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inside»   April 9–15, 2014 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 15

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100 DAYS OF MURRAY BY MATT DRISCOLL | How Mayor

Murray’s years in Olympia have marked his term so far. Plus, what McGinn’s been up to.

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THE STARR REPORT BY VERNAL COLEMAN | The story

behind a notorious tech geek’s belligerent online and in-person personae.

food&drink 15 LEAF STORY

BY SETH FRIEDMAN | In a city of coffee, Seattle’s tea devotees remain undaunted. 15 | FOOD NEWS/TEMP CHECK 16 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 19 IN PRAISE OF SLOW TV

BY ROGER DOWNEY | Why Mad Men and other shows cling to their formats in a world of binge-watching. 20 | THE PICK LIST 22 | PERFORMANCE

24 FILM

25 | OPENING THIS WEEK | Scarlett

29 MUSIC

Tinarawen: a Malian band birthed in a brutal revolution. Plus: A Sub Pop pioneer returns, the Blue Moon marks a milestone, and more. 30 | SEVEN NIGHTS 32 | CD REVIEWS

odds&ends 34 | CLASSIFIEDS

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Johansson as naked killer from space, Catherine Deneuve flees her past, and Donald Rumsfeld does not give a shit what you think. 26 | THE SIT-DOWN | A brief chat with Cuban Fury star Nick Frost.

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The Best of Olympia, the Worst of Olympia

100 Days in Political Exile A mellower Mike McGinn mulls his next steps.

In his first 100 days, Ed Murray shows us the legislative way.

all. On his third day in office, Murray called a press conference to announce an executive order directing city department heads to develop a comprehensive plan for raising the minimum wage for city employees, signaling that speed was of the essence. All the while, he’s largely managed to avoid alienating the local business community as part of this push.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

THE WEEKLY BRIEFING | What’s going on at seattleweekly.com: Scientist Robert Siliciano, one of the world’s leading researchers on HIV, said during a community question-and-answer session at the Downtown YMCA last week that a near-future cure for the virus might be temporary. Seattle-area child-care workers launched a $15-an-hour minimumwage initiative push, just in case. Zillow says 37 percent of Seattle homes are unaffordable for average income earners. Don’t tell Ryan Lewis. The campaign to create a new Seattle And in more Murray news, Kelton Sears analyzes the mayor’s unsettling lack of blinking. Parks District got underway, with one of Mayor Murray’s top campaign advisors leading the charge.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

“You build the relationship, you know. That’s how you get stuff done,” says onetime state Republican Party chairman Chris Vance of Murray’s ability to work behind the scenes with legislators of differing viewpoints and across party lines. “Inter-politicking is a skill. Olympia would have taught him that.” In short, Murray has methodically and thoughtfully brought people to the table, promoting collaboration while demanding progress as opposed to endless talk. In the spotlight, he’s recognized the importance of appeasing constituents; behind closed doors he’s made sure key players on both sides are invested in the outcome. “One thing you see in the legislative process in terms of problem-solving is creating a stakeholder process,” says political consultant (and former deputy mayor under Greg Nickels) Tim Ceis, who, it must be noted, helped raise money for Murray’s election. “I think Ed has shown he’s going to use that technique a lot.

WASHINGTON STATE LEGISLATURE

Murray during his formative legislative days.

“It’s a style he honed in Olympia,” Ceis continues. “I think it comes very natural to him . . . In a city like Seattle, I think people appreciate that.” Sure, people in Seattle like to be included—it’s hard to argue otherwise—but voters also appreciate results, and that’s where many said Murray’s “slow and incremental” approach, on full display during his years-long effort to legalize same-sex marriage, might falter. But as Vance notes, there’s an element of speed to working in Olympia that Murray perhaps didn’t get enough credit for. Having himself moved from the state House of Representatives to the King County Council, Vance says Olympia’s pace is actually much faster than city government’s—one that Murray, having ascended to the chair of the majority caucus, is comfortable with. “In Olympia, they just finished a 60-day session,” says Vance. “It’s speed, speed, speed. . . . That’s the atmosphere Ed Murray has been operating in for 18 years. It has to have had an impact.” Ceis may have been a Murray supporter last November, but longtime Seattle political consultant Cathy Allen was not, working instead on Peter Steinbrueck’s mayoral campaign. Even so, Allen says she’s been won over by the new mayor—specifically by the people he’s surrounded himself with. “I thought if you were part of the political system, that you would act like the political system,” Allen says of Murray. “I am convinced that this guy has put together a group of not-the-usual suspects, and that in itself is refreshing, and catching people pleasantly off guard.” Asked for examples, Allen identifies Mike Fong, whom Murray named deputy director of his newly created Office of Policy and Innovation. Though Fong has a long history working at City Hall, according to Allen he’s known as “a worker” and not someone who “has a political resume as long as his arm.” She also identifies Kathy Nyland, a longtime aide to Sally Bagshaw who now works in neighborhood outreach; and former community organizer Rahwa Habte, now a youth outreach manager. “If anything, they were people who worked in policy despite the politics,” Allen says. “All positive people whom you would not categorize as scheming, agenda-filled, or people likely to deliver to some special interest.”

eorge W. Bush returned to his ranch in Crawford to clear brush after finishing a bruising second term and a presidency marred by war. Jimmy Carter went back to Plains to lick his wounds. Richard Nixon flew west for solitary walks, feet encased in black wingtips, along the crystalline beaches of San Clemente. Nixon’s banishment, of course, was the most memorable. On August 9, 1974, over Jefferson City, Missouri, clocks in the nation’s capital struck high noon and Nixon, disgraced by Watergate, ceased to be president. Silence enveloped Air Force One, save for an aide who muttered “Air Force Once.” McGinn Nixon sipped a martini in his cabin, press secretary Ron Ziegler beside him. In another cabin, Pat Nixon, solemn as a church, thought about writing thank-you notes. A few days earlier, she was overheard telling her husband, according to accounts in The Atlantic, “You’ve ruined my life.” While political exile is exceedingly painful, one surely cannot compare the personal trauma a big-city mayor experiences when tossed from office to that of a U.S. president forced into an unceremonious, and humiliating, retirement. Still, electoral rejection at any level is often soulcrushing—even for a community activist turned Seattle mayor. It hurts. It gnaws. It steals sleep. It takes time for the wounds to heal. “Yes, I wanted to win, and it is disappointing,” reflects Mike McGinn on a recent breezy, sunlit evening. “You know, the first time I won with only 51 percent, and this time I lost with 47.5 percent. So the difference between victory and defeat is very small. So I lost the mayor’s race. What else do I have to complain about?” McGinn has mellowed since losing his bid for a second term four months ago. He’s 54 and looking good. He’s relaxed, his spirits are high, and he remains, as he’s prone to boast, an everpresent scoring threat on the basketball court. “I can still stick the open 15-footer,” the happy hoopster says with a wink. At his invitation, I met with McGinn, who has studiously avoided the spotlight since leaving office, at a function of the Social Justice Fund.

MIKE MCGINN

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lot can be done in 100 days. It’s enough time for a leopard to gestate; twice enough for the creation of a domestic ferret. If you set your mind to it, you can circle the globe by hot-air balloon at least four times. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, who on April 10 will celebrate his 100th day in office, can surely appreciate what can be accomplished in such a relatively short period. Just look at his track record: He’s already set out to tackle the minimum wage and income inequality headon. He’s forced an interim police chief into retirement and answered for his ill-prepared, bumbling replacement. He’s received a firsthand education on just how screwed up the SPD misconduct appeals process is, and has suffered politically because of it. He’s accidentally pronounced a living man dead, and replaced a press secretary shortly thereafter. He’s spoken at a Super Bowl victory parade, and managed to speak of Bertha, the stuck Highway 99 tunnel-boring machine, as little as possible. The list goes on. It’s quite impressive, really. All this from a man with 18 years experience as a state legislator whom many derided as painfully slow and methodical in the lead-up to last November’s mayoral election. All this from a man who some people said was too Olympia, too incremental, and too embedded in the political machine to be a good fit for Seattle. All this from a man more accustomed to wielding his power behind caucus doors; a man who often quotes Bobby Kennedy; a man who—in front of the cameras and public, at least—lacks charisma and, apparently, the ability to blink. There’s no doubt Murray has notched accomplishments in his first 100 days. But how exactly did his nearly two decades in Olympia affect his governing style and approach? According to close observers, the tell-tale signs of a savvy state legislator can be seen in some of the new mayor’s most high-profile moves. Take the minimum-wage debate. Largely (if not entirely) spurred by Kshama Sawant’s successful City Council bid and the groundswell it produced, wage inequality has been one of the key issues Murray’s administration has had to confront. And true to the mayor’s Olympiabred reputation, he’s taken to it predictably. He formed a 23-person committee comprising business and labor leaders, gathering stakeholders to jockey for a minimum-wage hike that works for

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Murray’s City Hall colleagues seem inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt for any early mishaps.

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All this has resulted in a continuing PR nightmare for Murray that’s necessitated an awkward and baffling string of public apologies and clarifications—from a mayor invested so heavily in the notion that he’s a leader capable of orchestrating Seattle’s police-reform efforts. Needless to say, it hasn’t looked good. Acting quickly to assert control and position himself to get credit for police reform in the eyes of voters—moves that may have served him well in Olympia—Murray likely contributed to his biggest Seattle gaffe to date. If there’s one thing Murray has in City Hall, however, it’s a coalition of supporters—which he’s made Olympian efforts, in both senses, to maintain. It’s something Mike McGinn never managed to achieve—or, perhaps more accurately, a skill the former mayor never understood the importance of. So far it’s serving Murray well. Because of the relationships he’s worked to forge with the Council, Murray’s City Hall colleagues seem inclined to give him the benefit of the doubt for any early missteps. “I think the collaborative part of it is maybe an outgrowth of Olympia. You don’t get anything accomplished if you don’t get it through both houses. He certainly understands the legislative process,” says longtime councilmember Jean Godden. Nick Licata, the Council’s longest-serving member—now on his fourth mayor—agrees. Though he’s been highly critical of the policemisconduct appeals process, when it comes to the botched reversals, he’s reluctant to place blame at the new mayor’s feet. “He’s still in learning mode,” Licata says. One thing seems certain: With Murray’s first 100 days now officially in the rear-view mirror, it’s time to shift out of learning mode. As every new mayor learns, the honeymoon period only lasts so long. Murray’s is probably over. E

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The organization promotes the creation of “a just society” through fundraising and enlisting “progressive” people to get involved in their community. McGinn, naturally, joined their Board of Directors. He’s here this night to champion another of his favorite causes, the Environmental Justice Giving Project. At the Impact Hub building in Pioneer Square, across the street from the Union Gospel Mission, young white liberals, mostly, are drinking wine and munching hummus-slathered crackers and carrot sticks. Many of them come up to McGinn, clad in a blue shirt and gray cords, to extend their well-wishes. Huddling in private before his brief speech to the Social Justice crowd, McGinn says with mock seriousness that he’s not used to talking with the media.“Come on, Mike, you don’t forget,” I joke. “It’s like riding a bicycle.” He laughs. Asked what those first days out of office were like, McGinn seems unsure how to respond. For all his Irish gift of gab, the New York–raised former neighborhood and Sierra Club activist is more comfortable, and accustomed to, addressing policy questions. “It was an opportunity to relax, to reconnect with old friends in a leisurely way,” he volunteers. “I have a great family, and I’ve had more time to spend with them, more time to see my kids’ games.” And more time to get his pictures up on Instagram, including shots of “squash ready for roasting,” a selfie with ex-Seattle Times reporter Emily Heffter, and a photo of a bouquet of flowers that someone placed on his bike. “I’ve been staying busy,” he adds, noting that he’s helping the Sierra Club make political endorsements and has been tapped to be on the speaker’s bureau for 350.org, an international global-climate organization. McGinn has no interest in returning to law. He says it is social activism and remaining integrally involved in the Seattle community that gets his juices flowing. For years he worked as a corporate litigator at Stokes Lawrence—a Seattle law firm where he eventually made partner in the early 1990s. But being mayor, he says, has created within him an appetite for things much larger than toiling in a law office. “I grew as a person [as mayor], and it made me a better person for sure, so right now, I’m doing some fact-finding stuff. Talking, reaching out, reconnecting, and making new connections. I’m just getting the lay of the land. I’m not sure what’s next.” McGinn concedes that there are many days when he can’t help but second-guess his second ill-fated campaign for mayor. “Yes, I revisit it, wondering what I might have done differently, but then you have to move on.” As to whether he has any thoughts on Ed Murray’s first 100 days, McGinn shoots a flinty stare. Then he mellows and says with smile and a mischievous look, “During the campaign I always said, ‘There’s no such thing as mayor’s school.’ ” I ask him whether he’ll run again. “I have not closed the door to run for political office,” he replies. “But to run, all the planets have to align—like they did in 2009. And if they do align again—well, awesome. If not, I’ll be doing something that I think is important, working with others to make our community better.” E

been exposed by his handling of the minimum-wage debate, perhaps the opposite can be said for the way he’s dealt with the city’s police department. Having promised during his campaign to work effectively—unlike McGinn—on Department of Justice-mandated reforms, Murray’s police dealings have nevertheless seemed just as embarrassingly clumsy, coming off like a business-as-usual comedy of errors. In January, Murray replaced since-retired interim chief Jim Pugel—whom reformers have continually applauded for his efforts to shake up the SPD status quo—with Harry Bailey, a Seattle police officer for 35 years. Bailey emerged from retirement only to stumble badly through the reversal of misconduct findings against six officers, including one who had threatened to harass Stranger news editor Dominic Holden.

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While Murray’s best Olympia qualities have

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100 Days of Exile » FROM PAGE 5

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Best and Worst » FROM PAGE 5

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014


Glasshole PORTRAIT OF A

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

By Vernal Coleman

MORGEN SCHULER

Is Nick Starr a harbinger of things to come, or just an entitled, agitating fameball with a computer strapped to his face?

T

o understand Nick Starr, you have to set aside for a moment what you know about his online persona. If you can, you’ll find he’s not as prickly in person as the Nick Starr on the Internet. Of course, that might be a new development. Given how negatively Starr’s past experiences with the press have turned out, it makes sense he’d try to soften his image—all the better to convey what it was like to watch his online life unravel. But we’ll get to that later. N For now, let’s talk about how Nick Starr is, as he says, a “creature of habit.” He agreed to meet for three interviews, arriving at each in the same staid outfit—black and white Fox Head windbreaker, black ribbed T-shirt, jeans. He has several of each item. “These work for me,” Starr says. N But here’s the most important part of his ensemble, the thing that during most hours of the day sits perched across the bridge of his nose: $1,500 worth of Google brand mobile computer. Or if you rather, Google Glass. N You may have heard of it. It’s Google’s grand experiment in wearable computer hardware, whose main design quirk is the clunky translucent prism that hovers above the right eye. N Starr is a first adopter—the kind of person who tracks the development of new digital and tech products and is at the head of the line to purchase them when they debut. But for him, Google Glass is less a consumer product than a lifestyle choice. N “Obviously, I’m heavily invested in the product,” Starr says. “I love it. It’s awesome. There’s not a single day that I don’t use it in a way that it is easier than doing that task on my smartphone.” N So if he sometimes seems combative when others suggest he allow himself to be governed by their discomfort with the device, it’s because Starr is allergic to changing what works for him. N But even addressing that discomfort, Starr’s thoughts are measured. His voice is, too. Given the right circumstances—for example, demonstrating how Glass works for curious strangers at downtown coffee shops—you might even take him for good-natured. N To some, the image of Starr interacting politely with anyone might seem incongruous. This is the same 33-year-old network engineer whose name appears in conjunction with “asshole” in many a corner of the Internet. If at any point your social-media footprint has intersected his, you probably know why. » CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 9


Glasshole PORTRAIT OF A

» FROM PAGE 9

Starr has been chronicling his life online since social media was young, sometimes in discomforting detail. When he’s not crafting bons mots like everyone else on Twitter, or retweeting links to the hot tech story of the day, he’s decrying the treatment of himself and other members of the small army of first adopters chosen by Google to field-test Glass. More recently, he’s come to embody a classic type of celebrity via a relatively new medium: the guy some people love to hate, on social media. The Internet’s displeasure with Starr reached its apex in November, when he posted a

note on his various accounts suggesting that an employee of a Capitol Hill diner be fired after she enforced the restaurant’s ban of Google Glass against him. For what was perceived as a breach of etiquette on Starr’s part, the Internet responded as the Internet often does. In other words, he was virtually tarred and feathered, and later had personal information, like his home address, loosed onto the Web. Starr says he doesn’t entirely care what people on the Internet think of him, though he disagrees with most assessments. Entitled poster boy for the perceived self-absorption of an increasingly maligned techie caste—that’s never been him, Starr says: “If I was that bad, or if I had done half the things people accuse me of, I’d be in jail.” Talk to those close to Starr, and they’ll say he

mellowed after the incident. “Ever since I met him, there have been people on the Internet who don’t like Nick for some reason,” says Brian Street, Starr’s partner of two years. “So, yeah, it was a relief almost to not have to deal with that as much.” The respite may be over. Nearly six months removed from the run-in at Lost Lake, he’s back to making the kind of statements that have some other Google Glass advocates cringing. “So now Glass is the new, ‘We don’t want your kind’ . . . now I’m a second class citizen’s citizen,” reads one recent online missive. That’s Starr claiming discrimination after being barred from a Vancouver, B.C., nightclub in March. It was not the most diplomatic response. But for Starr, being nice is secondary to being right. And the frustrating thing about Nick Starr is that, in more than one sense, he is.

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“Nearly every time someone has a conversation

with me about Glass, it’s about privacy, blah, blah, blah,” Starr says. “But if you’re the type of person who’s going to be doing lascivious actions, it doesn’t matter what type of technology you use, you’re going to be doing that. But nobody asks anyone to put their smartphones away. If you’re going to be saying that this isn’t allowed, you need to be consistent and say that there’s no smartphones allowed. No cameras whatsoever. But people are acting on emotion and not acting logically.” It’s a point made often by Starr and other strident Google Glass defenders when addressing fears about the device’s invasive implications. And it would seem to hold water. In 2013, Ericsson Mobile released a study projecting outwardly the number of global smartphone subscribers. In six years, the company expects there will be 1.9 billion people using registered smartphones across the globe—each, presumably, equipped with a camera that could be used to surreptitiously take photos of others. So think about how mobile technology has evolved over the past 10 years. Even as cell phones begat smartphones and the camera technology embedded in them became more and more advanced, no businesses barred the use of smartphones as they have the use of Google Glass. But even a zealot like Starr admits that the design advancements that so enamor Glass users, like the ability to take a photo simply by blinking, also make it easier to get away with capturing images of people without their consent. Starr has a standard response to that, too: “Why would I want their picture?”

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

“If you’re going to be saying that this isn’t allowed, you need to be consistent and say that there’s no smartphones allowed. No cameras whatsoever.”

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By discounting that concern about Glass, Starr is asking you simply to trust that he doesn’t want to take your picture. Problem is, people are often disinclined to extend trust to people they don’t like. And in the past six months, Starr has managed to become unliked by an awful lot of people. He’s not the only one. As Google lays the groundwork for a full rollout of the device, the narrative around Glass has come to be dominated by discussions about the behavior and treatment of its users. Tons of real and digital ink has been spilt discussing the appropriateness of wearing the device in public or in social situations. A number of its users have made headlines for being ticketed, allegedly assaulted, or in Nick Starr’s case, being banned from using the device at local businesses. None of it has resulted in good publicity. The negative thread in the narrative around Glass has become so strong that Google recently released a guide for users on how not to be disliked. Nick Starr is not governed by that guide. Nor does he buy into the idea that negative perception of Glass users will derail the company’s attempts to build a wider market for the device. What’s more clear, however, is the fact that Starr’s antics and advocacy for Glass in his virtual life have caused very real consequences in his real one. Question is, is it worth it?


In 2007, he was laid off from the marketing job. Some time later, he spooked friends and other Twitter followers by posting a note threatening to throw himself from Tampa Bay’s Sunshine Skyway Bridge. This was after a night of heavy drinking. The last message posted to Starr’s Twitter feed before it went dark that night read, “Alright this is it. Parked my car. I wish everyone who ever was nice to me well. See you in the next life.” According to news reports, police found him passed out in his car the next morning. Across the country, news outlets speculated that it was Twitter’s first suicide threat. The microblogging service had been live for barely over a year. When The New York Times got around to writing a trend piece on it, its reporters made Starr’s threat the lead under the headline, “The Global Nick Starr revisits the Sympathetic Audience.” scene of his undoing. A year later, Starr migrated across the It was the smart call. Better to deprive the country to San Francisco. On his now-defunct outrage machine of fuel and let it peter out on blog, he explained that the reasons were typical. its own. Starr returned to social media a short “Because of my upbringing and fears, I wasn’t time later, bent on toning down his oversharing able to come out until after I packed up and and the edgy—or, depending on your perspecmoved into my car and moved,” he wrote. “I still tive, tasteless—jokes that had been a staple of didn’t even feel comfortable coming out until his Twitter feed. Moreover, he tried to keep after living here 7 months.” from getting baited into debates about his use of Even after moving into the heart of the city, Google Glass. Starr says he continued to struggle with depresTweeting with a filter proved to be a lot less sion. “It’s a really hard town to break in and make fun, however. “I think the reason that I did grow friends,” he says. “People are working at a startup an audience is because I am the way that I am,” one second, and then it runs out of money and Starr says. “Social media used to be an outlet for they’re heading back to Nebraska.” doing and saying what you want. And it’s frusIn 2008, Starr posted a second suicide tweet— trating that I can’t do that without any restricthis time threatening to throw himself from tion, because people are going to use what you the Golden Gate Bridge. But the iconic San say against you.” Francisco structure is monitored both for exterior threats and for people trying to fling themselves from it. Starr was stopped by police en route. By the time Starr migrated to Seattle in 2011, Two years after that, officers of the Califorhe was already an infamous figure online, and nia Highway Patrol were called out after Starr had been for the better part of a decade. tweeted a threat to jump from San Francisco’s He grew up in Florida, the child of conother suspension bridge. “Heading to the Bay servative parents who transplanted the family Bridge,” he wrote in one post. He added: “Good from Ohio, which might explain his boyish riddance to bad rubbage (aka me). I was never Midwestern looks. His admittedly complicated meant to be born and I’m correcting what wrong relationship with online media began in his God meant to when I should’ve been aborted.” teens. At 15, Starr began posting to a personal So that’s Starr’s very public history of suicidal Geocities page, his first branded space on the ideation. Of course, none of this explains why he Internet. advocates for Google Glass as he does. These are By 27, he was working in marketing, which just the most extreme examples of Starr’s willinghelped fund his tech-consumption habit. Meanness to bare online the intimate details of his life. while he was also struggling to come to terms There are many more. with his sexuality. For example, back in 2009, Starr chronicled From his home in Tampa, Starr would make the experience of living out of his car after electthe 100-mile drive to Orlando to visit the city’s ing to go homeless. The purpose: To save for gay-friendly nightclubs. Wary of being outed, $8,000 worth of liposuction and other cosmetic he relied on anonymity, using a fake name when surgeries. He later posted a play-by-play of the interacting with other clubbers. surgery online. It was not a happy time, he now says. Besides Through such self-exposure, Starr has gained a depression, something he’d struggled with since substantial online following; at last count, he had his childhood, Starr says he wrestled with feelings of loneliness and body-image issues. » CONTINUED ON PAGE 12 MORGEN SCHULER

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For all the furor it caused, Starr’s tiff at Lost Lake played out quietly. It happened late on a Thursday night in November, a week before Thanksgiving. Starr and Street had left a comedy show at the Lobby Lounge on Capitol Hill and decided to head around the corner for a late dinner. According to Starr’s account, the couple took seats in the Lost Lake Cafe dining section. Shortly after, the restaurant’s night manager arrived at their table. Starr says he was told he’d have to remove his Google Glass device, which he’d been wearing all evening—as he does nearly every evening—or leave the restaurant. After some back-and-forth, Starr, annoyed, chose the latter option, and he and Street exited. The next morning, Starr took to social media with his complaints. “I would love an explanation, apology, clarification,” reads the most inflammatory section of the note. “And if the staff member was in the wrong and lost the owner money last night and also future income as well, that this income be deducted from her pay or her termination.” Starr now says he regrets writing those lines. The note “made the story more about me, and less a debate about the issues surrounding Glass, which is where it should be,” he says. At the time, he says he was unaware that the diner had an established ban against Google Glass. He will respect the rule, though “I strongly disagree,” he says. News of Starr’s post flew around the globe, with reports carried by the local press and news outlets as far afield as the United Kingdom. And Starr embraced the attention—mostly for the chance to weigh in on what’s become a national discussion about the privacy implications of wearable tech devices, and whether those who utilize Google Glass specifically are, among other things, terrible people. But then things went sideways. A November 27 item on Valleywag, a gossip blog covering Silicon Valley, marked the shift. The headline pegged Starr as an “asshole.” Other outlets—the more mean-spirited ones—made the more obvious pun. Glasshole. It’s unclear who coined it, but the term has become shorthand for any Glass user. And as the furor over Starr’s note peaked, dozens of blogs—especially those with writers who already held a negative opinion of Glass users— began using it as a shorthand reference for him. On Starr’s social-media feeds and in the angry missives posted in online comment sections, responses to the story got darker. One particularly dedicated Twitter user superimposed a photo of Starr onto an image of a grotesquely misshapen piglike creature. Starr keeps track of these. Asked about them, he hands over a few dozen printouts of Facebook comment threads. Most of the offending lines are just snarky jibes about everything from Starr’s appearance to his online demeanor, which is to say they’re commonplace. But among them is at least one very obvious threat of violence: “If I see him out tonight I might curb-stomp him (only if his glasses are off ).” Starr says the person behind that comment is one of his longtime harassers. He gained new ones, too. That week, Starr says both his address and the entry code to his apartment building were posted online. “It wasn’t stopping,” Starr says. “It got to the point I couldn’t read any more comments, or any more bile.” As was his habit, Starr tried to rebut them all. “I guess I just can’t let things go,” he adds. “But people were saying we should be killed in our sleep. So I had to shut it down.” Soon after, he deactivated all his social-media accounts.

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more than 50,000 Twitter followers. Not all are fans. And those suicide threats are not something his detractors seem willing to forget. In the big packet Starr is sharing with me are multiple Facebook comments on the Lost Lake incident that reference that period in Starr’s life. “Maybe he’ll actually jump this time,” reads one. “Whenever he has fallen out of go [sic] the limelight, he pulls another attention grabbing stunt,” says another. It’s a charge Starr vehemently denies. “This is my real life,” he says. “Those were my real feelings. Online you’re just more open and honest about these things. You express how you really and truly feel. And I don’t know why anyone would want to do these things just for publicity, or to sensationalize them.” But it wasn’t just his willingness to expose the gritty details of his life that rankled. His sense of humor got him into trouble, too. Former Bay Area blogger Zachary Sire covered Starr often in those years. Sire wrote for The Sword, a San Francisco outlet covering gossip and the local gay-porn industry. He wrote multiple times about the exploits of Nick Starr, who at that point had “become an object of scorn within the community,” says Sire. Starr once founded a website built on the premise that, despite the message of the popular It Gets Better web campaign, the harassment of gays does not get better after they age out of high school. ItGetsWorse had a short lifespan, utilized only as a platform for Starr to vent his frustrations about being Nick Starr. In hindsight, the joke was somewhat tasteless, Starr now admits. According to Sire, tasteless, insensitive Twitter jokes were all Starr had to offer. But Sire would cover his antics because, he says, “Our readers loved the chance at getting back at him. He was great for traffic.” If Starr’s online antics were a craven publicity grab, it would hardly make him unique. Alice Marwick, a professor of media studies at Fordham University in New York City, lived in San Francisco for a few months in the late aughts, researching her doctoral dissertation Status Update: Celebrity and Attention in Web 2.0. Among other things, Marwick’s research takes a deep look at the social-media habits and attention-seeking behaviors of the city’s tech elite. To boost their status within the community, young professionals are taking advantage of the democratization of online media tools to create “self-consciously constructed personae which are marketed, like brands or celebrities, to an audience or fan base.” The Internet now refers to extreme examples of this as “fameballs,” a word coined in the midaughts to shame status-seeking social climbers in New York’s media scene. That was around the time that Twitter, Facebook, and other companies democratized online media, allowing anyone with an Internet connection to become a memoirist, or alternatively their own shameless publicist. But Starr says that gaining status within the city’s tech community was never his intent. Marwick’s own conclusions about Starr seem to bear that out. A case study on him is featured in her dissertation’s chapter on self-branding. Reached by phone, Marwick remembers Starr as “very effective at using social media to get attention . . . But the attention that he was getting was considered by his peers to be the wrong kind, in that he was widely considered in a negative light by many of them.”

So why use social media as he did? Why put in the effort with no status-minded goal? As Marwick points out, people look to online social communities not just for status, but for acceptance. It was his secret for fighting the depression that’s plagued him for years—solace through social media. “I’d turn online,” he says. “Because even when I had no one to talk to, I had Twitter.” Inside a converted fourth-floor dance studio

at the Old Rainier Brewery in SoDo, a prayer is said for Nick Starr. “Just try to relax.” It doesn’t take, of course. Starr did not come to this meeting of local Google Glass enthusiasts for relaxation. Nor to chant ancient religious mantras while sitting cross-legged on a satin pillow. Instead, he’s here to network. But judging from the contempt on his face—the broad, accessible type that’s incapable of being camouflaged—he won’t be staying long. The space belongs to Bernice Imei Hsu, who introduces herself as a “psychotherapist by day, belly dancer by night.” Every Friday afternoon, she and a handful of other techies and Glass users meet to talk shop and to help each other develop whatever new applications for the device they can dream up. They call it an incubator. The group began meeting shortly after Google’s 2013 rollout of the device. Each is a Glass Explorer—the moniker given to the 10,000 people selected by Google for what amounts to a public beta test. To gain access to this exclusive club, each would-be Explorer had to enter a contest, telling Google “What Would You Do With Glass?” Starr wrote that he wanted to take his father sky-diving and record it with the device. During a brief interlude, Hsu gathers the attendees from a cluster of worn couches and marshals them into the middle of the room for directed breathing exercises, which she plans to film with her own Glass unit. Among the group are a Harborview Hospital trauma surgeon, a web developer, a woman whose occupation can perhaps best be described as “professional futurist,” and, attending for the first time on this shiny March afternoon, Nick Starr. A half-hour later, he’s gone. The rest continue to work—Hsu on her own project, designed to teach her patients how to pick up emotional and facial cues from their partners. Heather Evans, the surgeon, is attempting to develop ways in which Glass can aid doctors and students inside the operating room. That Hsu, Evans, and the others are invested enough in Glass to devote hours to it on a Friday afternoon also means they’re very aware of its public-perception problem, and of the host of incidents, the most recent being the alleged latenight assault of a Glass user in a dive bar in San Francisco earlier this month. And then of course there’s Starr, who spent much of the meeting sequestered on the group’s periphery tapping on a smartphone. How do other Glass users feel about him? Many decline to comment. Following Starr’s run-in with the staff at Lost Lake, the incubator’s co-founder Jeris Miller developed a code of conduct for local Glass users. She says they are trying to move the conversation forward: “By focusing on what is possible to accomplish with Glass through innovation, we can filter out the rest of the noise.” Doing so might help Google seed a market for the device in an consumer environment that’s yet to fully embrace wearable technology. But if Google is at all concerned that the Nick Starr’s of the Glass community will sour the public on the


device, they’re not saying so. Google spokesperson Anna Richardson White tells Seattle Weekly that “We don’t believe that Mr. Starr’s experience is representative of the whole experience of members of the Explorers program.” The list of Seattle establishments that have

banned Glass is growing. In addition to Lost Lake, there are the Black Coffee Co-Op and Purr Cocktail Lounge. Starr was a regular at Purr. Then, says owner Barbie Humphrey, some customers complained about Starr wearing his Glass unit inside the bar, saying that they were made “uncomfortable.” “You have to remember this is a gay establishment,” Humphrey says. “There are real concerns about someone bringing a camera into a place where there are people who are not out, and who may not want to be photographed.” As Starr remembers things, it was the com-

“There are real concerns about someone bringing a camera into a place where there are people who are not out.”

