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ATV CLUB MEETING

OROVILLE SOFTBALL OFF TO A 5-0 START

Hometown Pizza in Oroville Friday, April 4, 7-9 p.m.

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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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Mayor, county spar over highway

GO FLY A KITE

Oroville held their annual Kite Day under perfectly blustery conditions at Bud Clark Field last Saturday, March 26. The breeze helped kids of all ages launch their colorful kites skyward. It was one of the best turn outs since the tradition began as part of Oroville’s Centenial Celebration in 2008. As in past years the event was sponsored by the Oroville Chapter of the Royal Neighbors. The group gave out more than 100 free kites to launch this year’s event and helped add the long tails that made a big difference in how well the kites behaved. Below, Mike and Jennifer Ward from Wauconda introduce their nine-month old daughter, Wren, to the joys of flying a kite.

Heavy Haul talk highlights 10-point discussion between Plumb and County Commissioners

Gary DeVon/staff photo

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

OKANOGAN - Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb wanted a chance to meet with the Okanogan County Commissioners. He got that opportunity Monday, March 24, entering the commissioners’ chambers along with Tonasket City Council Member Scott Olson and Kurt Danison of Highands Associates, who serves as Tonasket’s (and other cities) city planner. Plumb had submitted a 10-point agenda of discussion points to commissioners Jim DeTro, Ray Campbell and Sheilah Kennedy that included: • the contentious (but heretofore indirect) issue of running a Heavy Haul corridor from Oroville Patrick Plumb to Pateros on US-97 through downtown Tonasket; • discussion about “.09 funds” and communicating with other cities in the county that may have common interests on that issue; • transitional issues regarding areas newly-annexed into the City of Tonasket; • requesting a finalized airport plan for the Tonasket area; • issues with the Oakes Trailer Park/Johns Landing sewer system, which is operated by the city but is outside the city limits; • the possibility of discussing connecting the U.S. and Canadian rail lines near Oroville; • attempting to gain an easement so that a southerly access to Chief Tonasket Park could be opened; • strengthening the economic conditions of North Okanogan County; • getting the commissioners’ take on the potential creation of a parks and recreation district to fund the operation of the proposed Tonasket swimming pool; • and Plumb’s offer to support the county on any projects it might need support on. The lengthiest discussion was, to no one’s surprise, regarding the Heavy Haul corridor designation. Though there wasn’t a consensus reached by the commissioners and the Tonasket representatives, there wasn’t much doubt where any of the parties stood after hashing over a number of aspects of the issue. While the possibility of the designation occurring is uncertain, Plumb has been displeased that the county had sought the it without consulting the city of Tonasket since the highway runs through its downtown core. The condition of the underlying infrastructure, Plumb said, is inadequate for what a Heavy Haul Corridor would require. “I caught wind through the media that this was going on and I was a bit taken aback by it,” Plumb said. “As some of you are aware there had been some talk it wouldn’t cost any money. I’d already had a city analysis done by our city engineer, Varela and Associates, and they said that it would cost about $5 million to fix the mile of roadway to bring it up to standard.” He noted that the recent Third/Fifth/ Sixth Street project to assess drainage issues in town had to stop more than 15 feet away from the highway, leaving drainage along the highway still a problem as well as costing the city an ADA wheelchair ramp. “We were told ... that if we touched that

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NVH chooses new CT scanner Full TSD

Board slate

Community health education series slated to begin in April

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Even in the midst of taking care of basic infrastructure needs - the oft-discussed boiler system and malfunctioning backup generator often on the forefront - North Valley Hospital District has kept its focus on another needed replacement: the hospital’s computed tomography (CT) scanner that it has been looking at upgrading for the past year. The old General Electric CT has reached the end of its useful life as its lease has expired (and since been extended to the end of 2014) and has increasingly lost operational time for a variety of repairs. Shane Pyper and Noreen Olma explained the process they went through to choose the new GE C660 scanner, an upgrade that actually will cost $735 per month less on lease than the outgoing unit. “After doing the site visits I felt the GE unit was best for a number of reasons,” Pyper said. “It’s a low-dose CT; it would be the lowest in the valley. Hopefully it will bring in business if we advertise that it is low-dose.” Pyper said that he didn’t automatically go back to GE, also considering Toshiba and Siemens units. The new CT is a 32-slice unit that, with its software package, functions as

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 14

NVH/submitted photo

Shane Pyper shows off North Valley Hospital’s current CT scanner. That scanner has reached the end of its life cycle; Pyper’s recommendation for a replacement was approved by the NVH Board of Commissioners last Thursday. a 64-slice. “We weren’t convinced GE was the best just because we’ve always been GE,” Olma said. “It was, do we want to stay with the status quo or make everyone sharpen their pencils? We were pleasantly surprised. We know what we’re getting with GE. We know their service...it will be the same engineers and technicians in the same place.” The new unit was included in the 2014 budget, as was the construction of the new CT shell that will be needed to house it. Originally the shell, which will

be much closer to the emergency room than the current unit, was to have been built as part of the larger construction project, but was postponed due to the district’s financial issues until it was necessary. The new unit also would not fit into the old unit’s current home. “We originally wanted to put the old CT in the new room but we had to cut that part of out of the project,” Olma said. “We left the old one in its current spot. It’s reached its end of life, so we’re

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INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board had a full and varied slate to discuss at the Monday, March 24, board meeting, covering everything from finances to curricula, grading methods and a spectrum of administrative reports. Legislative follies Superintendent Paul Turner reported a good news/bad news situation regarding actions from the state legislature that will have consequences on future school budget. On the good side, school districts will now be able to hang on to about half of the money provided by the federal government in lieu of taxes paid on federal forest land. “We’ll get (to keep about half) of our federal forest dollars, about $70,000,” Turner said. “We get one lump sum a year and the state takes out on a monthly basis to counter that.” That said, this year’s federal dollars haven’t been forthcoming yet though the state has still been taking its share from school districts. “It was due two months ago,” Turner said. “There’s $140,000 out there that we should have gotten and no one knows where it’s at. In the meantime, the state is taking out 1/12 of what that is (each month). So we’re going in the negative until we get that.” That actually wasn’t the bad news.

Valley Life A2-3 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Outdoors Obituaries Cops & Courts

A8 A9 A9

Classifieds/Legals A10 Real Estate A11 Sports A12-13


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 3, 2014

BLUSTERY JUST RIGHT FOR KITE DAY Photos by Gary DeVon

“Long tails were the secret this year,” Marilyn McCauley, Oroville Royal Neighbors

Oroville continues a tradition started with the town’s centennial in 2008, Kite Day. Above left, despite being a little chilly at times the conditions were just right for flight and there were the most kites in the air at one time as there had been in the past few years. Above, right, Rene Lavigueure, age 5, from Oroville, tries out one of the twirling streamers brought by Michael ‘Buffalo’ Mazetti (right). Left, Luke Studard, 7, Davana Buaugher, 10, and Vickie Martinez, 11, get a helping hand adding longer tails to their kites by Oroville Royal Neighbors member Marilyn McCauley. The group sponsored Kite Day and gave out 123 free kites to kids of all ages.

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APRIL 3, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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Tonasket Knowledge New management takes over OK Chevy Bowl 7th at State BY BRENT BAKER

BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Emphasizing a desire to bring more business to Tonasket as well as increasing community involvement, a new management team is hoping to bring some of the old spark to OK Chevrolet. The auto dealership has been sporting an “under new management” sign on its facade since early March, and that won’t be the end of changes customers will notice. “We’re going to do some remodel work in the showroom,” says new General Manager Wes Heinsma. We plan to expand our lot. We’ve got some stuff in the works. We’ll bulk up on some inventory so there’s better selection.” Heinsma has been working at Sunrise Chevrolet in Omak since 2009, but saw an opportunity in Tonasket. “It’s still owned by the same ownership,” he says. “(Tony Booth) still owns it out of Colville; Jason (Bernica)’s a partWes Heinsma ner, too. I’m hoping to become a partner here in the future. That’s one of the reasons I made the move north.” Heinsma made a number of moves right away, including fellow Sunrise employee Angie Gavin, a lifelong Tonasket resident, to make the business move with him as his sales and finance manager, and hiring former GM Rich Fewkes to his sales staff. Kris Duchow is also a new face in the front room, handling internet support and sales. “We want to get established with the community, support the community and keep as much as we can local,” Heinsma says. “We support the rodeo. We want to get more involved with the schools and their programs. We want to be in with the community in general. Joining the Chamber, trying to figure out what’s actually going on in town all the time.” Heinsma, currently a single dad with four daughters high school age and older, is

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

Brent Baker/staff photo

The OK Chevrolet team includes (top, l-r) Tyler Giles-Farley, Cameron Nelson, Pablo Nava, Rod Moore, Wes Heinsma, (front) Angie Gavin, Kris Duchow, Katy Tibbs, Nick Stafford, David Williams, Jim McCormick and Rich Fewkes. Not pictured is Mike McCarter. planning on making the move to Tonasket permanent. “My daughters are at a good age for me to do something like this,” Heinsma says. “so my main energy is going to be focused here.” Gavin, who formerly managed Omak’s Koala Bar and Grill and had been at Sunrise for about a year and a half, said that making the move “home” was an easy choice for her. “I’ve been making that commute for eight years,” Gavin says. “When Wes brought the idea to me, it was like, ‘Boom, yes I’ll go.’ Angie Gavin “My parents have done so much for me the past eight years, driving back and forth. They were taking the kids to practices, cooking them dinner. They were seeing them more than me. Now can see them an hour and a half more a day, and actually be their mom again.”

Gavin says she shares Heinsma’s business philosophy. “Coming home, working in the home town, just bringing business back home again is our main goal,” she says. “There are cars that we just don’t get in these stores. So if we don’t have it, we’ll find it for you. Whether it be at one of our sister stores, in Tacoma, in Montana, Rich Fewkes we’ll go get it for you.” Fewkes has been mostly retired since the sale of the former Hedlund Chevrolet to Booth in 2009, but was eager to return to the shop at which he was general manager for 26 years. “Wes looks at the local community the way we used to,” Fewkes says. “It just seemed like a good time, because he’s for real. To me, he is a great guy and that’s why I came back.”

Fundraiser concert for student’s trip to medical leadership forum April 11 THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

TONASKET - A benefit fundraiser concert will be held Friday, April 11, at Tonasket High School to raise money to support THS junior Tiffany Ferdon, who is raising money to attend NYLF Medicine, a nine-day national youth leadership forum for high-

achieving students preparing for a career in medicine. About a dozen conferences will be taking place at prominent medical universities throughout the country to allow students to engage with issues in public health, medical ethics, research and general practice. “The program provides and

important behind-the-scenes perspective on medical careers,” said Margerite Regan, Ph.D., dean of academic affairs for NWLF, in a press release. “This is a critical time for high school students to begin exploring their career paths, just prior to immersing themselves in college coursework and creating a pathway to future

success.” Though scholarships are available, tuition and housing costs (excluding travel to and from the course) run nearly $2,700. Chuck Oakes and Brock Hires will be providing the featured music. there will also be optical illusions and face painting taking place from 4:00-9:00 p.m.

ARLINGTON - Even down one member, the Tonasket High School Knowledge Bowl team earned a seventh place finish on Saturday, March 26, in Arlington. “It was pretty amazing, considering we were playing ‘one man down,’” said coach Susan McCue, whose teams have traveled to state four straight years and placed three times. Levi Schell, Kahlil Butler, Dalton Smith, Alex Mershon and Thomas Kennedy competed fiveon-six against the other top teams in the state. McCue said the competition involved the following: • The meet started at 8:00 a.m. with a written round followed by four oral rounds. • The top scoring teams moved on to the championship rounds; the other teams were released. • The championship rounds consisted of two oral rounds of three teams in three rooms. The

winners of the first oral round play for first, second and third place. The second place finishers compete for fourth, fifth and sixth, and the third place finishers play for seventh, eighth and ninth. “We were close to finishing second in the first championship round, until, a string of obscure show tune questions gave our competitors the advantage,” McCue said. “We went on to finish first in the last round to place seventh overall.” McCue said that the trip itself was an experience for the team. “I enjoyed hearing the discovery in their voices (‘Wow! It’s so green!’ and ‘I never want to drive in this!’),” she said. “And to see them compete is impressive.” Four Caribou Trail League schools (including Cascade, Okanogan and Cashmere) finished in the top nine. In Class 2B, Liberty Bell finished ninth as North Central Washington was well-represented at the state finals.

Tonasket kindergarten round-up information SUBMITTED BY TONASKET SCHOOL DISTRICT TONASKET Tonasket Elementary School will be holding kindergarten registration/arent night for the 2014-15 school year.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE INFORMATIONAL MEETING AND REGISTRATION

• Informational meeting will be Tuesday, April 15, 6:30 p.m. in the Elementary School library. Topics include a meet-and-greet with school staff, handing out of registration paperwork, signing up for registration times and a question and answer time with the kindergarten staff. Childcare will be provided. • Registration day will be April 16, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. in the School District administration office. Return and/or complete paperwork for your child that is at least five years of age on or before Aug. 31, 2014. If you miss these dates, please come into the office during regular school

hours to register your child (8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.). Phone is (509) 486-4933. SPANISH LANGUAGE INFORMATIONAL MEETING AND REGISTRATION

• Informational meeting will be Wednesday, April 16, 6:30 p.m. in the Elementary School library. Topics include a meet-and-greet with school staff, handing out of registration paperwork, signing up for registration times and a question and answer time with the kindergarten staff. Childcare will be provided. • Registration day will be Thursday, April 17, 9:00 a.m.3:00 p.m. in the School District administration office. Return and/or complete paperwork for your child that is at least five years of age on or before Aug. 31, 2014. If you miss these dates, please come into the office during regular school hours to register your child (8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.). Phone is (509) 486-4933.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

Contributing to the community in which we live 2013 Community Support: Dollars, Programs, Goods and Time In 2013, Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn donated over $370,000 of dollars and goods to local causes. Kinross employees donated nearly $100,000 in time, labor and expertise to the local community. Kinross employees donated a combined 2,265 hours of time to community programs. That’s more than the average American work year of 2,080 hours! Donations and Volunteerism

2014 Local Tax Breakdown Kinross Kettle River - Buckhorn pays local property taxes that support essential community services. This breakdown demonstrates some of the services in Ferry and Okanogan Counties benefiting most from Kinross property tax payments. Between both counties, approximately $1.6M in property tax is collected annually, representing nearly 4% of local tax base. Local Taxes


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 3, 2014

DONKEY BASKETBALL, TONASKET STYLE

That came in the form of the state legislature failing to come to an agreement on how to tie state assessments to teacher evaluations. That will cause Washington to lose its waiver to the No Child Left Behind act, which has consequences both how schools must manage their budgets as well as how schools are evaluated. “Last Tuesday we had a meeting in Wenatchee with two representatives from OSPI (Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction and they couldn’t tell us exactly what will happen,” Turner said. “What should happen ... we will be going back to two years ago when we were in AYP (the Annual Yearly Progress report system) and what I understand is they will roll our scores forward from the last two years to try to figure out where every school district is at. ... What that means now, no one can give us an answer. “What it does affect is that we have to set aside 30 percent of our Title I funding So we may gain $70,000 on our timber dollars but we have to set aside $100,000 for SES services and professional development.”

One week after Oroville hosted Donkey Basketball, Tonasket High School put on its own event. Top, the Tonasket Pizza Company team, comprised of high school students, defeated the Tonasket Firefighters, including Krissy (Call) Vance (at right). Also competing were teams sponsored by Subway and the Tonasket High School staff. Pizza Company’s John Rawley, erstwhile state medal-winning wrestlers, scored 20 points in his teams opening game to lead all scorers. Terry Mills/submitted photos

commissioners | FROM A1 we would have to bring it all up to code,” Plumb said. Danison recounted the history of the city’s attempts to have its US-97 issues addressed with the Washington Department of Transportation. “Tonasket is especially sensitive to 97,” Danison said. “Fifteen years or so ago, they were promised by the DOT a grind and fill. The next time it was just to grind and fill the travel lanes ... then it was a chip seal. The problem in Tonasket is there’s hardly any curb left. The DOT keeps telling Tonasket they need to apply for these programs and replace the ADA ramps and sidewalks. But how can we Jim DeTro actually do that with any certainty if it’s (we don’t know) the right elevation? ... “So there is this junction of misunderstanding, lack of communication, and for Tonasket it becomes a much more serious problem than for any other city in the county.” Danison did say that it was possible that the Heavy Haul Corridor might be the way for Tonasket to get the funding it needed to fix the highway. “(That could be) a beneficial side to that,” he said. “There’s a much higher level of recognition to these issues ... having the Heavy Haul at least out there, there is another reason out there to have Tonasket on the (state funding) list.” “I know that you were upset because of the fact that you were not notified,” DeTro said. “But I take exception to that because you were at the school board meeting (in December) where Rep. (Joel) Kretz, Sen. (Brian)

Dansel and I, all three, addressed this and pleaded with you to say it wasn’t our fault the DOT decided to chip seal. Maybe if you could help with this situation it might give you one more reason to fix your road.” Plumb noted the DeTro also said at the time that the designation would not cost any money and that the highway through town was already falling apart, which could be worsened by heavier loads rolling through town. “We just keep chip sealing,” Plumb said. “You said you would go with what the DOT said. And they did do an analysis ... and specifically said the Tonasket infrastructure needs to be entirely redone.” Campbell noted that the analysis was a preliminary one. The other issue regarding the Heavy Haul Corridor was differing perspectives on whether or not it would harm the railroad. Council member Olson said he felt Heavy Haul would hurt the existing railroad; DeTro said he thought it would actually help it. Olson felt that businesses that switched from hauling their goods via truck instead of rail would make it more difficult for the businesses that still wanted to use the rail system. “If they no longer have others using the railroad, it’s going to cost them a lot more to haul that stuff out,” Olson said. “Or, they’ll have to find a different way to haul it. I think the railroad is great infrastructure.” “People in the tree fruit industry that are asking to have this done so they can bring their fruit out of Canada and process it at these warehouses in Okanogan County, it’s going to enhance job. The railroad will get more freight from those diversion points after the apples or cherries or whatever

get to processing. “There’s Chelan Fresh involved, Golddigger ... several different entities regardless of whether they are owned by one company or not, does not diminish the fact that once they are processed they might be shipped by rail as well as truck. I’m not following how you say it will take jobs awa. It’s going to add jobs.” Campbell also pointed out that a number of trucks coming from Canada end up dropping half their loads and end up making two trips back and forth to the border due to the current weight restrictions; he disagreed with Plumb that it would increase the amount of traffic flowing through Tonasket. “I said it was my experience that Patrick, if everyone else in the room says the sun is shining, he’ll say it’s not.” DeTro said. “I’ve seen that in the Republican caucus. I know it’s for a purpose that you do that, but I’ve seen that.” “I was elected by the city of Tonasket to do what’s best for my constituents,” Plumb said. “This road being in this condition is not good for our businesses or pedestrians in my city... I’m not partisan; you guys have ‘Rs’ behind your names. But when the rubber hits the road, I’m not afraid of saying no to anyone.” Afters some further discussion, DeTro made a point of vocalizing his support for the railroad. “I support the railroad wholeheartedly,” he said. “It’s a vital part of our infrastructure. I know the guys that are engineers. I don’t want to see the lose their jobs. I want more freight on there. It’s a misnomer that this will destroy the railroad .” “None of us want to interfere with Tonasket’s ability to upgrade the highway,” Campbell added. “We want to support getting that done.”

HOSPITAL | FROM A1 taking advantage of the need to replace it, get a new system and finish the room.” Olma added that building the new shell for the new unit should help make for a seamless transition. “That’s the biggest piece to me is, we should have zero downtime,” she said. “We don’t want to miss one exam while we’re installing.” The board unanimously approved Pyper’s proposal.

Community education Business Development Director Terri Orford reported that she had finalized the hospital district’s community outreach education schedule. First up, she said, would be a course presented by Dr. Missy Swenson on women and heart disease. The courses will include: • Women and Heart Disease, April 29, 6:00 p.m. (note that the Apr. 24 date in the Community Calendar is incorrect); • Family and Friends CPR, presented by certified trainer Shauneen Range, May 8, 6:00

SCHOOL | FROM A1

p.m.; • Respiratory Care, presented by Respiratory Therapist Ken Radford, June 26, 6:00 p.m.; • Healthy Eating, presented by Registered Dietician Amber Hall, July 24, 6:00 p.m.; • Physical Therapy, presented by Dr. Jeff Massart, Aug. 28, 6:00 p.m.; • Breast Feeding Basics (in both English and Spanish), presented by OB Coordinator Pam Thacker, RN; • and Colon Health and Cancer Prevention, presented by Dr. Donald Sebesta, Oct. 23, 6:00 p.m. The courses do require registration as space is limited and varies by session. Register online at www.nvhospital.org/wellnessprogram-registration simply call 509-486-3163. Orford added that the hospital’s Facebook page has returned, though with stricter policies than what it had before. “It’s more of a message board for us,” she said. “People can still ‘Like’ posts and make comments, but they have to be approved by

me according to the standards we’ve set up.” Orford said she also had applied for a number of grants, the most significant of which would provide three quarters of the funding to replace old, inefficient windows in the Extended Care facility. The Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, April 10.

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Enrollment Turner and the board also discussed what enrollment level to base the 2014-15 budget on in light of the unique circumstances the district will be dealing with this fall. Typically the district bases its enrollment figure for the next school year on its March enrollment, subtracting 20-30 students to allow a margin for error in case of an unexpected reduction in enrollment in the fall. Schools receive state funding based on those enrollment figures. The complication this year: the district is extending its day back to what is considered a “full day,” adding about 45 minutes a day to the schedule. Additional staffing is in the process of being hired to cover the additional course offerings and other staff requirements; that additional staffing will be paid for primarily by money to be collected from the recently-passed Maintenance and Operations Levy. However, that additional funding won’t be collected until after the new year, leaving the district working to figure out ways to get through the first four months of the school year. Turner suggested basing the 2014-15 budget on a slightly higher enrollment than has been the district’s policy in the past to bring in increased funding during those first few months of the school year. “Usually we are conservative in our enrollment, cutting it down (from the actual expected number) by about 20,” Turner said, noting that he started with a projected enrollment of 1,050 for next fall. “So usually we might budget at 1,030. “When we budget at a lower number, we receive funding in the fall at that lower number. In January we get our catch-up to our actual enrollment. ... What I propose tonight is we look at it differently next year to get us through that fall shortfall of funds. I propose we budget at that expected number of 1,050. That will give us a constant revenue source through the fall into the spring, instead of a lower revenue source in the fall when we need it in lieu of the bump we usually get.” Business manager Deb Kitterman said that if enrollment came in below the projected number, the district would be able to set aside funds so that when the funding correction came in January there would be money to do so. Several school board members expressed discomfort with the plan. “I’d like to stay pretty conservative with this,” Lloyd Caton said. “What if we only get 1,045 or 1,040?” “We’re talking about 100-grand over 3-4 months,” said Board Member Ty Olson. “It would help me if I understood what one student represents, what 10 students represents ...so we can do some math. What is a student worth (budget-wise) - we’re throwing

darts at a wall right now.” The board took no action, but based on Kitterman’s recommendation committed to making a decision at the April 14 meeting.

Reporting on reports Each of the district administrators shared reports from their buildings, as well as a high school School Improvement Plan presentation coordinated by Jim Swanson. Key points from the presentations included: • Special Education Director Liz Stucker further discussed the potential impact of the state losing its NCLB waiver, as well as other changes to the Title I program. • Elementary Principal Jeremy Clark reviewed recent student successes, including the Math is Cool fifth grade tea taking third place in regional competition and two students attending the regional spelling bee. He also reported that the elementary school staff was making preparations to shift to Standards Based Grading next fall, which was elaborated on later in the meeting. • Middle School Principal Jay Tyus reported on the success of student-led conferences. He also said that the school received recognition for work done with English Language Learning students. “It’s the first time ever the state school board has done this, we were awarded an English Language Acquisition award for exceptional work with ELL students, one of eight tmiddle schools showing high promise in teaching kids that are ELL,” Tyus said. “It speaks well for Tyler Graves, but also anyone who has taught any of those kids along the way. It’s really a K-8 award.” • High School Principal Jeff Hardesty also reported a successful run with student-led conferences. He added that he was putting together a community group in an attempt to improve the relationship between the school and the community. “We’re talking about issues common to youth in the community,” Hardesty said. “We have some excited community members willing to meet on a monthly basis with me.” • Swanson, Amanda Chase and Shawn Rader discussed various aspects of the school improvement program upon which they have worked. Rader’s discussion was most accessible to noneducators as he discussed what changing over to Standards Based Grading meant. Rader said that, though it is an integral part of TPEP (Teacher/ Principal Evaluation Project) requirements, it’s something he’s been working on for some time. “It came to me after a talk with (an exchange student from Brazil,” he said. In AP biology we started talking about grade point averages. When I asked him what he had, he said they didn’t have that in Brazil. I thought that was interesting ... how do you measure what you’ve done? “He said, you have a checklist. Once you’ve mastered everything on the checklist, you get to graduate. And that is what this standards-based grading is all about. I can look at a student’s GPA and it tells me nothing about what that student knows.” Rader said there are both course objects and daily objectives that students know they need to master, and they are on each objective on a four-level scale as to their mastery.

“The objectives ... are actual learning goals that the state says are things they need to know,” he said. “They also become test questions. I don’t hide anything. The kids know what they will be tested on from Day 1. I also have a daily objective, so they know at the end of the day what they need to be able to do.” He said that with such as system it’s much clearer what students have learned and how well, as opposed to a general grade that might also include social skills or homework completion rate all wrapped into a single letter grade. “(With Standards Based Grading) they know exactly what they know and don’t know, and I as a teacher can tell what they know and don’t know,” Rader said. “You don’t see that in a GPA. Next year I am going to institute the checklist... to me that is more important than what any stupid grade in a grade book. They know where they’re at, and I know where they’re at.”

Calendar (mostly) approved The board approved the calendar for the 2014-15 school year but left open the question as to what time the longer school day would begin and end. Turner had proposed having the day run from 8:15 a.m.-3:00 p.m. (extended from the current 8:30-2:30), but the board asked for more research into what would be best for the students. Concerns expressed included the length of time and time of day students in more distant locations would need to be out waiting for the bus (potentially as early as 6:30 a.m. for some) and what the best hours were for student learning in the classroom. That issue will be discussed at a future meeting. Excellent education Teacher/librarian Kim Fitzthum and speech-language pathology assistant Sue Johnson were recognized as the district’s Excellence in Education honorees. The district hosts the Okanogan County Excellence in Education banquet in the high school commons on Thursday, May 8. The two (Fitzthum as a certified teacher, Johnson as classified staff) will be honored alongside representatives from other county school districts. Social skills curriculum Fitzthum submitted a curriculum for the board’s consideration designed to teach kindergarten through fifth graders social skills and coping strategies that, if approved, would likely be taught by a school counselor. The board did not make a decision on the curriculum at the meeting. The “older brother” of the curriculum has been used at the middle school level. School Psychologist Jim Huckaby was also on hand as he had participated in the piloting and development of the curriculum. While the it has somewhat of a reputation as a “suicide prevention” curriculum, Huckaby said that it includes a lot more than that. “It’s social competence, cooperation, coping, caring and other attributes that we hope to instill,” he said. Fitzthum added that it includes a parent introductory information letter. The school board next meets on Monday, April 14, at 7:30 p.m.

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APRIL 3, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

LETTERS Half a million for bathrooms - it’s no TO THE EDITOR April Fools joke When their facilities consultant told the school board that renovating two of the Oroville Elementary School bathrooms would be between $400-450,000 or more, you could have heard a pin drop. Even when you consider that’s actually four bathrooms (boys and girls on the north end of the building, and boys and girls on the south end) it still seemed like it was some sort of early April Fool’s joke. Unfortunately, it’s no joke, but it should be. Why, for half a million, you’d think the district could airlift two new brand new restrooms and set them down on the playgrounds, install the plumbing, etc. and still have money to burn. The whole new roof, including building in new substructure to get better elevation for a good portion, was only in the half million dollar range. We’re not talking about reinventing the wheel here. Though one set of restrooms, on the north end, has some pretty bad plumbing problems with antiquated water pipes encased in cement, Out of other has already had its plumbing updated My Mind the through a grant. That leaves purchasing new fixGary A. DeVon tures and bringing everything up to Americans with Disability Act (ADA) codes. The biggest problem seems to be making sure the doors are wide enough to allow wheelchair access. In the one set of bathrooms, on the south end, that will be harder because of the current layout. So, unless we are getting gold plated fixtures once used in the palaces of some Saudi princes, we’re not buying the estimated price tag. The voters within the Oroville School District generously approved a special three-year $1.2 million capital improvement levy to replace the elementary roof, with the understanding that the left over funds would be used for needed projects like the restrooms. While the roof came well under the original estimate, the remaining funds need to be spent wisely to get as many needed improvements done as possible. One improvement that is in process right now is to the heating and cooling system. While it is relatively new, it still needed some updating to get to the point where some classrooms aren’t so warm that they have to open windows and doors to balance out the temperature. The HVAC upgrades won’t eat up the remaining funds, and district Business Manager Shay Shaw says there should be at least $400,000 left to do the restroom project. That’s too unpalatable a price for most of your average taxpayers to swallow. Board Chairman Rocky DeVon said it’s way too high and he wants to return some of the unused levy dollars to the public, rather than spend them all. The bathrooms do need an upgrade – they’re basically the same as when Rocky and I were in school there sometime during the 20th century. On the north end they’re probably the same as when people our parents’ age went to school there. Most of us would be fine with spending all the money on legitimate projects at the elementary school. But whether we spend it all or return some to the public, what we do need to do is make sure we aren’t overspending on something that could be done for half the cost. The board’s first step is to have an architect draw up plans for the restrooms and then call for bids. If the bids come in too high I suspect it will be back to the drawing board for everyone.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Thrown into recycle bin

Dear Editor, The idea that the Affordable Care Act or Obama care is addressing injustice begs the question that was asked on the front page of your March 20th newspaper: Really? This article asked the question, who would throw fecal matter into the cardboard recycle bin? Rob Thompson does not appear to have a problem with the fecal matter that was thrown at the public to promote Obama care or maybe he forgot all that in the euphoria of the “healthcare for all” moment. Who knows how many people were thrown into the recycle bin when it came to the “if you like your health insurance plan you can keep it” statement, or the “it will save the average family of four 2500 dollars a year”. There are many other statements and promises that have proved to be more socialist poop that is part of this plan. But the good news is that now that we have been force to swallow all that, we can justify these lies with; it is about liberty and justice for all... Really? Who has made the cost of healthcare go up? Who said there would be no “death panel,” (now we know) it is called a medical advisor board? Who has forced companies and institutions that are pro life to provide abortion drugs against their conscience? Who has limited cancer medication and treatment that was covered under old plans, not covered under Obama care? Who has made the best cancer treatment centers off limits to those on the Obama care plan? Is this justice for all? The Obama administration just shook down the Toyota Corporation to the tune of

1.4 billion for lying about the safety issues they were having with one of their cars, there by putting the public at risk. Will those who pushed this health care plan on this nation be held accountable for the lies they used in forcing their agenda on the public? It wouldn’t take a DNA forensic investigation to figure out who crapped on the health care system this nation once had, but if that crap is relabeled: Chocolate, some people will love it, I guess? Steve Lorz Tonasket

Thoughts on missing Malaysian airliner

Dear Editor The real question that should be asked with respect to the missing Malaysian airliner is not “where in tarnation is the darn thing?” Rather, we should be asking is why, in this modern age of affordable GPS technology, do we not know precisely where it is?

One would think that we are still back in 1932 when Amelia Earhart disappeared from the “radar screen.” This is 2014! How can a large aircraft be missing, virtually without a trace, for more than 12 days? GPS technology is today employed by trucking and cab companies to track every movement of their vehicles. Parents can even afford to track their children’s whereabouts when they go cruising in the family vehicle. In my guise as an old pilot, and with a certain frustration, I suggest that every commercial aircraft be required to carry GPS tamper-proof tracking. It might be employed like the black box, in a manner that cannot be disabled or erased before successful completion of a flight. Had such technology been employed by Malaysia, authorities would have known instantly the exact position of a landing or crash site. The logical concluding question is for our own Western governments and the FAA: Why not? Indeed, why not? Kell Petersen Osoyoos, BC

Oso: Families are the story BY JERRY CORNFIELD EVERETT HERALD WRITER

You may notice the daily media briefings on the Oso mudslide getting shorter and tenser with less said and more questions asked. As unanswered questions pile up, some of those chronicling the disaster are losing patience. So are some of those entrusted with trying to sort things out. One flashpoint has been a push to get names of those killed or missing released to the public, though not everyone in the public may want it out. Another source of stress has been stories giving voice to second-guessers of the response even while grief-stricken families await word of their loved ones. Such tension is no surprise, it just seems to be occurring sooner than one might expect. Generally coverage of disasters tends to follow a pattern. At first, the focus is on telling what happened and describing the emergency response. Next come tales of heroism, profiles of survivors and portraits of victims. Eventually, reporting will fix on how well government forces reacted and the causes of this horrific event. Criticism tends to emerge in the later phases. The magnitude of this tragedy, with

the search for victims expected to take weeks, has disrupted everything. It is not crystal clear-when it is okay to dial back on chronicling the response and to begin unraveling whether there are parties at fault. Nor is there a bright line between seeking details of the lives of those who’ve died and what constitutes invading the personal space of their survivors. As a result, in the course of this week, those spearheading the rescue efforts in the field and the operations centers found themselves discussing matters probably few Arlington and Darrington residents felt needed addressing with so many people left to be found. Old scientific studies spurred questions about what Snohomish County leaders knew of the potential hazards of river flooding and hillside failure, and when they knew it. Frustrated residents and politicians had John Pennington, head of the Snohomish County Department of Emergency Management, on his heels explaining why the county didn’t request assistance sooner from the Washington National Guard. Common sense says such lines of inquiry can be investigated fully later. But common sense can disappear quickly in a pressurecooker of international attention. Early in the week I started asking questions

on these subjects but felt reticent to publish the answers because it felt too soon. Rep. Elizabeth Scott, R-Monroe, didn’t feel so inhibited and decided to trash-talk the performance of government forces coordinating the response. I couldn’t ignore her and it’ll be up to her constituents to decide this fall if her performance this week merits another term. And when Major Gen. Bret Daugherty, the commander of the Washington National Guard, called it a “terrible mistake” to second guess Pennington’s decision, the observation was worth sharing for exploration later. Things came to a head at Friday morning’s media briefing which ended with a rebuke of some media members pressing for additional details about the names and number of the dead and missing. Families have been advised of the process and getting out the information, said Everett police Lt. Robert Goetz. “They understand it, so I hope you do,” he told reporters. Families are still the story of the Oso mudslide – and the other questions can wait. Political reporter Jerry Cornfield’s blog, The Petri Dish, is at www.heraldnet.com. Contact him at (360) 352-8623 or jcornfield@heraldnet.com

Results not reasons OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

Is education failing in America? Undeniably. NPR, in December: “‘In mathematics, 29 nations... outperformed America... up from 23,’ reports Education Week. ‘In science, 22 education systems scored above America, up from 18. In reading, 19 locales scored higher than US students, a jump from 9. The top overall scores came from Shanghai, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea, Macao and Japan, followed by Lichtenstein, Bill Slusher Switzerland, the Netherlands and Estonia. American Education Secretary Arne Duncan calls it ‘a picture of educational stagnation.’” Even Duncan is wrong. The data above show our education system is not ‘stagnant’ meaning motionless... no... it’s dropping like a greased anvil. What to do? Take lessons from the US Army, I say. That odd sound you hear is sneers from the American education establishment at my suggestion. But consider: In one year, our Army can train 18-year-old youngsters to become excellent military helicopter pilots in a highly technical and very demanding field that would take American colleges four years to even approach. I know. I was both college student and Army instructor pilot. Army flight students are taught table manners, traditions, courtesy, pride, respect, and history along with electronics, weaponry, navigation, meteorology, aviation law, tactics, flight systems, aerodynamics and much more. The Army trains its own teachers, and to only one standard... results. Flight instructors in both classroom and cockpit are specifically

selected for their capacity not just to fly but to teach students to fly. If you don’t turn out qualified students, on time, you’re quickly replaced by a teacher who will. The Army is not interested in your excuses for why you can’t produce in the classroom and cockpit. Get it done or get out. Army teachers are not unionized. There’s no archaic tenure to protect them from having to compete on merit. The Army picks its students of course, a very critical luxury not permitted public school teachers who must work with any student thrust at them. The Army doesn’t give a hoot about your race, gender, country of origin, neighborhood, religion nor even your sexual preference. If you can cut the demanding personal standards and pass rigidly standardized testing, you’ll get your wings right along with the hetero white boys who qualify. You must be a US citizen and speak workable English (the official language of international aviation), but if you’re a naturalized citizen for whom English is a second language, you’re still in if you can perform on the testing. You will show up for every class or flight on time, pay attention and apply yourself. Misbehavior or cancer of the attitude will promptly get you yanked out of class and disciplined in unconfusing ways. The Army tries to help genuinely troubled students but ultimately personal problems are not an excuse. They want to see your results on the tests. You’re right. Army education differs drastically from public school teaching in many ways, so let’s not ship our five-year-olds off to boot camp. Still, there are valuable lessons that our public education system cries out to have immediately instituted for our children’s sake and that of our country. Sorry, teachers, you have a damned tough job I wouldn’t even try, but a quality education system is unsustainable with public service unions, in America at least. (I’m a retired cop who could not unionize or strike,

by law.) Underperforming teachers need to hit the door pronto, and no union should be allowed to hold American students and the public good hostage to strike extortion. A universal language is essential. Trying to teach in multiple languages is costly, inefficient and grossly ineffective for all. Good, bad, fair or unfair, correctly spoken English is the international language of business, prosperity and promotion. Ask the Europeans, Chinese, Japanese, etc. Let us pick and train students according to their demonstrated aptitudes, not just their momentary interests or some ‘common core’ political correctness curriculum engineered in part by unionized teachers to protect union interests. Let us train all students foremost to be so exceptional at what they do that they can compete on the international job market for a good living. They can be taught other fields of education later as they can afford and desire. Last, let us get much tougher on behavioral issues at school. We must adopt a far more ‘no excuses’ approach. We cannot continue to allow the problems of misbehaving or otherwise low performing students (of any race) to hold the system down to a shameful national high-school graduation rate in the sixties percentile range. I never said you’d love it, Americans, but it doesn’t matter what we like anymore where the education of our youth is concerned. It’s time to get real, fast. In the end, after all the excuses are in, it’s only results that will save us. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his newly reprinted down-and-dirty Southern murder mystery “Sheppard of the Wolves” (Amazon, cmppg.com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@ live.com.


PAGE A6

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 3, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

My how the months whiz by A new month! My, how they do whiz by. Still more than three weeks until Easter, which is quite late, this year. Next week birthday greetings are in order for the editor of the G-T, as well as the “old news” guy, as they fall on the 9th. More and more folks are commenting how much they enjoy the news from the past. What a nice tribute to Jimmy Jackson, written and sent to the paper by Darleene (Loney) Owyen, Idaho. Friendships that are kept alive and fresh, through the years, are the very best kind! Well, we’re still being inundated with all the theories of the missing 370 air-

plane, and no closer to knowing the answer, so I’ll add my two cents worth. I doubt it will ever be known what happened to it. A tragic happening, to say the least! Still searching for bodies in the mudslide in Oso, (Arlington area) and the rains still come. Oroville even has had some people involved. Last Monday night was the last of pinochle, ‘til next fall, at Molson Grange. Sure was fun while it lasted. Last Sunday was another of the pancake meals, that has made Molson famous. Very good, as always and a

good turn-out of folks from as far away was to see them all grown up and so ably as Okanogan, and from there was one taking charge of the service. Once again of my classmates, Georgia (Perry) the motto of the Oroville Senior Citizens Thompson, class of 1944 and comes to mind. “Life is that has been a day or so ago. uncertain. Eat dessert first.” I always enjoy the visiting The American Legion had a more than I do the eating, as part in the service, which is breakfast is not one on my always very touching. favorite meals. It’s the Military, not the A visit from across the politicians that ensures our street, Barb Shaw, brought right to life, liberty and the news from MO, as she had pursuit of happiness. It’s the received a call from one of Military who salute the flag, our cousin’s, that was checkwho serve beneath the flag ing up on us to see that we whose coffin is draped THIS & THAT and weren’t on the endangered by the flag. species list at the Oso mud- Joyce Emry I met a young lady at the slide area. Barb and I agree memorial that asked if I that we seem to live in our hadn’t worked at the Rexall little area that doesn’t have many disas- Drug store….boy! what a memory she ters and happy in that thought. has. Indeed I did. The memorial for Stan Porter was At my age sometimes I stop to think, well attended. As our memories go and forget to start again. back through the years, when the Porter Keep learning. Learn more about the “kids” were little urchins, how nice it computer, crafts, gardening or whatever.

Spring Quarter Underway

TERRIFIC KIDS

Never let the brain be idle. “An idle mind is the devils workshop and the devil’s name is Alzheimer’s. Soon we’ll be watching Mariner baseball games and a good quick and easy dip is to take a regular size package of cream cheese and a can of no bean chili, mix together in a microwave safe bowl, cover and cook three to five minutes, ‘til bubbly. Stir again with whisk and put in a serving bowl and use dipping chips. I like “scoops” but use your favorite. Can be made ahead and reheated at game time. Has this ever happened to you? Plumber: (arriving late) “Well how’s it going? Husband: “Not too bad. While we were waiting for you, I taught my wife how to swim”. We’ll be having three great grandsons, eight, six and four, during Spring Break, from Snohomish. Not at my house but visiting in Oroville. About a half day and I’d be “outa business.” But I can make cookies!

THE LEARNING TREE

SUBMITTED BY JACKIE VALIQUETTE NORTH VALLEY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS

Welcome to Spring! The NVCS program promotes educational and social development for the citizens of our community. You could call it ‘informal’ education as it is concerned with offering programs for the local community as a whole, rather than formal education through schools, colleges and universities. Our purpose is to improve quality of life and to bring

people together. We accomplish this through the classes we offer and with special events such as the annual 50’s Dance and the spring Fabulous Fondue Dinner. Ours is a three quarter program that begins in September and ends in June. Winter quarter ended last week and spring quarter begins next Monday. We regret that our (green) catalog

is late getting into local stores for you to pick up. It may be available by the time you read this. If not, any day now! Classes for the first week of spring quarter include: Monday, April 7, First Aid/ CPR; Tuesday, April 8, Sewing is Fun; Wednesday, April 9, Beginning Guitar 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and Intermediate Guitar 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. The AARP tax prep appointments continue through next week, as well. Call Ellen Barttels for information and to register at (509) 476-2011, emailcommunity.schools@oroville.wednet. edu, or sign up on our website at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Submitted photo

The Tonasket Kiwanis selected 16 Terrific Kids for the month of March. Standing with the Tonasket Elementary Sschool kids are Past President Wayne Verbeck and Past District Lt. Governor Bill Dean.

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Okanogan Valley

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Grange breakfasts off to a great start SUBMITTED BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

What a way to start the spring season. That is, to attend the Molson Granges Pancake Breakfast. The day was beautiful, a bit of a chill in the air but the sun was shining. We have all been waiting for spring. These breakfast are ones not to miss. For $8 you can dine on ham, eggs, hash browns, pancakes and apple sauce. They served 173 hungry country folk. The winners of the baskets (made by the auxiliary ladies) were Karen Cockle, Lisa Chapman, Becky Cockle and Judy Bunch.

NW MedStar talks about their program SUBMITTED BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

The Northwest MedStar representative was here to tell us about the program and how to enroll in the program. I have a brochure and membership application for those still interested. Please call me here at the Senior Center at (509) 476-2412 or leave a message on my cell at (509) 4291080. With ten applications you will receive a discount from the

Auxiliary Bake Sale this Friday SUBMITTED BY SUE WISENER TONASKET EAGLES #3002

What’s up with mother nature? Snow up in the hills. It’s April ,go figure. Don’t forget the Auxiliary Bake Sale on Friday, April 4 at 4 p.m. all proceeds goes to Our house Cancer Care in Wenatchee. On Saturday, April 5 Benefit for Cheyenne Stirek People to People trip to Europe. Starting at 5 p.m. Spaghetti Dinner $6 with Dessert Auction at 7 p.m., karaoke to follow by Linda Wood. Our Pull-Tabs are up and running again, as of last Saturday so come in and play. Bingo every Friday starting at 7 p.m. and kitchen open at 5:30 p.m. Lots of good money to be won, Pick 8 is over $13,000 -- you can’t win if you don’t come and play. Saturday April 12 there will be a Dinner/Auction for Marge Lange,

HILLTOP COMMENTS Congratulations ladies. The next breakfast will be on April 27 at 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. See you there. We are coming up on the last week of pinochle at the Grange Hall. The winners on March 24 with 32 players present were - Highs - Everett Turner and Dolly Engelbretson. The Lows Rodney Field and Bev Holden. Vivian Emry took the Traveling. The games will start again in October. Friday, April 4 will be the first of two Bingo Sessions for this month. The second session will be on April 18. Starting with these sessions the new starting

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS original price. Sylvia Williams will be the featured speaker on Tuesday, April 1 to discuss the Crime Victim Service Center. Several topics include: Assault, DUI/ DWI, Elder Abuse, Fraud, Hate Crimes, Identity Theft, Property Crimes, Robbery, Survivors of Homicide or victims of Attempted Homicide, Vehicular Assault. Also, symptoms that a

TONASKET EAGLES Tonasket’s librarian. She needs help with Medical Expenses due to a battle with Cancer. Any donation will be welcomed. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m. Auction at 7 p.m. Chicken fried for $10. Any questions you can call Deb Haven at (509) 486-2620 Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: This is different, there was a tie for first

time will be 7 p.m. The buy in will still be $10 per person, with the option of purchasing extra. cards. This is a Family affair so bring the kids and make an evening of fun. The Spring meeting of the Molson Museum Association will be held on April 16 at 1 p.m. at the Eden Valley Lodge. everyone is welcome to attend. The next Knob Hill Home Economics meeting will be held in the Chesaw Community Building on Wednesday, April 23 at noon. Bring your favorite dish for the pot luck. All are welcome to attend. Membership is open to new members, dues are $8 per family or $5 per person. Contact Marianne for more information at (509) 485-2103.

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3/24/14 1:24 PM


APRIL 3, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life

Submitted by Connie Maden Tonasket/Okan. Valley Lions Club

The Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club is inviting members of the community to join them on Friday, April 4, for a special international event. The Lions World Lunch Relay brings families and friends of Lions together in their

April’s events at the CCC April events at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket include: • Friday, April 4, 6:30 p.m. Essential Oils Class: Learn how you can use therapeutic grade essential oils to improve your health and well-being, just as they did in Biblical times and other ancient cultures. RSVP at (509) 486-0477 to ensure enough samples are on hand. • Thursday, April 10, 7:00 p.m. - Ecology of Dam Removal: Dr. Dennis Dauble, career fisheries scientist and manager, will speak

local communities with families and friends of Lions around the world to share a meal and celebrate the value of service. The Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club will be hosting a community no-host lunch event at noon at The Kuhler in Tonasket. Children are welcome to attend. The Lions World Lunch Relay is a great opportunity for residents to learn more about theTonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club, its work and opportunities to get involved. “We want to share the great things weíre doing in the community, and let others know how they can help,” said President Kris Bailey. The Lions World Lunch Relay

THIS MONTH AT THE CCC on the ecology of dam removal in the Pacific Northwest. He will discuss the economic and environmental issues that lead to dam removal and the anticipated effects of dam removal on fish populations. • Friday, April 11, 5:00 (dinner)/6:30 p.m. (presentation): OHA presents Introduction to Wild Mushrooms and Fungi Ecology (for more information, see page A8). • Saturday, April 12, 7:00 p.m.-

TONASKET LIONS CLUB will kick off on April 4 at noon in New Zealand. As Lions clubs around the world host lunch events at noon in different international time zones, the Lunch Relay will move from time zone to time zone around the world, forming the Lions World Lunch Relay. To learn more about the lunch event, the Tonasket/Okanogan Valley Lions Club or its service projects, contact Connie Maden, (509) 322-3797. The Tonasket/ Okanogan Valley Lions Club Eric y Encarnacion, fiery Spanish Flamenco guitar and dance: Back by popular demand, our favorite Spanish Flamenco Dancer and partner on Spanish Guitar for your entertainment pleasure. $10 for members, $12 for non-members. • Friday, April 18: Friday night coffee house--a Drumming Circle in our back room--bring your drum or other hand instrument and join in the fun. Mike Stensberg from Omak will be our leader. • Saturday, April 19: Dance to the music of returning musician Adrian Xavier, a rock/reggae specialist with his band. The evening begins at 7:00, refreshments will be available by donation.

Fiber Festival fun in May Submitted by Katie Haven Okanogan Valley Fiber Assoc.Sec.

OMAK - Knitters, crocheters, spinners, weavers and fiber artists know that a beautiful result starts with high quality materials. Join the Okanogan Valley Fiber Association for a celebration of our excellent local yarns and the people who produce and work with them. This free event hap-

pens Saturday, May 17, at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds Commercial Building, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bring your lawn chair and join a knitting or spinning circle, learn new fiber skills at a workshop, shop the local fiber products offered at the vendor area, and enjoy local music. Do you create beautiful articles, but have never thought of yourself as a vendor? We’re especially interested in promoting great

local products – consider a booth at the Fest. Local and small-scale vendors receive a substantial discount on vendor booth fees. A special producer/vendor dinner and educational presentation about the value of knowing your micron count will be held Friday, May 16 at 5:30 p.m. at the Big R training room in Omak. For more information on this exciting event, visit www.okfiberfest.org or call (206) 604-2218.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR NCRL Puppet Show

TONASKET - The NCRL Puppets will present a program at the Tonasket Library at 209 S. Whitcomb Ave. on Thursday, April 3 at 10 a.m. This will be in place of the pre-school storytime on that date. Everyone is welcome. Any questions call the Tonasket Library at (509) 486-2366.

Hunter’s Education Class

OROVILLE - There will be a Hunter’s Education Class Monday, MARCH 31 through Friday, April 4 at the Oroville Gun Club. Classes are from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. You can register on line at www.register-ed. com or you can register on Monday at the first class.

Okanogan County Genealogical Society Meeting

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Genealogical Society will meet Thursday, April 3 at 2 p.m. in the Wilson Research Center in Okanogan. Richard Ries, past president of the Historical Society, will give the program on what can be learned from the Society’s records with examples using maps, photographs, legal records and newspapers held by the group to supply information for family as well as community histories. Anyone interested is welcome to join us. For further information contact Karyl Hubbard at (509) 429-2416.

ATV Club Meeting

OROVILLE _ The North Central ATV Club (NCATV) invites all interested ATV and UTV enthusiasts to a Q & A and membership drive at Hometown Pizza, 1315 Main St. in Oroville on Friday, April 4 between 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. New laws, regulations and riding opportunities will be discussed. Handouts will be available. For more information contact Spencer King at rcdriver_50@ hotmail.com or (509) 826-1675.

Native Plant Sale

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan Conservation District Native Plant Sale will be held on Saturday, April 5 at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds Horticulture Building (175 Rodeo Trail Rd. in Okanogan) from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Purchase bare root native plants including ponderosa pine, serviceberry, mock orange, and many other species. A species list is available on the District website at www. okanogancd.org/plant-sale. Quantities are limited, so come early for best selection; in 2013 the sale sold out in less than one hour. Cash, checks, and MasterCard/VISA will be accepted. Okanogan County Master Gardeners will be on hand to answer questions about plants and planting. Information on noxious weeds will also be available. For more information, please contact the Okanogan Conservation District at (509) 4220855 ext. 100.

Spiritual Movie Night

OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, April 5 at 6:30 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and

help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call (509) 476-0200.

or by going to our Facebook Page Events, or you can simply call (509) 486-3163.

Oroville Chamber Meeting

Habitat for Humanity Yard Sale

OROVILLE - The next Oroville Chamber of Commerce general membership meeting will be Thursday, April 10 at 1 p.m. at the Plaza Restaurant. O Those in attendance will hear about several exciting developments for serving and attracting visitors to the area. The Discover Oroville Committee Projects, Rally at the Border Blues Festival Progress, International Baseball Tournament, Expanded Fourth of July Fireworks Show and Lake Osoyoos Cup Jet Ski Races. All are welcome to attend.

OHA Presents Mushrooms and Fungi

TONASKET - Introduction to Wild Mushrooms and Fungi Ecology, a Highland Wonders event at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket (411 S. Western Ave.), Friday, April 11. Presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5 p.m. Helen Lau will present an introduction into the world of macro-fungi and discuss some of their ecological functions. She will also discuss human uses of wild mushrooms, the role of mycorrhizal underground networks, truffle ecology, general fungi identification, common lawn fungi, wild collecting, and local fungi you may find while out hiking in the highlands. This event comes in response to community member requests, and is sure to illuminate the incredible nature of wild mushrooms. The presentation is free, the meal is $7.50 for CCC members or $8.50 for non-members; $5 for kids under 12; a dessert and one beverage are included for dinner guests. More information: okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw.

Spring Blossom Bazaar

OROVILLE - The 8th Annual Blossom Spring Bazaar will be held Saturday, April 12 in the Oroville High School Commons between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Admission is free (please bring a Food Drive Donation). There will be door prizes from the participating vendors throughout the day. Sponsored by Blossom Ministries. Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at (509) 733-1941. Come and enjoy the variety that is available to you in your community.

Women & Heart Disease

TONASKET - A free Community Wellness program brought to you by North Valley Hospital on Thursday, April 24 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. This course is presented by Dr. Missy Swenson (ER Physician and supporter of the American Red Cross Go Red for Women campaign). The course will be covering the signs and symptoms of heart disease and how they are different for men and women, breaking down the myths surrounding heart disease and more! There are only 20 spots available in this course, so be sure to register early. You can register online by going to www.nvhospital. org/wellness-program-registration

OROVILLE - Okanogan County Habitat for Humanity will be having a yard sale at Gold Digger’s Warehouse on Main Street, next to the Okanogan Estate and Vineyards Tasting Room and Retail Store, on Saturday, April 26. Donation of items are now being accepted – no clothing. Call Lynn Chapman at (509) 476-4626. All donations are tax deductible.

meets on the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Whistler’s Family Restaurant. Lions Clubs International is the largest service club organization in the world. Its 1.35 million members in more than 46,000 clubs are serving communities in 208 countries and geographical areas around the globe. Since 1917, Lions clubs have aided the blind, visually and hearing impaired, championed youth initiatives and strengthened local communities through hands-on service and humanitarian projects. For more information about Lions Clubs International, visit lionsclubs.org.

• Sunday, April 27, 4:00 p.m. No More Tears Concert, a tribute to Lisa Schell: Immediately following the free Community Dinner, local musician Chanon Butler will perform a free concert. healing and community awareness will be the theme; donations will be accepted for the bereaved family.

Where’s Your Grandchild? Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck President, NCW Blue Star Mothers

It is a time for the children of our Service men and women to be appreciated. Our hometown soldier’s children carry part of the burden for our nation’s freedoms. And we intend to do so this month: April is National Month of the Military Child. Military children hold a very special place in a Blue Star Mother’s heart. It is often the mother of the soldier who steps in to help with the care of a child and with running the military family while the parent(s) is away on an exercise or deployment. It is often the Blue Star Mom they call when help is needed adjusting to the absence of a parent or spouse away at war. Most of today’s military children have only known war. 85% of military children were

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge?s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item

Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don?t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

born after September 2011. It’s time to reflect on and acknowledge the contribution these children have made. As a token of our communities’ appreciation of their service, our chapter will be sending a Thank You gift to every child of our Hometown Soldiers! If you know of any children whose parent is in the Armed Forces and hails from North Central Washington, send us their names, age, and address so that they, too, can be included in the mailing this month. We don’t want any area children left out! Parents and Grandparents are also invited to upload a picture on our Facebook Page publicly honoring their Military Kid! This month we offer our personal thanks and heart to each Hometown Military Child. www. facebook.com/ncw.blue.star. mothers

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OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

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HEALTH CARE

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Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

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A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services (509) 826-6191

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

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24 Hour Crisis Line

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HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

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716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

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1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

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Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

HEALTH CARE

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center l Oxygen Concentrators l Portable Concentrators l Sleep Apnea Equipment l Nebulizers l Home Sleep Tests Open: Monday - Friday

Office: 509-826-1688

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Free NAC Class

TONASKET - North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning Monday, May 5. This class will be completed in August. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www. nvhospital.org . This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative & technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after April 11. For information call the Extended Care at (509) 486-3110 or Marcia Naillon (509) 486-3155.

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

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Tonasket/ Okanogan Valley Lions Club invites community to attend Lions World Lunch Relay Event

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Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602


PAGE A8

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 3, 2014

OUTDOORS

Controlled burns underway in northeast Washington SUBMITTED BY TOM LEUSCHEN WDFW

Submitted photo

Helen Lau will present an introduction into the world of macro-fungi and discuss some of their ecological functions at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on April 11.

SPOKANE -- The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is conducting controlled burns on parts of two wildlife areas in northeast Washington to reduce wildfire risks and enhance wildlife habitat. WDFW crews have already begun a controlled burn in the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area in Okanogan County. Depending on weather conditions, controlled burns also could be conducted as soon as April 1 in the Sherman Creek Wildlife Area in Ferry County. Recent wildfires demonstrate the importance of controlled burns, said Tom Leuschen, WDFW wildlife area fuels manager. Burning off brush and other

fuels help reduce the risk of highintensity wildfires that destroy wildlife habitat and endanger human health and personal property. “It’s not a question of whether we’ll have fires on these lands in the future, but rather the degree to which we can reduce the damage they cause while promoting a healthy forest for the future,” Leuschen said. The fires are permitted by the Washington Department of Natural Resources only when daily conditions are safe. The fires are monitored until they are out, Leuschen said. The controlled burn in the Sinlahekin will cover 956 acres located more than two miles south of Loomis. The Sherman Creek burn involves at least five areas, ranging from 13 to 170 acres between Highway 20 and Lake Roosevelt,

south of Sherman Creek and west to just beyond the Inchelium Highway. If burns are completed on all Sherman Creek units, other units just north of Sherman Creek in the area of Sherman Homes and WDFW fish hatchery might also be burned. WDFW works to minimize impacts of smoke from the burns, but Leuschen said some smoke could drift into nearby communities or temporarily cut visibility on highways at night or early morning. “Motorists should use caution and watch for personnel, fire equipment, and smoke near the burns,” Leuschen said. WDFW is coordinating with other agencies in the area to provide assistance with the burn, and is using private contractors with bulldozers and other equipment from local communities.

