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HORNETS AND TIGERS COMPETE

FOUNDERS DAY KIDS GAMES

AT STATE QUALIFYIING MEETS

Thursday, May 29, 5:30 at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds

See Pages B1-2

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School librarian arrested for sexual misconduct is broken, it is the duty of the administration and school board to react swiftly and directly. “On May 19, Tonasket administration received substantiated evidence of misconduct by Mrs. KinKade. Mrs. KinKade, a classiBY GARY A. DE VON AND fied librarian at Tonasket Middle/ BRENT BAKER High School, was immediately put on administrative leave. A TONASKET – A Tonasket special board meeting was conHigh School Librarian was arrest- vened on May 21 to address this ed May 20 for sexual misconduct employee issue. Upon reviewing with a student 19 years her junior. the evidence, the board voted Elizabeth Ann KinKade, 37, unanimously to terminate Mrs. Tonasket, was KinKade effecarrested for sextive immediual misconduct ately. with a minor “At Tonasket after admitwe hold the ting to school trust of student officials, as well-being at a well as police, very high level. that she had I commend my been having administraan affair with tion and school an 18-year-old board for their Tonasket High direct and swift School Student. decisions on Although the this issue.” student was Turner said over 18 and he would have the affair took no further complace off school ment and that grounds, in the all informalibrarian’s home Elizabeth Ann KinKade tion regarding and in her car, the matter had state law makes been turned it clear that such conduct as a over to law enforcement. school employee is illegal. High school principal Jeff Her employment with the Hardesty also had no comment school district was terminated when contacted. Wednesday, May 21, according to According to the Tonasket Superintendent Paul Turner. Police Report, School “School employee/student rela- Superintendent Paul Turner and tionships are based on the trust KinKade met Monday, May 19, that a student’s well-being is of with Kinkade’s union representautmost importance,” Turner said tive present and she admitted to in a statement released by the dis- the affair. Later that day, Tonasket trict on Friday. “When this trust

PBR, dance and art

Faces charges for affair with 18-yearold student

SEE ARREST | PG A4

Quite a few changes this Founders Day weekend BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Members of the American and Canadian Legions cast flowers and a wreath off the 12th Street Bridge and into the Similkameen River last Monday in remembrance of those who served as sea. The annual ritual is part of the Memorial Day Ceremonies that take place at the bridge and at Oroville’s Riverview Cemetery on Golden Road. For more photos see Page A4.

Oroville Council learns about Jet Ski Races

to race,” said Chinn. A year’s membership in the association is $45, according to OROVILLE – Raleigh Chinn Harnack. Chinn added the race and Roger Harnack, represent- committee would be getting insuring the Lake Osoyoos Cup Jet Ski ance for the event through the Races planned for this summer, association. “We’re excited about getting this appeared before the Oroville City Council at their Tuesday, May 20 thing as an inaugural event,” said Chinn. meeting. Harnack said “We antici“We anticipate 70 to Pateros, which pate seventy to 80 plus jet ski teams.... has a jet ski race, eighty plus jets ski teams,” said We’re excited about got the approvof their city Chinn, who is getting this thing as alcouncil to have heading up the an inaugural event.” tent camping at race committee the boat ramp for the Oroville Raleigh Chinn, Chairman, park. Lake Osoyoos Cup Chamber of “We are askCommerce. ing for camping, The racing is planned for June 28 and June 29 just tents in the park, and a place and will run from 10 a.m. until 3 to park an RV or two if we need p.m. daily, according to Chinn. He them,” said Harnack, who races “We are in communication with with his 12-year-old daughter. He said his daughter had been U.S. Customs and the Border Patrol regarding the race to the border,” racing for three years, starting Chinn said, referring to an all out when she was just nine-years-old. “We have multiple classes from endurance event that would take racers from Deep Bay Park to the beginners on up. The kids are really fun to watch,” he said. border and back again. He added that some of the top However, most of the races will be held just offshore and will be rated Canadian teams already conaround buoys on a one-half to sider Osoyoos Lake as a highly one-mile long course, according to sought after spot for jet ski races. “There were races in Penticton Harnack, who represents the Jet Ski and Skaha a couple of years ago and Association. “We have various classes that go at Kelowna. However, the Western around buoys. Anybody who owns Canadian races have moved a jet ski can participate, you just to Alberta and Saskatchewan,” have to join the Jet Ski Association SEE JET SKI | PG A4 BY GARY A. DE VON

MANAGING EDITOR

Kelly Denison/submitted photo

Kari Alexander (right), the Tonasket Founders Day Grand Marshal, will ride in Saturday’s parade with husband Matt in one of Lee Orr’s antique cars.

Kari Alexander to be front and center for a day as Grand Marshal BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - It seems to be a recurring theme that some of Tonasket’s most honored citizens are also the people that least like to be at the center of attention. Kari Alexander, the 2014 Tonasket Founders Day Grand Marshal, fits that mold perfectly. Alexander admits to being a bit taken aback at being named Grand Marshal, meaning she will be riding in the parade waving at the crowd with her husband Matt, rather than behind the scenes organizing the parade, which is what she’s done

the past four years. “I’m still trying to wrap my mind around it,” Alexander says. “Bertha Wandler is going to be doing the parade management on Saturday; otherwise I’ve been doing it behind the scenes.” Since the Alexanders, including daughters Emma and Sara (now in sixth and fourth grades, respectively) moved to Tonasket from the Los Angeles area in 2005, Kari has been a diligent behind-the-scenes worker that has been a driving force behind a lot of what have become Tonasket staples.

SEE MARSHAL | PG A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 22

SEE FOUNDERS | PG A4

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket’s 79th annual Founders Day weekend will see some significant changes this year, beginning Thursday, May 29, and highlighted the arrival of the Professional Bull Riders circuit Friday and Saturday, as well as Saturday night’s street dance in town. This year’s theme is, “Through a Child’s Eyes” to highlight the work being done to complete the Tonasket Water Ranch in Chief Tonasket Park and efforts to rebuild the Tonasket Municipal Swimming Pool. Kari Alexander was tabbed by the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce’s selection committee to serve as this year’s Tonasket Founders Day Parade and plans to ride in one of Lee Orr’s antique cars with husband Matt. Brisa Leep was chosen as Miss Tonasket Rodeo last October and has since been representing Tonasket in rodeos and other public appearances throughout the Northwest and Canada this spring. It all gets underway Thursday evening at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds on Rodeo Road, just south of Tonasket, with a 5:30 p.m. barbecue, followed by kids’ games at around 6:00 p.m. Also running Thursday and Friday is the Library Board’s annual book sale from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. It will be held in the Tonasket City Council chambers at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. All proceeds go for library needs. The Shane Proctor Invitational Rodeo, featuring the Professional Bull Riders and the World Class Bucking Horse Association, begins its Friday, May 30, session at 7:00 p.m. at the Tonasket Rodeo Grounds. Pre-sale tickets are $12 for adults, $8 for children ages 6-12 and free for anyone five or under and can be purchased at II Sisters, The Junction, or Tonasket Eagles 3002 in Tonasket; Les Schwab in Oroville; or Big R in Omak and Colville. At the gate, tickets will be $15 for adults and $10 for children 6-12. Gates open at 5 p.m. Saturday’s activities swing into action early, beginning with the Cowboy Breakfast at the Rodeo Grounds beginning at 8 a.m. The Tonasket Community 5K Community Fun Run, this year sponsored by the Tonasket/ Okanogan Valley Lions Club, will be run and/or walked at the Tonasket High School track beginning at 8 a.m. Vendors will begin opening on Third Street in town at 9 a.m. and will be there all day, until 9 p.m. A new event this year: Tonasket’s first Art in the Park, Saturday, May 31 at the Triangle Park from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Local

Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7 Founders Day A8-9

Cops & Courts A10 Sports B1,2,5 Schools B3

Classifieds/Legals B4-5 Real Estate B5 Obituaries B6


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

NEW BORDER PATROL STATION

Candidates file for local and state offices Three candidates file for Okanogan County PUD Commissioner Seat 1 Rodriguez prefers the Republican Party. While the job had been handled through the prosecuting attorOKANOGAN – It looks like ney’s office in the past, the county there will be at least one local race has reached a population threshold that will require a primary this that triggered the requirement for August. Four people have filled for an elected coroner. the Okanogan County PUD District All three Seventh District legis1 Commissioner lators find they position. have challengWhile incumers for their curbent David rent positions, Womach is seekBrian Dansel, ing a return for a former another six-year Tuesday, Ferry County term, he faces Commissioner August 5 challenges from from Republic Scott Vejraska, served part James Miller and of an unexSteve Nearents in pired term this non-partisan as state senaelection. All the tor and would other incumlike to remain Tuesday, bents for county in the senate. offices find He is being November 4 themselves alone challenged on the ballot. by another Jim Detro, a Republican, Republican is seeking reelection as Tony Booth from Colville. Okanogan County Commissioner Incumbent Shelly Short, from District 3, which represents Republican from Addy and the the north end of the county. Frank current state representative from Rogers, a Republican wants to con- the Position 1 is being challenged tinue on as sheriff and Karl F. Sloan, by Libertarian James R. Apker a Democrat, wants to remain the from Mead, Washington and Joel prosecuting attorney. Charleen Kretz from Wauconda, representaGroomes, a Republican is run- tive in Position 2, will be on the ning for county clerk and Leah ballot with Centralist Ronnie Rae McCormack as county treasurer. from Loon Lake, Wash. Heidi Smith and Charles Short The primary election, for all are both running for district court offices with more than two canjudge, in positions 1 and 2, respec- didates on the ballot, will be held tively. on Tuesday, Aug. 5. The general A new elective office, that of election is scheduled for Tuesday, county coroner, has three people Nov. 4. vying for the job – Anthony Frey Washington State’s online voting and Gary V. Reams expressed guide can be found at http://www. no party preference, while Dave sos.wa.gov/elections/. BY GARY A. DE VON

MANAGING EDITOR

Primary Election

General Election

Above, the U.S. Border Patrol offered an open house of the new Oroville Station on Saturday, May 17 and several of the curious braved rainy conditions to get a first hand look at the facility which is home to about 30 agents, according to Gerardo Regalado, Special Operations Supervisor with the Spokane Sector, which the Oroville Station is part of. Right, Patrol Agent in Charge Kolo Moser and Agent David McElheran talk about the new facility, as well as their experiences on the southern border of the U.S. Below, Agent David “Mac” McElheran takes a group on a tour of the facilities, including where the station stores their patrol boat. The tour also included the horse corral and arena, dog kennels and equipment garage, as well areas in the main building, including the area with the Agent’s computer work stations, the sally port and holding cells. USBP/submitted photos

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OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE Claire Jeffko finds closure through ‘magical’ find BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Gaining a sense of closure hasn’t come easily for Claire Jeffko. She wasn’t sure it would be possible to find it, not since her husband of about 30 years, Ed Jeffko, vanished without a trace in his small, homebuilt fiberglass airplane. Ed Jeffko took off from the Tonasket Airport on July 23, on a heading for Sequim on the Olympic Peninsula. But he never arrived, and searches both official and unofficial never turned up anything. It took about a year for Claire to begin to “live” again, she says. She took a trip to Italy that Ed had arranged for her shortly before his disappearance, and upon her return accepted an appointment to an open Tonasket City Council seat. “At some point you have to move forward,” Jeffko says. “I don’t want to live a life of regret. “It took everything I had. There were many days I didn’t want to get out of bed, but I did only because I had to feed the dogs. I did a lot of screaming, crying, all of that, but I haven’t had to do that for a long time.” She was moving on with life, but closure? Suddenly and miraculously, it came.

AN EARLIER LOSS Five or six years ago, Claire was walking her dogs on her familiar route by the Okanogan River, when she felt her wedding ring “catch” on her jeans. “I looked down, and son of a gun, the diamond was gone,” she says. “I’m crying, because I have to make everything dramatic. It was at a sandy spot that dips by the river on the trail. Ed and I went and got strainers and buckets, went down there straining sand, straining.” Ed finally convinced her that it was OK, that the original diamond was gone; he’d get her a new one. “I acquiesced,” she said. “I was not happy about it. He had another one put in. I was always suspicious because it didn’t look like the first one.” She shows off the replacement stone. “This is the ‘We’ve been married for 30 years diamond,’” she says. “What was gone was the ‘I’m in lust’ diamond.” APRIL FOOL’S? A couple of months ago - April 1, to be precise - Claire Jeffko was traversing her

Left, Claire Jeffko says that finding the diamond that her late husband Ed gave her more than 30 years ago, which had been missing near the Okanogan River bank for five or six years, has given her closure since his disappearance in his plan over the Cascades nearly two years ago. Above, Jeffko now wears the diamond in Ed’s old ring on her right hand.

Brent Baker/staff photos

usual path along the river, accompanied by Justin Savage. “We were near the same spot and he stopped and Justin bent over to pick something up,” she says. “I said, ‘If that’s a diamond, it belongs to me.’ “I was kidding, of course, but he had it. He frigging had it. I was stunned, shocked, couldn’t believe it. I kept looking at it thinking it wasn’t real.” Kids, dogs, five winters of snow and flooding, and the diamond was still there for her to find. But it wasn’t done with its, adventure. She clasped it in her hand and walked back toward Riverview Mobile Home and RV Park, which she still operates. Tonasket Police Officer Preston Ray was parked there to do his rounds she said, and asked what she had in her hand. “I opened my hand and it rolled out

into his engine compartment,” Jeffko says. “I’m going, ‘Holy crap, I can’t believe this happened.’ “He decided no police work was getting done ... he opened the hood, took out the filter, the fuel pump ... then he finds it.” She took it to Highlandia Jewelers in town and verified that it was, indeed, her long-lost diamond. “Keith Barnett ran it through a bunch of tests,” she said. “He said it was mine. I am still just so shocked by the whole episode.” She had the diamond placed in Ed’s old ring (quite securely, she points out) and has taken to wearing it again. “I asked Justin if he wanted a reward for finding it and he said, ‘No the look on your face when you went into shock when you realized it was yours was per-

efforts to find him. “I’m not going to the mountains to haul him out of there,” Claire says. “For Ed, it’s his mountains, it’s his airplane. It’s perfect way for him to end. Ed was 72 years old and he died with his dream, which is pretty awesome.” If someone should come across Ed and his plane, she says, retired Tonasket Police Officer Jim Rice would be notified and handle any arrangements that needed to be made. “I don’t need to go through any of it again,” Claire says. “Since the diamond, I feel much better, much calmer. Things finally make sense, for some reason. I have my ‘When you’re in lust’ diamond back. I honestly believe it’s Ed’s way of connecting with me and feel really strongly that he’s still with me. And that’s good enough for me.”

fect.’ He wouldn’t take it. We both decided it was something magical and went with it. “You can’t make that stuff up. It’s a fairy tale. If it hadn’t happened to me, I wouldn’t believe it. And if no one else believes it, I really don’t care.”

MOVING FORWARD Out of the blue, the miraculous find has given Claire a chance to make peace with her loss and move forward. “It’s the only closure I’ve had,” she says. “This diamond was down there for years. I’d been having trouble recently getting closure, and now I finally have it.” She says that, while she still not happy that Ed is gone, she is at peace with his final resting place being someplace deep in the Cascades and has asked that friends and family not make any further

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PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

FOUNDERS | FROM A1

ARREST | FROM A1

artists will be selling their handcrafted items such as paintings, stained glass, woodworking and stone etching. For those participating in the parade, line-up begins at 9:30 a.m. with check-in located in the parking lot of the Wells Fargo Bank, 16 West 5th Street. Judging of floats will take place at 10:00 a.m., with the parade itself starting at 11 a.m. Saturday afternoon will play out differently than in recent years. The second session of the rodeo will begin at 2:30 p.m. at the Rodeo Grounds, instead of in the evening. After the rodeo, there will be a street dance on Third Street (across the street from the Tonasket Visitor’s Center) beginning at 5:30 p.m. and running until 9 p.m.. Featured music will be by North Half and special guest Johannes Weber. There will be concessions and beer garden available.

Police and an Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputy responded to KinKade’s home after she called 911 about a domestic dispute with her husband, Mark Allen KinKade. After his wife informed KinKade about the affair he allegedly fired a shot from a 9mm handgun into the air and then left the scene. She said she was worried about his safety, though not her own. While the officers were taking her statement, Mark KinKade returned. They asked if he had a gun and he admitted he did, according to the police report. They ordered him to leave it where it was, but he reached into his pocket and pulled it out by the butt with two fingers and Tonasket Police Officer Audra Fuller confiscated it. Earlier the police had found a shell casing, but no indication the suspect had fired upon his wife, who was concerned that her husband was suicidal. She said he had PTSD after returning from Oso, Wash., where he had been doing clean up work at the landslide there. Deputy Terry Schrable released the suspect and suggested he get a mental health evaluation. The police report stated that Supt. Turner arrived on the scene and asked to speak with the librarian and advised the officers he may need officer assistance on the case afterwards. Turner returned and told the officers she had an affair with a student and that he wanted the Tonasket Police to investigate the matter since the school was within the city limits. The superintendent then left. At one point Mark KinKade asked to get a drink of water and while in the house, though not left alone, secretly took a set of truck keys and left the scene. Deputy Schrable pursued him and turned him around near Ellisforde. KinKade was placed under arrest for discharging a firearm in public. It was during this incident that Elizabeth KinKade first told the officers of her affair with the student. She said she had believed

Brent Baker/staff photo

Miss Tonasket Rodeo Brisa Leep will be busy hosting her home rodeo Tonasket Founders Day weekend.

MARSHAL | FROM A1 Her most current projects involve arranging and funding the annual visits by the Missoula Children’s Theater, which builds elaborate productions in dayslong visits using Tonasket School District students. She’s also one of the coaches for the Tonasket Elementary School’s Math is Cool teams, a fourth and fifth grade academic competition that this year both qualified for the state finals in just their second year of existence. “I’ve kind of settled into doing Missoula Children’s Theater year round,” she says, “and I’m loving the Math is Cool right now. At various times over the past eight-plus years, she’s served

as president of the Tonasket Cooperative Pre-school, served as Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Secretary, Vice President and President (“I went to the wrong meeting,” she jokes); worked for a couple of years with Americorps; served as the Tonasket PTO President; and through the PTO arranged the fourth grade classes’ annual Salmon Festival trip. Somewhere in there, she’s also found time to work her “real” job as a paraprofessional at Tonasket Elementary School while working toward her Masters Degree in Education. “By this time next year, I’ll be a certified teacher,” she says. Kari Alexander says her family moved here after enjoying the

area while visiting her grandfather, who was raised in Tonasket. Once they arrived, she realized that the best way to ensure that some of the things she enjoyed about the big city would happen here in Tonasket would be to take them on herself. “If I wanted things for the kids, I needed to be someone to step up and do it,” she says. “In L.A. things just kind of happen whether you’re there or not. In a small town, if you want something to happen you kind of have to step up and do it.” And sometimes when you do that, you end up publicly honored and recognized for your efforts, whether you prefer to stay behind the scenes or not.

“I think it’s awesome,” said Councilman Ed Naillon.

in and donated to the event,” he said.

PROJECT REPORTS Rod Noel, superintendent of Public Works, was asked to report on the various city projects underway. “The North End Reservoir Project is underway and work has resumed. As of yesterday (Monday, May 19) the tank crew had got the floor together. I expect by the end of this week the tank should be fully constructed,” said Noel. “It looks like the crew that is putting it together knows what it is doing.” Noel said the waterline for the Central and Cherry Street project should also be installed by the end of that week as well. “It is on schedule and the crew should start doing the pavement grinding by next Tuesday (May 27),” said Noel. “I think they’re doing a fairly decent job... especially those new ADA ramps.”

NARCOTICS TASK FORCE The city received a letter requesting Oroville’s continued participation in the North Central Washington Narcotics Task Force operational agreement. “Next year they want $2000, that’s twice as much,” said Councilman Jon Neal, questioning the increase and adding that Omak’s fee had only gone up 18 percent. “That means we’re going to get twice the attention,” quipped Mayor Spieth. Chief Warnstaff said the task force was not getting the outside funding it had been and was looking to its members to help make up the difference. He also said Oroville does not lend an officer to the task force and that might be why they are being asked to pay more. “Looking at the hard drug statistics startled me... heroin use is up by 75 percent,” said Warnstaff. “Considering the list of services, I think it is worth it... our kids are worth it,” said Councilman Naillon.

JET SKI | FROM A1 Harnack said. “The difference between us and the hydros is that for the jet ski races the pits are open to anyone as long as there is no drinking or smoking. Also, unlike the hydros we run whether it is a sunny day or pouring rain... and waves, they live for those conditions.” Chinn said the Oroville Chamber had already paid the park use fee. Mayor Chuck Spieth suggested the fee be refunded as the recent blues fest was allowed to forgo the fee for that community event and the council agreed. Harnack said he expected between 30 and 40 racers would want to camp at the park. The council approved tent camping at the park for racers, as well as $500 from the city’s Hotel/ Motel Tax funds for advertising which is part of the money that had been set aside for the annual Can Am Apple Cup Powerboat Races which have been cancelled for this year. They also approved a request for an ambulance and crew to be on standby with the understanding that it may have to leave if called to respond to an emergency elsewhere. Debra Donahue, Oroville Ambulance Coordinator questioned Harnack and Chinn about whether there were people that could respond to a water rescue and they assured her that there were. “I feel we need to have someone that is trained to get them out of the water,” she said. Chinn and Harnack said there is no charge to watch and it should be a good draw to the area and the races should prove to be an economic benefit to the town. “For one thing the racers will by as much gas as you can sell in town,” said Harnack. “It should also be good for the restaurants, grocery stores, the Pastime and the Plaza.” The mayor and council all expressed their approval of the races.

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RALLY AT THE BORDER BLUES Oroville Police Chief Clay Warnstaff, a member of the Rally at the Border Blues Fest Committee, reported on the event which had taken place the previous weekend. “There were roughly 225 tickets sold and we are happy about that... we were hoping for 500,” he said, adding that the weather probably played into the lower numbers. “It went well there were no incidents, no DUIs. These were pretty good people I think,” said Warnstaff, referring to those that attendance, many of whom were participants in the Run for the Border charity motorcycle ride from Wenatchee. “Hats off to the community for supporting us... everyone jumped

ANGRY CUSTOMER There was also some discussion about an angry utilities customer who was rude to an employee at city hall. He also called the city clerk and used profanity. In addition the customer had come to the council chambers, but left just before the meeting began. “I think if something like this happens Clay (Chief Warnstaff) should be called,” said Mayor Spieth. “The language he used could get him charged with disorderly conduct and taken away to jail,” said the police chief.

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Take a break at the Lake Early season hours Fri~Mon 8 ~ 7 Tues~Thurs 11 ~6 Biscuits n gravy, pastries, hot drinks, hot dogs hamburgers, nachos, espresso, cold drinks hard ice-cream and more! Closed during bad weather. Hours will be extended as summer arrives.

she had not broken the law since the student was nearly 19-yearsold and the affair took place off school grounds. Officers allowed her to be taken by her sister to the North Valley Hospital for a mental health evaluation. On Tuesday, May 20, Officer Fuller questioned the student at the police station and he too admitted to the affair, saying the librarian and he had intercourse five times, all off school grounds. Fuller called Elizabeth KinKade to the police station where she made a statement, again admitting to the affair, which she said had been going on for one to two months. Officer Fuller arrested KinKade for sexual misconduct with a minor in the first degree and she was booked into Okanogan County Jail at 8:18 p.m. on Tuesday, May 20. She was released on her own personal recognizance on Wednesday. She was scheduled for arraignment in Okanogan County Superior Court on Monday, June 21. union representative present and she admitted to the affair. Later that day, Tonasket Police and an Okanogan County Sheriff ’s Deputy responded to KinKade’s home after she called 911 about a domestic dispute with her husband, Mark Allen KinKade. After his wife informed KinKade about the affair he allegedly fired a shot from a 9mm handgun into the air and then left the scene. She said she was worried about his safety, though not her own. While the officers were taking her statement, Mark KinKade returned. They asked if he had a gun and he admitted he did, according to the police report. They ordered him to leave it where it was, but he reached into his pocket and pulled it out by the butt with two fingers and Tonasket Police Officer Audra Fuller confiscated it. Earlier the police had found a shell casing, but no indication the suspect had fired upon his wife, who was concerned that her husband was suicidal. She said he had PTSD after returning from Oso, Wash.,

where he had been doing clean up work at the landslide there. Deputy Terry Schrable released the suspect and suggested he get a mental health evaluation. The police report stated that Supt. Turner arrived on the scene and asked to speak with the librarian and advised the officers he may need officer assistance on the case afterwards. Turner returned and told the officers she had an affair with a student and that he wanted the Tonasket Police to investigate the matter since the school was within the city limits. The superintendent then left. At one point the Mark KinKade asked to get a drink of water and while in the house, though not left alone, secretly took a set of truck keys and left the scene. Deputy Schrable pursued him and turned him around near Ellisforde. KinKade was placed under arrest for discharging a firearm in public. It was during this incident that Elizabeth KinKade first told the officers of her affair with the student. She said she had believed she had not broken the law since the student was nearly 19-yearsold and the affair took place off school grounds. Officers allowed her to be taken by her sister to the North Valley Hospital for a mental health evaluation. On Tuesday, May 20, Officer Fuller questioned the student at the police station and he too admitted to the affair, saying the librarian and he had intercourse five times, all off school grounds. Fuller called Elizabeth KinKade to the police station where she made a statement, again admitting to the affair, which she said had been going on for one to two months. Officer Fuller arrested KinKade for sexual misconduct with a minor in the first degree and she was booked into Okanogan County Jail at 8:18 p.m. on Tuesday, May 20. She was released on her own personal recognizance on Wednesday. She was scheduled for arraignment in Okanogan County Superior Court on Monday, June 2.

WE REMEMBER

After a wreath is laid (above) at the grave of Pvt. Hodges, the soldier that Oroville’s Hodge’s Post of the American Legion is named after, the canon was fired and taps were played Monday morning. Post Commander Lou Wilson, Sgt. at Arms Vicki Hart and Walt Hart at the podium. Vicki Hart read “In Flander’s Field” and “Freedom isn’t Free” before placing the wreath at Hodge’s Grave in Oroville’s Riverview Cemetery during Memorial Day Ceremonies. Gary DeVon/staff photos

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MAY 29, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER Lots of support for Sarmiento

While a librarian at Tonasket High School being accused of sexual misconduct with a student certainly deserved our attention, another special board meeting was taking place in executive session in Oroville. The board was meeting to reconsider transferring Oroville High School Principal Kristen Sarmiento from her principal job back to a teaching position. This, on the recommendation of Supt. Steve Quick. The entire meeting took place in closed door session. Sarmiento got to answer questions from the board, as well as the district’s attorney Rocky Hansen. After an hour or so the nearly two dozen high school staff members who were there to support Sarmiento were called in one at a time to testify as to why she should remain as principal. No one appeared to be there to say they agreed with the superintendent’s decision. Out of Meanwhile Sarmiento’s supporters and I sat on the deck and learned tidbits of what was being My Mind as each staff member returned – what kind of Gary A. DeVon said questions were asked and what the supporters tried to get across. This makes for a hard-to-write news article, so instead I’m just going to give my impressions and opinion here in this space. There seemed to be an inordinate concern by the attorney about who told the staff that Quick was trying to transfer Sarmiento into a teaching position next year. Who talked in other words, how did they find out. Well, the obvious answer is probably that you can’t keep something like that under wraps in a work environment, especially given the circumstances. What might those be, you ask. Well, Sarmiento admitted that she got frustrated and at one point had told the superintendent something along the lines of “I might as well resign.” However, she didn’t resign. Unfortunately for Quick, according to reports, he proceeded to write Sarmiento’s resignation letter, but printed it out accidentally on someone else’s printer. It seems the superintendent let the genie out of the bottle, so to speak. Once out it couldn’t be put back in and soon nearly everyone knew. And without Sarmiento asking, in fact the opposite, she had an outpouring of staff support in the form of letters to the board. When I asked her if she asked Quick to write the resignation letter, she said, “No I didn’t ask him; apparently he took it upon himself.” Teacher Ed Naillon, who was on deck in support of his principal, said “There’s a lot of good letters here.” Those waiting had nothing but positive things to say about the principal, while many, who will remain unnamed, were a lot less positive about the superintendent and his methods. Her relationship with staff and students appears to be a strong one, unlike her predecessor in the job. “I heard a rumor that she was being sent back to the classroom before she even had a letter saying she was being transferred,” said another teacher, Tam Hutchinson. “I said that if we lose her you are going to shatter the morale of this building,” said teacher Linda Colvin, after returning to the deck following her talk with the board. Others talked about Sarmiento’s open door policy, her ability to suggest different ways of getting through to students when one course of action isn’t working. Discipline problems are down at the high school, they say. “She fosters growth in teachers, she fosters growth in students,” added teacher Ed Booker. What I’d like to know is how much Quick’s decision cost in attorney’s fees, and if is it true that he hired an investigator how much that cost. Principals come and go. I’ve seen my share in this job, but just going on staff and student support and my own experiences, it would be a mistake to get rid of Principal Sarmiento.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Submitted photo

Connelly Quick painted the new billboard advertising the Depot Museum as his Senior Project

SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602

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SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

How awesome is Oroville? Dear Editor, Our son Connelly Quick is a senior at Oroville High School this year. As part of all 12th grade graduation requirements, he has to complete a “Senior Project”. This project is one that will enhance our community, and teach our kids about organization, time management, people skills and so much more. But I think senior projects also give our kids the opportunity to “give something back” to their community, and show their apprecia-

tion for Oroville. Connelly chose to volunteer his time to the Borderland Historical Society. The project they needed done was to have a side of a billboard painted. The billboard is south on highway 97, on the north side of the highway, just past Thompson B’s. In doing this project Connelly had to ask for help from businesses that had supplies that he needed. One of the businesses was Oroville Building Supply. When Mr. Dan Lepley was told that the paint we needed was for Connelly’s senior project, Mr. Lepley didn’t hesitate to offer free paint, along with the use of his own personal painting supplies. Then Connelly went to Thompson B’s to ask if they had any scaffolding that he could rent. But when Mr. Brian Thompson, who had never spoken to Connelly before, heard Connelly needed it for his senior project, Mr. Thompson said “I’ll do you one better, how about a lift truck?” “Wow” was all Connelly could say. Mr. Thompson showed Connelly how to operate the truck and lift mechanics that lower and lift a bucket that a person can stand in. All that Mr. Thompson asked in return was to just have the truck back at night. Whenever Connelly needed to use the truck, he just went into Thompson B’s, and asked for the keys, and they handed the keys over to a nineteen year old. “Wow” was all that Connelly’s parents could say. The reason I decided to write this article was to share our experience with the willingness of our community to help our kids in any way they can. They might not even know the kids, but when asked to help, they are willing to go above and beyond, with huge acts of kindness. Well… Connelly finished painting the billboard for the Historical Society and it looks great. And Connelly’s parents are thrilled that their son will be graduating. But even more, our son will always be able to think back on Oroville and how our community was and always will be, willing to help our youth,

anyway possible. Thank you Oroville! You are awesome! A special thanks to Thompson B’s for trusting a kid with your truck. We seriously could not have done it without your help! Special thanks go out also to Mrs. Petry for being so nice as we drove through her yard every day as well as the Historical Society for giving us the project. We’d also like to thank the Oroville High School staff for their time, patience and counsel these past four years offering all three of our children a great educational experience. Thank you! Marsallai and Steve Quick Oroville

Standing up for his teacher Dear Editor, I have been informed that my favorite teacher, Ryan Frazier, is not going to get rehired by Oroville High School. He has been a great teacher, the principal likes him and most or even all the teachers like him, but there is one man who feels that Mr. Frazier is insignificant and that one man is Mr. Quick the superintendent for our school. Mr. Quick did not put Mr. Frazier on the rehire list, but excluded him from the list. Mr. Frazier wanted in on the meeting to defend himself from being fired but Mr. Quick said “that you can’t do that until you have a meeting with him” so incidentally Mr. Quick’s meeting with Frazier was the day after the school board’s meeting. I feel that he did this on purpose and I feel that the superintendent has tried to take the most inspirational teacher in the school from the students. If you agree with me come to the school board’s meeting on Tuesday, May 27 at 6:30 p.m. to help Frazier keep his job. Matthew Galvan - Student Oroville High School

Wind beneath your wings OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

In the nineties, my sons graduated from high school and I was moved to write this column. I have updated and published it every year since in the merry month of May. It’s that time again for accomplished commencement speakers to wax eloquent from podiums all over America, but, from the trenches, I humbly offer you graduates this Bill Slusher collection of the wisest things I’ve learned since I was your age, half a century ago. For perspective of viewpoint, I’m college educated, was a (once wounded) combat soldier, cop, police/medevac pilot, and (sometimes single) father of five. I’m one for three at the altar, been shot once, hospitalized four times, but I’m still a happy, lucky man. I’ve published several novels, but I claim no omniscience, young Americans. I just hope to speed you on a safer, happier way to your own success. First, question... everything... always ... including what I tell you. Increasingly, our politically incestuous universities are telling you young men and women what you... must... think, not teaching you how to think for yourselves. There is immense risk in this for you, America and freedom. There are always at least two sides to every story and the truth is... never... any of them, but is always something shifting about in between that you must ascertain for yourself. Beware they who insist they know the truth. The most valuable of human riches is respect. Respect cannot be demanded, taken or even given. Respect can only be... earned. Take care to earn respect and preserve it, for

life without it is not good, and retrieving it once lost is a long hard road. Never ... ever ... tell anyone to do anything you cannot legally and physically force them to do, for if they defy you, you lose their respect. Coincidentally, there is very little you can legally and physically force anyone to do. This is especially true in love relationships. So learn the art of reason. Fight the problems, not each other. If you can take back your love, then whatever you feel isn’t love. Love is an irrevocable gift, not a barter. If she doesn’t love you, or she does you wrong, wish her well and mean it. Then turn around and walk, and don’t look back. Sex and love are not the same thing. Think with your brain, love with your heart, do sex with the rest of your body, and don’t ever get those assigned functions mixed up. Love does not conquer all. Without compatibility, romantic love dies. Compatibility is... not ... about how much you are alike. Compatibility is your capacity to be content with each other’s enduring... differentness. Hell is Disney World compared to a bad marriage. Don’t marry until you’re closer to 30. You will have established your living, you’ll be better spouse and parent material, and you will have known enough lovers well enough to better tell a good one from one who will kill you from the inside out. A condom can save you 18 years of indentured servitude and a whole lot more... if you use it. Fight only for life, land, liberty and loved ones. Negotiate if possible, compromise where feasible, forgive where you can find it in your heart, and you may well and wisely never fight. But if you must fight, be utterly ruthless and rule out nothing but losing, especially in wars, for this is the fastest return to the longest lasting peace.

Beware they who tell you there are race, gender, class or other barriers to your success, especially if they tell you that you must elect them to break down those barriers for you. If you don’t vote you fail yourself and your people, and you forfeit all legitimate right to complain about government. Shun political bigotry... first in yourself. Know the thin difference between reasons and excuses, for in the latter lies ruin. Money cannot buy happiness, but it can buy freedom, and freedom is essential to happiness. Respect they who love their god. Beware they who declare that you must love it too. If you guys ever get to thinking you’re hot stuff with cars, motorcycles, horses, tractors, aircraft, guns or women, you better step back and reconsider, pronto, for you are about to get hurt badly by one of them. If you don’t eat, you can’t feed. Study investing, and start ... now. Much worse than being young and poor, is being... old... and poor. We all cry in our time, but there is a critical difference between suffering and whining. Be one who changes the trends, not one who is changed by them. To waste time is to invite death to draw nearer. Last and perhaps most importantly, remember... always... who runs your life. Now... run it. Congratulations, seniors! Here’s for wind beneath your wings. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his newly reprinted down-and-dirty Southern murder mystery Shepherd of the Wolves. (Amazon, cmppg. com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@live.com.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Memorial Day is different than it used to be Almost to the final days of May. Repeating once again that Memorial Day is by far different than it used to be. Many of the younger generations don’t participate in the old fashioned ways of putting flowers on the graves of loved ones who have gone on before, but some do. Neither one is right or wrong, it is just the “changing of the times.” Thank God we live in a country, where we can still make choices. In 1974 when Johnny Carson was asked to write his own epitaph, he said it would probably be something like, “I’ll be right back,” but then seriously said, “I don’t intend to have a tombstone. I consider that custom to be a waste of ground and a waste of marble. The funeral ritual in this country is ridiculous. I’d prefer that my ashes were scattered over the ocean.” And it does seem that more and more people are being cremated than ever before and I’m sure that the cost factor enters into the picture. And isn’t it amazing that the old fashioned yellow rose bush is profusely blooming and does so each year, regardless of weather conditions. Giving those that wish to do so, to take bouquets to

the cemetery. The children of Bob and Ethel Kelly are among those that do remember to come to the cemetery, each year, and bring a live geranium to place on their parents graves. In so doing, a mini family get together, for lunch, is held by Roberta Harrah, Spokane, Pat Ludeman, Waterville, Rick Kelly, Oroville, Barbara and Joe Shaw, Bill Greene and your truly, all cousins. Memorial services for Ruth (Johnston) Sexson will be held June 7 at the Whitworth Presbyterian Church, Spokane, Wash. Ruthie will be remembered as the daughter of Ward and Frieda (Forney) Johnston, Oroville residents of many years. Ruthie died from the recurrence of cancer. Condolences go to all the friends and family. Also, word has been received of the death of Marjorie (Wilson) daughter of George and Betty Wilson, longtime residents of Oroville. She didn’t survive heart surgery. Condolences go to Ivadell Sullivan in the loss of her daughter, Nancy. Sullivans were operators of the Loomis store for many years and lived at Palmer Lake.

It seems to be one of “those weeks” that I have way too many deaths to report. A phone call confirmed that Bev Storm will be released from the therapy facility May 28 or 29 and onward toward home. Reports are that the class of ’64 had a good attendance for their reunion, held May 10. Here’s a hint: When you have a reunion, appoint someone to write about it for the paper, as most like to read about those events. If you feel you can’t write it up, put down the pertinent information and get it to Gary (or me) and we’ll finish it. We don’t always know about everything. Until after the fact. I saw “Miss “J”, Elaine Johnson, former P. E. and much loved teacher. Perhaps she was here for the reunion! It’s good to see Gary walking without crutches or foot brace. Well, that was last week! Hopefully he’s continuing to heal… but I do believe he told me, surgery is down the road. Remember the 15th is Father’s Day and if you still have yours, be thankful and tell him so. The Similkameen River is running very high and muddy. No gold panning

LAUREN PICINI & JOSHUA LOFTHUS

being done there for a while. mind, was successful at most things he Steve and Laura Wilkerson recently attempted and helped many along the returned from a trip to Minnesota. I way. He provided employment for many couldn’t get Laura to admit to whether it men and women operating the “dryer” was still snowing there. (the Valley Evaporating Co.) for many Remember drive-in theyears, of which my mother aters? Back when our girls was a longtime employee. I were little we’d get them even worked during school dressed in their “jammies”, holidays a time or two. Many make a big bag of popcorn of those folks were in attenand a container of koolaid dance and a number of politiand off we’d go to the movie! cal dignitaries were on hand Fun days! There are very few to give thanks and appreciaof those theaters left these tion for all the contributions days but there is one near Pt. to society that Web was assoTownsend, Wash. that still is ciated with. in operation. We didn’t stay for the Soon, another term of THIS & THAT closing remarks, as the cold school will come to an end. Joyce Emry winds were just too much for Wednesday evening, 6 p.m. our old bones to endure. A will be Baccalaureate service fantastic array of foods and at the United Methodist Church for the drink were provided those attending. graduating class. All are invited. Was so sorry that Barbara Forrester was Refreshments of root beer floats will having a “bad day” and couldn’t be on be served. Seniors don’t participate in hand, as she was as a daughter to Web. this portion of graduation exercises as Among those present that I hadn’t they used to. When I graduated, you seen for many years were the Boucher went, or you didn’t receive your diplo- brothers, Desmond and Ron, sons of ma… (unless there was an acceptable Dorothy and Buck Hinton, (Mr. Dryer excuse) . himself). Ah! The Memories! Web Hallauer loved the beauty of The color is really bursting forth on Lake Osoyoos, so it was only fitting the hanging baskets that decorate Main that his Celebration of Life was held at St. and the pots along the street are like the Veterans Memorial Park, Sunday, they were filled with deep purple velvet. May 25. Web had nearly reached the Norman and Kathy Dull were visiting century mark when he passed away. his mom, Evelyn, during the Memorial His had been a life filled with exciting Holidays while other folks were away experiences, which he shared with those visiting family and friends. who would listen. He had a brilliant ‘Til next week.

Gifts for Military Children SUBMITTED BY DARALYN HOLLENBECK

NCW BLUE STAR MOTHERS

April was national Month of the Military Child: A time when we honor, appreciate, and encourage the children of our local active duty military. This year the NCW Blue Star Mothers sent out gifts to 24 kids ranging in ages from 1-18 years old. War-related family stresses are a part of a military child’s life. Families depend on their sac-

Nine years of history SUBMITTED BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Lauren Elizabeth Picini and Joshua Kord Lofthus were married on March 22, 2014 at Tonasket Bible Church. Lauren is the daughter of John and Joy Picini of Lake Stevens, WA, and Joshua is the son of Craig and Sharon Lofthus of Tonasket, WA. The bride’s maid of honor was Faith Lofthus, (sister of the groom). The bridesmaids were Laura and Hannah Jovich (friends of the bride), Libby Hook (friend of the bride), and Dorothy Leidig friend of the bride and groom). The best man was Caleb Lofthus, (brother of the groom). The groomsmen were Jeremiah and Zachariah Lofthus (brothers of the groom), Nolan Picini (brother of the bride), and Peter Williams (friend of the groom). Ushers were Eithan and Austin Knowlton. The ceremony was officiated by Craig Lofthus, Joshua’s father. The reception was held at the Tonasket Free Methodist Church. Joshua is a recent graduate of WSU and Lauren recently completed an internship at Lakeside Bible Camp on Whidbey Island, where the couple first met. The couple will make their first home in Tonasket.

Schoolhouse and Old Molson Museums open SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Everyone worked hard to make the Memorial Saturday in Molson a big success. Judy made many dozen of her World Famous (our hill top world) Cinnamon Rolls. They were as good as ever. There was a lot of household items and Christmas decorations from Cleta and Wayne. Spence had guns. Lani had hand made beautiful jewelry. Pat and Floyd and their daughter had a big selection of household items, clothes and much more. Max had handmade card and sketches and other art work. The Grange folks had anything and everything. Vivian had lots of beautiful clothing and some household items. The Auxiliary Ladies displayed many hand made items, like dish towels, pillow cases and lap quilts. The ladies held a raffle

312 S. Whitcomb

HILLTOP COMMENTS and the winner of the basket was Deb Nesper. The Chesaw ladies provided lunch (Walkin’ Tacos) for your pleasure. That was a hit as quite a few sold by noon. If you missed out in Molson you can purchase one at the Fourth of July Rodeo in Chesaw. Sandra’s Store Fiona was open down the road from the Grange Hall. She had several visitors and did sell a few items. Remember, she will be open all summer through Labor Day. However, Fiona will be closed the weekend of May 31 to June 1 but then will be open as usual after that. Sorry for any inconvenience. Don’t forget that the Farmer’s Market then will be every Saturday starting at 10 a.m. throughout the season. Saturday, June 7, 10 to 5, Fiona will have the second annual Great GreenStock Exchange with garden plants, seeds, and stock of all kinds as well as a WSU Master Gardener on hand to answer your plant questions. The North American Wool

509-486-0615

Cooperative will be hosting a Craft Day at Fiona, June 10, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Any and all types of crafty folks are welcome! Call Sally Facer 485-3262 for more info. The School House Museum also had it’s opening on Memorial Day and many visitors came to see the days gone by in Molson. You can also visit the Ghost Town or Old Molson with all of the old buildingsand machines. The Knob Hill Club will meet on Wednesday at Noon, starting with a potluck lunch. Everyone is welcome. The next Family BINGO Night in Molson at the Grange Hall will be on June 6 at 7 p.m. The Midsummer Festival in Molson will be on the Saturday, June 21. Stay tuned for more details. Don’t forget the Centennial Celebration celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Molson Schoolhouse is Saturday, June 26 in Molson. What is your favorite place in Chesaw? The store, the tavern, Fiona’s, the fire hall, the rodeo grounds, or the Mercantile or the Community Building. Until next week.

Raleigh Chin next guest speaker SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Raleigh Chinn will be telling his life story on the Tuesday, May 27 and may even add a little about the Jet Ski Races sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce this sum-

Preparing for Founders Day SUBMITTED BY AUDREY HOLMES TONASKET GARDEN CLUB

The meeting on May 12 was held at the Hillside Apartments. The subject talked about was the parade on Saturday, May 31 for Founders Day. Preparations are being made to have our annual booth at the II Sisters parking lot again this year. Baked goods and

2005, today we offer dozens of educational, recreational and cultural classes. Each of the three quarter catalogs contains classes that are always popular, and others that are offered for the first time. We have grown along with computer technology, too, offering a website, www.northval-

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS mer. No program yet about the Mosquito Control Board. Clyde Andrews will be the speaker on Tuesday, June 3 to tell us about upcoming programs this summer.

TONASKET GARDEN CLUB other items will be for sale. Also, we are invited to Oroville’s Spring District meeting for their Garden Club. It will be held at their Senior Center on Wednesday, June 11. Betty Roberts, member of the club, will give a program on Wild flowers in our area and the tour she takes

leycommunityschools.com; and a Facebook page, North Valley Community Schools. How communication has changed! With seven classes in June, here are some of the first offerings: Earn Your U.S. Citizenship (Tuesday, June 3, four sessions); Playing the Ukelele (Thursday, June 5, four sessions); Wild Flower Tour (Tuesday, June 10). Call Ellen Batttels at 509-4762011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu, or register on our website at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com. Many programs were on TV regarding tributes to all our military and veterans this weekend, but many more relating to the VA Hospital scandals. Pinochle scores for May 24: Ed Craig won the door prize; it is hard to believe that no one got any pinochles, but that is what happened. Leonard Paulsen was the high scoring man and Sally Eder was high for the ladies. More next time.

people on. She makes beautiful things out of the wild flowers as well. Discussed also at the meeting was that we were asked if we could help to water the large hanging pots ful of flowers in town. We said that we would if we can find enough volunteers due to the shortage of able members to participate. The next meeting will be at the home of Wendy Taylor. We encourage guests and new members to attend. The number to call for time and place is 509-223-3427.

OKANOGAN VALLEY

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THE LEARNING TREE

young children face. In an effort to make sure these children’s sacrifices are remembered, we sent all children under age 6 stuffed animals to hug, while older children received books, affirmation†necklaces, or gift certificates.†The funds for these gifts were made available to us through your participation in our flower bulbs sale and basket raffles. Thank you! We invite families of active duty military to share with us the names and addresses of your Military Kids for next year! Contact us at 485-2906 or ncw. bluestars@yahoo.com.

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TIN SIGNS!

rifice and resilience to make it possible for their parents to serve and protect our country. All U.S. children under the age of 13 have known nothing but war in their life time. A few years ago the short news video “Children Left Behind” was produced about SSgt Josh Hollenbeck’s (Oroville) children during a deployment (http://vimeo.com/13787612). This short documentary touches upon some of the stresses these

OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

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We continue to grow! North Valley Community Schools was introduced to our community nine years ago, and this year we celebrate our seventh year as a 501C3 non-profit organization. While the program began with beginning computer courses in

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509-476-3602


MAY 29, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

FREE SWIMMING IN MAY OROVILLE - The Camaray Motel is pleased to allow locals to use their pool from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday through Friday of each week with a few exceptions (3-day weekends). Motel guests will have the exclusive use of the pool on Saturdays. Cost per person is $1 per day, with a maximum of $2 for an immediate family. Until June 1, swimming will be free. Just check in at the front desk before going to the pool. For more info, contact the Camaray directly at 509-476-3684 TONASKET MS/HS CONCERT TONASKET - The Tonasket Music Department will be presenting the Middle School and High School Choirs as well as High School Band in a Spring Concert on Wednesday, May 28, at 6:30 p.m. The choirs will sing separate programs of folk and pop tunes including a medley of Adele hits, Royals by Lorde and Circle of Life from “The Lion King,� among other songs. The High School Band will perform a variety of music, from Handel to AC/DC. The concert will take place in the High School Commons, free of charge and open to the public. COMMUNITY ACTION MEETING OKANOGAN The Okanogan County Community Action Council Board will hold their regular board meeting on Wednesday, May 28, at 5:15 p.m. at Community Action, 424 S. 2nd Ave. Okanogan, Wash. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. OCCAC is a community building organization. It works with community members of all groups to raise the poor out of poverty, to feed the hungry, to provide affordable housing for all, to empower community members through education. Those that have questions or need additional info may contact Lael Duncan at OCCAC, 509-422-4041. OHS BACCALAUREATE SERVICE OROVILLE - “A Reflection of Accomplishment� - Oroville Churches are inviting people to join a ceremony honoring the 2014 Oroville High School Graduating Class on Wednesday, May 28 at 6 p.m. at the United Methodist Church. For more information contact Pastor Dwayne Turner 509-560-3141. OHS SPRING CONCERT OROVILLE - The Oroville High School music students will be presenting their Spring Concert on Wednesday, May 28 at 7 p.m. in the Oroville High School Commons. Admission is free. OROVILLE FARMERS’ MARKET OROVILLE - The next Oroville Farmers’ Market will be Saturday, May 31 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Oroville Public Library is presenting this market on Saturday mornings through Oct. 25. The 2014 season also features three Community Yard Sale and Flea Market dates: July 5, Aug. 2 and Aug. 30. New vendors are welcome and your booth fee helps support the Oroville Public Library. For more info call 509-476-2662. BENEFIT DINNER/AUCTION OROVILLE - There will be a benefit dinner and auction for

Mary Ann Martinez on Saturday, May 31 at the Oroville Eagles starting at 5:30 p.m. Dinner includes chicken fettuccine, salad and bread.

GOLD MINE TOUR OROVILLE - This North Valley Community Schools class is popular every time it’s offered. The Geology and Gold Mine Tour is two sessions on Thursday, May 29 and Saturday, May 31. You will learn the geological principles of mineral deposit formation with examples from local deposits. The second session will be a trip to a working underground gold mine at the Kinross Mine at Buckhorn Mountain. Participants must be 18 or older to register. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-4762011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu, or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. TONASKET LIBRARY BOOK SALE TONASKET - The Tonasket Library Board’s semi-annual book sale will be held as a part of the celebration of Founder’s Day in Tonasket. The book sale is Thursday, May 29 and Friday, May 30 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day in the Tonasket City Council chambers at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. All proceeds go for library needs. Donations will be accepted through May 27. Any questions call the library at 509-486-2366. ART IN THE PARK Tonasket’s first Art in the Park is being held as part of the Founders Day celebration on Saturday, May 31 at the Triangle Park from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Local artists will be selling their handcrafted items such as paintings, stained glass, woodworking and stone etching. Those wishing to be vendors may contact the Community Cultural Center at 486-1328. HUMUH OPEN HOUSE The HUMUH Clear-Mind Buddhist Life Science/Meditation Center at 1314 Main St. in Oroville is hosting an Open House Saturday, May 31, through Thursday, June 5, every day from 10am to 5pm. Everyone is welcome. For more information call 509-476-0200. CHECK LIPIDS AND GLUCOSE $5 Lipids and Glucose at North Valley Hospital’s laboratory to celebrate Health Care Week. Monday June 2 through Friday June 6 from 8 a.m. to Noon. No physician orders needed, and we will send the results to your primary care physician. For questions call 509-486-2151. PLAYING THE MIGHTY UKE It’s a small instrument with just four strings. In this North Valley Community School class you will learn the functions of each part of the ukulele, finger positions, basic chords, and how to play a few simple chorded songs. Strum and pick your way to a bunch of fun with this delightful instrument in four sessions beginning June 5. This miniature guitar-like wonder is easy to pack, too. Tons of easy entertainment for yourself and others. Call Ellen Barttels at 509-476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet. edu, or register online at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com. Remember, too, we have a Facebook page! CATHOLIC CHURCH YARD SALE OROVILLE - Immaculate Conception Catholic Church will hold its Annual Yard Sale at 1715 Main St. in Oroville on Friday, June 6 and Saturday, June 7 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. We will have many ice chests for picnics, fishing and camping. There will be ‘new to you’ items and plenty of parking. www.e d wa rd j o n e s .co m

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DESERT PARK FUNDRAISER OSOYOOS - Horse racing returns to Desert Park in Osoyoos on Saturday, June 14 and Saturday, Aug. 16. There will be a fundraiser dinner, dance, auction and pony races on Saturday, June 7 at the Watermark Beach Resort. Tickets are $50 each and available at the Osoyoos Times office or at the door. NVH RESPIRATORY CARE COURSE North Valley Hospital will be hosting a community education course on respiratory care on Thursday, June 26, 6 to 7 p.m. Respiratory Therapist Ken Radford will share information on understanding your respiratory health, spirometry, lung health, COPD and smoking cessation. You will receive a wealth of information on understanding preventative and rescue medications, and education on activities you can do to improve your lung health. The course is free, but with only 14 available spots preregistration is required. Call 509486-3163 or go to our website at www.nvhospital.org to register.

Brent Baker/staff photo

With spring in full bloom, colorful flora and fauna are making their appearances throughout the valley. Pictured above is what appears to be a Tiger Swallowtail butterfly in Tonasket last week.

OSOYOOS CHERRY FIESTA OSOYOOS - Join us on July 1st in Osoyoos, BC for the 66th Annual Cherry Fiesta. Pancake breakfast, parade, music and entertainment and ends with fireworks. Vendor and Parade Entry Forms available on our website at osoyoosfestivalsociety.ca/wp/. For more information call Nancy Katerenchuk, 250-495-4008. DENTISTRY

TONASKET FOOD BANK TONASKET - The Tonasket Food Bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the old Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Debbie Roberts at (509) 486-2192. OROVILLE FOOD BANK OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386. LISTING YOUR ITEM Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event� button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar.

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

In Tonasket & Oroville

OKANOGAN

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

HEALTH CARE

Call us . . . Se Habla EspaĂąol

GODZILLA FRI-SAT-

SUN,MON.-TUES., THURS,-FRI. MAY 30-31,JUNE 1-2-3,5-6 SHOWTIMES: FRI. &SAT. 7PM & 9:25PM

NEIGHBORS

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. JUNE 12-13-14-15-16-17 ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY @ 7:30PM

 

 

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST 131m

PG13

FANTASY/ADV./ACTION STARRING PATRICK STEWART, IAN MCKELLEN, HUGH JACKMAN. FRI. 6:30 & 9:30. SAT. *3:30, 6:30 & 9:30. SUN. *3:30, 6:30 WKDYS 6:45.

The

(509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel (509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

MIRAGE THEATER

GODZILLA ACTION/ADV./ SCI- FI

STARRING AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON, ELIZABETH OLSEN, BRYAN CRANSTON FRI.7:00& 9:45. SAT.*3:30, 7:00,9:45. SUN *3:30,7:00. MON.*3:45,6:45 WKDYS 6:45

BLENDED

117min

PG13

509-486-2174

Family Health Centers

CLINIC

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

Physician-owned and patient-centered

„ Anti

Coagulation Clinic

„ Ophthalmology „ Radiology „ Behavioral

Health In Clinic „ Family Practice „ Laboratory „ Surgery Center „ Chemo Infusion

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

„ Walk

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

OPTICAL

MASSAGE

509-826-1800

Su Ianniello Licensed Massage Practitioner

Emergency VA Clinic „ Surgical Center „ Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket) „ Obstetrical Services „ Imaging „ Full-Service Laboratory „ Extended Care „ Swing Bed Program

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

„ „

826-7919

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

We would be honored to work with you!

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

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WA Lic#MA21586

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COMEDY STARRING ADAM SANDLER, DREW BERRYMORE, WENDI MCLENDONCOVEY. FRI. 6:45, 9:45 . SAT. *4:00,7:00,9:45

SUN. *4:00,7:00. WKDAYS.7:00 MILLION WAYS TOR DIE 116min IN THE WEST

COMEDY/WESTERN STARRING SETH MACFARLANE, CHARLIZE THERON, LIAM NEESON. FRI. 6:45, 9:45. SAT *3:45, 6:45, 9:45. SUN*3:45,6:45. WKDAYS 6:45. Adult $8.50

HEALTH CARE

509-486-2174

HEALTH CARE

Healthcare Services

(509) 826-5600

OROVILLE

HEALTH CARE

Chemical Dependency Developmental Disabilities

TONASKET

www.wvmedical.com

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

OXYGEN SERVICE

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

(509) 826-6191

Mental Health

MOVIES 250-498-2277

TONASKET

OMAK

Toll Free

www.olivertheatre.ca Oliver, B.C.

“Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.�

OMAK: 6$VK6W2PDN 2IÂżFH+RXUV7KXUVGD\V Tel: 509-826-1930

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

(509) 826-6191

Oliver Theatre

FAMILY PRACTICE

FAMILY DENTISTRY

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. 2IÂżFH+RXUV7XHV:HG Tel: 509-476-2151

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP OROVILLE - The Stroke Support Group meets Wednesday, May 28 at 10:30 a.m. at the The Youth Activity Center (YAC) at 607 Central Ave. Oroville, adjacent to the Free Methodist Church. This is a support group for anyone who has had a stroke, no matter how long ago. Discussion from those who have recovered would also be very welcome. There will be a presentation and discussion. There will be refreshments.

COLORS OF SPRING

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

1RFKLOGUHQXQGHUDJHDGPLWWHGXQOHVVĂ€OPLV *UDWHG1RRQHXQGHUDGPLWWHGWR5UDWHGĂ€OPV without their own parent. Photo ID required.

z Your

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center z Oxygen Concentrators z Portable Concentrators z Sleep Apnea Equipment z Nebulizers z Home Sleep Tests

Direct Readers To Your Medical or Health Related Business Every Week

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WELCOME

PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

to the

79th TONASKET FOUNDERS DAY Through a Child’s Eyes Queen Brisa Leep

Good Times! Hughes

Good Luck to all the Rodeo Participants!

GREENHOUSE We grow our plants with TLC!

Roy’s Pharmacy

Enjoy the RODEO!

318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 486-2149

440 Hwy 7 S., Tonasket 486-2206

Welcome Rodeo Fans!

24 Pack Cube

24 Pack Coors Cubes 12 oz Cans

7.99

$

G RANT’S

18

$

.99

MARKE T

18 W. 4th, Tonasket 486-2127

Good luck to all Rodeo Participants! Enjoy the 79th Annual Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo!

RODEO Fans & Participants!

– Western Decor – Lots of Designs to choose from!

If we don’t have it, we’ll find it for you! www.okchevy.net 512 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509.486.8400

„ Salads „ Foods to „ Deli

go

„ Sliced Meats „ Cold Drinks „ More!

7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.

212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket z 486-2183

z Books z Children’s Gifts z Garden Decor z Candles z Quilts

LOCATED: ¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

z Antiques &

Collectibles

z Much, More!


MAY 29, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

2014

PAGE A9

TONASKET COMANCHEROS INC.

03/-.12Day

Schedule of Events

RODEO

BBQ and Kids Games at the Rodeo Grounds

Friday, May 30 PBR at 7 p.m. at the Rodeo Grounds

SHANE PROCTOR INVITATIONAL PBR WORLD CLASS BUCKING HORSE ASSOCIATION

WHERE TONASKET RODEO GROUNDS

WHEN

Thursday, May 29

Saturday, May 31 z Breakfast at the

ADVANCE TICKETS ADULTS $12.00 KIDS (6-12) $8.00

5'(%& MAY 29 5:30 P.M.

TH

BBQ & KIDS GAMES

5%I. MAY 30TH 7PM 5SAT. MAY 31ST 2:30 PM

AT THE DOOR ADULTS $15.00 KIDS (6-12) $10.00

PRESALE LOCATIONS DETRO’S WESTERN STORE

Rodeo Grounds 8 a.m. z Freedom 5K 8 a.m. at the THS Track (sponsored by the Lion’s Club) z Vendors on 3rd Street, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. z PARADE 11 a.m. z PBR at 2:30 at the Rodeo Grounds z Concessions and a Beer Garden will be open at the Street Dance... Street Dance at 5:30 to 9 pm on 3rd Street. With music from North Half and Special Guest Johannes Weber

Rodeo is at 2:30 p.m. this year!

THE JUNCTION II SISTERS VIDEO TONASKET EAGLES LES SCHWAB (OROVILLE) BIG R (OMAK & COLVILLE) Tonasket Chamber of Commerce supporting local businesses www.tonasketchamber.com

Have A Great Weekend!

Let’s rodeo

p by for Kid s 12 an d un der sto er Ho rse ey Br a n wi to a ch an ce r Tre ad or Jo hn De ere Mon ste Tracto rs!

We encourage everyone to get out and enjoy the Tonasket Founders Day Rodeo!

We will be closed for the Parade on Saturday, May 31 (Sat. Clinic), so our staff can participate in the Founders Day Celebration! If you have an emergency, please go to NVH Emergency Room.

Ertyl - John Deere Toys 20% Off

We will open Mon., June 2 at 8:30 a.m.

Breyer Horses 20% Off

| Family Medicine

Lee Frank Mercantile 324 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2105

HOURS: Mon. - Fri., 7:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Sat., 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sun., 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

17 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 486-2174 Limited to quantity on hand Not responsible for printing errors

1617 Main Street, Oroville 476-3631


PAGE A10

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

The court dismissed May 19 an assault in violation of a no-contact order charge against David John Smith Jr., 42, Tonasket. Smith had complied with a stipulated order of continuance. The charge was dismissed with prejudice. Jakob Stephen Parr, 21, Riverside, pleaded guilty May 20 to ÀUVWGHJUHHWUDIÀFNLQJLQVWROHQ property. The court dismissed a third-degree theft charge. Parr was sentenced to six months in MDLODQGÀQHGIRUWKH Jan. 6 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for June 16. Danyille Mariah McCarter, 20, Omak, pleaded guilty May 20 to POCS (methamphetamine). The court dismissed charges of POCS (heroin) and third-degree theft. McCarter was sentenced to 30 GD\VLQMDLODQGÀQHG for the Feb. 28 crime. Madison Leigh Louie, 28, Omak, SOHDGHGJXLOW\0D\WRÀUVW GHJUHHWUDIÀFNLQJLQVWROHQSURSerty. The court dismissed charges of second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Louie was sentenced to three months in jail DQGÀQHGIRUWKH'HF 13, 2013 crime. A restitution hearing was scheduled for June 16. The court found probable cause to charge Ryan Paul Mulligan, 28, Oroville, with second-degree malicious mischief. The crime allegedly occurred April 22. The court found probable cause to charge Dylan Jay Mulligan, 27, Oroville, with second-degree rape, unlawful imprisonment and furnishing liquor to a minor. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 27, 2013. The court found probable cause to charge Michael Aaron Cornella, 24, Omak, with criminal conspiracy to commit residential burglary, third-degree possession of stolen property and POCS (clonazepam). The crimes allegedly occurred May 7.

DISTRICT COURT Felipe Santiago Gomez, 44, Oroville, had a bail jumping charge dismissed. Christopher Felix Sheena, 31, Oroville, had a charge dismissed: no valid operator’s license without ID. Mary Ellen Smith-Capote, 44, Oroville, guilty of DUI. SmithCapote was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 343 days susSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHG Jeremy Dillin Smith, 22, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Roberta Joy Staggs, 40, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Staggs was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and Ă€QHG :LOOLDP&XUWLV6W3HWHU2PDN guilty of third-degree DWLS. St. Peter received a 90-day susSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGĂ€QHG Amy Elizabeth Tatshama, 30, Okanogan, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Tatshama was sentenced to 90 days in jail ZLWKGD\VVXVSHQGHGDQG Ă€QHGDWRWDORI 7HUUDQFH%ODLQH7KLHOH5LYHUside, guilty of hit-and-run (unattended vehicle). Thiele received a 90-day suspended sentence and Ă€QHG Jeremiah Leonard Track, 27, Okanogan, guilty of obstruction, thirddegree theft and third-degree DWLS. Track was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHGDWRWDORI  .DWKU\Q5XWK:DSDWR2PDN guilty of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock GHYLFHDQGĂ€UVWGHJUHH':/6 and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of DUI, second-degree DWLS, POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams) and use or delivery of drug paraphernalia. Wapato was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 319 days VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHGDWRWDORI  Jeffrey Van Weitman, 34, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Alicia Jonele Wilson, 19, Omak, had two charges dismissed: thirddegree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. -DPHV'HDQ:LOVRQ7RQDVNHW guilty of fourth-degree assault and violation of a no-contact order. Wilson was sentenced to GD\VLQMDLOZLWKGD\V VXVSHQGHGDQGĂ€QHGDWRWDORI  7KRPDV6FRWW:RRGDUG2PDN guilty of third-degree DWLS. Woodard received a 90-day susSHQGHGVHQWHQFHDQGĂ€QHG Andrew Curtis Wynecoop, 22, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wynecoop received a 90-day suspended sentence and Ă€QHG

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, May 19, 2014 Assault on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on N. Van Duyn St. in Okanogan. Wheels and tires reported missing. Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Medication reported missing. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Public intoxication on Pine St. in Okanogan.

Fraud on Spring Meadow Lane near Oroville. Illegal burning on Westlake Rd. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Columbia St. in Omak. Trespassing on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Burglary on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. DWLS on W. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on W. Cherry Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Forgery on Golden St. in Oroville. Eduardo Pamatz Ponce, 23, Department of Corrections detainer and an FTA bench warrant for unlawIXOSRVVHVVLRQRIDÀUHDUP Mark Allen Kinkade, 43, booked for XQODZIXOGLVFKDUJHRIDÀUHDUP 0DUN$QWKRQ\&RPEVERRNHG on two OCSO FTA warrants: ÀUVWGHJUHH':/6DQGDQLJQLtion interlock violation. Tuesday, May 20, 2014 Domestic dispute on Clarkson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Lost property on Elmway in Okanogan. Wallet reported missing. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on W. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Threats on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Trespassing on Box Spring Dr. near Tonasket. Harassment on Oak St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Central Ave. in Omak. Theft on N. Main St. in Omak. License plate reported missing. Theft on Ridge Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Fir St. in Oroville. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. BBQ grill reported missing. .HYLQ0LFKDOH'L[RQERRNHG for second-degree criminal trespassing. Shelby Laura Arias, 34, booked for second-degree malicious mischief (DV). Amy Sue Stewart, 40, booked on an )7$EHQFKZDUUDQWIRUWUDIÀFNing in stolen property. Joseph Michael Anguiano, 24, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for DUI. Danyille Mariah McCarter, 20, court commitment for POCS. Ezra Thomas Chapman, 33, booked on two OCSO FTC warrants: '8,DQGÀUVWGHJUHH':/6 Wednesday, May 21, 2014 Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Window reported smashed. Two-vehicle crash on Rehmke Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Myers Creek Rd. near Oroville. Firearms reported missing. Weapons offense of Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. DWLS on Wannacut Lake Rd. near Oroville. Malicious mischief on E. Pine St. in Okanogan. Sign reported damaged. Threats on Tacoma St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Threats on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on E. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Engh Rd. near Omak. Burglary on E. Hale Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omak Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Juniper St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Elizabeth Kinkade, 37, booked for ÀUVWGHJUHHVH[XDOPLVFRQGXFW Mihaly Racz, no middle name listed, ERRNHGIRUDWWHPSWHGUHVLdential burglary and two counts of felony harassment. Carlo Lee Perez, 29, Department of Corrections detainer. Tricia Lynn Dezellem, 40, booked for third-degree theft and thirddegree possession of stolen property. .HYLQ&DUWHU%DLOH\'HSDUWPHQW of Corrections detainer. Jeremiah Van Tachell, 22, booked on an FTA bench warrant for POCS. Thursday, May 22, 2014 Threats on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on Oak St. in Omak. Theft on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Imhoff Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Main St. in Oroville. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Alcohol reported missing. Theft on Shumway Rd. near Omak. Public intoxication at East Side Park in Omak. Malicious mischief on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Bicycle reported missing. Russell Ellis Gardner, 21, booked for second-degree assault. Jose Jesus Vega, 18, booked for felony harassment. Franklin Bernise Bowen, 27, booked for violation of a protection order. Jacob Dalton Kendall, 22, booked on an Okanogan County Superior Court FTA warrant for contempt of court, and two OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree theft and

FIRE ON THE POLE

violation of a protection order. Scott Warren, no middle name listed, FRXUWFRPPLWPHQWIRU'8, Jeremy John Lavender, 28, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for violation of a temporary restraining order and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for violation of a no-contact order. 'XVWLQ7KRPDV+D\HVERRNHGRQ an Okanogan County Superior Court FTC warrant for POCS. Alfonso Cardenas Jr., no middle QDPHOLVWHGERRNHGRQDQ OCSO FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Cody Franklin Webster, 28, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for DUI. Friday, May 23, 2014 Two-vehicle crash on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. No injuries reported. DWLS on Elm St. in Oroville. Alcohol offense on Omak Lake Rd. near Omak. DWLS on Golden Willow Lane near Oroville. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Burglary on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. 6WUXFWXUHĂ€UHRQ$PDQGD5GQHDU Oroville. Assault on Jackson St. in Omak. Fire on S. Main St. in Omak. Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Drugs on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Found property on Edmonds St. in Omak. Bicycle recovered. Found property on N. Main St. in Omak. Wallet recovered. Warrant arrest on Main St. in Oroville. Threats on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Sharon Eugene Moses, 27, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: hit-and-run (attended) and second-degree DWLS. Christopher Charles Anaya, 24, booked for false reporting and making a false or misleading statement. Nicholas Thornton, no middle name OLVWHGFRXUWFRPPLWPHQWIRU DUI. $OLFLD/\QQ)ORUHVERRNHGRQ an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Saturday, May 24, 2014 Trespassing on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Malicious mischief on Rose St. in Okanogan. Reader board reported damaged. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 in Okanogan. Injuries reported. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Malicious mischief on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Benton St. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on E. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Burglary on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on Rocky River HUD Rd. near Omak. Found property on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Wallet recovered. Burglary on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Harassment on Oak St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Warrant arrest on Benton St. in Omak. Two reports of trespassing on Engh Rd. in Omak. Tyler Lee Shelton, 23, booked for POCS (methamphetamine). 'DYLG$OOHQ*RUU'HSDUWPHQWRI Corrections detainer. Mathew Russell Carden, 27, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Cameron John Taylor, 19, booked for violation of a no-contact order. *DU\:D\QH%URZQERRNHGRQ an OCSO FTA warrant for an ignition interlock violation. $VKOH\&DUROLQH+XQHUERRNHG IRUĂ€UVWGHJUHHFULPLQDOWUHVSDVVing, second-degree burglary and ID theft. Patrick Thomas Watt, 40, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS. Sunday, May 25, 2014 Domestic dispute on Appleway Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Ione St. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on E. Jonathan Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Moccasin Flat HUD Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Palmer Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on E. Eighth Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Stage Coach Loop Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on S. Granite St. in Omak. Assault on Apple Lane near Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Benton St. in Omak. Theft on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Threats on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. DUI on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Eugene Reliford, no middle name OLVWHGERRNHGIRUKDUDVVPHQW (DV). +HFWRU0LVDHO5HJDODGRERRNHG for fourth-degree assault (DV) and interfering with reporting (DV). 7KRPDV$OEHUW*DQGHHERRNHG for DUI and carrying or exhibiting a weapon.

Katie Wheat/submitted photo

Oroville Fire Department responded Monday evening to a power pole fire on O’Neal Road, near Paws Produce & Fish Market. Paws Produce owner Katie Wheat said that shortly after 5:00 p.m., “There was a deafening explosion that sounded like a gunshot and we lost power immediately. I called the PUD who dispatched a lineman. Then I noticed the cross member of the power pole on the corner of my property was dangling precariously over the roadway and was in flames, so I called 911 and they dispatched the Oroville Fire Department.� Once the flames were doused, a PUD crew installed a new power pole, she said. Power was restored at about 11:00 p.m.

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE Baccalaureate Service “A Reflection of Accomplishment� Please join the Oroville Churches for a ceremony honoring our 2014 High School Graduating Class. Wednesday, May 28th @ 6:00 PM at the United Methodist Church For more information contact Pastor Dwayne Turner 560-3141

OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m. z Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en espaùol Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St.‡RFEI@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor ZZZ%URWKHU2I7KH6RQFRP

Faith Lutheran Church WK ,URQZRRG2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!â€? Pastor Dan Kunkel‡'HDFRQ'DYH:LOGHUPXWK

Immaculate Conception Parish 0DLQ6WUHHW2URYLOOH DP(QJOLVK0DVVVW6XQGD\RIWKH0RQWK Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado‡

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oroville Ward +LJKZD\  Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist )LU2URYLOOH‡ Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship Pastor Randy McAllister (DVW2URYLOOH5G‡ ‡6XQGD\6FKRRO $GXOW 7HHQV DP 0RUQLQJ:RUVKLSDP‡6XQ(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP 6XQGD\6FKRRO &KLOGUHQÂśV&KXUFK. WRSP2SHQWR&RPPXQLW\ /RFDWHGDW.LG&LW\(DVW2URYLOOH ‡:HGQHVGD\(YHQLQJ:RUVKLSSP

Trinity Episcopal 602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. +RO\(XFKDULVWVWUG WK‡0RUQLQJ3UD\HUQG WK +HDOLQJ6HUYLFHVW6XQGD\ 7KH5HYHUHQG0DULO\Q:LOGHU :DUGHQ‡

Church of Christ Ironwood & 12th, Oroville‡ Sunday School 10 a.m.‡Sunday Worship 11 a.m. :HGQHVGD\%LEOH6WXG\SP

Seventh-Day Adventist WK 0DLQ2URYLOOH %LEOH6WXG\6DWDP‡Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Pastor Tony Rivera‡

Oroville Free Methodist )LU6WUHHW‡Pastor Rod Brown‡ 6XQ6FKRRODP‡:RUVKLS6HUYLFHDP Youth Activity Center‡&HQWUDO$YH 0RQGD\SP‡$IWHU6FKRRO0:)SP RIÂżFH#RURYLOOHIPFRUJ

CHESAW Chesaw Community Bible Church Nondenominational‡Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle‡

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship 0ROVRQ*UDQJH0ROVRQ Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...� Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God 102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm :HGQHVGD\IDPLO\1LJKWSP Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver 3K

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish 1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket DP(QJOLVK0DVVVW6XQGD\RIWKH0RQWK Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. SP6SDQLVK0DVVHYHU\6DWXUGD\ Father Jose Maldonado‡

Immanuel Lutheran Church +DYLOODK5G7RQDVNHW‡ 6XQ:RUVKLSDP‡%LEOH6WXG\ 6XQ6FKRRO ³)RULWLVE\JUDFH\RXKDYHEHHQVDYHGWKURXJKIDLWKDQG WKLVQRWIURP\RXUVHOYHVLWLVWKHJLIWRI*RGQRWE\ZRUNV VRWKDWQRRQHFDQERDVW´(SK

³7RHYHU\JHQHUDWLRQ´&HOHEUDWLQJ\HDUV

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

$6:KLWFRPE$YH‡3DVWRU*HRUJH&RQNOH Sunday: 10 a.m.  ‡FHOO  

Tonasket Community UCC (WK7RQDVNHW‡ ³$ELEOLFDOO\EDVHGWKRXJKWIXOJURXSRI&KULVWLDQ3HRSOH´

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. &DOOIRUSURJUDPDFWLYLW\LQIRUPDWLRQ Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren /RRPLV2URYLOOH5G7RQDVNHW DP3UDLVH6LQJLQJDP:RUVKLS6HUYLFH DP6XQGD\VFKRROIRUDOODJHV

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren +Z\7RQDVNHW 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service ³&RQWLQXLQJWKHZRUNRI-HVXVVLPSO\SHDFHIXOO\WRJHWKHU´



LOOMIS Loomis Community Church Main Street in Loomis DP6XQGD\6FKRRO 11 a.m. Worship Service 3DVWRU%RE+DVNHOO ,QIRUPDWLRQ

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


MAY 29, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B1

SPORTS

Tigers rise to the occasion at regionals Tonasket earns eight state berths, including six by girls’ squad

Left, Cassie Spear leaps into Rose Walts’ arms after Spear ran a statequalifying personal best while finishing second in the 400-meter dash at last Friday’s regional meet in Cashmere. Kathryn Cleman, (left), Kylie Dellinger (right), Spear and Walts accounted for all six state berths for the girls team, including one as a group in the 4x100 relay. Below left, Ryan Rylie speeds to his first state finals spot with a fourth place finish in the 400. Below, Spear is in hot pursuit of a pair of Lakeside runners in the 400, catching one of them to take second place. Spear earned two individual second place finishes and another runner-up ribbon in the relay.

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Heading into Friday’s District 6/7 regional track meet at Cashmere on Friday, Tonasket coach Bob Thornton wasn’t sure what to expect. What transpired probably exceeded his highest hopes as each of the dozen Tiger athletes on hand either qualified for the state finals meet, achieved a personal best, or both. The Tigers will be represented in eight state events (six for the girls, two for the boys), along with one most surprising alternate. The girls also fared well as a team, finishing eighth out of 15 squads, which in itself was deceptive. Lakeside (9 Mile Falls) dominated the meet with 156 team points, but the Tigers were only eight points out of the runnerup spot. Chewelah (58), Chelan (57), Riverside (56.5), Cashmere (54), Quincy (54), Tonasket (50), Freeman (47.5) and Okanogan (43) were tightly-bunched in the battle for second place. “It is always our goal to help the athletes do their best at the end of the season and hopefully qualify for the state meet,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton. “It was a great day; their energy was contagious.” The top four finishers in each event head to Cheney this Friday and Saturday for the state finals meet at Eastern Washington University. There was plenty of energy throughout the Tiger camp as the strung together one state-qualifying performance after another. That was only slightly dampened at the finish as the 4x400 relay teams each finished sixth, and out of the state finals, but even that came with a four second PR for the boys and a five second PR for the girls. Cassie Spear’s performance led the Tonasket girls as she collected three red ribbons. Spear finished second in the 200-meter dash (26.78), 400 (1:01.04) and anchored the 4x100 relay with Kathryn Cleman, Kylie Dellinger and Rose Walts (51.75), all in personal-best fashion. Walts also qualified in two individual events, taking second in the 100 hurdles (16.28) and third in the triple jump (332.25). Cleman also heads to state in the pole vault after finishing fourth (9-6). She needed all of her PR-matching performance to edge Lakeside’s Amanda Mael for the final spot to state. Most of the girls rank in the middle of the pack in state seeding, putting them in contention for the medal stand (top eight finishers). For the boys, Ethan Bensing overcame a late-season ankle injury to finish third in the triple jump (40-4.75). Ryan Rylie snagged the last spot to state in the 400, finishing fourth in 53.02. Cleman, Walts, Dellinger and Spear were sixth in the girls 4x400 (4:23) while the boys (Rylie, Devyn Catone, Smith Condon and Beau Cork) were also sixth (3:37). Two of the Tigers’ more remarkable performances came from athletes who didn’t make the state cut. Alissa Young, seeded 11th out of 12

Brent Baker/staff photos

competitors in the javelin, uncorked a throw of 97-6, 14 feet better than her previous personal best, to finish fifth. She and Lakeside’s Farrahan O’Hara actually tied for the fourth spot, with O’Hara

CLASS 1A DISTRICT 6/7 REGIONAL MEET AT CASHMERE GIRLS

Lakeside 156, Chewelah 58, Chelan 57, Riverside 56.5, Cascade 56, Cashmere 54, Quincy 54, Tonasket 50, Freeman 47.5, Okanogan 43, Omak 19, Brewster 18, Medical Lake 16, Kettle Falls 11, Newport 3.

Winners and Tonasket results (top 4 in each event to state) 100 - 1. Maddy Parton, Cascade, 12.73 200 - 1. Maddy Parton, Cascade, 26.26; 2. Cassie Spear, Tonasket, 26.78 400 - 1. Valerie Tobin, Quincy, 1:00.92; 2. Cassie Spear, Tonasket, 1:01.04 800 - 1. Mikayla Shuler, Riverside, 2:21.37

nabbing the state spot based on a better second throw. Young can still travel to state as an alternate. Lloyd Temby, a triple jumper who qualified for regionals last week with a

PR that was over six feet longer than his second best, extended that by another 14 inches in finishing 10th (37-7). Jaden Vugteveen, who is also an alternate for the state-qualifying relay, also

achieved her personal best in the pole vault (7-6). The state meet begins Friday, May 30, with field events beginning at 9:00 a.m. and running events at 10.

1600 - 1. Lindy Jacobson, Lakeside, 5:23.38 3200 - 1. Erin Mullins, Cascade, 11:27.03 100 Hurdles - 1. Maggie Cobb, Chewelah, 16.12; 2. Rose Walts, Tonasket, 16.28 300 Hurdles - 1. Katie Collins, Lakeside, 45.84 4x100 Relay - 1. Lakeside 51.34; 2. Tonasket (Cleman, Walts, Dellinger, Spear), 51.75 4x200 Relay - 1. Cashmere 1:48.34 4x400 Relay - 1. Cashmere 4:15.35; 6. Tonasket (Cleman, Walts, Dellinger, Spear), 4:23.92 Shot Put - 1. Karle Pittsinger, Chelan, 41-9 Discus - 1. Kaitlin Krouse, Chewelah, 129-8 Javelin - 1. Emmy Engle, Okanogan, 119-1; 5. Alissa Young, Tonasket, 97-6 High Jump - 1. Brette Boesel, Brewster, 5-0 Pole Vault - 1. Farrahn O’Hara, Lakeside, 113; 4. Kathryn Cleman, Tonasket, 9-6; 11. Jaden Vugteveen, Tonasket, 7-6

Long Jump - 1. Jackie Mahowald, Lakeside, 16-2.5 Triple Jump - 1. Jackie Mahowald, Lakeside, 36-8; 3. Rose Walts, Tonasket, 33-2.25

1600 - 1. Ryan Coffman, Lakeside, 4:25.25 3200 - 1. Ryan Coffman, Lakeside, 9:46.59 110 Hurdles - 1. Tyler Lee, Cascade, 15.49 300 Hurdles - 1. Tristan Downing, Riverside, 40.33 4x100 Relay - 1. Medical Lake 43.88 4x400 Relay - 1. Riverside 3:26.91; 6. Tonasket (Rylie, Catone, Condon, Cork) 3:37.58 Shot Put - 1. Jose Padilla, Chelan, 56-3 Discus - 1. Micah Humann, Lakeside, 156-1 Javelin - 1. Hunter Bach, Brewster, 155-4 High Jump - 1. Luke Simonson, Cashmere, 5-10 Pole Vault - 1. Carter Bushman, Quincy, 14-0 Long Jump - 1. Luke Simonson, Cashmere, 19-10 Triple Jump - 1. Tyler Johnson, Kettle Falls, 40-11.5; 3. Ethan Bensing, Tonasket, 40-4.75; 10. Lloyd Temby, Tonasket, 37-7.

BOYS

Lakeside 89, Riverside 84, Medical Lake 78, Cashmere 69.5, Quincy 66, Freeman 54, Chelan 47.5, Cascade 46, Okanogan 31, Kettle Falls 29, Omak 18, Tonasket 14, Chewelah 14, Brewster 12, Newport 11.

Winners and Tonasket results (top 4 in each event to state) 100 - 1. Max Axtell, Freeman, 10.94 200 - 1. Tellas Johnson, Medical Lake, 22.49 400 - 1. Max Axtell, Freeman, 50.40; 4. Ryan Rylie, Tonasket, 53.02 800 - 1. Logan Owens, Riverside, 1:58.06.

Hornets’ softball season ends BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

EAST WENATCHEE Oroville’s softball team needed to be at its best if it wanted to win last Wednesday’s district tournament opening-round contest with White Swan. The Cougars took advantage of a rough first inning by the Hornets to take a big early lead and went on to eliminate Oroville from post-season play, 13-2. “We just didn’t get it going,” said Oroville coach Dane Forrester. “It’s just one of those things. I have a great team when they play their level best. But when they get down, it gets in their head a bit.” White Swan parlayed two Hornet errors, a passed ball, two walks and a pair of hits into a sixrun first inning and the Hornets never quite got back into the game. Oroville put its two runs on the board in the top of the second inning after Hannah Hilderbrand, Kendal Miller and Cruz Ortega all walked. Hilderbrand and Miller scored on wild pitches. The Hornets were building momentum in the third when their rally went awry. Faith Martin led off with a single and Courtnee Kallstrom followed with a double. However, Martin got held up trying to avoid the White Swan

shortstop while rounding second base and was thrown out at third. Instead of second and third with no one out, the Hornets were left with a runner on second and one out and didn’t score in the inning despite a single from Pie Todd. Forrester was frustrated that Martin wasn’t awarded third due to fielder interference, especially after a similar call went White Swan’s way earlier in the game. “She had to take a stutter step to get around the shortstop; that’s interference,” Forrester said. “But two calls didn’t really change things. We just weren’t at our best.” The Cougars put the game away with seven runs in the third, capped by a long, 3-run White Swan home run to put the margin over 10 runs. The Hornets couldn’t cut into the Cougars’ lead and the game ended after five innings. “I’m not sad,” Forrester said. “I’m glad we got as far as we did. We’ll come back next year and hopefully play a little longer.” The Hornets matched last year’s one-game showing in the district tournament, but had a far more successful season overall, finishing 10-11 after going 4-17 a year ago. And, Forrester, noted, despite the departure of seniors Shelby

Tonasket duo heads to state said. “Once we started looking around the league we saw one spot open for the two of us (to get CASHMERE - Tonasket’s to state). “We played Omak at doubles duo of Trevor Terris and Brian without a lot of pracHendrick won a pair of tice and beat them, so matches on Saturday, we looked at the league May 24, to win the again and saw a much District 6/7 regional better opportunity for title and take a top us to go with both of us seed into the State involved.” 1B/2B/1A tennis tourTerris and Hendrick nament in Yakima this won their first match weekend. of the week on Tuesday, Terris and Hendrick, Brian Hendrick May 20, sweeping past a both seniors, defeated Daniel Sonnichesen and duo from Entiat 6-2, 6-2. State matches will be played Fletcher Rickabaugh of Liberty Bell 6-2, 6-4, in their semifinal at West Valley High School in match and edged Sonny Fergoso Yakima, or at the Yakima Tennis and Rollie Ronish of Quincy Club if weather dictates the action needs to be moved indoors. 6-4, 4-6, 6-2. Terris and Hendrick All of those teams will take on Alex advanced to state, as Wheeler and Kyle did Morgan O’Dell and Canaday of LindGabe Holtz of Omak. Ritzville- Sprague in Terris and Hendrick their opening-round played singles for most match at 10:00 a.m of the season, but after on Friday. Pranav teaming up to defeat Harikrishnan / Keshav O’Dell and Holtz in Trevor Terris Ummat of Overlake or a late-season match Andrew Vargas and decided to play doubles Sean Singco, La Salle await the in the post-season. “We both had a tough go at Tigers in the second round. singles last year and knew how Medal round matches will be tough it was to make it,” Terris played Saturday. BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photo

Oroville’s Rachelle Nutt tags out a White Swan baserunner at third base after taking a cross-the-field throw from first baseman Hannah Hilderbrand during last Wednesday’s district tournament loss to the Cougars. Scott, Cruz Ortega and Gabriela Capote, are still an extremely young team. “This was a way better season than last year,” he said. “My

goodness, we had four strong freshmen and we used one eighth grader full time. We have another good group of eighth graders coming up next year.”


PAGE B2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

SPORTS

Hornets head to state track in 10 events Speiker eyes state meet record BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

EPHRATA - The only problem for the Oroville track and field teams Saturday at the District 5/6 state qualifying meet: there really was no way to exceed expectations, only match them. And with only two spots in each event available for the taking, there wasn’t much margin for error. Four Hornets who would have earned state finals trip a year ago, when there were three qualifying spots available, didn’t make the cut this year thanks to the more stringent requirements. “It was a very intense and high-pressure meet, thanks to the two allocations,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “We had 10 PRs in the process.” As it was, the girls team earned state qualifications in seven events and earned District 5/6 runner-up honors, 44 points behind regional champ Kittitas and 34 points in front of third place Bridgeport. “The girls team did well placing second,” Jensen said. “We just lacked team depth this year with no hurdlers, and we weren’t able to field 4x100 and 4x200 relay teams.” Sierra Speiker wasn’t even remotely challenged in sweeping the three distance races. Though not particularly pleased with her times, Speiker set a meet record in the 3200 (11:14.02) and winning the 800 (2:33.29) and 1600 (5:40.69). She will be a prohibitive favorite to win the 3200 state title and will look to beat the state 2B meet record of 10:56, which has held since 1989 (the 2B meet’s oldest standing record). Speiker’s best time this season is 10:49 (third best in all classifications). Speiker also has the state’s fastest 1600 time in 2B this year (5:19), but should have a battle on her hands as she is seeded eighth at state (based on times run at last weekend’s meets). Madison Ward of St. George’s posted a 5:20.60 at her regional meet, 11 seconds better than the second seed. She’s never earned a medal in the 800 and is seeded 10th. Speiker, Sammie Walimaki, Brittany Jewett and Kaitlyn Grunst won the 4x400

Left, (l-r) Sierra Speiker, Brittany Jewett and Kaitlyn Grunst cheer on 4x400 teammate Sammie Walimaki as she nears the finish line. The quartet won the district relay title, as well as snapping up six other girls’ state finals berths. Above, Luke Kindred won the district javelin title by one inch with a personal best throw of 167-1. Brent Baker/staff photo

relay (4:39.89) and will be seeded 14th of 16 teams at state. Grunst also qualified in two individual events, taking second in both the long jump (15-2.75) and high jump (4-11, surviving a “jump off ” for the final spot to state). She should be in medal contention (top eight) in both events as she is seeded seventh in high jump and ninth in long jump. Sammie Walimaki also won a jump-off

to qualify in the pole vault (2nd, 6-2). “Kaitlyn and Sammie both really came through in their jump-offs,” Jensen said. Finishing one spot out of state qualification as third place (but considered state alternates) were Walimaki in the 100 (3rd, 14.22), Jewett in the javelin (3rd, 99-6) and Grunst in the triple jump (3rd, 32-0.75). Grunst and Jewett both are past state qualifiers in those events. Walimaki was

an alternate in the 200 last year and was able to run at state. Luke Kindred, Tanner Smith and Matt Smith each won District 5/6 titles to punch their state meet tickets. Kindred won a battle with Kittitas’ Austin Oursland for the district javelin title, throwing a personal best 167-1 to edge Oursland by an inch in a battle of quarterbacks. Kindred will be seeded third heading into the state finals.

DISTRICT 5/6 MEET AT EPHRATA

Lake Roosevelt, 17.55 300 Hurdles - 1. Lauren Fitzmaurice, Liberty Bell, 53.48 4x100 Relay - 1. Kittitas 52.49 4x200 Relay - 1. Kittitas 1:49.26 4x400 Relay - 1. Oroville (Jewett, Grunst, Walimaki, Speiker), 4:39.89 Shot Put - 1. Alyssum Reno, Kittitas, 38-7; 5. Sarai Camaccho, Oroville, 24-9 Javelin - 1. Nicole Nobbs, Riverside Christian, 125-8; 3. Brittany Jewett, Oroville, 99-6; 7. Sarai Camacho, Oroville, 68-2 High Jump - 1. Lindsay Clerf, Kittitas, 5-2; 2. Kaitlyn Grunst, Oroville, 4-11; 4. Phoebe Poynter, Oroville, 4-2 Pole Vault - 1. Alexia Hanway, Lake Roosevelt, 6-6; 2. Sammie Walimaki, 6-2 Long Jump - 1. Lexi Ott, Kittitas, 15-5.75; 2. Kaitlyn Grunst, Oroville, 15-2.75 Triple Jump - 1. Chyenne Kelly-Marconi, Lake Roosevelt, 33-11.25; 3. Kaitlyn

Grunst, Oroville, 32-0.75; 5. Phoebe Poynter, Oroville, 25-9.25

GIRLS

Kittitas 148, Oroville 104, Bridgeport 70, Liberty Bell 68, Riverside Christian 68, Lake Roosevelt 64, Manson 63, White Swan 16

Winners and Oroville results (top 2 in each event to state) 100 - 1. Jacqlyn Hunter, Kittitas, 13.75; 3. Sammie Walimaki, Oroville, 14.22 200 - 1. Lyndsay Clerf, Kittitas, 28.09; 7. Sammie Walimaki, Oroville, 30.79 400 - 1. Annie Stickney, Kittitas, 1:05.66; 5. Brittany Jewett, Oroville, 1:07.89 800 - 1. Sierra Speiker, Oroville, 2:33.29 1600 - 1. Sierra Speiker, Oroville, 5:40.69 3200 - 1. Sierra Speiker, Oroville, 11:14.02 100 Hurdles - 1. Chyenne Kelly-Marconi,

Kittitas 150, Liberty Belll 140, Bridgeport 122, Manson 62, Riverside Christian 60, Lake Roosevelt 49, Oroville 48, White Swan 6

Winners and Oroville results (top 2 in each event to state) 100 - 1. Tanner Smith, Oroville, 11.68 200 - 1. Kip Craig, Bridgeport, 23.69 400 - 1. Kirk Gartrell, Riverside Christian, 52.08 800 - 1. Liam Daily, Liberty Bell, 2:01.93 1600 - 1. Liam Daily, Liberty Bell, 4:32.82 3200 - 1. Ben Klemmeck, Liberty Bell, 10:22.59

OHS to host hoops camp SUBMITTED BY JAY THACKER OHS BOYS BASKETBALL COACH

OROVILLE - Oroville High School’s basketball programs will be hosting a fundamentals camp for boys and girls looking to improve their shooting, passing, ball skills, and pivoting. Coaches from both the high school boys’ and girls’ programs will be running the camp. Camp staff will include Jim Thacker (Washington State Coaches Hall of Fame

Melissa Mills/submitted photo

Yellow Jackets dominate Jr. Olympics CASHMERE - The Oroville Junior High Track and Field Yellow Jackets, coached by Dawn Miller, dominated the events at the 68th annual Cashmere Junior Olympics on Saturday, May 17. The junior Olympics is the final track and field meet of the season consisting of 14 teams throughout the Wenatchee Valley and North Central Region. Although the Yellow Jackets team consisted of only 10 athletes on this particular day, don’t let their size fool you. This small team packs a punch. Tori Kindred set the pace for the day, taking first place and breaking the Cashmere Junior Olympics record in the 8th grade girls shot put with

a throw of 37-8.75. The previous record of 36-6.5 was set in 1997. Kindred also placed 2nd in the girls discus with a throw of 74-2.5. Caleb Mills took 3rd place in the boys eighth grade shot put with a throw of 36-9. Seth Miller placed third for boys eighth grade discus with a throw of102-2. Continuing in field events, Katie Egerton placed fourth in the girls eighth grade pole vault with a height of 7-4 and Kambe Ripley took sixth place with a height of 5-6. Egerton also took fourth place in the girls high jump (4-4). In running events, Seth Miller placed second in the 100 hurdles with a time of 16.0, and Brandon Baugher placed eighth with a time of 17.6. Miller continued on a streak taking second place

in the 50-meter dash with a time of 6.8. Caleb Mills took second in the 100 (11.9) and 200 (24.7), while Brandon Baugher won the 800 in 2:24.3. The Yellow Jackets’ 4x200 relay team of Caleb Mills, Brandon Baugher, Jerry Milholland and Seth Miller finished with a time of 1:44.3, breaking a meet record set in 1991. For the seventh grade boys, Jerry Milholland placed third in the 400 with a time of 1:03.3 and Dorian Carleton placed seventh in the 800 with a time of 2:37. For the girls, Katie Egerton won the eighth grade 400 dash with a time of 1:06.7 . The girls 4x100 relay team (Kindred, Ripley, Egerton and Marcella Ocampo) placed third with a time of 2:08.8.

Hornets send 4 to state golf THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OROVILLE - Oroville’s golf team shot its way to a district tournament boys team title last week and will be sending a total of four golfers to this week’s state finals near Tacoma.

110 Hurdles - 1. Kip Craig, Bridgeport, 15.92 300 Hurdles - 1. Kip Craig, Bridgeport, 41.74 4x100 Relay - 1. Liberty Bell, 45.28; 3. Oroville (T. Smith, Kindred, M. Smith, Mills), 46.14 4x400 Relay - 1. Liberty Bell 3:31.17 Shot Put - 1. Octavio Alejandre, Lake Roosevelt, 44-5 Discus 1. Alex Vanderholm, Manson, 148-3 Javelin - 1. Luke Kindred, Oroville, 167-1; 2. Austin Oursland, Kittitas, 167-0 High Jump - 1. Micah Tranch, Riverside Christian, 6-2; 5. Matt Smith, Oroville, 5-4 Pole Vault - 1. Matt Smith, Oroville, 10-0; 5. Riley Davidson, Oroville, 8-0 Long Jump - 1. Austin Watson, Liberty Bell, 21-0.5 Triple Jump - 1. Kirk Gartrell, Riverside Christian, 40-0; 5. Matt Smith, Oroville, 36-1.75

BOYS

The Oroville Junior High Yellow Jackets’ 4x200 relay team of Caleb Mills, Brandon Baugher, Jerry Milholland and Seth Miller broke a 23-year-old Cashmere Junior Olympics meet record at this year’s meet on May 17. They’re pictured with coach Dawn Miller. The Yellow Jackets also got a meet record performance from Tori Kindred, who broke a 17-year-old mark in 8th grade shot put.

SUBMITTED BY MELISSA MILLS

Tanner Smith sped to victory in the 100 (11.68) and recorded the fourthfastest regional time in a tightly bunched state finals field. Matt Smith won the pole vault (10-0) and ranks in the middle of the pack of state qualifiers. Just missing out on state qualifying was the 4x100 relay team of Kindred, Smith, Smith and Logan Mills, which took third (46.14).

Bryce Glover, Lane Tietje and Kyle Scott each qualified for state for the boys, while Jordyn Smith qualified for the girls. Glover and Smith both made state last year. The two day 1B/2B state finals begin on Wednesday, May 28,

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at Oakwood Golf Course in Lakewood. The boys all tee off between 7:00 and 8:30 a.m., with the girls teeing off afterward. Scott and Tietje are both juniors, while Glover and Smith are freshmen.

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Basketball Coach). The camp will be held June 16-20. For kids going in to grades 2-5, the camp will be at the Oroville Elementary School, 8-9:30 a.m. Cost is $40. For kids going into grades 6-8, the camp will be at the high school from 10 a.m.-noon, cost will be $50. To register, pick up and turn in a sign-up sheet at the Elementary or High School office. Checks should be made out to OHS Boys Basketball.

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Also competing in the seventh grade boys 800M run was Brigido Ocampo.

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MAY 29, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SCHOOLS OHA, TSD host ‘Viva la Naturaleza’ BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Seth Smith/submitted photo

Johnna Terris, Lexi Wahl, Serenity Poletti, Bonnie Siegfried, Hunter Swanson, Seth Smith and Matt Deebach show off Tonasket FFA’s newest state championship plaque, the third in a parliamentary procedure event for the program in the last four years.

State champs look ahead BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Having kids winning state championships will probably never get old for Tonasket FFA adviser Matt Deebach. But for the kids themselves, the experience was something new. That was as true for senior John Symonds, who was named State Star in Agribusiness, as well as the all-freshman state champ Rituals team of Serenity Poletti, Bonnie Siegfried, Seth Smith, Hunter Swanson, Johnna Terris and Lexi Wahl. And Deebach, for all his years at the state finals, still can’t see it coming. “I never know,” he said. “I’m probably the worst judge of our kids out of anybody. “I saw a couple of mistakes (in Rituals), but I usually see every bitty flaw with my own team and I don’t see them with anybody else. It’s hard to watch and see little mistakes, and not see them in the other kids because you just see them differently.” At least the Rituals (Novice Parliamentary Procedure) had it in their heads that they wanted to win a state title and earn a trip to nationals, as last year’s team had. Symonds really didn’t know what hit him. The State Star winners are announced at the state convention, but there wasn’t actual competition that took place. All of the work had been done and turned in; at the convention it was a matter of waiting. That in itself wasn’t easy, Symonds said. “I almost puked,” he admitted. “I was really nervous, standing in front of 3,000 people, watching the clock tick... You come out, they introduce you and there’s this big screen and you watch the slide show (for each of the four finalists) that you send in. And then you turn around, and they announce the Star ... and it was me.” “A lot of that stuff goes unrecognized because you’re not there competing at state,” Deebach said. “There will always be a special place in my professional career for those moments. It was really emotional for him. It was something that is dear to him, his business. “I thought he might pass out on me as I was having to drag him on stage.” Symonds has his own horse training business and was required to submit a host of materials on its inner workings. “You have to fill out an application and your records, expenses, money that you make on it ... how many horses you sold and traded and rode for people. You get judged on your business plan, mostly showing who has knowledge inside their business.” Part of the reason he was so shocked, he said, was that he hadn’t really entered with the thought of trying to win the contest. “I kind of did it not knowing I would even make it to the state finals,” Symonds said. “I wanted to see where I was going wrong and what I was doing right in my business, how it was set up on paper. Winning, I wasn’t really expecting that.” “It meant a lot to him and a lot to me,” Deebach said. “When someone succeeds in a way that’s different than what people are used to, it’s pretty heartfelt.” Symonds’ knowledge is already paying dividends: shortly after graduation he’s moving to Battle Mountain, Nevada, to work at a ranch that runs 5,000 head of cattle and nearly 300 horses. “I got an email from the cow boss, a guy I’d never met that heard about me and that I was looking for a job,” Symonds said. “I’m going for their horse training facility. I’ll mainly train their horses and cowboy on the side. So instead of doing it just for our county, it will be for a large production ranch.” The national convention will pick three finalists from amongst the State Stars to be honored in Louisville, so Symonds doesn’t know yet if he’ll head to Louisville this fall. “But if I’m one of the finalists,” he said, “I will definitely go.” The Rituals team had a different tack: their goal was to win the competition, and they wouldn’t have been happy with anything less. In fact, Deebach said, it was a bit of a bitter pill to swallow for the older Parliamentary Procedure teams, two of which made the state finals and finishing third and fifth. “It wasn’t easy for them to accept, but it’s still really neat,” Deebach said of the dual top-five finishes. Of the top five teams, only 20 points separated them, and we’re talking about scores of about 1,000. So it really was very impressive.” The Rituals team started out in what World Cup Soccer would have called the “Group of Death” as their flight contained four traditional state finalist teams, with only two spots open for teams to advance. “Several teachers that historically have teams in the state finals didn’t get through this year,” Deebach said. “So it was really a tough round.” Four of the team members - Seth Smith, Hunter

Brent Baker/staff photo

John Symonds shows off his State Star plaque for his winning Agribusiness entry. Swanson, Lexi Wahl and Serenity Poletti - were available for an interview last week, and they agreed that Deebach’s investment in the program was one of the primary motivators for them. “We wanted to make Deebach proud, for all the work he’s put into us,” Swanson said. “Even though winning was our goal, it was still pretty amazing.” “Winning it just shows what a great teacher and mentor he is,” said Smith. Tonasket was one of the first teams make its “run,” as they called it, so they had a chance to check out the other teams as the competition progressed while not having to worry about their own preparation. After it was all done, waiting as the announcements were made, in reverse order, kept their nerves frayed. “When we got down to the last four, we were all holding hands,” Poletti said. “My knees were shaking,” said Swanson. “When it gets down to the final two,” Smith said, “and you hear the other school’s name for second place, and you realize you won ... it really didn’t set in until we got back stage.” “We had to go outside to start screaming, because they didn’t want us doing that back stage.” It wasn’t just the team members that were excited. “My mom was trying to take video,” Wahl said. “She was jumping up and down so much we couldn’t even watch it.” The back-to-back state titles are a first in the event; last year’s Rituals team was this year’s third place Parli Pro team. “The Parli Pro competition was just fierce,” Deebach said. “The whole Rituals contest has made the senior Parli Pro contest extremely hard. Who knows next year how hard it will be? The kids have a lot more poise a lot earlier, state wide.” Nationwide, too. Last year’s Rituals team and the Parli Pro champion team of 2011 each finished second in the nation at the national convention, a high standard for the newest Tonasket state champs to try to beat. “Since last year’s team got second, our goal is first in the nation,” Poletti said. “We know it will be tough. Last year’s team reminded us of how tough the competition is, and the California team that won it last year will be there again. But I think we can do it if we practice a lot.”

AND ONE MORE With all of the activity at the state finals, mention of one team was neglected in last week’s summary. The Farm Management team of David Curtis, Charlie Sanchez, Colt Hatch, Brock Henneman and Trevor Peterson advanced to the championship round and finished seventh overall. The Farm Management event involves assimilation of information, critical thinking skills and problem solving skills taht can be applied both in farm/agricultural business careers, and economic principles that can be applied to both business management and personal financial management.

TONASKET - The Okanogan Highlands Alliance and Tonasket School District joined forces a couple of weeks ago to sponsor a companion event to OHA’s Highland Wonders series geared toward the area’s large Spanishspeaking community. The afternoon featured a tour of the Tonasket school garden (including the opportunity for planting cover crop seeds), a nature walk facilitated by Tonasket High School bi-lingual students, an “exploration hunt” and a carne asada barbeque. Approximately 50 community members registered for the event, with about 30 who actually showed up. “The student leaders demonstrated natural ability as teachers,” said OHA conservation coordinator Julie Ashmore of Hilda Celestino, Rosemary Luna and Fernanda Abrego. She cited Abrego’s work at her nature walk station as an example. “Her enthusiasm was contagious,” Ashmore said. “The families crowded around to see the plant characteristics and ethnobotanical information she described.” A number of additional entities worked together to bring off the event, including the School Garden, the Tonasket High School MEChA (Movimento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan) Club; the Tonasket Migrant PAC; and Americorps/VISTA. Also involved were Team Naturaleza and the Viva la Naturaleza leadership team. Norma Gallegos represented Team Naturaleza, which provides nature-based learning activities for Latino families in the Wenatchee area. She gave an introduction, as well as Migrant/ ESL teacher Tyler Graves, who talked with the help of a translator about the school garden. Local botanist George Thornton helped to develop the nature walk and served at one of the teaching stations on the walk. Gustavo Montoya, publisher if El Mundo, the state’s largest Spanish-language newspaper, was also on hand to cover the event, and made a surprise donation of some soccer publications to the families that attended. OHA presented the student leaders with their own Washington State Discover Passes. Ashmore aded that others that helped put the event together included Scott Olson, Hanna

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Photos by Julie Ashmore and Brent Baker

Top, student leader Fernanda Abrego (standing, in orange) has teaches families about yarrow and locoweed at her nature walk station during “Viva la Naturaleza” on Sunday, May 18. Above, participants had a chance to spread cover crop seed on a portion of the school garden. Kliegman, Lee Miller, Martha Wisdom, Maria Gonzales, Lavonne Hammelman, Norma Gutierrez, Sabrina Norrell, Jane Thompson and three members of the Junior Leadership group. “There was a strong consensus of success and appreciation,” Ashmore said. “The student lead-

OKANOGAN VALLEY

ers expressed gratitude for the oppporunity for their families and friends to be involved. They were keen to build on this experience by offering more events in the future (and) how some of their friends who initially chose not to participate are now eager to be part of it, too.”

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Similkameen Park Office 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 509-476-9721/509-476-3059

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Crosswords

www.gazette-tribune.com

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23. Cuckoos

3. Giving praise

25. Installed in a position of authority

4. Appear

27. Bolivian export

6. Astrological ram

28. Kidney-related 30. Arch type

7. Using two separate channels for sound reproduction

31. Cost of living?

8. Pasture vegetation

32. Bicker

9. Matterhorn, e.g.

33. Brandy flavor 34. Halftime lead, e.g.

10. Wrapped the dead in a waxed cloth

35. Bills, e.g.

11. Detective, at times

37. Basic unit of money in Myanmar

12. Thought

39. ___-bodied

13. Granting pension benefits regardless of retirement age

48. Back 49. “___ and the King of Siam” 50. Annoy 51. Battering device 52. Unhappy babies 54. Remnant 55. “All My Children” vixen 57. Handle the food for a party

1. Bottle gourd

59. Car accessory 60. State bordering Arizona 62. Police arrest record (2 wds)

9. On the move

64. A member of a nomadic Berber people of the Sahara

15. Each menu item priced separately (3 wds)

65. Cross

16. Hard to lift 17. More blackened by smoke or grime

66. Layers 67. Spouse

5. Shellacking

14. Accord 21. Ground beef mixed with raw egg (2 wds) 24. Cup holder 26. Mysterious: Var. 29. Grassland 31. Fastened shoelaces again 36. Bandy words 38. Dadaism founder 39. Picks up

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40. Support (2 wds)

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41. Layered

,/#!,å 02)6!4%å ).6%34/2å LOANSåå MONEYå ONå REALå ESTATEå EQUITYå )å LOANåå ONå HOUSES å RAWå LAND å COMMERCIALåå PROPERTYå ANDå PROPERTYå DEVELOPMENTåå #ALLå %RICå ATå  å  åå WWWFOSSMORTGAGECOM

43. Discover 45. African daisies 46. High point 47. Beneficiary 52. Addition symbol

56. “The Last of the Mohicans” girl Down

58. Invitation letters 61. ___ Khan

20. Catnip and lovage, e.g. 22. Carry away, in a way

Garage & Yard Sale

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53. Calyx part

18. Druid, e.g. 19. Atlantic catch

HORSES Pets

Statewides

44. Star in Orion

ANSWERS

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1. ___ buckthorn bearwood 2. One who distributes charity

63. Alter, in a way

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Statewides

Public Notices

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$ECEASED SIDERED !å PRE BIDå MEETINGå WILLå BEå HELDå ATåå ./å    /ROVILLEå #ITYå (ALLå ATå å AM å LOCALåå ./4)#%å4/å#2%$)4/23 TIMEå ONå THEå RDå DAYå OFå *UNE å å FORåå THOSEå INTERESTEDå CONTRACTORS å SUBCON å Legals Continued TRACTORS åANDåSUPPLIERS On Next Page


MAY 29, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B5

SPORTS WCRA Drag Racing highlights Defeated Steve Carrier of Kelowna, BC (Orange 1990 Nissan) Pro Bracket Dean Book of Penticton, BC (Blue 1986 Ford Pick-up) Defeated Mark Horvath of Kelowna, BC (Blue 1991 Ford Mustang) Super Pro Ernie Bartelson of Oroville, WA (Black 1951 Chevrolet) Defeated Don Cachola of Oliver, BC (1978 Monte Carlo) Bike/Sled Warren Brown of Oliver, BC (Green 2002 Kawasaki motorcycle) Defeated Steve Macor of Osoyoos, BC (Purple 02 Kawasaki motorcycle) Fastest Reaction Time Tim Hiebert of Osoyoos, BC achieved a coveted goal on Sunday. He moved his Ford Mustang off the starting line beautifully, to receive a perfect reaction time of .500. He carried the reaction time

WCRA will open their gates for two more races for the spring session. Sundays, June 8 and June 22, 2014. Gates open at 9 am. Racing begins around 11 a.m. Final elimination rounds will start at 1 p.m. Anyone interested in racing needs to show up early, in order to have their vehicle passed through safety inspection. Spectators are welcome to bring lawn chairs and coolers, or fill the grandstands. (The event is an alcohol and drug-free event.) Cost is $10, persons 12 and under admitted free with an adult.

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

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PUBLICĂĽ AUCTIONĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ HIGHESTĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ BESTĂĽ BIDDER ĂĽ PAYABLEĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ TIMEĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ SALE ĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ REALĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ PERSONALĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ HEREAFTERĂĽ REFERREDĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ COLLECTIVELYĂĽ ASĂĽ THEĂĽ h0ROPERTYv ĂĽ SIT ĂĽ UATEDĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ #OUNTYĂĽ OFĂĽ /+!./'!. ĂĽĂĽ 3TATEĂĽ OFĂĽ 7ASHINGTONĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ 2!.#(ĂĽ 0(!3%ĂĽĂĽ )) ĂĽ !3ĂĽ 2%#/2$%$ĂĽ ).ĂĽ 6/,5-%ĂĽ h0vĂĽĂĽ /&ĂĽ 3526%93 ĂĽ 0!'%3ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 4(2/5'(ĂĽ  ĂĽ !5$)4/23ĂĽ &),%ĂĽĂĽ ./ĂĽ ĂĽ 4/'%4(%2ĂĽ 7)4(ĂĽĂĽ !.$ĂĽ 2%3%26).'ĂĽ 4(%2%&2/-ĂĽĂĽ 4(/3%ĂĽ #%24!).ĂĽ %!3%-%.43ĂĽĂĽ &/2ĂĽ ).'2%33 ĂĽ %'2%33ĂĽ !.$ĂĽĂĽ 54),)4)%3ĂĽ !3ĂĽ 3(/7.ĂĽ /.ĂĽ 3!)$ĂĽĂĽ 2%#/2$ĂĽ /&ĂĽ 3526%9ĂĽ 3)45!4%ĂĽ ).ĂĽĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ #/5.49ĂĽ /&ĂĽ /+!./'!. ĂĽĂĽ 34!4%ĂĽ /&ĂĽ 7!3().'4/.ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 4AXĂĽĂĽ 0ARCELĂĽ .OĂĽĂĽ   ĂĽ ĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ COM ĂĽ MONLYĂĽ KNOWNĂĽ ASĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ 2!.#(ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7 ĂĽ 7!ĂĽĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 0ROPERTYĂĽ ISĂĽ SUBJECTĂĽ TOĂĽ THATĂĽ CER ĂĽ TAINĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ DATEDĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ RECORDEDĂĽ  ĂĽ UNDERĂĽ !UDI ĂĽ TORS2ECORDERSĂĽ .OĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ RECORDSĂĽ OFĂĽ /+!./'!.ĂĽ #OUNTY ĂĽĂĽ 7ASHINGTON ĂĽ FROMĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽ %ĂĽĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ -!22)%$ĂĽ !3ĂĽ ()3ĂĽ 3%0!2 ĂĽ !4%ĂĽ %34!4% ĂĽ ASĂĽ 'RANTOR ĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ 02,!0 ĂĽ ).# ĂĽ ASĂĽ 4RUSTEE ĂĽ INĂĽ FAVORĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ "!.+ĂĽ /&ĂĽ !-%2)#! ĂĽ .!ĂĽ ĂĽ ))ĂĽ .OĂĽ AC ĂĽ TIONĂĽ COMMENCEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCIARYĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ ISĂĽ NOWĂĽ PENDINGĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ SEEKĂĽ SATISFACTIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽĂĽ INĂĽ ANYĂĽ COURTĂĽ BYĂĽ REASONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROW ĂĽ ERSĂĽ ORĂĽ 'RANTORSĂĽ DEFAULTĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLI ĂĽ GATIONĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽĂĽ )LLĂĽ 4HEĂĽ DEFAULTS ĂĽ FORĂĽ WHICHĂĽ THISĂĽ FORE ĂĽ CLOSUREĂĽ ISAREĂĽ MADEĂĽ AREĂĽ ASĂĽ FOLLOWSĂĽĂĽ &!),52%ĂĽ 4/ĂĽ 0!9ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ -/.4(,9ĂĽĂĽ 0!9-%.4ĂĽ 7()#(ĂĽ "%#!-%ĂĽ $5%ĂĽĂĽ /.ĂĽ  ĂĽ !.$ĂĽ !,,ĂĽ 35"3% ĂĽ 15%.4ĂĽ -/.4(,9ĂĽ 0!9-%.43 ĂĽĂĽ 0,53ĂĽ ,!4%ĂĽ #(!2'%3ĂĽ !.$ĂĽ /4( ĂĽ %2ĂĽ #/343ĂĽ !.$ĂĽ &%%3ĂĽ !3ĂĽ 3%4ĂĽĂĽ &/24(ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ &AILUREĂĽ TOĂĽ PAYĂĽ WHENĂĽ DUEĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ AMOUNTSĂĽ WHICHĂĽ AREĂĽ NOWĂĽĂĽ INĂĽ ARREARSĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ !MOUNTĂĽ DUEĂĽ ASĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ -ARCHĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ $ELINQUENTĂĽ 0AY ĂĽ MENTSĂĽ FROMĂĽ *ULYĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ PAY ĂĽ MENTSĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ PAYMENTSĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ PAYMENTSĂĽ ATĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ EACHĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ   ĂĽ THROUGHĂĽĂĽ    ĂĽ ,ATEĂĽ #HARGESĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ "%.%&)#)!29ĂĽ !$6!.#%3ĂĽ 0ROPER ĂĽ TYĂĽ )NSPECTIONĂĽ &EESĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 3US ĂĽ PENSEĂĽ #REDITĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 4/4!,ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ )6ĂĽ4HEĂĽ SUMĂĽ OWINGĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ

4RUSTĂĽ ISĂĽ 0RINCIPALĂĽ   ĂĽ TO ĂĽ GETHERĂĽ WITHĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ ASĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ NOTEĂĽ ORĂĽ OTHERĂĽ INSTRUMENTĂĽ SECURED ĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ SUCHĂĽ OTHERĂĽ COSTSĂĽ ANDĂĽ FEESĂĽ ASĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ DUEĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽ NOTEĂĽ ORĂĽ OTHERĂĽ INSTRU ĂĽ MENTĂĽ SECURED ĂĽ ANDĂĽ ASĂĽ AREĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽĂĽ BYĂĽ STATUTEĂĽ 6ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ ABOVEĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽĂĽ REALĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ SOLDĂĽ TOĂĽ SATISFYĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ EXPENSESĂĽ OFĂĽ SALEĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGA ĂĽ TIONĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ PROVIDEDĂĽ BYĂĽ STATUTEĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽĂĽ MADEĂĽ WITHOUTĂĽ WARRANTY ĂĽ EXPRESSĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ IMPLIEDĂĽ REGARDINGĂĽ TITLE ĂĽ POSSESSION ĂĽĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUMBRANCESĂĽ ONĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 4HEĂĽ DEFAULTS ĂĽ REFERREDĂĽ TOĂĽ INĂĽ PARA ĂĽ GRAPHĂĽ )LLĂĽ MUSTĂĽ BEĂĽ CUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ DATE ĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ CAUSEĂĽ AĂĽ DISCONTINUANCEĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SALEĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ DISCONTINUEDĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ TERMINATEDĂĽ IFĂĽ ATĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ ONĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BE ĂĽ FOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ DATE ĂĽ THEĂĽ DEFAULTS ĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ SETĂĽ FORTHĂĽ INĂĽ PARAGRAPHĂĽ )LLĂĽ ISAREĂĽ CUREDĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ FEESĂĽ ANDĂĽ COSTSĂĽ AREĂĽĂĽ PAIDĂĽ 4HEĂĽ SALEĂĽ MAYĂĽ BEĂĽ TERMINATEDĂĽ ATĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ TIMEĂĽ AFTERĂĽ *UNEĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ DAYSĂĽ BEFOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ DATE ĂĽ ANDĂĽ BE ĂĽ FOREĂĽ THEĂĽ SALE ĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWER ĂĽ 'RAN ĂĽ TOR ĂĽ ANYĂĽ 'UARANTORĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ HOLDERĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ RECORDEDĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ LIENĂĽ ORĂĽ ENCUM ĂĽ BRANCEĂĽ PAYINGĂĽ THEĂĽ ENTIREĂĽ PRINCIPALĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ SECUREDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ PLUSĂĽ COSTS ĂĽ FEES ĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADVANC ĂĽ ES ĂĽ IFĂĽ ANY ĂĽ MADEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ TERMSĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ OBLIGATIONĂĽ ANDORĂĽ $EEDĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ ANDĂĽ CURINGĂĽ ALLĂĽ OTHERĂĽ DE ĂĽ FAULTSĂĽ 6)ĂĽ !ĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽĂĽ WASĂĽ TRANSMITTEDĂĽ BYĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCIARYĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ ADDRESSESĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ +%. ĂĽ .%4(ĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽ 2!.#( ĂĽ -%4(/7 ĂĽ 7! ĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 4(ĂĽ 342%%4ĂĽ 3/54(%!34 ĂĽ %6 ĂĽ %2%44 ĂĽ 7! ĂĽ ĂĽ 30/53%ĂĽ /&ĂĽĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ĂĽ 4(ĂĽ 3) ĂĽ 2%%4ĂĽ 3/54(%!34 ĂĽ %6%2%44 ĂĽĂĽ 7! ĂĽ ĂĽ 30/53%ĂĽ /&ĂĽ +%..%4(ĂĽĂĽ % ĂĽ 3-)4( ĂĽ ,/4ĂĽ ĂĽ -%4(/7ĂĽ 2)6%2ĂĽĂĽ 2!.#( ĂĽ -%4(/7 ĂĽ 7! ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ BYĂĽĂĽ BOTHĂĽ lRSTĂĽ CLASSĂĽ ANDĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ MAILĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ WHICHĂĽ ISĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ ANDĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ THEĂĽ "ORROWERĂĽ ANDĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽĂĽ WEREĂĽ PERSONALLYĂĽ SERVEDĂĽ WITHĂĽ SAIDĂĽĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ DEFAULTĂĽ ORĂĽ THEĂĽ WRITTENĂĽĂĽ .OTICEĂĽ OFĂĽ $EFAULTĂĽ WASĂĽ POSTEDĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ CONSPICUOUSĂĽ PLACEĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ REALĂĽ PROP ĂĽ ERTYĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ INĂĽ PARAGRAPHĂĽ )ĂĽ ABOVE ĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ HASĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽĂĽ PROOFĂĽ OFĂĽ SUCHĂĽ SERVICEĂĽ ORĂĽ POSTINGĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ6))ĂĽĂĽ 4HEĂĽ4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ HELDĂĽ INĂĽ AC ĂĽ CORDANCEĂĽ WITHĂĽ #HĂĽ ĂĽ ĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ANDĂĽ

ANYONEĂĽ WISHINGĂĽ TOĂĽ BIDĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽĂĽ BEĂĽ REQUIREDĂĽ TOĂĽ HAVEĂĽ INĂĽ HISHERĂĽ POS ĂĽ SESSIONĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ TIMEĂĽ THEĂĽ BIDDINGĂĽ COM ĂĽ MENCES ĂĽ CASH ĂĽ CASHIERSĂĽ CHECK ĂĽ ORĂĽĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽ CHECKĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ AMOUNTĂĽ OFĂĽ ATĂĽĂĽ LEASTĂĽ ONEĂĽ DOLLARĂĽ OVERĂĽ THEĂĽ "ENElCI ĂĽ ARYSĂĽ OPENINGĂĽ BIDĂĽ )NĂĽ ADDITION ĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SUCCESSFULĂĽ BIDDERĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ REQUIREDĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ PAYĂĽ THEĂĽ FULLĂĽ AMOUNTĂĽ OFĂĽ HISHERĂĽ BIDĂĽ INĂĽĂĽ CASH ĂĽ CASHIERSĂĽ CHECK ĂĽ ORĂĽ CERTIlEDĂĽĂĽ CHECKĂĽ WITHINĂĽ ONEĂĽ HOURĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ MAKINGĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ BIDĂĽ 4HEĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ WHOSEĂĽ NAMEĂĽĂĽ ANDĂĽ ADDRESSĂĽ AREĂĽ SETĂĽ FORTHĂĽ BELOWĂĽ WILLĂĽĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽ INĂĽ WRITINGĂĽ TOĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ REQUEST ĂĽ INGĂĽ IT ĂĽ AĂĽ STATEMENTĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽ COSTSĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ FEESĂĽDUEĂĽATĂĽANYĂĽTIMEĂĽPRIORĂĽTOĂĽTHEĂĽSALEĂĽĂĽ 6)))ĂĽ 4HEĂĽ EFFECTĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ DEPRIVEĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ ANDĂĽ ALLĂĽ THOSEĂĽĂĽ WHOĂĽ HOLDĂĽ BY ĂĽ THROUGHĂĽ ORĂĽ UNDERĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ OFĂĽ ALLĂĽ OFĂĽ THEIRĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ ABOVEĂĽ DESCRIBEDĂĽ PROPERTYĂĽ )8ĂĽ !NYONEĂĽĂĽ HAVINGĂĽ ANYĂĽ OBJECTIONĂĽ TOĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ ONĂĽĂĽ ANYĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ WHATSOEVERĂĽ WILLĂĽ BEĂĽ AF ĂĽ FORDEDĂĽ ANĂĽ OPPORTUNITYĂĽ TOĂĽ BEĂĽ HEARDĂĽ ASĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ THOSEĂĽ OBJECTIONSĂĽ IFĂĽ THEYĂĽ BRINGĂĽ AĂĽĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ TOĂĽ RESTRAINĂĽ THEĂĽ SAMEĂĽ PURSUANTĂĽĂĽ TOĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ ĂĽ &AILUREĂĽ TOĂĽ BRINGĂĽĂĽ SUCHĂĽ AĂĽ LAWSUITĂĽ MAYĂĽ RESULTĂĽ INĂĽ AĂĽ WAIVERĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ ANYĂĽ PROPERĂĽ GROUNDSĂĽ FORĂĽ INVALIDAT ĂĽ INGĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ 8ĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽĂĽ 4/ĂĽ /##50!.43ĂĽ /2ĂĽ 4%.!.43ĂĽĂĽ 4HEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ 4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽĂĽ ISĂĽ ENTITLEDĂĽ TOĂĽ POSSESSIONĂĽ OFĂĽ THEĂĽ PROP ĂĽ ERTYĂĽ ONĂĽ THEĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ SALE ĂĽ ASĂĽ AGAINSTĂĽ THEĂĽ 'RANTORĂĽ UNDERĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUSTĂĽ THEĂĽ OWNER ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ ANYONEĂĽ HAVINGĂĽ ANĂĽ INTERESTĂĽ JUNIORĂĽ TOĂĽĂĽ THEĂĽ $EEDĂĽ OFĂĽ 4RUST ĂĽ INCLUDINGĂĽ OCCU ĂĽ PANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ !FTERĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ THĂĽ DAYĂĽ FOLLOWINGĂĽ THEĂĽ SALEĂĽ THEĂĽ PUR ĂĽ CHASERĂĽ HASĂĽ THEĂĽ RIGHTĂĽ TOĂĽ EVICTĂĽ OCCU ĂĽ PANTSĂĽ WHOĂĽ AREĂĽ NOTĂĽ TENANTSĂĽ BYĂĽ SUM ĂĽ MARYĂĽ PROCEEDINGĂĽ UNDERĂĽ #HAPTERĂĽĂĽ ĂĽ 2#7ĂĽ &ORĂĽ TENANT OCCUPIEDĂĽĂĽ PROPERTY ĂĽ THEĂĽ PURCHASERĂĽ SHALLĂĽ PROVIDEĂĽĂĽ AĂĽ TENANTĂĽ WITHĂĽ WRITTENĂĽ NOTICEĂĽ INĂĽ ACCOR ĂĽ DANCEĂĽ WITHĂĽ SECTIONĂĽ ĂĽ OFĂĽ THISĂĽ ACTĂĽĂĽ $!4%$ĂĽ ĂĽ 2%')/.!,ĂĽĂĽ 42534%%ĂĽ 3%26)#%3ĂĽ #/20/2! ĂĽ 4)/.ĂĽ 4RUSTEEĂĽ "YĂĽ -%,!.)%ĂĽ "%! ĂĽ -!. ĂĽ !54(/2):%$ĂĽ !'%.4ĂĽ !D ĂĽ DRESSĂĽ ĂĽ STĂĽ !VENUE ĂĽ 3UITEĂĽ ĂĽĂĽ 3EATTLE ĂĽ 7!ĂĽ ĂĽ 0HONEĂĽĂĽ  ĂĽ  ĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ )NFORMATIONĂĽĂĽ WWWRTRUSTEECOMĂĽ 0ĂĽ  ĂĽĂĽ  0UBLISHEDĂĽ INĂĽ THEĂĽ /KANOGANĂĽ 6ALLEYĂĽĂĽ 'AZETTE 4RIBUNEĂĽ ONĂĽ -AYĂĽ ĂĽ ANDĂĽĂĽ *UNEĂĽ ĂĽ /6'

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

8

7

5

1

4

2 6

2 8

4

8

6

3 9

2

5 7

9

8

2 2

1

4

4

8

3

3

6

7

4

Medium, difficulty rating 0.59

ANSWERS

1

8

3

6

2

1 4 9

Sponsored by

509-476-3602

2 3

6 7 9 8

5

5

6

1

7

4

8

1 8 2 5 3 6 4 9 7

6 9 4 8 7 1 2 3 5

7 5 3 9 4

8 3 5 1 6 9

2

7

8

4

6

2

1

4 6 7 2 5 3 1 8 9

2 1 9 4 8 7 3 5 6

4RUSTEESĂĽ 3ALEĂĽ .OĂĽ  "4 ĂĽĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ /&ĂĽ 42534%%3ĂĽ 3!,%ĂĽ 0UR ĂĽ SUANTĂĽ TOĂĽ 2#ĂĽ 7ĂĽ #HAPTERĂĽ  ĂĽ ETĂĽĂĽ SEQĂĽ ANDĂĽ !! A  ĂĽ ETĂĽ SEQĂĽ )ĂĽĂĽ ./4)#%ĂĽ )3ĂĽ (%2%"9ĂĽ ')6%.ĂĽ THATĂĽ THEĂĽĂĽ UNDERSIGNEDĂĽ 4RUSTEE ĂĽ 2%')/.!,ĂĽĂĽ 42534%%ĂĽ 3%26)#%3ĂĽ #/20/2! ĂĽ 4)/. ĂĽ WILLĂĽ ONĂĽ  ĂĽ ATĂĽ THEĂĽ HOURĂĽĂĽ OFĂĽ ĂĽ !- ĂĽ ATĂĽ !4ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ -!).ĂĽ %. ĂĽ 42!.#%ĂĽ 4/ĂĽ 4(%ĂĽ 350%2)/2ĂĽĂĽ #/524(/53% ĂĽ ĂĽ 4()2$ĂĽĂĽ ./24( ĂĽ /+!./'!. ĂĽ 7! ĂĽ SELLĂĽ ATĂĽ

Sudoku

3

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Dan Hodson/staff photo

Oroville’s Ernie Bartelson launched his 1951 Chevrolet “Glory Daze� to take the first win of the 2014 season, in the Super Pro division, at Richter Pass Motorplex on Sunday.

2

Sportsman Bracket Tim Hiebert of Osoyoos, BC (Black 1990 Ford Mustang) Defeated Blair Ogilvy of Osoyoos, BC (White 1981 Chevrolet Pick-up) Warrior Heads up Racing Tanner Ericson of Osoyoos, BC (Silver 2004 Nissan)

9

WINNERS:

4

OSOYOOS - The Wine Country Racing Association (WCRA) hosted their first race of the 2014 season last Sunday, May 25. The event was attended by 67 race cars, approximately double the cars generally showing for race number one. A total of 274 side-by-side drag races entertained the crowd.

5

WINE COUNTRY RACING ASSOCIATION

trophy home with pride. Exhibition Runs Ashley Clark (the next Force) 10 Years old from Sicamous, BC Junior Dragster Brad Heppner of Sicamous, BC driving his 1989 Ed Quay Dragster Chris Bilodeau of Abbotsford, BC in his turbo powered Blue 92 Mustang

7

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PAGE B6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MAY 29, 2014

76th Anniversary of the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area First use of state’s P-R funds for a wildlife area

of birds emphasizes the seven species of grouse since Okanogan County is the only place in Washington where all occur. WDFW research scientist Mike Schroeder, who specializes in grouse, and wildlife biologist Leslie Robb will conduct this session. Depending on weather and participant interest, it may include a brief field trip, or may serve as a species identification primer for independent next morning early birding.

SUBMITTED BY MADONNA LUERS WASHINGTON DEPT OF FISH & WILDLIFE

LOOMS - This summer the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will celebrate the 75th anniversary of the state’s first use of funds from an historic federal-state cooperative law for acquisition of its first wildlife area. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Director Dan Ashe will help WDFW officials kick off the celebration at a public ceremony June 7 on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area in northcentral Washington’s Okanogan County. The Sinlahekin began in 1939 to protect winter range for mule deer with the state’s first use of funds from the 1937 Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act. The funds come from an excise tax on sport hunting arms and ammunition, administered to states by USFWS. Better known as the Pittman-Robertson Act (P-R) after its prime Congressional sponsors, the law has helped Washington and other states manage game species, provide hunter access, protect wildlife habitat, and educate young hunters. Hunters’ P-R dollars supported Washington’s first re-introduction of extirpated bighorn sheep on the Sinlahekin in 1957. The milestone ceremony on June 7 will begin at 11 a.m. at Sinlahekin headquarters*, including a mid-day tally of species seen in a birdwatching “Big Day� led by Northcentral Washington Audubon. After lunch, a hiking trail will be dedicated in memory of Dave Brittell, a WDFW administrator who was instrumental in acquisition of wildlife areas across the state. WDFW managers will also lead memory sharing sessions about living and working in the Sinlahekin area. As part of Washington’s annual Free Fishing Weekend, the afternoon will also include a how-to-fish session for newcomers to the sport at lakes on the wildlife area. The June 7 event will kick off a summerlong series of free public field trips and presentations on the area’s diverse wildlife, vegetation, geology and history by WDFW staff and other experts. The weekends of June 14-15, July 5-6, July 26-27, August 23-24, and September 6-7 will include sessions on everything from bees, birds and butterflies to wildflowers and wildfire management. For example: SAT., JUNE 14: 1 – 3 P.M. BIRDS OF THE SINLAHEKIN: This session on the Sinlahekin’s diversity

SUN., JUNE 15: 9 A.M. - 12-NOON

Wildflowers of the Sinlahekin:

This field trip to identify some of flowering plants among the area’s 510 vascular species is led by botanist Dana Visalli , who conducted the Sinlahekin vegetation inventory, and Conservation Northwest botanist George Wooten SAT., JULY 6: 9 A.M. - 12 NOON BUTTERFLIES OF THE SINLAHEKIN This field trip is led by lepidopterist Caitlin LaBar, who has documented some of the Sinlahekin’s 87 butterfly species. Although there is some walking, this is mostly a car-pool driving tour (convoy limited to 8 vehicles, first come, first served), along Cecile Creek Road, north of Sinlahekin headquarters, focusing mostly on immature butterfly stages (eggs and caterpillars). Participant note: Wear sturdy shoes and long pants, bring a hat, sunscreen, plenty of water, and of course a camera! Binoculars and/ or butterfly net are optional

SUN., JULY 7: 9 A.M. – 12 NOON DRAGONFLIES & DAMSELFLIES OF THE SINLAHEKIN This field trip is led by zoologist Dennis Paulson, retired Director of the Slater Museum of Natural History at the University of Puget Sound and author of “Dragonflies of Washington,� “Dragonflies and Damselflies of the West,� and other books. It includes car-pool driving and some walking along Sinlahekin Creek and wetland and shallow pond areas near Forde, Conners, and Blue lakes and Reflection Pond.

SAT., JULY 26: 6 - 10 P.M.

BATS OF THE SINLAHEKIN The first half of this workshop, conducted by WDFW wildlife biologist Ella Rowan and former BLM wildlife biologist Neal Hedges, will focus on bat biology, identification, and behavior; the second half might include bat collection, examination, and viewing of bat colonies leaving daytime roosts for nighttime feeding. SUN., JULY 27: 9 A.M. - 12-NOON 10,000 YEARS OF SINLAHEKIN PLANT COMMUNITIES AND FIRES This presentation and short field trip on the evolution of the Sinlahekin’s vegetative landscape and the role of wildfires is led by Central Washington University paleobotanist Megan Walsh. SAT., AUG. 23: 10 A.M. - 12-NOON GLACIAL GEOLOGY AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN THE OKANOGAN This presentation by Western Washington University geologist Don Easterbrook may be followed by a short field trip to view some of the Sinlahekin’s unique geologic features. SAT., SEPT. 6: 7 A.M. - 12-NOON BIRDS OF THE SINLAHEKIN This field trip to find and identify birds throughout the Sinlahekin is led by Penny Rose, president of the Washington Ornithological Society, and local birder Scott Hoskins. The series will close on National Hunting and Fishing and National Public Lands Day, September 27, with a fun run through the Sinlahekin and a celebration of the hunting and fishing heritage that is the backbone of WDFW wildlife area management. More information about the Sinlahekin’s 75th anniversary events this summer will be available later this spring at http://wdfw. wa.gov/lands/wildlife_areas/sinlahekin/. (*Driving directions to Sinlahekin Wildlife Area headquarters: From Loomis, proceed west in a sweeping left turn onto Broadway Street which turns into Sinlahekin Road. Proceed south on Sinlahekin Road about 3 miles to the wildlife area boundary and continue about 2-1/2 miles to headquarters entrance road on left.)

American ‘Ninja Warrior to speak at Tonasket SUBMITTED BY ANITA ASMUSSEN TONASKET SCHOOLS ASB ADVISOR

TONASKET - Hoan Do, 28, competitor in NBC’s hit show, American Ninja Warrior, has traveled to every corner of the United States — and parts of Canada — on a mission to provide students with practical strategies to succeed in school and in life. He takes abstract life lessons and makes them real through creative metaphors and analogies, likening attitude adjustments to “changing the radio station.� “Sometimes your biggest breakdowns in life can provide you with your biggest breakthroughs in life,� he says. “It’s not about being positive all the time; it’s about having the right attitude.� Hoan Do will be speaking at Tonasket High School on Monday June 2 at 9:20 a.m. After graduating from Pepperdine University in 2007, Hoan beat out candidates who were considerably older and vastly more experienced than him to work with the top personal development company in the world. As a national speaker and

corporate trainer, he conducted sessions for distinguished audiences that included: Century 21, Bank of America, Honda, Toyota, UBS Financial, Chambers of Commerce, and the U.S. Army. “Hoan Do is consistently one of the most popular speakers at our National Conference on Student Leadership.� — Susan Liimatta, National Center for Student Leadership “Out of all the speakers that I have heard, what makes Hoan unique is his ability to connect with the students. Hoan is genuine, relatable, and truly understands what students are going through.� — Bruce August Jr., University of Texas at Dallas Hoan is also the author of Succeeding in the Real World: What School Won’t Teach You, was recognized as the Best Youth Mentor by the International Examiner, and is a recipient of the Verizon Wireless Motivator Award. He made it past the Venice qualifier in this season of American Ninja Warrior and the episode of him competing in the finals will air on NBC sometime next month.

OBITUARY EARNEST D. DAHLGREN Ernest D. Dahlgren, 66, of Tonasket died May 10, 2014 in Tonasket. Private family services will be held.

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 29, 2014  

May 29, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, May 29, 2014  

May 29, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune