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NORTH COUNTRY CAR CLUB

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

2014 CAR SHOW

At the CCC of Tonasket Fri.-Sat., June 20-21, 7:00 p.m. Sunday, June 22, 4:00 p.m.

See Pages A3

OKANOGAN VALLEY

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S

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Molson Midsummer Festival is Saturday Grand Marshals are David, Silvie and Sandra Hilstad BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

MOLSON – The 19th Annual Molson Midsummer Festival is planned for this Saturday, June 21 in and around the Molson School Museum and the Molson Grange Hall. This year the event is honoring David, Silvie and Sandra Hilstad as Grand Marshals for all the family does for the community. It is also a preview of the 100th anniversary of the Molson School House, which now is a museum and houses many exhibits of early day life in Molson, as well as items from Molson’s school days. The day starts out with a pancake breakfast at the Grange Hall beginning at 8 a.m. and going to 10 a.m. The Fun Run/Walk also takes place in the morning and is a good time to gather wildflowers to decorate the May Pole at 10:30 a.m., followed by the May Pole dance where everyone is encouraged to join hands and dance around the May Pole. Meanwhile the classic car show will be taking place on the lawn next to the school house. At 11 a.m. the parade, featuring the Grand Marshals

Clockwise from top: Kade McKinney, nine, and Wylie Shellenbarger, six, return from an airplane ride at the Tonasket Father’s Day Fly-in last Sunday morning. Gabe, six, gets a lift from his mom, Rosalyn Ray to get a closer look inside this sport airplane. The Spirit of Tonasket, is a familiar sight at the fly-in and gave lots of rides to the five and under kids. There’s always time to pose before going for one of the adult rides. Lee Orr, with the Airport Improvement Club, which sponsors the event, said he was very happy with the turnout, including the barbecue the night before, which attracted many pilots from all over the region Washington and B.C.

and everyone else who would like to participate, will make it’s way down Main Street. The food concessions, put on by the Sitzmark Ski Club, also begin at 11 a.m. and go through 3 p.m. in the Grange Hall. At 11:30 festival goers are invited to participate in several events on the school house lawn, including a horseshoe tournament, kids’ games, and new for this year, the Amazing Molson Challenge. The Challenge includes the traditional scavenger hunt and much more, say organizers. The Ed Forthun Memorial Frizbee Golf Tournament begins at 12:30 p.m. and goes through 3:30 p.m. The car awards are announced at 2 p.m., so voters on their favorite cars must have their votes in by 1:45 p.m. While all the outdoor events are going on there will also be much besides food taking place inside the Hall. There will be arts and crafts tables, as well as music going on all day long at the Grange. And of course folks are invited to step inside the School House Museum and look at the many displays or take a short trip to the Molson Ghost Town Museum and have a look at the early day buildings, farm equipment and vestiges of pioneer living in the highlands. All proceeds from the day go to the museums and maintenance of the Grange Hall. Organizers also invite people to come back on July 26 to help them celebrate the school house’s centennial anniversary.

Tonasket seeks grant for Parry’s Acres sewer rehabilitation BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Following a public hearing to get public comment, the Tonasket City Council voted its approval for the city to apply for a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to partially fund the rehabilitation of the Parry’s Acres sanitary sewage collection system on Tuesday, June 10. Though Parry’s Acres lies outside the city and was originally built and operated by Okanogan County more than 30 years ago, its sewage system was transferred to the city about 15 years ago. Mark Varela, representing the city’s engineering firm Varela and Associates, estimated the cost of the project will be about $700,000.

Gary DeVon/ staff photos

He said that the chances of receiving the grant would be enhanced by the city’s ability to contribute its own funds (from the sewer reserve fund) to the project. “When we apply, if we say we have $400,000 in the bank but ask for a 100 percent grant, we’re not going to get it,” Varela said. “If we say we have $400,000 and we’ll kick in $100,000, they’ll want to know what the other $300,000 is for.... “We need to show a pretty significant chunk of those reserves matching to do the Parry’s Acres improvements. When you do improvements in the city, Rural Development will make you spend it anyway. If you get the grant, you will have used the reserves to leverage the block grant.

SEE SEWER | PG A4

Conscious Culture Festival June 20-22 Forty live acts and as many DJs line up to perform at festival THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET – The fifth annual Conscious Culture Festival, which blends music, art and education, will take place in the highlands above Tonasket June 20 through 22. The festival features over 40 live acts and 40 DJs playing reggae, rock, folk, soul, hip hop, dubstep, blues and more. There will also be fire dancers, aerial performers, a kids area, live glass blowing, local crafts, great food, free camping and free workshops, say organizers. This year Conscious Culture Festival has booked number of notable and nationally celebrated acts including

popular Jamaican reggae singer Kabaka Pyramid (with his band the Bebble Rockers), the NWs favorite stringband The Blackberry Bushes, hard hitting soul stars The Staxx Brothers, Californian female hip hop sensation J Ross Parrelli, Seattle reggae-fusion stars Indigitize, and renowned Australian DJ Mr Bill. In the diverse field of roots music the festival is proud to announce Washington State locals Robin Barrett & Coyote Kings (blues/rock), Mike Love (acoustic/beatbox) hailing from Hawaii, Australian export Blake Noble(percussion/guitar), local roots reggae favorite Essential I and the top Costa Rican reggae singer Noah among the 40 live acts that will perform. In the DJ dome we will feature many EDM (Electronic Dance Music) DJs from around the world and the U.S. playing will into the night. The CCF reaches its fifth year as the largest Roots, Rock, and Reggae festival of its kind in the Northwest. The festival has steadily gained a loyal following since

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 25

its inception, for the most part because of incredible word and mouth and grassroots support, say organizers. But also because CCF is truly an inclusive event by nature. Over the last five years, festival founder and life long Tonasket area resident, BlueJay Hankins, co-owner off Sick Donkey Records, has enthusiastically embraced visual artists, teachers, speakers, DJs; just about any artist of merit that impacts his life, and is willing to work with his festival to spread a positive message. “CCF is also proud to announce they have teamed up with Ben Cohen of Ben & Jerry’s fame to present what Ben himself humorously calls the “world’s most complex way to stamp a dollar.” “His machine is a brilliant work of functioning art and engineering, protest and activism, that uses a Rube Goldberg style machine to send a special message to elected officials and the people they represent,” said Hankins. “Ben’s machine stamps dollar bills with a message that

your money is not to used to bribe politicians.” Free workshops include subjects ranging from Organic Farming, NonGMO use, Energy Healing, Kirtan, T’ai Chi, Fertility Awareness, Informed Childbirth, Dynamic Breath Release, Healing with Sound and Belly Dancing to African Drumming, Hula Hooping and Hoop making. Also all sorts of yoga classes all weekend including the very popular Youth Yoga classes, Viniyoga, Qigong, Kundalini Spirit Animal, Moon Salutations, Open Heart Yoga Flow and Yoga Nidra. The festival takes place at the Okanogan Family Faire grounds located at 76 West Cayuse Mountain Road, about 12 miles east of Tonasket. Entry is $50 pre-sale or $60 at the gate for the weekend. Tickets are available at Main Street Market in Omak, Tonasket Natural Foods Co-op in Tonasket and online at BrownPaperTickets.com. Day passes will be available at the gate for $25 a day.

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Gary DeVon/file photo

A scene from last year’s CCF. The festival is full of music, art and dance.

Tonasket Pool Car Show Letters/Opinion

A2 A3 A5

Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Valley Life A9-10 Outdoors A11 Cops & Courts A12


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 19, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Once Upon a Time in 1948: A Tonasket Pool Story SUBMITTED BY BILL MCDANIEL

TONASKET - Hopes for a swimming pool for the City of Tonasket were never as bright as when the Lions Club went beyond the conversational stage to appoint a committee to bring in definite facts and figures for a swimming pool. People were appointed. K. C. Ludwig and Thurman Ogle and Grant Call. The project was on but a swimming pool is more than just a cement tank. Lockers and dressing rooms, sanitation, water heating facilities, and a business office were all part of the plan. A project such as this would cost quite a sum of money. Yet enthusiastic citizens who wanted to see this brought to actuality believed there was enough spirited capital in the community to put it over. And there was. The Gun Club, The Lions Club, The Town of Tonasket, The American Legion, The Civic League, Odd Fellows, Rebekahs, Masons and Eastern Star. The week of January 24 - 29, 1948 was decided upon for an intensive campaign to roll in the needed cash. Volunteer workers accepted assignments of territories which were thoroughly covered. H. L. Smith, Hans Lund, Melvin McKinney, Ed Appel, Jim Winslow, John Longanecker, Howard Appel, Ed Pheasant, Art Callison, W. B. Grinnell, Earl Pheasant, Walter Irons, Walter Clarkson. And pledges and donations of money, labor and material rolled in. Tonasket Plumbing and Heating, Lee Franks, Verbeck and Sons, Atchison Mill, Rickle Mill, Biles Coleman Lumber Company, Regal Orchards, Smith & Nelson, First National

Bank. People living in adjacent rural areas were enthusiastic in support of the project. Money continued to come in. Ron Roberts, Bob Faubion, C. W. Powell, George Seipp, F. J. Appel, Fred Williams, G. H. Verbeck, Leon Holmes, John Brattian, Paul Wickersheimer, John Bartell, Arthur Lund, R.R. Walton, H. E. Burgat, Herb Norton, Mrs Joseph Halstead, Leon Swegle, C.C. Rhodes, C. H. Brown, Wm. Sylvester, Henry Morris, V.F. Farrens, W. S. Bair, John Utzinger, Austin Sylvester, Frank Sylvester, R. W. Cool, Floyd Miller, D. A. Wietrick, Walter Davis, Thos G. Dammel, Ben Helm, Walter Duchow, Jack Sohn, Gilbert Siltman, Lois Helberg, Carl Duchow, Ed Wilder, Bud Harkness, H.A. Kriefall, Ray and Hugh Visser, Melvin Kuhlman, Vic Helm, Thomas Sohn, H. McDermott, E. A. Notson, Loyd Davies. They realized that with their donations they were helping to bring into realization an important community project where kids could learn to swim and grownups could swim and relax and enjoy the fun with their families and friends. Albert Rubert, R. V. Riceardo, Carmen Weddle, Ralph Pheasant, Jack Hill, Charles Pheasant, Frank Ferrin, J.R. Sumner, Cecil Moore, C. Chrisman, Chas. Merrill, Dr. Nelson, Bill Alstott, Conrad Miller, A.R. Greenaway, O. L. Watson, Mrs. Dolan, Keith Pickering, Geo. Apple, C.W. Jensen, Ruark’s Realty, Narcisse Nicholson, Fred Cockle, Lester Corum, Billie Kiser, C.A. Eberlein, Jack Harrison, Shelton Fisher, Ceicle Dorrel, Deane Stansbury, Claude Gates, H. Howeiler, Bob Lorz, Melvin Kinney, Gorden Burt, John Larrabee, Eddie Nicholson, C. M. Beeman, Lenard Ekman, F. D. Hemstreet, P. M. German, T. P. Conners, O.E. Dorrel, Frank

Stead, Aronald Haaland, Jack Simpson, Earl Carley, E. C. Williams. To the great joy of all its many supporters and active workers the municipal swimming pool actually reached construction stage in May of 1949 when Howard Appel donated his time and tractor service to dig the huge basin where the reinforcing steel and concrete would be placed. And the contributions of money, labor, and material continued. W. D. Johnston, Stanley Bertram, Roy Van Woert, J.M. Arborgast, Ray Verbeck, Fred Laundry, Paul Rogers, Walter Davis, Dover Fitzthum, Ed Scholz, Ed Burke, Ed Bronowski, Dick Randolph, Rex Corum, Oliver Weddle, Kenneth Young, Frank Bellinger, C.E. Albrecent, Violet Formanek, ED Crocker, Mittie Fisher, C. H. Mack, C.V. Carter, Leland McDaniel, Guy Fisher, B. E. Lawson, Herb Wasserfurth, James Pyper, J. Corburn, A. W. Roggow, Deane Fleming, Bob Norton, Henry Colbert, W. Spangler, Budd Hutton, Otho Daniels, James Holloway, Ray Merrill, Gunnar Franson, Fred Stevens, R. A. Simon, W. L. Farley, Bud Grimes, Don Mooney, Clyde Quigg, A.R. Patton, Joe Buchanan.

Hinman, Joe Fox, Ed Workosky, Walt Appel, Lynn Allen, A. W. Hanson, Harry Yount, Monte Smith, Bernard Laurie, Jeanne Buchert, Muriel Johnson, Eva Johnson, Mary Ann Hite, Thos. Talbot, Archie McDaniel. On August 5, 1949, the newspaper reported that the swimming pool was approaching its final stage, but on August 12 work stopped $1500 from the goal. More money was needed. R.J. Temby, H. M. Thornton, Sam Frazier, C.E. Homes, Frank Zolgar Jr., Sandra Greenaway, Walter Greenaway, Ivan Seals, Ed Winslow Jim Doran, Tavern CafÊ, Men’s Toggery, Ervin Ehrhart, Mildred Rankin, Loren Corum, Fred James, Lanes Tavern, Larry Henkemeyer, Earl Cotton, Guy Yarnell, Fritz Ammann, J. F. Silverthorn, L. M. Sigrist, John Mohr, Ralph Kaufman, Lynn Davis, Clyde Stevenson, Archie Renner, Harold Herrin, Ralph Hutchinson, K. C. De Merchant, Victor Lesamiz, Dan Coe, Fred Fountian, Don Farrens, True

Wages in those days were about $1 per hour but bread was 16 cents a loaf. And the money rolled in. Al Robinson, Bill Allstot, E. E. Rampley,Louise Cooksey, E. A. Beaughan, Ralph Henderson, R. L. Picken, Laurence Peterson, Ward Yount, Elmer Colbert, Earl Atkins, H. W. Nelson, George McKnight, Mrs T. R. Lewis, Earl Rubert, Evert Vance, Harvey Miller, Chas. Anderson, Earl Sawyer, Evelyn Weed, Grace Yount, Verne Charbonneau, John Eaton, Romeo Sasse, J. F. Lyon. Valley Evaporating Company, Lester Clark, Ben Allen, G. A. Freeman and Sons, Bill Lum, Fritz Willms, S. F. Panteau, E. A. Dicus, C. J.

Freeby, Ralph Turpin, Mrs. Don Wilson, Mrs Jerry Funk, Wm, Linden, Mrs. Harry Brugh, Vic Marchesseau, Dave Ehrhard, Jim Harvey, Carrol Hardin, Glen Canfield, Earl Freels, E. T. McIntosh, W. E. Tenneson, Dr. Kinzie, Hugo Lund, C. J. Ridge, Don Richardson, John Dicus. The final amount of money and the completion of the pool could not be accomplished in time for the pool to be used in the summer of 1949 but the pool was opened for swimming in the summer of 1950. Life guards and swimming instructors were recruited, and memories were produced for our community members for the next 60 years. Louie Boni, Earl Costello. But that was then and this is now. It was a great loss when the pool had to be closed a few years ago. Today’s kids are missing a lot and that should not be. We must build a new pool. They did it for us and now it is our turn.

POOL COMMITTEE The pool committee includes Karen Stangland, Jack Lorz, Bill McDaniel, Billie Attwood, Norman Weddle, Julie Alley, Roger Castelda, Greg Gardenier, Aaron Kester, Jenny Gardinier, Scott Olson, Gina Inlow, Jan McDaniel, Kari Alexander and Patti Hill. Contact Karen Stangland 509486-2517 or by email at karen@ tonasketpool.com. For more information, visit our website at www.tonasketpool.com Bill McDaniel used research from the Tonasket Times and Okanogan Record in the writing of this article.

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Swimming pool construction for a small city is a major but very worthwhile undertaking. Even though it is a city project, a pool would benefit all in the surrounding area as well, children and adults alike. After more than 60 years, Tonasket’s pool has become unusable and needs to be replaced and replaced NOW if the current batch of kids is to benefit. Let’s make the pool more than a memory. There is not a parks and recreation district in place at this time that could fund the project through tax dollars and it would take time to establish such a district. HOWEVER, if a substantial number of people would come forth with donations, BOTH LARGE AND SMALL the amount could be raised locally and the project started right away. Kids need to learn to swim and a pool would be a GREAT ASSET for our community. SO, HOW ABOUT IT~CAN WE DO IT? Can you or your organization make a tax deductible donation? $1 to $100,000.00 or more? Let’s POOL our dollars for a great cause for our community. All donations are appreciated.

Let the pool committee know and they will get the ball rolling.

Call Karen, 509-486-2517 for details and information. THANK YOU!

DIVE ON IN As before it will take a lot dedicated people and lots and lots of spirited capital for it to happen, but it can be done. Make tax deductible donation checks to CFNCW-Tonasket Pool. Donations of all sizes are needed but make it hurt a little.

DONATION/PLEDGE FORM

Thank you for your support

Help Tonasket Build A Pool !

Email karen@tonasketpool.com Visit our website www.tonasketpool.com

It would be expected of us. It is the right thing to do.


JUNE 19, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A3

Something for everyone at annual Car Show North Country Car Club 2014 Car Show Results The annual North Country Car Show had a little of everything from classic, antique and hot rod cars and pickups, to tractors, one lone Norton motorcycle -- even a rusty wagon. Mike and Dorothy Sweeney’s 1948 Buick Roadmaster Convertible. left, was the Belle of the Ball. The couple drove the low-slung curvaceous beauty from Twisp to enter her in the show. Shane Freeze and his son Kenneth, below left, with their 1957 Ford Pickup Project. The elder Freeze and all four of his sons are working to add the engine, chassis and running gear from a 1995 Ford Crown Victoria to the pickup, which took second in the Projects category at the car show. While most of the cars and trucks were “Don’t Touch” this little guy, below, was enjoying sitting in a 1960’s VW Dune Buggy.

Best of Show (OK Chevrolet) Mike & Dorothy Sweeney, 1948 Buick Convertible Best Engine (Allens Auto Parts) Dick Sweetman, 1955 Chev. Bel-Air Best Paint (Hickman Body Shop) Rick Golleher, 1932 Chev. 5 Window Best Interior (Bob Raymer Machine Shop) Dick Sweetman, 1955 Chev. Bel-Air 100 Motorcycle (Steve Smith Accountant) 1st - Jerry Jones, 1971 Norton Commando 200 1960-1979 (US Bank) 1st - Darrel Hickman, 1964 Chev. Nova 2nd - Larry& Coralee Thompson, 1961 Corvair 3rd - Sam Nau, 1967 Ford Falcon 300 Classic 1980-up (Rob Nau Dentistry) 1st - Rob Nau, 2007 Ford Mustang 2nd - Devon Sementilli, 2001 Pontiac Firebird 3rd - Allan Enquist, 1994 Chev. Corvette ZR-1 400 Custom (RDL Automotive) 1st - Jack Hopkins, 1948 Plymouth Coupe 2nd - Paul Yarnell, 1956 Metropolitan Conv. 600 Post War (Steve Smith, Accountant) 1st - Mike & Dorothy Sweeney, 1948 Buick Convertible 2nd - Hugh Glassburn, 1951 Ford Coupe 3rd - Joe Shell, 1950 Ford Custom 700 Pre-War 1941-Older (Grants Market) 1st - Rick Golleher, 1932 Chev. 5 Window 2nd - John Brown, 1925 Model T 3rd - Ralph Otto, 1931 Model A 800 Project (N/A) 1st - Mursick Welding, 1927 Dodge Pickup 2nd - Shane Freese, 1957 Ford F-100 900 Street Machine (Superior Auto Parts) 1st - Dick Sweetman, 1955 Chev. Bel-Air 2nd - Bob Cunningham, 1968 Pontiac Firebird 3rd - Tom Bretz, 1969 Chev. Camaro 1000 Street rod 1954-older (Orr’s Enterprises) 1st - Jim Palmer, 1932 Ford Roadster 2nd- Lee & Lola Orr, 1929 Ford Roadster P.U. 3rd - Gerry & Kathy MacDonald, 1938 Chev. Coupe 1100 Teenage (N/A) 1st - Chris Freese, 1967 Red Flyer Custom 1200 Tractor (Wilber Ellis) 1st - George & Patti Hill, 1951 Ford 8n 2nd - Matt Deebach, 1950 IH Cub 3rd - George & Patti Hill,1949 John Deere B 1300 Truck (Whitney’s Garage) 1st - Arnie Wheatcroft, 1955 Chev. P.U. Stepside 2nd – Bacon, 1947 Chev. P.U. 3rd - Jerry Anderson, 1974 Chev. P.U. 1400 N/A 1st - Fred Holmes, 1957 Ford T-Bird 1600 1 Ton & Bigger (Hannah Trucking) 1st - George & Patti Hill, 1946 Studebaker 1.5 Ton 1700 Rat Rod (N/A) 1st Dennis Farnsworth, 1968 VW Rat

THANK YOU We Would Like to Thank Our 2014 Sponsors...

Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

- Diane & Tom Acord - Jim & Marilyn Prince - Surgit Singh - Dick & Jan Garner - Marylou’s Gifts - John & Collette Biele - Bud & Leona Forthun - Glenna & Glen Hauenstein - Lee & Lynn Chapman - Gordon & Nancy Roberts - John & Cathy Moran - Dave & Jaden Taber - Dick & Sarah Sass - Reta Emry & Debbie Cook - Sheri Blakeman - Dolly Engelbretson - Joan Cool - Oroville Dental Clinic/Dr. Chen - Chris Branch - Perry & Hillary Blackler - Vicki & Brant Hinze - Sunrise Chevrolet - Midway / Oroville Building Supply - Ted Murray - Local Boys Construction - Joanne Morris - Garry & Esther Sorensen

- Mike & Etta Cantwell - Joyce Forthun - Helen Casey - Judy DeVon - Oroville Royal Neighbors of America - World of Gaia - Walter & Lindsey Acord - Bill & Viola Dowd - Appleway Video - Craig & Juanita Roth / Nulton Irrigation - Food Services of America - Sysco - Sandy Lorentzen - Bob & Francine Warriner - Joanne Thomas - Ernie & Jeannie Robison - Mark & Amy Morris - Jerry & Audrey Forney - Evelyn Dull - Esther Bricques Winery - Robert R. Colbert - Dale L. Crandall - Trino’s Restaurant/The Plaza - Tickets West - Oroville Mini Storage - Eisen Construction and Excavation

See You Next Year ~ 3rd Weekend In May!


PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 19, 2014

SEWER | FROM A1

BEE AT WORK

Gary A. DeVon/staff photo

The plight of all types of bees, which have been experiencing somewhat frightening die-offs in recent years, was one of the many topics discussed (by Don Rolfs, author of “Native Field Guide to Bees of Central Washington�) at last weekend’s continuing celebration at of the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area’s 75th anniversary. This bumblebee was caught at work in Oroville last weekend. More on the Sinlahekin activities can be found on page A11.

“I’m not trying to push you, but the chances of getting the grant are nil unless you put in something decent. What is decent is up to you.� Varela said that drawing the fund down had disadvantages, but that to get a grant that would cover about three quarters of the project cost the city would likely need to commit $200-225,000 of its own to the project. “That would lead about $180,000 in reserves,� Varela said. “It’s a good chunk left, but I think we can explain why we need it there and it’s not so low that we’re all too scared.� He added that if the city received the grant, but that something major happened with the city sewer system in the meantime that ate up the reserve fund, it wouldn’t have to accept the grant. Varela said that it would also behoove the city to raise the sewer rates since the city is already seeing its reserves being drawn down slowly since rates haven’t kept up with rising costs. City Clerk Alice Attwood said that the reserve fund hadn’t had to be used for much other than some interfund loans. “If we don’t leverage this,� said Mayor Patrick Plumb, “we’ll just be forced to send it dollar for dollar instead of spending one dollar to get three. At this point the interest on those reserves is so small ... right now it’s best to leverage it into something tangible.� Asked council member Jean Ramsey, “Where else can you invest your money and get three times as much in return?� “I feel that ... we are to the point where we are attacking some big projects that are priorities of this council.� The council approved 4-0 (Scott Olson was not in attendance) for Varela to apply for up to $750,000 in funding, while committing the city to up to $225,000 of reserve funds to match. Varela added that the city needed to prioritize a list of future projects to justify holding onto

the rest of the sewer reserve funds in preparation for questions that come up during the application process.

WATER WORKS After a fair amount of discussion, the council decided to offer a one-time 50 percent forgiveness to three city water customers that received massive bills due to water leaks. The city currently has no fixed policy on how to deal with those kinds of bills other than leaks that occur on the consumer’s side of the water meter are their responsibility, while leaks on the street side of meters are the city’s problem. Three customers appealed to the city to have their overage rates, which ranged from $500 to $4,200, including one for a customer who has since passed away. “These three cases that have been here for quite awhile,� AttwoOd said. “I would really like some resolution to this.� Council member Jill Vugteveen said that she had contacted other cities in the area and that most allowed customers to pay off overage fees over time, but that only Okanogan offered any kind of forgiveness. Vugteveen had suggested a couple of options: one, to offer a one-time, 100 percent forgiveness to an account per 20-year period, or two, to offer a one-time, 50 percent forgiveness per 10-year period. Council member Jean Ramsey moved to offer full forgiveness but wasn’t able to garner any sup-

port after Claire Jeffko rescinded her second. “I reiterate, this is only for these three accounts,� Ramsey said. “Not anybody else. On of these the gentleman is deceased; another one is a single mom who is renting. I’m a bleeding heart, whatever. This is just these three accounts so Alice can clear it up. I’m more than open to 50 percent for a permanent policy.� “We keep forgiving things that generate revenue for our city,� Vugteveen said. “To give 100 percent forgiveness, I don’t think we can continue to do that as a business. I’m not saying they deserve this, but to do it 100 percent, I’m afraid people will take advantage of that at some point.� The council voted 3-1 to go with the 50 percent option for the three outstanding accounts, and that the portion of fees to be paid to the city could be done so over time. A permanent policy still needs to be established.

DECISIONS The council also: • approved its six-year streets plan, which is reviewed and reapproved on an annual basis; • was told by Police Chief Rob Burks that Officer Audra Fuller submitted her resignation, effective at the end of June; • and approved the placement of a storage shed a the north end of the city library and painted to match the main building. The Tonasket City Council next meets on Tuesday, June 24, at 7:00 p.m.

Edna Mae Hinger is turning 80 In June!

You are invited to a birthday party for her at the Riverside Grange Hall June 21st from 2pm-4pm. No gifts please. Refreshments will be served.

Submitted photo

Oroville Elementary School staff recently took part on the first steps of “The Leader in Me� program.

Leader In Me training at Oroville Schools SUBMITTED BY JOAN HOEHN OROVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

OROVILLE - As the initial step in bringing The Leader in Me to the students at Oroville Elementary, more than thirty elementary staff members completed The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and Vision training with Pat Cushing, Franklin Covey Foundation trainer, last week. The materials and the training are all part of a grant the Elementary School received from the Franklin Covey Foundation. The grant included 40 copies of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, 2 copies of 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens, 11 copies of 7 Habits of Happy Kids, 14 copies of the 7 Habits of Happy Kids Posters, Vision guides, The

Leader in Me Guides, activities for students, 21 copies of The Leader In Me, and more. The 7 Habits are 1) Be Proactive 2) Begin with the end in Mind 3) Put First Things First 4) Think Win-Win 5) Seek First to Understand, then to be Understood 6) Synergize and 7) Sharpen the Saw. At the core of these principles is the belief that every child is a leader in their own way. Each child has a talent or a set of unique abilities, teaching them the 7 habits will help them capitalize on their talent and develop into the best person they can be. The Leader in Me teaches key skills businesses and educators are looking for in future candidates: leadership, accountability, adaptability, initiative and selfdirection, cross-cultural skills,

responsibility, problem solving, communication, creativity and teamwork. Oroville Elementary is honored to join the elite group of one thousand six hundred eighty-one (1681) The Leader In Me schools worldwide. Schools who have implement The Leader In Me have seen the following results after only a short time: higher levels of self-esteem and self-confidence, improved school culture, and increased engagement of parents and community within the school. This is not a one-day process, oneweek process or even a one-year process. This is a journey that will take a few years to completely implement, but the first step has been taken and to quote Lao-tzu, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.� Please join us on our journey.

Out On The Town

nns oFono’ds! Sahba ulou F

„ „ „ „

your guide to

&

Breakfast Every Morning Steak Night on Wed. & Sat. Spaghetti Thursday Prime Rib Friday — We have WiFi — 626 Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2259

Main St., Tonasket z 486-2996

* Wednesday *

Entertainment

PRIME RIB starting at 5 pm.

* Thursday *

Advertise your specials and events here!

Steak Night

EVERY WEEK

Open: Mon. - Sat. 11 to close

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JUNE 19, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER ITEMS FROM THE PAST COMPILED BY CLAYTON EMRY FORMER G-T PUBLISHER

The Molson Leader Jack Nisbet speaks at the Sinlahekin 75th Anniversary Celebration.

Sinlahekin’s 75th Anniversary Celebration full of information Unfortunately I wasn’t able to attend all of the goings on up in Sinlahekin Wildlife Area these past few weekends. There was a celebration that included lots of opportunity to learn about the history of the area and the wildlife that is so abundant, and in some cases unique, the Sinlahekin. After taking in the Tonasket Father’s Day Fly-in, I did rush up to Loomis to catch part of Jack Nisbet’s talk about Scottish Naturalist David Douglas and the many plants he collected in the area. Douglas explored the region in the early part of the 1800s and collected seeds to send home, germinated and then hand illustrated. Many of those plants can now be found growing in the Scottish rock gardens of today. While others, like some of the unwanted imports from Europe and Asia that harass us, are considered nuisance plants or plain old noxious weeds. Afterward I sat down with David Rolfs from Wenatchee. He spoke earlier about the Sinlahekin’s tiniest wildlife, the native bees and why we need them. Rolfs is undertaking the large Out of of authoring a Field Guide to Native Bees of My Mind task Central Washington. He told me there are over Gary A. DeVon 600 species of native bees in our part of the state ranging from the very tiny, where differentiating between species takes a microscope to the larger bumble bees. He said that all bees are important and that 85 percent of all pollination is carried out by native bees, while only 15 percent is done by the honey bee, an import from Europe, Asia and Africa. There wasn’t a single honey bee in the Americas when Columbus arrived, he said. He said the Time magazine cover story on the loss of bees of all kinds should serve as a warning that we must change the way we do things or risk losing our food supply. I also chatted with Tom Burke, author of Land Snails and Slugs of the Pacific Northwest. He spoke about the Sinlahekin’s Not-So-Creepy Crawlers: Snails, Slugs and other Mollusks. He made the snails, slugs, clams and mussels sound more interesting than you might think and made it clear that they play an important purpose in nature. And of course I also stopped by the Be Bear Aware! booth ran by Chuck Bartlebaugh and had a go with an inert training canister of Bear Deterrent. We had an article about him in last week’s paper. All in all it would have been nice to check out the party and all the wildlife talks and walks. The Sinlahekin Wildlife Area is an important asset to our county, the state and nation. It offers many wildlife viewing and fishing opportunities. There are trails to hike and much to see. Let’s hope we continue to preserve these important places and their natural inhabitants for ourselves and future generations to come.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at (509) 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

92 Years Ago: May 17 - 31, 1922: Plans for operating the old Poland China mine, six miles east of Molson, are now being made by President F. W. Rankin, of the Mary Ann Creek Company, from Schenectady, N. Y. and W. A. Marvin, a mining engineer from Los Angeles, California. The mine was formerly owned by the Molson Gold Mining Company but was recently reorganized under the name of Mary Ann Creek Mining Company. The mine has been closed down for some time and is said to have been due to poor management of handling the ore and preserving its value. The Poland China claims were located by Jerome Hankins and Neal Unden in 1896. In 1905 the Molson Gold Mining Company was organized and the mill was installed in 1909. No work has been done at the site since 1913. The Junior Class of the Molson Union High School gave a farewell banquet to honor Mildred Sanger, the only senior graduating from the local school this year. Plans for holding a celebration here July 4, wee adopted at the meeting of the Molson Community Club Friday evening. No Independence Day celebration has been held in Molson in recent years, but much enthusiasm was shown over the proposal for this year. Several committees were established to begin planning for the event. The Okanogan Country shows more development with more new settlers coming in; more land coming under water, more orchards coming into bearing and more building in its history. It is the most promising in immediate possibilities of any section of the state, in the opinion of W. E. Vincent, President of the Old National bank of Spokane. Just this spring, Tonasket out shipped out 3,000 cases of eggs. The greatest development is around Okanogan, Omak, Tonasket, Oroville and Molson. Creameries in Tonasket and Oroville are doing well and dairying has a firm foothold.

The Oroville Gazette

50 Years Ago May 21, 28 1964: Grant Rainsberry, a U. S. Navy war veteran of World War II was elected Ninth District Commander at the District Conference of the American Legion at Coulee Dam last Friday and

Warren Dirk, Brewster was elected to Vice Commander. Grant is a local Post Office employee and has lived in Oroville for the past twenty years. The largest group of seniors to ever receive their diplomas from the Oroville High School will have their ceremonies at the Coulton Auditorium on May 22, 1964. With a total of sixty young men and women go the congratulations and best wishes for a bright future from everyone in the community. The businesses in and around Oroville have shown their congratulations by sponsoring the pictures of all the seniors. In an effort to bolster their storage facilities, the Oroville Fruits have purchased the former Stadleman’s Warehouse on Appleway. The building will be used for storage space only and the north side of the building has been leased to Chamberlin‚‘s Distributing Company. With several thousand high school land college youth due soon to be seeking employment during the summer months, employers today were reminded by the State Department of Labor and Industries that Minor Work Permits will be required for a large number of these individuals. It was pointed out that work permits were required by law for boys and girls from 14 through 17 years of age and that they are required to comply with the minimum wage law of $1.25 per hour. Grocery Prices: Lettuce, crisp solid heads, $.09 per lb; Okanogan Butter, $.47 per lb; 25 ft. roll of aluminum foil, $.29; Oranges, $.13 per lb; Spareribs, $.39 per lb; Frozen dinners, 3 for $1.00; New potatoes, $.06 per lb; 2 ¬Ω size cans Pork & Beans, 6 for $1.00; Shasta pop, 12 oz. cans, 6 for $.49. WeatherWise, by Marge Fazier, official observer: May 20th, 81 degrees, maximum and 53 degrees minimum; 21st, 66 and 42; 22nd, 65 and 46; 23rd, 66 and 29; 24th, 66 and 39; 25th, 74 and 36 and 26th, 75 and

43. Total precipitation for the period, .01 inch.

The Gazette-Tribune

25 Years Ago May 18 - 25, 1989: After nearly a year long struggle, Senior Housing may become a reality in Tonasket, according to officials of Crest Construction. The project, 30 units of Senior Housing, is hoping for farmers Home Administration, that funds will become available so construction can begin by early next spring or early summer. Tonasket’s big annual event is Founder’s Day and Rodeo will be held on June 4 - 5. Two very ear ladies, Tessie Wilson and Madeline Scholz, will share the duties of Grand Marshalls and of course accompanied by Tiffany Wilson, Miss Rodeo Queen. May Festival is for people, especially the kids. If you didn’t know that by now, you obviously weren’t in Oroville last week-end. Kids could be seen scrambling for the free treats passed out by the local firemen and several other groups in the parade. Crown Recources Corporation has announced significant assay results, from it’s Gold Operation on Buckhorn Mountain, southeast of Chesaw. Real Estate for Sale; Molson home, large 3 bdrm, 1/5 bath with basement, very large deck, large dock on 1.52 acres; $49,500.00; and 6 acres with 500 feet of lake frontage on Lake Osoyoos; pond and marshy but with good beach, shorelands and building sites, $48,000. Weather Wise: May 16, High of 75 degrees and low of 49; May 17 69 & 47; May 18, 63 and 34; May 19, 66 & 41; May 20, 72 & 33; May 21, 75 & 38; May 22, 69 & 42. Total precipitation for the week, .25”.

Hope amidst the tragedy A headline in Saturday’s Pittsburgh Post- for their cause. Gazette’s Celebrities section reads “Harrison “Jon Meis ‘Likes’ NRA on Facebook!” Ford, Jon Meis, Mekayla Diehl and more!” crowed a pro-gun website Friday morning; Such has been life for the family of one of “Jon Meis didn’t need a gun to subdue shootmy son’s best friends for the past week and er!” offered an anti-gun website. half, sharing headlines with Han And so it began, a kid who only Solo and a Miss America conwanted to graduate, get married tender. Chad Meis and A.J. have and begin his life after college, been close friends since A.J. startwas unwillingly thrust into the ed at Seattle Pacific University public spotlight. On one hand, five years ago. Saturday we were grateful and impressed strangers at SPU’s graduation to watch my paid (several times over) for every daughter-in-law Robyn receive item on Jon and his fiancee’s wedher diploma, but the course of ding registry, as well as donating history changed a lot of lives (and more than $50,000 to a fund set ended one prematurely) in the up by a Seattle radio producer for last week before graduation. their honeymoon. Jon Meis is the now-gradu- HALF-BAKED On the other hand, it’s meant Brent Baker ated SPU senior who stopped living under siege as the media a murderer from doing more descended on his family’s home, damage than he’d already done, making any kind of normal life pepper-spraying and disarming the gunman impossible, including at his own graduation. after one student was killed and two others The Meis family has required security both injured in an SPU campus science building on formal and informal, primarily headed by Thursday, June 5. Chad and enhanced at times with the help We see so many stories of bystanders of A.J. and some of their former SPU cross doing nothing or running away in fear when country teammates, who have provided a they come upon someone being assaulted or tight-knit cordon of protection around the worse. Meis, unarmed except for his pepper quiet hero. spray - working his last shift as a building My alma mater made me proud with its monitor at SPU’s Otto Miller Hall, one week handling of the entire episode, especially in away from graduation and two weeks before those first few hours when no scripted public his wedding - kept a tragedy from becoming relations campaign was in place to control a bloodbath. messages or provide spin. Staff and students Like many associated with SPU that after- alike responded with a combination of grace noon (I am a 1987 alumnus as well) I felt and raw honesty we don’t often see. that chill of terror as I awaited word to see if Jon received a pair of standing ovations my son, daughter-in-law, or several longtime at the graduation ceremony, most heartfelt friends I have on staff there were among the from the 800 or so fellow graduates. A new casualties. scholarship in the SPU School of Engineering None were, but that was cold comfort has been established in his name (as well as knowing it meant someone else’s loved one school-sponsored funds to aid the shooting was dead. A professor friend of mine told me victims and the family of Paul Lee, who lost of hiding out in a storage room during the his life). resulting lockdown, only knowing that there Left unanswered are the larger questions had been a shooting and that there might be that plague our society, about guns and nearly a gunman on the loose. His phone battery everything else. As a Christian school, some died; he could hear helicopters and blaring at SPU were asking, “What would Jesus do loudspeakers but had no idea if his colleagues about guns?” I don’t know, but I also wonder: or students were OK. Some of his friends if Jesus were the last line of defense for the watched events unfold from second floor 200 young girls that the militant group Boko offices with window views of the area where Haram kidnapped in Nigeria a few weeks the shootings occurred, helpless to intervene. ago, what would he do? Others were cloistered in classrooms, scramIs there a way to keep firearms out of the bling for self-defense measures, unsure of hands of the mentally ill and attention seekwho might burst through the door. ers who see a high body count as the way to The crime scene was still taped off the next fame or infamy, when either will do? And will morning, but that didn’t stop advocacy groups that process also take them away from those from trying to make Jon Meis the poster child only who want to defend themselves and their

families? One of the many reasons we have the tsunami of immigrants flooding our border with Mexico is that the rank-and-file citizens of countries south of us can’t defend themselves. Mexico, for instance, has some of the strictest gun laws in the western hemisphere. U.S. Marine Andrew Tahmooressi discovered this the hard way when he accidentally crossed the border with three guns that are legal in the United States but illegal in Mexico; he’s been jailed for months. Meanwhile the drug cartels are betterarmed (illegally) than the military. When a group of Mexican citizens armed themselves to defend their town of Tepalcatapec, their actions were illegal as well. Faced with an uncomfortable choice, the Mexican government deputized the vigilantes into the police force which before that had been unable to defend the local citizens, rather than prosecute those who took it upon themselves to stand up to the local cartel. We don’t want that kind of environment here; yet our trust in our own government isn’t exactly high these days as federal regulatory agencies (i.e. Bureau of Land Management, even student loan collection agencies) suddenly seem to have their own SWAT teams to deal with those that are deemed “internal threats.” Maybe there is a way to keep the Columbine wannabe assassins from shredding our kids’ lives in their places of education without sacrificing the freedoms that have made the United States a unique and blessed place to live; maybe there aren’t. I don’t have those answers and I have yet to hear anything in the ceaseless blathering of media personalities or politicians that indicates that they do either. Words are cheap, and my generation is adept at issuing sound bytes, writing speeches and making headlines out of every foolish utterance by every person who becomes famous for no good reason at all. Maybe the generation represented by Jon Meis (with no desire whatsoever for fame) and his SPU Class of 2014 will do better. When thrown into crisis, we find out who a person really is at their core whether we know them or not. When the crucible of tragedy ruthlessly burned away pretense and left no time for words for the SPU community, their actions were a bright light on a dark day. And so a real-life hero shares headlines with one of the iconic fictional heroes of our time. Maybe there is hope for our nation after all.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 19, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Cherry harvest will soon be going full bore Eleven more days and we’ll be into July. How can that be? Finally, I got a health report on Neoma Vandiver. Her daughter tells me of the health issues she’s been plagued with and they are quite a few, but she is beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel, but I’d say she won’t be picking the great strawberries her garden has produced in the past, nor mowing and watering and the things that have been rule of the day for her during the summer months. She’s missed at pinochle, too. If you wish to send her a card, her address is Box 1910, Oroville and it will get to her. And, Beverly Storm is finally home. She too has had more than enough time in hospitals and rehabs, etc. etc. Beverly and Barbara Forrester, in the past were walking buddies. I’ve been told Barb is having some bad days but she was on hand shortly after Bev arrived home,

and what a happy reunion that must have been. Barb has continued to put up a courageous battle with cancer for six years and is getting tired. Have you noticed how “pinkish” the cherries are colored? Soon the packing sheds will be going full bore, night and day. Hard work, while it lasts! The rain showers have made us dig out warmer clothing, again. I hope the weather isn’t gearing up for cherry harvest and cause another lot of losses, as it did last year. Manufacturer’s must think that the public is crazy…. How many have noticed that a quart of mayonnaise contains 30 oz. now, not 32 oz. The jar still looks the same, but contains less. Cans of tuna still appear the same, but contain less. Toilet paper is from one to two inches narrower than it used to be. The cardboard on a box of cereal is still the

same size but has more empty space beverage cans and deposit them at the inside, but the price remains the same. Senior Center and a big vote of thanks And that’s just to name a few goes to the fact that Jim Fry items. I guess that might be gets the cans to Spokane, givcalled “merchandising.” ing the proceeds to the cenHave learned that anothter. Volunteers are welcome er of the Robinson brothto help Jim when the containers have passed away. Ivan ers get filled up again. died last Thursday, and he Did you remember to tell had lived in the Colvilleyour father how much you Chewelah area for quite a appreciate the many things few years, with his wife Edna he has done for you, through(Sawyers) who passed away, out your lifetime? We had some while back. phone calls from both of our Nellie (Robinson) Smith THIS & THAT girls and also one from our and her husband Dean, were Brazilian boy… good kids! here last week attending the Joyce Emry How pleased our dear Robinson reunion, at Lost friend Kay (Sherling) Tracy Lake. They have lived in would have been to have Oregon most of their married life but seen the many friends and relatives who still have friends and relatives here in attended her Memorial service and lunOroville and Tonasket. cheon last Saturday. Her arms would I notice a (For Sale) sign at the Shop have been very tired from trying to give a tavern location. With the death of hug, and not miss anyone. Her daughter Isadore Williams, some changes have to Sharon and I agreed that she would have be made, as Bunny can’t be two places at been in 7th heaven… and believed that the same time. is truly where she was. A most talented The Oroville Senior Citizens sincere- lady gone on before us! ly appreciate the fact that so many in It was good to see Art, John and the community, remember to save their Georgia, children of Harry and Mrs.

Sherling, who grew up in the Molson area. A visit with Bob Hirst finds him a bit stronger and still winning at pinochle. Lloyd and Beverly Curtis have returned from a getaway, visiting family and enjoying sights in the Colorado area and parts in between. High school and college kids home for the duration of the summer and just in time to go to work on the cherry lines. A call for help. The Depot Museum is open again but without the necessary finances to pay for some of the touch up items around and in the building. This is also the Tourist Center and Arnie Marchland is the captain of the ship but it is hard to get things done on the outside of the building and listen for the phone to ring or take care of tourists and museum visitors at the same time. He would be appreciative of help, mostly in the carpenter line, so if you have such a knack it would surely help the matter. Also, it would be nice to have volunteers to man the museum traffic and tourists on the inside. If you are interested, contact Arnie at the museum, phone 509-476-2739. ‘Til next week.

HILLTOP COMMENTS

TAE KWON DO BLACK BELT

Students have ‘Oregon Trail’ experience SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Submitted photo

On May 17, Caleb Lofthus earned his Black Belt in Tae Kwon Do. Caleb studied under Master Terry Cariker for over 10 years. Pictured from left to right are Kelly Cariker, Caleb Lofthus and Terry Cariker.

Looking for a few more officers

TONASKET EAGLES

SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

Hope everyone got their first cutting of hay bailed before the rain hit. Now it’s allergies time, I know mine have hit. Father’s Day has come and gone, hope all you fathers had a great day. Last week was State Convention in Yakima. Lots of awards went out to several Aeries and Auxiliaries, great speakers and lots of people from far away like Alaska.