“April really marks the start of the new year for fishing, hunting, and a wide range of outdoor activities,” said Joe Stohr, WDFW deputy director. “The annual cycle is beginning again and a lot of us are glad to see it arrive.” For most people, a valid 201415 fishing or hunting license will be required to participate in those activities after March 31, when all 2013-14 licenses expire. The exception is young people under age 15, who can fish for free. Licenses and permits are avaiIable online (https://fishhunt.dfw. wa.gov/ ), by phone (1-866-2469453) and from sporting goods stores and other retail license dealers around the state. A list of license vendors (http://wdfw. wa.gov/licensing/vendors/ ) is available online and from local WDFW offices around the state. Key dates to keep in mind in April include: • April 1 - Several dozen lakes in the Columbia Basin open to fishing. • April 4-6 -The first Olympic Peninsula BirdFest takes place in Sequim near the Strait of Juan de Fuca. • April 5-6 - A two-day spring turkey hunt for hunters age 15 and younger is scheduled statewide. • April 14-20 - A seven-day morning razor clam dig is tentatively scheduled on various ocean beaches. For details, see WDFW’s razor clam webpage athttp://

wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/ razorclams/current.html . • April 15 - The general spring turkey hunt opens for hunters of all ages and runs through May 31. See WDFW’s Washington Wild Turkey Spring Season pamphlet at http://wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/regulations/ for more information. • April 16 - Lingcod fishing season opens in the Neah Bay area (Marine Area 4). • April 25-27 - The Grays Harbor Shorebird Festival, based in Hoquiam, celebrates shorebirds. For information, see http:// www.shorebirdfestival.com/ . • April 26 - Hundreds of lakes open to trout fishing across the state for the biggest “opening day” of the year. For more information about these and other outdoor activities coming up in the weeks ahead, see the region-by-region Weekender Reports on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/ weekender/ . These reports are updated for changes in fishing rules and other developments throughout the state.

Wild Mushrooms and Fungi Ecology presentation ‘Opening Days’ galore for OHA Highland anglers in April Wonders educational series

Trout fishing opens statewide April 26, capping off a month of ‘opening days’

SUBMITTED BY JULIE ASHMORE CONSERVATION COORDINATOR, OKANOGAN HIGHLANDS ALLIANCE

TONASKET - On the second Friday of April, Helen Lau will present an introduction into the world of macro-fungi and discuss some of their ecological functions. She will also discuss human uses of wild mushrooms, the role of mycorrhizal underground networks, truffle ecology, general fungi identification, common lawn fungi, wild collecting, and local fungi you may find while out hiking in the highlands. This event comes in response to community member requests, and is sure to illuminate the incredible nature of wild mushrooms. Helen Lau is a botanist for the USFS on the OkanoganWenatchee National Forest. She manages the rare botanical species (plants, lichens, bryophytes and fungi), native plant restoration and invasive plant program on the Cle Elum Ranger District. Helen has been involved with botanical research and rare species work for the last 10 years. Her research interests are in fungi biodiversity and she received an undergraduate degree at Evergreen State College and her master’s degree on mycorrhizae ecology in the Biological Sciences Department at Central Washington University. “Fungi for most bring visions of danger and mystery; however, they are found in all terrestrial and aquatic environments,” says Lau. “Fungi are beneficial to most flowering plants, grasses, and trees, in addition to being

Julie Ashmore/submitted photo

Russula xerampelina group of mushrooms. necessary for such human uses as cheeses and alcoholic beverages. I aim to demystify the world of fungi and hope to inspire attendees to explore the fungi of Okanogan County.” The Highland Wonders educational series brings the natural history of the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas to Tonasket, indoors from November through May (skipping December), with outdoor events in the highlands during summer. On Friday, May 2, Scott Fitkin will present on “Amphibians of the Okanogan.” OHA’s Education Program builds awareness and understanding of local natural history, with the goal of increasing community member involvement in the stewardship of our natural habitats and resources. Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA) is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. Highland Wonders

presentations are offered free of charge to the community, and donations are welcome. The indoor educational series is offered by OHA, at the Community Cultural Center, the “CCC,” of Tonasket (411 S Western Avenue, Tonasket). The presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5:00 p.m. The meal is $7.50 for CCC members or $8.50 for non-members; $5.00 for kids under 12; a dessert and one beverage are included for dinner guests. Please note that the April 11 event is on the second Friday of the month, to accommodate the local school districts’ spring break. Details about Highland Wonders are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. For more info, contact OHA’s Conservation Coordinator, Julie Ashmore: julie@okanoganhighlands.org or 509-476-2432.

SUBMITTED BY WDFW PUBLIC AFFAIRS For many anglers, “opening day” is synonymous with the start of the lowland lakes troutfishing season, which gets under way April 26 this year. Hundreds of thousands of Washingtonians typically descend on troutstocked lakes to kick off the state’s biggest outdoor event. To prepare for the upcoming season, hatchery crews from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) have been working since last year to stock more than 16 million fish in hundreds of lakes throughout the state. Anglers can find how many went where at http://wdfw. wa.gov/fishing/plants/statewide/ . But anglers - and hunters, too are also looking forward to a variety of other “opening days” this month for outdoor adventures ranging from razor clam digs on ocean beaches to turkey hunting in fields throughout the state. In addition, several Washington communities are hosting festivals this month to mark the seasonal migration of waterfowl and shorebirds.

MOvieS Oliver Theatre OLIVER THEATRE Oliver, B.C.                              Visit  Our  Website  

April, 2014  Programme  

www.olivertheatre.ca 250-498-2277

The LeGO MOvie

DiveRGeNT

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  Sat.,  April  5      at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       April  5  –  6  –  7  -­  8,  10  -­  11   One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  p.m.  

pg

Violence. There  wil  at  2:0

Thur Showtime

sun. MOn. sAT.-sun.-MOn.-Tues, Thurs-Fri. April 5-6-7-8, 10-11

CAPTAiN AMeRiCA WiNTeR SOLDieR. sAT.-sun.-MOn.-

Coarse language,  viol

Tues., Thurs.-Fri. Apr. 26-27-28-29, MAY 1-2

Sat. –  Sun.  – April  26 One  Show

Violence.

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       April  12  –  13  –  14  -­  15,  17  -­  18   One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  p.m.  

OMAK THEATER OMAk And MirAge TheATers Are nOw digiTAl

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

CAPTAiN AMeRiCA WiNTeR SOLDieR

ACTiOn/AdVenTure/sCi-Fi sTArring Chris eVAns, FrAnk grillO, sebAsTiAn sTAn. Fri. 6:30,9:45. sAT.*1:00,4:15,7:30 sun.*1:00,4:15,7:30 wkdAYs.6:30

Sandra Rasmussen

The

Violence.

Violence.

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  no

pg13

140 min

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

DiveRGeNT

Doctors’ Discovery Helps Diabetes

PHILADELPHIA – A team of doctors has found that a formulation of exotic sounding herbs and spices gives diabetics new hope. The formula, called Cinnatrol™ promotes healthy blood sugar levels by effectively metabolizing glucose into energy. In a research study, all patients taking just one capful of the liquid (one ounce) daily, dramatically lowered their blood sugar levels compared to a placebo group. Another scientific study found that an ingredient in Cinnatrol™ made insulin 20 times more capable converting blood sugar to energy. While individual results vary, one patient in the study lowered his blood sugar from 220-245 to the 100-130 range in only 28 days, despite

being instructed not to change his dietary habits or physical activity. Some patients, under their doctors care, have been able to reduce or eliminate their need for diabetic drugs. Scientists say that Cinnatrol™ actually helps diabetic drugs to work more efficiently. Additional information is available at www.cinnatrol.com. Cinnatrol™ is available without a prescription at pharmacies and nutrition stores or call 1877-581-1502. Now at select

Now at:

ACTiOn/AdVenTure/sCi-Fi sTArring ChAilene wOOdleY, TheO JAMes, kATe winsleT Fri.6:30 & 9:45, sAT.*1:00,4:15,7:30 sun *1:30,4:15,7:30. wkdYs 6:30.

140min

pg13

NeeD FOR SPeeD 132min pg13

ACTiOn/drAMA/CriMe sTArring AArOn pAul, dOMiniC COOper, iMOgen pOOTs

Fri. 6:45, 9:45 sAT. *1:15,4:30,7:45 sun.*1:15,4:30 & 7:45. wkdAYs. 6:45

NOAh AdVenTure/drAMA

138min

sTArring russell CrOwe, JenniFer

pg13

COnnellY, AnThOnY hOpkins

Fri. 6:30, 9:45 sAT. *1:00,4:15,7:30 sun.*1:00,4:15 & 7:30. wkdAYs. 6:30 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

USBP photo

Two Explorers drag a 170-pound dummy during the Physical Agility event. 14-21. The Explorer program provides training on the purpose, mission and objectives of law enforcement in a safe yet challenging way. Explorers develop leadership skills and perform volunteer services in the community as they consider careers in law enforcement.

Pho

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon

Thurs. -­  Fri.          April  3  –  4    

g Thurs-Fri Apr 3-4 MATinee sAT. Apr 5 2pM $6

U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PATROL RELEASE

that demonstrates teamwork and integrity. “The events were fun and challenging, but I had a blast. I can’t wait to go next year,” said Oroville Explorer Bonnie Roley. The Law Enforcement Explorer program is for young men and women between the ages of

Sun.  – Fri.  –                      

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

Washington Border Patrol Explorers win multiple awards OROVILLE - The U.S. Border Patrol’s Oroville, Wash. Explorer Post #0023 competed recently against Law Enforcement Explorer teams from up and down the West Coast at the Federal Way Explorer Challenge in Federal Way, Wash. The Federal Way Police Department and the Federal Way Explorer Post hosted a total of 15 teams from February 21-23 to compete in the following events: • Active Shooter • Hogan’s Alley • Bus Assault • Marijuana Field Raid • Physical Agility • Pistol Assemble/Disassembly • Arrest Warrant • Sniper • Defensive Tactics • High Risk Warrant • Reality Based Training • Building Search • Missing Officer The Oroville Explorers team was comprised of Lena Fuchs (Team Leader), Ryan Marcolin, Narya Naillon, Abe Podkranic, and Bonnie Roley. The Oroville Explorers won three awards: 2nd place in the Sniper event, 3rd place in the Building Search event, and the Spirit Award which is awarded to the team

         R

www.olivertheatre.ca

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APRIL 3, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

Cops & Courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

The court dismissed March. 31 three charges against Gregory Eugene Doner, 61, Riverside, based on compliance with a March 2013 stipulation order. Charges dismissed were: POCS (marijuana), POCS (LSD) and POCS (psilocybin mushrooms). Amy Sue Stewart, 40, Okanogan, pleaded guilty March 31 to first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Stewart was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the Aug. 3, 2013 crimes. She was also ordered to pay $977 in restitution to Sarah Grooms, Okanogan. Robert Brian Bradshaw, 27, Okanogan, pleaded guilty March 31 to POCS with intent to deliver (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. Bradshaw was sentenced to 20+ months in prison and fined $2,110.50 for the Sept. 12, 2013 crimes.

District Court

Carla Jean Agapith, 42, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Agapith was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 356 days suspended, and fined $808. Robert Lee Alexander, 41, Tonasket, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Santos Alvarez Andaya, 23, Tonasket, guilty of second-degree hunting of big game (violate rule). Alvarez Andaya received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $2,893. Donald James Anthony, 65, Tonasket, guilty of a trip permit violation. Anthony received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $468. Michaeljon Lee Austin, 34, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft. Austin received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $507.96. Robin Gaye Baumann, 60, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Bill Cephus Bedard Jr., 23, Riverside, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Bedard received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. David Ray Best, 29, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS and use/ possession of a loaded firearm in a vehicle. Best received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $818. Pedro Camarena Balbuena, 56, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Camarena Balbuena received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $858. Alfonso Cardenas Jr., no middle name listed, 56, Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree theft and violation of a no-contact order. Cardenas was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $2,549. He had an additional charge dismissed: violation of a no-contact order. Michelle L. Carden, 26, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Carden was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. Joshua Curtis Carpenter, 22, Oroville, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Carpenter was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 349 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Delia Ann Marie Cheer, 26, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Cheer was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. Tyler Thomas Clough, 21, Omak, guilty of first-degree negligent driving. Clough was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $808. Sandra Dee Cooper, 44, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Cooper received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $768. Karen Lee Davis Beam, 63, Okanogan, guilty of making a false statement to a public servant. Davis Beam was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $608. Bobbie Bernard Dick, 21, Omak, guilty of DUI. Dick was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,936. Lawrence Alan Eder, 76, Oroville, had a DUI charge dismissed. Allen was fined $1,425. Colton Neal Ellis, 25, Oroville, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed.

911 Calls & Jail Bookings Monday, March 24, 2014

Burglary on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Television reported missing. Trespassing on Fig Ave. in Omak. Four reports of vehicle prowls on Weatherstone Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on Hendrick Loop Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on Pogue Rd. near Omak. Theft on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Okanogan. Oxygen tank reported missing. Vehicle prowl on Lake Breeze Lane near Oroville. Vehicle prowl on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Main St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Harassment on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on the Central Ave. Bridge in Omak. Harassment on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Mill Dr. in Tonasket. Gordon Joseph Harry, 49, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for deposit of unwholesome material. Antonio Altamirano Ramirez, 35,

booked for DUI and a USBP detainer. Joshua Carl Jacobs, 28, booked for third-degree assault of a child. Alisha Ann Russell, 21, booked for third-degree assault of a child. Jared Joseph Milam, 29, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for second-degree criminal trespassing.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Harassment on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Two reports of vehicle prowls on Eastlake Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Wagon Trail Rd. near Tonasket. Rifles reported missing. Theft on Koala Ave. in Omak. Wallet reported missing. Harassment on Ellemeham Mountain Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Elderberry Ave. in Omak. Harassment on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. Illegal burning on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Weapons offense on Engh Rd. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Eighth Ave. in Omak. Public urination on Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on Jasmine St. in Omak. iPhone reported missing. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Trespassing on N. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Johnathon James Stern, 23, booked on OCSO FTA warrants for violation of a no-contact order and fourth-degree assault (DV). Chehalis Cloud, no middle name listed, 33, booked on an FTA bench warrant for theft of a motor vehicle. Stonechild Theodore Moran, 37, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for DUI.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Vehicle prowl on Soren Peterson Rd. near Omak. Five vehicles reportedly entered. Structure fire on Engh Rd. near Omak. Structure fire on West River Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on Epley Rd. near Omak. Two vehicles reportedly entered. Tools reported missing. Assault on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Sex offender registry on Golden Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Limebelt Rd. near Riverside. Vehicle prowl on Index St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on E. Ridge Dr. in Omak. Harassment on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash blocking traffic on N. Ash St. in Omak. No injuries reported. DWLS on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Two reports of violation of nocontact orders on S. Granite St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Omak Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Public intoxication on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on S. Juniper St. in Omak. Phone reported missing. Lori Louisa Flores Belz, 38, court commitment for DUI. Tyce Jefferey Farrar, 25, court commitment for reckless driving. Mongo Jerry Lodi Renion, 31, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Daniel Allen Hershaw, 48, booked on FTA bench warrants for first-degree trafficking in stolen property and third-degree theft. Michael Robert Fry, 35, court commitment for DUI. Shaylin Jerran Smith, 20, booked for second-degree burglary.

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Jewelry reported missing. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Batteries reported missing. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Automobile theft on S.Main St. in Omak. Lost property on Engh Rd. in Omak. Purse reported missing. Threats on S. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Omak. William Gomez, no middle name listed, 67, court commitment for DUI. Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 36, Department of Corrections detainer. Tamara Kathleen Wilson, 52, booked for DUI.

Friday, March 28, 2014

Domestic dispute on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Burglary on Cameron Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on FS 3525 Rd. near

AURORA MASONS CELEBRATE 100 YEARS

Tonasket. Harassment on Gordon St. in Okanogan. Drugs on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on N. First Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on North Country Vue Rd. near Omak. DWLS on E. Dewberry Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Dayton St. in Omak. Automobile theft on Dayton St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Assault on N. Juniper Pl. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Threats on S. Juniper St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Pine St. in Omak. Theft on N. Fir St. in Omak. Laptop reported missing. Daniel S. Dubois, 27, booked on two counts of third-degree assault and DUI.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Explosives on Aspen Way near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Graffiti reported. DWLS on S. Main St. in Omak. Illegal burning on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on Jasmine St. in Omak. Cash reported missing. Threats on River Ave. in Okanogan. Obstruction on Koala Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Apple Way Rd. in Okanogan. DUI on S. Main St. in Omak. Alcohol offense on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Threats on S. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on Omache Dr. in Omak. Tobacco problem on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Juveniles reported smoking. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Assault on Engh Rd. in Omak. Keyanna Ellynk Dos Santos, 29, booked for DUI. Jesse Ballesteros Garcia, 24, booked for third-degree malicious mischief, second-degree criminal trespassing and obstruction. Carlos Negrete Jr., no middle name listed, 23, booked for POCS (hydrocodone). Ernesto Eduardo Mendez Leon, 19, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, resisting arrest and third-degree DWLS. Steven Wayne Raynes, 29, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Martin Antonio Aguilar, 25, booked on OCSO FTA warrants for thirddegree DWLS and third-degree malicious mischief.

Sunday, March 30, 2014

DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Assault on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Theft on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Chain saws reported missing. Disorderly conduct on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on 10th Ave. in Oroville. Two-vehicle crash on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. No injuries reported. Kyle Louis King, 21, booked for obstruction. John Frederick Wayne Carden, 42, booked on State Patrol FTA warrants for DUI and third-degree DWLS, and a Tribal warrant for fourth-degree assault. Leroy Pearl McDonald, 65, booked for violation of a no-contact order with assault (DV) and fourthdegree assault (DV). Ryan Paul Mulligan, 28, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Seth Jared Harris, 27, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Antonio Mendoza Bravo, 27, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Kane McKinsey Searcy, 31, booked for third-degree DWLS. Timothy James Spague, 58, booked for DUI.

Key:

DUI – Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R – Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC – Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C – Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP – Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV – Domestic Violence FTA – Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF – Failure to Pay Fine RP – Reporting Party OCSO – Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC – State Department of Corrections USBP – U.S. Border Patrol CBP – U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Gary DeVon/staff photo

The Aurora Masonic Lodge celebrated its 100th Anniversary with several ceremonial events Saturday, March 29 at the Oroville Grange Hall. Many of the members of the lodge, as well as the Grand Master of the State of Washington, Bruce Vesper and Aurora Masons Lodge Master Frank Grunert (center, front) gathered for a celebratory photo after the luncheon. Founded in 1914, Oroville’s Aurora Masonic Lodge began with 90 different local men and has a long history of volunteering in the community. The lodge has members from Oroville and Tonasket and the surrounding area.

Obituary

Frank Ping

Frank Ping

Frank Ping, 92, passed away March 14, 2014 at Guardian Angel Homes in Liberty Lake, Wash. He was born March 6, 1922 in Papakovasci, Hungary. branch

Frank was the oldest of five children and was raised on the family farm. He served in WWII and was active in the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, which resulted in his emigration to Canada. He originally settled in Vancouver, British Columbia, where he completed a forest engineering degree at the University of British Columbia. Vancouver was also where he met his wife, Margaret. Later family helped him immigrate to the United States. The majority of his working years were in forestry. He lived in various locations finally settling in Tonasket, Wash where he raised his family and retired from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources after 20 years of service. Frank and Margaret recently relocated to Liberty Lake to be closer to family. Through the years he continued to be active with ethnic Hungarian groups and his fellow classmates from the UBC. He

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maintained close ties with many people that accompanied him to Canada after leaving Hungary. Frank is survived by his wife of 51 years, Margaret of Liberty Lake; son, Frank Ping (Sheila) of Spokane Valley, Wash.; daughter, Cathy Harris (Mark) of Veradale, Wash. He is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and cousins all residing in Hungary. Special Thanks to Guardian Angel Homes and Hospice of Spokane for their amazing care and support in helping make Dad’s last days full of kindness and comfort. A celebration of Frank’s life will be planned by the family and announced at a later date. Frank supported environmental causes like the World Wildlife Foundation. Please consider a donation instead to this or a similar cause in his memory. Community Cremation & Funeral, Spokane Valley, Spokane Valley, Wash in care of arrangements.

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 3, 2014 11

April 3, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

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RODEO QUEEN University Clinic, April 5th and 6th, 9am to 3pm. Omak Stampede Grounds. For all girls, ages 8-24 who are interested in improving their Rodeo Queen skills or want to learn more about becoming a Rodeo Queen. Parents are encouraged to attend. For more information or registration forms, go to Facebook Omak Stampede Queen Alumni or call Marcie at 509-322-2477 Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted JOB OPENING Okanogan County Dept. of Public Works is accepting applications until April 18, 2014 at 4:30 pm for Temporary M-2 Truck Drivers and Traffic Control Striper Crewperson Wages will be $15.55/hour. Applicants must possess a Commercial Driver’s License, current updated health card, and flagging card. Okanogan County is also excepting applications for Flagger and General Labor positions at $12.65/hour. Positions are available in various maintenance areas. Applications, supplemental and job descriptions may be obtained by contacting the Dept. of Public Works, 1234-A 2nd Ave. S, Okanogan, WA 98840 or go online to www.okanogancounty .org/HR/. Telephone (509) 422-7300. Equal Opportunity Employer. www.okanogancounty.org/HR/

Okanogan County Department of Public Works is accepting applications until Friday, April 18, 2014 for the positions of Summer Temporary Solid Waste Operator/Mechanic and Recycle/Transfer Station/Equipment Operator For more information go to www.okanogancounty.org/HR or call 509-422-7300

Help Wanted P/T MERCHANDISER-

SUN LAKES REALTY. 2 bedroom lake front $595, Darling 1 bedroom Furnished Cottage $625.. Call NOW to find your new home. 509476-2121

Announcements First Aid and CPR Class will be held on April, 8, 9, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow for the first night. For information, call Ben Hylton (509)223-3412, leave message.

Help Wanted

Announcements

JOB # 11243- stocking “general merchandise� items in 1 store in Omak, WA 3 hrs/wkly, $11.00/ hr. www.ataretail.com or 800-287-1604 X 672

Job Fair April 10, 2014

Veranda Beach invites you to our annual job fair April 10th - 9am to 1pm. Positions in the following departmentswill be offered RESORT STAFF Front Desk Services Housekeeping z Housemen THE DINER Line Cooks z Servers z Baristas Front of House Manager General Laborer Landscape/Vineyard crew Veranda Beach Resort, 299 Eastlake Rd, Oroville, WA 98844 Ph. 509-476-4000

Firewood

Statewides

Statewides

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MARCH 31, 2014

Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor) • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (602) 730-7709

agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

FREE NAC Class North Valley Extended Care is now accepting applications for the next Nursing Assistant Training Class beginning May 5th 2014. This class will be completed in June. Applications may be picked up at the North Valley Hospital’s Human Resource office or on-line at www.nvhospital.org . This is an excellent opportunity for motivated, caring individuals to prepare for a challenging career, leading to employment opportunities in the Extended Care. Course content includes basic personal care, restorative & technical skills needed to care for residents and individuals rehabilitating toward independence. Applications will no longer be received after April 11th 2014. For information call the Human Resources at 509-486-3185 Seeking Experienced

Dental Assistant Who enjoys working in a fastpaced office. Must be trustworthy, reliable, and a good team worker. Approx. 3 days/week. Call 509.486.2902 Mon/Tues or 509.422.4881 Wed/Thurs.

www.gazette-tribune.com Transportation Mechanic The Tonasket School District is now accepting applications for a Transportation Mechanic. Position closes April 14. Requirements include: Vocational training and/or at least five years work experience in automotive and truck maintenance and repair industry; school bus maintenance preferred; high school diploma or equivalent. For more information, please contact Jeff Yeckel at 486-2665. To apply: contact the District Office for an application or available on the district’s website at: www.tonasket.wednet.edu. Tonasket School District, 35 DO Hwy 20 E., Tonasket, WA 98855. Phone 486-2126.

Horses

Buying all kinds of horses. Gentle saddle horses for sale. Ask for Don Frazier 509-846-3377.

Garage & Yard Sale STORAGE AUCTION SAT, APRIL 5TH. 140 Chesaw Rd Oroville, WA Gates open at 9am, Auction at 10am. Partial list includes: GUN RELOADING SUPPLIES drill press, hydraulic press, elect casing cleaner, powders, primers, dies, brass, etc. AMMO 223, 308, 762, 545, 12ga. Magazines for 223 to 22 conversion, 12ga. And much more. PARTS for 9mm, rem870, 22 pistol, 223 conv. Tool boxes, camo gear, scopes, targets, how to books, firework supplies, cleaning supplies, air pistol, etc. 60+ 55 GAL DRUMS. Metal and plastic with lids. Great for dry good or water storage. $30/each (like new). Drums are currently filled with crushed Obsidian.

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make goodâ€?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. CABLE/SATELLITE TV GET DISH And Save! Call today, lock in 2 years of savings 1-866-220-6954 * FREE Hopper Upgrade * FREE Premium Channels * Internet $14.95 *See dish-systems.com for details. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HEALTH/BEAUTY PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL Mesh? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS EXPERIENCED DRIVER Or Recent Grad? With Swift, you can grow to be an award-winning Class A CDL driver. We help you achieve Diamond Driver status with the best support there is. As a Diamond Driver, you earn additional pay on top of all the competitive incentives we offer. The very best, choose Swift. • Great Miles = Great Pay • Late-Model Equipment Available • Regional Opportunities • Great Career Path • Paid Vacation • Excellent Benefits Please Call: (602) 730-7709

FOR MORE DETAILS CALL 509-560-0166

GORDON TRUCKING CDL-A Solo & Team Truck Drivers Up to $5,000 Sign-On-Bonus & $.54 CPM Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k, EOE. Call 7 days/week 866-220-9175

We accept all credit cards, cash and checks (conditions apply). All sales final.

NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Classâ€? training. • New Academy Classes

Crosswords

An Equal Opportunity Employer

Miscellaneous Alfalfa Grass Hay, small square or large round bales $170- $220 per ton (509)4298829, (509)486-4301

www.gazette-tribune.com

ANSWERS

Across 1. Christian Science founder

D & D SALES CALENDAR

Sat., April 19 - Tonasket Estate Antiques & Collectibles Sat., May 3 - Annual Spring Consignment at Tonasket Rodeo Grounds Call and Let Us Know what you want to sell so we can get it Advertised. Sun., May 18 - Pending Date - Curlew Farm and Estates

D & D AUCTION SALES LICENSE NO. 2241

LLC

BOX 417 - TONASKET, WA. 98855 Licensed & Bonded DAL DAGNON DARYL ASMUSSEN 486-2570 486-2138

5. Damon of “Good Will Hunting� 9. Hiding place 14. A married German woman

LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices April 1, 2014 City of Tonasket Declaration of Surplus Property Call For Bids The City of Tonasket has declared certain property owned by the City to be surplus to its needs. The property consists of the Tonasket Cemetery building and contents (not the real estate or the concrete slab) located across from the Tonasket Gerhard Cemetery, 702 Hwy 7, Tonasket, WA. To view the building and contents please contact the City of Tonasket, 509.486.2132, between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 pm Monday - Friday. A cashier’s check, personal check, or money order in the sum of the bid amount must be in the sealed bid envelope. Sealed bids must be received in City Hall at the ClerkTreasurer’s office no later than 4:30 pm April 16th, 2014 and marked “BID� on the outside of the envelope. Sealed bids received by that date and time will be opened and read aloud and awarded to the highest responsible bidder during the regular City Council meeting on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 which commences at 7:00 pm, in the Council Chambers at Tonasket City Hall, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket, WA 98855. The successful bidder is responsible for removing the building and contents in a safe and neat manner. The City reserves the right to refuse any or all bids. Alice Attwood City Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 3, 10, 2014. #553239 PUBLIC AUCTION There will be a Public Auction at Budget Towing, 32156 Hwy. 97, Tonasket, WA 98855, Phone 509-5601056, on Tuesday, April 14, 2014. Viewing Time will start at 11:00 a.m. with the auction at 12:00 p.m. Up for auction will be: 1993 GMC, lic # B79758Y 1974 FORD, lic # ANY4680 1991 OLDS, lic # AMD1300 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 3 , 2014. #553207 CITY OF TONASKET NOTICE TO CONSULTANTS FOR US 97 PEDESTRIAN IMPROVEMENTS The CITY OF TONASKET solicits interest from consulting firms with expertise in Civil and Structural Design. Consultants will be considered for the following project. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The work to be performed by the CONSULTANT consists of preparing preliminary engineering and PS&E

Legals Continued On Next Page

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APRIL 3, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • April 3, 2014

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Public Notices

Legals Continued From Previous Page

Submittals must include the following information: Firm name, phone and fax numbers; Name of Principal-incharge and Project Manager; and Number of employees in each firm proposed to project. Submittals will be evaluated and ranked based on the following criteria: 1) Key personnel; 2) Firm Experience with PS&E; 3) Firm experience with environmental planning, permitting and approval processes; 4) Ability to meet schedule; 5) Approach to project; 6) Familiarity with WSDOT/FHWA requirements and standards; 7) Past performance/references; The CITY OF TONASKET encourages disadvantaged, minority, and women-owned consultant firms to respond. Please submit SIX copies of your Statement of Qualifications to: City of Tonasket, Alice Attwood, City Clerk/Treasurer, 209 S Whitcomb Avenue, PO Box 487, Tonasket, WA 98855. Statement of Qualifications must be received at the above address, no later than 4:00 PM, April 24, 2014. No submittals will be accepted after that date and time. Any questions regarding this solicitation should be directed to City Clerk/Treasurer, Alice Attwood at 509-486-2132 or Kurt Danison, planner at 509-422-5030. The City of Tonasket, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d

to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. Dates of publication: April 3, 2014 and April 10, 2014 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 3, 10, 2014. #552931

Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: March 10, 2014 DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 20, 2014. /s/Linda Barclay LINDA D. BARCLAY Personal Representative /s/Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Letkemann P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 20, 27, and April 3, 2014. #549719

change in the boundaries of said district as proposed in said petition should not be made. Statement of any support or opposition must be vest and received by the Board before the date of the hearing in order for your support or opposition to be considered by the Board. Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, Jay O’Brien, Secretary/Manager. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 3, 2014. #552622

representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: March 20, 2014 Co-Personal Representatives: Brian Thompson 1028 Pilot Place Brewster WA 98812 Sonya Gebbers Taylor P.O. Box 7 Brewster WA 98812 Attorneys for Personal Representative: Bryan J. Maroney, WSBA No. 36966 of Davis, Arneil Law Firm, LLP 617 Washington Wenatchee, Washington 98807 509/662-3551 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 20, 27 and April 3, 2014. #550261

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for construction of sidewalks, curbs, ADA ramps and a pedestrian bridge over Bonaparte Creek on the west side of US 97 from 6th Street south to the vicinity of Legacy Park. This project is funded by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The proposed improvements will enhance pedestrian safety and accessibility. The major features of the project are as follows: Replacement of existing sidewalks, Construction of new sidewalks, Upgrading existing sidewalk ramps to ADA standards, Design of ADA compliant sidewalk ramps where none exist, Relocation or adjustment of existing utility & stormwater features, Permanent signing and pavement markings, Environmental planning, preparation/submittal of permit applications and preparation/submittal of the Environmental Classification Summary (ECS) and supporting discipline reports as necessary, and Determination of R/W needs (easements, construction permits, shoreline permits, etc.). Construction of a pedestrian bridge The CITY OF TONASKET reserves the right to retain the services of the successful CONSULTANT for any and all subsequent phases for the above referenced project. SUBMITTAL

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IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: PATRICK JERRY BURTON, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00017-0 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representatives named below have been appointed as copersonal representatives of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representatives or the personal representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: March 17, 2014. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: March 27, 2014. /s/Pamela Lee Maier-Burton PAMELA LEE MAIER-BURTON /s/Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 27, April 3, 10, 2014. #550906 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: MARION LETKEMANN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00031-5 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate.

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 4/11/14 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1996 Dodge Caravan Lic# 159-XNP Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on April 3, 2014. #552610 NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CHANGE IN BOUNDARIES OF THE OROVILLE-TONASKET IRRIGATION DISTRICT Notice is hereby given that a petition for inclusion of land has been filed with the Board of Directors of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, praying that the Board of Directors of said District enter an order changing the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District to include the tract of land described below from within the boundaries of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District. The name of the petitioners, together with the descriptions to be included within the boundaries of the OrovilleTonasket Irrigation District in Okanogan County, State of Washington, same as follows: INCLUSIONS: David and Jaden Taber, 4027230029; 40-27-23. 3.0 acres Notice is also given that Thursday, April 13, 2014, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. at the main office of the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District, is the time and place that all persons interested in or that may be affected by such change in the boundaries of the Oroville·Tonasket Irrigation district must appear and show cause in writing, if they have any, why the

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR LINCOLN COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of STARR L. HAMMONS, Deceased No. 14 4 00011 0 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent that arose before the decedent’s death must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Clerk of this Court. The claim must be presented within the later of (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the Notice to the Creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of this notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim will be forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW Section 11 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: 3-20-14 Personal Representative: ROD C. HAMMONS Attorney for P.R.: Norman D. Brock Address for Mailing or Service: Brock Law Firm, P.S. 529 Morgan St., P.O. Box 249 Davenport, Washington 99122 Rod C. Hammons Personal Representative Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 20, 27, and April 3, 2014. #550257 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY In the Matter of the Estate of DANNA SUE GUZMAN, Deceased. No. 14-4-00026-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY Estate of IRVING R. BORDEN, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00028-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Marie (Mary Ann) Borden as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: March 27, 2014 /s/Dale L. Crandall Attorney for Marie (Mary Ann) Borden, Personal Representative PO Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 27, April 3, 10, 2014. #551684

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | APRIL 3, 2014

SPORTS OROVILLE KILLER BEES

Submitted photo

The Oroville Killer Bees are pictured with high school senior Taylor Robinson (kneeling, far left), who provided his experience and expertise in coaching the team as his senior project this season. Submitted by Chuck Ricevuto

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Noe Vazquez tries to get the ball as he’s fouled from behind during Saturday’s 1-0 loss to Cashmere.

Tigers fall on late goal By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - An evenly played game didn’t tilt Tonasket’s way on Saturday, March 29, as Cashmere tallied the game’s only score late in the second half to defeat the Tigers’s boys soccer team in a Caribou Trail League match. Tonasket outshot the Bulldogs 12-10 but for the second time in two league games couldn’t cash in with a goal. “We’re still working on sharing the ball,” said Tonasket coach Jack Goyette. “We’re still not passing the ball at the right time; that’s part of it.” Carlos Abrego had the Tigers’ best scoring opportunities in the second half, stopped on one point blank opportunity by Cashmere’s goalkeeper, and on another chance chopped a shot too high

as he tried to beat the charging keeper one-on-one. It was the Tigers’ fourth game in eight days. “I think we were tired,” Goyette said. “They got to a lot of balls that we didn’t. So we’ll get some recovery and get back at it.” The Tigers (2-3, 0-3 Caribou Trail League) travel to Okanogan after Spring Break on Tuesday, April 8. We’re still working on sharing the ball. We’re still not passing the ball at the right time. It was a four game week for us, and I think we were tired. That’s life in the big city. We’ll get some recovery and get back at it. They got to a lot of balls we didn’t get to

Tonasket 5, Manson 0 TONASKET - The Tigers exploded for four goals in the

second half on Thursday, March 27, to claim a 5-0 victory over visiting Manson. Elias Abrego scored twice while Carlos Abrego, Christian Garcia and Anthony Luna each added goals for the Tigers, who outshot the Trojans 25-14 in the contest. Derek Sund had nine saves in goal.

Brewster 2, Tonasket 0 TONASKET - Luis Orozco scored two goals for Brewster, once late in the first half and another early in the second, as the Bears knocked off Tonasket 2-0 on Tuesday, March 25. After being outshot 10-5 in the first half the Tigers managed to play the game on even terms after the break, but couldn’t get the ball into the net. Derek Sund had nine saves for the Tigers.

Cashmere tops Tonasket tennis The Gazette-Tribune

TONASKET - Cashmere’s tennis teams swept Tonasket on Saturday, March 29. Cashmere’s girls beat the Tigers 3-0 (the two doubles matches were not contested due to a lack of available players); Tonasket’s boys lost 3-2. The Tigers had Friday’s match

with Lake Roosevelt postponed due to rain. They next play Tuesday, April 8, at Okanogan.

Results Girls: Cashmere 3, Tonasket 0 Sammy O’Bryan (C) def. Madi Villalva (T), 6-1, 6-1; Mikaela Sites (C) def. Jenny Bello (T), 6-0, 6-2; Carrie O’Donnell (C) def. Brisa Leep (T), 6-0, 6-0.

Boys: Cashmere 3, Tonasket 2 Chad Raven (C) def. Brian Hendrick (T) 6-3, 6-3; Trevor Terris (T) def. Alexander Robertson (C), 6-0, 6-3; Walker Marks (T) def. Armando Estrada (C), 6-1, 6-0; Cameron Moser/Trey Michael (C) def. Jesse Holan/Colton Leep (T), 6-4, 6-1; Jordan Moser/Ian Lindell (C) def. Morgan O’Brien/Levi Schell (T), 7-5, 6-4.

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES BASEBALL Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Brewster 0 0 1 0 Cascade 0 0 2 1 Cashmere 0 0 2 1 Chelan 0 0 1 2 Okanogan 0 0 3 0 Omak 0 0 1 3 Quincy 0 0 3 2 Tonasket 0 0 4 0

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L Lk. Roosevelt 3 0 3 2 Pateros (1B) 1 0 1 1 Bridgeport 0 0 1 2 Liberty Bell 0 0 1 2 Manson 0 1 0 4 Oroville 0 3 0 7

Cent. WA League So. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L Soap Lake (1B) 2 0 4 0 Kittitas 1 0 2 0 Waterville (1B) 1 1 3 2 White Swan 1 2 5 2 Riverside Chr. 0 2 1 3

SOFTBALL (FASTPITCH)

Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Brewster 0 0 1 3 Cascade 0 0 0 2 Cashmere 0 0 2 0 Chelan 0 0 1 3 Okanogan 0 0 2 1 Quincy 0 0 3 3 Tonasket 0 0 1 4

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L Bridgeport 0 0 5 0 Oroville 0 0 5 0 Lk Roosevelt 0 0 0 3 Liberty Bell 0 0 3 1 Manson 0 0 0 3 Pateros (1B) 0 0 1 3

C ent. WA League So. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L Kittitas 0 0 3 1

Soap Lake (1B) 0 0 0 2 Waterville (1B) 0 0 2 5 White Swan 0 0 0 2

BOYS SOCCER Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall Pts W L W L T Brewster 9 3 0 5 0 0 Quincy 9 3 0 3 2 0 Chelan 6 2 0 2 1 1 Cascade 6 2 1 2 1 1 Okanogan 6 2 2 3 2 0 Cashmere 3 1 3 1 4 0 Tonasket 0 0 3 2 3 0 Omak 0 0 4 0 5 0

Central Washinigton Lge (B)

League Overall Pts W L W L T Bridgeport 0 0 0 2 2 0 Liberty Bell 0 0 0 6 0 0 Manson 0 0 0 1 4 0 Oroville 0 0 0 2 3 0

boys tennis Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Chelan 2 0 2 0 Omak 2 0 3 0 Cashmere 3 0 3 1 Quincy 2 1 2 1 Tonasket 0 2 1 2 Cascade 0 2 0 2 Okanogan 0 3 0 3

Cent. WA League No. Div. (B)

League Overall W L W L Liberty Bell 3 0 3 0 Entiat (1B) 2 2 2 3 White Swan 3 3 3 3 Oroville 1 1 1 2 Pateros (1B) 1 1 1 1 Lk Roosevelt 1 2 1 2 Wilson Crk (1B) 0 2 0 2

GIRLS tennis Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Chelan 2 0 2 0 Cascade 2 0 2 0 Okanogan 3 1 3 1

Quincy Cashmere Tonasket Omak

1 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 0 2 0 3 0 2 1 2

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L Pateros (1B) 3 0 3 0 White Swan 5 1 5 1 Entiat (1B) 2 2 2 3 Oroville 1 1 2 1 Liberty Bell 1 3 1 3 Wilson Crk (1B) 0 2 0 2 Lk Roosevelt 0 3 0 3

Schedules Apr. 3-12

BB = Baseball; SB=Softball; TEN=Tennis; BSC= Boys Soccer; TR=Track & Field; GLF=Golf Saturday, April 5 BB - Tonasket at Lake Roosevelt (1), 11:00 am Tuesday, April 8 BB - Tonasket at Okanogan (1), 4:30 pm BB - Oroville at Bridgeport (1), 4:00 pm SB - Okanogan at Tonasket (1), 4:30 pm BSC - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm TEN - Tonasket at Okanogan, 4:30 pm TR - Tonasket and Oroville at Bridgeport (Brewster Relays), 4:00 pm GLF - Manson at Oroville Thursday, April 10 SB - Tonasket at Liberty Bell, 4:30 pm BSC - Tonasket at Cascade, 4:30 pm BSC - Moses Lake C at Oroville, 4:00 pm TEN - Entiat at Oroville, 4:00 pm Saturday, April 12 BB - Chelan at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am BB - Oroville at Manson (2), 11:00 am SB - Chelan at Tonasket (2), 11:00 am BSC - Chelan at Tonasket, 11:00 am BSC - Oroville at Newport, 12:00 pm TEN - Chelan at Tonasket, 11:00 am TR - Tonasket and Oroville at Cashmere Invite, 12:00 pm

WINTHROP - Liberty Bell High School provides small Wrestling Trophies for kids who place first which is a great added incentive. Oroville, Tonasket, Omak, Okanogan, Brewster, Pateros, Chelan, and Cashmere made up a larger than normal size tournament for this time of the season.

Here are how the Oroville Killer Bees placed: First/Second Grade: Frisco Sanchez - 3rd place. Also wrestling: Isiah Ocampo and Ryken Harris Third/Fourth Grade: Shane Marquiss - Champion; Oscar Cervantes - Champion; Kolo Moser - Champion; Travis Darrow - 2nd; Victor Ocampo - 3rd. Also Wrestling: Tommy Spikes and Katie Maynard

Fifth/Sixth Grade: Colby Guzman - Champion; Sergio Ocampo - Champion; Brayden Thompson - Champions; Chris Worell - 2nd; Steven Lopez 2nd; Julian Lopez - 3rd; Charles Egerton - 3rd; Corey Olson - 4th. Also wrestling: Daegon Harris, Cody Field, Seth Baugher and Darian Range. There will be an extra and final Tournament in Omak Saturday, April 5.

CHURCH GUIDE 8th Blossom Spring Bazaar

Saturday, April 12, 2014 10:00 am – 2:00 pm. Oroville High School Commons. Arts & Entertainment, Fairs & Festivals. No Cost. Contact Melisa Turner / blossom.ministries@ gmail.com 509-476-2246. Admission Free (please bring a Food Drive Donation). Door Prizes, from the participating vendors, throughout the day! Sponsored by Blossom Ministries. Potential Vendors may contact Melisa Turner at 509-733-1941 Come and enjoy the variety that is available to you in your community!

OROVILLE

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. Estudio de la Biblia en español Martes 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Oroville Ward 33420 Highway 97 509-476-2740 Sunday, 10:00 a.m. Visitors are warmly welcomed

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Tony Rivera • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


APRIL 3, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A13

SPORTS KARATE COMPETITION

Brent Baker/staff photos

It may not quite be how they practiced it, but Oroville’s Mikayla Scott and Sydney Egerton (No. 2) combined to make a spectacular if unconventional play during Saturday’s doubleheader sweep of Tonasket.

Hornet softball team piling up runs By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - If the early season is any indication, the Oroville softball team is shaping up to be an offensive juggernaut. The Hornets swept Tonasket on Saturday, March 29, 27-10 and 15-4 to run their non-league record to 5-0. The 15 runs in the second game actually represented the Hornets’ season low. The Hornets have outscored their three non-league opponents 119-39 in five games. Last season, with a handful of eighth graders getting used to playing the high school game, Oroville had been outscored 76-36. An inexperienced Tonasket team couldn’t keep Oroville off the scoreboard Saturday. The Hornets started off the opening game with six runs in the first inning and nine runs in the second and never looked back. Hannah Hilderbrand, and Shelby Scott each had three hits for the Hornets, with Kendal Miller and Pie Todd adding two. Rachelle Nutt also had a hit as Oroville drew 21 walks in the contest. Courtnee Kallstrom pitched a five inning complete game for the

win, striking out seven. Vanessa Pershing had three hits including a double for Tonasket, with Selina Cosino and Tori King adding two hits and Jenna Valentine and Baylie Tyus adding one hit apiece. In the second game, the Hornets took a five-run lead in the first and scored in every inning to support the pitching of Kendal Miller, who tossed a three-hitter. Miller and Kallstrom had two hits with Hilderbrand, Nutt, Mikayla Scott, Cruz Ortega and Shelby Scott each adding a hit apiece. Shyane Lewis, Alexa Sutton and Carrisa Frazier had hits for the Tigers. Tonasket, which defeated Lake Roosevelt 22-8 on Tuesday, March 25, fell to 1-4 with the loss.

Oroville 18, Omak JV 13 OMAK - Oroville scored six runs in the third inning and nine runs in the fifth to key an 18-13 victory over Omak’s JV squad on Thursday, March 27. The Hornets took a 6-0 lead in the top of the third after three consecutive RBI singles by Pie Todd, Faith Martin and Hannah

Kallstrom each had three-hit days for the Hornets, with every player in the lineup scoring at least one run and eight of the nine picking up at least one hit.

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Selina Cosino makes a leaping grab behind second base on Saturday against Oroville. Hilderbrand and capped by Rachelle Nutt’s home run. After the Pioneers crept back to within 6-5, Oroville made it a 15-5 game with a nine-run fifth. Omak answered with a seven-run fifth to avoid the 10-run mercy rule but the Hornets salted the game away with runs in the sixth and seventh innings. Hilderbrand, Nutt and

Oroville 27-32, Soap Lake 4-8 SOAP LAKE - The Hornets started their season with an 13-run first inning at Soap Lake on March 22 and cruised to a 27-4 and 32-8 sweep of the Eagles in their opening doubleheader. In the opener, Hannah Hilderbrand and Rachelle Nutt each had five hits Courtnee Kallstrom and Shelby Scott had four hits apiece and Pie Todd, Faith Martin, Mikayla Scott, and Cruz Ortega each had three hits to lead the Hornets’ onslaught. Hilderbrand had a home run while Nutt and Mikayla Scott each added doubles. Kallstrom picked up the win in the pitching circle, striking out six batters. In the second game, a 21-run second inning put the contest out of reach early. Todd and Nutt had four hits each with Martin and Hilderbrand adding three each. Scott, Scott and Ortega each added two hits as Kendal Martin was the winning pitcher, striking out six.

Weather-filled day in Colville Snow, wind, lightning harass Tonasket & Oroville track teams By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

COLVILLE - “Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.” In reality that is the unofficial creed of the U.S. Postal Service. But after last weekend it could be the motto for the Tonasket and Oroville track and field teams - as well as the other 20-plus teams in attendance at Colville’s Ezra Gordon Invitational on Saturday, March 29. From snow on the road on the trip over Sherman’s pass to rain, hail, sun, cross winds and, finally, thunderstorms, the runners, throwers and jumpers had it all. The meet was called off a few events early after a pair of 30 minute lightning delays, torrential rains and high winds. “Despite the weather,” said Tonasket coach Bob Thornton, “the team had 11 season bests and 18 new personal records. I was impressed with their attitude and competitiveness in less than ideal conditions. This is a fun team to coach.” The Tonasket and Oroville girls teams tied for eighth place with 29.5 team points. The Oroville boys finished ninth and the Tonasket boys took 14th. Both teams are next scheduled to compete on Tuesday, April 8, at the Brewster Relays (held at Bridgeport High School).

Tonasket Highlights Cassie Spear and Rose Walts led the Tonasket girls. Spear took second in both the 200 and 400 (season best times in both races) and teamed with Walts, Bonnie Siegfried and Jaden Vugteveen to take fifth in the 4x100 relay. Walts also third in he triple jump and Alissa Young placed fifth in the discus with a personal best. Top finishers for the Tiger boys included Ethan Bensing in the triple jump (2nd) and long jump (9th), Smith Condon in the 200 (5th) and Dallas Tyus in the triple jump. Oroville Highlights “We had some great performances in the 400 (4x100) relay (which finished fourth, four-one

hundredths of a second behind Class 2A Deer Park) with Blaine Weaver, Luke Kindred, Matt Smith and Tanner Smith,” said Oroville coach Harold Jensen. “We had a great 100 by Sami Walimaki (11th) and 200 by Phoebe Poynter (23rd.” Other finishers for the boys included Luke Kindred in the javelin (2nd), Tanner Smith in the 100 (3rd), and Matt Smith in the high jump (5th). Other top finishers included an ill Sierra Speiker in the 3200 (1st) and mile (3rd); Walimaki, Poynter, Kaitlyn Grunst and Brittany Jewett in the 4x200 (7th); Jewett in the javelin (5th); and Grunst in the high jump (4th), long jump (5th) and triple jump (9th).

Ezra Gordon Invitational at Colville

Saturday, March 29 Tonasket / Oroville Results (and event winners)

Boys

Team Scoring - 1. Deer Park 78.5, 2. West Valley (Spokane) 70, 3. Freeman 58, 4. Medical Lake 49, 5. Bridgeport 41, 6. Colville 39, 7. Kettle Falls 36, 8. Lakeside 27, 9. Oroville 23, 10. Liberty Bell 22, 10. Liberty (Spangle) 22, 12. LindRitzville 21, 13. Davenport 18, 14. Tonasket 15, 14. Chewelah 14, 14. Cheney 14, 17. NW Christian 14, 18. Reardan 11, 19. Priest River 5, 20. Republic 3, 21. Mt. Spokane 2, 22. Cusick 0.5. 100 - 1. Tellas Johnson, ML, 10.90; 3. Tanner Smith, ORO, 11.40; 14. Parker Kenyon, TON, 12.15; 42. Jacob Villalva, TON, 13.07. 200 - 1. Ryan Thayer, LB-SP, 24.02; 4. Smith Condon, TON, 24.40; 15. Tanner Smith, ORO, 25.29; Lloyd Temby, TON, 29.25. 400 - 1. Tellas Johnson, ML, 51.61; 13. Devyn Catone, TON, 57.18. 800 - 1. Brady Bollum, DP, 2:09.10; 18. Abe Podkranic, TON, 2:29.00; 26. Makalapua Goodness, TON, 2:35.90. 1600 - 1. Skylar Ovnicek, WV, 4:37.40; 27. Abe Podkranic, TON, 5:35.80; 31. Diego Santana, ORO, 5:44.00; 36. Dalton Smith, TON, 5:54.10; 37. Luis Casarrubias, TON,

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5:55.60. 3200 110 Hurdles - 1. Ryan Whitmore, LRS, 15.36; 13. Blaine Weaver, ORO, 19.56; 21. CAio Baumstein, TON, 21.80. 300 Hurdles - 1. Kip Craig, BPT, 41.90. 4x100 Relay - 1. West Valley 44.17; 4. Oroville (Kindred, T. Smith, M. Smith, Weaver) 47.06; 10. Tonasket (Catone, Condon, Villalva, Kenyon) 48.71. Shot Put - 1. Andrew Buynak, DP, 48-9.5; 26. Oscar Rosales-Cortez, ORO, 35-10; Chad Edwards, TON, 34-9.5; 37. Adrian Palomares, TON, 33-5; 62. Dakota Haney, ORO, 23-7. Discus - 1. Aaron Obert, DP, 148-2; 42. Dakota Haney, ORO, 77-3; 43. Chad Edwards, TON, 76-11; 47. Joaquin Polito, TON, 69-9. Javelin - 1. Austin Zeller, DAV, 15611; 2. Luke Kindred, ORO, 145-3; 40. Oscar Rosales-Cortez, ORO, 89-11. High Jump - 1. Brandon Mauget, DP, 6-2; 5. Matt Smith, ORO, 5-4. Pole Vault - 1. Brendon Algeier, WV, 13-0. Long Jump - 1. Chris Boring, KF, 20-3.75; 9. Ethan Bensing, TON, 18-7.25; 19. Dallas Tyus, TON, 1610.75; 22. Matt Smith, ORO, 16-9; 26. Caio Baumstein, TON, 16-6. Triple Jump - 1. Chris Boring, KF, 425.25; 2. Ethan Bensing, TON, 4110; 7. Dallas Tyus, TON, 38-3.25; 30. Lloyd Temby, TON, 25-10.

Girls

Team Scoring - 1. Lakeside 93.5, 2. Cheney 64, 3. Colville 61.5, 4. Chewelah 61, 5. Deer Park 59.5, 6. Freeman 38.5, 7. Lind-Ritzville 35.5, 8. Oroville 29.5, 8. Tonasket 29.5, 10. Pateros 27, 11. Reardan 26, 12. Mt. Spokane 23.8, 13. West Valley (Spokane) 22.5, 14. Republic 15.3, 15. Lake Roosevelt 13.5, 16. Davenport 13, 17. St. George’s 10, 17. Cusick 10, 19. Liberty (Spangle) 8, 19. Mary Walker 8, 21. Medical Lake 6, 22. Almira/Coulee-Hartline 5, Bridgeport 1.3, Northport 1. 100 - 1. Malia Luu, COL, 12.90; 11. Sammie Walimaki, ORO, 13.99; 25. Bonnie Siegfried, TON, 15.19. 200 - 1. Malia Luu, COL, 27.00; 2. Cassie Spear, TON, 27.80; 23. Phoebe Poynter, ORO, 32.70; 25. Johnna Terris, TON, 32.90. 400 - 1. Harley Strope, REAR, 1:01.59; 2. Cassie Spear, TON, 1:03.61. 800 - 1. Moriah Duenich, DP, 2:31.80; 19. Amber Monroe, TON, 3:05.30;

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22. Mary Naylor, TON, 3:23.20. 1600 - 1. Maddie Ward, STG, 5:30.00; 3. Sierra Speiker, ORO, 5:32.70. 3200 - 1. Sierra Speiker, ORO, 11:23.00. 100 Hurdles - 1. Anna Cartee, DP, 17.33. 300 Hurdles - 1. Johanna Sherman, CHY, 50.13. 4x100 Relay - 1. Lind-Ritzville 54.01; 5. Tonasket (Spear, Cleman, Walts, Siegfried) 55.89. 4x200 Relay - 1. Colville 1:53.80; 7. Oroville (Grunst, Jewett, Walimaki, Poynter) 2:05.00; 10. Tonasket (Terris, Siegfried, Vugteveen, Ferdon) 2:06.00. Shot Put - 1. Kaitlin Krouse, CHW, 366.5; 10. Alissa Young, TON, 26-7; 11. Amber Monroe, TON, 26-6.5; 13. Jenna Davisson, TON, 26-0.5. Discus - 1. Kaitlin Krouse, CHW, 1317; 5. Alissa Young, TON, 93-1; 23. Jenna Davisson, TON, 70-4; 38. Allison Glanzer, TON, 59-11. Javelin - 1. Farrahn O’Hara, LKS, 110-2; 5. Brittany Jewett, ORO, 86-3; 21. Alissa Young, TON, 68-8; Allison Glanzer, TON, 51-10. High Jump - 1. Tora Luu, COL, 5-0; 4. Kaitlyn Grunst, ORO, 4-6. Pole Vault - 1. Samantha Blake, LKS, 10-6. Long Jump - 1. Anna Cartee, DP, 15-10.25; 5. Kaitlyn Grunst, ORO, 14-6.25; Triple Jump - 1. Anna Cartee, DP, 358.5; 3. Rose Walts, TON, 33-7.25; 9. Kaitlyn Grunst, ORO, 30-3.5; 20. Jaden Vugteveen, TON, 27-9.

Submitted by Shirley Keith

Eric Owsley competes for he Okanogan Valley Martial Arts and Cariker Academy of Self Defense at the Central Washington Karate Tournament in Yakima last month. Results: Alex Owsley- 2nd place Kata and 4th place Sparring. Caleb Hardesty -3rd place Kata. Cesar De La Cruz- 2nd place Kata and 5th place Sparring. Conner Hardesty- Honorable Mention. Eric Owsley- 3rd place Sparring. Killian Cariker- 2nd place Kata, 4th place Sparring and 5th place Weapons. Lyn Maus Delys- 4th place Kata and 3rd place Sparring. Natalyn Cariker 4th place Kata. Seth Whittington- 2nd place Kata and 4th place Sparring. Instructors: Sensei Terry Cariker and Sensei Dan Keith.

Hornets topple Newport By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s soccer team won its second game of the season Friday, March 28, at home against Newport, 5-2. “Being the third game in four days, my players were sore, tired and ready for a win,” said Oroville coach Mike Pitts. He said that a conversation at halftime of the previous day’s loss to Liberty Bell seemed to have made a difference the team’s approach to the game that paid off with a win. “They players have responded well,” he said, “and they bet a very good Newport team.” Abe Capote tallied his second hat trick of the season, with Brian Wise and Thomas Elias each adding scores. “I had to make some position changes since I was missing my two center midfielders,” Pitts said. “We played a 4-5-1 in order to flood the midfield and maintain control and possession.” Though that limited the number of offensive opportunities, Pitts said the Hornets did a good job of capitalizing on the chances they did create. “I brought first year player Thomas Elias up from right defender to right midfielder,” Pitts said. “He had a huge impact on that side of the field creating scoring opportunities. I was proud to see the players adjust

accordingly and excel after being pulled from their comfort zone.” Robbie Dudley earned the win in goal, with Pitts adding that he made a number of pivotal saves to preserve the lead. The Hornets (2-3) next play Thursday, April 10, at home against Moses Lake’s C squad.

Liberty Bell 9, Oroville 0 OROVILLE - The Mountain Lions, who have already beaten CTL teams Brewster and Cashmere this season, scored eight goals in the first half of Thursday’s game to put the contest away in a hurry. “At the half I had a very real conversation with my players about Hornets Soccer: what it is and what it’s not. Although we didn’t win, I thought the kids played a tremendous second half.” Bridgeport 7, Oroville 0 BRIDGEPORT - One good half and one bad one set the tone for Oroville’s three games in four days stretch as the Hornets fell 7-0 at Bridgeport after trailing 1-0 at the half. “We failed on a penalty kick early that would have given us the lead and much-needed momentum,” Pitts said. Bridgeport did most of its scoring midway through the second half. “We have to play a near-perfect game,” Pitts said. “And we need to capitalize on our opportunities to win a game like that.”

Raiders sweep Oroville By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

OROVILLE - Oroville’s baseball team was swept in a Central Washington League doubleheader at home doubleheader on Saturday, March 29. The Hornets were one-hit by the Raiders’ Devin Black in an 11-0 opening game defeat, but fared better in the second game, a 9-5 loss. Six errors in the opening game helped to undermine the pitching of Boone McKinney. Taren Redstar had two doubles and

Out On The Town

scored four runs to lead Lake Roosevelt. The Hornets touched up Chance Garvin for five runs on four hits in the nightcap as Dustin Nigg drove in a pair of runs with two doubles. Casey Martin took the loss for the Hornets (0-7, 0-3 CWL), allowing seven hits while striking out nine. Oroville also lost to Tonasket on Pateros in its league opener on March 25, 18-3, and fell at Tonasket on Thursday 12-2. They next play at Bridgeport on Tuesday, April 8.

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PAGE A14

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | APRIL 3, 2014

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 03, 2014  

April 03, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, April 03, 2014  

April 03, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune