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MAY 14-20, 2014 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 20

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FEDS STILL BUSTING WASHINGTON WEED PAGE 5 | AMAZON’S COMIC-BOOK DEBACLE PAGE 34

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ALL GROWN UP

OUR GUIDE TO THE ENORMOUS

40th Edition of SIFF

Including Richard Linklater’s 12-years-in-the-making Boyhood, a bumper crop of local docs, and 21 must-see titles from Horton & Miller.


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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014


inside»   May 14–20, 2014 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 20

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

NUrtUre • your • CallINg set the foundation “Bastyr to harvest my passion

for natural medicine and community public health. Sabine Thomas, ND (2007)

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CANN-ABYSS

BY NINA SHAPIRO | Colville residents get swallowed up by federal pot laws. Plus: Russell Wilson rumors, an Iraq vet’s theatrical cry of rage, and more.

food&drink 31 PRECIOUS PRODUCE BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | Matt Dillon’s

new boutique for veggie eye candy. 31 | FOOD NEWS/THE WEEKLY DISH 32 | CITIZEN FOOD 33 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 15 SIFF AT 40

BY SW CRITICS & STAFF | Our guide

Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Interns Thomas James, Diana Le, Laurel Rice Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, James Ballinger, Michael Berry, Sara Billups, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Dusty Henry, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Patrick Hutchison, Sara D. Jones, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, John Longenbaugh, Jessie McKenna, Jenna Nand, Terra Clarke Olsen, Brian Palmer, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti

Graphic Designers Jennifer Lesinski, Brennan Moring

OPENING THIS WEEK | Philip Seymour

40 | FILM CALENDAR

42 MUSIC

A new EP from a serial multitasker. Plus: jazz in uncharted territory, and Nickel Creek finds its flow again. 43 | SEVEN NIGHTS 46 | CD REVIEWS

odds&ends 47 | CLASSIFIED

»cover credits

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Art Director Karen Steichen

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Advertising Sales Manager, Arts Carol Cummins Senior Account Executive Krickette Wozniak Account Executives Peter Muller, Brett Leverett, Erin McCutcheon Classifieds Account Executive Matt Silvie DISTRIBUTION Distribution Manager Jay Kraus OPERATIONS Administrative Coordinator Amy Niedrich PUBLISHER Wendy Geldien COPYRIGHT © 2014 BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION IS PROHIBITED. ISSN 0898 0845 / USPS 306730 • SEATTLE WEEKLY IS PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY SOUND PUBLISHING, INC., 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 SEATTLE WEEKLY® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT SEATTLE, WA POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO SEATTLE WEEKLY, 307 THIRD AVE. S., SEATTLE, WA 98104 • FOUNDED 1976. MAIN SWITCHBOARD: 206-623-050 0 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: 206-623-6231 RETAIL AND ONLINE ADVERTISING: 206-467-4341

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

Hoffman’s near-final film, Tom Hardy trapped in a SUV, and Jon Hamm as a baseball scout among the cricketeers.

Learn more: Info.BastyrUniversity.edu • 425-602-3330 Kenmore, Wash. • San Diego

PRODUCTION

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Degrees Include: • Ayurvedic Sciences • Naturopathic Medicine • Nutrition • Psychology • Midwifery

EDITORIAL

Production Manager Sharon Adjiri

35 | THE PICK LIST 36 | PERFORMANCE 38 | VISUAL ARTS/BOOKS

Create a Healthier World

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten

to the Seattle International Film Festival: hot docs, must-sees, and a Bellingham kid’s success at Sundance (and here).

BY MARK RAHNER | Has Amazon already ruined the popular comics vending site? Or is there a secret plan . . . ?

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news&comment

Mountain Low

It’s the End of the World as We Know It: Do We Feel Fine?

BY NINA SHAPIRO

BY KELTON SEARS

While the state is handing out marijuana licenses, the feds are throwing the book at an ailing 70-year-old and his family over a small group grow.

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“It’s like the federal government in eastern Washington is an occupying army.”

Larry Harvey takes his case to D.C alongside (l–r) Rep. Sam Farr; executive director of Americans for Safe Access Steph Sherer, and Rep. Paul Broun.

Despite longstanding medical-marijuana laws in numerous states and despite Washington’s and Colorado’s recent legalization of recreational pot, the federal government maintains that growing, using, and distributing marijuana for any reason at all is illegal. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has indicated with several memos that he will give states some leeway to experiment with legalization laws. But, contrary to general impression, the memos also give discretion to individual U.S. attorneys to prosecute cases as they see fit. U.S. Attorney for Eastern Washington Michael Ormsby apparently sees fit to throw the book at people growing even relatively small amounts of marijuana. In a trial that starts on Monday, Harvey, his wife, the Greggs, and friend Jason Zucker are facing five marijuana-related charges in federal court that could potentially send them to prison for decades. Among the charges are drug trafficking and possession of firearms in furtherance of the same, despite the defendants’ insistence that they were growing for their own use and that multiple guns found on the Firestack-Harvey premises were used for hunting and scaring off bears and other wildlife that roam their 34-acre patch of the mountains. Reached by phone, Ormsby, an Obama

appointee, declined to talk about this case or his policies on marijuana in general. In pretrial hearings last month, Assistant U.S. Attorney Earl Hicks was reportedly more voluble. He said he was “fed up with the lawlessness of the marijuana community” and within his rights to prosecute for as little as “one plant” of marijuana, according to Kari Boiter, who was there as the state chapter coordinator of the advocacy group Americans for Safe Access and an ally of Harvey and his wife. Whether Ormsby’s office will really prosecute for one plant remains to be seen, but another current case shows it will do so for as few as 15. Seattle attorney Jeffrey Steinborn says he is defending an eastern Washington medicalmarijuana patient who grew that many plants in accordance with state law. “It’s like the federal government in eastern Washington is an occupying army,” says Steinborn, who notes that such prosecutions are not happening in western Washington. What gives these prosecutions a surreal quality is that they are happening at the exact same time that the state is handing out its first licenses to people who really do intend to “traffic” marijuana. On May 2, the Liquor Control Board

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

Last week, a dust-up between Amazon and big-time New York publisher Hachette Book Group over the online merchant’s strongarm tactics had the writing class chattering. Here’s a bit of what they had to say. “Amazon delays book shipment as negotiation ploy/punishment. Dictatorial much?” —Sherman Alexie, via Twitter “Also, wanted to chime in on the Amazon/Hachette thing. Basically, I don’t feel sorry for Hachette. They made their bed.” —Evan Gregory, via Twitter “First Reagan came for the air-traffic controllers. And the ‘journalists’ said nothing. Short leap to Bezos.” —Regina Schrambling, via Twitter “Amazon says those Hachette books just fell off a truck, wise guy, yeah, that’s right. They’ll find them eventually.” —Glenn Fleishman, via Twitter

• Snowpack in the Cascades has decreased 20 percent since 1950 and is melting 30 days earlier than normal in the spring. By 2050, it will melt three to four weeks earlier than that, packing the one-two punch of reducing the region’s water supply while simultaneously increasing flood risk. • The flood risk is tough to dodge, but the impact of a decrease in water supply is softened by the fact that regional water consumption has fallen 24 percent since 1990. • Seattle is also preparing for a sag in the supply of hydroelectricity, having already met and surpassed its goal to save 105,200 megawatts of electricity annually: 121,290 were saved in 2013. • Seattle Public Utilities predicts that by the year 2100, higher sea levels will flood Harbor Island, Smith Cove, and the vast majority of the waterfront during high tide—making the obnoxious “Ducks,” a viable transportation option. • But another viable transit option will be pedal power: Bicycle usage in Seattle has jumped an astounding 59 percent since 2011 thanks to improved bike routes. Also, Seattle has joined the small crop of cities where less than half of commuters travel via single-occupancy vehicles. • By 2080, thanks to decreased water supply, 21 to 38 existing tree and plant varieties will no longer be climatically suited to the Northwest, meaning forest ecosystems “may undergo almost complete conversion to other vegetation types.” • That would be bad land conversion. But there is good land conversion too. Since 1990, the amount of publicly accessible land for food production has increased 104 percent. In 2010, a recorded 4,772 P-Patch gardeners were actively urban-farming. In 2013, that number climbed to 6,329, a 32 percent increase. • And a final note: On average, a single Seattle citizen currently emits half the carbon the average U.S. citizen does. But that’s not enough. By 2015, Seattle will adapt a climate-preparedness strategy intending to make the city carbonneutral by 2050—an accomplishment that will perhaps distract us from the lack of powder on the slopes that year. E ksears@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

Harvey says he and his wife had been to a naturopath, who provided them with a medicalmarijuana authorization as well as a sheet explaining that the state allows each patient to maintain 15 plants. Since the couple was growing for seven people, they figured that some 70 plants would be well within the legal limit. What they didn’t realize, Harvey says, is that the state’s complicated medical-marijuana law has another provision establishing a 45-plant limit for “collective gardens” (although, as with the individual 15-plant limit, defendants can argue in court that they need more). What they also didn’t realize is that running afoul of the state could be the least of their worries. They could be in far, far more trouble should the federal government come down on them.

or decades now, scientists have been almost absolutely certain that climate change is about to kick modern civilization’s ass. Thanks to the National Climate Assessment (NCA) released last week by the U.S. government, we can pinpoint exactly where the boot will land in the Pacific Northwest. Serendipitously, Seattle released its first citywide environmental-accomplishments report, titled Moving the Needle, right before the ominous NCA came out. Let’s confront the impending doom, and examine what green things Seattle is doing to subvert the apocalypse.

KARI BOITER

iving on the side of a mountain nine miles north of the eastern Washington town of Colville, Larry Harvey and Rhonda Firestack-Harvey grow and hunt as much of their food as possible. They can and freeze produce from their huge vegetable garden and process venison in the “sausage kitchen” in their barn. The 70-year-old Harvey says avoiding processed foods alleviates his gout, an acute form of arthritis related to diet. It also makes economic sense. A retired truck driver with no pension, Harvey says he and his wife live off his Social Security income of $1,200 a month. So when Harvey and his wife started using marijuana to relieve certain ailments—gout and a knee injury in his case, a degenerative disc disease and arthritis of the feet and hands in hers—they say they naturally decided to grow their own. “We went up on the hill and planted,” recalls Harvey. “I made a plywood sign with a big green cross on it so that if a plane flew over they could see it was a medical-marijuana grow.” The couple says the grow was not only for them but also for a family friend and some relatives, including Firestack-Harvey’s son, who had back problems from a ski accident, and his wife, who had an eating disorder and found that the munchies induced by pot helped. The younger couple, Rolland and Michelle Gregg, live in Kirkland, where maintaining a pot garden wasn’t as easy.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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news&comment» Mountain Low » FROM PAGE 5 announced the winners of its lottery for retail licenses. They include 18 marijuana entrepreneurs in Spokane County, where Ormsby works. So why did he target an aging and ailing couple on a remote homestead? “I think they just stumbled upon it,” says Spokane attorney Jeffrey Niesen, who is representing Firestack-Harvey.

wrong,” Phelps explains. Harvey adds that a felony on his record would also deprive him of the ability to own guns and hunt. “It would take away my livelihood,” he says. That’s apart from the safety of him and his wife: “The bears are out of hibernation now, and when they first come out, they’re hungry.” Yet a ruling this week means that “it’s going to be a very hard case to defend,” Phelps allows. On Tuesday, May 6, U.S. District Court Judge Fred Van Sickle held that defense attorneys are not

Rhonda Firestack-Harvey, Rolland Gregg, and his wife Michelle are all facing prison time for pot.

allowed to bring in any testimony about medical marijuana on the grounds that it is not relevant to federal law. That means that the defendants cannot counter the charge that they were selling marijuana by showing that they were doing something else—something legal under state law—with it. “You have a situation where you cannot have the truth presented in federal court,” says attorney Douglas Hiatt, who did some early legal work on the case.

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While the attorneys were arguing that issue on a conference call, Harvey was in Washington, D.C., with Boiter, meeting with Congressional staff. Many tend to assume that marijuana prosecutions have stopped, or if not, that they target people who have really done something wrong, says Boiter. Meeting Harvey—whose gout took a turn for the worse in prison, and who has been going around D.C. in a wheelchair—disabuses them of that notion, she says. “I was surprised,” says U.S. Rep. Sam Farr, a California Democrat, of his reaction on hearing about Harvey. Using limited resources on such a case “seems foolish and makes the government look bad.” On Wednesday, Farr joined Harvey, Boiter, and Rep. Paul Broun, a Georgia Republican, for a press conference. They talked about the eastern Washington case and called attention to a bipartisan budget-bill amendment the representatives are pushing that would prohibit federal funding from being spent on medical-marijuana cases in states that have passed legalization laws. That amendment, however, would not protect the new recreational-pot entrepreneurs of Washington and Colorado. “I think those people are at great risk,” says attorney Niesen. “If a prosecutor gets a feather up his butt, those people will be shut down in a day.” E

2nd

According to documents filed in the case, the Civil Air Patrol, an auxiliary of the Air Force, spotted the grow during a flyover of the area on July 11, 2012. About a month later, Stevens County Sheriff ’s deputies and a DEA agent executed a state search warrant. FirestackHarvey, the only one home at the time, presented four medical-marijuana authorizations for herself, Larry, her son, and her daughter-in-law. Authorities claim she also said that the marijuana was “taken to the west side of the state” where she and her husband “hoped to start a business of making marijuana-based food products.” Harvey says his wife said no such thing, and that they had no commercial dealings with anyone in western Washington or anywhere. Regardless, the officers didn’t arrest her. They told her she had too many plants for a collective garden and chopped down roughly 25 of them, leaving the allowed 45. Then, they left. A week later, the officers came back with a federal search warrant. This time they chopped down all the plants and destroyed the processed marijuana in the house, including frozen pot-infused butter that Firestack-Harvey would make in the crockpot. Still, the officers made no arrest. Six months passed before the feds came back once more. “There were five carloads of cops,” recalls Harvey, who was home alone this time. His wife was in Alaska, where she is enrolled as a member of the Tlingit Indian tribe. Carrying assault rifles, the officers put Harvey in handcuffs and took him to jail, where he spent the next 17 days—some of them, he says, in great pain given his ailments and lack of access to medication. Subsequent arrests followed. Prosecutors recently offered the defendants plea deals with prison time ranging from six to 20 months, according to attorney Douglas Phelps, who is representing Rolland Gregg. They turned the deals down. “My client believes he did nothing

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news&comment

MORGEN SCHULER

ART CREDIT

ON THE FRONT LINES WITH…

Jacques Pugh BY ELLIS E. CONKLIN

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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ears have passed since Jacques Pugh’s time in Bosnia and later in Iraq, where he served in the 81st Infantry Brigade. But the pain lingers; you can see it his eyes, knowing that comrades in arms, dedicated soldiers—some of them friends—were raped at the violent hands of their superiors. Last week, at a dimly lit Ballard coffee house strewn with Adirondack chairs, Pugh recounted the searing memories that culminated in his 90-minute play, which dramatically unearths the psychological toll of military sexual assault. It’s called Submerged/The Play, and opened last weekend at Freehold Theatre. Our conversation unfolded just a week after the release of a muchanticipated Pentagon study that showed a 50 percent increase last year in reports of rapes and sexual assault. “It was 2002. We were winding down in Bosnia when I learned that a sergeant in the battalion had raped several of his soldiers,” Pugh begins. “The guy was married, with a family. He was an ordained Baptist minister. He was 6´5˝, 240 pounds, chiseled. He ordered them down to do pushups, and then he raped them.” Pugh is an intense man, 50 years old, tall and thin as a reed. He grew up in the East, but has called Seattle home since the 1980s, when his family moved here. A public-affairs officer for much of his quarter-century in the Army, Pugh spent a number of years before entering the service working as a TV journalist in Little Rock, Pittsburgh, and Indianapolis. In 2011, three years after bidding the Army farewell, Pugh enrolled at the Art Institute of Seattle (he graduated last December) with the goal of becoming an independent film producer. He recalls being asked by an admissions officer what kind of film he wanted to make. Pugh,

“Too many good soldiers have had their lives destroyed.”

consumed then—as he is now—with anger that one could fall prey to sexual assault by those he or she trusted, relayed some of his experiences in the armed forces. He said his film would center on the price of betrayal, the savage cost of sexual wrongdoing. Submerged is a composite of real situations and people Pugh encountered in the military. Veteran Seattle stage director and actor Robert Bertocchini adapted the work for the stage after being cast in Pugh’s original short film as the psychotherapist who guides the protagonist Jane Bishop (played by actress Melissa Topscher) through her post-rape ordeal and struggle to live a normal life. Pugh takes the role of the rapist, a fictionalized Sgt. Major Dupree, who turns her life into a living hell. “I love the Army and I love my nation,” Pugh says quietly. “I gave a lot to the Army. I didn’t have to serve.” He pauses. And then, “All of this sullies the Army, but it is important to know that the vast majority serving, 95 percent, are good, honorable people. But there is something in the culture of the military that allows this to happen. Too many good soldiers, men and women, have had their lives destroyed. This is ugly. It has to stop.” Pugh proceeds to rifle through his tattered wallet. At last he finds it: a small piece of plastic that some soldiers attach to their dogtags. It contains a list of the seven Army values: Loyalty, Duty, Selfless Service, Respect, Honor, Integrity, and Personal Courage. “I will keep this with me,” says Pugh, “until I die.” E

econklin@seattleweekly.com

Submerged plays at 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 16–Sat., May 17 and 1:30 p.m. Sun., May 18 at Freehold Theatre, 2222 Second Ave., Suite 200, 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $20.


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news&comment» About Those Russell Wilson Divorce Rumors . . .

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accusation that Tate—Wilson’s talented receiver, who signed in the off-season with the Detroit Lions—was referring to. But he apparently had read or heard someone claim that he was the Other Man. Rather than allow another seemingly wild guess to fade away, Tate responded, stating that he and his girlfriend Elise Pollard were friends with the Wilsons—nothing more. In four separate tweets on April 29, he stated: “Btw the ignorant minority of people, bloggers and whoever else spreading ridiculous rumors should cut it out. It’s absurd the stories that” . . .  “Are being made up from whatever source. In fact Elise and Ashton are still incredible friends, as well as Russ and I.” “I strongly advise the ignorant folks blowing this situation up and spreading this rumors to shut the hell up. Go watch the nba playoffs.” “Finally, I don’t understand why it’s anyone’s business what happens in ones personal life. It’s irrelevant to his performance on the field.” Let’s take Tate at his word—the story’s not true, and the rumor should die. Problem is, his denial gave it new life, such as this headline on a popular Seahawks website: “Golden Tate denies sleeping with Russell Wilson’s wife.” Actually, Tate’s tweet didn’t expressly deny any such thing; it’s subject to interpretation, but that didn’t seem to matter. That story was read by more than 18,000 visitors, some who likely will remember only the key words—Tate, sleeping, Wilson’s wife. As even the Seahawks blogger wrote: “Maybe Tate is denying the allegations about sleeping with Ashton because he wants to defend his reputation—maybe they actually happened. If so it would certainly explain Wilson’s decision to divorce Ashton, but who knows? That Tate felt compelled to even speak to the rumor says a lot about the pervasive nature of social media gossip.” That was just the start. Publications from the Detroit Free Press to the International Business Times have now picked up on the denial. Gossip sites are also running with it, while some sports blogs are calling it a “dumb rumor,” which they then repeat. One site, trying to knock down the story altogether, topped it with the daunting headline “It’s Unlikely Golden Tate Had an Affair Russell Wilson’s Wife” [sic]. Wilson, wisely perhaps, is silent on the denial. He vowed not to talk about the divorce, and hasn’t mentioned it in the public space where he comments daily, Twitter. But, since the subject is gossip, we feel compelled to report that Wilson was seen with someone whom he tweeted was a “beautiful woman” at the May 3 White House Correspondents Dinner: his mom. Headline writers, take it away. E JENNIFER BUCHANAN / THE HERALD

hen it came time to announce his divorce plans last month, Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson decided to issue a brief statement through his football team. His decision to split from his wife of two years, 26-year-old Ashton Meem Wilson, was difficult, he said. Wilson asked his fans for “prayers, understanding, and privacy,” and said he’d have no further comment. BY RICK ANDERSON The public and media weren’t sure they’d heard right. The 25-year-old athlete, who has in his two years with the team cultivated family values and a deeply Christian persona, was ditching his highschool sweetheart? They went through college and the NFL draft together, visited hospitals, and made public appearances. They even went to the Super Bowl together. There’d been no rumors of trouble. As recently as February, Ashton, in a local TV interview, spoke glowingly about her husband—why he’s so level-headed and how she buys him salted caramels as a pregame ritual. Just a few weeks before the announcement, Wilson ran a picture of his wife between the Bible verses he posts daily on his Twitter feed, indicating theirs was still a marriage made in heaven. The split wasn’t the most important news story of April 23—President Obama had visited the Oso landslide the day before, for example. But locally and nationally, in the papers, on TV, radio, and the Internet, the Wilson divorce was one of the most read and discussed stories for days. Many felt the split was none of the public’s business. But Wilson is likely Seattle’s most popular sports figure, and it was his press release that got the town talking. Times columnist Larry Stone—after first apologizing for writing about the divorce, saying he felt “uncomfortable” doing so and noting that “I’m not at all interested in the whys and wherefores of the split” —thought Wilson’s superstar stature made the divorce newsworthy. Besides, the QB “has handled this intensely personal issue as forthrightly as could be expected,” Stone felt. But the missing “W” from the story was “Why?” Wilson hadn’t explained or even hinted at the reason for the breakup, and wasn’t going to. Inevitably, given the volatile mix of sports, gossip, and divorce, the Internet trolls and chattering class began guessing. Comments ranged from insinuations that Wilson didn’t want to share the fortune he’s about to get from a postSuper Bowl contract to suspicions about marital infidelity and sexual orientation. It was off-the-wall speculation. And it seemed to be dying a deserved death. Then an odd thing happened. Without being asked, Wilson’s former teammate, Golden Tate, denied he’d had an affair with Wilson’s wife. It’s not clear if there had been a specific

randerson@seattleweekly.com

Rick Anderson writes about sex, crime, money, and politics, which tend to be the same thing.


SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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n&c The Myth of the Seahawks Success

T

he Seahawks added nine players during the NFL draft last weekend. Here’s a transcript of ESPN’s draft telecast whenever the Hawks made

SPORTSBALL

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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a pick: Analyst 1: “[Name of player] wasn’t expected to be taken until later in the draft.” Analyst 2: “Yes, I had him ranked much lower than this.” Analyst 1: “But it’s the Seahawks, so they must know what they’re doing!” After building a Super Bowl champion through the draft—making a number of questionable moves like the ones they BY SETH KOLLOEN made this year—the Seahawks’ infallibility level has reached “Pope.” This year the Hawks picked offensive tackle Justin Britt 64th overall; ESPN ranked him 215th. But the TV analysts were so cowed by the Seahawks’ drafting success, you didn’t hear a peep of criticism. The Hawks could’ve taken Bo the White House Dog. Analyst 1: “No Portuguese Water Dog has ever played in the NFL.” Analyst 2: “Scouts tell me that Bo may struggle due to his lack of arms.” Chris Harper Analyst 1: “But it’s the Seahawks, so they must know what they’re doing!” Not since the grunge era has Seattle’s judgment been valued so highly. Back then, clueless music executives flooded Pioneer Square, trying to figure out how the Northwest’s music was crushing New York’s and SoCal’s. Clueless football executives might start doing the same. Thing is, the trick to the Seahawks’ draft success is no-brainer math: The more picks you have, the better your chances of getting a good player. The Hawks’ nine picks this year were more than all but five other NFL teams. Once again, the Hawks bet on quantity over their own infallibility. In draft after draft, Pete Carroll and John Schneider trade down, amassing more than their share of picks. They know they aren’t infallible. Last year the Seahawks made the most egregious error of the draft—fourth-round pick Chris Harper. Picked 123rd overall, Harper was the highest-drafted player in the league to be cut. The Hawks struck out on Harper, and on Ryan Seymour (220th overall), Ty Powell (231st), and Jared Smith (241st) —Seymour and Powell got cut and Smith didn’t play a down. But Michael Bowie, picked 242nd overall, started nine games, including the playoff win over the Saints. Was it the Seahawks’ genius that led them to find a playoff-worthy starter in the final round of the draft? No, it was the fact that they held more cards in the NFL’s annual bingo game. E

12

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Raped or Attacked? In an Accident or Combat?

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014


SIFFAT40

SIFF Guide

The Festival at Faux-ty

What I Wanna See at SIFF BY ROBERT HORTON

S

hould you utter the title The Babadook out loud, you may be in danger of summoning an Australian bogeyman from its hiding place—and woe betide those who doubt its existence. Film Comment calls this first-time effort from director Jennifer Kent “the real deal” in horror, so expect to lose some sleep. (Egyptian: 11:55 p.m. Fri., June 6. SIFF Cinema Uptown: 9:30 p.m. Sat., June 7.) In Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter, a young woman (Babel Oscar nominee Rinko Kikuchi) becomes convinced that Fargo is real, and journeys to the movie’s setting to find money buried in the snow. Well, Fargo did claim to be based on a true story, even if that turned out to be a Coen brothers jape. This film is from another set of filmmaking siblings, David and Nathan Zellner, and comes with warm notices from other festivals. (Egyptian: 7 p.m. Sun., June 1 & 4 p.m. Mon., June 2.) In going from Wendy & Lucy to Meek’s Cutoff, Portland’s Kelly Reichardt blithely established the kind of range that most indie filmmakers can only dream about. Therefore her new one, Night Moves, automatically becomes a must-see. It’s about a group of Oregon environmental activists; Jesse Eisenberg and Dakota Fanning lead the cast. (Lincoln Square: 7 p.m. Fri., May 23. SIFF Cinema Uptown: noon Mon., May 26.) One of the most important and distinctive members of the Taiwanese moviemaking world, Tsai Ming-liang, returns with this study of people in the lower depths of a crumbling

Taipei. Stray Dogs has divided reviewers (though it copped at prize at the Venice fest last fall), with its unblinking long-take style a source of either rapture or exasperation. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 9 p.m. Weds., May 21 & 2 p.m. Mon., June 26.) Shawn Telford is a Seattle actor (and UW drama alum) whose new film BFE marks his debut as a feature director. The movie looks at a small town—it was shot in northern Idaho with a Seattle crew—and the desperate ways a few different generations of residents are trying to get out. (Harvard Exit: 9 p.m. Mon., June 2 & 4 p.m. Tues., June 3.) Although he remains at the top of the list of living practitioners of expressive cinematic art, Roman Polanski has frequently been drawn to stage adaptations (lately including Carnage). Maybe all the cramped spaces appeal to a director whose mastery of paranoia is unquestioned. Venus in Fur is another of those, an adaptation of a play by David Ives that looks at an actress (Emmanuelle Seigner, Polanski’s wife) and director (Mathieu Amalric) preparing a version of the notorious Sacher-Masoch novel. (Harvard Exit: 4 p.m. Fri., May 16. SIFF Cinema Uptown: 6:30 p.m. Sat., May 17.) South Korea’s prolific Hong Sang-soo has been on a roll lately, with his languid style making In Another Country and The Day He Arrives as pleasurable as they are sometimes puzzling. Our Sunhi is described as a sunny look at a film student and the three

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

You can debate whether this is in fact the 40th edition of the Seattle International Film Festival, since its inaugural was at the Moore in May 1976 (38 years ago), when Jimmy Carter was president, Wes Uhlman was mayor, and The Weekly (as we were then called) was all of two months old. SIFF skipped forward past the enumeration of the 1988 fest, which would’ve been its unlucky 13th, and it gets an extra candle for its ’76 birth, when 18 films were screened over two weeks. By comparison, playing at nine venues, this year’s fest runs 25 days (May 15–June 8), with 258 features and docs on its elephantine schedule. How to make sense of it all? Our critics list their 21 wanna-sees and curiosities. Then we meet the local filmmakers behind four standout titles, many of them music-related, and talk with the UW grad who recently scored a success at Sundance. See siff.net for full schedule and details; and we’ll bring you ongoing coverage of SIFF during the next three weeks. BRIAN MILLER

DEAN RODGERS/MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Jesse Eisenberg plays roles in Jessedual Eisenberg inThe TheDouble. Double.

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Horton » FROM PAGE 15 men who buzz around her as she embarks on her future. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 4:30 p.m. Tues., May 27 & 9:30 p.m. Mon., June 2.) Although he has been associated with British cinema and features such as the dreamy-drowsy My Summer of Love (the 2005 SIFF screening of which led to Emily Blunt fixing my broken tape

utes—I recall waves of walkouts at German’s mind-altering Khrustalyov, My Car! when it showed at SIFF in 2000). German died just before he completed final editing on this epic with sci-fi overtones, so it will serve as his final statement. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 8:30 p.m. Fri., May 16 & 2 p.m. Sat., May 17. Lincoln Square: 1 p.m. Sat., May 24.) What Is Cinema? is the latest documentary by Oscar winner Chuck Workman; it gathers Kim Sang-jung (left) and Jung Yu-mi in Our Sunhi.

JEONWONSA FILM

recorder during an interview—but that’s another story), Pawel Pawlikowski accesses his Polish roots in his acclaimed new film Ida. It’s about a convent girl in 1960s Poland who discovers she is actually Jewish, and a journey that brings the shadow of the Holocaust across her life. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 3:30 p.m. Fri., May 16. Harvard Exit: 7 p.m. Wed., May 21.) Haven’t actually heard much about this one, but The Two Faces of January is based on a novel by the author of Strangers on a Train and The Talented Mr. Ripley, Patricia Highsmith, which makes it intriguing enough to take a flyer on. Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst play a couple traveling in Greece; their guide (Oscar Isaac, from Inside Llewyn Davis) leads them into mystery. (Egyptian: 6:30 p.m. Fri., May 23 & 1:30 p.m. Sat., May 24.) Advance word suggests that the final film by Russian director Alexei German, Hard to Be a God, will separate hard-core cinephiles from casual festivalgoers (and probably separate a few spectators from their seats during its 170 min-

a batch of notable talkers and some judiciously chosen clips to answer the title question. Among the testifiers: David Lynch, Mike Leigh, Kelly Reichardt, Chantal Akerman, and vintage musings from the likes of Hitchcock and Bresson. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 2 p.m. Sun., June 1. Harvard Exit: 6:30 p.m., Wed., June 4.) SIFF’s “archival” section (couldn’t they give this a snappier title?) is thankfully upgraded from last year. Among the goodies: a restored print of Last Year at Marienbad, offered in tribute to the late master Alain Resnais; Abel Gance’s 1919 epic J’accuse ; and a collection of Charlie Chaplin shorts. In these overwhelmingly digital days, it’s a novelty when a title returns on actual 35 mm film, which is why The Lusty Men should be an absolute got-to-see for this fest. Never one of the more famous of Nicholas Ray’s movies, this 1952 gem features Robert Mitchum in glorious form as a busted-up rodeo rider; Susan Hayward and Arthur Kennedy co-star. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 5:30 p.m. Sun., May 18.) E

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

SUNDANCE SELECTS

Seigner and Amalric in Venus in Fur.

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Rudd and Poehler in They Came Together.

head. All the time—we never actually see Fassbender’s face. Could it be that the actor inside is not actually Fassbender, away collecting another paycheck on some bigger movie? That’s the kind of question that make us curious about this British indie, directed by Lenny Abrahamson and written by one of our favorite English authors and journalists, Jon Ronson (The Men Who Stare at Goats). Ronson actually played in a college band with Chris Sievey, a performance artist who created a separate bobblehead stage persona, so there’s a factual basis for this surreal band road trip and its possibly insane leader. Variety calls it “weird and wonderful.” Among the few Americans in the cast, Maggie Gyllenhaal thankfully leaves her head uncovered. (Egyptian: 9:30 p.m. Fri., May 30. SIFF Cinema Uptown: 2 p.m. Sat., May 31.) It sounds less like a movie than a supercut of rom-com clichés as Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler meet cute, meet cute again, and then meet cute until you can’t goddamn stand it anymore in They Came Together. The rather meta-sounding comedy comes from David Wain and Michael Showalter (of Wet Hot American Summer and the old comedy show The State), which means the sugar will be well-laced with irony. Imagine Nora Ephron put in a blender with Borges, an infinite chick-flick regress. Then there’s the supporting cast, which includes Bill Hader, Ed Helms, and half the crew from Reno 911!. (Egyptian: 7 p.m. Sat., June 7 & 2 p.m. Sun., June 8.) Almost three hours long, Richard Linklater’s Boyhood looks to be an audacious experiment in cinema. I didn’t have time for the press screening, but Robert Horton reports, “Twelve years in the making (to allow leading man Ellar Coltrane to actually grow from tyke to teenager before the camera), this project isn’t quite like any other movie. It leaves a lyrical impression and yet is rooted in the most quotidian events of childhood; even the big dramatic moments are simply folded back into the measured spectacle of time passing—an approach that could easily be boring but is somehow spellbinding here. Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke play the boy’s parents, and they too grow old as we bear witness.” Linklater will attend SIFF. His film opens here on July 25. (Egyptian: 5 p.m. Sat., May 31. Harvard Exit: 8 p.m. Sun., June 1.) E

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oldie, sigh), the CD apparently stuck on endless loop in their car stereo. And that, ironically, leads them into a debate about the meaning of irony. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 4:30 p.m. Fri., May 30 & 8 p.m. Sat., May 31.) SIFFgoers will remember the prior two installments—L’Auberge Espagnole (2003) and Russian Dolls (2006)—of what now becomes a trilogy written and directed by Cédric Klapisch. Chinese Puzzle finds the characters played by Romain Duris and Kelly Reilly to be divorced parents with two small kids. She takes the tykes to New York, and he has no choice but to follow. If the prior two comedies dealt with the linguistic and cultural confusion of the new Europe, experienced from a Gen X perspective, this one looks to be more of a mid-life stock-tacking, something like Richard Linklater’s Before Sunset. And yes, since you ask, Audrey Tautou makes an appearance—spouting fluent Mandarin, no less. The film opens at the Seven Gables on May 30. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 5 p.m. Fri., May 16 & 8:30 p.m. Sun., May 18.) Richard Ayoade made an impressive feature debut with Submarine at SIFF ’11. Now he freely adapts Dostoyevsky’s story The Double with Jesse Eisenberg as the schlub, living in a bleakly Kafka-meets-Her near future, who encounters his suave, successful doppelgänger. Is confident James Simon the projection of meek Simon James? Does it even matter? Soon James is taking over Simon’s job and girl (Mia Wasikowska); whether fantasized or real, this rival becomes an existential threat to our hero. The Double is also an actor’s showcase for Eisenberg. Says The New York Times, “Mr. Eisenberg wears his persona like a reversible coat, switching from loser to charmer by adjusting his posture and the angle of his brows.” The film opens next Friday at the Varsity. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 9:30 p.m. Fri., May 16. Lincoln Square: 9:30 p.m. Sun., May 18.) Lena Dunham is everywhere, thanks to Girls on HBO, and prolific indie director Joe Swanberg (Hannah Takes the Stairs) now avails himself of her talent with Happy Christmas. Swanberg and Melanie Lynskey (Hello I Must Be Going, SIFF ’12) play a Chicago couple whose lives are upended by the arrival of feckless kid sister Anna Kendrick. Dunham plays the latter’s even more irresponsible wingwoman. There’s a lot of indie talent here, which can sometimes trigger a train wreck, but Swanberg after Drinking Buddies is definitely moving beyond his mumblecore roots. And Dunham after Girls and Tiny Furniture is overdue to make a new movie of her own. (Lincoln Square: 9:25 p.m. Wed., May 28. SIFF Cinema Uptown: 9:30 p.m. Fri., May 30.) Frank. Yes, this is the movie in which Michael Fassbender plays an eccentric English art-rocker Reilly and Gleeson in Calvary. who wears a giant papier-mâché

alvary reunites star Brendan Gleeson and writer/director John Michael McDonagh (brother of playwright/filmmaker Martin McDonagh), who scored a hit with their 2011 comedy The Guard. Gleeson plays a Catholic cleric marked for death by the victim of a pedophile priest (not Gleeson’s Father James) in their small Irish parish. Essentially, he’s being set up as an innocent sacrifice for the sins of his church, but don’t expect a doom-and-gloom melodrama. Said The Guardian of this dark comedy, “Calvary touches greatness. It crawls clear through the slime and comes out looking holy.” Look for Chris O’Dowd and Kelly Reilly (Chinese Puzzle, below) in supporting roles. The film opens here August 1. (SIFF Cinema Uptown: 7 p.m. Sat., June 7. Harvard Exit: 11 a.m. Sun., June 8.) Stanley Ann Dunham, future mother to our president, graduated from Mercer Island High School, class of 1960. Now her story is told in Obama Mama , a new documentary by Vivian Norris. The film covers the full spectrum of her globetrotting life, not just her teenage years on M.I., and I’ll be fascinated to see whether this portrait dispels or adds to the mystery of Barack Obama’s origins. Not the birth certificate, of course—we mean how this woman who died relatively young (at 52), before her son’s swift political ascent, shaped his future policies. Norris will attend SIFF. (Kirkland Performance Center: 6 p.m. Sat., May 31. Harvard Exit: 11 a.m. Sun., June 1.) With their proven improvisational skills, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon made the English culinary road-trip movie The Trip my favorite comedy of SIFF ’11. After that excursion through England’s Lake District, director Michael Winterbottom now steers his duo south in The Trip to Italy. Food and scenery are again abundant, but the real subject remains Steve and Rob. These two rivalrous self-caricatures must balance professional and personal discontents, keep oneupping each other, and grudgingly accept their age. The lovely Italian women mostly ignore them, and they’re left to quarrel like an old married couple. Like The Trip, this new movie has been condensed from an English TV series, which ought to allow Winterbottom to distill the best gags and dueling celebrity impersonations (last time, Michael Caine; this time, Michael Caine). The first Trip prominently featured ABBA. This time around, the lads have a go at Alanis Morissette’s Jagged Little Pill (now also an


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3:00 Norwegian Male Chorus 3:30 Norwegian Ladies Chorus 4:00 Bonnie Birch 4:30 Seattle Lilla Spelmanslag 5:00 Skandia Kapell

Norwegian Constitution Day Festival JOIN US for the BIGGEST 17TH of MAY Norwegian Constitution DayCELEBRATION Festival JOIN US for the BIGGEST 17TH of MAY CELEBRATION JOIN US and for the BIGGEST of MAY CELEBRATION OUTSIDE of NORWAY! Café Open House at17TH Leif Erikson Lodge - 3:30 - 5:30 PM

Festival

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OUTSIDE NORWAY! 2245 NW 57th St. Join us at Leifof Erikson Lodge before the parade for Nordic food, soft drinks and alcoholic beverages, which are available for purchase. 17 th of M ay Cel eb r a ti on D a n ce 17th of May Parade - 6 - 8 PM

Saturday May 17th 2014

Music: 8:30 PM - 11:30 PM

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Why local filmmaker Taylor Guterson embraces the senior set.

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Hotel and Quartet, with a genuine interest in treating senior citizens as people, not stereotypes. So Guterson reconvened his three stars and selffinanced a sequel of sorts, Burkholder. Burkholder focuses on the friendship between

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Teddy (Burkholder), a spirited, impulsive, ferociously independent bachelor, and his landlord and friend Barry (Crosley). The two bicker like an old married couple and, fittingly, see a marriage counselor to sort through their household issues. As with Old Goats, the film uses breezy humor to explore themes of age, independence, and declining health. However, Burkholder has a more somber tone: 88 when filming began, Burkholder was struggling with oncoming dementia, which becomes central to the movie. When Teddy gets confused while driving and pulls off to sleep in his car until morning, it’s not a moment of panic or dramatic crisis, like Henry Fonda getting in lost in the woods in On Golden Pond. It’s simply a solution, and Teddy shrugs it off, despite the deeper significance. Says Guterson, “I’ve spent a lot of time around older people, and I’ve found that things . . . that may seem dramatic or super-unusual to you and me, like pulling over on the side of the road and sleeping, to them is not unusual or weird. It’s just part of the reality of their daily life.” VanderWal, who has a small but splashy role in Burkholder, concurs: “Taylor seems to have a knack for the crap that nobody ever tells you when you get old.” Burkholder’s health was in decline during production, and Guterson recalls his star morbidly jesting, “We better get this done, I might not be here.” He made it through filming, but died last year at 90, during post-production. In tribute, Guterson not only dedicated the film to Burkholder, but named it after him. ShadowCatcher again plans to target the senior audience, as with Old Goats. Of the latter, says Guterson, “I’ve heard over and over from older people that it feels authentic.” Burkholder will likely strike the same chord. E

TM & © 1957, 2014 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L.P.

INSET: COURTESY TAYLOR GUTERSON, SHADOWCATCHER ENT.

Burkholder in his second and final role.