Last week, Google set up shop in SoDo Park

for a three-day show-and-tell demonstration of Google Glass. Inside the cavernous venue, the curious accumulated around booths waiting for a chance to play with the device. Other, more experienced attendees mingled with Google officials near the bar sipping champagne. Greg Priest-Dorman, the burly Google systems developer who helped pioneer wearable technology, held court near a cluster of couches. When will Google release Glass to the wider public? “Rumor is next year,” he says. But that’s just a rumor. And then there was Starr. In a photo taken at the reception photo booth on the second day of the event, and then later posted to his Twitter account, Starr stands hunched over his bright-smiling partner with a bemused expression. He looks happy. And maybe he is. According to his Twitter timeline, Starr has job interviews lined up. The state has signed off on his unemployment insurance claim. And at the time of the picture, he was in an environment surrounded by likeminded people looking at the world through the lens of a Google product. “Every time something like this happens, it changes how a person or the collective uses things,” Starr says. And here he manages to spin the last month of drama and setbacks into something positive. “The point is people are going to adjust. And when that happens, everybody wins.” E

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

plainants who were taking “spy shots” after recognizing him as Nick Starr, the guy from the Lost Lake incident. Humphrey says that Starr is welcome to return, but only so long as he leaves his Glass unit elsewhere. In response, Starr took to Facebook, writing that he will not support a business that bans Glass. As usual, Starr seemed to take the policy shift personally: “It’s really sad that there are people who have nothing better to do than to try to ruin the small joys and places I like to go,” he wrote. He has not been back to Purr since Humphrey enacted the ban. That response was fairly tame, at least compared to Starr’s latest efforts to persuade wary local business owners to change their Google Glass policy. Starr believes an opening presented itself with the announcement, in January, that Google will produce a new line of glass frames designed to accommodate corrective lenses. By his logic, Glass users with imperfect eyesight who have purchased a Glass unit with prescription lenses are protected under the umbrella of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Starr first mentioned this in a February interview with Seattle Weekly. “I would love to go back into Lost Lake with a prescription pair of Google Glass,” he said. “I won’t do it. My prescription is not that bad. But I would love for someone to.” Later that month, he directed a tweet at Lost Lake owner Dave Meinert, whom he’s continued to snipe at since his dust-up at the restaurant, hinting that someone soon would. “You ready for an ADA lawsuit,” he wrote. Reached by phone, Meinert is aware of the message, but has no plans to lift Lost Lake’s Glass ban. Whether or not his theory is sound, Starr seems to have bought into it. He decided to pony up the non-refundable $225 for the frames, and then made a formal request to the humanresources department at the Casey Family Programs, where he works, asking that it reverse the policy preventing him from wearing Glass on the job. The thrust of Starr’s argument was that the device’s functionality could be limited to the point of rendering it just another pair of prescription glasses.

In March, Starr says, he and his bosses were to have a “discussion” about his request. According to him, it did not go well. In fact, a week after that meeting, he says, he arrived at work only to be ushered into yet another meeting with the company brass. A short time later, he was riding home in a car hired by the company with his personal effects and a severance check. Starr says the foundation provided no official reason for his termination. But it wasn’t the first time his efforts to reverse the foundation’s Glass policy had been quashed or he’d been accused of reacting poorly to the company’s rejection of his plea. In the aftermath of his first attempt in January, Starr says, he was written up for “taking the decision personally.” He received a second writeup for similar reasons after the March meeting. A week later he was gone. Starr and Street were saving to buy a home together. He admits that this sudden shift in employment status has thrown a monkey wrench into those plans. So—the dream of a new home with his boyfriend? The financial stability he’s worked years to achieve? Starr has risked them both in pursuit of his personal right to wear a computer on his face. Whether federal law gave him any leverage in doing so is an open question. Emily Cooper, an attorney with Disability Rights Washington, says that a person would be “hard-pressed” to successfully make the argument that use of a Glass unit that incorporates prescription frames is covered by the ADA. “If the employer in the situation you are covering prohibited all employees from wearing google glass (perhaps due to privacy, confidentiality, or proprietary reasons), then it would be difficult to show how the policy itself is discriminatory,” she writes via email. Cooper says a person would also have to convince a deciding body that wearing a Glass unit helps them do a job they might not be able to otherwise do, and that it should be provided as a reasonable accommodation. Starr has no regrets. “I have to live with the choices that I make,” he says. “But I’m not going to change. I’m not going to change myself for other people and decide not to do something because other people decide it’s not to their comfort level.”

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food&drink Tea Party

A connoisseur’s guide to Seattle’s other hot beverage.

S

BY SETH FRIEDMAN

BY SARA BILLUPS

Álvaro Candela is The Saint’s new executive chef. Candela, from Mexico City, has been crafting the Monday-night tacos pop-up at Sitka & Spruce. He’ll showcase a new menu at the Capitol Hill tequileria.

itting at Sea-Tac drinking tea, I realized just how passionate—er, obsessive?—I had become. I had brought my tiny travel tea set, and was brewing green tea with my gaiwan (an ancient tea-brewing implement, basically a cup with a lid and saucer). I had secured some piping-hot water from a nearby coffee shop, and—astutely aware that green tea brews best at a lower temperature— poured the hot water into my glass pitcher to cool it a bit before pouring it into the gaiwan. The result: a delicious, slightly nutty cup of sencha. Maybe, dear reader, you’re thinking that “slightly nutty” might be used to describe something other than the tea? Well, perhaps—but there are definitely those in the Seattle area who share my affection for The Leaf, as I learned during my recent quest to explore some of the area’s premier tea shops.

Piecora’s pizza on Capitol Hill is set to close on April 15 after 33 years. The building at 14th and Madison was sold to an apartment developer. Local distiller 3 Howls brought home two awards at the recent American Distilling Institute’s Craft American Spirit awards. Their Navy Strength Gin grabbed “Best in Category,” and their Blood Orange Vodka snagged the silver medal in the flavoredvodka category. They’ll celebrate with a party on April 15 at Clever Bottle. The Rhino Room on Pine Street is ready to start serving, and Ma’ono chef Mark Fuller is at the helm. Seattle Met describes the menu as “Hawaii-meets-awesome.”

My first stop, and a little-known gem: Guitian’s Tea Club (1531 First Ave., # 509, guitiansteaclub.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KYU HAN

Top: Li, of Guitian’s Tea Club. Bottom: Jason Chen at Smacha.

Next I make the short drive to Phoenix Tea (902 S.W. 152nd St., Burien, phoenix-teashop.com), co-owned by Virginia “Cinnabar” Wright and Brett Boynton, both of whom are also tea bloggers. The first tea I sample is a tulsi blend (also known as “holy basil”), joining a tea session with two young women who have just finished the Clove to Clover 5K. Complimentary tea tasting is offered for patrons at a low, ornately carved, antique Chinese table. I ask about an odd-looking device on the table. (Picture something like what is used on foosball tables to record the number of goals.)

TEA TYPES White: lightly oxidized (a chemical process that browns tea leaves and contributes to flavor and aroma) Yellow: fixed (oxidation prevented by applying heat) Green: fixed Oolong: semi-oxidized Purple: produced from a newly developed varietal of Camellia sinensis in Kenya Black: fully oxidized Puerh: may or may not be oxidized, but is always fermented Herbal: an infusion not made from the tea plant, Camellia sinensis. This glossary was adapted from Tea Trekker (teatrekker.com) and from Phoenix Tea.

“Customers would sometimes ask which infusion we were on, so I invented, designed and made this tea-infusion counter,” says Wright. How many people—even in the tea world— have homemade “infusion counters” at their tea table? That Phoenix Tea has one is a true indication of the depth of their passion. After each infusion, Wright dutifully slides another bead. Another item of interest on Phoenix’s tea table is the small “tea pet.” “Watch this,” Wright says, pouring hot water over the little sculpted animal. (It looks like a cross between a dog and a dragon, but is in fact a pi xiu, a Chinese mythological creature.) The moment the water hits, it instantly changes from a dull greyish-beige to bright gold. Another sign of the seriousness with which Phoenix Tea takes its craft: Customers have the option of recording tasting notes and maintaining that information in an index-card file on the tea table. “Most of our teas,” Wright says, “are bought from people at or one step away from origin. We don’t use one big wholesaler to supply all the tea. Instead, we buy from companies and individuals that specialize in one particular tea-producing region. We also buy in fairly small quantities to keep our stock fresh. Although we sell 120 to 130 different teas . . . because we have smallish quantities, it makes it more manageable and ensures an interesting and seasonal selection.” We sample a high-end Taiwanese oolong and then a “purple” hand-rolled tea from Kenya. When I inquire about the meaning of “purple” and about African teas, Wright shares her detailed understanding. It seems that no matter how esoteric my tea question, Wright’s range of knowledge is broad and deep enough to provide interesting, insightful answers. In fact, Phoenix is so devoted to tea culture that it maintains a tea museum. “Perhaps the most

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

E morningfoodnews@ seattleweekly.com

Temperature Check

FROM CHRISTIAN CHANDLER, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT SERAFINA

Terra cotta cooking vessels. Cooking in terra cotta connects you to a culinary tradition thousands of years old and disseminated by the world’s grandmothers. Be it a woodfired fish stew simmering in a Mediterranean tagine or a casuela bubbling with Nonna’s ribollita, I love the aesthetic and comfort of this one-pot style of cooking.

Immersion circulators. These are overused and played out. There’s something to be said about cooking a piece of fish or meat to the correct temperature on the grill or by panroasting. It provides a sense of gratification that you can’t quite get from the immersioncirculator technique.

Pretentious or disinterested service. We bend over backwards to accommodate our guests and try to leave our ego out of it. It’s tiring to dine and feel like you have to impress your server or order a certain way to prevent pissing off the kitchen.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

com). Underground supper clubs are gaining in popularity, but an underground tea club? That’s a new one for me—and as it turned out, a delightful one. Proprietor Guitian Li doesn’t sell tea or tea ware; instead, she focuses on providing a serene and peaceful tea-drinking experience. I meet her on a Sunday morning; elegantly dressed and welcoming, she kindly ushers me into her small space near Pike Place Market. Li’s calligraphy adorns her walls, and bookcases are lined with books on tea, philosophy, and literature. The space is warmly lit by Asian-style lamps, and soothing classical Chinese music plays softly. After taking off our shoes, we sit on floor cushions on bamboo mats. The low table is exquisitely arranged, and includes small plates of dark chocolate and dates. Given the supreme tranquility of the scene, it’s admittedly a bit jarring when Li announces that our first tea will be “duck shit,” a type of oolong. Luckily, its taste in no way resembles its name. Indeed, the tea is quite pleasurable, and certainly greatly enhanced by my appreciation for Li’s delicate and mindful serving style. This style, called gongfu (or kung fu), refers to the Chinese tea ceremony, in which various tools and techniques are used to extract the best flavor from fine teas, as well as to foster harmony and refresh the spirit. “It’s spiritual development through the presence of tea,” says Li. “Through the slow pace of the tea ceremony, you can connect with yourself, your consciousness—and then you become more aware of your surroundings, your community.” Li serves a curated selection of very rare, handmade high-mountain teas from China, mostly oolongs and puerhs, to a maximum of four people on Friday evenings and some Saturdays. The price of the two-hour session is $20, and, depending on the group and the mood, often includes silent meditation or poetry. Li creates an especially restorative and relaxing tea experience. Although I’d arrived that morning a bit late and feeling semi-ragged, I left nourished and uplifted.

FoodNews

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food&drink» » FROM PAGE 15 interesting feature of our museum,” Wright says, “is our collection of nine different devices [braziers and other vessels] for heating water without electricity.” Ha! Heating my water over the glowing charcoal in a brazier: Yet another to add to my list of tea missions! Finally, Phoenix’s tea selection is immense, and will satisfy even the tea connoisseur seeking rare yellow teas, hard-to-find Korean or African teas, and a wide range of loose-leaf oolongs, greens, blacks, puerhs, and many others.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

Late in the afternoon, I arrive at my final tea destination, Smacha (14603 N.E. 20th St., Bellevue,

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Fun Classes. Fresh Ideas. Spring/Summer catalog in stores now or online at PccCooks.com.

smacha.com). Jason Chen started a wholesale tea business in Seattle about 16 years ago, and just last year opened Smacha, his first retail location, in a strip mall. Chen has wide-ranging and varied tea experience: In brief, he’s an author of two books, a winner of multiple gold and silver medals at international tea competitions, the owner of 3,000-plus acres of tea gardens in China, and even the inventor of a signature tea-brewing implement. Incredibly, Chen personally manages the whole supply chain—from planting and harvesting to sorting, processing, importing, and roasting—for many of his products. Smacha combines the efficiencies of vertical integration with the attention to quality and craft of a small-scale artisan. More evidence of his impact in the tea world: Starbucks is one of his wholesale clients. “I created [purchased, set up, and planted] tea gardens in 2000, 13 years ago,” says Chen. “If you want to sell high-quality tea, you must have your own tea gardens . . . You must do all the processing yourself, otherwise you cannot guarantee that you have good quality. . . . This supply chain is all-important. When I know the whole process, only then can I speak with confidence and honesty to my customers.” Chen recently returned from another trip to China. In addition to overseeing his tea gardens, he sought high-quality sources of bergamot and hibiscus and made preparations to design and manufacture authentic yixing (clay) teapots in an 800-year-old “dragon kiln” that’s fired only once a month. (And I thought I was into tea. It was inspiring.) Upon entering the tea shop, Smacha’s dedication to quality is immediately apparent: a wall of water; a gorgeous thick Brazilian rosewood custom bar with built-in drainage; a tastefully arranged and nicely illuminated tea-ware display—and, though it might seem minor, the clincher for me: a fresh bouquet of flowers. Exquisite locally made tea snacks include oolong plum-paste tea cake, black-tea lotus-tea cake, fresh mochi, and more. The quality of the teas I taste is superb. The high-mountain oolong (Ali Shan) from Taiwan has the creamiest texture of any oolong I’ve ever tasted; the Phoenix oolong has a powerful honey/orchid fragrance and a pleasurable lingering on the tongue, not unlike a fine wine. I’m excited to see this burgeoning tea culture in the Seattle area—of which the crowning event is the annual Northwest Tea Festival, held the first weekend in October. Although it’s fun to brew tea in unexpected places, maybe one day soon, instead of covertly brewing mine in the corner of the airport, I’ll be enjoying the airport’s new communal and artisanal tea bar. E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

SoDo Spirits Takes on Japanese Shochu

Y

ou’ve probably never had shochu. That isn’t saying much; you probably haven’t had arrack or raki or tej either. Unlike those spirits, though, shochu has a wide range of possible cocktail uses, and, even more interesting, it’s being distilled right here in Seattle. SoDo Spirits was the first shochu distillery outside Japan when they opened in 2009, and they’re still largely on their own, hoping to bring this unique spirit to a public constantly searching for the next big thing. I’ll own up to it: My knowledge BY ZACH GEBALLE of shochu was basically limited to “It’s like a sake liquor.” To remedy this ignorance, I met withSoDo distiller KC Sheehan to learn more. After touring the space and tasting the spirits, I have a new understanding and appreciation of what is currently the most popular liquor in Japan. “For a long time it was a laborer’s drink in Japan,” Sheehan said. “Now, though, they sell more shochu than sake.” The easiest way to classify shochu is to say it’s “like vodka, but.” It’s a clear, relatively smooth spirit made from grain or other starches, but unlike vodka, it’s distilled only once, leaving behind more of the flavor of the starting grain. Sheehan uses pearled barley (which has been polished to remove the husk), but instead of malting it as is done in scotch, it’s inoculated with a fungus the Japanese call koji. This gives the result a unique umami quality (the so-called “fifth” taste, besides sweet, sour, salty, and bitter, that translates to “a pleasant savory taste”), and rounds out the flavor quite a bit. Instead of the harsh, alcoholic finish of most vodkas, shochus finish with mildness and a slight sweetness. While it can be enjoyed on its own or slightly watered down, perhaps shochu’s most interesting application is mixed with tart fruit juices. Combined with cranberry or orange juice, it magically hides much of its acidity, leaving behind that rich, clean finish that makes it far more drinkable on its own than most vodkas. It opens some interesting possibilities in drinks with a strong acidic or bitter profile: say a corpse reviver #2 or even a lemon drop. The big question is: Will a public attuned to vodka be willing to take a chance on an unknown spirit with a strange name and a slightly different flavor? To date, shochu is found mostly in restaurants and bars with a defined Japanese theme, like sushi restaurants. Obviously, Sheehan is hoping to change that, and has produced a whole line of flavored shochus to appeal to a number of different tastes: ginger, mint, chili-infused, even a barrel-aged shochu that has some elements of a whiskey. There’s no doubt in my mind that this cocktail community can do interesting and delicious things with shochu. As was the case with me, it’ll require some education, some experience, and a willingness to experiment. We have the advantage of a local producer and a cuisine that liberally incorporates Asian flavors and ingredients, making shochu a natural fit in quite a few bars. Fellow bartenders: Let’s get to work. E

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arts&culture

In Praise of Slow TV

Why is everybody binge-watching their favorite programs? Just because Netflix streaming and DVD box sets make it possible? That’s not necessarily the way good television is written or meant to be seen.

BY ROGER DOWNEY

I

Which brings me to a seven-part “mini-

will linger powerfully in the mind, making most contemporary “long-form” TV seem formulaic and vacuous in comparison. By mid-series, it’s clear that the real drama of the show is archetypical, not individual. We’re watching two unconventional “families” of characters, polarized by gender: the rankly male compound of the missing child’s feral father, and a collective of women damaged by poisonous relationships huddled around a ferociously sardonic feminist. Against their background, agencies of

FRANK OCKENFELS/AMC

t used to be easy to watch television. Too easy. Everything went down smoothly, predictably, according to decades of familiarity. You can still find the old style of television if you look for it; but even one of the most successful shows of the decade, Mad Men, is less the straightforward serial drama it appears to be than a meticulous simulacrum of old-style TV, with big quotation marks around every scene and action suggesting “See? This is how TV used to be: Isn’t it strange?” It’s those quotation marks which have kept Mad Men lively on its six-season journey through the national psyche. (Its seventh and final season begins 10 p.m. Sunday on AMC.) In the same way, it was the sardonically amoral atmosphere of The Sopranos that kept us serially fixated through a near-decade of grotesque violence and family horror-comedy. Narrative, its permutations of events, is just not enough anymore to engage us. The most successful contemporary television shows are individually hand-tooled to capture a state of mind, a pervasive mood that saturates the whole experience.

Above: Moss with Jon Hamm in the ’70sset final season of Mad Men. Right: Moss in detective mode in Top of the Lake.

is conceived and edited as a single dramatic arc, some six hours of experience to be absorbed slowly through restrained immersion—not the

Let it breathe, and it will linger powerfully in the mind, making most contemporary “long-form” TV seem formulaic and vacuous. instead as a theatrical marathon at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, then debuted last March in seven installments on the niche Sundance Channel before even airing Down Under. Despite extraordinary reviews, it continued its idiosyncratic career, more or less disappearing from view before arriving without fanfare on DVD this

January (BBC Home Entertainment, $34.98). You can rent the discs at Scarecrow, or stream it from Amazon or Netflix. Viewers accustomed to today’s free-and-easy way with video watching may have difficulty with Top of the Lake. Its comparative brevity may tempt you to gorge instead of letting the show make its effect over time. Let it breathe, and it

It’s understandable that viewers are succumbing more and more to the forcefeeding of TV entertainment. There’s just too damn much good stuff out there, more than any normal, measured appetite can absorb. Fortunately there aren’t that many of us equally drawn to the comicversus-gothic politics of Veep and House of Cards, the meticulous period evocations of Boardwalk Empire, and the over-the-top fur-and-sorcery of Game of Thrones. Somewhere among the giants’ battle for viewers, there must be room for a Top of the Lake somewhere underfoot. E

arts@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

Despite its episodic structure, Top of the Lake

now-fashionable practice of binge-watching. Written (and largely directed) by Kiwi auteur Jane Campion, the series is saturated by the surreal, Kaspar Hauser–ish sensibility that made her early work—including Sweetie, The Piano, and An Angel at My Table (originally broadcast as a miniseries)—among the most distinctive and disturbing of the early ’90s. Top of the Lake’s release history is as unconventional as its dramaturgy. Instead of debuting on the small screen it was shot for, it premiered

PARISA TAGHIZADEH/SUNDANCE CHANNEL

series” from New Zealand co-produced with BBC2. At first look a plain-vanilla police procedural in the laid-back, moody Nordic manner, Top of the Lake rapidly evolves right off the genre map into something more like Twin Peaks than CSI. It opens with familiar-enough procedural tropes—a preteen pregnancy, a disappearance—but the pedestrian mechanics of cop-show routine are rendered eerie and echoey from the git-go by the physical setting, the precipitous Lake district of New Zealand’s South Island. Even in near shots, the characters seem ant-sized against the blue-gray sheets of water and their surrounding peaks. Adding to the eerie mood is the sheer lack of exposition; we learn (or fail to learn) the facts along with juvenile-crime specialist Robin Griffin (Elisabeth Moss) as she awkwardly copes with her high-macho colleagues in investigating the disappearance of a pregnant 12-year-old. As the facts do reluctantly emerge, they seem increasingly less important than the atmosphere around them and the rising pressure on Detective Griffin to separate her own fate from that of the vanished child.

the state—police, school, hospital—seem tissue-thin. And, increasingly as the “story” unfolds, there are the children of this anomic “paradise,” emerging to “play” the roles of the adults missing from their lives. With our knowledge that there will be no postponement of issues to a second season, the pressure for dramatic and emotional resolution as the final episode nears its end becomes intense. Much of the drama’s tension is dependent on Campion’s characteristically brilliant casting: of Holly Hunter, viper-thin, as the women’s-collective guru, and of the male trio of David Wenham (Lord of the Rings’ Faramir) as top cop, the embodiment of oblivious male authority; Peter Mullen (My Name Is Joe) as his raging feral counterpart, and Thomas M. Wright, charming and feckless as Mullen’s sexy boy-man son. And above all is Moss as Detective Griffin, with her enigmatic gaze, already so brilliantly exploited as Mad Men’s Peggy Olson. In that show, Moss’ character subverts expectations of the males around her by apparent innocuousness; in Lake, it’s the viewer who’s subverted by that gaze, fixed but uncertain, forcing us to see everything it sees from Griffin’s point of view—while also keeping us at a distance from her thoughts and feelings.

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arts&culture»

THURSDAY, APRIL 10

Citizen Kane/ The Magnificent Ambersons

Previously part of Northwest Film Forum, the Grand Illusion celebrates its 10th successful year as a standalone nonprofit cinema with this Orson Welles double feature. His great-though-compromised 1942 Ambersons is based on the Booth Tarkington novel about a wealthy family oblivious to the turning of the 20th century. This follow-up to 1941’s Citizen Kane—no further praise or introduction needed— was famously recut, to put it politely, by Robert Wise at the studio’s behest without Welles’ permission. Tim Holt, Joseph Cotton, Agnes Moorhead, and Anne Baxter are among Welles’ expertly directed ensemble (he narrates, of course). Most of the players are introduced in the famous long-take Christmas ball sequence, shot by Stanley Cortez with Bernard Herrmann’s score in the background; it’s a technical achievement on par with anything in Kane. Not quite a tragedy, since the Ambersons somewhat gaily cause their own decline, the film communicates the sad, somber, ineluctable passage of time. More than a few commentators have noted that its elegiac tone portends Welles’ own imminent obsolescence. But half a masterpiece is better than nothing at all. (Through Mon.) Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org. $5–$8. 7 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

All kinds of elements go into choosing dances for a performance, from style and content to the logistics of costume changes, so it’s probably just a coincidence that several dances the Ailey company is bringing to Seattle are about water. For Bill T. Jones’ D-Man in the Waters (1989), the connection comes from its dedication to the late Demian Acquavella, one of many dance artists lost to AIDS. In Ailey’s own choreography for The River, made originally in 1970 for American Ballet Theater, he used the life of a river flowing to the sea as an allegory for the life of man, working closely with Duke Ellington on the project. But it���s in Ailey’s iconic Revelations (1960) that the watery references are most vivid, especially in the baptismal section to “Wade in the Water.” (Through Sun.) The Para-

mount, 911 Pine St., 877-784-4849, stgpresents. org. $26–$72. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

Bethany

Some works of art are forever tied to times of economic hardship, like The Grapes of Wrath and the Great Depression. And while a raft of nonfiction accounts have been written and filmed about the 2008 bubble and following recession (The Big Short, Inside Job, etc.), a play takes longer to percolate. Laura Marks’ dark comedy premiered in New York last year to good reviews, with Ugly Betty’s America Ferrera in the lead role of Crystal, a saleswoman who’s rapidly lost her job, home, and daughter Bethany (the latter to

HEDGEBROOK WRITING WORKSHOP SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

SATURDAY, APRIL 12 10 AM–5 PM 1ST AVE & UNION ST

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Ailey’s Revelations.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11

Explore the essence and form of works in Seattle Art Museum’s special exhibition, Miró: The Experience of Seeing, by crafting written responses during this workshop for adults led by writers from Hedgebrook writers retreat. After spending the day in the galleries, participants have the opportunity to read their freshly minted poetry and prose surrounded by the art that inspired them, followed by a reception. Registration and tickets at salon.hedgebrook.org. All artwork © Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris 2014. Photo: Nathaniel Willson.

CHRISTOPHER DUGGAN

ThisWeek’s PickList

foster care). Now Emily Chisholm assumes the same position as a heroine so bottomed-out that she sneaks into an abandoned (supposedly) and foreclosed home to live as a squatter. She hopes to get a new job selling cars and thereby to win her kid back. Things take a turn, however, when she discovers a fellow recession refugee under the same roof—the possibly schizophrenic Gary (Darragh Kennan). He’s sometimes her ally, sometimes a menace as Crystal tries to claw herself back onto the economic ladder. That process makes her a meaner, more conniving, and possibly even dangerous woman—and those are the qualities required in our cutthroat new economy.

John Langs directs. (Through May 4.) ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7660, acttheatre.org. $55 and up. 8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

Mistaken for Strangers

You don’t have to know, or like, the stately indie rock of The National to enjoy this documentary, but it helps to have a brother. Sibling rivalry isn’t the main subject of Mistaken for Strangers, yet neither is music. It’s a hybrid: tour doc and family romance, as curiously endearing as the schlubby ne’er-do-well Tom Berninger, who begins the movie living in his parents’ Cincinnati home at age 30 while successful brother Matt Berninger, nine


Can you guess which Berninger brother is which? DEIRDRE O. CALLAGHAN

years older, prepares to take The National on a 2010 world tour. Metal-head Tom asks to make a movie about the band, which hires him as a roadie; no surprise, he’s not qualified for either job. And yet the movie works, in part because Tom’s fumbling progress as a filmmaker parallels his gradual maturation. It also helps that Matt and his wife Carin Besser both helped produce and edit the picture; they show forbearance and exasperation, but they’re also leading Tom by professional example (even when he misses a 5 o’clock “bus call” in Europe). Artists have to be on time, too. Tom’s like some guileless Zach Galifianakis character, unable to ask good interview questions or shape the miles of video he’s shot—including his own confessions to the camera. “I don’t have fucking anything,” he despairs to Carin, and he’s talking about his life, not just the footage. Yet editing the unruly film forces a kind of discipline on Tom—something like The National’s “humiliating” early failures, Matt tells his kid brother. Those words of support, and the implicit love here, are what make Mistaken for Strangers so rewarding, even for those who couldn’t care less about the music. (Through Thurs.) Grand Illusion, $5–$8. 9 p.m.

“I think women composers are often reluctant to talk about this—I was for years— because we don’t want to seem like we’re complaining, or saying our careers aren’t what they could be. I feel like I have lots of great opportunities and performances, and so do most of my composer friends who are women. . . . Seeing my students face the same issues that I did 20 years ago is really what made me start speaking out about this. So although I still look forward to the day when concerts of music by women composers aren’t necessary, in the meantime, I think we need to do whatever we can to get women composers more exposure.” Thus Sunday’s concert, featuring music for viola—itself unduly neglected—played by Mara Gearman and a gathering of excellent colleagues and written by Rebecca Clarke, Janice Giteck, Sofia Gubaidulina, and Doolittle herself. PONCHO

BRIAN MILLER

SUNDAY, APRIL 13

Women in Music

“When I was just starting out as a composer in the early ’90s,” says Cornish faculty member Emily Doolittle, “I felt like sexism was just about to be over . . . I was dead set against what then seemed to me like segregating music into concerts of ‘women composers.’ Twenty years later, not much has changed.” Doolittle cites statistics from recent seasons: “Of the 55 pieces I see listed on the [Seattle Symphony’s] Masterworks series next season, one is by a woman. . . . Perhaps there are more women composers on their Untitled series, which is devoted exclusively to the music of living composers? No: zero out of eight! . . . The program for the Seattle Chamber Music Society Summer Festival lists 24 male composers, and no women at all—and women have been writing excellent chamber music since the baroque era, so there is no shortage of repertoire that they could have chosen from.

Concert Hall, Cornish College of the Arts, 710 Roy St., cornish.edu. $10–$20. 7 p.m. GAVIN BORCHERT

TUESDAY, APRIL 15

A Room With a View

MARK KITAOKA

625-1900, 5thavenue.org. $29 and up. 7:30 p.m.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

Hobson and Griffith as Forster’s lovers.

They’ve made stage musicals out of The Lion King, Hairspray, even Carrie. There doesn’t have to be any singing in the original Hollywood product, just an uplifting-enough story—and preferably romance—that lends itself to a cheerful chorus in the final big production number. Though it’s hard to imagine how prim and proper (and gay) E.M. Forster (1879–1970) would feel about his 1908 novel becoming Broadway fodder. The Merchant-Ivory movie of 1985 is the more direct inspiration for writer Marc Acito and composer Jeffrey Stock, both Broadway veterans. (The 5th is also nakedly targeting the Downton Abbey demo with its marketing.) As you’ll recall, virginal heroine Lucy (Laura Griffith) is traveling through Italy with her chaperone (Patti Cohenour); there she’s courted by the romantic George (Louis Hobson), which threatens a potential match back in England with uptight Cecil (Will Reynolds). Which man will she choose?!? Well, you’ve seen the movie, so you know. This Room debuted in San Diego two years ago, when Variety praised the book and score but found the production lacking. Now the 5th’s David Armstrong, directing a local cast, hopes to improve upon it. (Through May 11.) The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave.,

FRIdAy, APRIL 11, 8:00 PM The RiveR D-Man in The WaTeRs (PaRT i) RevelaTions

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arts&culture» Performance B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

ATTEMPTS ON HER LIFE The Horse in Motion presents

this immersive audience-participation play. University Heights Community Center, 5031 University Way N.E., 800838-3006, thehorseinmotion.org. $15–$25. Opens April 12. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sun. Ends April 27. BETHANY SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 20. THE ERNEST PUMPHREY REVUE A musical salute to Motown. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S., 684-4757, langstoninstitute.org. $25–$30. 7 p.m. Fri., April 11. ERNEST SHACKLETON LOVES ME Balagan Theatre presents a new musical by Valerie Vigoda, Brendan Milburn (of the band GrooveLily), and Joe DiPietro about a modern-day woman who improbably meets—and possibly falls for—the famous Antarctic explorer. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 329-1050, balagan theatre.org. $5–$45. Previews begin April 12, opens April 18. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun., 2 p.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends May 3. IMPENETRABLE SIS Productions presents Mia McCullough’s play about women, society, and body image. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., 800-838-3006. $12–$16. Opens April 11. Runs Thurs.–Sat. plus 8 p.m. Mon., April 28; see brownpapertickets.com for exact schedule. Ends May 3. THE MARK OF IMMEDIACY The Gospel of Mark made theater by a cast of three. Isaac Studio Theatre, 208 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre.org. $12–$15. Opens April 11. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends April 19. OFFICE HOURS Norm Foster’s comedy about a busy Friday afternoon. Renton Civic Theater, 507 S. Third St., Renton, 425-226-5529, rentoncivictheater.org. $17–$22. Opens April 11. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends April 26. PETER PAN Lyric Opera Northwest presents this very kidfriendly musical. Kirkland Performance Center, 350 Kirkland Ave., Kirkland, 425-893-9900, kpcenter.org. $24–$34. 2 p.m. Sat., April 12–Sun., April 13; 7:30 p.m. Fri., April 18; 2 p.m. Sat., April 19; 7:30 p.m. Fri., April 25–Sat., April 26. A ROOM WITH A VIEW SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 21. WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE An improvised parody of—guess which sci-fi TV classic. JewelBox/ Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 800-838-3006, brown papertickets.com. $16–$20 8 p.m. Wed., April 9. For Current Runs, see seattleweekly.com.

Dance

MADE IN SEATTLE Velocity’s annual fundraiser includes

performance, guest of honor Mark Haim, and DJ Bruce Pavitt. AXIS Pioneer Square, 310 First Ave. S., velocity dancecenter.org. $120–$250. 6:30 p.m. Thurs., April 10.

BALLET: A MIDSUMMER • PACIFIC NORTHWEST George Balanchine’s choreography

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

NIGHT’S DREAM

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includes a surprising number of Shakespeare’s nested plots, which makes for plenty of juicy roles for dancers of all levels. If you’ve been following some favorite PNB dancer’s career lately, chances are they’ll be featured somewhere here—as a lover, a fairy, or even a bug. SANDRA KURTZ McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 441-2424, pnb.org. $28–$174. Opens April 11. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Fri., 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., 1 p.m. Sun. Ends April 19. BOOST DANCE FESTIVAL Seattle’s a supportive place for emerging dance artists. Here’s another opportunity for them to showcase new work, to be performed by local dancers and curated by BOOST directors Marlo Martin and Kristen Legg. SANDRA KURTZ Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., 800-838-3006. $20. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends April 12. See boostdance festival.com for full lineup. ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 20.

• 

Classical, Etc.

DAVID KIM From this pianist, a lecture-recital, “A

Historical Performance: Old Pianos and New Musicianship.” Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music.washington.edu. $15. 4:30 p.m. Wed., April 9. IL DIVO Everyone’s favorite Euro-crossover-vocal boy band sings Broadway. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, ildivo.com. $55–$125. 8 p.m. Wed., April 9. PACIFIC MUSICWORKS Vocal and chamber music from the early German baroque. Seattle First Baptist Church,

• 

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

1111 Harvard St., 800-838-3006, pacificmusicworks.org. $10–$40. 8 p.m. Thurs., April 10. THE GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA Playing on the Seattle Symphony’s Pops series. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$95. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., April 10, 8 p.m. Fri., April 11, 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., April 12, 2 p.m. Sun., April 13. FOLLOWING THE NINTH Apparently, like Spinal Tap, it’s really big in Japan. Through compelling interviews and archival footage, Kerry Candaele’s reverent doc explores four cultural manifestations of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, especially the finale, the “Ode to Joy.” Japan’s adopted it, in performances amateur and professional, as a December tradition, a good omen for the New Year—and as a communal buck-up gesture after the 2011 earthquake. Students in China played it over loudspeakers during the protests that culminated in the massacre at Tiananmen Square. In Chile, with Spanish words, it was a hymn known to all, thus banished by the Pinochet regime, and thus sung defiantly at demonstrations. And in East Germany, it was naturally the musical climax to the celebrations of the fall of the Wall. But it’s this last interviewee who gives the game away, when she tells us the tune of the “Ode” was taught to every East German schoolchild. If the symphony’s adoption as an inspiring message of hope, freedom, and brotherhood makes it a great piece, what does its inclusion in the official state curriculum of a Soviet satellite make it? Candaele’s choice of some relatively cheery segments of the slow movement to back discussions of Chilean secret-police torture and quake footage further confuses the issue: If the symphony can mean all this, it can mean anything, and if it can mean anything, it means nothing. The halo this film sets atop the Ninth thereby comes to seem a little simplistic, and misses the real point—the piece’s worth must lie in something other than merely the uses to which it’s put. To get a clearer idea of that worth, you’re better off spending this 80 minutes just listening to the Ninth itself. (NR) GAVIN BORCHERT. SIFF Film Center, Seattle Center, 324-9996, siff. net. $6–$11. 5:30 p.m. Fri., April 11, 1:30 & 5:30 p.m. Sat., April 12, 3:30 & 7:30 p.m Sun., April 13. SOWETO GOSPEL CHOIR The Grammy-winning troupe presents colorful harmonies, costumes, and music. (They’ll also hold a free community sing-along at Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S., 7 p.m. Thurs., April 10.) Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $10–$46. 2 & 8 p.m. Sat., April 12. SEATTLE/SEATTLE CHAMBER • ORCHESTRA Bach’s monumental Mass in B Minor. First SINGERS

Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., 800-838-3006, osscs.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 12. CAPPELLA ROMANA Son-in-law of Rimsky-Korsakov, classmate of Stravinsky, teacher of Shostakovich: Maximilian Steinberg (1883–1946) was surrounded by three generations of musical fame without ever quite achieving it himself. Portland-based choir Cappella Romana calls his Passion Week “the last major sacred work composed in Russia after the imposition of communism,” which explains why it had to be published outside of the country, in Paris in 1927, and was never performed there. Few copies survived, but one was recently given to music director Alexander Lingas, who will lead the choir in the work’s first modern-day performances this weekend. (Thanks to Lingas’ revival efforts, including travel to St. Petersburg to study Steinberg’s manuscript, a CD recording and new critical edition are planned.) In the work’s 11 movements, Steinberg layered old Russian religious chants into a lush tangle of eight voices, sometimes more; its combination of medieval melodic purity and velvety opulence should appeal to anyone who enjoys the coeval choral works of Rachmaninoff or the contemporary ones of Arvo Pärt. St. Joseph’s Parish, 732 18th Ave. E., 503-236-8202, cappella romana.org. $22–$41. 8 p.m. Sat., April 12. ENSEMBLE CAPRICE From this Montreal-based group, baroque chamber music influenced by Latin American rhythms. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, early musicguild.org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Sat., April 12. BAINBRIDGE CHORALE With the Bainbridge Symphony, Verdi’s juicy Requiem. Bainbridge High School, 9330 N.E. High School Road, Bainbridge Island, bainbridge performingarts.org. $5–$25. 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 12, 4 p.m. Sun., April 13. THALIA SYMPHONY BEE-THO-VEN’S FIFTH! BEE-THOVEN’S FIIIIIIIIFTH!!!! Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 800-8383006, thaliasymphony.org. $15–$20. 2 p.m. Sun., April 13. OCTAVA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Handel and Delalande with the Seattle Bach Choir. Maple Park Church, 17620 60th Ave. W., Lynnwood, 425-743-2288, octavachamber orchestra.com. $5–$15. 6 p.m. Sun., April 13. WOMEN IN MUSIC SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 21. ANDRÉ WATTS Scarlatti sonatas, Chopin etudes, and much more from this pianist, now starting his second half-century onstage. (He started young.) Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $50–$55. 7:30 p.m. Tues., April 15.

• 

•  • 


GOOD BOOKSTORES A Reader’s Guide

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Blood Will Out

Why I Read

by Wendy Lesser (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

by Walter Kirn

Why I Read is a spirited investigation of literature's methods and capabilities, and Lesser shines as she illuminates the strengths of her favorite works. But it is her eloquence in approaching the uncanny and ethereal connections between writers and their readers, her reasoned and intuitive grasp of the "spaces between" that makes this book such a welcome revelation. - Casey

What a ride! Besides being an incredibly gripping story about a bizzare con-man, this book is a fascinating look inside the writer's mind. Kirn's own culpability in being duped and what it says about writers and the human psyche is the real engine that drives this book. - Robert

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arts&culture» Film

Opening ThisWeek Draft Day OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT SUNDANCE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 110 MINUTES.

Exhibition

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

RUNS FRI., APRIL 11–THURS., APRIL 17 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 104 MINUTES.

24

Form follows function in this modernist house on a quiet street in London. Stacked in clean, streamlined boxes, its floors are wrapped in glass. It is home to two artists, who work in different sections of the house and communicate through an intercom. We don’t have to watch long to intuit that the house is like their marriage: compartmentalized but comfortable, hiding its share of secrets despite the great views in every direction. The home, a real place designed by architect James Melvin, is the primary location for this new film by British director Joanna Hogg. Hanging over the action—if “action” is the right word for this immersive, elliptical movie—is a pending sale of the home, which has put the spouses on different sides of the fence. He’s ready to move; she is hesitant. (Tom Hiddleston shows up briefly as a real-estate agent.) The two lead roles are played by non-actors: The wife, known as D, is played by Viv Albertine, onetime member of Brit-punk band the Slits; husband H is played by artist Liam Gillick. The one-off performances are completely credible. The two remain physical with each other, albeit with a few quirks. He’s stymied by her reluctance to share her working methods, which she chalks up to his tendency to pass judgment. We see her more

VIVIAN MAIER/MALOOF COLLECTION

Kevin Costner came late to the Hollywood party, minting his stardom in his 30s with hits like The Bodyguard and his Dances With Wolves. By 40 and Waterworld, audiences grew tired of his earnest, humorless heroism. Now pushing 60, despite nice character work in The Upside of Anger and Man of Steel, he still clings to the same square, virtuous leading-man template that isn’t really interesting anymore. His NFL team manager, Sonny Weaver of the Cleveland Browns, keeps insisting “Let me do my job,” as if mere competence—and listening to his gut, of course—were all it took to succeed in today’s marketplace (be it football, finance, or flipping burgers). The gimmick here, and it’s a good one, is the ticking clock, a finite period of time in which NFL teams can draft or trade top college prospects, now a fairly data-driven process. Yet Sonny resists the usual metrics, which annoys his coach (Denis Leary) and the team owner (Frank Langella), and confounds his secret girlfriend ( Jennifer Garner), also on the Browns staff, and conveniently pregnant. Slickly directed by the veteran Ivan Reitman, this is a very NFL-authorized product, and it duly celebrates the league and its loyal fans. (Our Seahawks figure in the plot, thus some lovely stock footage of Seattle.) Here is the glory of the gridiron, without the eccentric underside celebrated in Costner’s best sports movies—Tin Cup and Bull Durham (both created by Ron Shelton). Even if Sonny isn’t a numbers guy, Draft Day simply plays the percentages. BRIAN MILLER

Vivian Maier’s self-portrait.

often by herself, frequently trying out strategies for her performance art while tentatively allowing the neighbors to see what she’s up to through the windows. I think that’s what she’s doing, anyway. Exhibition does not spell out its purposes, at least not often. It comes as a relief, after H and D have gone to a dinner party across the street and D has had a fainting spell, when we hear them talking about the spell being a tactic for escaping dull company. Other sequences, equally inscrutable or vaguely alarming, are left unexplained. All of which will undoubtedly annoy some unsuspecting viewers, although for the most part Hogg has made a consistently intriguing movie. Maybe it’s the sense that something serious has happened in the past, and remains coursing beneath the surface through the most mundane sequences. Maybe D knows that their world will collapse when they give up this unique domicile. Maybe H knows that, too; maybe that’s why he’s pushing for it. Whatever they are thinking, after they move out of the place, I give the marriage six months. ROBERT HORTON

PFinding Vivian Maier OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT SEVEN GABLES. NOT RATED. 83 MINUTES.

The biggest discovery of 20th-century photography was made in 2007 by Chicago flea-market maven/historian John Maloof. Vivian Maier was a nanny who died soon thereafter, indigent and mentally ill, a hoarder. Maloof bought trunks of her negatives with no idea what they contained. The revelation of those images, in a series of art shows—including at Photo Center NW last year—and books, immediately placed her in the front rank of street photographers like Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, and Garry Winogrand. But who the hell was she? Now Maloof and Charlie Siskel have directed a kind of documentary detective story about the enigmatic spinster (1926–2009). It’s an irresist-

ible quest, as Maloof interviews the now-grown kids Maier cared for, plus a few fleeting friends and acquaintances, who had no idea of her gifts. I don’t want to spoil the sleuthing in this sad, intriguing movie, which also functions as a sales reel for more books and shows to follow from a massive archive that’s still being indexed and printed. Maloof has become a one-man industry on Maier’s posthumous behalf: curator, champion, and businessman. Maier’s prints are selling in a way those of the tired icons of the last century are not; she’s trendy not just because of her eye—excellent, with many new (to me) images included here—but because of her mystery. That’s where, despite the film’s art-history appeal, I part ways with Maloof. Do we really need to know an artist—Frank, Winogrand, Diane Arbus, whomever—to appreciate their work? Why must there always be psychology on the other side of the lens? Maier was almost pathologically secretive (“sort of a spy,” she said), but all photographers hide behind the camera. Would she have wanted her images seen by the public? Maloof conclusively answers that question. Would she have wanted his movie to be made? All her grown charges say the same: No. BRIAN MILLER

Ilo Ilo OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 99 MINUTES.

Nearly 10, Jiale is a nightmare of an only child: selfish, spoiled, ungrateful. His mother, a Singapore office clerk, is pregnant with baby number two, which may explain Jiale’s acting-out at home and school. His father is in sales until he’s not. It’s 1997, and Asia is plunging into economic crisis, which matters not a whit to Jiale, an obsessive student of lottery numbers, until his busy parents hire a Filipina live-in maid to care for the household and him. Suddenly there’s a new focus for this petulant boy (Koh Jia Ler): his vehement opposition to “Auntie Terry” (Angeli Bayani).

Anthony Chen’s worthwhile drama (his debut) makes Jiale neither unbearably horrid or, when patient Teresa finally wins him over, unbearably cute. He’s just another self-absorbed kid who can’t understand how the globalized economy is making pawns not just of Teresa but his parents, too. The script is based on Chen’s own experience with a Filipina nanny, and we see how an ethnic and religious outsider is gradually drawn into the intimate rituals of a Chinese home. (Dad wanders around obliviously in his tighty-whities until Teresa giggles.) The Lim family and their servant communicate in English (with subtitles), and this peculiar mixing of cultures points to Chen’s larger point—the economic interdependency of Asia, with its close proximity of cheap labor and wealthy cities. Even as we watch the Lims slipping out of their middle-class bubble, we also learn from Teresa’s pay-phone calls that she has family back home. She works abroad and surrenders her passport because she must; and Jiale’s father is soon also forced beneath his station. That Ilo Ilo—a childish transliteration of Iloilo province in the Philippines—is set 10 years before the global financial crisis gives it a small, sad, prophetic power. Think of all the Mexican migrants ebbing across our border, the Eastern Europeans doing menial work in the West, the desperate Africans drowning in the Mediterranean. Teresa is a member of the same bottomless sea of unskilled workers that sloshes around the planet. BRIAN MILLER

PLe Week-End OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT GUILD 45TH. RATED R. 93 MINUTES.

If a British couple making a misguided trip to Paris to save their marriage sounds like a clichéd plot, rest assured it’s not. This is no midlife crisis movie à la Woody Allen or Judd Apatow. In fact, our protagonists are past middle age, in their 60s even—an age group that most films avoid like the plague. (Unless they star the likes of Diane Keaton or Alec Baldwin bumbling through one slapstick joke after another.) Instead, we meet still-beautiful Meg (Lindsay Duncan) with her sculpted cheekbones and long blonde hair, and Nick ( Jim Broadbent), a sweet, goofy-ish philosophy professor who confesses on the trip that he’s just been sacked from his job. From the first scene their dysfunction is evident: Arriving at a third-rate hotel, Meg’s silent fury at Nick grows hysterical as she huffs off, hails a cab, and checks them into a gorgeous suite at a luxe hotel. From there, the weekend perfectly encapsulates this trenchant quote from Liane Moriarty’s novel The Husband’s Secret: “Marriage was a form of insanity; love hovering permanently on the edge of aggravation.” As Nick makes one loving overture after another, Meg’s aggravation with him—and downright cruelty— becomes increasingly palpable, even as she tries to check it. When Nick falls on the street and badly hurts his knee, she runs to him, the worried wife trying to help him up—yet ultimately walks away scoffing at his weakness. (Their push-pull dynamic is expertly rendered by the veteran team of director Roger Michell and screenwriter Hanif Kureishi, previous collaborators on The Mother and Venus.) Despite Nick and Meg’s 30-year rut and the loathsome jabs that result, there are exquisite moments of levity, like when they dine and dash at a pricey Parisian restaurant, or chase each


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The Retrieval RUNS FRI., APRIL 11–THURS., APRIL 17 AT SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 94 MINUTES.

Under the Skin OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT HARVARD EXIT AND SUNDANCE. RATED R. 107 MINUTES.

Yes, this is the movie where Scarlett Johansson gets naked and—playing an alien huntress cloaked in human skin—lures men to their deaths. Let’s get that out of the way early. Adapt-

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

se 8 FILMS HAPPY HOUR RAFFLE ADVENTURE

re adventu

un

ity

APRIL 24

5 pm - Happy Hour 6 pm - Films

SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN

Hosted by e

It would be cynical to suggest that this sound little drama about fugitive slave hunters, set during the late Civil War, is riding the coattails of 12 Years a Slave. Let me put it differently: Chris Eska’s indie feature wouldn’t be released in theaters were it not for the new interest in that fraught chapter of American history. The plot you know from countless Westerns and such: An impressionable youth on a perilous journey, mentored by two father figures—one a scoundrel, the other a man of integrity. Will (Ashton Sanders) is a 13-year-old whose parents have disappeared into the plantations. He and Marcus (Keston John) are the two black members of a white bounty-hunting gang that uses them as bait. They’re paid a few coins to betray their kind, but the ringleader clearly has the power of death over them, too. Will feels compelled to obey, even when he and Marcus are sent north over the border—the film was shot in Texas, though the story isn’t region-specific—to entice Nate (Tishuan Scott) back to the land of shackles (or worse). On this rural odyssey, our trio walks off the paths where whites and soldiers might be encountered. Their existence is liminal, and we’re unsure where the border lies. The grass, trees, and swamps provide no clue, since all men ought to be free in this natural domain. Only Nate feels confident here. “I ain’t a runaway,” he tells Will, who’s awed to meet a free black man—probably the first he’s ever encountered. (Nate’s also lethal with a tomahawk, which helps make an impression.) Rather than burrowing into the psychological anguish of one particular slave, as in the recent Oscar winner, this is a more archetypical tale— solemn and familiar, with an outcome that seems older than slavery itself. BRIAN MILLER

An event to benefit Washington Water Trust For tickets and information: www.washingtonwatertrust.org 206-675-1585 SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN 511 Queen Anne Ave N, Seattle • Happy Hour courtesy of Stoup Brewing printad4.83x3.64.indd 1

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

When The Raid 2 bowed at Sundance earlier this year, it triggered an instant-analysis debate along a narrow spectrum. Was it the greatest action movie ever made, or merely the most violent? Considering the film’s target audience, that’s a win/win argument. Gareth Evans’ sequel to his culty 2011 The Raid: Redemption, which was set primarily within a Jakarta high-rise, considerably widens the canvas this time out. Returning hero Rama (Iko Uwais) has survived that adventure only to be tapped for an undercover operation as unlikely as it is brutal. He’s spent two years in jail earning the trust of an Indonesian gangster’s son (Arifin Putra), the better to infiltrate the gang when he gets out. The aim is to gain information about police corruption and smash the syndicate, but Evans seems less interested in the intricacies of storytelling than he is in devising one flabbergasting action sequence after another. This he does, with utter confidence, for two and one-half hours. This is far too long by ordinary standards, but not too long if you a) have an appetite for unbridled mayhem, or b) curiosity about the spectacle of a director playing can-youtop-this with himself. On the latter point, Evans

Friday- WEDNESDAY @ 9:30PM

on

OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT SUNDANCE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED R. 148 MINUTES.

THE WARRIORS

ati

The Raid 2

SHOWTI MES APRIL 11 - 17 CLUE Fri - WED @ 7:00PM /SAT & SUN @ 3:00PM

rv

Femme d’un certain âge Bettie Chapoutier is beleaguered by some very French problems: Her bistro is failing, and her lover—she’s been waiting for years for him to leave his wife—instead takes up with some queue-jumping 25-year-old. Bettie doesn’t intend to run away from all this, but one afternoon I’m-just-going-for-a-drive turns into a road trip, and that carpe diem adventure (among other things, she hooks up with a skeezy guy half her age, at most) turns into a surprise opportunity to reconnect with the grandson she barely knows and the troubled daughter she knows all too well. Bettie is played by Catherine Deneuve, whose face, I don’t need to tell you, is one of the wonders of cinema history, and is photographed accordingly by director Emmanuelle Bercot—not prettified, but allowed the ravishing dignity of looking its age. A subplot concerns Bettie’s being inveigled into attending a reunion of beauty queens; loath to think her life might have peaked as Miss Brittany 1969, Bettie at first refuses. But—and this too is so deliciously French—the reunion is portrayed without a molecule of camp, instead filmed as a bouquet, a banquet, of dozens more magnificent faces, as if Deneuve was a priceless pearl placed in an exquisite jeweled setting. And screenwriter Bercot also grants Bettie a final scene that’s a surprise not in terms of plot, perhaps, but in tone: a fizzing, slightly absurd, sparkling-rosé sort of joy until then absent from the film but which suddenly seems like the only possible capper. GAVIN BORCHERT

AT THE N

m

OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT SUNDANCE. NOT RATED. 113 MINUTES.

ing Featur IONAL

co m

POn My Way

frequently succeeds, staging an awe-inspiring car chase, a massive donnybrook in a muddy prison yard, and a climactic hand-to-hand fight in a state-of-the-art kitchen that uses each utensil for maximum effect. We’d also like to introduce you to a couple of characters who lurk around the edges waiting to deliver their specialties: Hammer Girl and Baseball-Bat Man. Given the expectations raised by their billing, they do not disappoint. There’s also a fantastically cool old-school assassin (Yayan Ruhian, sharing fightchoreographer credit with Uwais) who really deserves his own spinoff vehicle. Before that comes, Evans will undoubtedly deliver Part 3 of this series—or so the ending suggests. It’s hard to know where that movie would go, given the maximalist treatment here: The fights are breathtaking, the stunts a hoot, and a few of the most violent moments are shockingly grisly. The Raid 2 is some kind of pulp achievement, but it doesn’t really make you eager for more; except for die-hards, exhilaration could surrender to exhaustion just after this movie gets out of the kitchen. ROBERT HORTON

ng

other through the halls of their grand hotel. Also here are unexpected moments of passion: a long kiss on the street, an almost discomfiting scene of sexual masochism. The weekend culminates at a posh dinner party thrown by Nick’s old Cambridge buddy, played appropriately neurotically by Jeff Goldblum, where both this marriage’s frailty and its endurance are beautifully, achingly captured. NICOLE SPRINKLE

25


arts&culture» Film TOWN HALL

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questions never would’ve occurred to the illegals in Men in Black or the predator in Predator. Intelligence is here vying with instrumentality. If this alien can question her role, consider her apartness from the hive, might she then have a soul? BRIAN MILLER

The Unknown Known OPENS FRI., APRIL 11 AT SUNDANCE. RATED PG-13. 102 MINUTES.

A24 FILMS

Johansson as alien.

» FROM PAGE 25

APRIL 22

JOSHUAROMAN ANDRIUSZLABYS Cello and Piano Duets sponsored by TOWN HALL

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GIRLS MOVIE NIGHT OUT

26

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ing a 2000 novel by Dutch writer Michael Faber (not really a sci-fi guy), Jonathan Glazer dispenses with suspense or context. Instead we have process. Aided by some motorcycle-riding minions, Johansson’s unnamed character functions like part of the same hive-mind. She’s more worker bee than killer, a drone programmed to do one particular thing. This consists of driving around Scotland in a white van, calling out to single men with a posh English accent, then leading them back to her glass-floored abattoir. Her victims follow willingly and seem to die painlessly. (Also naked and erect.) Not only is the eerie, affectless Under the Skin not really sci-fi, it’s not really horror, either. So what is it then? British director Glazer emerged from commercials and music videos with Sexy Beast (2000), stumbled with Birth (2004), and now follows Faber into what Descartes called the mind/body problem. How can we know what another person is thinking? How can we be certain our own solitary consciousness isn’t unique in a world of replicants placed here to fool us? Because humankind is, if you study our physical form long enough, profoundly odd. As it certainly is to Johansson’s alien, who’s constantly scrutinizing her prey: Is he big enough, meaty enough, a suitable delicacy to be slaughtered and beamed back home? Personality or psychology count for nothing; it’s Descartes in reverse. She cares only for the body, and she’s learned only enough of our language and social protocols to flirt and deceive. In the film’s most chilling scene, she drags a victim to her van, ignoring a crying toddler on the beach. Why not grab this little morsel, too? It’s not big enough, not worth the effort for an apex predator. (She’s no cannibal, however, since she’s not hunting her own kind.) Eventually Johansson’s visitor goes rogue, apparently having been inspired to empathy—or maybe just bloodless curiosity—after picking up a disfigured hitchhiker. Under the Skin then becomes a dilatory chase movie, without much action, as her brood tries to return her to the nest. Johansson is suitably blank (and gorgeous) for her dispassionate role, with several scenes filmed with ordinary Scots who were unaware of the hidden cameras. Out of her van, she’s disoriented and vulnerable, panicking when a gaggle of women drags her to a disco. (You see terror in her eyes: Am I being led to the slaughterhouse, too?) Standing in a full-length mirror, studying her nude body, the huntress flexes her knees and joints, bends and stretches her unfamiliar physique (really more of a carapace or housing, like a snail shell for her protean being). What is this strange thing I’m wearing? Is that all it takes to trap these stupid men? Why do they want me so badly? What would food or sex actually feel like? Such

The conceptual appeal is unmissable: Having won an Oscar for his 2003 The Fog of War, a study of Vietnam War architect Robert McNamara, documentary giant Errol Morris would naturally turn to another controversial U.S. Secretary of Defense for a bookend project. The subject here is Donald Rumsfeld, who held the job during the commencement of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Rumsfeld became famous for his loquacious (at times downright hammy) press conferences, when the sound of his own voice would lead him through ever-expanding circles of rhetoric—a Yogi Berra elevated to a position of life and death. Thus his classic formulation: “There are known knowns . . . There are known unknowns . . . But there are also unknown unknowns.” I always thought that was one of the more sensible of Rumsfeld’s puckish quotes. But—at the risk of sounding Rumsfeldian—it does give a glimpse into a mind in which even uncertainties are Rumsfeld something in denial. to be certain about. And this is what makes The Unknown Known something of a non-starter as an Errol Morris film. Rumsfeld is utterly tranquil in his aphorisms and his conviction. The fog of war? There isn’t even a faint mist in Rumsfeld’s mind. Where McNamara was troubled by the decisions he’d made during Vietnam, Rumsfeld does not appear to have practiced introspection, or even heard of it. Nothing happens to break the surface, and Rumsfeld’s bright-eyed, unfailingly cheerful bureaucrat is unflappable in the face of Morris’ camera. Morris supports the interview sessions with vintage clips of the man’s career, as well as sound bites from the war years. It comes to feel desperate, as though Morris knew he hadn’t gotten through to his subject and needed to fill out the program with evidence. But maybe this extended look at blandness is a worthy companion piece to The Fog of War after all. It lacks that movie’s drama; but in the absence of a breakdown or the slightest bit of handwringing, it allows the viewer to decide how to view this singularly unreflective person. Intriguing bits are highlighted, such as Rumsfeld’s torrent of memo-writing—some on big issues, some daftly trivial. What drives that? For that matter, why did Rumsfeld sit down with Morris for an extended interview? Morris, perhaps exasperated, asks him that question as the film nears its close. It’s the one moment Rumsfeld seems at a loss for an answer. His not to reason why; his but to be a decider.

ROBERT HORTON E

film@seattleweekly.com

The Sit-Down Nick Frost pours himself a fizzy drink and peers

amenably across the table. He’s a big bloke with a great radio voice, friendly faced without saying anything. We’re in a downtown Seattle hotel to talk about dancing, specifically his new underdog-makes-good salsa-dancing movie Cuban Fury, which opens Friday at Sundance and other theaters. Best known here for his pairings with Simon Pegg in Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, and The World’s End, Frost doesn’t look like a dancer, a fact he freely acknowledges. In his own personal life, Frost explains, “I was afraid of dancing in front of people. I felt it was kind of crippling me. You get to the point where you can only dance if you’ve drunk 10 pints of Stella Artois. And then you can’t dance anyway.” At his own wedding, he recalls, “When we had to dance in front of our friends and family, it was a living nightmare!” Frost laughs at the irony, “Considering I’m a screen actor and I make my living with a hundred people watching me perform” on a film set. Confidence is key to dancing, and that’s what Frost’s character Bruce has lost. “He’s kind of given up,” says Frost. “He’s lonely and single; he has a job he loves but hates the people he works with.” Things were different for the 13-year-old Bruce we see in flashback—then a champion junior salsa dancer. After some bullying, Bruce puts away his dance shoes . . . until he realizes that his lovely new American boss (Rashida Jones) is a newbie salsa dancer. Let’s stipulate here that Cuban Fury is entirely predictable and enjoyable; it ends just as you expect, with the rival (Chris O’Dowd) defeated and everyone on the dance floor. But that’s true of all movie musicals or movies about dance. And Frost sees his film—which he produced and conceptualized—in that Hollywood tradition. Just as Bruce is trying to reclaim his glorious past, Cuban Fury tries to reclaim some of the social rituals of the dance floor. Says Frost, “I love Strictly Ballroom and West Side Story. Citing the old days of Fred Astaire hoofing and singing a number in one continuous take, he muses, “Where’s that gone as a skill? We’re in an odd position culturally where something as unique and beautifully flamboyant and skillful can be forgotten.” With rock ’n’ roll and the baby boom, the grown-up protocols of dancing “start to get chipped away, and it’s suddenly no longer in vogue.” For that reason, perhaps, we have the salsa revival in the U.S. and UK. Says Frost, “I think it’s a very adult dance, the salsa. Part of my training for this movie was going out to clubs with the people who taught me to dance. It was amazing to see how Latinos do that. Being an English person, that’s not what my culture is. You don’t dance with girls like that. You leave it until the last 30 minutes at the disco and then try to dance with a girl with a vague hope of copping off with her. For me now, it seems so smart that you could go dance with, like, 20 girls, and there’s none of that pressure—‘Does she like me, does she not like me?’ ” And how does Frost feel today about dancing in public? “I still need a couple drinks,” he chuckles. BRIAN MILLER E


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arts&culture» Music

PRESENTED BY WASHINGTON STATE BEEF COMMISSION

The Desert Muse of the Tuareg Blues The music of Tinariwen reflects the political conflict and enduring spirit of Mali’s people. BY KELTON SEARS

A

t age 4, Ibrahim Al Alhabib, the founder of Malian desert-blues group Tinariwen, saw his father executed during the Tuareg rebellion of 1962–1964. His father, like many Tuareg rebels, was fighting for the establishment of independent nations in the Sahara following the end of French colonial rule. The new unified Malian government’s response was brutal. Men, women, and children were slain and tortured during the rebellion, a horrific episode inextricably woven within the band’s music. Formed in 1979, Tinariwen’s ascent has been slow and steady, picking up steam with a handful of its later releases, like 2011’s Tassili and its latest, Emmaar. Now singed to Anti Records, the

especially in the U.S. There are similar elements between American blues and our music (we call our music assouf, [which means] “our nostalgia”). We do share common themes—exile, suffering, love—that you can feel in the music. Maybe this is a part of the explanation why we have so many fans in the U.S.!

As a band that has so thoroughly identified itself with the deserts of Mali, both lyrically and politically, can you speak to the importance that the concept of place holds in your music, and the function of music in general?

It’s our main inspiration. Our desert is part of us, wherever we go. Places are fundamental in music in general. Wherever you are, you have the ability to be inspired, or not, by the environment around you. It’s something that naturally directs your music, your art in general. Our desert is part of our culture and traveling with us.

MARIE PLANEILLE

group and its assouf style, a distinct mix of guitardriven blues and traditional Tuareg rhythms and poetry, has collaborated with acts like TV on the Radio and Carlos Santana, all while attracting the accolades of rock ambassadors like Robert Plant. The band’s popularity is perhaps due in part to its authenticity (its members put down their instruments and picked up weapons in a separate 1990 Tuareg rebellion), yet Emmaar is the band’s first release created outside the deserts of the Sahara, due to yet more political strife. Though the place they recorded it—Joshua Tree, Calif.—does have a certain poetic justice. Through a translated e-mail (group members speak only Tamasheq and French), we recently contacted Tinariwen bassist Eyadou Ag Leche, who shared some thoughts on the universality of music and the band’s similarities to American blues. SW: A popular Seattle band, Rose Windows, has often cited Tinariwen as a big influence. Is it strange to count so many fans in the United States now, given how distinctly Tuareg your music is? What do you think accounts for the universality of your music despite its highly specific background?

Eyadou Ag Leche: Music is universal despite of language barriers. Maybe people get connected naturally to our own music thanks to its authenticity! We are very grateful and honored to have so many fans around the world and

You often speak of the inseparability of music and politics in the Tuareg culture. As a band that has been through so much suffering in the past, does the turmoil you revisit daily through the words of your songs ever weigh heavily on you? Or does it help relieve that emotional weight?

It’s important for us to spread our message about what is happening to our community. People get interested about it or not, it’s up to them. We’ve decided to use music to spread our message, but music is also naturally part of our culture. This is our daily life!

What advice do you have for young musicians who are fearful of mixing politics and music? It used to be commonplace in the U.S., but now the two very rarely mix in contemporary pop.

It’s up to the musicians; it needs to be natural and to be authentic, if you want the people to understand and feel your message.

There is a distinctly trance-like quality to your music—is this purposeful, or just happenstance?

Our music is inspired by our desert, by ancestral Tamasheq poetry, and by traditional Tuareg music, like the Tinde transe [a drum trance], which is mainly based on percussion, and on the singing of women. The percussion rhythms are inspired by the camel dance which gives this specific character to our music—altogether with the sound of electric guitars, of course, that we’ve been plugging on our low-battery amps since our debuts! All these elements define our music. E

ksears@seattleweekly.com

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arts&culture» Music

SevenNights E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Wednesday, April 9 There’s something incredibly authentic about TEMPLES’ brand of ’60s psychedelia, as heard on its debut album, Sun Structures. Yes, the Kettering, England–based quartet of 20-somethings is decades removed from the period it replicates, but it has nailed the era’s jangly-pop guitar riffs, summertime melodies, and sweet, shimmering vocal harmonies. Comparisons to the Fab Four are not without merit. With Drowners. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $15. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY A touring edition of the Best Fest—started a decade ago at a Lower East side bar in New York—PETTY FEST boasts an astonishing lineup of national acts, including The Kills’ Alison Mosshart, Jakob Dylan, Albert Hammond Jr., and Wilco’s Glenn Kotche, as well as locals including Noah Gundersen, Peter Quirk, and Ayron Jones, all playing from one of the most rock-solid catalogs of American music. You should be a face in this crowd. The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 9 p.m. $20 adv./$25 DOS. 21 and over. MARK S. BAUMGARTEN From folky fiddle tunes to Western polkas, Portland’s CALEB KLAUDER has cornered the old-time revival. One of his many projects, in fact, is dubbed the Cajun Country Revival, an accordion-spiked zydeco spectacular featuring Cajun masters Jesse Lége and Joel Savoy. Speaking strictly country, however, his Country Band, playing tonight, is pure honky-tonk with all the twangy trimmings: pedal steel, fiddle, and the wholesome harmonies of Reeb Willms. Rounding out the bill is Cahalen Morrison’s Country Hammer, the new solo project from the vocalist and multi-instrumentalist known for his Americana duo with Eli West. Clean, sincere, a little weary, Morrison’s vocals sound as if they were plucked directly from radio airwaves back in the days of vintage country. His new outfit includes pedal-steel player Country Dave Harmonson, an addition that will surely carry on the tradition. 8 p.m. $12. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

Thursday, April 10

Tuesday kicked off the first day of gigs celebrating the 80TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BLUE MOON, a series of special shows running through the 20th. This beloved U District dive, which opened April 15, 1934, has created more than its share of urban legends. Some believe it was frequented by Jack Kerouac; another

30

Friday, April 11

ARRINGTON DE DIONYSO makes sounds with his

mouth you didn’t know humans could make. He learned the ancient art of Tuvan throat singing by accident as a child after trying to imitate “Sound Effects Guy” Michael Winslow from Police Academy. Years and years later, he blends that skill with Javanese-inspired rhythms and melodies and his Olympia K Records background to create bewitchingly unique music he calls “trance punk.” With Dream Salon. LoFi, 429 B Eastlake Ave. E., 254-2824, thelofi.net. 9 p.m. $8. 21 and up. KELTON SEARS KITHKIN He doesn’t know I’m writing this listing and would almost certainly object to its inclusion, but one of the members of Kithkin is in fact a Seattle Weekly staffer. His stage name is either Tin Woodsman or Shredder, I can’t remember which. It doesn’t matter. What does matter is that Kithkin deserves praise and an audience for the rumbling, effusive spirit-rock that it has dubbed “treepunk.” Conflict of interest be damned—the quartet’s upcoming debut, Rituals, Trances & Ecstasies for Humans in Face

Fatoumata Diawara plays Jazz Alley on Tuesday.

YOURI LENQUETTE

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

story goes that author Tom Robbins once called Picasso from its pay phone. If you’ve lived in Seattle for any amount of time, you surely have one of your own. No better way to celebrate “authentic Seattle’s” enduring watering hole than with tonight’s show featuring the Brothers Balthazar (Blue Moon owner Gus Hellthaler’s band) and Daddy Treetops. Later this month, bands like Summer Babes, Country Lips, Star Anna, and a bevy of other local groups will sidle up to the Moon’s dingy stage and play—no doubt to a cheap-beer-fueled, funloving, legend-making crowd. Blue Moon Tavern, 712 N.E. 45th St., 675-9116, bluemoonseattle.wordpress.com. 8 p.m. Free tonight; future covers $5 and up. GE Lately it seems the folk-rock genre tends to accentuate the folk more than the rock. Though the members of NEW BUMS play primarily acoustic guitars, their song structures and melodies feel akin to the menacing nature of Leadbelly with a nod to Led Zeppelin: sonically quiet, but dark and heavy in tone. With Case Studies, Aykut Ozen. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey. com. 8 p.m. $10. 21 and over. DUSTY HENRY ROCKWELL POWERS is a tireless champion of Grit City— aka Tacoma—who practices what he preaches: For a half-dozen years, his musical involvement in the south Sound has included Tacoma-themed eps, mixtapes, and a popular hip-hop radio show. In T-town we keep it real, and it’s refreshing to hear someone rap convincingly about the joys of married life and having a mortgage. With Spoke Unheard, Stoned Ape Theory, DJ Save1. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile. com. 8 p.m. $5. All ages. MICHAEL F. BERRY Bands don’t usually go five years without releasing a new record, but this is what the blitzkrieg-bluegrass and progressive-folk band YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND has done. Its self-titled album came out in 2009, but when you make dizzying, kick-ass music that plays well live, fans will forgive you for the wait. With the Brothers Comatose. The Showbox. 8 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS. All ages. BRIAN PALMER


The Afghan Whigs

Y

Saturday, April 12

Fact is, Macklemore wishes anything of his was half as fresh as anything R. Kelly owns, sheets or otherwise. At this night celebrating THE MUSIC OF R. KELLY, Seattle will forget the soulman’s extracurricular bedroom activities and pay tribute to his rich and wholesome canon, including “Sex Me,” “Bump ’N’ Grind,” and “Ignition” (remix or original TBA). With Zach Bruce, J. Charles, Will Jordan. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009, columbiacitytheater.com. 9 p.m. $15 adv./$20 DOS. DANIEL PERSON KATIE HERZIG’s new album, Walk Through Walls (out April 8) was difficult to make. Her mother succumbed to cancer in 2011 just as Herzig was about to tour, and the songwriter stopped writing for nine months. When she did start crafting new material, she wondered whether she’d ever be able to perform it without breaking down. That’s not to say Walk is overly melancholy; it’s more about transitions, thematically, than anything else. Herzig encourages listeners to follow their hearts instead of closing them (“Frequencies”), and to tackle obstacles instead of letting them beat you down (“Walk

cedric watson and sidi toure THU/APRIL 10 • 7:30PM

lady rizo

through the neighborhoods of my life,” he told Rolling Stone, “using my imagination to create environments that I could move around in.” Absent from the album, and from the band’s Seattle date, is founding guitarist Rick McCollum; personal problems got in the way of his participation. The band is touring instead with an expanded lineup that allows the Whigs to reinterpret its sound through players who weren’t there originally and who can bring the new songs to life. “I’m going to play rock and roll with my friends this summer,” Dulli said in advance of the original reunion shows in 2012. “And if it leads to something else, that’s what will happen.” Thankfully, it did. With Early Winters. The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 9 p.m. $31.50 adv./$37 DOS. 21 and over. DAVE LAKE Through Walls”). “Drug” is a sexy-as-hell piano-pop track about being in love’s grasp, and “Summer” is the sort of spine-tingling, ebullient dream-pop number that popular radio loves. If you like soul-searching and ultimately hopeful pop, Walk is the album for you. With Amy Stroup. The Crocodile. 8 p.m. $13 adv. 21 and over. BP GUITAR SHORTY has quite the pedigree. He’s played with Ray Charles, Willie Dixon, T-Bone Walker, hell; he’s even married to Jimi Hendrix’s half-sister! With his trusted guitar, “Red,” Shorty has been a club-scene fixture for over 60 years, but he’s no relic. He’s still got the chops, and the ability to cut off the head of any challenger coming his way. Highway 99 Blues Club, 1414 Alaskan Way, 3822171, highwayninetynine.com. 8 p.m. $17. CORBIN REIFF With this year’s release of Wig Out at Jagbags, there are now more STEPHEN MALKMUS albums in the world than those of Pavement (six vs. five). Malkmus’ solo work has always been more idiosyncratic than that of the band he changed the world with, and Wig Out is no different; fancy guitar work resides largely in the fifth position, and the vocal melodies tend to knock the listener off balance. But throughout the album, plenty of rewards are hidden among the noise. With Speedy Ortiz. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414. 9 p.m. $18.50 adv./$20 DOS. Nearing the end of a largely sold-out three-month, 40-date tour, ODESZA will most likely roll into town with a refined and mind-blowing live show featuring the duo’s meticulous, bright, shimmering compositions—most recently heard on the soundtrack for Divergence, to which the Seattle soundsmiths contributed a remix of Grammy-nominated heavy-hitter “Pretty Lights.” With D33J, Kodak to Graph. Through Sun. Neumos. 8 p.m. Both shows SOLD OUT. MSB NRBQ doesn’t have a song everyone knows, which makes a tribute night perfect for the band that’s been chugging since the 1960s and has won the adoration of the kind of people you want adoration from: Elvis Costello, Paul McCartney, and the like. It’s considered one of the best bar bands in history; allow members of the Tripwires, the Jukehouse Hounds, Red Jacket Mine, and Young Fresh Fellows to fill you in on what you’ve been missing. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., 906-9920, theroyalroomseattle.com. 9 p.m. $10 suggested donation. DP The album to be celebrated tonight, Believer, is the culmination of a long journey for KRIS ORLOWSKI, who for 10

FRI/APRIL 11 • 7PM - ALBUM RELEASE CONCERT

v. contreras w/ the andrew joslyn

orchestra and special guest cami lundeen SUN/APRIL 13 • 7:30PM

andy daly w/ andy blitz MON/APRIL 14 & TUE/APRIL 15 • 7:30PM

slow music w/ the humans

featuring: bill rieflin, robert fripp, peter buck, matt chamberlain, fred chaleno

WED/APRIL 16 - SAT/APRIL 19 • 2 SHOWS PER NIGHT

through the looking glass:

the burlesque alice in wonderland SUN/APRIL 20 • 7:30PM

portland cello project w/ alialujah choir

next • 4/21 juana molina • 4/23 simon townshend w/ j wong • 4/24 jose james w/ moonchild • 4/25 brent amaker and the rodeo • 4/26 craig shoemaker • 4/27 lady “a” presents: “sunday night gospel” • 4/29 destroyer w/ valley maker (solo) • 4/30 johnny clegg • 5/1 - 5/3 rock and vaudeville featuring geoff tate • 5/4 the teaching • 5/6 michael nesmith • 5/7 & 8 cassandra wilson • 5/10 lowrider band • 5/11 wishbone ash • 5/13 grant lee phillips and howe gelb • 5/14 karla bonoff • 5/15 william fitzsimmons w/ ben sollee

happy hour every day • 4/9 the sunshine junkies • 4/10 yaamba • 4/11 the djangomatics / billy brandt • 4/12 charles mack • 4/13 justin k-h & friends • 4/14 crossrhythm session • 4/15 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: tobias the owl, samantha lynn and chuck rite • 4/16 doria/flory-barnes/abouzied TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net

216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE · 206.838.4333

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

of the Collapse, is that rarest of things: exactly what it says it is. With Wishbeard, Fauna Shade, Thee Samedi. Neumos. 8 p.m. $7 adv. All ages. MSB THE COLOURIST Next time you’re at a party that’s less than spectacular, put on The Colourist, the self-titled debut of the indie-pop quartet behind “Little Games” and “We Won’t Go Home.” With dancey guitar riffs, pulsing percussion, bright keys, and both guitarist Adam Castilla and drummer Maya Tuttle on vocal duty, you can practically hear confetti fall from the ceiling. With Night Terrors of 1927, The Wind and the Wave. Tractor Tavern. 9 p.m. $11. 21 and over. ACP ANDREW JOSLYN is taking chamber pop mainstream. Touring with Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, plus working with fellow locals Allen Stone and David Bazan, the composer has created orchestral arrangements suitable for the masses. String instruments are not just a studio flourish in his hands, but beautiful pop music. With V. Contreras (album release), Cami Lundeen. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7 p.m. $20–$50. All ages. DH

WED/APRIL 9 • 7:30PM

PIPER FERGUSON

ou can blame Usher for signing Justin Bieber, but at least the soul man seems intent on atoning for his sins. It was none other than Usher Raymond IV whom we can thank for facilitating the resurfacing of the Afghan Whigs, one of the ’90s’ most critically beloved bands, who called it quits at the height of its creativity in 1998. But after a joint show at last year’s South by Southwest, which capped a series of reunion shows for the Whigs, making a new record finally seemed to make sense. Do to the Beast, out today, is the band’s first album of new music in 16 years and its first for Sub Pop since 1992, which signed the Cincinnati band 25 years ago as its first act from outside the region. Though singer/guitarist Greg Dulli has stayed active with the Twilight Singers and the Gutter Twins in the meantime, Beast finds him harnessing the full spectrum of his songwriting. At times majestic (“Can Rova”), at others visceral (“The Lottery”) and oozing with sex (“Parked Outside”), the album is the rare comeback that doesn’t feel as if a once-formidable band is grasping at what formerly made it great. Rather, it’s an extension of those qualities—namely Dulli’s raging id, which has long been at the center of his work. For the first time, he mucked with his formula: writing all the music first—not just for each song, but for the entire album—then added lyrics on top of everything. “I walked around

mainstage

dinner & show

Tuesday, April 15

31


arts&culture» Music years has been cultivating a laid-back pop songwriting style rooted in a preternatural sense of melody and his distinctive loose-lipped croon. For this album, Orlowski has mastered the formula, assembling a talented, forceful band whose meticulously arranged instrumentation buoys and elevates verses that explore, with a hardearned maturity, issues of love, faith, and existential quandary. With Campfire OK and St. Paul De Vence. The Showbox. 7 p.m. $12 adv./$15 DOS. MARK BAUMGARTEN SAY HI This tour finds Eric Elbogen preparing for the June release of Endless Wonder, his eighth album as Say Hi. Such a title might invite speculation that the Seattle songwriter has returned to the brighter, synth-heavy pop songs of his middle era, but the album’s first single, “Such a Drag,” comes from the same dark place where the previous one, Um, Uh Oh, left off three years ago. The song has at its spine a thundering, dark kick drum— a new instrument for the multi-instrumentalist last time around—and at its heart an indictment of love that sounds like a fresh wound. With Big Scary, Telekinesis. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunset tavern.com. 9:30 p.m. $12 adv. 21 and over. MSB

Sunday, April 13

At any point on 2013’s Innocence Is Kinky, Norwegian experimental-pop musician JENNY HVAL can be heard doing one of three things: singing sweetly; reciting spoken word; or belting a lyric, often a comment about mythology or gender, with the passion of 10 people. No matter what style she chooses, Hval’s voice is hard to ignore. With Mark McGuire. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $10. 21 and over. ACP If punk is dead, no one told OFF’s legendary frontman Keith Morris (ex-Black Flag, Circle Jerks). OFF! brings the Nervous Breakdown–era intensity of early Black Flag to the modern age without missing a step. The band’s latest record, Wasted Years, is a frantically paced collection of 16 short and straightforward tracks of early hardcore fury. With Cerebral Ballzy, NASA Space Universe. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 262-0482, elcorazon seattle.com. 7:30 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS. All ages, bar with I.D. JAMES BALLINGER

El Corazon www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9

Mike Thrasher Present:

Post Alley Hoodlums and Jackrabbit Starts Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

with Cerebral Ballzy and NASA Space Universe Doors at 7/ Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

THE CREEPSHOW with The Phenomenauts, Hard Money Saints, THURSDAY, APRIL 10

A Benefit Show For The Puget Sound Keepers Alliance

MOTHER CRONE

For more info please visit rockforcleanwater.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 Mike Thrasher Presents:

MINDLESS SELF INDULGENCE with Death Valley High, The Iris, plus guests. Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $25 ADV / $30 DOS

SATURDAY, APRIL 12

THE PANCAKES & BOOZE ART SHOW

Over 50 Local Emerging Artists Exhibiting!!! Live Body Painting!!! All-U-Can-Eat Pancake Bar!!! Live Audio & Visual Performances!!! Doors at 8PM. 21+. $5

OFF!

SUNDAY, APRIL 13

KR with Alex Wiley, Mike Champoux, Campana and Scotty Jay Lounge Show. Doors at 7/ Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

TUESDAY, APRIL 15

KING PARROT with Vattnet Viskar, Theories,

A God or an Other and The Vatican Doors at 7/ Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16

LION I AM with We Rise The Tides,

I, Assailant, We The Audience, Avoid The Void and VIS Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 4/17 LOUNGE THE SILVER PALMS 4/20 OSO BENEFIT FEAT. STEADY RIOT 4/25 GIRL ON FIRE 5/3 LOUNGE DREADFUL CHILDREN 5/16 LOUNGE EVERYONE DIES IN UTAH 5/27 DEVILDRIVER / WHITECHAPEL 5/31 ENVISIONIST 6/1 LOUNGE WE ARE THE CITY 6/2 BANE 6/5 LOUNGE LECHEROUS NOCTURNE 6/22 THE BUSINESS 7/7 LOUNGE KIERAN STRANGE UP & COMING 4/17 DIRECT DIVIDE (CD RELEASE) 4/18 SEVENDUST 4/19 DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN 4/20 LOUNGE GLOOMSDAY 4/21 LOUNGE PEELANDER-Z 4/22 LOUNGE PAT HULL 4/25 LOUNGE LIKE VULTURES 4/26 PRESTIGE 4/26 LOUNGE MIGGS 4/27 YOU ME AT SIX 4/29 LOUNGE GATES 4/30 MILLIONAIRES

Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

GOAT hails from Korpilombolo, Sweden, a town it claims

“has a history of voodoo worship after a witch doctor came and lived there.” While the band’s backstory is likely bullshit, its music will truly hypnotize you—incred-

Tuesday, April 15

FATOUMATA DIAWARA’s biography reads like some-

thing from a movie: After refusing to attend school, the 12-year-old Malian was sent to live with her aunt, and eventually landed her first acting role. But when her parents forced her to abandon a blossoming career, she fled to Paris and began singing. Diawara’s debut album, Fatou, showcases the soulful voice of a woman who’s always followed her heart. Repeats Wed. Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729, jazzalley.com. 7:30 p.m. $24.50. All ages. ACP

LocaLReLeases The Horde and the Harem, Fairweather Friends

EP (4/12, self-released, thehordeandtheharemband.com) Though it began as a way for singer/ guitarist Ryan Barber to record songs that didn’t work for previous projects, The Horde and the Harem has grown into its own entity, a collective of musicians with strong indie-rock and folk sensibilities. The follow-up to its debut full-length A Long Midwinter, Fairweather Friends was tracked live in the band’s basement studio in December and feels like a well-orchestrated jam session, with a large ensemble, including two percussionists, coming together to create a cohesive six-song package. The decision to track live works in the band’s favor as it authentically transfers the warm and vibrant energy of the group’s live show. The EP begins with the joyous “Robbery,” and the vocal back-and-forth between Barber and singer/pianist Hanna Stevens really shines in the folk-rock “Shiver. When the pair adopts a style of talk-singing, they make the song sound like a story. Then when they add more melody to their words, their sweet harmonies makes the daily grind of paying bills and putting in a hard day’s

work seem almost appealing. Elsewhere, “Magician’s Hat” heads down a psychedelic route; the breezy “Salutations” features nothing but Barber, ukulele, and Stevens’ subtle background vocals; and the title track begins with a tropical flair before ending on a wonderfully raucous note. (Be sure to stick around after the bluesy “A Girl He Once Knew” for a little something extra.) Though four of the Horde’s members contribute vocals and the band explores several genres throughout the album, Fairweather Friends doesn’t seem boggeddown or unfocused. In fact, there’s nothing fairweather about the band at all. There’s a real sense of closeness here, one that incorporates the strengths of all involved without making each song seem like a battle for the spotlight—something all groups should strive for. Its running theme of friendship, seems a natural, effortless choice. (Sat., April 12, Tractor Tavern) AZARIA C. PODPLESKY DIDA LOPEZ

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 9 — 15, 2014

with Devils Hunt Me Down, Swords For Arrows, Fruit Juice, plus guests. Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10.

32

SUNDAY, APRIL 13

Zorch Radio Presents:

Monday, April 14

ibly percussive Afro-inspired psych jams with dueling female vocalists who jump around and scream in your face while wearing fringed masks. The band recently signed to Sub Pop, making its first Seattle appearance all the more special. With Holy Wave, Midday Veil. Neumos. 8 p.m., $17. 21 and up. KS There’s a nice variety to Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies, the fifth album from Danish metal quartet VOLBEAT. “Pearl Hart” and “Our Loved Ones” are straight rock songs with radio-ready melodies, while “Room 24” and “Black Bart” feature pedal-to-the-metal guitar riffs and pounding percussion. There’s also an unexpected, though well-executed, cover of Young the Giant’s “My Body” to round it out. The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/paramount. 7 p.m. $35. All ages. ACP While trap and party rap have been on the rise, SCHOOLBOY Q and the Top Dawg Entertainment crew are returning to the raw West Coast sound. “Gangsta,” the first track on Q’s latest album, Oxymoron, features the bucket hat–clad MC shouting “gangsta, gangsta, gangsta” repeatedly over a Dr. Dre–inspired rumbling bass and choppy piano notes. Q’s flow is brutal, menacing, and a much-needed return to form for an increasingly merchandised genre. With Isaiah Rashad, Vince Staples, Audio Push. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxpresents.com. 9 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS. All ages. DH BILL RIEFLIN’S SLOW MUSIC Bill Rieflin has drummed for some of the most iconic groups in rock and fringerock history: King Crimson, Ministry, Swans, and Nine Inch Nails, just to name a few. Ever the experimentalist, he’s continued to take on new genres and ideas with his industrial and ambient projects Slow Music and the Humans, who share a bill here. Slow Music features Peter Buck of R.E.M., Matt Chamberlain of Pearl Jam, and King Crimson’s own Robert Fripp. The Triple Door. 7:30 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS. Repeats Tues. All ages. DH

Send your upcoming release to

reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com


2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

1303 NE 45TH ST JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

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Real Estate for Sale King County

34

Carnation Luxury 2 Story! 4 Bdrms 3 Baths, 3492sqft, Huge Garage. FHA & 203K Eligable. $485,000. 425-7667370; Realty West 206650-3908 HUD HOMES For Sale Save $$$! Bellevue: 2 BR, 1 BA, 900 SF, $185,000, ext. 206. Snoqualmie: 4 BR, 2 BA, 1,372 SF, $215,600, ext. 310. Renton: 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,753 SF, $286,000, ext. 295. Chris Cross, KWR 800-711-9189, enter ext for 24-hr rec msg. www.WA-REO.com

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GE PORTABLE Dishwasher, 3 years old, like new, Black and White, $350 or best offer. 206932-1391


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NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360-9021857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Auto Events/ Auctions

A ROSE TOWING AUCTION

1500 West Bertona Street, Seattle 206-545-1111 April 15th, 2014 at 12:30pm Viewing 9:30-10:30am

ET TOWING AUCTION

3400 16th Ave West, Seattle 206-622-1111 April 15th, 2014 at 12 Noon Viewing 9am - 10am Employment General MARKETING COORDINATOR The Daily Herald, Snohomish County’s source for outstanding local news and community information for more than 100 years and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, daily deals, event sponsorships and special publications as well as the daily operations of the Marketing department. Responsibilities include but are not limited to the coordination, updating and creation of marketing materials across a range of delivery channels, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and working closely with the Sr. Marketing Manager to develop strategies and implement the marketing plan. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem-solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com No phone calls please. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Employment General

Employment General

CREATIVE SERVICES MANAGER Seattle Weekly, part of the Sound Publishing group, is looking for a dynamic candidate to manage creative services operations. This is a FT, Salaried position and the 40 hour per week schedule will vary, Mon-Fri. The position oversees the process that insures all display ads run when and as ordered; and that ad proofs are delivered/transmitted to customers and sales consultants as requested. Would coordinate with the Editor for page production and assist the Publisher with any marketing tasks/projects. Position requires knowledge of Macintosh computers and Adobe CS3 applications (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat.) Also requires working knowledge of basic and advanced design concepts, attention to detail and followthrough, excellent communications and customer service skills; and the ability to work well under deadline pressure. Newspaper or other media experience is preferred. Sound Publishing offers competitive salaries and benefits including healthcare, 401K, paid holidays, vacation and sick time. Qualified applicants should send a resume, cover letter, and a few samples of your work to: hreast@soundpublishing.com or mail to: Sound Publishing, Inc., 19426 68th Avenue S., Kent, WA 98032 ATTN: HR/CSMSEA Sound Publishing, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Visit our website at: www.soundpublishing.com to find out more about us! MARKET DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Development Coordinator to research, plan and implement market programs throughout the organization. This position acts as a consultant and resource to Sound Publishing’s National/Regional Advertising Sales team and senior-level management; and is responsible for developing and implementing brand, market, and account specific sales and marketing presentations. The successful candidate will bring extensive marketing/advertising experience in the print and/or digital media industry. Must be proficient in InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat Pro, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and html5; have the ability to communicate effectively; possess excellent presentation skills as well as basic math and English skills. Candidate will also be a problem solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. Position requires a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing or related field and three to five years of marketing/brand experience. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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Employment Social Services

Wave Broadband is now seeking an Broadband Technician I, II, III

VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Must live in Seattle area. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

Provide outstanding customer service contributing to Wave’s success in making customers happy. Under supervision, perform basic installations, disconnects and service changes for residential customers. Perform basic troubleshooting from tap to customer’s electronic devices (TV, CPE, Modem, MTA, etc.) For a full job description, visit www.wavebroad band.com/careers www.wavebroadband.com/careers

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Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

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Graphic Designer (multiple open positions): Develop & design execution strategy behind our client’s unique needs in traditional and non-traditional advertising. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree (or foreign degree equivalent) in Graphic Design, Design or clsly rltd fld and 2 yrs of exp working in the creative and production side of advertising. Must have 2 yrs of exp utilizing design principles, layout & color theory. Exp must include working with each of the following programs: working with Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign CS5 or higher, and Acrobat; HTML, CSS (Responsive WebDesign) and WordPress; Flash, After Effects, Premiere or Final Cut Pro; SlideRocket, PowerPoint, Keynote (with Custom Animation) and Prezi formats; and Interactive PDF. Experience may be gained concurrently. Position at Beyond Traditional, Inc. in Seattle, WA. Send resume to Christian Gerling, 79 S. Horton Street, Suite 210, Seattle, WA 98134.

Employment Finance Accountants & Auditors / Data Analysts PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP has an opportunity for the following position in Seattle, WA. Sr. Associate. Reqs recent exp w/in the following: Exp working on proj teams & providing deliverables that involve all phases of data analysis related to the eval of acctg or financial issues. Travel req 20-40%. Reqs incl Master’s deg in Acctg Info Sys, Bus Info Sys, Bus Admin or rel & 1 yr recent exp. Mail resume to Attn: HR SSC/Talent Mgt, 4040 W. Boy Scout Blvd., Tampa, FL 33607, Ref #SEAQYA. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. w/out sponsorship. EOE

Employment Computer/Technology Facebook, Inc. currently has openings in Seattle, WA for Production Engineer (281): Participate in the design, implementation & ongoing management of major site applications & subsystems. Mail resume to: Facebook, Inc. Attn: JAA-GTI, 1 Hacker Way, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Must reference job title & job # when applying. Software Developers @ iStreamPlanet Co. in Redmond, WA. For further details, position reqs. & instructions on how to apply, visit www.istreamplanet.com/ about/careers/ software-developer

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ADOPTION Devoted, nurturing, loving gay couple in Seattle, looking to adopt first baby into a family offering education, fun, travel, laughter, and unconditional love and support. Call, TEXT, or email anytime about Kyle & Adrian; 971-238-9651 or kyleandadrianfamily@gmail.com or visit kyleandadrianadoption.com

SOFTWARE It’s work that matters. It’s what we do at Symantec. Symantec is the world leader in providing solutions to help individuals and enterprises assure the security, availability, and integrity of their information. In essence, we protect the free flow of information in a connected world. As the fourth largest independent software company in the world, Symantec has operations in more than 40 countries with 475 out of Fortune’s global 500 companies using our solutions. People look to us to safeguard the integrity of their information, ensuring it is secure and available. Achieving this ambitious goal is only possible through the combined efforts of the innovators and visionaries that Symantec continuously attracts. Symantec draws the very best people with a variety of backgrounds, experiences and perspectives and provides them with a work environment where uniqueness is valued and empowered. The creative people we attract help define the spirit of innovation at Symantec. Symantec is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.We currently have openings for the following positions (various levels/types) in our Bellevue, WA office: Software Engineers (SWEWA214) Analyze, design, debug and/or modify software; or evaluate, develop, modify and code software programs to support programming needs. Submit resume to: JOBADS@symantec.com. Must reference position & code listed above. EOE. For additional information about Symantec and other positions visit our website at http://www.symantec.com.

Appointment Setter Work Outdoors on Flexible Schedule

Avg. Reps are earning $500-$750/ week working 25 hours/week. Top Reps are earning $1,500+/ week Travel, Medical, and Cell Phone Allowances Avail. Req. Vehicle, Driver’s License, & Cell Phone

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRIL 9 — 15, 2014

& BRUSH REMOVEL 4HAULING 4EXCAVATION 4BACKHOE & 4BOBCAT WORK 4Lot Clearing HConcrete, Asphalt Removal HStump Removal HSmall Bldg Demolition HLandscaping Services

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Intruder Alert! Talented Emerging Seattle Cartoonists Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery

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INTRUDER 10 art show and launch party Saturday, April 12, 6:00 to 9:00 PM Music by Lori Goldston and Kyle Hanson Exhibition continues through May 7, 2014 Fantagraphics Bookstore & Gallery 1201 S. Vale Street Seattle, WA 98108 | 206.658.0110

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Ad #: P31593-f-10528-2x3 Deadline To Pub: 4/4 10am First Run: 4/9/2014 Publication: Seattle Weekly Section: Back Cover Specs: 2.33x2.69

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Seattle Weekly, April 09, 2014