s) Couples Therapy (s) Couples Therapy (N) (s) Mob Wives (N) (s) (cc) Tanning of Amer VH1 (62) Songs Space Jam (PG, ’96) ›› Michael Jordan. (s) I Love the 2000s “2002” I Love the 2000s “2003” Space Jam (PG, ’96) ›› (s) VH1 (62) Two Can Play That Game (4:50) (’01) › Vivica A. Fox.


Everett Daily Herald, June 18, 2014