Time Out NY

WINNER! BEST MUSICAL REVIVAL

BY SEAN AXMAKER

y films are a little weird,” says Taylor Guterson. It’s a weird statement to make about his two easygoing features. His debut Old Goats (SIFF ’11) and his new Burkholder both concern a group of of elderly, sometimes cantankerous codgers facing their retirement years on Bainbridge Island, where the director grew up. The films gently meander through their doings and conversations, which have a habit of detouring into blind alleys. Those detours are intentional, says Guterson, the son of bestselling novelist David Guterson (Snow Falling on Cedars): “There are people out there who think that that’s not how you tell a story, that you never bring up something that . . . doesn’t have a point. And to me it has a point. They go off on these tangents because that’s what they do.” Today based on the Eastside, Guterson is a selfmade filmmaker with his own video production company. Chatting in a Mercer Island coffee shop, he’s like an earnest, relaxed grad student. So why, I ask, has he created a stock company of senior citizens? Reflecting on Old Goats, he says, “I was 27 and thinking, ‘If I don’t just figure out a way to do it now, I’ll never make a feature.’ ” The largely self-taught director had the filming equipment through his Elliott Bay Productions; it was a matter of finding a project he could produce himself. In both movies, his cast of amateur oldsters was a practical consideration. Rather than auditioning professional actors, he cast local retirees—all with wide-open schedules—and drew from their lives to create their screen characters. Bob Burkholder and David VanderWal had appeared in Guterson’s early shorts. He met Britton Crosley while working a landscaping job during college at the UW. “Their mannerisms and personality were very striking to me,” says Guterson. “I thought if you could just capture that on film, they would be interesting people to watch.” They were willing to improvise on camera, and their price was right. And, says VanderWal, they had a lot fun with it: “[Taylor] could call me to do anything, and I’d show up.” Produced for all of $5,000, the low-key buddy film Old Goats earned some nice reviews—and a selected national release thanks to local company ShadowCatcher Entertainment. It caught the same cultural wave as The Best Exotic Marigold

An Auteur of Aging

21


SEATTLE WEEKLY PROMOTIONS FEATuREd EvENT: FARESTART’S GuEST chEF SPEcTAcuLAR!

June 5th - 6:30 pm @ Showbox SoDo Sixty area restaurants, wineries, breweries and distilleries will gather to offer delectable tastes at FareStart’s tasting event celebrating the local restaurant community.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: SEATTLE EROTIc ART FESTIvAL May 30 @ Seattle Center Exhibition Hall Stimulate your senses and invigorate your relationship during a long weekend of exploring the erotic via the arts. Feast your eyes on art by the world’s best erotic artists and explore our interactive installations.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: LAdY GAGA’S artRave!

Live Nation Global Touring announced that Lady Gaga’s artRave: The ARTPOP Ball will begin May 4th in Ft. Lauderdale, including KeyArena on May 28. The tour will include several cities that have not hosted Lady Gaga before.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: BAvARIAN BATTLE

June 21 - 9 am @ Leavenworth Ski Hill The Bavarian Battle is a gnarly 5k Adventure Race held in the Bavarian village of Leavenworth, Washington. Racers will jump, slide, run, climb, hop and crawl their way to the finish line.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: TIMBER! OuTdOOR MuSIc FESTIvAL! SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

July 24-26 @ Tolt-Macdonald Park

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“A CALL TO ACTION. A FAST, COOLLY INCENSED INVESTIGATION.” THE NEW YORK TIMES

Innocents Abroad

“EYE-OPENING. PULLS NO PUNCHES IN ITS INFORMED OUTRAGE.”

Why just do a music video when your band can make an entire movie instead?

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“HERE IS SOMETHING RARE AT THE MULTIPLEX: A MOVIE THAT MATTERS.”

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H

ing machines, the strange new food (including ice-cream hot dogs)—these become the basis for comic vignettes both in Seattle and Japan. (At one point, Phillip even becomes lost in an anime sequence!) “Everyone’s playing fictionalized versions of themselves,” says Jeffcoat, but certain biographical details come through. Thus we have phlegmatic guitarist David Drury, also a writer and part-time professional blackjack player; buoyant bassist and family man Phillip Peterson, whose wife and kids act in the film (“They were game”); and deadpan drummer/ hairstylist Sean Lowry, the bachelor of the three, who sees the most temptation on their travels. (At one point, the group is staying in a brothel.) The tone is brisk and light, reflecting both the pop energy of Tennis Pro—now selling the soundtrack via its website—and the bustle of Tokyo’s demimonde. The bars are bursting with other musical acts, sometimes more akin to performance art than Tennis Pro’s springy sound.

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Jeffcoat taking a selfie with his micro-crew.

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT SEATTLE WEEKLY

JOHN JEFFCOAT

is last film at SIFF, the 2007 comedy Outsourced, was about a Seattle tech worker sent to a strange land, India. John Jeffcoat’s latest film is about a Seattle band touring in a strange land, Japan, where it was also shot on location. The similarities end there with Big in Japan, as he and the three members of Tennis Pro explained over drinks recently at Still Liquor on Capitol Hill. The project is a hybrid—don’t call it a mockumentary—that Jeffcoat scripted, with some improvisation, after observing the band’s offstage antics. “None of us had been to Japan before,” Jeffcoat recalls. It was total immersion, and culture shock, for him and the three musicians, who’ve been performing together since 2003. They didn’t really know Jeffcoat when the project coalesced in 2009 with a Kickstarter funding campaign. He was finishing the MTV webseries $5 Cover and looking for some new project. The band, meanwhile, was hoping a few music videos would come of its first Japanese tour, which Jeffcoat and a two-man crew filmed using a handheld DSLR camera. Looking and behaving like tourists, or rock ’n’-roll tourists, they had no permits while filming in the Tokyo bars and streets (and in the famous Yoyogi Park, where street dancers and buskers perform). What we see in the cramped, rowdy subterranean bars of the bohemian Shimokitazawa district (usually called Shimokita) and the impossibly small sleeping-pod hostels is seen through Tennis Pro’s innocent eyes. All the crowds and neon, the wacky vend-

JOHN JEFFCOAT

From left: Drury, Lowry, and Peterson in Yoyogi Park.

©2014 Atlas Films

23


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Innocents Abroad » FROM PAGE 23 Alcohol constantly flows, yet there are quieter moments of cultural incomprehension, too. (Studying the instructions for the world’s most complicated laundry machine, Dave reassures Phil, “Arrows mean the same thing in Japanese.”) This zippy, well-textured travelogue avoids all the usual rock-doc clichés; you get the sense that the three musicians don’t take themselves too seriously, even while striving for more recognition. (“I’m sick of being a fucking novelty act,” Sean complains in the film.) There’s a real sense of being on tour from a band’s perspective: forever offbalance and punchy from the jetlag (and copious amounts of shōchū). As a distant influence, Jeffcoat mentions The Monkees TV show, to which I’d add traces of Anthony Bourdain and Mr. Hulot.

Dave reassures Phil, “Arrows mean the same thing in Japanese.” In addition to following Tennis Pro on two of its three Japanese tours, Jeffcoat filmed in the band members’ Seattle homes and neighborhoods and shot club dates at Chop Suey. (The band will play at that Capitol Hill club on Thursday following the film’s screening at the nearby Egyptian.) Jeffcoat also plays a record-label executive in the film, and his soundman, Adam Powers, stepped in to play a hippie tourist with a hilariously unplaceable accent. Completed last year with local financing, Big in Japan premiered at the South by Southwest festival in March, where Tennis Pro also performed. As the movie seeks a distributor, the plan is to tour it—and the band, of course—with stops naturally including Tokyo, where Tennis Pro has indeed gained a following. “We fit so well musically,” says Peterson today, citing the camaraderie of the Shimokita scene, where Tennis Pro would join other bands “to go out and eat together after the shows.” “We were in our natural habitat,” says Drury, meaning onstage, backstage, and in bars—the life of a touring musician. The three bandmates have an easy rapport, in person and onscreen, which eased the transition to acting together. Lowry is the relative veteran in that regard, having done A Christmas Carol way back in high school; he compares the process of enacting Jeffcoat’s lifeinspired vignettes to “hanging out and making each other laugh”—precisely what most touring bands do with their down time. If there’s a story to Big in Japan, it’s the perennial tale of a band trying to establish a reputation, to become known. In the film, says Sean, “Seattle doesn’t get us, and they’ve never got us.” That may change with the movie, by treating Tennis Pro as an import product, a delicacy sent from Shimokita with love. E

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

BIG IN JAPAN Egyptian (805 E. Pine St., 324-9996, siff.net), $10–$12: 7 p.m. Thurs., June 5. SIFF Cinema Uptown (511 Queen Anne Ave. N.), 12:30 p.m. Sat., June 7.


All in the Family A new documentary celebrates the band Girl Trouble and its Tacoma roots. BY MATT DRISCOLL

F

“We’re pretty high on the weirdo factor,” says Von Wheelie today of her family and Girl Trouble’s roots. “I think the family story can suck people in [to the film]. It’s just the story of this family that kind of had these weirdo kids . . . It’s more of a personal thing than a band thing. It’s going to be a little scary to see how people react to that,” she admits of the film. “This is really a story of our life.” As we learn, Girl Trouble’s story wouldn’t be possible without “The Babe” and “The Powerhouse,” as the younger generation of Hendersons nicknamed their parents. Von Wheelie and Kahuna’s Depression-era folks let Girl Trouble gestate on the wooded, cluttered Henderson family plot in Tacoma, and in that open-door environment, they essentially adopted Girl Trouble’s other two members, singer Kurt “KP” Kendall and bassist Dale Phillips. To this day, Girl Trouble’s four members—none married, none with kids, and none far removed from where it all started—celebrate Christmas together, something “most bands don’t do,” Von Wheelie notes. With historical photos and a then-and-now view of Tacoma (think ugly waterfront ruins vs. empty waterfront condos), Strictly Sacred also provides a history of that gritty, oft-ridiculed port city. (Former Mayor Harold Moss once compared it to bombed-out Beirut.) Olsen crafts a very distinct story of place via these musical misfits. Thirty years after its first show, Girl Trouble reflects, and remains true to, the city’s humble roots. Its motto, “Eluding fame since 1984,” is appropriately self-effacing, though it undersells the band’s regional influence. “For us to be from Tacoma,” says Von Wheelie, “that’s part of the Girl Trouble thing. Back then, we had to create our own fun. That was the deal, you know. We really had to band together. I think that makes you a little tougher.” E

mdriscoll@seattleweekly.com

STRICTLY SACRED SIFF Cinema Uptown (511 Queen Anne Ave. N.), $10–$12, 5 p.m. Mon., May 26. Renton IKEA Performing Arts Center, 8:30 p.m. Tues., May 27.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

or Isaac Olsen, the story of cult Tacoma garage-rock band Girl Trouble is personal. The band— now in its 30th year—is family, quite literally. “I knew I was the only person who could make this movie,” says the 28-year-old director, discussing his Strictly Sacred: The Story of Girl Trouble, which debuts at SIFF. From practically the opening moments of Olsen’s third feature (and first doc), the lineage is clear, but not overstated. Strictly Sacred follows the career of the most unheralded yet revered Tacoma band of a generation—which, in true Tacoma fashion, never came very close to “making it,” but collected a lot of black eyes and bizarre stories along the way. Gradually we sense that the man behind the camera is the nephew of Girl Trouble drummer Bon Von Wheelie and guitarist Big Kahuna (aka siblings Bonnie and Dave Henderson). Olsen grew up surrounded by the band, and we see him in diapers in old home movies, but that’s not the point. Strictly Sacred is more than a labor of love, says Olson: “I didn’t want to be the enamored nephew, or to make this family love-fest thing. Part of my job was to be as objective as possible.” And that, plus the ridiculous stockpile of archival footage amassed by the band, is what makes the movie work. Yes, Olsen and the band are related, but the Girl Trouble family tree transcends bloodlines. That as much as anything is what this film captures. The 90-minute documentary—launched by a $5,000 Kickstarter campaign to get “the train on the track,” per Olsen—is about a doggedly idealistic band’s life on the DIY fringes. Like any good doc, Strictly Sacred lays out the facts, detailing the band’s place in Northwest rock annals as the original underdog on Sub Pop’s roster and the strange, go-go-dancing stepsister to the grunge phenomenon. Olsen interviews those who were there for the ride, including K Records’ Calvin Johnson, The Rocket ’s Art Chantry, and Tacoma’s favorite daughter, Neko Case. But beyond the rich DIY music history, Strictly Sacred is really the very personal story of castoffs and punks bonding—and forging a rock-’n’-roll family —that’s so stubborn and peculiar it’s managed to defy age and time.

ISAAC OLSEN/WIG-OUT.COM

Olsen, as a boy, and Girl Trouble.

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(5/14) Rick Atkinson Allied Triumph of WWII

In the Shadows Before Stardom

(5/14) Stacey D’Erasmo A Musician’s Wild Ride

John Ridley explains why his Jimi Hendrix biopic eschews the hits and stage bravado.

(5/15) Cameron Camp The Dementia-Friendly Community

BY BRIAN MILLER

TOWN HALL

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(5/15) Seattle University: Rabbi Donniel Hartman Putting God Second (5/16-18) Strawberry Theatre Workshop Control: A Living Newspaper (5/16) Seattle Arts & Lectures: Timothy F. Geithner

Benjamin as Jimi, with Poots as Linda.

(5/17) PSSO presents 15th Anniversary Season Finale

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peaking from Los Angeles, writer/ director John Ridley is well aware of Seattle’s expectations for his SIFF-opening Jimi Hendrix biopic. Hendrix was, before Nirvana, our greatest musical gift to the world. “There could not be a more appropriate place to show this film than in Seattle,” says Ridley, who recently earned an Oscar for writing 12 Years a Slave. At the same time, he acknowledges, we in the Northwest are protective of the legend surrounding Hendrix (1942–1970), whose family-administered estate is famously guarded about licensing his music and image (one reason Paul Allen’s EMP Museum didn’t end up being simply a Hendrix museum). With that in mind, let’s just drop one spoiler right now: None of Hendrix’s original hits are included in Jimi: All Is by My Side. No “Purple Haze,” no “Foxy Lady.” “They are entrusted with intellectual property, and they have a right and responsibility to execute it,” says Ridley of the Hendrix estate. So instead of a panoramic, hits-laden, cradleto-grave approach (think The Doors), Ridley confined his soundtrack and script to Hendrix’s pre-fame period of 1966–67, leading up the Monterey Pop Festival. “With this story,” he says, “we found a way to be honest and true with music. It was a challenge, but it liberated us in some ways. One, because it’s a finite amount of time. It helps to have limits: Even though [Hendrix] only made it to 27, that’s a lot to put into two hours.” What we hear in New York and London is what Hendrix heard during that period: Steve Winwood, the Animals, the Small Faces, etc.— influences that helped him reach beyond the chitlin’ circuit. We first encounter Hendrix playing to a tiny crowd, merely a backup guitarist. “Jimi at 24 years old was basically washed up,”

Ridley says. “He was being put in a corner. So he got into rock and folk a little bit; Bob Dylan was one of his big influences.” Jimi: All Is by My Side essentially chronicles that transition: from New York to London, from R&B to white-boy rock (and traces of the psychedelia to come). It’s an obscure chapter in Hendrix lore, Ridley explains: “I did a piece for NPR about how Linda Keith discovered [Hendrix] in a club in New York City . . . to see if it played, to see if it had resonance, if there was a story here that had not yet been excavated.”

PR O M O T I ONS

Played by English actress Imogen Poots, Keith was in 1966 a model and girlfriend of Keith Richards (briefly, amusingly seen), and Ridley later interviewed her for his 2010 NPR story. Jimi (André Benjamin, of OutKast fame) was then a broke, shy young musician—unsure of his gifts, unwilling to sing, and surprised by Linda’s coaxing and coaching. In short order, she gets him a manager, a ticket to London, and an introduction to Carnaby Street celebrities including Eric Clapton. The Jimi Hendrix Experience trio is formed, and its first few pub dates are encouraging. (We hear them play tunes like “Hound Dog” and “My Heart Is Bleedin’,” with Benjamin singing and effectively mimicking Hendrix’s lefthanded guitar style.) In London, another woman comes into Hendrix’s life, Kathy Etchingham (Hayley Atwell), and their romance is a more volatile affair than his Pygmalion-like connection to Keith. Fans may not like Ridley’s depiction of their hero: somewhat passive and aimless, with sudden turns of temper and a dreamy, evasive quality. This Hendrix is a bit of an antihero, a cipher, and Ridley’s movie pointedly avoids the usual biopic clichés and a-ha! moments. We see the band coalesce, less so the man.

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Ridley describes Keith’s influence on Hendrix as “just do what you’re doing, figure out who you are as a man” and artist. Yet he’s in a crucible, subject to influences both good and bad. “Like

“When he went to London, he was performing as Jimmy James; when he came back, he was Jimi Hendrix.”

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

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a lot of artists, he had a lot of self-doubt,” says Ridley. “You let the wrong people in [to your confidence], and they tell you the wrong things. He passed away before he had a complete understanding of himself. When he went to London, he was performing as Jimmy James; when he came back, he was Jimi Hendrix.” So did Hendrix, in the three years between the period Ridley covers and his death, achieve a more concrete sense of self? “I think to a degree,” says Ridley, who’ll attend SIFF’s opening night. “I think if he had more a sense of himself, he’d be alive right now. He pushed people away who really cared about him, like Linda, like Kathy, like Chas Chandler [his manager]. He was trying to get back together with those people, but the timing was just too late.” E

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Eulogy for the Clown The Funhouse gives way to gentrification, but a new doc isn’t bitter about it. BY GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

The Funhouse before its demolition.

Worsley

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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ocal director Ryan Worsley’s debut documentary chronicles the people, culture, and eventual demise of the legendary punk venue The Funhouse, which closed in 2012. (With its iconic clown on the roof, the bar opened in 2003 on Fifth Avenue North at John Street, near Seattle Center. A seven-story apartment building is now being built on the site.) Worsley’s relationship with The Funhouse began as a patron and grew into something more when she heard it was shutting down. “That was the catalyst,” she explains, yet her film goes beyond the tightknit community that revolved around the club. Razing the Bar also addresses gentrification, always a charged topic in booming Seattle. The Funhouse was a place, she says, where countless bands, performance artists, and other aspiring creative types could find space to gig. “A lot of people say, ‘Gentrification is good, it brings money to an area, it cleans a place up.’ Well, yeah, it does all that. But the thing is, if you want to be creative, or be in the arts, or get started with anything, you’ve got to start at the bottom.” Through interviews with former Funhouse staff, patrons, and bands, Worsley and her filmmaking team—which includes producer Debbie Porter, previously a Seattle Weekly colleague— relate the bar’s history as a gritty arts incubator. We hear about various bands—including one whose guitar player “peed in a cup, put it in his mouth, and then spit it on the audience”—and learn about the rise of Joetta Velasquez, a former homeless runaway who booked talent for Funhouse co-owner Brian Foss; today she’s a senior producer at Austin City Limits. Foss, host of Sonic Reducer Sundays on KEPX and a magnetic character within the Seattle music scene, is a prominent figure in the film— something Worsley hadn’t anticipated, but which became key to the project’s completion. “I’d tried to start other projects before,” she says, “but with documentaries, you can’t plan the outcome. My other projects just didn’t seem to flow right. This one, everything sort of fell into place. There were

all these great stories, and Brian Foss was on board from the beginning.” Worsley describes Foss as “this sort of Zen guy,” and through candid, intimate interviews we see how his golden-rule business ethic kept The Funhouse together for nine years. “I had to really push him to do an interview,” says Worsley. “He doesn’t like to be in the limelight, but he opened up and said exactly what he was thinking.” The resulting portrait, also expressed through photo collages, a rocking soundtrack, and old concert footage (some shot by Worsley herself ), is a poignant commentary on the power of music and the resilience of community—a picture in stark contrast to the relentless development in South Lake Union and its environs. When the Aperture on Fifth apartments are completed later this year on the old Funhouse site, you can bet they’ll be full of Amazon workers with no time to go out late to hear live music. Worsley, who studied film at the Rhode Island School of Design and moved to Seattle in 1998, has considered this issue for some time. Most of the music venues seen in the 1996 grunge documentary Hype!—which she cites as a strong influence—are now also gone. But what of Foss today and his loyal former Funhouse patrons? Now booking shows for the 2 Bit Saloon and the Highline, Foss says in a tender postscript that “My biggest dream was my wife Cyndi. I love the music, I love the booking, and I’ll do it as long as I can, but the most important thing is my wife, and that is my life.” Everyone else will land on their feet, says Chris Chambers of the band Smokejumper, which often played The Funhouse. “As terrible as it is,” he says of the venue’s demise, “it symbolizes how great we are at bouncing back from something. I have no worries about the people involved at The Funhouse bouncing back. We’ll all move forward and we’ll all be successful.” E

gelliott@seattleweekly.com

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Return Engagement How a Northwest native won the Sundance jackpot. BY BRIAN MILLER

entirely on the bruised banter between Maggie and Milo, two damaged adults whose father committed suicide during their childhood and whose mother has fled to the Southwest and New Age spirituality. Reconvening in their New Jersey hometown, where Maggie’s a dental hygienist, she and failed actor Milo consider their alienation from the world. (She’s married to Wilson’s Lance, but treats him like furniture.) How is it that two kids of such promise, once so tight, ended up so mopey and alone? “What the hell happened to us?” asks Maggie. The situation and sibling dynamic puts you in mind of You Can Count on Me and The Savages, if rendered in a more self-consciously sardonic key. Maggie and Milo are two drama queens who—if they deserve no one else—certainly deserve each other. Johnson wanted the tenor of his film to be “humor in the face of darkness,” he says, to build on the rapport of his stars to sell a small story that the studios deemed “a little too weird.” To offset that story’s underlying sadness, Johnson says it’s “riffing on this relationship that exists in the public’s mind. [Bill and Kristen] are very close friends in real life, very much a kind of brother/sister relationship.” Though Hader and Wiig won’t be attending SIFF with Johnson, who’ll do a Q&A on Friday, they were both at Sundance with him to share in the buzz for Skeleton Twins (expected for latesummer release). He’s grateful for Hader—“This was his first lead role, and he just plunged in”— but especially for Wiig, who after Bridesmaids can headline most any comedy she wants. (Fun SIFF fact: Her voice can also be heard in How to Train Your Dragon 2.) “When Kristen stepped in,” says Johnson, “I felt like this might really happen. There’s so much fear in this business. It costs so much money, and movie stars are your insurance.” Still, like any good indie director, he admits of Hader and Wiig, “They got paid nothing.” E

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to the star-filled parties in Park City, Utah? “I was a theater kid,” says Johnson of his youth, when he acted alongside Hilary Swank (who soonafter decamped for L.A.). “I was a total drama jock at Sehome High School, and I was a theater major at the UW.” At the same time, encouraged by his mother (who turned him on to My Life as a Dog and The Piano), Johnson’s filmgoing habit picked up steam in Seattle. “I became a huge film nerd, and I credit Seattle for some of that,” he recalls. “SIFF was a huge part of it.” Getting a student pass for the festival, “I’d see all those weird-ass movies.” Still, after bumming around the fringe-theater scene at Open Circle and Empty Space during the early ’00s, even doing sketch comedy, “I had a sort of mid-20s crisis,” Johnson explains. Watching movies wasn’t enough. “I had to go to film school. It was a complete transition. And it cost a shit-ton of money.” Good-bye, Seattle; hello, student loans. At NYU, he and Mark Heyman (later the writer of Black Swan) began developing The

Indeed, the film depends

SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

So how did a humble guy from Bellingham get

Skeleton Twins, Johnson explains. The mood was “something emo and resonant,” inspired by a student/teacher sexual relationship, but the project was shelved before Johnson shot True Adolescents—“technically my thesis film for film school.” When he and Heyman returned to the script years later, it was revamped to emphasize the two adult siblings, years after the incident in question. “I call it a non-romantic love story,” says Johnson of the rapprochement between Maggie (Wiig) and Milo (Hader). “It was really important to me to capture the ways brothers and sisters interact.”

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W

e’re sitting in the lobby of a U District hotel, coffees in hand, staring at the morning rain in late January. And Craig Johnson couldn’t be happier to be back home in the drizzly Northwest, he tells me. Raised in Bellingham, with his undergraduate degree from the UW, the director is fresh off the high of two packed screenings of The Skeleton Twins at the nearby Sundance Cinemas—this after the just-concluded Sundance Film Festival, where his sibling dramedy picked up a screenwriting prize and distribution deal. He doesn’t need the coffee; he’s already buzzed enough with success. “I’m still sort of digesting and readjusting to it,” he says. “It was that Sundance fairy tale. Sundance looms in the head of the indie filmmaker as this ShangriLa. It was all very overwhelming.” But a good kind of overwhelming. Now based in L.A., Johnson has been scrapping his way in indieland since film school at NYU. His locally shot, Mark Duplass– starring debut feature, True Adolescents, played SIFF ’09 but wasn’t widely seen. (You can find it at Scarecrow and via Netflix.) Things will be different—already are different—with The Skeleton Twins, in which SNL alumni Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader play morose, sarcastic siblings who reconnect after a 10-year estrangement. No offense to Duplass (one of this film’s producers), but this time around Johnson has two recognizable stars who are playing against comic type. (And look, there’s Luke Wilson in a supporting role!) “We really pitched people as, ‘This is a drama,’ ” says Johnson, who simply hopes of the film “that it resonate emotionally with people.” There are laughs in it, but more in the sense of laughing-against-despair.


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food&drink Tasty and Twee

BY MEGAN HILL

The London Plane is a Wes Anderson film for the palate; its fussy pretention is a refreshing change for Pioneer Square. BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

G

PHOTOS BY NICHOLE SPRINKLE

The colorful prepping at The London Plane.

potatoes with turmeric and mustard-seed oil (that lovely dish I first spied from overhead). The salads come out all on one plate, which isn’t quite ideal. They begin to blur in your brain as well as on the plate, their various spices, sauces, and colors commingling a little too much. I have to serve myself each one carefully, keeping track of which I’m eating. The raw beets are my favorite; not only are the pink, thinly sliced discs pretty, but they’re crunchy and have a subtly bitter after-note (sort of like a radicchio) that takes nicely to the sweet fennel. The sprouting brassicas taste just as you’d expect a green in the mustard family to taste, and the potatoes add heft, helping smooth out and soak up the delicious but astringent turmeric and mustard-seed oil it’s dressed in. The in-season asparagus, according to my friend, is “perfectly tender with a buttery bite and zing of citrus”— not like the reedier stalks she’s had recently. From the large salad menu, a chicken, trofie (a thin, twisted pasta similar to orzo), and lentil salad with stinging nettles, walnuts, and feta tasted essentially like a pesto pasta salad. It was pleasant—perhaps a little too mild on its own— but a nice respite from the bold flavors of our other salads. The chicken, however, was dry—and the mere two pieces of it that I could find felt like an afterthought. From the Meat & Seafood section, I opted for the sliced leg of lamb with tzatziki, and was

disappointed when it arrived cold (the menu gave no mention of its temperature). Though the thin slices were perfectly rare and the tzatziki bite-y as it should be, I’m no fan of cold or room-temperature meat unless it’s Italian charcuterie or wedged in a sandwich. Plus, I simply craved something warm. And therein lies this restaurant’s main problem: While the cold dishes are delightful, one after another of them can become dreary. There’s a reason why, when you watch the beautiful plating happening in the kitchen, there’s virtually nothing going on atop the stove—just a pot of carrots boiling, probably being prepped for the carrot raita or the honey-roasted carrots with chard leaves and stems—both cold. (There are a couple of hot soups, and the meatballs fortunately come warm.) Dillon has clearly opted to make the menu a pre-prep one, so don’t come expecting comfort. In that sense, the soaring, minimalist space with its precious products mimics the food—it’s all very clean and fresh. And descriptions like “our yogurt made from beautiful local whole milk” and “crème fraîche made from beautiful local cream” are overly quaint and give no real information; we’re supposed to just trust that it’s from the best, most sustainability-conscious farms. In keeping with the place’s twee craft/mercantile theme, there’s a “cold larder” where you can buy those items—as well as their whole-grain mustard and preserved lemons to go. But The London Plane’s limitations are also

its appeal. In a food culture that currently celebrates braised meats, offal, decadent brunches of hash and eggs, and desserts of fried dough, The London Plane is a palate-cleanser. Of course many restaurants in Seattle strive to bring beautiful produce to their menus, but none at this level. And, smartly, Dillon reserves the tightly curated menu for lunch: a perfect time to choose a healthier, cleaner, colder meal, along with perhaps a crisp glass of vinho verde (there

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

Interbay is getting a brewery! Holy Mountain is currently in the construction stage at 1421 Elliott Ave. W., a project three years in the making. Owners Adam Paysse, Colin Lenfesty, and Mike Murphy are planning to stray a bit from the typical Northwestmicrobrewery lineup, with lots of seasonal beers, saisons, and a significant sour program. Distribution is planned to begin at the end of July, and the taproom should be open in August. The guys behind Seattle’s beloved Kraken Congee pop-up will be on CNBC’s Restaurant Kickstart this summer as they try to sell their food concept to investors/restaurateurs Joe Bastianich and Tim Love. Will Kraken get the money they want to start a real restaurant? Seattle’s nominees came up empty in last week’s James Beard Awards ceremony, but Washington state netted a win thanks to Willows Inn chef Blaine Wetzel, who tied for the Rising Star Chef of the Year accolade, awarded to chefs under 30. North Seattleites have a new watering hole: Lantern Brewing opened last week at 95th and Aurora. The brewery began as a nano back in 2011, selling beer at the Phinney Farmers Market before going brick-and-mortar. Their tasting room is open Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays 5 to 9 p.m. E morningfoodnews@gmail.com

TheDish

Roasted Tomato Soup With Rosemary BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

I spent this Mother’s Day on Vashon Island with my daughter and my mom. Rather than frantically looking for a reservation for one of the many prix fixe menus in the city, we opted for the laid-back ambience of Snapdragon Bakery & Café with its tasty vegetarian menu and decadent baked goods—and a seat in their outdoor garden courtyard. While they had many delicious egg dishes and rhubarb-stuffed French toast on the menu, I decided to try their roasted tomato soup with rosemary. Even though it was a beautiful sunny day, the still-crisp air made soup a compelling option. I loved its texture: slightly chunky, so that some spoonfuls were smooth on the tongue and others had juicy pieces of tomato. The addition of rosemary gave it just the right dose of spring—evident but not overpowering, as rosemary can be. The soft hunks of whole-wheat bread served on the side were perfect for dipping into the sweet, tangy soup. Extra perk: We came home with a delicious chocolate-chip bundt cake for dessert later. E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

rass-green veggies and potatoes lie in an almost fluorescent yellow pool of turmeric-mustard-seed oil. A perfect oval of a just-pitted avocado sits expectantly on a spoon. Something fuchsia, which looks from above like watermelon radish, is plucked and tossed into a bowl of white beans. Big orange carrots, the kind Bugs Bunny gnaws on, fill a large bin. Into another, a bag of pale yellow parsnips are poured. The entire table is covered with small plastic containers filled with herbs and spices that seem to include almost every hue in the Pantone color chart. It looks as if a CSA cherry-picked all its very best produce, then a food stylist came in and prepared it for a layout in a Martha Stewart Living spread. What I’m looking at, in fact, is the preparation of the lunch menu at Matt Dillon’s The London Plane—now ensconced in its real home on the southeast corner of Occidental Avenue and South Main Street (moved from the intersection’s southwest corner, where The Little London Plane, its sister wine bar, now lives). I’m sitting on the second floor of the large, lofty space, with a wonderful bird’s-eye view of the staff plating the salads, soups, and spreads that are the mainstay of this restaurant, which quadruples as a larder, floral shop, and precious boutique. It’s bona fide herbivore eye candy. But while the menu is indeed overwhelmingly vegetarian— there are usually about four meat and seafood options, like leg of lamb, meatballs, boquerones, and King salmon lox—Dillon’s restaurant doesn’t really cater to the meat-free crowd per se. Vegetarians will certainly find lots to love here, but the food is really intended for anyone who enjoys the freshest, most exotic produce and grains—all punched up with Middle Eastern and Mediterranean spices and vinaigrettes, served in a space filled with beautiful glassware, quaint napkins, tiny jars of jam, cookbooks, vials of sea salt, and freshly cut seasonal flowers—all of it for sale. The menu is designed for sampling a lot of things—hence their option of three small salads for $12.50 or three large ones for $16. Hint: The “small” salads are medium-sized, so two people can easily share three along with some dips and a larger salad. You’ll also want an order of their naturally leavened sourdough bread with herb butter, or a larger sampler that includes a variety of breads—like the sourdough, a cumin papadum, and rustic crackers. It’s necessary for the spreads. On my third visit I bring a vegetarian colleague, and we order the parsnip hummus with harissa oil, a sweeter, milder version of traditional chickpea hummus. (The carrot raita with cumin and mint isn’t on today’s menu, unfortunately; I love its bombastic tang.) It’s tough choosing our three small salads, but we go with roasted asparagus and spring onions with pistachio and mint; raw beets, fennel, and radishes with ginger, lime, and cilantro; and sprouting brassicas and

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food&drink» The London Plane » FROM PAGE 31 are usually two white pours and a red or two) or a housemade soda, like Meyer lemon or the lovage-infused one I had—like a sweet glass of salad, in a good way. The outlier is the dessert menu, which offers an expansive choice of decadent options ranging from rhubarb-crisp galette and cardamom cake to gâteau Basque or a variety of tartlets, like lemon and chocolate caramel. And while this lineup may feel like an odd juxtaposition with the rest of the menu, it’s actually quite logical: These also can all be made ahead of time. Surprisingly, or maybe not, our chocolate tart—with buttery caramel, a rich, flaky crust, and glossy semisweet chocolate, sprinkled with sea salt— came with only the option of drip coffee to enjoy

it with: austerity again winning out over cozier lattes or liqueurs. But ultimately I like The London Plane. Only maybe once a month. And maybe only on, say, a Wednesday, and a sunny one at that. It’s a place to meet that friend who devotedly shops at Anthropologie, religiously reads magazines like Dwell, and sees every Wes Anderson movie the moment it hits theaters. It’s a style-conscious food island that, despite its pretentions, delivers some seriously good eats in a part of Pioneer Square that’s still heavy on gyro stands and sandwich shops. E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

THE LONDON PLANE 300 Occidental Ave. S., 624-1374, thelondonplaneseattle.com. Lunch, 11:30 a.m.– 3 p.m. weekdays; brunch, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. weekends.

CITIZEN FOOD

Emily Johnson’s Handmade Miniature Cookbooks BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

Store Hours: Mon-Fri 10-8, Sat 10-6 7710 SE 34th St. Mercer Island | 206-275-7760 | www.miyfs.org

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n one of the early books, I forgot to include a very important ingredient in my mac ’n’ cheese—the cheese!” says Seattle graphic designer Emily Johnson, laughing about the charming little 5˝-by-7˝ cookbooks she designs and produces. At least it was a friend who broke the news to her. The art director for locally based Parent Map magazine, Johnson is also a great cook who loves to entertain and has grown a cult following of friends and neighbors who feast on her creations. After consistently receiving requests for her recipes, she decided to marry her design expertise with her passion for cooking. Hedgehog FOOD: Favorite Family Recipes is the result. Johnson has designed and produced these colorful mini-cookbooks for a decade, and the current iteration includes 19 recipes—like her time-tested “Mexi-chili bake” and newer additions like her “onion naan” with “cilantroyogurt dipping sauce.” “I’ve only been making the naan for over a year. I work with highgluten flour for better texture. I usually go to Cash & Carry and get way too much flour,” she says with a chuckle. The format of her cookbooks has changed through the years. “They started out even smaller, and were kind of hard to read. I just stapled them together and had a little plastic stand you could put it up on while you were cooking.” She’s since moved to a “larger” version with spiral binding. The cookbooks were first distributed at a craft sale in her Ravenna neighborhood, where about 10 people sell homemade items from knitted scarves to pottery. She also gives them to friends, sometimes as holiday gifts, and takes them on vacations so she always has her recipes on hand. New recipes are added with each edition, and

Johnson worries that “they just keep getting bigger.” She asks me: “Do you think I should do themed ones?” I tell her that could be fun, and she says that she’d love to do a soup collection for her nearly 90-year-old mother who loves soup. Along with her originals and some modifications to traditionals, a lot of the recipes were born from experiments cooking for her children when they were younger and from family recipes, like “Aunt Mary’s blueberry muffin cake” (another fan favorite and one of the oldest), the “molasses crinkles,” and the “orangesoaked pound cake” which she mails to her brother and mom each Christmas. She’s cooked many of the dishes at the dinner parties she loves to throw and at an annual Sunday-night summer potluck on the sidewalks of her neighborhood. But back to that mac ’n’ cheese incident: Testing the recipes is something Johnson confesses she’s not always vigilant about, though with baking she’s more careful. Her goal is to start testing more rigorously. Made correctly, the mac ’n’ cheese, with its ground nutmeg, cayenne pepper, and mix of Cheddar and pecorino Romano, sounds very enticing. As I flip through the cookbook, I’m anxious to try some recipes, like the buttermilk-garlic slaw with smoky paprika and the “minestrone-ish soup”—the “ish” comes from the less-traditional addition of chicken and sausage. While Johnson is enthusiastic about them all, it always comes back to the Mexi-chili bake. Her people just can’t get enough of it—even though, she says, “they don’t realize that most of it comes from a can!” E Citizen Food features willful adventurers in food culture—who typically have a day job outside a kitchen. Know someone who fits that bill? If so, send info to nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com.


W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

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ost of us have been there: sitting alone at the bar, nursing a drink and quite possibly some heartache, when you happen to spy someone across the counter who immediately grabs your attention. After a quick reconnaissance to figure out if she or he’s alone, you get the brilliant idea to buy the person a drink to signal your interest. It’s a risky play, but one that can definitely be worth making. With a bit of guidance, it might even work out for you! We bartenders have seen BY ZACH GEBALLE it all: spectacular failure, glorious success, and everything in between. So while we’re generally happy to help, here’s some advice to make sure you don’t end up with that drink thrown in your face. First and foremost, think about what kind of drink you’re going to offer. Your safest bet is whatever they were drinking before. If you’re

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enlisting the bartender’s aid, then definitely make sure to be polite. Be up-front: “I’d like to buy that person a drink—what have they been having?” Of course in a super-busy bar, there’s no guarantee the bartender will remember, but it’s a good place to start. I also strongly discourage making assumptions based on the (apparent) gender of the target of your affection. Buying a man a whiskey drink or a woman a sweet, fruity one can be a really good way to offend someone before you have the chance to actually talk to them. It’s a bad idea to make any assumptions about what a given individual might want to drink based only on their gender or appearance, as personal tastes vary much more than you might think. Beyond avoiding gender stereotypes, be aware of the message you’ll send by your choice of drink. Shots are risky, because they carry the not-very-subtle subtext of “I’d like to get you drunk enough that you’ll make a possibly poor choice later this evening.” Especially shots of tequila. A beer is safe, but also boring. My suggestion is a glass of Champagne or similar sparkling wine: It’s classy, nearly everyone likes it, and you look sophisticated. Unless you’re in the kind of bar where no sane person would drink wine, in which case you’re on your own. Lastly, it really helps to have the bartender on your side. They’re the one who’ll deliver the drink, and you want them to sell you. As always, being considerate helps, as does recognizing when the bar is packed and the moment might not be ideal. Also, ask the bartender’s opinion. They might prevent an awkward situation, like asking to send a drink to the person he or she happens to be sleeping with. Now that was an interesting conversation. E

®

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arts&culture Superhero Strangled by Corporate Cape!!!

THURSDAY, MAY 15

Whim W’him

Olivier Wevers continues to experiment with movement so slippery you need rubber gloves to catch it. For this mixed-repertory show, he’s invited back choreographers Andrew Bartee and Annabelle Lopez Ochoa to make new works, as well as inviting himself to do the same. Bartee is soon to leave Pacific Northwest Ballet for Vancouver’s Ballet BC (and a wider berth for freelance choreography), and Ochoa is on a major roll, with national recognition for her work. This fifth-anniversary year, Wevers is putting the company dancers on contract and adding another week to its usual run—two more big steps for a group that excels at fancy footwork. (Through May 23.)

How did Amazon so quickly manage to ruin its most recent purchase? Comic-book fans demand an answer—and suspect a conspiracy. BY MARK RAHNER

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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Erickson Theater Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., whimwhim.org. $50 (opening night); $15–$25. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ FRIDAY, MAY 16

Bottle Rocket/Fantastic Mr. Fox

Human: Where can I buy your comics? Me: Any comic shop.

(Human: Blank stare. Never setting foot in one of those. Won’t even look one up. Fading.) Me: You can also get them on comiXology. Human: What’s that? (Human’s eyes roll up to the whites as I explain the rest and how to do it, and I have to plunge an adrenaline needle directly into the heart.) But now everyone—this is in the voice of Gary Oldman shouting in The Professional— EEEEEEVERYONE! immediately understands this one big thing: You can get ’em on Amazon! So I was optimistic. But then they pulled the trigger. On April 27, comic-book luminary Gerry Conway—co-creator of The Punisher, among others—wrote a viral column that began, “And so, as we could have predicted, Amazon wrecks comiXology.” By removing the old storefront from its app and adding extra steps to get to the material, Conway argued, Amazon “destroys the casual reader’s easy access to an impulse purchase. And that’s a terrible development for the future of comics.” As of this writing, comiXology has a rating of one star out of five on Apple’s App Store. A

representative sampling of user-review titles includes “Very disappointed,” “Lost another customer,” “Worst product decision ever,” and—perhaps also meant to be shrieked like Gary Oldman—“Why?!?” A couple days later, writer Mark Waid—one of the industry’s sharpest and most levelheaded—wrote in his Thrillbent.com blog, “Man, I wouldn’t want to be comiXology this week.” Why did Amazon make a move guaranteed to anger fans? What’s its response to the outrage? And what’s its plan for comiXology? Now under Amazon’s umbrella, comiXology’s longtime spokesman Chip Mosher declined to comment, instead sending a TechHive article that quotes him thusly: “Amazon has a long history with subsidiaries like Goodreads, Zappos, Audible, and IMDb, of helping them grow and, over time, learning from each other and improving together.” An Amazon PR rep asked me to submit questions in writing— which tends to raise a journalist’s hackles— and issued the following statement instead of answering any of them. “Amazon and comiXology share a passion for making comics and graphic novels easy to enjoy anywhere and on any device. ComiXology reinvented the digital comics experience

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

COLUMBIA PICTURES

The Grand Budapest Hotel has been playing for two months now, and nationally the film has earned north of $50 million. Spider-Man and Godzilla might sneeze at such paltry, non-3D sums, but these days Wes Anderson is actually a hit filmmaker. Moonrise Kingdom remains my favorite among his oeuvre, but here’s a chance to revisit two of his signature works. The first, Bottle

BRENNAN MORING

t seemed like a good idea last month, at least to me: Amazon buying comiXology. Launched in 2009, the privately backed, New York–based service was instantly popular. Its cloud-based digital platform made it easy to buy and read comics on digital devices. I’m pretty sure geeks thought the iPad and other tablets were invented to read comics from comiXology. It was the top-grossing non-game iPad app in 2012 and 2013, and had been among the top-10-grossing iPad apps in 2011 and 2012. Its “Guided Viewing” technology even made it tolerable to read on little smartphone screens. But for comic-book fans—and some prominent pros—the ownership transition has been the equivalent of the Obamacare site’s rollout. Amazon’s first and widely loathed move: getting rid of comiXology’s ability to make in-app comic purchases. That is, they made it harder to buy comics using the world’s most popular fucking comic app. Let’s try some metaphors here. Has Seattle’s online retailing giant become a Galactus in its rapaciousness, ruining what it devours? Or is it really Batman, with a brilliant plan to kick ass that isn’t apparent yet? Or did it just crap the bed? (Save your time looking. There’s no Incontinence Man.) It’s too early to say. The sale’s April 10 announcement got everyone in the business speculating, and I was no different. (I’m a comic-book writer with titles on comiXology, but I’ve never made a penny off ’em, so delete your conflict-of-interest drafts.) And let it be said that I like Amazon . . . er, at least I use it. Because I’m cheap and I’m lazy, and I just used Amazon Prime to have discounted razor blades delivered to my front door. I waited to shave until they arrived. I’m conflicted about what I’ve read about the working conditions in Amazon’s Seattle-office warehouses and how the company treats its employees. I also remember enjoying spending time in those nearly extinct things that were known as “bookstores.” Moreover, as a comics author who isn’t a household name with anyone but the studentloan people, I have to consider how Amazon’s absorption of comiXology might be a great way to reach non-geeks interested in comics, to expand the market—particularly since they’ve become the source of all pop culture, most big movies, and an unknown but significant quantity of tattoo art. This is how it used to go for me in a typical conversation at a comic con, party, bar, etc.:

ThisWeek’s PickList

Rocket, was developed from a 1994 short film—also starring Owen and Luke Wilson—that Anderson expanded at the Sundance Labs. Two years later, the lighthearted caper became a darling on the indie and festival circuit, but you wouldn’t have expected Anderson to enter studio-land like, say, Steven Soderbergh. His vision seemed a little twee, a little precious; and maybe we filmgoers liked him all the more because he’d never escape the gravity of our small adoration. Then Bill Murray deigned to do Rushmore, becoming Anderson’s patron (saint) in the process, and that got his foot in the Hollywood door. And that brings us to Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009), by which time Anderson was playing with the big boys (well, big voices) in adapting Roald Dahl’s children’s tale via stop-motion animation: Murray, Streep, Clooney . . . plus company players Jason Schwartzman and Willem Dafoe. (Anderson himself plays Weasel.) You’ll see echoes of both films in Grand Budapest: the art heist that turns Luke (left) and Owen Wilson in Bottle Rocket.


out not to matter very much; the haltingly animated ski-toboggan pursuit through the patently artificial little forest; and the pervasive sense of chasing memories and dreams even while knowing they can never be grasped. (Through Tues.) Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com. $6–$8. 7 & 9:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Bike to Work Day

cascade.org for a full schedule of activities and map of commuter stations. BRIAN MILLER

Monterey Pop

movie than the three-hour Woodstock, more concise and focused (it runs only 78 minutes), and the soundtrack has been newly restored, so it should sound even better than before. (Through Thurs.)

Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org., $5–$7. 7 & 8:45 p.m.

25 & UNDER? ALWAYS PAY $12

BRIAN MILLER

MONDAY, MAY 19

UW Modern Music Ensemble

Unlike most high-minded high modernism, it’s not its aggressiveness but its reticence that’s made the music of Anton von Webern a tough nut to crack. First of all, his preference for generic titles—Symphony, Concerto, Three Songs, Six Pieces—don’t offer a listener much of a way in. He’s also decidedly antiromantic in his pointillist avoidance of long melodic lines (at least in his instrumental writing): In the first movement of his eightminute Quartet, op. 22 (1930), everyone plays just two- and three-note nanophrases that tumble around one another like the shards of glass in a kaleidoscope. The second movement, in which the violin, piano, clarinet, and saxophone sometimes play as many as six or even more pitches in a row, sounds positively lush in comparison. (But even in this ascetic music, the sax can’t quite escape its jazz connotations: Bits of the Quartet remind me of a swank, smoky nightclub combo, only with 95 percent of the notes removed.) Morton Feldman’s music takes the idea of making a lot out of a little even further; in pieces like False Relationships and the Extended Ending (1968) for violin, cello, trombone, three pianos, and chimes, he replaces Webern’s cubist angularity with hushed, shimmering mystery. And with its fairy-tale scoring—piccolo, glockenspiel, and celesta—Franco Donatoni’s 1987 Ave starts out blithely, but begins to echo and fold in on itself; imagine a Hans Christian Andersen story made up only of the sentences in the first paragraph, repeated and recombined, with words here and there being surreally twisted in the process. All three pieces will be performed tonight by the UW Modern Music Ensemble, alongside compositions by UW students Jeff Bowen and Anna Stachurska. Meany Hall,

UW campus, 543-4880, music.washington.edu. $12–$20. 7:30 p.m. GAVIN BORCHERT

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seattlerep.org 206-443-2222

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R. Hamilton Wright, Aaron Blakely, Amy Hill, and Pamela Reed. Photo by Andry Laurence.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

If you didn’t feel like paying the premium and braving the lines to see the SIFF-opening Jimi: All Is by My Side last night, tonight you can watch Hendrix break big at the 1967 Monterey Pop festival. The former film is set during the prior year, as the obscure guitarist tries to forge a new musical identity in London; it’s a prelude, if you will, to what we see in D.A. Pennebaker’s 1968 concert doc. During the three-day fest, Hendrix mixed with proven luminaries like Simon and Garfunkel, The Mamas & the Papas, Jefferson Airplane, and The Who. Also securing their reputations at Monterey would be Janis Joplin and Otis Redding, but it was Hendrix, then basically unknown in the U.S., who rose fastest and highest. His performance of nine songs, including “Purple Haze,” “Foxy Lady,” and “Wild Thing”—famously concluding with his guitar in flames—instantly made him a star, put his poster on a million dorm-room walls, and got him invited to Woodstock. Three years later, he was dead. For my money, Monterey Pop is a better

Hendrix at Monterey.

CRITERION COLLECTION

Mayor Murray just announced that a separate, protected bike lane will be installed on Downtown’s Second Avenue (as opposed to the present painted Left Lane of Death); the Broadway Bikeway is nearly complete; and Seattle’s first bike-share program is set to launch this fall. So there’s plenty to celebrate today, especially for those regular pedalers who’ll pass through dozens of Puget Sound commuter stations where freebies will be dispensed. (Mine’s on the West Thomas Street overpass that links LQA to the waterfront; can’t beat the view.) I suspect the two highest concentrations of velocipedal smugness will be Dexter-at-Mercer and the ferry terminal. But lest we two-wheelers be too proud of ourselves, too besotted with our lowcarbon-footprint superiority, a word about red lights: Yes, they apply to us, too. And as summer approaches and dawdling tourists abound, slow the fuck down and give polite warning when you pass pedestrians. You’re not riding the Giro, so show some manners. Today a morning rally from the Fremont Bridge (at 7:30 a.m.) to KEXP is planned; and for those who later care to roll through SLU (mind the trolly tracks!), there’s an official after-party at Sixth and Blanchard from 4:30–6:30 p.m. On offer will be music from KEXP’s Greg Vandy and food and drinks from Tom Douglas. The latter event’s sponsored by the relocated Velo Bike Shop (so long, Cap Hill!), where I recommend you buy some of those USB-rechargeable blinky lights. They are, after the West Thomas Street bridge, the best thing that’s happened to my Schwinn since I rescued it from a blackberry patch. See

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arts&culture»

filtering the best of THE NORTHWEST!

» FROM PAGE 34 with Guided View technology and Amazon reinvented reading with Kindle, and together we’ll continue to innovate on behalf of readers, publishers, writers, and artists. Our goal is to build on each other’s strengths and create the best service for all comic and graphic novel readers on any platform with comics content for every age, gender and demographic.” (Facepalm.) Conway speculated in his column that Ama-

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“All we have, each one of us, is our story.”

May 15–Jun 15

Buy tickets today or see it with an ACTPass!

(206) 292-7676•acttheatre.org

© Ian Johnston

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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zon made the purchase to better the comic experience on its own Kindle and screw over Apple’s iPad and iPhone. He also predicted mainstream publishers such as Dark Horse will keep their own apps with storefronts while the independents—and diversity—suffer. Waid wrote, “If you don’t think Amazon’s comiXology acquisition was their first step towards building some Kindle-like comicsreading hardware to replace brick-and-mortar stores, you’re nuts . . . Talk to me in a couple of years when [print comics are] all $4.99, but Amazon’s selling downloads for half that and swallowing the margin loss in order to sell hardware.” Lacey-based writer Eric Trautmann (cowriter with Brandon Jerwa of the digital comiXology exclusive Frost) says,“I think adding extra barriers between oneself and the customer is kind of . . . stupid? Yeah, that’s the word.” Echoing Conway and Waid, he adds, “People will go find the thing they know they want, and won’t have a lot of incentive to poke around and find new things. I think that’s the biggest shortcoming.’ Writing for widely read comic-industry blog The Beat, Rob Salkowitz said fans should calm down—but “retailers should probably start to panic.” He suggested giving Amazon the benefit of the doubt, as they “know a thing or two about selling stuff,” is rarely accused of stupidity, and is “probably the most data-driven company in the world.” But comiXology sells only digital comics, while brick-and-mortar comic-book shops also attract customers with T-shirts, toys, and other merchandise. Now Amazon . . . well, it sells everything, including merchandise, and it knows what you like and might like, Salkowitz wrote. In Wallingford, The Comics Dungeon’s G. Scott Tomlin tells me, “ComiXology up to this point has had minor impact on my business. I was not too worried yet, as by themselves they did not have the muscle to move the market in a fast way. Being part of Amazon changes that greatly. “Overall, as a comic-book retailer, it’s definitely time to rethink our business model for the new age,” he continues. “Hopefully we have enough time to do that before Amazon and comiXology hit full steam.” So is Amazon’s Jeff Bezos the supervillain who spells the doom of comics? Or does he represent a necessary, painful mutation that will advance them out of pulp and ink and into the digital future? One thing’s for sure: I guess I need to buy a goddamn Kindle. And maybe a second certainty for me: more blank states and whitened eyes. E

markrahner.com

Stage B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

OPENINGS & EVENTS

ARCADIA Tom Stoppard’s dense history play is revived.

Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 524-1300. $10–$30. Preview May 15, opens May 16. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see seattlepublictheater.org for exact schedule. Ends June 8. DIANA OF DOBSON’S Cicely Hamilton’s 1908 English comedy about a class-jumping young heroine during the Edwardian period. Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 7819707, taproottheatre.org. $15–$40. Previews May 14–15, opens May 16. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends June 14. DON JUAN IN CHICAGO Arouet presents David Ives’ play about the classic womanizer, updated. The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., 800-838-3006, arouet. us. $12–$20. Opens May 16. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus 7:30 p.m. Tues., May 20 and 2 p.m. Sun., May 18. Ends May 31. FAMILY AFFAIR Jennifer Jasper’s “sick, hilarious, and ultimately relatable” monthly cabaret on the theme of family. JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., jenniferjasper performs.com. $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 21. FUNNY GIRL Jule Styne’s memorable score relates the life of vaudeville legend Fanny Brice. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202. $30–$65. Opens May 15. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see villagetheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends July 6. (Runs in Everett July 11–Aug. 3.) GIGI Lerner & Loewe’s frothy Parisian fantasy, in concert. 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900, 5th avenue.org. $33.75 and up. 8 p.m. Fri., May 16, 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., May 17, 1:30 p.m. Sun., May 18. THE GRIMALDIS: A MUSICAL GHOST STORY “An audience-immersion party/theatre event . . . a unique mix of burlesque, cabaret, circus, improv, and musical theatre.” Plus ghosts! And hors d’oeuvres! Hale’s Palladium, 4301 Leary Way N.W., 800-838-3006, thegrimaldisaredead. com. $35–$45. Opens May 16. 7 p.m. Thurs., Fri., & Sun., 2 & 7 p.m. Sat. Ends May 25. HEDGEBROOK WOMEN PLAYWRIGHTS’ FESTIVAL

New work by Mia Chung, Alexa Junge, Evangeline Ordaz, and Tracey Scott Wilson. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676, acttheatre.org. 7:30 p.m. Mon., May 19. KAZOKU! In this improv game-show spoof, actual audience members get to play. Pershing Hall, 3618 S.W. Alaska St., 800-838-3006, kazoku.brownpapertickets.com. $10. Opens May 16. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends May 24. TERRE HAUTE Edmund White’s prison drama, based on the actual letters between Gore Vidal and domestic terrorist Timothy McVeigh. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $15–$25. Preview May 15, opens May 16. Runs Thurs.– Sat., plus Sun. starting June 1, plus Mon., June 9; see acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends June 15. 25,000 POSTS Jim Lapan’s solo show explores what exactly constitutes “the American dream” these days. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., 800-838-3006, jameslapan. com. $20. Opens May 16. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun., plus 8 p.m. Thurs., May 29. Ends May 31.

CURRENT RUNS

CHAOS THEORY In Courtney Meaker’s new absurdist tragi-

comedy, the audience is dropped into the living room of Frannie (Keiko Green) as she’s coping with the loss of her lover. She and her quirky friends, male-identifying Bach (Evelyn Dehais) and dim-witted Seth (Drew Highlands), build what seems to be an alternate-reality machine; all three have their motives for using it. IRFAN SHARIFF Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre. org. $5–$20. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends May 17. CONTROL Strawberry Theatre Workshop takes on the gun issue in a “living newspaper” production. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., strawshop.org. $10–$15.7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 1 p.m. Sun. Ends May 18. CREEPS In David Freeman’s 1972 play, five men with cerebral palsy in a men’s room talk frankly about their lives. Seattle Subversive Theatre is staging this in, yes, an actual men’s room. The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., seattlesubversivetheatre.org. $25. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends May 31. END DAYS In Deborah Zoe Laufer’s comedy, “16-yearold Rachel Stein is having a bad year. Her father won’t get dressed, her mother is newly born again, her Elvis impersonator neighbor has fallen for her, and Jesus has moved in with the family. Plus the Apocalypse is coming Wednesday. Her only hope is Stephen Hawking will save the day.” Burien Little Theater, S.W. 146th St. & Fourth Ave. S.W., Des Moines, 242-5180, burienactorstheatre.org. $7–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends June 1. HAIR The smash ’60s musical is full of hippie goodness and song. ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., 938-0339, arts west.org. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. Ends June 7.


KEELY AND DU The abortion wars are dramatized in Jane

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Dance

UW MFA DANCE CONCERT A showcase of original cho-

reography. Meany Studio Theater, UW campus, 543-4880, dance.washington.edu. $10–$16, 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14–Sat., May 17; 2 p.m. Sun., May 18. SPECTRUM DANCE THEATER New work by Donald Byrd set to American string quartets, played live by musicians from Simple Measures. At Fremont Abbey Arts Center, 4272 Fremont Ave. N., 8 p.m. Thurs., May 15–Fri., May 16 & 1 p.m. Sat., May 17. At Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., 8 p.m. Thurs., May 22–Sat., May 24. $25. spectrumdance.org. WHIM W’HIM SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 34.

Classical, Etc. vexing problem in staging • SEATTLE OPERA TheThemost Tales of Hoffmann, based on

Jacques Offenbach’s three short stories by German fantasist E.T.A. Hoffmann, is how to cast it. The three tales, plus the framing prologue/ epilogue, parallel one another; each includes a heroine, a nemesis, and a servant role, and it can be effective to cast one singer in each slot. Seattle Opera did. Norah Amsellem (and Leah Partridge in the alternate cast, May 16) sings all four lost loves, which demand an intimidating range of color and style, from high-flying coloratura to weighty tragedy. The stunning and adored 2005 production is being revived as an opulent farewell for Speight Jenkins, who steps down as SO’s general director in September. GAVIN BORCHERT McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 389-7676, seattleopera.org. $25–$220. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14, Fri., May 16, Sat., May 17. UW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Two serenades by Dvorak. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 6858384, music.washington.edu. $5. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 14. WSU WIND ENSEMBLE Traveling west to play Gershwin. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $13–$21. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., May 15. CLARINET/HARP QUINTET Specifically, three of one and two of the other, gathering for an evening of improv. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., 7891939, waywardmusic.blogspot.com. 8 p.m. Thurs., May 15. SEATTLE SYMPHONY Ludovic Morlot conducts Haydn’s 70th and Mozart’s 36th. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19 and up. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., May 15 & Sat., May 17. NORTHWEST SINFONIETTA Premieres of works by Gordon Chin and Thomas Pasatieri (his Symphony no. 3). Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 866833-4747, nwsinfonietta.org. $27–$55. 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 16. CHORAL ARTS Performing with the Pacifica Chamber Singers and premiering a work by John David Earnest. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 732 18th Ave. E., choral-arts. org. $18–$25. 8 p.m. Fri., May 16. SEATTLE SYMPHONY: UNTITLED Stockhausen’s creepy Gesang der Jünglinge—an electronic collage of children’s voices—and more on the SSO’s final [untitled] concert of the season. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $20. 10 p.m. Fri., May 16. UW OPERA In a collaboration with Pacific MusicWorks, Stephen Stubbs conducts Handel’s Semele. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, music.washington.edu. $20–$40. 7:30 p.m. Fri., May 16–Sat., May 17, 2 p.m. Sun., May 18. PUGET SOUND SYMPHONY Debussy, Rossini, and Gershwin’s Piano Concerto with soloist Sara Davis Buechner. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., psso.org. $5–$11. 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 17. SEATTLE WIND SYMPHONY Music on an outer-space theme: Holst, Sousa, and more. First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., 800-838-3006, seattlewind symphony.org. $5–$20. 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 17. MARKET STREET SINGERS Vivaldi and more. At Westside Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 7141 California Ave. S.W., 7:30 p.m. Sat., May 17, and First Lutheran Church Ballard, 2006 N.W. 65th St., 4 p.m. Sun., May 18. Donation. marketstreetsingers.org. SEATTLE PRO MUSICA Brahms’ German Requiem. St. James Cathedral, 804 Ninth Ave., 800-838-3006, seattlepro musica.org. $15–$38. 8 p.m. Sat., May 17–Sun., May 18. SEATTLE SYMPHONY Collaborating with Seattle Youth Symphony players in Ravel and Tchaikovsky. Fisher Pavilion, Seattle Center, seattlesymphony.org. Free. 2 p.m. Sun., May 18. SEATTLE SYMPHONY From SSO players, music by Brahms, Carter, and Mozart. Benaroya Recital Hall, 2154747, seattlesymphony.org. $39. 2 p.m. Sun., May 18. MOSTLY NORDIC CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES Finnish music for cello and piano. Nordic Heritage Museum, 3014 N.W. 67th St., 789-5707, nordicmuseum.org. $22–$27 ($47–$55 w/smorgasbord). 4 p.m. Sun., May 18. SEATTLE JEWISH CHORALE Love songs by a highly eclectic mix of composers from Salamone Rossi (b. circa 1570) on forward. Temple Beth Am, 2630 N.E. 80th St., 800838-3006, templebetham.org. $17–$20. 7 p.m. Sun., May 18. UW: MUSIC OF TODAY SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE, 35. UW ETHNOMUSICOLOGY Javanese music, dance, and shadow-puppet theater. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, music.washington.edu. $12–$20. 7:30 p.m. Tues., May 20. DAVID FINCKEL, WU HAN, PHIL SETZER The exEmerson Quartet cellist, his wife, and a current Emerson Quartet violinist play Dvorak, Beethoven, and Schubert piano trios. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworld series.org. $38–$43. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 21.

elevate

tonight.

CHRISTOPHER CROSS

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THUR | MAY 15 | 7PM

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THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER

THUR | MAY 22 | 7PM FRI | MAY 23 | 8PM SAT | MAY 24 | 8PM

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PAUL RODGERS THUR | MAY 29 | 7PM

GREAT WHITE

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

SLAUGHTER | | THUR

JUNE 5

7PM

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MICHAEL BOLTON SUN | JUNE 15 | 7PM

•  • 

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. • = Recommended

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Martin’s wrenching ’90s play. Second Story Repertory Theatre, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425-881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. $27. Preview May 8, opens May 9. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sun., May 25. Ends May 25. KING LEAR Seattle Shakespeare Company’s fine acting is in ample evidence, but this overly cerebral take on a cathartic tale made me want to run outside and gasp for the saturated hues of messy real life. Dan Kremer’s Lear, tall and sardonic, does more with the humorous and witty situations than with the tragic ones. The most memorable performance is from Eric Riedmann as evil Edmund, who narrates his intentions to the audience like a stand-up comedian. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, 733-8222. $25–$48. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see seattleshakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends May 17. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Alan Menken & Howard Ashman’s musical toys affectionately with two of America’s enduring infatuations: cheesy monster movies and jukebox pop. Appropriately, this co-production of ACT and the 5th Avenue cranks the fun dial up to 11. KEVIN PHINNEY ACT Theatre, $20–$50. See acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends June 15. LOLLYVILLE In Bret Fetzer and Juliet Waller Pruzan’s new show, a ghost bent on revenge “returns to the site of his fatal heartbreak: an isolated village inhabited entirely by women.” Richard Hugo House, 1634 11th Ave., macha monkey.org. $18–$20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends May 24. A NEW BRAIN William Finn’s semi-memoirish musical about a songwriter and his medical issues. Cornish Playhouse at Seattle Center, 800-838-3006, seattlestage right.org. $15–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends May 17. PETER PAN Youth Theatre Northwest presents the classic. Youth Theatre Northwest, 8805 S.E. 40th St., Mercer Island, 232-4145 x100, youththeatre.org. $13–$17. 7 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends May 18. RETURNING TO ALBERT JOSEPH Spike Friedman’s confounding new concoction, created with The Satori Group. There’s a three-way war being waged among 1) a faction called “statists,” 2) rebels reprogramming our weak human brains to accept rationalist theories of charismatic leader/brainwasher Albert Joseph, and 3) counter-rebels whose vestigial tattered memories make them nostalgic for emotions and the pre-rationalist regime. LoraBeth Barr plays Andrea, our rather stiff, strident guide to the struggle; Quinn Franzen is Leo, Andrea’s sensitive, brain-damaged charge. The torrent of details, buzzwords, and narrative shards makes a fun puzzle, but Barr and Franzen don’t quite sell an emotional connection between them. Maybe they’re not supposed to, as the setting is a universe of distrust and disconnection. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Inscape, 815 Seattle Blvd. S., 800-838-3006, satori–group.com. $15. Runs 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends May 25. SUBMERGED SEE PAGE 8. TEATRO ZINZANNI: ON THE AIR Their new radio-themed show features the return of emcee Kevin Kent and stars Anki Andersson. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 8020015. $99 and up. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see zinzanni.com/ seattle for exact schedule. Ends June 1. TROUBLE IN FAIRYTALEZANIA & WILD WES Two lively children’s shows from Taproot’s touring company. Isaac Studio Theatre, 208 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproot theatre.org. $5–$12. Noon & 2 p.m. Sat. Ends May 17. TRUTH LIKE THE SUN Local writer Jim Lynch set this recent novel during our 1962 World’s Fair. Now see Book– It Repertory Theatre’s stage adaptation. Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 216-0833. $23–$45. Runs Wed.– Sun.; see book-it.org for exact schedule. Ends May 18. WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? Edward Albee’s 1962 play is a landmark dissection of the American family, demonstrating how it’s possible to rip flesh from bone and destroy a person with nothing more than verbal skills, a few marital secrets, and the firm conviction that your opponent is beneath contempt. Martha (Pamela Reed) and George (R. Hamilton Wright) are daring each other to end their marriage—or raise the stakes with another toxic revelation. Director Braden Abraham’s production takes this circular firing-squad masterwork to Olympian heights and Stygian depths. KEVIN PHINNEY Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222, $12– $80. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun., plus 2 p.m. some Wed, Sat., & Sun; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends May 18.

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arts&culture» Visual & Literary Arts B Y K E LT O N S E A R S

BY DIANA LE

Galleries

Author Events

SAL CELIS Seattle-Paris-London and Back is a globe-

CORBON ADDISON This attorney and activist’s new

trotting photo exhibition featuring images from Celis’ recent European travels. Opening reception 4-8 p.m. Sat., May 17. Wallingford Center, 1815 N. 45th St., wallingfordcenter.com, Mon.-Sun., 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Through May 27. IAN MCMAHON: CASCADE He installs two massive plaster theater curtains in the gallery space, creating all sorts of interesting shadowplay and lighting. Opening reception 5-7 p.m. Fri., May 16,. Suyama Space, 2324 Second Ave., 256-0809, suyamaspace.org, Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Aug. 15.

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POSTGLAMISM: GLAM ART IN THE 21ST CENTURY Fourteen artists assembled for this mixed-

media exhibition to explore their love of all things glittery, glossy, and coated in a radiant metallic sheen. Opening reception 5-9 p.m. Thurs., May 15. Center on Contemporary Art, 6413 Seaview Ave. N.W., 728-1980, cocaseattle.org, Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Aug. 1. DANA ROBERTS Roberts’ paintings deal in visual metaphors that often play in contradictory imagery. Opening reception Thurs., May 15, 6-7:30 p.m. SAM Gallery, 1300 First Ave., 343-1101, seattleartmuseum.org, Weds.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Aug. 10. THROUGH OUR EYES: GENDER & SEXUALITY

Photos and textual works explore several local artists’ individual visions of gender and sex. Reception 6-8 p.m. Weds., May 14. Seattle Central Community College, 1701 Broadway, 344-4379, seattlecentral.org, Mon.-Fri., 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Through May 29.

Museums

• DANISH MODERN: DESIGN FOR LIVING A survey

of modern style Danish furniture from 1950-60. Nordic Heritage Museum, 3014 N.W. 67th St., 789-5707, nordicmuseum.org, $8, Opens May 16, Tues.-Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Aug. 31.

FOLDING PAPER: THE INFINITE POSSIBILITIES OF ORIGAMI An exhibit that examines the evolution

of origami as an art form around the globe from its origins all the way up to today. Bellevue Arts Museum, 510 Bellevue Way N.E., 425-519-0770, bellevuearts. org, Opens May 16, Tues.-Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Through Sept. 21. ANNE FENTON Recent winner of the Brink Award, the local artist shows two new videos, stencil art, and handmade fibrous objects. Henry Art Gallery, 4100 15th Ave. N.E., Seattle, 543-2280, henryart.org, $6-$10, Weds., Sat., Sun., 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Thurs., Fri., 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Through June 15. LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER Born in the declining Rust Belt town of Braddock, Pennsylvania, Frazier’s images have mostly been black-and-white studies of her kin, lending dignity to loved ones struggling with underemployment, disease, and fractured families. She began taking photographs as a teenager during the ’90s, in part as a rebuttal of the historical images of Braddock that showed only its white faces. Born by a River includes about two dozen black-and-white images of her family, often with Frazier posing among them. Look at us, Frazier is saying; this is how we live. The main gallery contains seven large color aerial views of Braddock, taken last year from a helicopter hovering over The Bottom, the poor, flood-prone, and polluted neighborhood where Frazier was raised. There’s a startling micro/macro effect as we pull up high to these impersonal views. Frazier’s family, and others like it, disappear. BRIAN MILLER Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., Seattle, 654-3100, seattleartmuseum. org, $12.50-$19.50, Weds., Fri.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through June 22. LIU XIAODONG Having achieved success in Beijing, Liu went back to his emptied-out old village after three decades away, finding stagnation and defeat among his old pals. There’s nothing explicitly political in the paintings of Hometown Boy, yet they read like a socioeconomic portrait of China’s Rust Belt. These are somewhat sad, desultory scenes. Weeds grow in an unused pool. A restaurant fails. A dejected man shows up at the wrong door, pointing futilely at it with a purple umbrella. Liu isn’t a political artist like Ai Weiwei. He works within the system but is certainly aware of its constraints and discontents, which surely swirl into Hometown Boy’s palette of oils. BRIAN MILLER Seattle Asian Art Museum, 1400 E. Prospect St. (Volunteer Park), Seattle, 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $5-$7, Weds., Fri.-Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Through June 29.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

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PNB.ORG

ONLY AT

M c C AW HALL

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Send events to visualarts@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

book, The Garden of Burning Sand, tells the story of a young rape victim who seeks justice. University Book Store - Bellevue, 990 102nd Ave. N.E., 425-462-4500, bookstore.washington.edu, Wed., May 14, 6 p.m. RICK ATKINSON The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe, 1944-1945 concludes his WWII trilogy. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle. org, $5, Wed., May 14, 7:30 p.m. AUTHORS GONE WILD On hand will be Garth Stein (The Art of Racing in the Rain), and Erik Larson (In the Garden of Beasts), Jennie Shortridge (Love, Water, Memory), Stephanie Kallos (Sing Them Home), Peter Mountford (The Dismal Science), and Frances McCue (The Car That Brought You Here Still Runs). Live music follows. Seattle Central Library, 1000 Fourth Ave., 3864636, spl.org, Free, Sat., May 17, 7 p.m. GIL BAR-SELA What Makes a Family? is an interactive children’s book that introduces different family models. University Book Store, 4326 University Way N.E., 800335-7323, bookstore.washington.edu, Tue., May 20, 7 p.m. JOSEPH BOYDEN The Orenda is his historical novel of battling Indian tribes in pre-colonial Canada. Elliott Bay Book Co., 1521 10th Ave., 624-6600, elliottbaybook.com, Mon., May 19, 7 p.m. SAM CHALTAIN Charter schools aren’t mentioned in the title, but they’re surely addressed in his Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice. Seattle Central Library, 7 p.m. JAMES A. COLE The former naval architect shares his expertise in the evolution of fishing vessel design in Drawing on Our History: Fishing Vessels of the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. University Book Store, Mon., May 19, 7 p.m. ANNA DEWDNEY New from the creator of llama llama books is Nelly Gnu and Daddy. Third Place Books, 17171 Bothell Way N.E., 366-3333, thirdplacebooks.com, Fri., May 16, 5:30 p.m. FIRST LOVES TOUR Three Young Adult-category authors discuss their books about love and relationships: The Chapel Wars (Mary Leavitt), Open Road Summer (Emery Lord), and Fool Me Twice (Mandy Hubbard). Third Place, Thu., May 15, 7 p.m. STEVEN GALLOWAY The Confabulist is a novel about the life and sudden death of Harry Houdini. Third Place, Mon., May 19, 7 p.m. PETER HELLER He returns with his second novel, The Painter, in which a philosophical fisherman gets caught in a gunfight. Elliott Bay, Tue., May 20, 7 p.m. JOSHUA HOWE The Reed College prof will discuss his Behind the Curve: Science and the Politics of Global Warming. Town Hall, $5, Mon., May 19, 7:30 p.m. LINDA LAWRENCE HUNT Her grief memoir is Pilgrimage Through Loss: Pathways to Strength and Renewal after the Death of a Child. Elliott, Sat., May 17, 2 p.m. SAM KEAN His new science tome is The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons: The History of the Human Brain as Revealed by True Stories of Trauma, Madness, and Recovery. Town Hall, $5, Tue., May 20, 6 p.m. KEVIN O’BRIEN Tell Me You’re Sorry is a new thriller about mysterious suicides and mass murders. Elliott Bay, Fri., May 16, 7 p.m. RUTH REICHL Delicious! is a food-themed novel from the famed former restaurant reviewer. (A separate, special noon lunch event at Dahlia Lounge is sold out.) Book Larder, 4252 Fremont Ave. N., 397-4271, booklarder.com, Thu., May 15, 6:30-8 p.m. SAMANTHA SHANNON The Bone Season is the debut thriller from this 21-year-old writer. University Book Store, Thu., May 15, 7 p.m. RICK SPRINGFIELD From the musician and former heartthrob, his debut novel Magnificent Vibration follows a young man who steals a self-help book. University Book Store, Wed., May 14, 7 p.m. EVA STACHNIAK She reads from and discusses her new Empress of the Night: A Novel of Catherine the Great, a follow-up to The Winter Palace. Elliott Bay, Thu., May 15, 7 p.m. MARK STEIN This historian takes us through political panics from Salem to the present day in American Panic: A History of Who Scares Us and Why. 7:30 p.m. ADELLE WALDMAN The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. is a witty novel about a young male’s sexual mores. Elliott Bay, Wed., May 14, 7 p.m.

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Send events to books@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended


» Film

Opening ThisWeek God’s Pocket OPENS FRI., MAY 16 AT VARSITY. RATED R. 88 MINUTES.

are vivid, and the sad/dreamy Jenkins could make an art form out of slouching—but where does that leave Mickey? Hoffman, leading with his beer gut and reacting to each new disaster with head-down resignation, is unquestionably that guy. But he’s lost amid the movie’s blue-collar bustle. Everything here is trying just a little too hard to convince you of its authenticity. Everything except Hoffman, who appears to know a lot about disappointment and bad choices. ROBERT HORTON

him a bastard child—as Locke now refuses to do. It’s a miscalculated, stagy device, but it doesn’t ruin the movie’s spell. Hardy gives Locke a calm, steady self-assessment, a kind of lucid despair. He’s a guy forced to realize in one night that his life has no foundation. BRIAN MILLER

Million Dollar Arm OPENS FRI., MAY 16 AT ARK LODGE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG. 124 MINUTES.

Mickey (Hoffman) on the run.

PLocke OPENS FRI., MAY 16 AT HARVARD EXIT. RATED R. 85 MINUTES.

OPENS FRI., MAY 16 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. NOT RATED. 97 MINUTES.

It’s good to be king. Yet having achieved that purpose in Richard III, already crippled of body and twisted by ambition, the new monarch blows it all. After an unlikely, ruthless rise, his reign is brief and unhappy. How much nicer then to be Kevin Spacey, leading a grateful troupe of Anglo-American Shakespeareans around the world on a world tour! Visiting the Great Wall in China, driving through the sand dunes of Qatar, cruising off the coast of Amalfi—now that’s the way you secure the loyalty of your subjects, and their love. (“I’ve got to find some more rich friends,” says one dazed actor who’s never been outside the U.S. before.) So is this just a vanity project for Spacey and his stage director, Sam Mendes, a kind of belated infomercial for a theater production we can’t see? (The tour ended two years ago in New York.) In descending order of importance, this awkwardly titled documentary celebrates three things: our benevolent patron Spacey, the backstage camaraderie of theater folk, and . . . what’s the third thing again? Oh, right, Shakespeare. A few passing nods are tossed at the Arab Spring and oil barons in the Middle East, and Spacey gets a rehearsal laugh by delivering one raspy speech as Bill Clinton (“Myself ? There’s none else by. Richard loves Richard; that is, I am I”). But to place Richard III in the context of our modern world, to solicit a few opinions outside the Spacey Dome—that’s not the assignment for film director Jeremy Whelehan. That said, after seeing the doc and reading the Richard III reviews online, I wish Seattle had merited a stop on its grand tour. (The play was last mounted locally in 2006 by Seattle Shakespeare Co.) We don’t get to see any full scenes from the production, but Spacey’s usurper has a healthy self-regard, a hammy, canny politician’s sense of projection and (in the early going) a wicked sense of humor. (At one point he attacks Hastings’ severed head in a box, just to startle the court—See? This is what I’m capable of !) He’s selling an image, like any effective candidate. More important, the movie’s an advertisement for theater, an argument for doing it big and grand. If I were teaching a high-school drama class, I’d take the kids to see it. If this guy can make it, I’d tell them, so could you. (I mean Richard, of course.) BRIAN MILLER E film@seattleweekly.com

Who’s your ruler? Spacey and company.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

Bane has a problem. And by Bane we mean Tom Hardy, here cast as a methodical Welsh structural engineer who specializes in concrete. This is a film where you will learn a lot about how that material is poured and processed, from its viscosity to the closing of streets to allow for the mixing trucks to arrive according to schedule. Locke the movie and Locke the individual are nothing if not concrete. This is a film about limits—of emotions, of structures, and of locations. And there is only one location: Locke’s BMW as he heads south through the night from Birmingham toward London—away from a critical job he is abandoning—to attend the birth of a child from a drunken one-night stand. (“I have behaved in a way that is not like me,” he will tell his wife.) Confining the action to a SUV is a gimmick, as in Lifeboat or Phone Booth—a narrative constraint that writer/director Steven Knight has assigned himself. Locke is essentially a radio play made into a movie. The camera moves up high to track Locke’s journey; there are some visual flourishes; but basically we’re listening to Hardy’s soft rumbling voice for 85 minutes. It’s a one-man dialogue, with calls to and from his wife and two sons, the hospital, his irate bosses, and a panicked Irish underling back at the job site. A veteran English screenwriter (Dirty Pretty Things, Eastern Promises), Knight clearly respects literary form and tradition. He explicitly nods to Samuel Beckett, whose pauses and repetitions are echoed here. Ivan Locke keeps telling others, “Everything will be all right,” but he’s really trying to reassure himself against the existential void, the potential loss of job, family, and self-control. He says of his precious 55-story tower, “You make one little mistake, and the whole world comes crashing down.” The symbolism is clear. The car’s claustrophobia suits Locke’s cramped rationality, his rigorously ruled sense of himself as a man. He loses composure only when yelling at his father, unseen in the backseat, who left and made

KEVINSPACEY.COM

LANCE ACORD/IFC FILMS

It is no disrespect to the late Philip Seymour Hoffman to say that he was often difficult to look at onscreen; his lack of vanity saw him embracing schlubby, disheveled, or out-and-out gross characters. Hoffman’s February death left a few projects still awaiting release, of which God’s Pocket is the first to hit theaters. True to form, he looks terrible in it. But does he inhabit his role with his customary uncanny veracity? He does. In this period-set adaptation of a 1983 novel by Pete Dexter (now a Whidbey Island resident), Hoffman plays Mickey Scarpato, a flabby working-class mug in a careworn Philly neighborhood called God’s Pocket. Mickey is married to the unsatisfied Jeanie (Christina Hendricks), whose appalling son from a previous marriage, Leon (Caleb Landry Jones), is truly the lint in God’s pocket. When this creep is killed at a construction site, the mysterious death raises the curiosity of gangsters and a famous newspaper columnist (Richard Jenkins, the Dexter figure). If the latter can stop drinking himself in the direction of oblivion and shagging newspaper groupies (wait, those exist?), he might stumble on something significant. He might even get a crush on Jeanie. God’s Pocket director John Slattery is best at prowling the streets and alleys of the neighborhood, which is so insular that even a regular Joe like Mickey can’t ever be fully accepted because he isn’t from there. We’re told this is significant, but it doesn’t seem to matter all that much to hapless Mickey. There’s good local color, especially with John Turturro’s butcher (or whatever he is—everybody’s got a shady sideline), Eddie Marsan’s venal undertaker, and various barflies and construction workers. Also, veteran actress Joyce Van Patten nails a very brief turn (that’s how a pro does it, folks). Those performances reflect on Slattery’s taste with actors; he’s an actor himself, best known for his impeccable turn as white-haired devil Roger Sterling on Mad Men. None of which entirely brings the movie to life, or locates its reason for being. The other characters

A true story neatly reshaped by the Disney mill, Million Dollar Arm gathers a collection of reliable sports-movie chestnuts with a bit of Moneyballstyle backroom negotiating for grit. The exotic touch here is a scenic trip to India, where desperate agent JB Bernstein ( Jon Hamm) treks to find a couple of baseball prospects in a country that doesn’t play the sport. It’s a gimmick: JB’s staging the search for a reality-TV competition, and he’s convinced a backer that this stunt might have the benefit of attracting a billion new baseball fans from the subcontinent. The trip takes up the picture’s midsection, and is followed by JB’s attempt to get a USC coach (Bill Paxton) to turn these raw talents into pitchers. There must also be romance, which comes as workaholic JB pauses long enough in his conquest of cheerleader types to notice the plain-but-spunky doctor who lives in his guest house. This being Hollywood, “plain” is embodied by bodacious Lake Bell. Million Dollar Arm is directed by Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl ) and scripted by Thomas McCarthy (The Visitor), both of whom appear to be punching below their weight, to mix sports metaphors. There are far too many cute gags about how naive the contest winners are, despite the best efforts of Suraj Sharma (the kid from Life of Pi) and Madhur Mittal. And casting Alan Arkin as a sourpuss old-school baseball scout—he doesn’t have to watch the recruits pitch, he can judge talent by the sound of the ball hitting the mitt—is so lazy that Arkin could be played by his own hologram. The film’s got the soft edges and invisible expertise of a product newly rolled out of the factory. Devotees of Mad Men may find some fascination in watching Hamm stretch out in a leadingman role that actually has a pleasant, conventional arc. The actor has sustained his masterpiece of a performance as Don Draper on Mad Men so long that it comes as a shock to see self-centered, grimfaced JB loosen up and break into a smile. He finds happiness in the end by learning and growing, don’t you know. That should be an agreeable sight—hey, look, a Jon Hamm character can redeem himself— but if you’re a longtime Mad Men follower, you may also find it absolutely unnerving. ROBERT HORTON

NOW: In the Wings on a World Stage

39


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Local & Repertory AS YOU LIKE IT The Mouse That Roared (1959) contin-

ues this British film retrospective. Peter Sellers plays three roles in the gentle Cold War satire, in which his tiny nation somehow defeats the mighty U.S. About time for a remake, anyone? (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $63$68 series, $8 individual, Thu., May 15, 7:30 p.m. FANTASTIC MR. FOX/BOTTLE ROCKET SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 34. JOHN HUBLEY CENTENNIAL The pioneering American animator’s birth is celebrated with several cartoon shorts (mostly appropriate for kids), including the whimsical Moonbird. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 829-7863, nwfilmforum.org, $6-$11, Sat., May 17, 3 & 7 p.m.; Sun., May 18, 3 p.m. METROPOLIS Fritz Lang’s silent-era classic is accompanied with a new live musical score by Grid. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$11, Fri., May 16, 7 p.m. MONTEREY POP SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 35.

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• SILENT MAGIC: TRICK FILMS AND SPECIAL •  Georges Méliès, Edwin S. EFFECTS, 1895-1912

Porter, Segundo de Chomón, and other film pioneers are represented in this package of shorts. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$11, Tue., May 20, 8 p.m. STAGE FRIGHT This new slasher flick, set backstage on Broadway, is apparently modeled on the final-girl thrillers of the ’80s. (R) Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org, Fri., May 16, 10 p.m.; Sat., May 17, 10 p.m.; Fri., May 23, 9 p.m.; Sat., May 24, 9 p.m.

Ongoing

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2 If Tobey Maguire was

all open-faced wonder about his accidental arachnid skill set, Andrew Garfield’s more of a brooder—Peter Parker hiding in his room despite the entreaties of Aunt May (Sally Field). He’s given a welcome few goofy grace notes with girlfriend Gwen (Emma Stone), but most of the time we’re watching his masked CG avatar swing seamlessly through Manhattan canyons, not the actual thespian. Everything slowly builds after a zingy first hour to a two-part finale that’s more coded than directed. Where are the actors? No one cares. The plot and dialogue are elementary—subtitles not required anywhere on the planet. Also worth the 3-D IMAX ticket price is the roster of supporting talent: Campbell Scott, Embeth Davidtz, Chris Cooper, Colm Feore, Denis Leary, and Paul Giamatti. Given the money invested in Spidey’s aerial ballets with the camera (totally untethered, as in Gravity), it’s nice to see the budget padded with so many pros. (PG-13) BRIAN MILLER Ark Lodge, Bainbridge, Cinebarre, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Majestic Bay, Pacific Place, Southcenter, Sundance, Thornton Place, others BLUE RUIN While fugitive humor emerges in regular intervals in the bloody, micro-budget revenge picture Blue Ruin, this is something different. The jokes are funny, for one thing, but they also serve a purpose. Dwight (the heroic Macon Blair) lives in a disintegrating blue car by the seashore. He receives disturbing news: The man convicted of killing Dwight’s parents is being released from prison. This sets in motion Dwight’s revenge, a plan so haphazard and freely improvised that at times it approximates the end-overend momentum of a Road Runner cartoon. The movie is the sophomore effort of director-writer Jeremy Saulnier, a clever chap who clearly wants to grab some attention with this ingenious effort. And yet, except for the explosions of violence, the movie isn’t flashy; Saulnier trusts his material enough to let the early reels unfold slowly, with very little dialogue, as he sets up his dominoes. (R) ROBERT HORTON Sundance FED UP Narrated by Katie Couric, Stephanie Soechtig’s advocacy doc is slickly made, studded with food gurus (Michael Pollan, Marion Nestle, etc.), and sympathetic to the sad young teens we see struggling with obesity. Yet heredity is only part of our four-decade obesity epidemic, which the filmmakers convincingly trace back to a collision between industry and regulators. On the one hand, the FDA is supposed to keep our food healthy. On the other, the USDA’s goal is basically to sell as much food as possible—including corn; and from that, high fructose corn syrup. Which side do you suppose is winning? “It’s fair to say the U.S. government is subsidizing the obesity epidemic,”

*Tickets available at the box office.

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says Pollan, who then pauses a beat. “Indirectly.” Fed Up convincingly argues how the processed food industry has so successfully engineered its products since the ’70s to be addictive yet never sating. Viewers will not be surprised when parallels to Big Tobacco are explicitly drawn. (PG) B.R.M. Varsity • FINDING VIVIAN MAIER The biggest discovery of 20th-century photography was made in 2007 by Chicago flea-market maven/historian John Maloof. Vivian Maier was a nanny who died soon thereafter, indigent and mentally ill, a hoarder. Maloof bought trunks of her negatives with no idea what they contained. The revelation of those images, in a series of art shows and books, immediately placed her in the front rank of street photographers. But who the hell was she? Now Maloof and Charlie Siskel have directed a kind of documentary detective story about the enigmatic spinster (1926–2009). It’s an irresistible quest, as Maloof interviews the now-grown kids Maier cared for, plus a few fleeting friends and acquaintances, who had no idea of her gifts. Would she have wanted her images seen by the public? Maloof conclusively answers that question. Would she have wanted his movie to be made? All her grown charges say the same: No. (NR) B.R.M. Varsity • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL By the time of its 1968 framing story, the Grand Budapest Hotel has been robbed of its gingerbread design by a Soviet (or some similarly aesthetically challenged) occupier—the first of many comments on the importance of style in Wes Anderson’s latest film. A writer (Jude Law) gets the hotel’s story from its mysterious owner, Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham, a lovely presence). Zero takes us back between world wars, when he (played now by Tony Revolori) began as a bellhop at the elegant establishment located in the mythical European country of Zubrowka. Dominating this place is the worldly Monsieur Gustave, the fussy hotel manager (Ralph Fiennes, in absolutely glorious form). The death of one of M. Gustave’s elderly ladyfriends (Tilda Swinton) leads to a wildly convoluted tale of a missing painting, resentful heirs, a prison break, and murder. Also on hand are Anderson veterans Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Bill Murray, Jason Schwartzman, and Owen Wilson—all are in service to a project so steeped in Anderson’s velvet-trimmed bric-a-brac we might not notice how rare a movie like this is: a comedy that doesn’t depend on a star turn or a high concept, but is a throwback to the sophisticated (but slapstickfriendly) work of Ernst Lubitsch and other such classical directors. (R) R.H. Guild 45th, Bainbridge • JODOROWSKY’S DUNE I don’t believe for one second this documentary’s central claim: Chilean-born Alejandro Jodorowsky’s planned ’70s adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune is the Rosetta Stone of all subsequent sci-fi, from Star Wars to Alien to The Matrix. But the irrepressible director, now 85, is the first guy you’d want to invite to a dinner party, no matter how outrageous and unsustainable his tales. Director Frank Pavich tries to recap the chapters of Jodorowsky’s varied career: avant-garde theater in Mexico during the ’60s; midnight-movie success in the ’70s with his headtrips El Topo and The Holy Mountain (both excerpted); and finally Jodorowsky’s ill-fated, French-financed 1975 attempt at Dune. Pavich’s account is perhaps too insidery and film-geek-detailed, paying homage to this near-forgotten director, but it’s impossible to fault his generosity after such a long draught. Are any of Jodorowsky’s polished anecdotes about Mick Jagger, Orson Welles, Pink Floyd, and Salvador Dalí true? Does it really matter? Not when the telling is so cheerfully entertaining. (PG-13) B.R.M. Sundance NEIGHBORS This fun but formulaic comedy pits Seth Rogen, as a married homeowner and new father, against Zac Efron, playing the rival patriarch of a rowdy frat house next door. We’ve got to get Delta Psi put on probation, so our baby can sleep at night! The conflict writes itself, and you really do feel these likeable two stars could play more against type. Efron, once the Disney idol, is certainly capable of undermining his image. When Rogen and wife (Rose Byrne) trick him into a fight with a loyal frat bro (Dave Franco), pushing and shoving give way to the dreaded mutual testicle grab. Efron stares at his foe and declares, with berserk conviction, “I’ll hold onto your balls forever!” Rogen again inhabits the familiar role of the shambling, genial dude who doesn’t want to be an adult. When he and the wife get into a fight, they debate who ought to be the “Kevin James”—i.e. the irresponsible partner—in their marriage. But, really, the term they ought to be using is “Seth Rogen.” And that’s the problem with this movie’s ambition: It simply lets Rogen be Rogen. (R) B.R.M. Bainbridge, Big Picture, Cinebarre, iPic Theaters, Pacific Place, Sundance, others


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41


arts&culture» Music

Leading Lady

Lena Simon of Kairos on juggling life, touring, and music.

MORGEN SCHULER

BY MORGEN SCHULER

Simon outside her practice space on Capitol Hill.

L

ena Simon is a musician whom you have undoubtedly heard but whom you might not know much about (other than that in January, Seattle Weekly ranked her as one to watch in 2014!). With projects like now-defunct indie pop group Throw Me the Statue, Pillar Point, and 2012 Sound OFF! winners Tomten on her resume, Simon, just 23, recently replaced Abbey Blackwell as bassist for local all-femme sensation La Luz. These days she’s juggling work with Pollens, Thunderpussy, and Kairos—her own electro-synth project featuring a rotating cast of musicians, including members of Kithkin, Katie Kate, and Charms. Kairos releases its eponymous debut EP this Monday, and we recently caught up with the serial multitasker; here’s what we learned (read the full interview at seattleweekly.com/ reverb).

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

SW: Is there one project you identify with more than the others?

42

Simon: La Luz has been an interesting experience. Just having to fill in somebody else’s shoes, because Abbey was an incredible bass player. I was already a fan of the band, then I was friends with the band, and now I’m in the band. Which is kind of like a dream come true, to be a fan and then to be in the band. The songs have a style distinct from the other bands you’re in. Where does that come from?

A lot of [the EP] changed in the recording studio. I had home demos I’d made on my laptop in my bedroom with full instrumentation like MIDI drums, or whatever I had to add to fully realize the songs. I gave them to my producer Charlie Smith and said, “Here’s all the songs I want to do.” He said, “These are great—now I want you to re-demo every single one and only use one accompanying instrument and one vocal line, no harmonies.” He wanted you to start from scratch.

Not in a bad way—just to see what happens. I didn’t use guitar, I used keyboards

because I’m way less comfortable on a keyboard. Because I am partial to guitar, Charlie said, “Maybe you shouldn’t use guitar this time.” I happened to be cat-sitting for Scott Reitherman [Pillar Point, Throw Me the Statue] at the time. He has all these keyboards and synthesizers, so I just decided to demo everything on his keyboards.

Because I am partial to guitar, Charlie said, “Maybe you shouldn’t use guitar this time.” Are you excited about the release of the EP?

Actually, it’s been ready for a couple years; it just wasn’t the right time to release it.

So you’ve had a little time to sit on it. What’s your favorite song?

I really like “Sister.” It’s actually the newest one because I wrote it in the studio while we were making the record. Charlie had me write it as a bridge for “That Which Does Not,” which is the poppiest electronic dance song that I have. Kairos has a rotating lineup—is that on purpose?

It started off with a couple of different members who have moved or didn’t have the time to commit, but I’ve always felt that it’s kind of a modular band. Obviously if they want to stay, I’m happy to have them stay. Everyone who’s in it right now is extremely talented. What’s your favorite band that you’re not in?

I really like Gold Leaves. Rose Windows is also killing it right now. Something we’ve been listening to on tour [with La Luz] is Mac Demarco. That’s something I’ve been listening to a lot these days. E

mschuler@seattleweekly.com

KAIROS With Dude York, Sundries. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. $8 adv. 8 p.m. Mon., May 19.


CIGARETTES © SFNTC 2 2014

SevenNights E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Wednesday, May 14 RIFF RAFF is practically an urban legend—a bizarre

white man with cornrows and an MTV-logo tattoo, a persona that purportedly inspired James Franco’s Spring Breakers performance as rapper “Alien.” See the human cartoon character in the flesh tonight, where he’ll likely rap about Jose Canseco and Dolce & Gabbana. With Grandtheft. The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents.com. 8 p.m. $25. All ages. KELTON SEARS

Thursday, May 15

What MICKEY AVALON did to his “muse” (nemesis?) Jane Fonda in an eponymous song is indefensibly sexist but criminally funny. And totally fitting with

his persona: an enfant terrible escaped from the ’70s punk scene. He’s playing the iconic Crocodile with Tacoma rapper Dirty D, who’s also performed at the Playboy mansion and the most recent Seahawks/49ers game. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave, 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $17 adv./$20 DOS. All ages. JENNA NAND MIKE TRAMP made his name as the singer for pop-metal band White Lion, but in recent years he’s pursued an acoustic solo career on the back of the same kind of arena-ready, big-hook power ballads his ’80s metal group trafficked in. And he’s still a big deal in his native Denmark, where his latest LP, Cobblestone Street, charted. With Glenn Cannon, Rane Stone, Jonny Smokes. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 262-0482, elcorazon.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv./$18 DOS. 21 and over. DAVE LAKE THE FAMILY STONE Three founding members of the legendary funk/soul group and a gang of industry veterans are keeping the spirit of the ’70s alive with the hits that rocketed it to pop stardom. Classics like “Everyday People” and “Stand!” hold their own by

ANDREW SWANSON

Burn List CD Release Show Wednesday, May 14

W

hen many people hear the word “jazz,” they grumble. As Spinal Tap’s David St. Hubbins said in a recent interview, “Jazz is mistakes. You’re playing a song, but you are playing it wrong . . . [It’s] an accident waiting to happen.” Hubbins’ expert analysis be damned, Seattle’s jazz musicians have been playing all the right wrong notes of late, pushing the genre into uncharted territory by mashing its traditional forms with far-flung influences. Table & Chairs, a local jazz label founded by grads of UW’s excellent School of Music, purposefully signs artists with academic jazz knowledge who willingly skewer their work with all sorts of leftfield weirdness that might make the seemingly unapproachable genre more fun and palatable for rock fans. Take Burn List, the latest Table & Chairs signees. Something of a jazz supergroup, it brings together influential and celebrated trumpeter Cuong Vu, who has played with Laurie Anderson and David Bowie; Aaron Otheim, a keyboardist who also cuts his chops in an

“experimental” band named Uncle Pooch; Chris Icasiano, an incredible, fluid percussionist who lends his talents to Table & Chairs’ flagship drum-assault band King Tears Bat Trip; and saxophonist Greg Sinibaldi, who plays with local manic indie band Heatwarmer. The result is a spooky, Lynchian noir sound that swirls in movements alternating between smooth, crisp grooves and maniacal breakdowns—a selfdescribed intersection of “Ligeti to Albert Ayler to Aphex Twin to Meshuggah.” Tonight, Burn List celebrates the release of their debut album in the “cavernous” Good Shepherd Center in Wallingford, which promises all sorts of tasty natural reverb. Performing alongside the group is Anacortes mainstay Mount Eerie, who will up the jazz weirdness in an improvised set alongside Olympia’s favorite throat-singing spaz, Arrington de Dionyso. He’ll be playing his brand-new contrabass clarinet, a comically large version of your typical clarinet designed to reach all those gut-rumbling, farty low-end notes you would miss otherwise. This might be the best thing you ever experience inside a former chapel. With Mount Eerie. Good Shepherd Center, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., 679-6576. $10 ($20 with CD). 7:30 p.m. All ages.

For more information on our organic growing programs, visit www.sfntc.com

KELTON SEARS

Seattle Weekly 05-14-14.indd 1

4/15/14 11:46 AM


arts&culture» Music

mainstage

dinner & show

WED/MAY 14 • 7:30PM

karla bonoff THU/MAY 15 • 7PM & 10PM

william fitzsimmons w/ ben sollee (7pm only) FRI/MAY 16 • 7PM

the beatniks “summer of love”

today’s pop standards—but don’t come expecting to hear Sly belt them out; the front man, once reportedly homeless, has experienced numerous legal difficulties in recent years. Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729, jazzalley.com. Through Sunday. 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $26.50 adv. All ages. JESSIE MCKENNA I’m no different—GHOST TO FALCO was the psychedelic lo-fi drone-rock band from Portland crashing at my house the night I broke up with the first guy I dated after my divorce, because, man, you never forget those bands, do you? New album Soft Shield rattles, shakes, and burns, like Jesse Sykes, Modest Mouse, and Bright Eyes riding off into a blazing sunset. Which is pretty much how the divorce went down. With Down North, Eight Legs to Nowhere. Lo-Fi Performance Gallery, 429 Eastlake Ave., 254-2824, thelofi.net. 9 p.m. $6. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT Katie Kate Nation, the upcoming album from Seattle rapper KATIE KATE, is a pop gem that somehow toes the line between Kate Bush and Kreayshawn, mixing witchy melodies about end times with a tough hip-hop sensibility. Tonight she’s joined by a star-studded list of local talent like Erik Blood, Pillar Point, and Bobbi Rich, host of Internet show Hangin Tuff. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $8. 21 and up. KS History, as we know, repeats. In the case of soft rock, not only has CHRISTOPHER CROSS found a fan in Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon—who conjured Cross’ trademark wispy synths and ethereal, passionless style on his latest, Bon Iver, Bon Iver—but you can actually hear the two together on a popular YouTube doubler that plays “Sailing” and “Beth/Rest” simultaneously. If you’d rather not, there’s enough ’80s nostalgia—or raw material for the next big indie band—in “Arthur’s Theme” and “Ride Like the Wind” to entertain instead. Snoqualmie Casino, 37500 S.E. North Bend Way, Snoqualmie, 425-888-1234, snocasino.com. 7 p.m. $25 and up. GE

SAT/MAY 17 • 8PM

Friday, May 16

w/ christine lavin

Think of NATHANIEL RATELIFF as the blue-collar cousin of Iron and Wine’s Sam Beam. A former truck driver from Denver, his tender yet haunting songs share a similar intimacy with Beam’s (with some thanks to Brian Deck, who has produced both artists). But where Beam, a former college professor, can sing you a soothing lullaby, it’s Rateliff you want in your corner when the shit goes down. With Carly Ritter. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, thebarboza.com. 7 p.m. $10. GE Lots of well-crafted power pop will be on display tonight as GERALD COLLIER, former front man of Best Kissers in the World, shares the bill with Red Jacket Mine. Collier’s material is the more delicate of the two, but both acts share an affinity for the Beatles, Elvis Costello, and three-minute pop gems. With Gibraltar.

the righteous mothers SUN/MAY 18 • 7:30PM - STG PRESENTS

jon batiste and stay human TUE/MAY 20 • 7PM & 10PM - 91.3 KBCS WELCOMES

suzanne vega w/ ari hest

High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212, highdiveseattle. com. 9:30 p.m. $8. 21 and over. DL Pearl Jam’s Mike McCready annually bands together with other local talent in FLIGHT TO MARS, a tribute to British heavy-metal outfit UFO. Tonight the band celebrates its 12th year by rocking a benefit for Camp Oasis, the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America’s program for child sufferers of the disease. With the Young Evils. The Showbox. 9 p.m. $20–$25 adv. 21 and over. JM LIL JON DJ SET is a man who genuinely has no fucks to give. With the East Side Boyz in the mid-2000s, he sent the PC patrol into a frenzy with a gigantic Confederate flag in the music video for the band’s first hit, “Bia Bia.” In case the unsuspecting public missed those stars and bars, the rapper also wore the flag draped across his shoulders onstage, under his flowing dreads. Before that Southern battle cry hit the airwaves, we never knew that mundane words like “What?,” “Yeah!,” and “OK!” could become stand-alone lyrics. Producing for everyone from Usher to E-40, Lil Jon dominated the crunk movement that he mainstreamed; then, eschewing predictability, he turned to EDM. Since then, his collaborators have been less crunk and more David Guetta, LMFAO, and DJ Snake. After eight years of DJing in the EDM scene, the prodigal artist has returned to the pop charts with his latest Top-10 single, “Turn Down for What,” with a seismic EDM beat laid under explosive vocals. As basic yet addictive as “What You Gon’ Do” or “Snap Yo Fingers,” we replay it constantly but are not sure why. With Butch Clancy. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., showboxpresents. org. 8 p.m. $28–$37. 18 and over. JN

Saturday, May 17

Capitol Hill’s Highline bar is turning 4 this week, and three of the Pacific Northwest’s most notorious heavy bands are helping to celebrate. AGALLOCH mixes neo-folk with blasts of black metal, doom and prog, and on its latest record, The Serpent & the Sphere, it’s done to perfection. Show up early—this will most definitely sell out. With Yob, Wounded Giant. The Highline, 210 Broadway Ave. E., 328-7837, highlineseattle.com. 9 p.m. $16 adv./$18 DOS. 21 and over. JAMES BALLINGER

Sunday, May 18

THE KYLE GASS BAND Though he’s made a name

as half of comedy-rock band Tenacious D, Kyle Gass’ skills as a singer, guitarist, and flutist (really) are no joke. Gass, along with members of his now-defunct side project Trainwreck and Tenacious D touring guitarist John Konesky, create solid rock jams that wouldn’t be out of place at your favorite local bar. With Sonny Votolato & the Groupons, Scarves. The Crocodile. 8 p.m. $15. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 46 WED/MAY 21 • 7:30PM - DOUBLE CD RELEASE PARTY

44

next • 5/22 seattle secret music showcase #14 • 5/23 mycle wastman • 5/24 bowievision • 5/25 ramblin’ jack elliott and nell robinson • 5/28 the bgp w/ aijia • 5/29 vicci martinez • 5/30 gypsy soul • 5/31 johnnyswim • 6/1 throwing muses w/ guest tanya donelly • 6/4 judith owen w/ hallstrom • 6/5 siff justin kaufman trio • 6/6 flamenco de raiz • 6/7 dar williams • 6/8 amy g • 6/10 & 11 jack jones • 6/12 niyaz • 6/13 josh rouse w/ doug paisley • 6/14 bluestreet jazz voices • 6/15 johnette napolitano • 6/17 aoife o’donovan w/ kristin andreassen • 6/18-20 benise • 6/21 kevin smith

happy hour every day • 5/14 tekla waterfield w/ rachel audrey price and jesse solomon • 5/15 sam marshall trio • 5/16 the djangomatics / shady bottom • 5/17 joe doria/brad gibson • 5/18 hwy 99 blues presents: tetrabox • 5/19 crossrhythm session • 5/20 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: pierce & thompson, adam foley and maiah manser • 5/21 kareem kandi TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

polly o’keary and the rhythm method / randy oxford band

Kishi Bashi plays the Showbox on Tuesday, May 20.


2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

1303 NE 45TH ST JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

Nickel Creek Saturday, May 17

C

ontrary to what some might have believed in the wake of Nickel Creek’s final (at the time) tour in 2007 and the lengthy hiatus which followed, the band did not break up. THE HEADHUNTERS WED, MAY 14

Redefining modern funk, world music and jazz one of the most innovative groups in history BRANTLEY GUTIERREZ

Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees & legendary funkateers!

BALLARD HIGH SCHOOL JAZZ BANDS / VOCAL JAZZ PERFORMANCE MON, MAY 19 Recognized as one of the best jazz band & vocal jazz programs in the nation!

SPENCER DAY CD RELEASE PARTY! TUES, MAY 20 - WED, MAY 21 “A lapsed Morman with the looks and charm of a matinee idol, Day’s vocals are breathy, sensual, and intimate.” - Huffington Post

RAMSEY LEWIS ELECTRIC BAND WITH SPECIAL GUEST PHILIP BAILEY OF EARTH, WIND AND FIRE THURS, MAY 22 - SUN, MAY 25

in This Bring T And ge n o Coup er iz T e p p one A 2 oFF! For 1/

Longtime keyboard jazzman on his funkiest outing in years.

all ages | free parking full schedule at jazzalley.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

“When we started the indefinite hiatus, we made sure to call it just that,” says guitarist Sean Watkins. “Our last tour was called the ‘Farewell (For Now) Tour’ because we needed space to do other things.” Those who mistakenly thought the Grammy Award–winning trio had called it quits can be forgiven, seeing as how singer/fiddler Sara Watkins and singer/mandolinist Chris Thile both went on to successful solo careers in the interim, while Thile and Watkins also strutted their stuff with the Punch Brothers and Fiction Family, respectively. For all intents and purposes, it seemed as if the trio had moved on. But then they started talking again last year, and with the 25th anniversary of the band’s 1989 formation on the horizon, the timing seemed right to give the group another shot. Though when they entered the studio to record their latest album, A Dotted Line, there was some trepidation. “We hadn’t written in almost nine years or played onstage since the last tour, so there were some question marks as to whether or not it was going to work,” says Watkins. “But once we got into the same room together, everything started clicking.” Line, which debuted at #7 on the Billboard 200 last month, captures the band’s classic bluegrass flair, proving they are still masters of the country style. Each member is as vocally and musically impressive and complementary as ever, whether on the driving “Destination” or the more thoughtful “Rest of My Life.” They even take Mother Mother’s progressive rockmeets-’80s-new-wave track “Hayloft”—about young lovers getting caught by a shotgunwielding parent—and skillfully turn it into a rollicking bluegrass track. The album is arguably the band’s most cohesive work yet, and Watkins knows why. “Before we took a break, we were trying to fit all the things we wanted to do, musically, into Nickel Creek because it was our only outlet,” he says. “But now, having done a lot of stuff outside the band, we [have some] perspective on what makes the band what it is, so now we’re just letting the band be what it naturally wants to be.” With the Secret Sisters. The Moore, 1932 Second Ave., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/moore. 8 p.m. $32.50–$42.50. All ages. BRIAN PALMER

THE FAMILY STONE THURS, MAY 15 - SUN, MAY 18

45


arts&culture» Music » FROM PAGE 44

NTw.RlitYtlereMdhUenS.coICm LIVE COUww

Doom-metal pioneer SAINT VITUS is celebrating 35 years of slow, sludgy, Sabbath-inspired metal. Pitchfork said its 2012 LP Lillie: F-65, its first in 17 years, was “flush with renewed energy.” Not bad for a bunch of 50-something metal lifers. With Mos Generator, Sons of Huns. The Highline. 9 p.m. $15 adv./$17 DOS. 21 and over. DL L.A.’s FAILURE were lost among the grunge clones who clogged alternative radio in the ’90s—which is too bad, since its songs were better and more sonically intricate than most everybody else’s. Fifteen years later, the band’s enjoying a deserved renaissance. Make sure to get there early: The tour forgoes an opener for a longer set list. The Showbox. 8:30 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS. DL

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109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY, MAY 15

MIKE TRAMP (WHITE LION)

- 2014 U.S. ACOUSTIC TOUR with Glenn Cannon (Windowpane), Rane Stone and Jonny Smokes. Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM 21+. $15 ADV / $18 DOS

FRIDAY, MAY 16

SEATTLE WEEKLY • MAY 14 — 20, 2014

ARISEN FROM NOTHING with Ravages Of Time, Lucky Machete,

46

Jellyneck and Galaxy Doors at 7:30 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

FRIDAY, MAY 16

EVERYONE DIES IN UTAH

with Kingdom Of Giants, Indirections, Ashylus, Nevada Rose and Death By Pirates Lounge Show. Doors at 6:30 / Show at 7PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

SATURDAY, MAY 17

PLAGUE with For The Likes Of You, The Lion In Winter, Nevaeh and Redeem The Exile Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $6 ADV / $8 DOS

SATURDAY, MAY 17

THE HOONS with Dead Remedy, Dead Language,

Fire Vs. Time, plus guests Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $6 ADV / $8 DOS

SUNDAY, MAY 18

NEW YOUNG PONY CLUB (NYPC) with Hearts Are Thugs,

Tuesday, May 20

If he weren’t headlining, Marcel Everett, aka XXYYXX, wouldn’t be allowed into this show. Just 18, the Florida-based electronic musician has already made a name for using lo-fi, ambient elements in singles like “Angel” and “Pay Attention” and remixing songs by heavy hitters like Tinashe, Usher, and Waka Flocka Flame. More power to you, kid. With Djao, Philip Grass. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15. 21 and over. ACP Seattle-born, Norfolk, Va.-raised singer/multi-instrumentalist KISHI BASHI kicks off his second full-length, Lighght, with a 47-second violin solo. Near the end of the song, the line between what’s natural and what’s digitally manipulated blurs to create a frenetic sound somewhere between organic and experimental— wonder if he picked that up from his many shows opening for Of Montreal. Kishi Bashi’s versatile voice adds even more whimsy to the album. The Showbox. 9 p.m. $15 adv./$17 DOS. All ages. ACP Feel-good indie-poppers MATT POND PA celebrate the 10th anniversary of its album Emblems by playing it in its entirety, but there’s plenty of other material to draw upon as well, like last year’s equally pleasing The Lives Inside the Lines in Your Hand. With The Lighthouse and the Whaler. The Tractor, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 8:30 p.m. $15. 21 and over. DL SUZANNE VEGA’s cool and restrained vocal style leads one to wonder what it is about a singer that makes him or her good. Her easy, sing-song speaking wouldn’t be particularly interesting were it not for the mysterious subtleties of corruption and innocence she weaves into her lyrics. Her melodies are engaging but simple nonetheless. Yet in the seven years since the release of her last album of new material, the artist has been capitalizing on that catalog—which includes the most recognized song about child abuse, “Luka,” and the one about the famous Seinfeld hangout, “Tom’s Diner”—with a four-volume series, “Close-Up,” which reinterprets those songs and culminates in a four-disc set this August. Her latest album, Tales From the Realm of the Queen of Pentacles, dropped in February. With Ari Hest. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7 p.m. all ages, 10 p.m. 21 and over. $25–$50 adv. JM

Purr Gato and Jupe Jupe Doors at 7:30 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

Katie Kate plays Neumos on Thursday, May 15.

MONDAY, MAY 19

THE FRONT with Obsessive Compulsive, Expired Logic, The Assasinators, plus guests Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

TUESDAY, MAY 20 Take Warning Presents:

ARCHITECTS with LetLive., Glass Cloud and I The Mighty Doors at 6 / Show at 7:15PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 5/29 LOUNGE ISAIAH DOMINGUEZ 6/15 ARSONISTS GET ALL THE GIRLS 6/21 THE MARCH VIOLETS 6/26 GRAHAM LINDSEY / BILLY COOK 7/10 LOUNGE KOLDUN 7/16 SUFFOKATE 10/4 THE PRETTY RECKLESS

UP & COMING 5/22 LOUNGE EARLY MAN / WITCHBURN 5/23 LOUNGE LIKE VULTURES 5/24 WE THE AUDIENCE 5/25 SYMMETRY 5/25 LOUNGE MILONGA 5/26 BLACK COBRA 5/27 DEVILDRIVER / WHITECHAPEL 5/28 TYLER WARD 5/28 LOUNGE THE VEER UNION 5/30 METALACHI 5/31 ENVISIONIST

Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

MARLIN JAMES BAND

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

LocaLReLeases

Various artists, Seattle Noise Vol. 1 (May 20, Good to Die Records, goodtodierecords.com) A collaboration by Good to Die, AVR Music, and the Cha Cha Lounge’s bartending rocker Kerry Zettel, this compilation features 14 tracks from 14 of Seattle’s best bands. Recorded over a 10-day period last February with all bands sharing the same backline (with some band-to-band modifications), each track was specifically recorded for this compilation, and the energetic nature of the sessions shows as a result. The record opens strong with “Dogwater,” Sandrider’s shotgunned beer blast to the head, then takes a sharp turn with Crypts’ menacing electronic noise track “Carnivore.” While there are some notable names here (Constant Lovers, Deadkill, Theories), the tracks by some of the city’s newer bands—like The Great Goddamn, Blood Drugs, and Tacos!—are what really make this comp worthwhile. It’ll issue first via an (interesting) T-shirt/digital-download package on May 20, and thereafter can be found on goodtodierecords.com and Bandcamp. (CD release and listening party, May 20, Cha Cha Lounge) JAMES BALLINGER

Grynch, Street Lights (out now, self-released, get-

grynch.com) With his fourth full-length album, Seattle rapper Grynch waxes nostalgic, keeping one foot firmly planted in old-school hip-hop. An even dozen tracks pine for the days of rap past while reflecting on the ups and downs of his own career. On “Carry On,” the first track (and first single), he brings up the success of 2009’s “My Volvo” as he raps, “The folks at Volvo said they’d get me a new whip/ But here I am now two years later and they didn’t do shit/And for a while I had to struggle with the pen/Put it down for a second, fell in love with it again.” On “Unrequited,” he updates Common’s love letter to hip-hop, “I Used to Love H.E.R,” delivering the song’s original lyrics with a twist that reflects his early relationship with the genre: “I met this girl when I was 10 years old/And what I loved most is she had so much soul/She was oldschool and I was just a shorty/Never knew throughout my life that she would be there for me.” The album features guest spots from Malice and Mario Sweet, Kokane, Slug, and Bambu, among others, and production from the likes of Jake One, D-Sane, Justo (of The Physics), and MTK. While it might not be musically groundbreaking, Street Lights is another thoughtful, solid offering from one of Seattle’s most consistent MCs. MICHAEL F. BERRY

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Employment Computer/Technology TECHNOLOGY Salesforce.com, inc. has the following positions open in Seattle, WA: Senior Member of Technical Staff, Quality Engineering: Utilize extensive prior experience to perform functional manual and/or automated testing of features, including writing detailed testing plans and relevant test cases to cover business use cases, error handling and boundary conditions as defined in technical specifications. Member of Technical Staff, Quality Engineering: Perform functional manual and/or automated testing of features, including writing detailed testing plans and relevant test cases to cover business use cases, error handling and boundary conditions as defined in technical specifications. Lead Member of Technical Staff – Sales Cloud: Design, develop, and automate data structure and user interface. To apply or for more information, please go to http://www.salesforce.com/ company/careers/

Employment General MARKET DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Development Coordinator to research, plan and implement market programs throughout the organization. This position acts as a consultant and resource to Sound Publishing’s National/Regional Advertising Sales team and senior-level management; and is responsible for developing and implementing brand, market, and account specific sales and marketing presentations. The successful candidate will bring extensive marketing/advertising experience in the print and/or digital media industry. Must be proficient in InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat Pro, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and html5; have the ability to communicate effectively; possess excellent presentation skills as well as basic math and English skills. Candidate will also be a problem solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. Position requires a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing or related field and three to five years of marketing/brand experience. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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Employment Professional Deputy Director of Disaster Response for Christian non-profit global relief and development agency. Requires a Bachelor’s degree in International Development, Intercultural Studies, Emergency Management or related field and one (1) year experience managing relief activities for international humanitarian response programs including logistics and procurement, needs assessments, grant proposal development, project implementation and preparation of best-practice manuals. The position is located in Seattle, WA with 40% domestic/international travel. Send resume to World Concern, Attn: Diane Bricker, 19303 Fremont Avenue North, Seattle, Washington 98133. Please indicate DDDR in subject line. World Concern is an equal opportunity employer and does not unlawfully discriminate under federal, state, or local laws. As a religious organization, Christian faith is an essential function of the position based upon federal guidelines provided by Title VII, Section 702-703 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, and the Revised Code of Washington 49.60.040.

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Employment Legal Associate Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati seeks an Associate for its Seattle, WA office. Provide Legal and Business advice involving use of IP and Tech. Structure, draft, & negotiate legal policies, terms, & agreements. J.D. and 5 yrs of exp. Mail resume & cvltr to Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Attn: L. Nevarez . 650 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304. Must ref: 2014SL to be considered.

Real Estate for Sale King County

Carnation Regal Residence! Luxury 2 Story! 4 Bdrms 3 Baths, 3492sqft, Huge Garage. FHA & 203K Eligible. $446,200. 425-7667370; Realty West 206650-3908 HUD HOMES For Sale Save $$$! Renton: 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,753 SF, $286,000, ext.295. Renton: 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,492 SF, $253,000, ext. 380. Issaquah: 1 BR, 1 BA, 780 SF, $121,200, ext. 210. Chris Cross, KWR 800-711-9189, enter ext for 24-hr rec msg. www.WA-REO.com Splendid Lake WA View! Leshi! $589,900 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, 2240sqft + Garage. Totally Renewed. Realty West 206-570-7672 Apartments for Rent King County Commercial space avail perfect for office. 880sqft. Rent $1,760 + NNN. Call (206) 441-4922 Daniel University District 3 bedroom apts available for rent. 206-441-4922 9am–2pm

WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent Greenlake/WestSeattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

U-DISTRICT $450-$550 All Utilities Included! Call Peir for more info (206) 458-0169

Lead Generator for The Tree Industry Work Outdoors In high end neighborhoods setting Free Estimate Appointments with Homeowners. Help create awareness about proper trimming and maintenance of Trees & Shrubs to keep them safe and healthy. Set your own schedule. Most reps work 25-35 hours a week. Average Reps are earning $500-$750/ week and Top Reps are earning up to $1,500/ week setting appointments. Training, Flyers and Company Apparel Provided. Travel, Medical and Cell Phone Allowances Available. Must have Vehicle, Driver’s License & Cell Phone to be considered.

Corporate Office: 509-227-7410 ext. 3304 or 3308 Apply online at www.tlc4homesnw.com

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Announcements

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WANTS gls TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

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Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

Appliances

Appliances

AMANA RANGE Deluxe 30� Glasstop Range self clean, auto clock & timer ExtraLarge oven & storage *UNDER WARRANTY* Over $800. new. Pay off balance of $193 or make payments of $14 per month. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

STACK LAUNDRY Deluxe front loading washer & dryer. Energy efficient, 8 cycles. Like new condition * Under Warranty * Over $1,200 new, now only $578 or make payments of $25 per month

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& BRUSH REMOVEL 4HAULING 4EXCAVATION 4BACKHOE & 4BOBCAT WORK 4Lot Clearing HConcrete, Asphalt Removal HStump Removal HSmall Bldg Demolition HLandscaping Services

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KENMORE FREEZER

Repo Sears deluxe 20cu.ft. freezer 4 fast freeze shelves, defrost drain,

NOTICE interior light Washington State law *UNDER WARRANTY* requires wood sellers to Make $15 monthly payments or pay off balance of $293. provide an invoice (reCredit Dept. 206-244-6966 ceipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and KENMORE REPO the date delivered. The Heavy duty washer & dryer, deluxe, large cap. w/normal, invoice should also state perm-press & gentle cycles. the price, the quantity * Under Warranty! * delivered and the quanBalance left owing $272 or make payments of $25. Call tity upon which the price credit dept. is based. There should 206-244-6966 be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. NEW APPLIANCES UP TO 70% OFF When you buy firewood All Manufacturer Small Ding’s, write the seller’s phone Dents, Scratches and Factory number and the license Imperfections *Under Warranty* plate number of the deFor Inquiries, Call or Visit livery vehicle. Appliance Distributors @ The legal measure for 14639 Tukwila Intl. Blvd. firewood in Washington 206-244-6966 is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a REPO REFRIGERATOR Custom deluxe 22 cu. ft. sidefour-foot by eight-foot SF022198B by-side, ice & water1disp., color space filled with wood to panels available a height of four feet. UNDER WARRANTY! Most long bed pickup was over $1200 new, now only trucks have beds that payoff bal. of $473 or make are close to the four-foot pmts of only $15 per mo. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966 by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360-9021857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx

Yard and Garden

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FREE: ORGAN, Orbit Synthesizer Wurlitzer. Total Tone Deluxe. 4 keyboards. You must haul away. Call 425-3357734 from 10am to 8pm. (Lake Stevens) Miscellaneous

BUY JUNK CARS

Auto Events/ Auctions Stan’s Mountain View Towing Inc Abandoned Vehicle Auction 9000 Delridge Way SW, Seattle WA Wednesday 5/21/14 Gates Open 9AM, Auction 12 PM 206-767-4848

WE PAY CASH & MORE THAN OTHERS! PICKUP RIGHT AT YOUR FRONT DOOR PAY FROM $250 RUNNING 5/14/2014 OR NOT! KHOWARD 206-941-1857

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Seattle Weekly, May 14, 2014