Wisdom the word of the week SUBMITTED BY SUZANNE DAILEY HOWARD

We would like to thank everyone who came and helped with our A-Dopt-HWY good job. The Joker Poker is up to $1083. Come in and get your tickets, drawing is every Saturday at 6:45 p.m. You could win half. We are looking for a few more officers to fill the chairs for the Aerie. Please come in and inquire as to what offices are still open. Aerie meetings are the first and third Wednesday at 7 p.m., Auxiliary meetings are the first

TONASKET MARKET REPORT

TONASKET FARMERS’ MARKET

Summer officially arrives this week according to the calendar. Wise gardeners know the summer growing season has been here for a while. “Wisdom” is the word of the week as we complete our exploration of how shopping at Tonasket Farmers’ Market can make you healthy, wealthy and wise. A gardening friend explained the difference between wisdom and knowledge using this example. Knowledge states that a tomato is technically a fruit, not a vegetable. Wisdom knows not to put a tomato in a fruit salad! It is said that wisdom comes with age. It also comes with experience. If you want to know about canning, you’d be hard pressed to find a better source than Val Welles. Welles, one of the original pioneers of the market, now in its 16th year of operation, has been preserving food since she was a teenager. Her inspiration was a great aunt whose walk-in pantry was lined with jars. Try her many varieties of chutney, relish, jam and jelly. Cranberry wine jelly caught my eye this week, and her hot pepper jelly is as delicious to look at as it is to eat. Besides her flair for

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flavor and display, Val also has a flair for fashionable hats. Another experienced vendor, Carey Hunter has been making cheese for forty years. She raised goats for milk when her children were young. As the children grew she found herself with more milk than they could drink, so she began making cheese. Her varieties of goats’ milk cheese include Farmhouse, Black Ash, Asiago, and Chevre. Hunter says goats have taught her how to negotiate; each has a different personality. She offered this word to the wise, “Goats are the right size for a

woman to wrestle.” Tonasket Farmers’ Market and the entire community suffered a loss this past February as our most senior market vendor, Emert Verbeck passed away. His tomatoes and sweet corn and bell peppers were sought after every year. Emert and son Wayne, the “Verbeck Boys” as I call them have been a fixture at the market for many years, as has Emert’s annual birthday party. This year would have been his 98th on July 31st, and the market is hosting a celebration of his life that day which providentially falls on a Thursday. There will be surprises to honor the memory our favorite gentleman farmer. Young or old, you will learn something of value from a person with experience. Eat healthy, save money, and gain wisdom this week. Come to the market!

NVCS Spring Quarter ends SUBMITTED BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Only two classes remain this Spring Quarter. They are: Useful Wild Stuff (Tues, June 24) and Declaration of Independence

FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen

Summer is almost here — which means it’s officially vacation season. You may be looking forward to “getting away from it all,” but, as you know, vacations actually require a fair amount of planning. And it might surprise you to learn that some of the efforts required for successful vacations can impart some valuable lessons in other areas of your life — such as investing.

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On June 3 the fifth grade class from Oroville came to the hilltop for their annual field trip and learned about the Oregon Trail and the pioneers that traveled from the east. will be full with more games. There will be music, door prizes, softball and volleyball, arts and crafts and lots and lots of door prize drawings. Get a group together and come spend the day in Molson. Perhaps the Grange in Molson will be this week’s Favorite Place on our Hilltop. Are you planning to be a part of the Chesaw Fourth of July Parade? Well it is time to get your entry registration made before it is too late. You must bring with you a half sheet of paper with your information on it. We will need to have this information for the line up and the announcer in the arena. The information must include: Who you are, who you represent, a short description where you come from (queen, princess, local or county, fair, what and when is your celebration? We have a new Parade Chairperson this year so let’s make Michell’s job a little easier, sign up now. You can reach Michelle at 509-485-3606. On June 3 the 5th Grade Class

HILLTOP COMMENTS (Thurs, June 26). It’s been a good spring quarter and we thank our students, our instructors and our advertisers for making North Valley Community Schools a viable, one-of-a-kind program in our area. It’s a program in which

from Oroville came to visit our Hilltop. This is a annual field trip, and goes along with the lessons they learned about the Oregon Trail and the Pioneers that traveled from the east. Waiting for the children were two black draft horses and a covered wagon. The horses and wagon belong to Don Super of Highland Stage Company, who provide Wagon Train and Stage Coach Adventures. The Adventure for this day was to make the 14 mile walk to Bonaparte Lake. No! they do not have to walk back to the Historic Home on Nealey Road where they started. The students were separated into three groups, so the they could rotate the positions they walked. One group was in front of the horses, another, bringing up the rear, and the last group was inside the wagon. The children were all very well behaved and eager to get on the trail. Thanks go out to Maria and David Covarrubias for the rest stop and drinks. Until next week.

we should all have great pride. We will be working throughout the summer to be ready for Fall Quarter which starts in September. If you have ideas for classes or would like to teach a class, PLEASE give us a call at 509-476-2011 or send us an email at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu. The phone and email will be monitored throughout the summer.

What Can Vacations Teach You about Investing?

Reported by Edward Jones

Includes 96 Newspapers & 24 Shoppers

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and third Thursday at 6:30 p.m. We would like to see more members attend. Tuesday is free pool all day long. Friday is Meat Draw, kitchen and Bingo all starting at 5:30 p.m. Saturday is Karaoke at 9 p.m. and on Sunday there is Pinochle at 1 p.m. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: first place Gladys Fifer, second place to Leonard Paulsen low score went to Penny Smith and last pinochle to Gene Michels and Joann Michels. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God Bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

The next event on our Hilltop will be the Friday Night BINGO at 7 p.m. on the June 20 in the Grange Hall in Molson -- $10 gets you in play for 10 games. Bring your favorite snacks to share and have a good time. On the next day, Midsummer Festival, June 21 at 8 a.m. the kitchen at the Grange Hall will be filled with hungry visitors ready for the wonderful Pancake Breakfast for $8. After breakfast there are many events to entertain you or that you can participate in a walk/run and a Classic Car Display. At 10:30 a.m. you can decorate the May Pole and at 11 a.m. it will be time for the big parade. This year Davey, Silvie and Sandra Hilstad will be the Grand Marshals. The Sitzmark Ski Club will have Food Concessions from 11 am-3 pm. from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. be ready for the Horseshoe Tournament, Kids games and new this year the Amazing Molson Challenge (Scavenger Hunt and so much more). At 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. the Ed Forthun Memorial Frisbee Golf Tournament. The Car Show voting needs to be done by 1:45 p.m. so awards can be presented by 2 p.m. All other awards will be done by 2:30 p.m. The rest of the day

Here are some vacation-related moves that you may want to transfer to the investment and financial arenas: Secure your home. If you’re going on vacation for a week or so, you may need to take some steps to safeguard your home: stopping your mail and newspaper, putting on a timer to turn on lights, alerting your neighbors that you’ll be out of town, and so on. But while it’s important to secure your home

today, you will also want to help ensure it will be there for your family in the future, should anything happen to you. That’s why you’ll want to maintain adequate life and disability insurance. Know your route. If you are driving to your vacation destination, you will want to plan your route beforehand, so that you can avoid timeconsuming delays and detours. And to reach your financial goals, such as a comfortable retirement, you will also want to chart your course — by creating an investment strategy that is designed to help you work towards those goals based on your specific risk tolerance, investment preferences and time horizon. Keep enough gas in the tank. As you set out on a road trip, you need a full tank of gas in your car, and you’ll have to keep refueling along the way. And to “go the distance” in pursuing your financial goals, you will need to have sufficient “fuel” in the form of investments with reasonable growth potential. Without a reasonable amount of growth-oriented vehicles in your portfolio, you could lose ground to inflation and potentially fall short of your objectives — so, over time, you may need to “refuel” by reviewing your portfolio and rebalancing if necessary.

Protect yourself from getting burned. If your vacation plans include a stay at the beach, you’ll need to protect yourself and your family from the hot sun — so make sure you’re all using sunscreen. When you invest, you can also get “burned” if you are not careful — especially if you are inclined to chase after “hot” investments. By the time you hear about these socalled sizzlers, they may already be cooling off, and, even more importantly, they just might not be appropriate for your goals and risk tolerance. Instead of becoming a “heat-seeking” investor, focus your efforts on building a diversified array of quality investments appropriate for your needs. If you only own one type of financial asset, and a downturn hits that asset class, your portfolio could take a big hit. But by diversifying your holdings, you can help reduce the effects of volatility. Keep in mind, though, that diversification, by itself, can’t guarantee profits or protect against loss. As we’ve seen, some of the same principles that apply to creating a vacation may also be applicable to your investing habits. So, put these principles to work to enjoy a pleasant vacation — and a potentially rewarding investment experience.


JUNE 19, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

TONASKET ELEMENTARY READING GROWTH

OROVILLE ROYAL NEIGHBORS

Supporting emergency services SUBMITTED BY JOANNE MORRIS OROVILLE CHAPTER OF ROYAL NEIGHBORS

The Oroville Royal Neighbors Of America’s “2014 Raffle Extraordinaire, which raised money for Oroville Emergency Services� has ended and the winners have been picked. The three winners were picked Saturday afternoon at the Farmer’s Market by Susan Marcille. The grand prize winner was Randee Welfare from Oroville. The second and third place prizes went to Vera Roel and Judy Miller also of Oroville. The raffle was made possible through the generous donations of many local businesses. All Royal Neighbors members would like

Tonasket Elementary School had four students win donated bikes at its year-end assembly for most growth in reading according NWEA testing. The Oroville Masons Club donated two bikes; due to a tie for most growth between two girls and a tie for most growth between two boys the Tonasket PTO stepped in and donated two more bikes. Winners were (l-r) Krystal Schade (5th grade, Mr. Vassar); Vanessa Pacheco (3rd grade, Mrs. Cheeseman); Jalen Kiely (2nd grade, Mrs. Huckaby); and Joshua Gasho (1st grade, Mr. Mathews).

Vivian Iverson presents an Apple iPad plus gift certificates to Randee Welfare, the Grand Prize Winner of the Oroville Royal Neighbors “2014 Raffle Extraordinaire.� to thank everybody that participated. The real winner will be the volunteers of the Oroville Emergency Services as they will receive one hundred percent of funds raised.

THE LEARNING TREE

NVCS Spring Quarter ends SUBMITTED BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Healing Vets and Saving Pets SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK PRESIDENT, NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Janice Andrew of The Nourishing Hand Pet Rescue informed us at this monthĂ­s meeting about their program called “Paws with a Causeâ€?, a part of a national program called “Pets for Vetsâ€? . She presented the purpose of their program, the benefit of such a program to both the soldier, the vet, and the animal, and how we may be of help. Pets for Vets National believes our country owes military veterans a debt of gratitude. Our soldiers have been brave but

BLUE STAR MOTHERS many of them have returned with physical and emotional injuries that have made it difficult to transition in to civilian life. Some estimates state that as many as 30 percent of returning military veterans suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The goal is to help heal the emotional wounds of military veterans by pairing them with a shelter animal that is specially selected to match his or her personality. Animal trainers rehabilitate the animals and teach them good manners to fit into the veteran’s lifestyle. Training can also include desensitization to

wheel chairs or crutches as well as recognizing panic or anxiety disorder behaviors. It’s a win-win situation! Needy shelter animals receive a second chance at life while giving our returning soldiers a second chance at health and happiness. The bonds of friendship formed between man and animal have the power to ease the suffering of our troops when they return from overseas. Veterans in our area who could benefit from having a companion animal and who are also able to care for an animal are eligible to receive a Pets for Vets companion animal. Come hear about this exciting program for our area! Call Janice Andrew 509-5562753 for more information about this program.

Music in the Park

SUBMITTED BY SUSAN GEISLER & ALLENE HALLIDAY

In 2015 the Oroville Community Library will be 100-years-old. The Friends of the Library (FOL), in league with the City of Oroville, is preparing for this milestone event. Have you noticed the new roof? And how about the terrific new paint job and new door? These are typical of the upkeep jobs homeowners undertake to enhance and extend the lives of their homes. Just so, from time to time our library needs repairs and refurbishments also. For its

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en espaùol Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

Faith Lutheran Church

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY upcoming Centennial, the library will undergo further renovations. City Hall is studying plans for this year’s projects. Perhaps you have stopped by our FOL booth to purchase a home made treat at a recent Farmers’ Market or been to our January Showtime programs -possibly you’ve done both. These fundraisers assist our library in providing the splendid children’s programs that take place during the summer, as well as year around public access to internet services.

$12.99 to $22.99

WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Rick Braman, who took the helm of the FOL two years ago and who worked to promote the library for even more years, recently retired from that position. We appreciate the time and and talent he’s given to our group. The FOL continues its work under the leadership of Eilene Smith, a long time member and library supporter. We meet on the second Wednesday at noon every month in the library. You are invited to bring your lunch and ideas to a meeting.

MOVIES www.olivertheatre.ca

Oliver, B.C.

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

250-498-2277

BLENDED THURS. - FRI. JUNE 19, 20 • 7 & 9:15 EDGE OF TOMORROW

JUNE 21 – 22 – 23 - 24, 26 – 27 SHOWTIMES ON FRI. & SAT. @ 7:00 & 9:15 P.M. A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST SAT-SUN-MON-TUES.JUNE 28 - 29 - 30, JULY 1 SHOWTIMES ON SAT. @ 7:00 & 9:15 P.M.

HOW TO TRAIN 102m YOUR DRAGON 2 PG

MIRAGE THEATER

MALEFICENT

NEW OFFICE in YAKIMA

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. +RO\(XFKDULVWVWUG WK‡0RUQLQJ3UD\HUQG WK +HDOLQJ6HUYLFHVW6XQGD\ 7KH5HYHUHQG0DULO\Q:LOGHU :DUGHQ‡

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

DRAMA/ROMANCE STARRING SHAILENE WOODLEY, ANSEL ELGORT, NAT WOLFF. FRI.6:30,9:45. SAT.*3:30, 6:30, 9:45. SUN *3:30, 6:30,9:45 .WKDYS 6:30,9:45

22 JUMP STREET

126min

PG13

Oroville Free Methodist )LU6WUHHW‡Pastor Rod Brown‡ 6XQ6FKRRODP‡:RUVKLS6HUYLFHDP Youth Activity Center‡&HQWUDO$YH 0RQGD\SP‡$IWHU6FKRRO0:)SP RIÂżFH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ

LOOMIS

COMEDYACTION/CRIME STARRING CHANNING TATUM, JONAH HILL, ICE CUBE. FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. SUN*3:45, 6:45, 9:45 WKDAYS 6:45, 9:45 R 112 min Matinee $6.00

Seventh-Day Adventist WK 0DLQ2URYLOOH %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡

PG

ACTION/ADVENTURE/FAMILY STARRING 98 min ANGELINA JOLIE, ELLE FANNING, SHARITO COPLEY. FRI.7:00,9:30. SAT.*4:00,7:00,9:30. SUN *4:00,7:00, 9:30. WKDYS 7:00, 9:30.

Adult $8.50

Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP 6XQGD\6FKRRO &KLOGUHQÂśV&KXUFK. WRSP2SHQWR&RPPXQLW\ /RFDWHGDW.LG&LW\(DVW2URYLOOH ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡ Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

Call Today: 877-823-2020

Oroville Ward +LJKZD\  Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Church of Christ

ANIMATION/ADVERNTURE/ACTION STARRING JAY BARUCHEL, CATE BLANCHETT, GERARD BUTLER FRI. 6:30 & 9:15. SAT. *3:45, 6:30 & 9:15. SUN. *3:45, 6:30, 9:15. WKDYS 6:30,9:15

The

With interest-free payment options, this technology is now more affordable than ever. “Definitely worth the $2150 cost. I should have come sooner,� said Dr. Cusic’s patient. For more information and a FREE telephone consultation,

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Valley Christian Fellowship

Oliver Theatre

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

Patient Driving with Bioptic Telescopic Glasses

0DLQ6WUHHW2URYLOOH DP(QJOLVK0DVVVW6XQGD\RIWKH0RQWK Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡

)LU2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

Seattle Optometrist Helps LEGALLY BLIND to See!

Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

Oroville United Methodist

OMAK THEATER

Just because you have macular degeneration (or other vision-limiting conditions) doesn’t always mean you must give up driving or reading. A Seattle optometrist, Dr. Ross Cusic, is using miniaturized binoculars or telescopes to help people who have lost vision from macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy or other eye conditions. “Our job is to figure out everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning,� says Dr. Cusic. “Whether it’s driving, reading, TV, seeing faces, check writing, bingo or bridge. We work with whatever is on the person’s ‘wish list.’�

CHURCH GUIDE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Kites Galore

Okanogan Valley OROVILLE

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

spring quarter and we thank our students, our instructors and our advertisers for making North Valley Community Schools a viable, one-of-a-kind program in

Come join us!

Community Cultural Center presents Ian McFeron, June 27 at History Park in Tonasket, 6:00-9:00 p.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket (and bug repellent). La Ultima will be serving up Mexican food for purchase, and the CCC will have a drink and dessert table by donation. A tip jar for the band will be passed through the audience. Upcoming Music in the Park events will be: July 11 (local talent); August 1 (Chanon and friends, and Randy Battle Bluz Band.

Oroville Library turns 100 in 2015

Only two classes remain this Spring Quarter. They are: Useful Wild Stuff (Tues, June 24) and Declaration of Independence (Thurs, June 26). It’s been a good

our area. It’s a program in which we should all have great pride. We will be working throughout the summer to be ready for Fall Quarter which starts in September. If you have ideas for classes or would like to teach a class, PLEASE give us a call at 509-476-2011 or send us an email at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu. The phone and email will be monitored throughout the summer.

Loomis Community Church

Child $6.00

1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVĂ€OPLV *UDWHG1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGĂ€OPV without their own parent. Photo ID required.

Main Street in Loomis DP6XQGD\6FKRRO 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO ,QIRUPDWLRQ

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship 0ROVRQ*UDQJH0ROVRQ Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm :HGQHVGD\IDPLO\1LJKWSP Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver 3K

TONASKET Holy Rosary Catholic Church 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket DP(QJOLVK0DVVVW6XQGD\RIWKH0RQWK Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. SP6SDQLVK0DVVHYHU\6DWXUGD\ Father Jose Maldonado‡

Immanuel Lutheran Church +DYLOODK5G7RQDVNHW‡ 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO ³)RULWLVE\JUDFH\RXKDYHEHHQVDYHGWKURXJKIDLWKDQG WKLVQRWIURP\RXUVHOYHVLWLVWKHJLIWRI*RGQRWE\ZRUNV VRWKDWQRRQHFDQERDVW´(SK

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Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

$6:KLWFRPE$YH‡3DVWRU*HRUJH&RQNOH Sunday: 10 a.m.  ‡FHOO  

Tonasket Community UCC (WK7RQDVNHW‡ ³$ELEOLFDOO\EDVHGWKRXJKWIXOJURXSRI&KULVWLDQ3HRSOH´

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. &DOOIRUSURJUDPDFWLYLW\LQIRUPDWLRQ Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren /RRPLV2URYLOOH5G7RQDVNHW DP3UDLVH6LQJLQJDP:RUVKLS6HUYLFH DP6XQGD\VFKRROIRUDOODJHV

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren +Z\7RQDVNHW 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service ³&RQWLQXLQJWKHZRUNRI-HVXVVLPSO\SHDFHIXOO\WRJHWKHU´



To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 19, 2014

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

Houses For Sale TONASKET HOME

Large Home, beautifully landscaped, fenced very private backyard, accents this home in established neighborhood. 2319 sq ft. with 4 bedrooms, 1 ¾ baths, hobby room, open spacious kitchen, Lots of parking, sprinkler system, all this within walking distances of schools and shopping. Price reduced to $249,500. Call 509-486-2295 for appointment.

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Health General

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!$/04)/. !$/04)/.å nå /URå HEARTSå REACHå OUTåå

TOå YOUå ,OVINGå COUPLEå HOPESå TOå ADOPTåå "RIDGEPORTå-ED$ENTAL Aå NEWBORNå ANDå PROMISESå LOVE å HAPPI $ENTALå!SSISTANTSå åå&ULLåTIMEåPOSITIONS 2.å.URSEå#ASEå-GRå å&ULLåTIME -! #åORå,0.å å&ULLåTIME 0ATIENTå2EGISTRATIONå2EPååå &ULLåTIMEå&ULLåTIMEå %NGLISH3PANISHåBILINGUALåRE å QUIREDåDUEåTOåBUSINESSåNEED

www.gazette-tribune.com 22. Wading birds, such as herons or storks

6. Romanian round dance

24. Without concern

8. Rent payer

26. “Smart” ones

9. “Silent Spring” subject (abbrev.)

28. Atoll protector

10. County ___, Ireland

29. 20-20, e.g.

11. Conceals

30. Landlocked African country

12. Maximums

32. Tropical fish with thick lips

13. Camouflage ___ suit

35. Morgue, for one

16. Some daisies

4ONASKET -! 2 å-! #åORå,0. ååPERåDIEMåPOSITION

36. “I” problem

21. ___ Hitchcock

37. Watergate, e.g.

23. Disdain

41. Skyscraper, e.g.

25. Drops on blades

/2/6),,%å$%.4!, Dental Assistant Per Diem

45. Apprentice

27. Fastener

46. Beach bird

31. Moors

48. Twangy, as a voice

33. Not “fer”

49. Spacecraft protective covering (2 wds)

34. Chesterfields, e.g.

Crosswords

å

3EE åWWWMYFAMILYHEALTHORG FORåJOBåDESCRIPTIONSå 3UBMITåCOVERåLETTERåANDå RESUMEåORåAPPLICATIONåTOåå &(# åCOå(UMANå2ESOURCES åå 0/å"OXå å/KANOGAN åå 7!ååORåEMAILå (2 MYFAMILYHEALTHORGåå /PENåUNTILålLLEDå &(#åISåANå%%/å%MPLOYER

53. Fizzy drink

ANSWERS

Across

1. Son or daughter by marriage 10. Laboring engine sound

www.gazette-tribune.com

37. Separation into factions

54. Specks in the sea

38. Ridges transitioning from a gentle slope to a cliff

55. Competed

39. Marine rock-clinger

57. Back muscle, familiarly

40. “Fantasy Island” prop

58. Backgammon piece

41. Joins the military

59. Be naughty

42. Cut off

61. Parsonage

43. Dead body

62. Elevation instrument

44. Beetles

63. Merlin, e.g.

47. Bad-mouth

64. Furniture refinishers

50. Perfect, e.g.

14. Retired with benefits

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7. Within the womb (2 wds)

51. Animal in a roundup

15. Print made with aluminum plate

Down

17. Intended to regulate monopolies

1. Like some relationships

59. Fold, spindle or mutilate

18. Blend

2. Defensible

60. “___ Town Too” (1981 hit)

19. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby”

3. Competitors

20. Beanery sign

4. Telekinesis, e.g.

21. Iris part

5. Commend

52. Ledger entry 56. Audition tape


JUNE 19, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Table Mountain Star Party returns to Eden Valley in July

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Public Notices

DUEĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ NOTEĂĽ ORĂĽ OTHERĂĽ INSTRU ĂĽ MENTĂĽ SECURED ĂĽ ANDĂĽ ASĂĽ AREĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽĂĽ BYĂĽ STATUTEĂĽ 6ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ ABOVEĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽĂĽ REALĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ SOLDĂĽ TOĂĽ SATISFYĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ EXPENSESĂĽ OFĂĽ SALEĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGA ĂĽ TIONĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽ BYĂĽ STATUTEĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽĂĽ MADEĂĽ WITHOUTĂĽ WARRANTY ĂĽ EXPRESSĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ IMPLIEDĂĽ REGARDINGĂĽ TITLE ĂĽ POSSESSION ĂĽĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUMBRANCESĂĽ ONĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 4HEĂĽ DEFAULTS ĂĽ REFERREDĂĽ TOĂĽ INĂĽ PARA ĂĽ GRAPHĂĽ )LLĂĽ MUSTĂĽ BEĂĽ CUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ DATE ĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ CAUSEĂĽ AĂĽ DISCONTINUANCEĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SALEĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ DISCONTINUEDĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ TERMINATEDĂĽ IFĂĽ ATĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ ONĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BE ĂĽ FOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ DATE ĂĽ THEĂĽ DEFAULTS ĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ SETĂĽ FORTHĂĽ INĂĽ PARAGRAPHĂĽ )LLĂĽ ISAREĂĽ CUREDĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ FEESĂĽ ANDĂĽ COSTSĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ PAIDĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ MAYĂĽ BEĂĽ TERMINATEDĂĽ ATĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ AFTERĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ DATE ĂĽ ANDĂĽ BE ĂĽ FOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALE ĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWER ĂĽ 'RAN ĂĽ TOR ĂĽ ANYĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ HOLDERĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ RECORDEDĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ LIENĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUM ĂĽ BRANCEĂĽ PAYINGĂĽ THEĂĽ ENTIREĂĽ PRINCIPALĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ PLUSĂĽ COSTS ĂĽ FEES ĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADVANC ĂĽ ES ĂĽ IFĂĽ ANY ĂĽ MADEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ TERMSĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽ ANDORĂĽ $EEDĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ ANDĂĽ CURINGĂĽ ALLĂĽ OTHERĂĽ DE ĂĽ FAULTSĂĽ 6)ĂĽ !ĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽĂĽ WASĂĽ TRANSMITTEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCIARYĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ ADDRESSESĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ +%. ĂĽ .%4(ĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ 2!.#( ĂĽ -%4(/7 ĂĽ 7! ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 4(ĂĽ 342%%4ĂĽ 3/54(%!34 ĂĽ %6 ĂĽ %2%44 ĂĽ 7! ĂĽ ĂĽ 30/53%ĂĽ /&ĂĽĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ĂĽ 4(ĂĽ 3) ĂĽ 2%%4ĂĽ 3/54(%!34 ĂĽ %6%2%44 ĂĽĂĽ 7! ĂĽ ĂĽ 30/53%ĂĽ /&ĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ

2!.#( ĂĽ -%4(/7 ĂĽ 7! ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ BOTHĂĽ lRSTĂĽ CLASSĂĽ ANDĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ MAILĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ WHICHĂĽ ISĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ ANDĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ WEREĂĽ PERSONALLYĂĽ SERVEDĂĽ WITHĂĽ SAIDĂĽĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ DEFAULTĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ WRITTENĂĽĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽ WASĂĽ POSTEDĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ CONSPICUOUSĂĽ PLACEĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ REALĂĽ PROP ĂĽ ERTYĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ INĂĽ PARAGRAPHĂĽ )ĂĽ ABOVE ĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ HASĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ SUCHĂĽ SERVICEĂĽ ORĂĽ POSTINGĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ6))ĂĽĂĽ 4HEĂĽ4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ HELDĂĽ INĂĽ AC ĂĽ CORDANCEĂĽ WITHĂĽ #HĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ WISHINGĂĽ TOĂĽ BIDĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽĂĽ BEĂĽ REQUIREDĂĽ TOĂĽ HAVEĂĽ INĂĽ HISHERĂĽ POS ĂĽ SESSIONĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ TIMEĂĽ THEĂĽ BIDDINGĂĽ COM ĂĽ MENCES ĂĽ CASH ĂĽ CASHIERSĂĽ CHECK ĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ CHECKĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ AMOUNTĂĽ OFĂĽ ATĂĽĂĽ LEASTĂĽ ONEĂĽ DOLLARĂĽ OVERĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCI ĂĽ ARYSĂĽ OPENINGĂĽ BIDĂĽ )NĂĽ ADDITION ĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SUCCESSFULĂĽ BIDDERĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ REQUIREDĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ PAYĂĽ THEĂĽ FULLĂĽ AMOUNTĂĽ OFĂĽ HISHERĂĽ BIDĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ CASH ĂĽ CASHIERSĂĽ CHECK ĂĽ ORĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽĂĽ CHECKĂĽ WITHINĂĽ ONEĂĽ HOURĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ MAKINGĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ BIDĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ WHOSEĂĽ NAMEĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADDRESSĂĽ AREĂĽ SETĂĽ FORTHĂĽ BELOWĂĽ WILLĂĽĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ INĂĽ WRITINGĂĽ TOĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ REQUEST ĂĽ INGĂĽ IT ĂĽ AĂĽ STATEMENTĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽ COSTSĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ FEESĂĽDUEĂĽATĂĽANYĂĽTIMEĂĽPRIORĂĽTOĂĽTHEĂĽSALEĂĽĂĽ 6)))ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ EFFECTĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ DEPRIVEĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ ANDĂĽ ALLĂĽ THOSEĂĽĂĽ WHOĂĽ HOLDĂĽ BY ĂĽ THROUGHĂĽ ORĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽ OFĂĽ THEIRĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ ABOVEĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ )8ĂĽ !NYONEĂĽĂĽ HAVINGĂĽ ANYĂĽ OBJECTIONĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ WHATSOEVERĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ AF ĂĽ FORDEDĂĽ ANĂĽ OPPORTUNITYĂĽ TOĂĽ BEĂĽ HEARDĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ THOSEĂĽ OBJECTIONSĂĽ IFĂĽ THEYĂĽ BRINGĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ TOĂĽ RESTRAINĂĽ THEĂĽ SAMEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽ &AILUREĂĽ TOĂĽ BRINGĂĽĂĽ SUCHĂĽ AĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ MAYĂĽ RESULTĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽ WAIVERĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ ANYĂĽ PROPERĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ FORĂĽ INVALIDAT ĂĽ INGĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ 8ĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽĂĽ 4/ĂĽ /##50!.43ĂĽ /2ĂĽ 4%.!.43ĂĽ

4HEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽĂĽ ISĂĽ ENTITLEDĂĽ TOĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ PROP ĂĽ ERTYĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SALE ĂĽ ASĂĽ AGAINSTĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ UNDERĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ THEĂĽ OWNER ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ HAVINGĂĽ ANĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ INCLUDINGĂĽ OCCU ĂĽ PANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ !FTERĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ THEĂĽ PUR ĂĽ CHASERĂĽ HASĂĽ THEĂĽ RIGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ EVICTĂĽ OCCU ĂĽ PANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ BYĂĽ SUM ĂĽ MARYĂĽ PROCEEDINGĂĽ UNDERĂĽ #HAPTERĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ &ORĂĽ TENANT OCCUPIEDĂĽĂĽ PROPERTY ĂĽ THEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ SHALLĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽĂĽ AĂĽ TENANTĂĽ WITHĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ INĂĽ ACCOR ĂĽ DANCEĂĽ WITHĂĽ SECTIONĂĽ ĂĽ OFĂĽ THISĂĽ ACTĂĽĂĽ $!4%$ĂĽ ĂĽ 2%')/.!,ĂĽĂĽ 42534%%ĂĽ 3%26)#%3ĂĽ #/20/2! ĂĽ 4)/.ĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ "YĂĽ -%,!.)%ĂĽ "%! ĂĽ -!. ĂĽ !54(/2):%$ĂĽ !'%.4ĂĽ !D ĂĽ DRESSĂĽ ĂĽ STĂĽ !VENUE ĂĽ 3UITEĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 3EATTLE ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 0HONEĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ )NFORMATIONĂĽĂĽ WWWRTRUSTEECOMĂĽ 0ĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ  0UBLISHEDĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ /KANOGANĂĽ 6ALLEYĂĽĂĽ 'AZETTE 4RIBUNEĂĽ ONĂĽ -AYĂĽ ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ *UNEĂĽ ĂĽ /6'

Sudoku

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

2 2

6

8

5

1 4

9

7

7

6

3

9 3

7 5

2

5

4

9

9

1

3 8

4

4

7

5

2

4

Easy, difficulty rating 0.40

ANSWERS

6

3

7

1

2

8

3

6

5

4

1

2

9

7

7 1 2 9 5 4 8 6 3

4 7 5 2 3 9 1 8 6

2 3 8 6 1 7 9 4 5

1 6 9 5 4

6 5 7 4 9 1

8

2

3

3

7

8

2

9 8 1 3 7 2 6 5 4

3 2 4 8 6 5 7 9 1

TAINĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ DATEDĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ RECORDEDĂĽ  ĂĽ UNDERĂĽ !UDI ĂĽ TORS2ECORDERSĂĽ .OĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ RECORDSĂĽ OFĂĽ /+!./'!.ĂĽ #OUNTY ĂĽĂĽ 7ASHINGTON ĂĽ FROMĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽ %ĂĽĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ -!22)%$ĂĽ !3ĂĽ ()3ĂĽ 3%0!2 ĂĽ !4%ĂĽ %34!4% ĂĽ ASĂĽ 'RANTOR ĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ 02,!0 ĂĽ ).# ĂĽ ASĂĽ 4RUSTEE ĂĽ INĂĽ FAVORĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ "!.+ĂĽ /&ĂĽ !-%2)#! ĂĽ .!ĂĽ ĂĽ ))ĂĽ .OĂĽ AC ĂĽ TIONĂĽ COMMENCEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCIARYĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ ISĂĽ NOWĂĽ PENDINGĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ SEEKĂĽ SATISFACTIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽĂĽ INĂĽ ANYĂĽ COURTĂĽ BYĂĽ REASONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROW ĂĽ ERSĂĽ ORĂĽ 'RANTORSĂĽ DEFAULTĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLI ĂĽ GATIONĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽĂĽ )LLĂĽ 4HEĂĽ DEFAULTS ĂĽ FORĂĽ WHICHĂĽ THISĂĽ FORE ĂĽ CLOSUREĂĽ ISAREĂĽ MADEĂĽ AREĂĽ ASĂĽ FOLLOWSĂĽĂĽ &!),52%ĂĽ 4/ĂĽ 0!9ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ -/.4(,9ĂĽĂĽ 0!9-%.4ĂĽ 7()#(ĂĽ "%#!-%ĂĽ $5%ĂĽĂĽ /.ĂĽ  ĂĽ !.$ĂĽ !,,ĂĽ 35"3% ĂĽ 15%.4ĂĽ -/.4(,9ĂĽ 0!9-%.43 ĂĽĂĽ 0,53ĂĽ ,!4%ĂĽ #(!2'%3ĂĽ !.$ĂĽ /4( ĂĽ %2ĂĽ #/343ĂĽ !.$ĂĽ &%%3ĂĽ !3ĂĽ 3%4ĂĽĂĽ &/24(ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ &AILUREĂĽ TOĂĽ PAYĂĽ WHENĂĽ DUEĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ AMOUNTSĂĽ WHICHĂĽ AREĂĽ NOWĂĽĂĽ INĂĽ ARREARSĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ !MOUNTĂĽ DUEĂĽ ASĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ -ARCHĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ $ELINQUENTĂĽ 0AY ĂĽ MENTSĂĽ FROMĂĽ *ULYĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ PAY ĂĽ MENTSĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ PAYMENTSĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ PAYMENTSĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ   ĂĽ THROUGHĂĽĂĽ    ĂĽ ,ATEĂĽ #HARGESĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ "%.%&)#)!29ĂĽ !$6!.#%3ĂĽ 0ROPER ĂĽ TYĂĽ )NSPECTIONĂĽ &EESĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 3US ĂĽ PENSEĂĽ #REDITĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 4/4!,ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ )6ĂĽ4HEĂĽ SUMĂĽ OWINGĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ ISĂĽ 0RINCIPALĂĽ   ĂĽ TO ĂĽ GETHERĂĽ WITHĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ ASĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ NOTEĂĽ ORĂĽ OTHERĂĽ INSTRUMENTĂĽ SECURED ĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ SUCHĂĽ OTHERĂĽ COSTSĂĽ ANDĂĽ FEESĂĽ ASĂĽ AREĂĽ

Public Notices

DURING THE DAY There is plenty going on during daylight hours as well. Activities include: • Speaker presentations on a variety of topics ranging from the practical (making a mirror for a telescope, or learning techniques for taking pictures through a telescope) to historical (how “ordinaryâ€? citizens have contributed to scientific study) to the less easily defined (what is the true color of the universe?). • Over the course of the week and with the purchase of a kit, you can be guided through the process of building your own telescope. • Vendors are available on-site selling telescopes, accessories,

4

Legals Continued From Previous Page

AT NIGHT The reason most regulars come to star parties is to take part in what happens at night. • If you are an experienced user of your own telescope, you probably know what you’ll be doing after dark. • If you have a telescope but never figured out how to see much through it, bring it. People will be happy to demonstrate the basics of telescope use; most also are willing to show off the views through their own telescopes. • “Sky toursâ€? will also be available to give basic information about the night sky. • Things to see include several planets (Saturn and Mars will be in good position to see in the

8

Public Notices

vacation. Most who attend for the full week camp in tents, trailers or RVs (some will also stay in the Eden Valley Guest Ranch cabins, but those accommodation have already been reserved). Many will bring telescopes to look skyward. Telescopes with special filters can view the sun, but most “observing,� as it is called, will happen after sundown. The sky at Eden Valley is remarkably dark, far as it is from city lights and helped by the altitude of the Okanogan Highlands. While the moon and planets can be viewed by telescopes located just about anywhere with a view of the sky, fainter and more distant objects are best seen in dark skies that we in the Okanogan almost take for granted. For many TMSP attendees, it’s star parties like these that provide their only chance throughout the year to see all but the brightest such objects. Most astronomy aficionados will bring their own telescopes, but most also will happily share the view with those who don’t have or can’t transport their own to the site. Binoculars are also handy to bring along.

9

OROVILLE - Under the dark cover of night, they will come. Okay, most will probably arrive during daylight hours. But the night will be the primary focus of five days (and nights) of seminars at the Table Mountain Star Party, which will be returning to Eden Valley Guest Ranch east of Oroville July 22-26. The star party - a gathering of astronomy enthusiasts, their telescopes, and vendors - was displaced from its typical location at Table Mountain outside of Ellensburg after fire damaged the area in 2012. Eden Valley Guest Ranch was selected as the annual event’s home for the time being. Last year, its first at Eden Valley, organizers weren’t sure how well the transplanted site would work or how many people it could accommodate, so advance publicity was almost non-existent save for regular attendees who mark their calendars months in advance. Online registration and lots of information is available at www. tmspa.com.

and other paraphernalia. This could include “test drivesâ€? of telescopes available for purchase. • The student program, available for kids age 5-16, has been a particular point of pride at the Table Mountain Star Party, including learning, crafts and fun events. • A swap meet takes place on Saturday morning. • Eden Valley Guest Ranch’s trail rides and nature hikes will also be available during the day (any fees required for Eden Valleybased activities are not included in the star party registration). It’s hard to say how long the Table Mountain Star Party will continue to take place at Eden Valley Guest Ranch. Both the organizers and Eden Valley proprietors Patrick and Robin Stice were pleased with how last year went, but TMSP’s eventual goal is to return to the site for which it’s named and where the tradition of the star party has grown for more than 30 years. In the meantime, it’s an internationally renowned event that has chosen the Oroville area as its home and a great opportunity for the area to see what it’s about without leaving our own back yard.

evenings); globular star clusters (basically, they appear like a ball of stars); nebulas (depending on the type, birth places or death throes of stars); and galaxies (massive groups of countless stars so far away that their light takes millions of years to travel here). Those pictures you’ve seen from the Hubble Telescope on the internet or TV? Put them out of your mind. What the camera sees and what the eyes see bear little resemblance to one another.

Cost for the week is $60 for the first person, $40 for each additional adult, $15 for students ages 7-17 and free for kids 6 and under. Registrations are based on a “per vehicle� structure (one “first person� per vehicle) but not limited to family member groupings to encourage carpooling. Meals are not included in the price, but some meals can be pre-purchased while registering, while a food vendor is also available on-site. There are also one-day/night only passes available for $5 per person (maximum $20 per vehicle), primarily to give locals a chance to check out what’s going on; more than one day’s attendance requires full registration. “We know after last year what we can handle there,� said Table Mountain Star Party Association Chairman Thom Jenkins. “It’s a further drive for a lot of the people that usually go (as opposed to the Table Mountain site), so we’re hoping to get the word out to the locals that they are more than welcome.� If you are inclined toward or interested in science, the Table Mountain Star Party is an ideal

5

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Generated by http://www.opensky.ca/~jdhildeb/software/sudokugen

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HINTS FOR HOMEOWNERS De-Cluttering Solutions for Your Home Pack up all your knickknacks, anything that is sitting on top of a countertop, table or other flat surfaces. Anything that you haven’t used in at least a year? Give away what you can, throw away or donate unused items.

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SMALL FARM - 80 Acres w/Home & Outbuildings. 9 miles to Tonasket. County Road. Borders Nature Conservancy. Cascade Views. Includes 2 Tractors & other Equip. $380,000.00 - Possible Owner Contract TONASKET NEW LISTING - A-frame Style Home. 2-bdrm, 2-bath. 2-car Garage. 6-bay Equip Shed. Insulated Cellar. Deck w/Views. 1/2 Acre w/easy care yard. 8 miles to town. - Sell to Settle Estate. $150,000.00

SOLD

Jan Asmussen, Broker - Owner 509-486-2138 www.hilltoprealtyllc.com z 158 Airport Rd - Tonasket, WA. 98855

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Tamara Porter & Joan Cool Price Reduced!!! Awesome layout makes life easier in this 3 bed 2 bath home. Master suite with walk in closet, all upgrade appliances and fenced back yard. This is a MUST SEE $159,500


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 19, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE COMMUNITY CALENDAR Arrigoni finishes 20th at NCAA track finals

METAL E-WASTE COLLECTION

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TONASKET Green Okanogan is hosting an E-Cycle collection and metal drive on Thursday, June 19. All metals are accepted and the following e-cycle materials: computers, monitors, laptops and TVs. Collection is near the corner of Western and Division from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

MOOD SWINGS AT ESTHER BRICQUES

OROVILLE – The Mood Swings from Omak will perform Thursday, June 19 at Esther Bricques Winery. The Mood Swings features three women vocalists, Judy Johnston, CherylAnn Crego and Betsy Rainsford singing in the style of the “girl groups� of the 1940s through the ‘60s into Motown sound. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. Esther Bricques Winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more info, call the winery at 509476-2861.

STARTING FRESH WORKSHOP

OMAK - Starting Fresh: A workshop for people who can’t pass a background check will be presented by WorkSource Okanogan County on )ULGD\-XQHDWWKHRIĂ€FHDW S. Main from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. “Is your record or anything in your EDFNJURXQGPDNLQJLWGLIĂ€FXOWIRU \RXWRĂ€QGDMRE"$UH\RXODFNLQJ the knowledge of how to market your VNLOOVDQGDELOLWLHVWRDQHPSOR\HU",I the answer is yes, this workshop is for you. For more infor or for registration call Nancy Nash at 509-826-7558.

TAMING OF THE SHREW

TONASKET - The Tonasket Community Theater’s presentation of “The Taming of the Shrew� continues this week with performances on Friday and Saturday, June 20-21, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, June 22, at 4 p.m.

MOLSON FAMILY BINGO

MOLSON - Just a reminder that Molson Grange has a family bingo on WKHĂ€UVWDQGVHFRQG)ULGD\RIHYHU\ month in the evening. There will be DQH[FHSWLRQEHFDXVHWKHĂ€UVW)ULGD\ of July is the 4th we will not be having bingo. We hope every one has a wonderful holiday and we will see you on the Friday, June 20 and Friday, July 18. Children are welcome if accompanied by a parent or guardian. &RPHRXWDQGHQMR\

MOLSON MIDSUMMER FESTIVAL

MOLSON - The 19th Annual Molson Midsummer Festival is Saturday, June 21 at the Molson School Museum and Grange Hall Areas. The events start at 8 a.m. with the pancake breakfast and include the Fun Run/Walk, May Pole decoration, parade, lunch, horseshoe tourney, kids’ games, Amazing Molson Challenge, Ed Forthun Memorial Frisbee Golf Tournament, car show, arts &

HABITAT HOME TOUR

OMAK - Okanogan County HFH Home Tour will be held in Omak, Okanogan area this year. Four beautiful homes are showcased, Saturday, June 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a salad luncheon served at Shady Creek Garden and Ponds. Tickets are $15 and will be on sale at Oroville Pharmacy, Lee Frank’s in Tonasket, Novel Delights in Omak and Rawson’s in Okanogan. Directions to each home will be given with the ticket purchase. Please come and invite a friend. Proceeds go to the purchase of our eighth building site for an eligible family in need of a home.

SPIRITUAL MOVIE NIGHT

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, June 21 at 6 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call 509-476-0200.

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

TONASKET - Hope Lutheran and Tonasket Free Methodist Churches in Tonasket are offering kids K-12th grade an opportunity to learn about sports, discover character-building concepts, and have a whole lot of fun. At MEGA Sports Camp “Breaking Free,� kids can choose between Soccer, basketball, baseball and cheerleading. Between Sports Sessions, coaches lead LQVRQJVWHOOVWRULHVDQGGRFRROREMHFW lessons that help character-building themes take hold in kids’ hearts. And most importantly, kids will discover God’s great love for them. The camp runs Monday, June 23 - Friday, June 27, 5-8 p.m. Register online at http:// tinyurl.com/pqy2qnr, or pick up forms at Hair Designz or at either church.

her at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu or sign up online at www. northvalleycommunityschools.com.

NVH RESPIRATORY CARE COURSE

North Valley Hospital will be hosting a community education course on respiratory care on Thursday, June 26 from 6-7 p.m. Respiratory Therapist Ken Radford will share information on understanding your respiratory health, spirometry, lung health, COPD and smoking cessation. You will receive a wealth of information on understanding preventative and rescue medications, and education on activities you can do to improve your lung health. The course is free, but with only 14 available spots preregistration is required. Call 509-4863163 or go to our website at www. nvhospital.org to register.

OSOYOOS CHERRY FIESTA

OSOYOOS - Join us on July 1st in Osoyoos, BC for the 66th Annual Cherry Fiesta. Pancake breakfast, parade, music and entertainment DQGHQGVZLWKĂ€UHZRUNV9HQGRUDQG Parade Entry Forms available on our website at osoyoosfestivalsociety. ca/wp/. For more information call Nancy Katerenchuk, 250-495-4008.

TONASKET FOOD BANK

TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

EUGENE, Ore. - It wasn’t the race Catie Arrigoni wanted, but the 2011 Oroville graduate still cracked the top 20 in the steeplechase at her first appearance at the NCAA Division 1 national meet on Wednesday, June 11. She finished ninth out of 12 runners in her heat of the 3,000 meter race and didn’t advance to the championship heat two days later. Her time of 10:24.65 was 20th overall out of the 24 championship contenders. She was seeded 24th after she grabbed the final spot into the championship meet, so it was an improvement of four spots over her seeding. Arrigoni said the magnitude of the moment got to her a bit. “The race was so professional I didn’t realize how serious it was to make it to nationals,� she said. “It was a shock. The race was intense; everyone had their game face on. I was just bouncing around doing my own thing before and trying

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

LISTING YOUR ITEM

GRANGE FLEA MARKET

OROVILLE - The Oroville Grange Flea Market will take place on Saturday, June 24 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. inside the hall at 622 Fir St. Watch for posters and sign on Hwy. 97 on the south end of town. There are a lot of new vendors and bargains. Tables for rent to sell your stuff. For more info call 509-476-3878.

NVCS NATIVE PLANT CLASS

OROVILLE - If the use of native plants for medicines, dyes, and food interests you, this North Valley Community School class, Useful Wild Stuff, is a must. Identify which plants were used by our Native Americans. And, yes, you’ll learn about the ones to avoid, too. Bring a sack lunch and water, and wear sturdy shoes for this outdoor tour of our beautiful surroundings on Tuesday, June 24. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011, email

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazettetribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event� button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

COMMUNITY SIDEWALK SALE PLANNED FOR OROVILLE OROVILLE – A city wide sidewalk sale is planned to coincide with Canada Day, Tuesday, July 1, to help promote Oroville businesses. COST TO PARTICIPATE - Retail businesses and restaurants are being asked to participate and organizations are encouraged to use the event as a fund raiser. Participation in the sidewalk sale is free. ADVERTISING - Organizers say those that want to advertising their business or organization name through flyers, coupons and in the newspaper may contribute to the campaign by contacting Mary Lou Kriner at Mary Lou’s Gifts at 509-476-3200 or Cecilia Ray at World of Gaia at 509-476-2628. WHERE TO SET UP - Businesses are asked to use the space in front of their buildings. Other businesses and organizations can contact Ray to learn what other space is available. “Let’s make it a fun, successful day for Oroville,� said Kriner and Ray.

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not to let the nerves get to me. But regret... However I did move up after seeing how serious everyone four places what I was ranked and looked and the atmosphere before I’m very happy about that.� the race it was tough to keep the The experience of running at mood light. the national meet at the “Once i started thinklegendary University of ing too much going in I Oregon track was somelet myself get stressed and thing Arrigoni said she’d it was over... This whole never forget, and hopes season I have been good to experience again as at not over thinking and the NCAA finals will be being confident but this held there for the next race was different for me. Catie Arrigoni several years. I let the pressure get to “If anyone ever gets me and cracked.� the chance to go to Arrigoni felt that to advance she watch, take it,� she said. “It will be needed to stay in the top five and worth it. You get to see the best let other runners try to catch her. of the best in every event and the (The top five in each heat, plus crowd is amazing. I was two miles the next two top times, advanced out on my cool down run and to the final heat). Instead, she fell could hear the crowd cheering as off the pace quickly and had to the 10k was going on.� work her way back into the race, She added that the support she which hasn’t been her strength. received from back home meant “I didn’t stick to the game a lot to her. plan,� she said. “I’m a runner that “You guys all gave me so much runs well from the front of the support; it truly means so much pack and can maintain and hold. to me,� she said. “I come from Once in the back it is hard to be the best place with the best peomentally in it for me. This is a big ple!�

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MAY 22, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

OUTDOORS RE-CREATION OF OLD SINLAHEKIN MAP

Lost Lake loons beat odds SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE OHA CONSERVATION COORDINATOR

LOST LAKE - The Okanogan Highlands provide some of the best loon-nesting habitat in Washington State, with rich wetlands at the lake’s edge providing ideal conditions for floating mat nests. Lost Lake is no exception, producing more loon chicks on record than any other lake in state. Unfortunately, this year, a fishing tackle jig became embedded in the tongue of the male loon at Lost Lake. “This may have been caused by ingesting a fish on an active fishing line,� says Ginger Poleschook, who has been conducting Washington Common Loon observation and conservation efforts with her husband Dan for 20 years. At first it was not clear whether the male would be able to survive with this impediment. “This tackle could have impaired the loon’s ability to feed and care for the nest and young, but it looks like he is doing pretty well now,� says Jeff Heinlen, Wildlife Biologist for the WA Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). He continues, “This situation is a good example of why there is a lead tackle restriction on this lake. Loons can ingest and become poisoned from lead fishing tackle. The lead restriction is in place to prevent that.� On May 10, Ginger and Dan Poleschook, with the help of Dan Furlong and Jeff Heinlen, attempted to capture the male utilizing a pursein fishing net and decoys painted by Ginger.

Ginger & Dan Poleschook/submitted photo

The male Lost Lake loon, with a fishing tackle jig embedded in its tongue and fishing line protruding from the beak. The Lost Lake male loon is not banded because he has evaded capture every summer during the banding effort coordinated by the Loon Lake Loon Association and the Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI). The male again avoided capture, so the fishing tackle remained embedded. Beating the odds, the male adult has survived for over eight weeks since the tackle was first observed, and possibly longer since it was acquired. Despite the injuries caused by the tackle and line, the pair has successfully produced two chicks, hatched on June 5 and 6. The BRI capture crew will attempt to capture the male in July during the annual capture, banding and lab sampling of adults and chicks, and they will assess if there is any action necessary at that time. In the meantime, the male has been observed foraging, vocalizing, and assisting

with care and protection of the chicks. Community members are encouraged to watch the loons from a respectful distance and if a beached or dead loon is found, it is important to contact Jeff Heinlen at 509-826-7372. According to Dr. Mark Pokras’ Common Loon research (Tufts University, New Hampshire), if loons ingest lead fishing tackle, they will expire in two to three weeks from lead toxicosis. It is prohibited to use lead weights and jigs that measure 1.5 inches or less along the longest axis at the 13 lakes in Washington State where the lead restriction is in place for nesting loons. Heinlen adds, “Please remember that responsible fishing includes collecting all broken fishing line and tackle, and using lead-free tackle.� The community can learn more about loons by reading public information signs posted at Lost and Bonaparte Lakes. More information can also be found at www. okanoganhighlands.org/restoration/lost-lake. OHA owns and manages the Lost Lake Wetland and Wildlife Preserve, initiated in 2010 to protect 40 acres of wetland and 25 acres of adjacent upland forest at the south end of Lost Lake. The Preserve includes family-friendly hiking trails, which are open to the public and feature full-color interpretive signage. For more information about the Lost Lake Wetland and Wildlife Preserve, contact julie@ okanoganhighlands.org or 509476-2432. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues.

Lisa Middleton/Great River Arts

A hand-tinted re-creation of the first Indian allotments in Washington State, among the earliest in the U.S., was done by map artist Lisa Middleton of Great River Arts. The map was made in honor of the 75th Anniversary of the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area, where these allotments were then located. The original map is done on linen and is not hand tinted, but local historian Karen Beaudette asked Middleton to create the hand-tinted version for display.

BUSINESS & SERVICES Directory Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

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PAGE A12

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JUNE 19, 2014

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Daniel S. Dubois, 27, Okanogan,

pleaded guilty June 10 to third-degree assault (health care worker) and DUI. Dubois was sentenced to two months in jail DQGĂ€QHGIRU0DUFK crimes. The court dismissed an additional assault charge. 6KDQH0+HLVH\2URYLOOH pleaded guilty June 11 to POCS (methamphetamine). The court dismissed an additional charge RI32&6 KHURLQ ,QDVHSDUDWH FDVH+HLVH\SOHDGHGJXLOW\ June 11 to POCS (methamphetDPLQH ,QDWKLUGFDVH+HLVH\ pleaded guilty June 11 to obtaining hotel accommodations E\IUDXG+HLVH\ZDVVHQWHQFHG to nine months in jail to run concurrent among all cases DQGĂ€QHGDWRWDORI LQFOXGLQJLQUHVWLWXWLRQ WR7KH&DPDUD\0RWHOLQ2URYLOOH,QDIRXUWKFDVHWKHFRXUW GLVPLVVHGDFKDUJHRIFULPLQDO conspiracy to commit residential burglary. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVH WRFKDUJH-RVH0LJXHO1LHEOD 3ODWD2NDQRJDQZLWKĂ€YH FRXQWVRIGLVWULEXWLRQRID controlled substance (methamSKHWDPLQH ZLWKLQIHHWRI a school zone. The crimes alOHJHGO\RFFXUUHGLQ$SULO0D\ DQG-XQHRI 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVHWR charge Ruben Jauregui Ochoa, 2PDNZLWKGLVWULEXWLRQRI a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and alien in posVHVVLRQRIDĂ€UHDUP7KHFULPHV allegedly occurred between -XQHDQG'HFHPEHURI 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVHWR charge Brandon Scott Thomas, 2PDNZLWKXQODZIXOLPSULVRQPHQW '9 DQGIRXUWKGHgree assault (DV). The crimes DOOHJHGO\RFFXUUHG-XQH 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVHWR FKDUJH0DUYHOOD2FDPSRQR PLGGOHQDPHOLVWHG2URYLOOHZLWKUHVLGHQWLDOEXUJODU\ VHFRQGGHJUHHWKHIWDQGWKLUG GHJUHHPDOLFLRXVPLVFKLHI 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVH WRFKDUJH.ULVWLQD0LFKHOOH *URRPV6ORDQ2PDNZLWK POCS (methamphetamine) DQGXVHRIGUXJSDUDSKHUQDOLD The crimes allegedly occurred June 9. 7KHFRXUWIRXQGSUREDEOHFDXVHWR FKDUJH6HWK-DUHG+DUULV Okanogan, with second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon), KLWDQGUXQ DWWHQGHGYHKLFOH  and hit-and-run (unattended YHKLFOH 7KHFULPHVDOOHJHGO\ RFFXUUHG0D\

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$\HDUROG2PDNJLUOSOHDGHG guilty June 11 to third-degree asVDXOW ODZHQIRUFHPHQWRIĂ€FHU  7KHJLUOZDVVHQWHQFHGWR GD\VLQGHWHQWLRQDQGĂ€QHG IRUWKH0D\FULPH$UHVWLWXWLRQKHDULQJZDVVFKHGXOHGIRU Aug. 27. $\HDUROG2PDNJLUOSOHDGHG JXLOW\-XQHWR0,3&7KH JLUOZDVVHQWHQFHGWRĂ€YHGD\V LQGHWHQWLRQZLWKFUHGLWIRUWZR GD\VVHUYHGDQGĂ€QHGIRU WKH0D\FULPH

DISTRICT COURT *DUUHWW-DURPH0DUODWW2PDN JXLOW\RIWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 0DUODWWUHFHLYHGDGD\ VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGÀQHG  ,VKQD5D\PDQ0DVRQ2PDN JXLOW\RIVHFRQGGHJUHHYHKLFOH SURZODQGWKLUGGHJUHHWKHIW 0DVRQZDVVHQWHQFHGWR GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGÀQHG -HUU\5D\0HDUV-U2PDN KDGDWKLUGGHJUHHWKHIWFKDUJH dismissed. 9DQ7KRPDV0HGFDOI2NDQRJDQJXLOW\RIVHFRQGGHJUHH ':/60HGFDOIUHFHLYHGD GD\VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFH DQGÀQHG -XDQ00HGLQD2PDNKDGD KLWDQGUXQ DWWHQGHGYHKLFOH  charge dismissed. (UQHVWR(GXDUGR0HQGH]/HRQ 2NDQRJDQJXLOW\RIIRXUWK GHJUHHDVVDXOW0HQGH]/HRQ ZDVVHQWHQFHGWRGD\VLQ MDLOZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHG DQGÀQHG /DQFH'LRQ0LOOLFDQ7RQDVNHW JXLOW\RIWKLUGGHJUHHWKHIW0LOOLFDQZDVVHQWHQFHGWRGD\V LQMDLOZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHG DQGÀQHG &KULVWLQH0DULH0L[2NDQRJDQJXLOW\RIWKLUGGHJUHH ':/60L[ZDVVHQWHQFHGWR GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\V VXVSHQGHGDQGÀQHG 9HURQLFD6DOLQDV0RQWR\D 2PDNJXLOW\RIÀUVWGHJUHH criminal trespassing and thirdGHJUHH':/60RQWR\DZDV VHQWHQFHGWRGD\VLQMDLO ZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHGDQG ÀQHG &KDUOHV(XJHQH0RRUH2PDN JXLOW\RIWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 0RRUHZDVVHQWHQFHGWR GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHGDQGÀQHG 5\DQ3DXO0XOOLJDQ2URYLOOH KDGDWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 charge dismissed. 3HJJ\/HH1HZPDQ7RQDVNHW had two charges dismissed: GLVRUGHUO\FRQGXFWDQGIRXUWK degree assault. -HVXV5DPLUH]3DORPDUHV 7RQDVNHWJXLOW\RIWKLUGGHJUHH ':/6DQGIDLOXUHWRWUDQVIHUD WLWOHZLWKLQGD\V3DORPDUHV was sentenced to 90 days in jail ZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHGDQG ÀQHG

-DPHV'RQDOG3DUVRQV7RQDVNHWKDGDWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 charge dismissed. 5LFKDUG'$3RLWUDV2PDN KDGDIRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW charge dismissed. $OH[DQGHU5H\HV5DPLUH] Tonasket, guilty on three counts RIWKLUGGHJUHH':/65H\HV 5DPLUH]UHFHLYHGDGD\ VXVSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGĂ€QHGD WRWDORI 6WDF\/HD5RGULJXH]2URYLOOH KDGDFKDUJHGLVPLVVHGIDOVLĂ€FDWLRQRIDQLQVXUDQFH,'FDUG 'DQLHO6DQFKH]+HUQDQGH] 2URYLOOHKDGDWKLUGGHJUHH ':/6FKDUJHGLVPLVVHG .HQQHWK%DUW6DVVH7RQDVNHW had two charges dismissed: IRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOWDQGWKLUG GHJUHHPDOLFLRXVPLVFKLHI

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, June 9, 2014 3XEOLFLQWR[LFDWLRQRQ10DLQ6W in Omak. 7KHIWRQ66HFRQG$YHLQ2NDQRgan. Alcohol reported missing. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ66HFRQG $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ66HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. Fraud on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ66HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ5DLOURDG6WLQ Omak. 7KHIWRQ3RZHUV%XWWH9LVWDQHDU 5LYHUVLGH 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ*ROGHQ+LOO Dr. near Okanogan. Trespassing on Sunrise Dr. in Omak. %XUJODU\RQ*ROGHQ6WLQ2URYLOOH 9HKLFOHĂ€UHRQ-HQQLQJV/RRS5G QHDU2URYLOOH 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ0DLQ6WLQ 2URYLOOH Domestic dispute on Golden St. in 2URYLOOH -DPHV(GZDUG0HQJOHERRNHG RQDQ2&62)7$ZDUUDQWIRU DUI. 7KRPDV5RVV.HOOH\ERRNHG IRUWKLUGGHJUHHWKHIWDQG 0,3& (GZDUG(UQHVW+DQZD\ booked on a DOC secretary’s warrant. &KULVWRSKHU0LFKDHO&RUQHWW booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants, both IRUIRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW .HYLQ0LFKDHO&ODUN'2& detainer. 6KDQH'XDQH%HUFLHUFRXUW FRPPLWPHQWVIRU'8,DQG WKLUGGHJUHH':/6 0LFKDHO%ULDQ%URXVVDUG ERRNHGRQWKUHHFRXQWVRIFKLOG PROHVWDWLRQDQGRQHFRXQWRI DVVDXOWZLWKVH[XDOPRWLYDWLRQ Jakob Stephen Parr, 21, court FRPPLWPHQWIRUĂ€UVWGHJUHH WUDIĂ€FNLQJLQVWROHQSURSHUW\ 0DWWKHZ$DURQ9HODVTXH] booked on an OCSO FTA warUDQWIRUWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 DOC secretary’s warrant, POCS (methamphetamine), SRVVHVVLRQRIGUXJSDUDSKHUQDOLDDQGWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 Tuesday, June 10, 2014 +DUDVVPHQWRQ2¡1HLO5GQHDU 2URYLOOH Assault on Robinson Canyon Rd. near Omak. 2QHYHKLFOHKLWDQGUXQFUDVKRQ 7XQN&UHHN5GQHDU5LYHUVLGH :HDSRQVRIIHQVHRQ+Z\QHDU Tonasket 7KUHDWVRQ1)RXUWK$YHLQ2NDQRgan. ':/6RQ&RXQWU\9XH5GQHDU Omak. 7KHIWRQ:$SSOH$YHLQ2PDN ':/6RQ5LYHUVLGH'ULQ2PDN 6H[RIIHQVHRQ,URQZRRG6WLQ 2URYLOOH $VVDXOWRQ0DLQ6WLQ2URYLOOH )UDXGRQ*ROGHQ6WLQ2URYLOOH .ULVWLQD0LFKHOOH*URRPV6ORDQ ERRNHGIRU32&6 PHWKDPSKHWDPLQH DQGSRVVHVVLRQRI drug paraphernalia. &RG\-DPHV0DJUXGHUERRNHG on an OCSO FTA warrant and a State Patrol FTA warrant, both IRUWKLUGGHJUHH':/6 $QJHOR-DYLHU/RSH]'2& detainer. Wednesday, June 11, 2014 :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ0DLQ6WLQ 5LYHUVLGH )DLOXUHWRUHJLVWHUDVDVH[RIIHQGHU RQ*OHQZRRG$YHLQ5LYHUVLGH 7KHIWRQ%URRNV7UDFW5GQHDU 5LYHUVLGH'HELWFDUGUHSRUWHG missing. Burglary on Frosty Creek Rd. near Tonasket. ':/6RQ7XQN&UHHN5GQHDU 5LYHUVLGH 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ16HFRQG $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ $VVDXOWRQ66HYHQWK$YHLQ Okanogan. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. 7KUHDWVRQ%R[6SULQJ'UQHDU Tonasket. 7KHIWRQ%LGH$:HH5GQHDU Omak. Grease guns reported missing. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ+XEEDUG 5GLQ5LYHUVLGH 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ5RJHUV$YH in Okanogan. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6'RXJODV St. in Omak. +DUDVVPHQWRQ$SSOH/DQHLQ Omak. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6%LUFK6W in Omak. %XUJODU\RQ:)LUVW$YHLQ2PDN $OFRKRORIIHQVHRQ1$VK6WLQ Omak. 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ:%DUWOHWW $YHLQ2PDN +DUDVVPHQWRQ6XQULVH'ULQ Omak. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ17KLUG$YHLQ Omak. 9LRODWLRQRIDQRFRQWDFWRUGHURQ

)LU6WLQ2URYLOOH 5REHUW1.HQQHG\ERRNHGIRU Ă€UVWGHJUHHDVVDXOWDQGXQODZIXOGLVFKDUJHRIDĂ€UHDUP 0RQJR-HUU\/RGL5HQLRQ booked on an OCSO FTA warUDQWIRUWKLUGGHJUHHPDOLFLRXV PLVFKLHI '9  %HQMDPLQ/HH-RKQVRQERRNHG on a DOC secretary’s warrant IRU98&6$IDLOXUHWRUHJLVWHU DVDVH[RIIHQGHUDQG32&6 (methamphetamine). Rachel Ann Banks, 27, booked on a DOC secretary’s FTA warUDQWIRUSRVVHVVLRQRIDVWROHQ YHKLFOHDQG32&6 PHWKDPphetamine). 6KDZQ0XULFH&RRN'2& detainer. 0DULVVD5DH6SHDUVERRNHGIRU second-degree assault. 'DYLG-XVWLFH&RQGRQ6RGHUEHUJ 19, DOC detainer and two Omak Police Department FTA ZDUUDQWVERWKIRUWKLUGGHJUHH WKHIW Thursday, June 12, 2014 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)LUVW $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ6SULQNOHUV outhouse reported damaged. 7KHIWRQ6)LUVW$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)LUVW $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ0RWRUKRPH reported damaged. Threats on S. Birch St. in Omak. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)LUVW$YH in Okanogan. Vehicle window reported smashed. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)RXUWK $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ9HKLFOH window reported smashed. 7KHIWRQ6)LUVW$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ Bicycle reported missing. :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ/RRPLV2URYLOOH Rd. near Tonasket. Burglary on Elmway in Okanogan. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. 9LRODWLRQRIDQRFRQWDFWRUGHURQ $SSOH/DQHLQ2PDN Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. 7KHIWRQ0DSOH6WLQ2PDN Threats on Omache Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Dayton St. in Omak. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ,URQZRRG 6WLQ2URYLOOH 7ZRUHSRUWVRIWKHIWRQ,URQZRRG 6WLQ2URYLOOH 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ-XQLSHU6W LQ2URYLOOH:LQGRZVUHSRUWHG smashed. 'DFLD/HH0DFNDUQHVVERRNHG on three bench warrants: one IRUUHVLGHQWLDOEXUJODU\DQGWZR IRUYLRODWLRQRIDSURWHFWLRQ order. 'DYLV+HQGHUVRQ7DWVKDPD DOC detainer. -HIIUH\+RZDUG+HUVFKOLS ERRNHGRQDQ2URYLOOH3ROLFH 'HSDUWPHQW)7$ZDUUDQWIRU reckless endangerment. -RKQDWKDQ/HUR\6WRWWVERRNHG on two OCSO FTA warrants: second-degree criminal trespassing and third-degree PDOLFLRXVPLVFKLHI '9  &KULVWLQD/\QQ)OHWFKHU ERRNHGRQ,'WKHIWVHFRQGGHJUHHWKHIWXQODZIXOUHGHPSWLRQ RIIRRGVWDPSVDQGWUDIĂ€FNLQJ LQIRRGVWDPSV -RVKXD(DUO'DYLVERRNHG RQĂ€UVWGHJUHHWUDIĂ€FNLQJLQ stolen property, second-degree SRVVHVVLRQRIVWROHQSURSHUW\ WKHIWRIDĂ€UHDUPIRXUFRXQWVRI residential burglary, two counts RIVHFRQGGHJUHHEXUJODU\ WKUHHFRXQWVRIWKHIWRIDPRWRU YHKLFOHDQGWZRFRXQWVRIĂ€UVW GHJUHHWKHIW 'DQLHO:LOVRQ5D\ERRNHGIRU ,'WKHIWVHFRQGGHJUHHWKHIW XQODZIXOUHGHPSWLRQRIIRRG VWDPSVDQGIRRGVWDPSVWUDIĂ€FNLQJ %ULDQ.HLWK)DUUHQVFRXUWFRPPLWPHQWVIRU'8,WKLUGGHJUHH ':/6DQGLJQLWLRQLQWHUORFN YLRODWLRQ 0DXULFLR$JXLODU&DVDUH] ERRNHGIRUVHFRQGGHJUHHUDSH Friday, June 13, 2014 Trespassing on Eastlake Rd. near 2URYLOOH 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)LUVW $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ6SULQNOHUV reported damaged. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)LIWK$YH LQ2NDQRJDQ:LQGRZUHSRUWHG smashed. 9LRODWLRQRIDQRFRQWDFWRUGHURQ 6)RXUWK$YHLQ2NDQRJDQ 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ,RQH6WLQ Okanogan. +DUDVVPHQWRQ66HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ+DXVVOHU5G near Omak. ':/6RQ6)LIWK6WLQ7RQDVNHW 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6&HGDU6W in Omak. $VVDXOWRQ0DLQ6WLQ2PDN 9HKLFOHSURZORQ:7KLUG$YHLQ Omak. 7KHIWRQ2PDN$YHLQ2PDN:DOlet reported missing. 7KHIWRQ(QJK5GLQ2PDN 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ,URQZRRG 6WLQ2URYLOOH

INLAND MONUMENT CO.

Monuments & Bronze

CEMETERY MARKERS See Us First for Greater Savings BUILD A LASTING TRIBUTE TO YOUR LOVED ONE

~ 62 years of serving you ~ Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

7ZRYHKLFOHFUDVKRQ6:KLWFRPE $YHLQ7RQDVNHW1RLQMXULHV reported. 0XUUD\+RZDUG6DONHOG ERRNHGIRUIRXUWKGHJUHHDVsault (DV). 'HOĂ€QR0HMLD$YLODERRNHG RQWKUHHFRXQWVRIGHOLYHU\RI a controlled substance (methDPSKHWDPLQH WZRFRXQWVRI ZKLFKZHUHZLWKLQIHHWRI a school zone. 6KDQQRQ5D\1DSLHUFRXUW FRPPLWPHQWIRU'8, 5\DQ*OHQQ&DVH\ERRNHGRQ two OCSO FTA warrants, both IRUZHOIDUHIUDXG -RVKXD'DYLG0RRUHERRNHG IRUYLRODWLRQRIDSURWHFWLRQ order, and two OCSO FTA ZDUUDQWVIRXUWKGHJUHHDVVDXOW '9 DQGWKLUGGHJUHHWKHIW (DV). -DVRQ3DXO0DUWLQVFRXUWFRPPLWPHQWIRU32&6 PHWKDPSKHWDPLQH DQGWZRFRXQWVRI WKLUGGHJUHHWKHIW .ULVWLH/HH)UHHVHERRNHGIRU LGHQWLW\WKHIWDQGIRRGVWDPS IUDXG

ing. 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ2OG5LYHUVLGH+Z\ near Omak. $VVDXOWRQ16HFRQG$YHLQ2NDQRgan. ':/6RQ(OPZD\LQ2NDQRJDQ +DUDVVPHQWRQ66HFRQG$YHLQ Okanogan. 0RWRUF\FOHWKHIWRQ)HUU\6WLQ Omak. 7KHIWRQ1)LU6WLQ2PDN&DVK reported missing. 3XEOLFLQWR[LFDWLRQRQ60DLQ6W in Omak. $OFRKRORIIHQVHRQ6$VK6WLQ Omak. 7KHIWRQ(QJK5GLQ2PDN Trespassing on Ironwood St. in 2URYLOOH ':/6RQ+Z\QHDU2URYLOOH :DUUDQWDUUHVWRQ+Z\QHDU Tonasket. (UQHVWR5DPLUH]3DORPDUHV ERRNHGIRUVHFRQGGHJUHHSRVVHVVLRQRIVWROHQSURSHUW\

Saturday, June 14, 2014 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ&RQFRQXOO\ Rd. near Tonasket. 6WUXFWXUHĂ€UHRQ(G)LJOLQVNL5G QHDU5LYHUVLGH 8WLOLW\SUREOHPRQ2PDN$YHLQ Omak. Railroad arms reported GRZQDQGOLJKWVĂ DVKLQJ 7KHIWRQ&KHVDZ5GQHDU2URYLOOH Riding mower reported miss-

Sunday, June 15, 2014 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ6)LUVW $YHLQ2NDQRJDQ6SULQNOHUV reported damaged. 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ:HDWKHUstone Rd. near Omak. 'RPHVWLFGLVSXWHRQ:DJRQ7UDLO Rd. near Tonasket. 7KHIWRQ66HFRQG$YHLQ2NDQRgan. 3XEOLFLQWR[LFDWLRQRQ6SRNDQH6W in Okanogan. 7KUHDWVRQ+Z\QHDU2URYLOOH Trespassing on Quince St. in Omak.

DENTISTRY

FAMILY DENTISTRY

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OMAK: 6$VK6W2PDN 2IÂżFH+RXUV7KXUVGD\V Tel: 509-826-1930

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

10

TONASKET

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

CLINIC

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line (509) 826-6191

Toll Free (866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-5600

„ Anti

the region

Se Habla Espanol WWW . MYFAMILYHEALTH . ORG

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Developmental Disabilities

ACROSS

1.800.660.2129

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

(509) 826-6191

Mental Health

Locations

& growing

OMAK

Call us . . . Se Habla EspaĂąol

KEY: '8,'ULYLQJ8QGHUWKH,Qà XHQFH ':/65'ULYLQJ:KLOH/LFHQVH 6XVSHQGHG5HYRNHG 326&3RVVHVVLRQRID&RQWUROOHG Substance 0,3&0LQRULQ3RVVHVVLRQ&RQsumption 709:237DNLQJD0RWRU Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA - Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County SherLII¡V2IÀFHU '2&6WDWH'HSDUWPHQWRI&RUrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs (QIRUFHPHQW

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome.

3XEOLFLQWR[LFDWLRQRQ60DLQ6W in Omak. 7KHIWRQ'D\WRQ6WLQ2PDN 0DOLFLRXVPLVFKLHIRQ,URQZRRG 6WLQ2URYLOOH 7UHVSDVVLQJRQ0DLQ6WLQ2URYLOOH /RLWHULQJRQ6:KLWFRPE$YHLQ Tonasket. 7LIIHQH\0DULH2OVRQERRNHG on a Tribal FTA warrant and an 2&62)7$ZDUUDQWERWKIRU WKLUGGHJUHH':/6

FAMILY PRACTICE

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. 2IÂżFH+RXUV7XHV:HG Tel: 509-476-2151

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

Coagulation Clinic

„ Ophthalmology „ Radiology „ Behavioral

Health In Clinic „ Family Practice „ Laboratory „ Surgery Center „ Chemo Infusion

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

„ Walk

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

OPTICAL

OXYGEN SERVICE

509-826-1800

We would be honored to work with you!

„ Emergency „ VA

Clinic

„ Surgical

Center

„ Rehabilitation „ Obstetrical

(Oroville & Tonasket)

Services

„ Imaging „ Full-Service

Laboratory Care „ Swing Bed Program „ Extended

z Your

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center z Oxygen Concentrators z Portable Concentrators z Sleep Apnea Equipment z Nebulizers z Home Sleep Tests

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

Open:0RQGD\)ULGD\

2I¿FH509-826-1688 .RDOD‡2PDN:$‡ZYPHGLFDOFRP

2NRPD'ULYH6XLWH'2PDN

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 19, 2014  

June 19, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, June 19, 2014  

June 19, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune