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APRIL 2 – 8, 2014 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 14

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CAPITOL HILL THUGS BETTER WATCH OUT PAGE 5 | FILM: HORTON ON NYMPHOMANIAC VOL. II PAGE 26

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inside»   April 2–8, 2014 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 14

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

NUrtUre • your • CallINg not only learning about “I’m nutrition, I’m learning about treating people with integrity and care.

Ellie Freeman, MS (2013)

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A NEW Q PATROL

BY KELTON SEARS | As crime on Capitol Hill spikes, a neighborhood-watch group is revived. 5 | SEATTLELAND

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WE’RE TALKIN’ BASEBALL

BY SETH KOLLOEN & SW STAFF

Will the Mariners succeed this season? Only if the 89 percent step up. Plus: staff (and star) predictions; the Moose speaks; and more.

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Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Interns Thomas James, Diana Le, Laurel Rice

start for Ethan Stowell’s new bistro. 15 | FOOD NEWS/TEMP CHECK 16 | THE BAR CODE

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15 RED (COW) ALERT

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | A lackluster

arts&culture 19 AHAB IN SPACE!

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about troubled teenage girls: one with music, the other packed full of lies.

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in Cambodia, the return of Anita Hill, and Part II of Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac. 28 | FILM CALENDAR

29 MUSIC

Lydia Loveless: a little June Carter, a little Neko Case; uncovering Neutral Milk Hotel’s long-lost Seattle past; and more. 33 | SEVEN NIGHTS 33 | CD REVIEWS

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news&comment

Watch Out for Outwatch

The Naked Truth of ‘Seattle Vice’

Twenty years ago a citizens’ foot patrol helped quell hate crimes on Capitol Hill. Organizers of a new group hope they can do the same.

A

BY KELTON SEARS

J

SEATTLELAND

KELTON SEARS

Brains and brawn: Jennifer Dietrich, left, and Gina Kutz.

Hill dressed in black berets in an attempt to deter gay-bashing. Time proved the group’s efforts were warranted—in 1996, The Seattle Times reported that “hate crimes plummeted citywide, from 132 to 41, and violent crime fell 41 percent on Capitol Hill” from 1993 to 1996, a period that marked the height of the group’s activity in the neighborhood. Dietrich lit up when she heard about the group. “I didn’t know much about Q Patrol beyond the name and the idea, but that’s all I needed to hear to be like, ‘Let’s do that.’ ” Every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, Dietrich’s group of volunteers will roam the hill in four-person patrols. At least two will be selfdefense trainers or have received self-defense training in the past six months. Dietrich hopes to have at least a dozen people out per patrol, running in two shifts from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. and 1:30 to 4 a.m. The group won’t be out to “crack skulls,” as Dietrich explains. “We will diligently report every incident we see to the police, because that helps them with their patrols. I am very adamant about that. If we come in contact with a fight, we will break that fight up and call the police. We just want to be a presence.” Volunteers for Outwatch will receive free selfdefense training from Mac Scotty McGregor, a transman and a former member of the U.S.

karate team with 43 years of martial-arts experience who also happens to be a member of the city’s LGBT Commission. Seven Star Women’s Kung Fu is also offering free training for anyone looking to get involved. “Any time we can expand that dialogue about personal safety and community safety, just being aware of your surroundings and creating a safe city, we want to facilitate that,” says Gina Kutz, an instructor at Seven Star. “We don’t see Outwatch as a vigilante group; it’s just eyes on the street. We deserve to live in a safe environment.” Even SPD acknowledges we could use some more eyes on the street. None of the officers contacted for this story were aware of Outwatch’s existence, but East Precinct officer Don Bolton illustrated the dearth of patrols on Capitol Hill. “We used to have 18 to 22 officers per squad,” Bolton says, pointing to a picture on the wall of a grinning group of officers posing for a portrait circa 1990. “Now we have this many.” Bolton holds up his current patrol sheet. I count six officers. “You do the math on that one.” Bolton says none of the officers are on foot patrol at night, many working non-street positions. “It’s hard. You’ve got officers in squad cars, and sometimes we get bike patrols, but they say the faster you’re moving, the more you miss.” E ksears@seattleweekly.com

THE WEEKLY BRIEFING | What’s going on at seattleweekly.com: Geeks rejoice: George Takei will act as grand marshal for this year’s Seattle Pride Parade. Still simmering: Tensions remain high at the Northwest Detention Center, where protesting detainees were sent to solitary confinement this week. Bad habit: A Bremerton man, 41, who has logged 51 ER and urgent-care visits since November 2012 was sentenced to 26 months in prison for scamming pain medications. BFFs again: Ari Kohn, the patron saint of ex-cons, and the state Department of Corrections made up. Kohn and his Post-Prison Education Program had been barred from two prisons.

a

randerson@seattleweekly.com

Rick Anderson writes about sex, crime, money, and politics, which tend to be the same thing.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

ennifer Dietrich’s business, Dr. Jen’s House of Beauty, is the last place you would expect a martial-arts-trained street patrol to be forming. Dietrich, a pinup-styled cosmetician, has decorated her dreamlike salon with generous swashes of pink, a whimsical LED lace-doily tree full of fuchsia flowers, and a chandelier. Cheery dance music wafts from the speakers as she talks with her co-workers about their love interests and mixes pigments for her handmade makeup, wearing a lab coat with pink leopardprint trim. She was doing something similar the day before I sat down to talk to her last week, when she heard a loud thud. “We look outside, and there’s this guy who has just been knocked to the ground,” Dietrich says. “I went outside and was helping the guy up, and asked ‘What the hell is happening?’ He goes, ‘These guys just punched me in the face, I don’t even know who they are.’ They were complete strangers. It was right in the middle of the day, right in front of 10 or so people, and right by an open window. I’ve just had enough.” Hers is not an idle complaint. For a month now Dietrich has been organizing what she’s calling “Outwatch”: a citizen-run volunteer patrol group that will provide a visual antiviolence presence on Capitol Hill. The group, a response to a recent rash of attacks and crimes in the neighborhood, will hit the streets for the first time this weekend. The flashpoint for the group’s creation came last month when Dietrich heard about two incidents that had occurred on the same weekend—the attack of Ade Connere, a drag performer who was jumped by two young men on the way home from Pony, a gay bar; and the rape of a young woman near Hot Mama’s pizza, just blocks away from Dietrich’s business. The victim had left the pizza shop simply searching for a restroom. Dietrich herself was jumped months ago after parking her car up the street, when a man grabbed her and attempted to steal her purse. She broke free, ran down the street, and locked herself in her store. “I had heard enough from my friends about getting harassed on the street and getting called a ‘faggot,’ ” Dietrich says. “I’d heard enough about people getting attacked. I was just tired of it.” Dietrich joined a Facebook group called “Take Back the Hill” where she first read a post about Q Patrol, a former LGBTQ watch group formed in 1991 that patrolled Capitol

bout a half-hour into Seattle Vice, the new musical that premiered at ACT last weekend, there’s tittering not only from the bare-breasted dancers but from the crowd as a man enters the subterranean Bullitt Cabaret stage through the audience. He is nude from head to head, well-endowed and not by money. Which was the point. When he orders a drink, the BY RICK ANDERSON bartender refuses to serve him. “What? Just because I’m naked?” “No,” says the bartender. “Because I know you don’t have any money on you.” It gets a robust laugh from the sold-out opening-night crowd. But if they haven’t read the book I wrote that inspired ACT’s comedic and musical romp into the boozy, unclothed world of late Seattle mobster and stripper king Frank Colacurcio, they probably think someone made it up. I don’t know the naked guy’s name. But the bartender it happened to—at Frank’s sister’s place, Ciro’s Rickshaw Room on Pine Street— was Tommy Atkins. As Tommy later told me, “If he had money on him, I still woulda refused. Who knows where he was keeping it?” It is a great joy to see this episode come to life again on a dim, cavernous stage. The Bullitt is a place seemingly built for the play, down to the fact that you can access the theater through a back door, encountering a bar perched on the balcony level and a theater spread out below where the play, written by Mark Siano and Opal Peachey, unfolds. The two are also part of the ensemble cast and live band: Siano as lounge singer Gil Conte and Peachey as Madam Washington, a character based on Seattle beautyqueen-turned-prostitute Rose Williams, whose Rolodex of cops, civic leaders, and politicians was somehow misplaced during her last arrest. As Seattle Weekly’s Brian Miller wrote last week, the stage version of Seattle Vice is “all about melody and comedy; it’s not meant to be serious history.” But the musical exaggeration generates the larger truth of Colacurcio’s dance evolution from topless to full frontal. The city had lungs back then—exposed and breathing heavily, from the cops-on-the-take ’60s through the scandalous ’03 Strippergate payoffs until Frank’s final federal indictment, which he beat by dying in 2010. “I love this fucking town!” says Frank, played with believable gold-chain swagger by Michael Cimino. And Colacurcio did, as Siano and Peachey obviously do. Hear, hear. In a company town renowned for software, retailing, and, good Lord, coffee, there is a place to see what actual fun looks like. After April 19, you’re on your own. E

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The Sportsball News WHERE SEATTLE ATHLETICS ARE TAKEN SOMEWHAT SERIOUSLY ★ ★ ★ SPECIAL MARINERS 2014 EDITION ★ ★ ★

ILUSTRATION BY JOSHUA BOULET

T

he Mariners won’t have an unsuccessful 2014. Success depends on expectations, and for the Seattle Mariners, there are none. The M’s are like March 24. You expect 50s and rainy, you plan for 50s and rainy, and when 50s and rainy comes you barely notice. But when it’s 68 and sunny, as it was two weeks ago? You’re overjoyed! You didn’t even know that could happen. All previous crappy March 24s are forgiven. The Seahawks, meanwhile, have driven their

BY SETH KOLLOEN

expectations to August 24 levels. You expect sun, you plan for sun, and if you get 50s and rainy, you’re livid. For the 2014 Seahawks, anything less than a Super Bowl victory will be a disappointment. For the 2014 Mariners, all they need is a winning season to bring baseball fever back to Seattle. And yes, I do mean baseball fever. You may think of Seattle as a football town, but if the M’s match an August 24 experience to their March 24 expectations, fans will flood Safeco.

I hear your doubtful clucks. In reply, I point you to Pittsburgh. Home of the wildly successful Steelers. A metropolis serving western Pennsylvania and northeast Ohio, the throbbing heart of gridiron fanaticism. Pittsburgh’s baseball team had 20 consecutive losing seasons. What happened when the Pirates finally gave their city a winner in 2013? They sold out nearly a third of their games—including one the day of a Steelers home game. It can happen here. But only if the

Rise of the 89%

Mariners Home Opener vs. Anaheim Angels Tuesday, April 8 • 7:10 p.m. worst-paid, least-noticed members of Mariners society make it happen. The single expectation for the Mariners is the one that’s least likely to come true: Robinson Cano will earn his $24 million salary. $24 million is an insane amount of money to pay a single athlete. The entire Seahawks starting defense in

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

Occupy Safeco

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 8 7


The Sportsball News

W W W. S E AT T L E W E E K LY. C O M / S I G N U P

WEEKLY

NEWSLETTER

NI NG

WE E K LY

FILM

The inside scoop on features, columns and reviews.

M U SI C

HA P P Y HO U R

Occupy Safeco » FROM PAGE 7 the Super Bowl, plus Russell Wilson, made $23.9 million last year. Could Cano equal the return on that investment? It’s not likely. Actually, it’s impossible. Basketball stars like LeBron James ($19.1m/year) and football stars like Peyton Manning ($20m/year) touch the ball on nearly every offensive play. But eight out of nine times a Mariner comes to bat, it will be someone other than Robinson Cano. Should the M’s win the World Series, Cano won’t have done it alone. He’ll need the other eight guys in the lineup to hit too. The Mariners need a rise of the 89 percent. The mystery of the offseason was why the Mariners would splurge on Cano when they have so many questions on their roster. The 89 percent can answer those questions. The M’s can win with Cano if—and only if—young, inexpensive players like those in the 89 percent play well. If this sounds familiar, that’s because it’s exactly how Pete Carroll built the Seahawks. Draft what you can (Earl Thomas) and spend big on the rest (Percy Harvin). Three years ago Richard Sherman was a backup, Malcolm Smith was a special teamer, and Russell Wilson was just a name on a draft board. Their names were no more familiar than Brad Miller, Mike Zunino, and Taijuan Walker are now. Like those Seahawks, the Mariners’ 89 percent are underpaid—compared to Cano, at least. Some deserve to be as outraged as a Westlake Park protester. Kyle Seager was one of baseball’s best third basemen last year, and earned “just” $510,000. On the open market, he’d probably earn $10m/year; Nationals’ 3B Ryan Zimmerman, who posted similar numbers, will earn $14 million in 2014. But since Seager isn’t eligible for free agency, the Mariners can pay him the major league minimum. Seager’s 2014 salary will be

EV ENT S

A R T S A ND

about what Cano earns in a week. But let’s not make the mistake of Occupy Wall Street and demonize the wealthy. Cano worked his way up through the system, and if Mariner desperation inflated his take, he’s hardly to blame. If the 89 percent join Cano to make the Mariners a contender, that rising tide really will lift all ships. The captain, new manager Lloyd McClendon, was also part of the 89 percent. A career backup, he never earned more than $650,000 in a season. Maybe because of his undistinguished career, McClendon judges players by performance, not reputation. This spring the M’s cut veterans Endy Chavez and Scott Baker, with a combined 20 years of MLB experience, in favor of Stefen Romero and Roenis Elias—neither of whom had yet to play a major league game. McClendon also brings a sailor’s fondness for straight talk and salty language. “This is not about development at this level, it’s about winning games,” McClendon said at the start of spring training. “If you want to be developed, then we’ll send you back to the minor leagues and you can do all the developing you want to do.” Pete Carroll’s philosophy of competition isn’t much different, he just expresses it in a more positive way. Hard to imagine Carroll saying something like “Erasmo Ramirez made a lot of horseshit pitches,” as McClendon did this spring. With McClendon’s expletives cutting the wind, the Mariners’ 89 percent can make the utopian vision of a sold-out Safeco Field a reality. Eleven-percenters like Cano can’t do it alone. Don’t expect any help from Seattle’s politicians; they’re too busy making it harder for you to find a ride home from the game. Start a popular movement. Make August 24 a day of sun and pennant-race baseball. Rise up, 89 percent! You have nothing to lose but another 100 games. E

PR O M O TI O NS

The mystery of the offseason was why the Mariners would splurge on ENTE R TAwhen I NMthey E NT Cano have so many questions on their roster.

sportsball@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 2 — 8, 2014

Pay Ball!

8

A Look at the Mariners Payroll

C Mike Zunino $500,000 1B Justin Smoak $2,637,500 2B Robinson Cano $24,000,000 SS Brad Miller $500,000* 3B Kyle Seager $600,000* LF Dustin Ackley $1,700,000 CF Abraham Almonte $500,000* RF Michael Saunders $2,300,000 DH Corey Hart $6,000,000 P Felix Hernandez $22,857,143 *estimated

C Mike Zunino $500,000 1B Justin Smoak $2,637,500 2B Robinson Cano $24,000,000 SS Brad Miller $500,000* 3B Kyle Seager $600,000*

LF Dustin Ackley $1,700,000 CF Abraham Almonte $500,000* RF Michael Saunders $2,300,000 DH Corey Hart $6,000,000 P Felix Hernandez $22,857,143


The Sportsball News

Meet the 89 Percent The players who need to step up for the Mariners to step forward.

BRAD MILLER 24 • shortstop

The M’s second-year shortstop is attracting national attention, popping up on plenty of “rookies to watch” or “fantasy sleeper” lists after hitting four homers this spring.

ABRAHAM ALMONTE 24 • outfielder

He beat alcohol addiction and now looks to have won the starting centerfield job. Almonte is stocky, speedy, and aggressive—think Kirby Puckett—so McClendon’s putting him in the leadoff spot.

STEFEN ROMERO 25 • outfielder

Converted to outfield last year, this star of Oregon State’s national championship teams won a major league job thanks to four spring homers.

JAMES PAXTON 25 • starting pitcher

The lefty with a mid-90s fastball went 3-0 in four starts last September. He’d be the first pitcher drafted by Jack Zduriencik to stick in the M’s rotation.

DANNY FARQUHAR 27 • relief pitcher

Started 2013 with AAA Tacoma; ended it as the Mariners’ closer after developing a tricky cut fastball. Expected to be the 8th-inning bridge to new closer Fernando Rodney.

ROENIS ELIAS 25 • starting pitcher

Four years ago, he was a Cuban defector pitching in beer leagues in Monterrey. Now, his mid-90s fastball and devastating curve helped him beat eight-year veteran Scott Baker for a spot in the M’s starting rotation.

MIKE ZUNINO 23 • catcher

The M’s starting catcher quietly had an outstanding spring at the plate. Maybe his dismal September last season was due to fatigue?

The M’s backup catcher lived in an RV park during spring training—his Instagram of the going-away party his elderly neighbors threw him (#livingthedream, #trailorlife) got 1,767 likes, including mine.

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TAIJUAN WALKER 21 • starting pitcher

The Mariners’ best prospect flashed brilliance in a September call-up, effortlessly firing a mid-90s fastball past hitters. Scary shoulder pain put Walker behind this spring, but he’s pitching again and could be contributing in Seattle by April.

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A BIG T H A N K YO U TO O U R E V E N T S P O N S O R S !

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

JOHN BUCK 33 • catcher

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YOERVIS MEDINA 25 • relief pitcher

One of the M’s big bullpen arms, Medina’s low walk total this spring gives us hope he’s finally learned to control his nasty stuff.

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10

BY THE MARINER MOOSE

Boys & Girls Ages 5 - 15 Seattle Renton

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an a moose get real for a minute, you guys? I’ve been at this a long time. Like, a long time—since 1990. And I’ve done a lot of things since then. The T-shirt cannon. Making kids cry. That time I broke my ankle at the Kingdome. More important, I’ve watched a lot of baseball over the past 24 years—most of it terrible. So I can speak from authority. I know a loser when I see one. And one thing I can say for certain: Jack Zduriencik, the Mariners general manager, isn’t a loser. This guy gets it. Stay with me for a minute, because I know what you’re thinking: “Moose, man, don’t you read? Don’t you follow the blogs? Aren’t you on Twitter? Don’t you know the guy looks like a baby boy’s penis dressed up in a business suit? Don’t you see he’s terrible?” That’s where you’re wrong, you guys. First of all, comparing Jack Z to a baby boy’s penis is just messed up, OK. You shouldn’t do that. It’s unconscionable. Have some decency. But more important: Jack Z is The Man. He exudes integrity and great leadership. He’s a mastermind, a magician, and a visionary. He’s everything that’s right about baseball and America. He’s like a big, supple father figure to the whole organization, including me. He sees the big picture. He is the big picture. One day, some day, he will make a winner out of the Mariners. (Wait! What? No, he’s not making me say that. He’s not standing over my shoulder, sweating Grey Goose as I type this. He would never do something like that.) I get it, though. I mean, a lot of really harsh things have been said about The Z Man, as I like to call him. I’ve heard he’s dysfunctional and unprepared. I’ve heard he’s stupid and obsessed with home runs (who doesn’t like home runs, you guys?). I’ve heard he doesn’t understand math, doesn’t get stats, and can’t count to 27. I’ve heard he meddles and nitpicks. I’ve heard he’s intimidating and manipulative. I’ve heard he humiliates co-workers for sport. I’ve heard he thought signing Chone Figgins was a really good idea. I’ve heard he once made Don Wakamatsu sob like Joey Cora. Perhaps The Moose needs to address the elephant in the room. When Geoff Baker’s Seattle Times hit piece came out last year, it must have been a little disconcerting for fans to read all that negativity. It must have been a gut punch to learn that Jack had someone else prepare his application package for the Mariners GM job. It was no doubt alarming to read that ILUSTRATION BY JOSHUA BOULET

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The Sportsball News • OPINION

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12


The Sportsball News • HOROSCOPE

Chicken Little and the Astrologer

Beleaguered Ballclub Asks, ‘Are My Stars Aligned?’ BY WESLEY HALLOCK Dear Astrologer, I’m a 36-year-old professional baseball franchise based in the Northwest United States. I’ve been having a rough couple of years, almost to the point where I feel like unseen forces greater than myself are conspiring against me. I’ve made some grand gestures toward serious change this year, but I’ve still got a lot of uncertainty in my life. With this in mind, I’ve got to ask: Are the stars aligned for me this year? Sincerely, The Seattle Mariners Born April 6, 197

EXPIRES: 4/30/14

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2006 season: Think outside the box, be a pioneer of things never-before-tried, and don’t hesitate to affect necessary changes. They will pay off most handsomely in the 2016 season. Your year at a glance: Don’t be dismayed by early-season sluggishness. Performance improves dramatically beginning in May. A robust and well-placed Sun in Aries is this year’s rising-sign ruler, boding well for the season overall. An equally strong Venus is ruling the third house of competition, giving the team a distinct playing edge. Your strongest period of the season comes in August and September. Moon and Mars will progress together at that time to put the team at its competitive best. Team morale spikes upward in September, as

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Sat. April 26 some long-standing tensions or conflicts cease to trouble. Also, Saturn by then will be packing his bags and saying good-bye. This should give you a satisfying finish to the season. Maybe even a hot shower. E Unlike some of the stories in this package, Chicken Little and the Astrologer is a real thing, appearing regularly in Whidbey Weekly. Send your questions, along with your date, time, and place of birth (as listed on your birth certificate) to Wesley at planetbiz4u2@gmail.com.

SW Staff Predictions MATT DRISCOLL, staff writer Mariners 2014 record: 82-80

There’s something in the air in Seattle. Or the water. As the Seahawks taught us, Seattle isn’t a loser anymore. We’re winners! The tide has turned, at long last! Rejoice! When it comes to the Mariners, that should translate into a record two games over .500, and maybe even meaningful baseball in August. Dream big, people. Anything’s possible. Refuse to Lose. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT, entertainment editor Mariners 2014 record: 56-106

I don’t know much about baseball, but I do know about food and booze—two things Safeco

Field does right, albeit at a premium. Win or lose, if I’m going to watch the M’s, I’m doing it on a full stomach, with a Field Roast frankfurter, a pile of garlic fries, and a few shots of El Zacatecano tequila from Edgar’s Cantina. Based on the amount I’ll consume at the two games I’ll likely attend this year, with an average of 50 fries per order, that’s 100 fries, two dogs, and around four drinks. My prediction: 106 losses, 56 wins. PETER MULLER, account executive Mariners 2014 record: 6-5-151

I think there will be a lot of ties this year. Some wins, some losses . . . but mostly just ties.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

11am to 5pm

Map in Natural Awakenings magazine & at

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

Dear Seattle Mariners, Old Man Saturn is paying you a visit in 2014. Saturn’s visits are a bit like a pie in the face: You like what he brings, but you object to his delivery. Boot camp and cold showers were both invented by Saturn. Saturn’s visit means your 2014 season will be a no-nonsense year demanding hard work and discipline. Benefits come from his simple regimens and attention to basics. Review very carefully the practices and policies begun in the

|

11


The Sportsball News Predictions » FROM PAGE 11

MARK BAUMGARTEN, editor-in-chief Mariners 2014 record: 93-69 (wild-card berth)

SETH KOLLOEN, Sportsball columnist Mariners 2014 record: 73-0*

The Mariners begin the season on an extremely suspicious 73-game winning streak. After win 73, investigators announce that all Mariner players have been ingesting a special concoction of Douglas fir needles and salmon roe called “Squatch Juice,” commissioned from Tom Douglas by a Mariners’ executive team desperate to win. MLB disqualifies the Mariners for the season, declares all wins forfeited, and moves the team to Sacramento.

The Mariners will surprise when both the A’s and Rangers falter from injuries and overconfidence. Unfortunately, the Mariners will lose the wild-card playoff game to the Kansas City Royals after Jesús Montero—called up from AAA late in the season after Corey Hart finally admits that, yes, his knees do in fact hurt and that he’s “just gonna keep sitting right here and watch the game, OK?”—trips on his way to first base, earning the third out on what would otherwise have been a game-tying RBI in the bottom of the ninth. Way to go, Jesús. E For all the Seattle Weekly staff predictions, go to seattleweekly.com.

Behind Moose Eyes » FROM PAGE 10 Jack “never understood one iota of statistical analysis,” as his former right-hand man told it. I mean, that’s the sort of thing that can sour a fan base, especially after five seasons of putrid mediocrity under Z’s direction. I’m sure it all seemed very plausible. Maybe Jack Z was a fraud? But here’s the thing: He’s not. Jack was smart enough to tell Chuck Armstrong and Howard Lincoln what they wanted to hear, and it worked. He got the job. When it comes to his resume, trust me, that kind of stuff happens all the time. Like, really, all the time. I never

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would have gotten a second interview with the Mariners if I hadn’t lied. Back in 1990, I hated kids and had never held a job for longer than three months. (In fairness, I’m a moose.) Just look at me now. Everybody loves me. Jack Z, in this moose’s opinion, deserves the same chance. Has he made mistakes? Sure. Was he the most qualified guy for the job when he was hired? Probably not. Does he understand statistical analysis? Not really. Does he look like a baby boy’s penis? Some have said. But he gets it. He knows what his bosses want, and he delivers. He’s a company man, just like me. And that’s what really matters. Trust me. . . . At least for one more season. E

Classifieds FOR SALE Keep your fashion above the Mendoza Line with my hand-woven necklaces. Perfect for a double header or double kegger. Available in two sizes: thick and chunky. Find ordering information online at my Etsy store or at smoakweaves.biz. WANTED Huge fan in search of one pair of floorlevel Bob Seger tickets. Been working on my night moves, trying to lose those awkward third-base blues. Now it’s time to see the legend. Top dollar paid. The closer to the Silver Bullet Band, the better. Contact KyleSeager15@gmail.com. FOR SALE Gently used elliptical machine. Like new. Must sell fast. Open to trades, including Girl Scout cookies (preferably Samoas). Serious inquiries only. E-mail Jesus Montero for pics at BigMan63@ AOL.com. FREE SMOAKAMOTIVE Not running. You haul. Call Geoff Baker at 206-555-2121. LAWN-CARE SERVICE You’ve seen us dance at

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ROOMMATE WANTED Quiet, left-handed pitcher who travels a lot seeks responsible roommate. No pets. No smoking. Must be OK rooming with a man named Furbush. E-mail Charlie at Furbush41@ Hotmail.com for more info. CLASSES NOW FORMING Want to tighten those obliques and achieve that nondescript jawline of a middle-aged white guy you’ve always wanted? Let lead instructor Willie Bloomquist show you the way. Spinning, Zumba, yoga, hip-hop dance: Body by Bloomquist incorporates it all to deliver the results you crave. Classes now forming at the Sammamish YMCA. ENCOUNTERS Me: Cy Young Award–winning ace

on the mound. You: Wearing a yellow T-shirt in the King’s Court. Interested in a close friendship, a K counter, and maybe more. Hopefully you like waffles and low ERAs. Tip your hat to the left if interested.

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food&drink Red Cow’s French: Fair

FoodNews

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

The Comet Tavern re-reopened Monday under new owners David Meinert and Jason Lajeunesse. The first live show was yesterday, and the owners’ press release promises “the largest collection of cheap beer in Seattle.”

BY MEGAN HILL

Ethan Stowell’s newest restaurant needs work.

A

RESTAURANT INTERIORS: GEOFFREY SMITH

s Ethan Stowell prepared to open his eighth restaurant, Red Cow, word on the street was both excited and skeptical. A French steakfrites-style brasserie in Madrona—yay!—but was the renowned Seattle chef perhaps spreading himself too thin? As a regular at Tavolàta and a fan of other Stowell restaurants, I’d had the same doubts when mkt. hit the scene last year in Tangletown. Yet Stowell delivered at that location with a menu that offered faultlessly executed seafood, meat, and vegetable dishes with the Pacific Northwest flourishes that he helped make de rigueur in Seattle. Unfortunately, I cannot say the same for Red Cow. Seattle certainly needed another classic French bistro (we’re low on good ones), but two months in, Red Cow has proven lackluster. On my first trip, a weeknight, we sat in the bar area, where you get just enough of a glimpse of the

and fatty and generously portioned, though the mustard on the side, in this case, was needed for a punch. But the biggest disappointment was the steak itself. My hanger, ordered medium rare, came out medium (as my server agreed) and was sent back. A medium-rare one quickly replaced it, but was so heavy on the salt as to be nearly inedible. Of the four steak sauces to choose from, I went with the béarnaise, which only upped the salinity. My friend and I both were up several times later in the night gulping water. To add insult to injury, the fries weren’t the crispy delights that French frites are meant to be. These were slightly crunchy on the outside and soft in the middle. On my second visit (a Friday night), I went for the boneless rib-eye, again ordered medium rare, but this time delivered as such. The big

» PRICE GUIDE

HOUSEMADE CHARCUTERIE........ ......$8–$25 BEEF TARTARE ..................................................$14 MUSHROOM TARTINE ....................................$11 HANGER STEAK (WITH FRIES) .................. $21 BONELESS RIBEYE (WITH FRIES) ............ $36 ROASTED HALF CHICKEN ............................$19 MOULES FRITES ...............................................$18

hunk of meat was quite fatty, though, and while I know rib-eyes are a fattier cut, there were just too many inedible pieces for $36. This time the steak wasn’t salted within an inch of its life, though the red-wine reduction I chose for it was. The fries, once again, were a let-down. We also tried the roasted half-chicken, another French staple, this one served with Yukon Gold potatoes. It was oddly rubbery in texture, particularly the white meat, which can be an indication of poor-quality chicken or overbrining. It also was lacking that addictive crispy skin that places like Le Pichet have mastered. Besides meat, we ordered the mushroom tartine, an open-faced French-style sandwich. When we asked the waiter what kind of mushrooms were on it, he hesitated, then said he thought they were hen-of-the-woods. He came back to tell us they were in fact oyster, cremini, and shitakes. The grilled bread was spread with too much goat cheese and the mushrooms were pretty flavorless. This was essentially a bruschetta I could have easily made myself. The moules frites, however, were among the best I’ve eaten. We opted for the curry sauce,

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

Seattle’s 2bar Spirits Vodka is now on sale at all Trader Joe’s stores in Washington. This award-winning vodka is made in a SoDo distillery with locally grown ingredients. Tom Douglas is heading to Capitol Hill to open a third Serious Pie by August. His pizza restaurant will be located along the Minor Avenue side of the upcoming Starbucks roasting facility at Melrose Avenue and Pike Street, according to Capitol Hill Seattle. Food & Wine has published a list of the best places to drink wine in Seattle, contributed by Aragona’s Chris Tanghe, who is also one of the magazine’s 2014 Sommeliers of the Year. Among Tanghe’s top 10 picks are Bar Ferd’nand, Essex, and Mashiko. morningfoodnews@gmail.com

Temperature Check FROM NICOLE SPRINKLE,

FOOD + DRINK EDITOR AT Seattle Weekly

Salad greens with some zing. I’m thinking things like mizuna and tat soi. Arugula and watercress are still great, but let’s mix it up more!

Beet salads. A delicious default, but I’m getting tired of seeing them on every menu.

Salads that try to pass off bad lettuce like iceberg as something exotic, i.e., “Iceberg Petals.”

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

semi-open kitchen. While there are fish and seafood items on the menu, I decided on both visits to hone in on the hyper-French fare. We know Stowell has perfected scallops, but what will he do with, say, beef tartare and a hanger steak and fries? The answer: not much. The first red flag was the bread, not very crusty and flavorful, but softish and bland. At a French restaurant, good bread should be a given. When our beef tartare arrived sans raw egg and capers, I was first struck by its color, not the gorgeous ruby-red jeweled tone of most uncooked beef. Instead, it was grayish. I asked the server if the egg had already been incorporated into the dish. She wasn’t sure, but came back to inform us that the egg, the capers, the cornichons, and an aioli had been premixed into it. One bite and that was evident. The tartare tasted mostly like mustard, thoroughly masking the flavor of what should be unadulterated quality beef. I might as well have been eating chicken salad. Fortunately, a lamb terrine was nice, with the flavor of the lamb coming through. However, while the tzatziki sauce it was served with was good, it overpowered the terrine. I opted not to use it. A pork rillette was appropriately moist

NICOLE SPRINKLE

I can’t help but wish he’d given his foray into French food the real strength and consistency he’s known for.

Belltown is getting another restaurant, thanks to Marcus Johnson and Jessica Gifford, owners of The Rabbit Hole, Bathtub Gin, and Lava Lounge. Eater Seattle says the pair’s new restaurant, The Bear and the Bee, is set to open any day now, and will feature enormous sandwiches on Grand Central Bakery bread.

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food&drink» Red Cow » FROM PAGE 15 which was so nicely balanced and delicate, melding perfectly with the notes of thyme (the kind of sauce Stowell excels at). The mussels themselves were almost preternaturally plump. I’m not sure where he gets them, but let’s hope he continues to use that purveyor. Roasted Brussels sprouts with bacon and caramelized onions were good, if predictable; the braised kale, though, was cooked in a smothered, dripping Southern style that didn’t pair well with the fatty, soft bacon chunks it was served with. It was all just too mushy, and heavy on the salt as well. The drinks menu has plenty of the requisite well-made craft cocktails, and the wine menu is exhaustively French in a good way: hitting the major regions of France as well as offering sparklings and rosés and a decent number of Washington and Oregon wines too. At dessert, a curated menu of brandies, ports, and Sauternes came with a choice of a chocolate mousse (nice), a pear tart with crème fraîche ice cream, and profiteroles with coffee-butternut ice cream and chocolate sauce (neither of which we had room to try). Coffee was “Starbucks Reserve”—an odd choice given the current preoccupation with small, local roasters. Interestingly, on my second visit there was no reference to Starbucks. Instead the coffee was listed as “Espresso Brew No. 11, Guatemalan Antigua Sun Dried Ethiopian.” A Google search for that confirmed that it was still, indeed, a Starbucks product. Of all Stowell’s restaurants, this one feels the coziest. Though still incorporating clean lines and concrete and steel elements, there’s lovely dark-gray wainscoting in the bar area, a pretty, curvy, white-painted cutout framing the exposed kitchen, some lime-green glass windows, and a single green Glassy Baby (an homage to the neighborhood, no doubt). A couple of toy cows are strategically placed. A big, beautiful arrangement of colorful flowers would perfectly complete the look. Here’s the thing: Reservations are hard to get. On both my visits, the place was packed, mostly with a well-heeled, older clientele, as befitting the neighborhood. But considering the overall dearth of seriously good restaurants in Madrona, does it really come as any surprise? I have no doubt that people will continue to flock there. Yet considering Stowell is one of our pioneering chefs—one who’s not only helped put Seattle on the culinary map but has consistently brought us excellent neighborhood restaurants—I can’t help but wish he’d given his foray into French food the real strength and consistency he’s known for. Perhaps French isn’t the right fit for him—or has he really spread himself too thin this time? There’s lots of talk about the soon-to-open tiny restaurant behind Red Cow, Noyer, with a daily changing menu that Stowell will supposedly preside over regularly. It’s good to hear that he wants to be back in the kitchen cooking, not just moving on to yet another business venture. But before he does, I hope he’ll bring his laser-focused attention to Red Cow. Only two months in, it’s not too late to make it the standout French bistro it’s purported to be. E

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

Why Cheap Wine Is a Bad Deal

C

heap wine is the drinking equivalent of fast food. If you turn your nose up at McDonald’s or Taco Bell, it’s time for you to reconsider that $4 bottle of wine. Let’s talk about why it’s less of a bargain than you think. • You get what you pay for. It’s easy to forget, but wine is first and foremost an agricultural product. To be able to sell a wine priced in the single digits, producers have to take at least a few of any number of shortcuts. They might grow vast amounts of grapes in more fertile soil, which leads to huge yields but limited BY ZACH GEBALLE quality. They often use fertilizers and pesticides to boost yields as well; if you never buy conventionally farmed produce, you should think about what exactly goes into making that $5 bottle of wine. Spoiler alert: It’s often the same farming practices

THEBARCODE

you’d decry in tomatoes or spinach.

• Your bargain wine also probably comes from a developing nation. So maybe you feel

that you’re supporting struggling growers. Sadly, that’s rarely the case. Again, to make wine that cheaply requires large companies to use either extremely inexpensive labor or mechanized harvesters over massive swaths of land. The only people making money off that bottle are the winery owners and the retailer. • Your bargain wine is probably ruining your palate. OK, this is where my unabashed wine

snob is going to come out, but so be it. Part of the beauty of wine is its complexity, its range and depth of flavors, and the sense that it is a reflection of a specific place in a specific year—individual characteristics evident in a finished wine. Wines that cost a few dollars have none of that nuance: it’s akin to a McDonald’s hamburger as compared to a handmade one. Great wine is a product of conscious winemaking and grapegrowing choices, the qualities of a specific plot of land, and the vagaries of nature—not generic and nondescript alcoholic grape juice produced in lake-size quantities. But I get it. Good wine is expensive, and I’m not advocating that you spend tons of cash on your everyday wine—especially since there’s a lot of interesting and relatively inexpensive wine available in Seattle from places like Spain, France, Portugal, and Greece. It might cost you more than $5, but it’s often less than $15. If that’s more than you can or will spend on wine, so be it—but own up to the facts about why that wine can be made so cheaply. It’s not a magic trick, and throwing a cute label on it and stocking it at Trader Joe’s doesn’t make all those questionable agricultural practices disappear. E

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com


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arts&culture

Beam Me Up, Ishmael

How a Bellevue math nerd co-founded the comedy duo Charles, currently sending Herman Melville into orbit.

BY DANIEL NASH

M

black stage, Armstrong and Stockman play all Moby Alpha’s characters, distinguished by the differently colored LED lights on their space helmets. It’s a lighthearted, stripped-down take that, though hitting all the major plot points, is

Charles has since opened for local troupes like

Armstrong (left) and Stockman practicing their interstellar cetology.

less concerned with Moby-Dick ’s story than with using it as a vessel for poking fun at various science-fiction clichés and referencing space-faring classics from Star Trek to Alien. After all, Ishmael might be considered a kindred spirit to any casual geek or outside observer of sci-fi fandom, populated with the kind of people who obsess over the logistics of transporter travel or how such a device might, say, create an evil double while still adhering to the laws of physics. Stockman says of Moby Alpha, “It is sort of a hybrid of a play and sketch-comedy show in that it follows a story arc, but each individual scene for the most part also works on a standalone level.” Armstrong adds, “The main characters all kind of go through a kind of pop-culture sci-fi odyssey. For that reason, the show seems to resonate most with sci-fi fans.” Moby Alpha has the type of premise that would

be right at home in one of Charles’ comedy sketches, where audiences might see Santa Claus get caught up in an argument about race relations, or a marketer desperately try to salvage a presentation after realizing Jaguar deals in cars, not jungle cats. Over the past four years the two have become known, in small Seattle theaters and on the sketch-festival circuit, for this highbrow brand of absurdity. It’s writing-centric comedy, perhaps because neither Armstrong or Stockman expected to be a performer. Armstrong jokes that the LEDs in Moby Alpha make up for their lack of acting skills. He might not even have become a

C O G A SUPER BR A WL S UNDAY SUN | APR 6 | 4PM

writer—he excelled in math and science as a child, and now works as a project manager in the tech industry—if his fourth-grade teacher hadn’t encouraged him to use humor in creative-writing assignments, he says. At Bellevue High School, he became a drama kid more likely to re-enact his favorite Monty Python sketch than a Shakespearean soliloquy. Armstrong met Stockman, a Baltimore transplant, when the latter was editing the Stanford humor magazine, The Chaparral, where Armstrong was a staff writer. Armstrong majored in computer science and Stockman, now a freelance web designer, majored in symbolic systems, but they bonded over their shared comic sensibilities and work on “the Chappie.” They moved to San Francisco after college as roommates, and eventually relocated to Seattle. “We were looking to launch a project together, and Seattle just seemed really appealing,” Armstrong says. “For one, we both had friends and family up here. But more importantly, we thought that Seattle’s a city that’s supportive of its artists.” They began producing Seattle Untimely, a weekly web series inspired by John Keister’s “The John Report” from Almost Live!. This was 2007, and video series like Ask a Ninja looked like they’d become the Next Big Thing in podcasting—so Armstrong and Stockman decided it was important to produce a new episode every week. “We bit off more than we could chew,” Stockman says today. “For two people basically doing all of the writing, directing, editing, and one-half to two-thirds of the acting, that meant almost all of those areas were going to suffer.”

the Pork Filled Players and performed at fringe festivals outside Seattle. A 2010 performance at the Toronto Fringe Fest took them “from famine to feast in terms of touring North America,” says Armstrong. “In a lot of ways, performing our own material started out as much a logistical decision as anything. But truthfully, we’ve learned a lot about writing from performing. We’ve learned the importance of keeping dialogue snappy and keeping motivations clear. And besides, as much as we love writing, there’s no denying that performing on a stage is one of the most fun things you can do.” Still, Charles hasn’t left scripted videos entirely behind. The duo’s comedy short Less Rock, More Talk, an emotional debate among DJs on the preferred ratio of rock to talk, won the Seattle Comedy Film Challenge last year. During the same period, Charles was workshopping Moby Alpha at the Eclectic Theater on First Hill. Early viewers like standup comic Emmett Montgomery of Laff Hole and Satori Group playwright Spike Friedman gave Armstrong and Stockman notes to help polish the show. “Artists love each other here,” says Stockman. Moby Alpha has since been performed at the Edmonton and Winnipeg Fringe Festivals and at First Night Tacoma. Charles’ current production of Moby Alpha marks its Seattle premiere in final form; a three-week run in L.A. is in the works. Might Moby Alpha be a calling card in Hollywood, to get Armstrong and Stockman sitcom writing work? Armstrong says Charles is keeping its comedy-platform options open. “The way television is changing,” he says, “there isn’t really a clear blueprint anymore.” E

dnash@bellevuereporter.com

MOBY ALPHA Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com and charlescomedy.wordpress.com. $12–$15. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends April 12.

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A dozen years later, performing on a bare, pitch-

After 49 episodes of Seattle Untimely, a friend of Armstrong’s from improv class invited him and Stockman to perform live. They gathered several old sketches, rewrote them to fit the format, and hoped for the best. One 30-minute show later, they decided they had found their new niche.

CHARLESCOMEDY.NET

any words have been used to describe Moby-Dick—Lord knows Melville used enough himself in writing the classic novel—but “funny” isn’t usually among them. That’s a shame. What’s often lost to the minutiae-shy reader is that between (and sometimes within) the shipping manifests and exhaustive descriptions of 19th-century whaling, there’s a hilarious tale about a buffoonish sailor navigating, narrating, and desperately trying to keep his head above the obsessively dug-in points of view of his fellow seamen. But Moby-Dick was a flop that only entered the cultural zeitgeist with its critical revival after World War I. By that time and since, its archaic tone earned it a reputation as a Very Serious Old Work. “There are actually some really funny parts in Moby-Dick,” says Chuck Armstrong, half of Seattle sketch-comedy duo Charles. “There’s a whole faux-French translation scene between second-mate Stubb and the captain of the Rosebud that is legitimately hilarious, even today.” Armstrong and Charlie Stockman are the coauthors and performers of Moby Alpha, a comic sci-fi retelling of Herman Melville’s magnum opus now playing at the Ballard Underground. Like its source material, Moby Alpha follows the crew of the Pequod on Captain Ahab’s mad quest to kill the monster that took his leg. Unlike in Melville’s tale, the Pequod is a starship, the monster is an amorphous energy cloud, and Ahab is walking quite well with the assistance of a bionic leg. The show was conceived when the Bellevueraised Armstrong was at Stanford, based on riffing with a friend about the novel both were reading. “[We] had this conversation about other places the story could be set,” Armstrong says. “You know—the way that everyone unnecessarily reimagines Shakespeare plays, like in a mental institution or whatever. When we hit on space as a setting for Ahab’s quest for the white whale, we were both greatly amused. The idea stuck with me.”

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arts&culture»

ThisWeek’s PickList WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2

Dive Bar Film Fest

Engman’s Double Skew.

GREG KUCERA GALLERY

Esteemed former Seattle Weekly editor-in-chief Mike Seely knows how to drink. We’ve seen him do it, and he’s a goddamn pro. He literally wrote an entire book about the subject, Seattle’s Best Dive Bars: Drinking & Diving in the Emerald City. So it comes as no surprise that he’s joining Rainier Beer and Rawstock Media to launch the DiveBarFilmFest. Billed as “a pop-culture call-to-arms catalyzed by the recent announced closings of such venerable Seattle watering holes as The Canterbury, Moon Temple, Streamline Tavern, and The Rimrock,” the DBFF intends to celebrate the city’s drunken, gritty history, the dim, smoky rooms where it was made, and the piss-stained-bathroom-floor romanticism

A scene from Dank, at the Dive Bar Film Fest.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 2 — 8, 2014

DBFF

20

of old Seattle. The screening lineup will vary slightly each night, but titles include a new short filmed inside Moon Temple by Justin Freet, a study of New York City bathroom graffiti, and a retrospective of classic old Rainier and Ivar’s commercials made by ad man David Culp in the ’80s. Andy Smushkin is your host tonight; Seely will emcee on Thursday; Jonsey Dillinger fills that role on Sunday. And naturally there will be booze: shots of Evan Williams bourbon with a Rainier chaser. Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., brownpapertickets.com. $12. 9 p.m. (Also: Jules Mae’s, 8:30 p.m. Thurs.; Liberty Bar, 7:30 p.m. Sun.) MATT DRISCOLL

THURSDAY, APRIL 3

Chris Engman

For past photo series, Engman has driven his truck into the desert, there assembling and documenting installations that change with time and light. In his new show, however, most of the images are of a different kind of process—that within his studio. Here we see the ink, paper, frames, and other materials employed in his work. Some of the paper is torn, cut, or even shredded. In other images, he gouges deeper into the wall where a photo might ordinarily hang; the effect is trompe l’oeil, like you’re peering

deep behind the surface of what is, still, only a picture. But Engman hasn’t abandoned his roaming in the wilderness. In one diptych, he stakes out a beach scene of scattered stones and sand, then neatly boxes and preserves it. The duplicate image isn’t identical, nor is it meant to be. Instead, like his studio shots, it gets you thinking about the time, labor, and materials that go into an image, everything ordinarily unseen but still contained in the frame. (Through May 17.) Greg

Kucera Gallery, 212 Third Ave. S., 624-0770, gregkucera.com. Free. First Thursday opening reception: 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER FRIDAY, APRIL 4

BOOST Dance Festival

It’s a DIY world, so when choreographer Marlo Martin thought there weren’t enough opportunities for young dancemakers to see and be seen, she founded the BOOST Dance Festival, which is celebrating its fifth anniversary over two weekends. This year’s fest is a combination of returning alumni and new-to-us artists, with a fresh mix of work including matinee performances by the next generation in a special BOOSTmeUP! program designed for student dancers. Come and catch a glimpse of the next five years. (Through April 13.) Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524


Harvard Ave., 949-8643, boostdancefestival.org. $20. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ SATURDAY, APRIL 5

Exterminator City

For the first time since the ’90s, Seattle is in the midst of an underground-comics renaissance. This explosion of new work comes in part thanks to the unifying power of the Short Run Festival and the monthly Dune Comics night at Café Racer. These two events aren’t necessarily breeding new comic artists; rather, they’re bringing disparate, secluded artists together in one place. All sorts of wonderful scribblers have been coming out of the woodwork and dazzling folks with their heretofore unknown talents, and we couldn’t be more excited. The newest alt-comix gathering is the inaugural Exterminator City, where 16 artists will show and sell their work all in one place. Members of The Intruder, the Ballard Sketch Team, Seattle Indie Comic and Game Artists, and participants in the Dune Comics night are among those who’ll be hawking their doodly wares. Half of the tables are reserved for women, so ladies need not worry that this will turn into a Comicon-style sausage fest. Push/Pull Studio

but also suspect peons to their employers. As Aleynikov told Lewis, the code in question was mostly open-source, and so outdated that he didn’t even use it at his new flash-trading firm; he wrote newer, faster code instead. What made Goldman Sachs so angry was the revelation that essentially any super-smart programmer, given enough servers, could do what it does. The genie, not the code, was out of the bottle; and for that Aleynikov had to be punished. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhallseattle.org. $27.63 (includes book). 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER

TUESDAY, APRIL 8

Walter Kirn

Gallery (Greenwood Collective), 8537 Greenwood Ave. N., facebook.com/ExterminatorCity. Free. Noon–6 p.m. KELTON SEARS MONDAY, APRIL 7

TABITHA SOREN

Kirn’s pal Rockefeller turned out to be neither.

The more an Ivy Leaguer denies he or she’s hung up on that pedigree, the more secretly obsessed they are with the implicit prestige of having gone to college in New Haven or Cambridge or Providence. (It’s tacky to name the actual school, old sport.) But Kirn, who roots for the Tigers, freely cops to his class and status anxieties in his truecrime tale Blood Will Out (Liveright, $25.95). A longtime journalist and the author of Up in the Air, the now-Montana-based Kirn was raised of humble Minnesota stock; and even as a successful writer in 1998, he was slightly awed and intimidated to meet an eccentric Rockefeller heir. It’s one thing to grab society’s upper rungs—a topic Kirn explored in his 2009 Lost in the Meritocracy: The Undereducation of an Overachiever— and another to have been born at the top, behind a gilded door, sitting on a pile of silver spoons. Kirn wanted to be liked by Clark Rockefeller, so he did favors for him, went on strange social outings with him, and listened to long, rambling stories of lost wealth and powerful connections— all the while suppressing his usual reportorial skepticism. Ten years later, as Kirn subsequently related in The New Yorker, “Clark Rockefeller” revealed himself to be an invention, and not the Jay Gatsby/Horatio Alger kind of bootstrapping, class-jumping invention. Instead, as Kirn interweaves his own feelings of class insecurity and credulity, he introduces us to the German con artist Christian Gerhartsreiter, who tried on a few different guises (including Rockefeller) after reaching the U.S. in the ’70s. And the deeper Kirn digs, the greater his shame at being hustled by a man who also has murder in his past. Town Hall, $5. 7:30 p.m. BRIAN MILLER E

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Previously the author of Liar’s Poker (about Wall Street in the ’80s), Moneyball (the NFL and salary caps), and The Big Short (the 2008 financial crash), Lewis knows a thing or two about money and its pernicious effects. He’s America’s pre-eminent pop-financial writer (as opposed to a Krugman-level macroeconomist) because he identifies great characters to tell important stories. Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt concerns the same crew of high-frequency “flash” traders who’ve been upending the old market hierarchy. In one such instance, detailed in Lewis’ Vanity Fair story last year, Goldman Sachs arranged in 2009 to have criminal charges brought against one of its math-whiz programmers, Sergey Aleynikov, for allegedly swiping its code to take to a new employer. The notion, and supposed theft, has to do with cutting milliseconds off each computer-generated trade. That intermediary trading takes place—a thousand times over— Lewis is a contributing before you can editor at Vanity Fair. even pick up the phone when your broker calls. Lewis says such trades generate $10–$20 billion in profits for Wall Street. With the proliferation of new public and private trading exchanges, he writes, “A once sleepy oligopoly dominated by NASDAQ and the New York Stock Exchange was rapidly turning into something else.” In that dark new scheme, quants like Aleynikov are valuable

BEOWULF SHEEHAN

Michael Lewis

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arts&culture» Stage Detzer as our prevaricating heroine.

Here’s a sample of this month’s sexy and useful education experiences. April 3rd - Backdoor Basics Richard “Dr. Dick” Wagner, M.Div., Ph.D., ACS April 12th - Appreciating the Femme Foot Annamarie April 24th - Romance 101 Mac McGregor

Our educational opportunities are open to the public 18+ TheFSPC.org/april

TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(4/3) Charles R. Cross with John Richards Kurt Cobain’s Eternal Legacy (4/4) Austin Kleon Building a Creative Community

APRIL 22

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 2 — 8, 2014

JOSHUA ROMAN

22

Cello and Piano Duets

ANDRIUS ZLABYS

TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG

(4/6) Early Music Discovery: Handel’s Alcina with Seattle Historical Arts for Kids (4/7) Jeremy Rifkin Why Capitalism is Dwindling (4/7) University Book Store: Michael Lewis (4/8) Walter Kirn The Untold Clark Rockefeller Story (4/9) UW Science Now Ian Johnson Tiny Rockets For Small Satellites Michael Hutchins Finding Lightning (4/9) Kate Ascher The Evolution of Transportation

Wyncote Foundation NW w Tagney-Jones Family Fund Roger Klorese & David Haney w Nesholm Family Foundation The Aaron Copland Fund for Music w Town Music Aficionados

TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(4/10) Jared Diamond The Future of WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG the ‘Third Chimpanzee’ (4/11) Arts Corps presents Youth Speaks

BRUCE CLAYTON TOM

The Foundation for Sex Positive Culture promotes high quality affordable education in all areas of sexual expression.

is a quick mind and a mastery of storytelling such that her elaborate portraits of events, real or not, give her a sorceress’ skill to create fresh realities. And they give her the upper hand in every situation—unless of course those situations are fictions. There’s a brief moment when a second uncredited performer appears as a maintenance man to clear the stage (here again, WET’s tech work is a marvel of economy), which only makes for more head-scratching. Has Bernadette been fantasizing the whole time? Is her entire yarn merely meant to test her potential as a pied piper? The Edge of Our Bodies becomes a spiral staircase of conundrums, bringing to mind Churchill’s famous adage about Russia: “a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma.” It’s that, and fodder for decades of conversations to come. KEVIN PHINNEY

The Tutor VILLAGE THEATRE, 303 FRONT ST. N. (ISSAQUAH) 425-392-2202, VILLAGE THEATRE. ORG. RUNS TUES.–SUN. ENDS APRIL 27. (THEN MOVES TO EVERETT PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, MAY 2–25.)

Opening Nights PThe Edge of Our Bodies WASHINGTON ENSEMBLE THEATRE, 608 19TH AVE. E., 325-5105, WASHINGTONENSEMBLE.ORG. $15–$20. 7:30 P.M. THURS.–MON. ENDS APRIL 14.

All these eons of coexistence, and women still haven’t found a place alongside men where they feel comfortable, secure, and themselves? How is it that feminine free agency, for survival’s sake, can be twisted into covert strategies of manipulation? WET’s regional debut of Adam Rapp’s drama uses its 90 minutes not to address the whys of this dilemma but to explore the dark process of deception—or is it self-deception? The play is one long dreamscape of recollection, often so beautifully poetic that you can close your eyes and be dazzled by the language alone. Director Devin Bannon and actress Samie Spring Detzer agreed that Rapp’s 2011 play would make an ideal showcase for her, and there’s no arguing that she’s well cast as 16-year-old Bernadette, a prep-school ingenue who takes a day trip to New York to tell her boyfriend she’s pregnant. Along the way, this doe-eyed coquette— whose eyes dance almost imperceptibly between innocent victim and carny huckster—encounters men who have faces of “fat, sick babies,” whom she otherwise describes as “lunch meat” with “simian tufts of hair” billowing from their shirts. But the veracity of Bernadette’s reverie is always in question. Rapp undermines her credibility early by showing that she has a gift not only for hyperbole, but for flights of fancy. She steps in and out of character while recalling her own performance in a recent school production of Jean Genet’s The Maids—where female characters also tease the audience for believing too much of what they say. The pregnancy plot doesn’t matter much. This is a play about Bernadette’s mind, and how a young woman finds footholds in the world. If she’s a Little Girl Lost in the Big City, how then will she not fall prey to those who’d take advantage of her? For Rapp (whose Red Light Winter was seen at ACT last year), what Bernadette has

Maryrose Wood’s musical has its strengths, but clarity of intent is not one. Her story—of an aspiring writer, Edmund (Eric Ankrim), hired by Manhattanites Richard and Esther (Hugh Hastings, Beth DeVries) to help their rebelliously apathetic daughter Sweetie (Tatum Ludlam, double-cast with Katie Griffith) get into Princeton—presents a setup for a satire, of literary pretensions or upper-class neuroses or both, but Wood throws marshmallows rather than darts at her targets. Nor does it seem to be simply a nonjudgmental sociological character study; not one of these four is sharply drawn enough to elevate them above bland archetype. And none of them are easy to like—which, OK, earns a point for daring, but which really works against persuading the audience to care what happens next. The Tutor’s cleverest conceit is that the characters in Edmund’s novel-in-progress come to life to advise him. Played adroitly by Matthew Kacergis and Kristen deLohr Helland, they shape-shift from role to role as Edmund tries to commit to a milieu: Civil War? Roaring ’20s? Wild West? Irish immigration? The costume and accent changes must have been a hoot for the actors, but it trapped composer Andrew Gerle into writing a lot of pastiche. Other numbers I’d just bet were repurposed from a pre-existing comedy revue: a faux college fight song, one about veganism, one about impotence. (Richard and Esther are in bed arguing about their nonexistent sex life; the orchestra steals in underneath; oh, God, please don’t sing about it. He does.) Gerle’s a deft setter of Wood’s lyrics, especially when she offers the juicy challenge of dialogue or differing points of view within a song. (Though even these can come off as lessons too assiduously learned from Sondheim.) But his best number is a solo for Esther, “That’s How a Life Is Made,” a poignant paths-not-taken lament with a graceful melodic irregularity that sounds just like introspection made music. It’s a rare moment of spice. According to the playbill, The Tutor was workshopped both at Village Theatre in 2004 and in Connecticut in 2001. Today’s result, expertly constructed and paced, testifies to a painstaking development process, but I’d rather not think about how much color and flavor might have been boiled out of it along the way. GAVIN BORCHERT E

stage@seattleweekly.com


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arts&culture» Performance B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

A... MY NAME IS ALICE Twelfth Night Productions

Final Two Weeks

Must Close Apr. 13

Mar. 19–Apr. 13, 2014

www.seattleshakespeare.org

A New Mus i cA L coMedy

presents the classic 1983 revue, sketches and songs with a feminist spin. Kenyon Hall, 7904 35th Ave. S.W., 800-8383006, brownpapertickets.com. $15–$18. Opens April 4. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 5 p.m. Sun. Ends April 13. AMERICAN GLORY Jet City spoofs Aaron Sorkin’s highminded chat-fests. Wing-It Productions, 5510 University Way N.E., 781-3879, jetcityimprov.com. $12–$15. Opens April 3. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri. Ends May 23. THE BARBER OF SEVILLE A reading of Beaumarchais’ 1775 play about the fixer Figaro (the original of the Rossini opera). ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, endangered speciesproject.org. $10–$15. 7 p.m. Mon., April 7. BELLTOWN BURLESQUE REVUE A tax-day-themed show. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 425-243-7835, purpledevil productions. $13–$40. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., April 3. THE NEGRO PASSION PLAY Brownbox Theatre presents “a dramatic depiction of the Passion of Jesus Christ within the context of the American civil rights movement” in SU’s Campion Ballroom. Seattle University, 901 12th Ave., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $5–$15. Opens April 8. 7:30 p.m. Tues. & Thurs. Ends April 17. SPIN THE BOTTLE April’s show includes “frightening, futuristic theatre,” “sexy animal burlesque,” and much more. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annextheatre. org. $5–$10. 11 p.m. Fri., April 4. TAILS OF WASPS A politician gets caught in a sex scandal in Stephanie Timm’s new drama, presented by New Century Theatre Company. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, wearenctc.org. $15–$30. Preview April 3, opens April 4. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends April 27. TWELFTH NIGHT Shakespeare’s cross-dressing romance. Studio East, 11730 118th Ave. N.E. #100, Kirkland, 425-8201800, studio-east.org. $12–$14. 7:30 p.m. Fri., April 4; 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 5; 2:30 p.m. Sun., April 6. WHERE NO MAN HAS GONE BEFORE An improvised parody of—guess which sci-fi TV classic. JewelBox/ Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., 800-838-3006, brown papertickets.com. $16–$20 8 p.m. Wed., April 9.

CURRENT RUNS

THE BOY AT THE EDGE OF EVERYTHING A bored

12-year-old meets his doppelgänger—in space! Seattle Children’s Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-0807. $15–$36. Runs Thurs.–Sun.; see sct.org for exact schedule. Ends April 6.

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

CHECKOFF IN THE SUN A dying woman’s friends gather

one last time in Leonard D. Goodisman’s comedy. Eclectic Theater, 1214 10th Ave., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets. com. $12–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends April 19.

DINA MARTINA: HER GREATEST VIDEOS... AND MORE! A night of highlights from the grande dame’s

shows, hosted by herself. Re-bar, 1114 Howell St., 800838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $20–$25. 8 p.m. Fri.– Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends April 27. THE EDGE OF OUR BODIES SEE REVIEW, PAGE 22. GIDION’S KNOT Censorship erupts in school in Johnna Adams’ drama. Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 524-1300. $15–$32. See seattlepublictheater.org for schedule. Ends April 20. GIRL YOU KNOW IT’S TRUE A frustrated playwright has a wheelchair-bound lesbian stand in for him—and watches interest in “her” work skyrocket—in Bixby Elliot’s satire of the arts biz. Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $15–$20. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends April 5. THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST In Oscar Wilde’s 1895 comedy, style largely depends on the way the women are played. The men get plenty of good lines, but it’s the women who deliver Wilde’s most pointed satire. GAVIN BORCHERT Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 733-8222, seattleshakespeare.org. $29. 7:30 p.m. Tues.–Sat. plus weekend matinees. Ends April 13. IN THE BOOK OF In John Walch’s play, inspired by the Book of Ruth, an Afghan woman tries to fit in in a Mississippi town. Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 7819707, taproottheatre.org. $20–$40. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends April 26. KISS OF THE SPIDER WOMAN Two unlikely cellmates fall in love, or something, in this revival of the Fred Ebb/ Terrence McNally musical. Second Story Repertory Theatre, 16587 N.E. 74th St., Redmond, 425-881-6777, secondstoryrep.org. $22–$27. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sat.–Sun. closing weekend. Ends April 13. THE LION KING This 1997 Broadway stage musical proved a smash for Disney, thanks largely to the vision of director Julie Taymor and the tunes of Elton John and Tim Rice. BRIAN MILLER The Paramount, 911 Pine St., 877784-4849. $85–$135. Runs Tues.–Sun.; see stgpresents.org for exact schedule. Ends April 6. LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Little Shop is simple, it’s overstuffed with hummable melodies, and it toys affectionately with two of America’s enduring infatuations: cheesy monster movies and jukebox pop. Appropriately, this production cranks the fun dial up to 11. KEVIN PHINNEY ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676. $20–$50. See acttheatre.org for exact schedule. Ends June 15. MOBY ALPHA SEE PREVIEW, PAGE 19. MOISTURE FESTIVAL Entering its second decade, the Moisture Fest comes in two flavors: the family-friendly edition featuring clowns, acrobats, jugglers, and all manner of music; then there’s the late-night program, which emphasizes burlesque, T&A, and double entendres (liquor helps set the mood). Both are good fun. T. BOND Hale’s Palladium, 4301 Leary Way N.W., 706-1544. $10–$25. See halesales.com for schedule and lineup. Ends April 13.

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“I want more people to be engaged with new, living music,” says composer Aaron Grad. And what composer doesn’t? But Grad’s strategy is to get ’em young with The Lost Voice, his new children’s-theater piece in the vein of Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf. The BY GAVIN BORCHERT 25-minute work for baritone and chamber ensemble, premiering this weekend, tells of a young boy, a singer, who has a crisis of confidence, travels into the forest, and meets animals who help him regain it. The music is tuneful, and the instrumental colors are rich, sophisticated, and beguiling—especially a duet for celesta and xylophone representing a bee and an ant. Grad, who also writes program notes for the Seattle Symphony and other orchestras nationwide, says The Lost Voice is somewhat in the tradition of the early baroque masque, a form that combined music, poetry, dance,

EARSUPPLY

On stage: March 20 - April 27 Box Office: (425) 392-2202 www.VillageTheatre.org

AARON GRAD

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 2 — 8, 2014

Behind the Mask

What does the fox play? Violinist Jen Kovarovic.

and spectacle—in this case with etymological literalness, since the musicians assume their animal personae by donning masks (beautifully crafted by Mary Levinsky). Jonathan Silvia is the baritone; Julia Tai conducts. Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center, 104 17th Ave. S. Pay what you can. 2 p.m. Sun., April 6.

ODYSSEO The dancing horse show from traveling circus

troupe Cavalia. Marymoor Park, 6046 W. Lake Sammamish Parkway N.E., Redmond. $34.50–$149.50 ($154.50–$229.50 w/dinner). Runs Tues.–Sun.; see cavalia.net for exact schedule. Re-re-extended through April 6. ROYAL BLOOD The premiere of Sonya Schneider’s play about a dysfunctional family and their illusions. West of Lenin, 203 N. 36th St., 800-838-3006, brownpaper tickets.com. $20–$25. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sun. Ends April 4. SEATTLE VICE SEE SEATTLELAND, PAGE 5. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, acttheatre.org. $20. 8:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends April 19. THE SUIT Set in 1950s South Africa during apartheid, Peter Brook’s play relates what’s essentially a simple story of adultery and revenge. Three performers share the stage, brilliantly and believably expressing the anguish of the script. ALYSSA DYKSTERHOUSE Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 443-2222. $15–$80. Runs Tues.– Sun.; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends April 6. THE TUTOR SEE REVIEW, PAGE 22. UNCLE VANYA The first thing you notice is the sheer physicality of Joseph Lavy’s Vanya. He also directs, and manages to carry the play almost entirely on his own. MARK BAUMGARTEN Washington State Federation of Garden Clubs, 2336 15th Ave. S., 800-838-3006. $15–$22. Runs Thurs.–Sun. plus Wed., April 2; see akropolis performancelab.com for exact schedule. Ends April 5.

•  • 

Dance

BALLET DU GRAND THÉÂTRE DE GENÈVE For this

Swiss company’s first Seattle appearance, members will dance Preludes et Fugues by Israeli choreographer Emanuel Gat, which turns Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier (played live) into a backbone for extreme kinetic exploration. At first it seems like so much snaky fun, but then you see how Bach’s patterns are reflected in the movement. SANDRA KURTZ Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.com. $10–$44. 8 p.m. Thurs., April 3–Sat., April 5. SHEN YUN The gaudy touring Chinese dance extravaganza is back. McCaw Hall, Seattle Center, 888-998-9961, shenyun.com. $70–$180. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., April 3–Fri., April 4; 2 & 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 5; 2 p.m. Sun., April 6. BOOST DANCE FESTIVAL SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 20. FISHER ENSEMBLE A new work from the brother/ sister team of composer Garrett and choreographer Christy, plus music of Satie and a dance-drama inspired by the Mahabharata. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., 800-838-3006, fisherensemble.org. $15. 8 p.m. Fri., April 4–Sat., April 5. WHO’S AFRAID OF DEBORAH HAY? Shannon Stewart and Mary Margaret Moore perform solos by this choreographer. Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave., 800-838-3006, therealshannonstewart.org. $12–$15. 7 & 9 p.m. Sat., April 5–Sun., April 6.

•  • 

Classical, Etc.

GUAN CHANGXIN Chopin, Schubert, and Chinese music

from this pianist. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music.washington.edu. $15. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 2. TOM COLLIER Celebrating “60 Years Behind Bars” as a jazz mallet player. Meany Studio Theater, UW campus, music. washington.edu. $12–$20. 7:30 p.m. Wed., April 2. SEATTLE SYMPHONY That popular choral blockbuster, Carmina burana, plus Haydn’s “Military” Symphony. Stilian Kirov conducts. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$127. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., April 3, 8 p.m. Sat., April 5, 2 p.m. Sun., April 6. TEN GRANDS Pianos, that is, on this fundraising concert. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattle symphony.org. $42 and up. 7 p.m. Fri., April 4. SEATTLE REPERTORY JAZZ ORCHESTRA At 4 p.m., Jazz4Kids (free); at 7:30, “The Art of the Jitterbug” ($15–$44). Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 215-4747, srjo.org. Sat., April 5. GALLERY CONCERTS A Haydn symphony and more, repurposed as chamber music. Queen Anne Christian Church, 1316 Third Ave. W., galleryconcerts.org. $15–$30. 7:30 p.m. Sat., April 5, Sun., April 6, 3 p.m.. BYRD ENSEMBLE Handel’s Dixit dominus and more, performed with the Seattle Baroque Orchestra. At Saint Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1245 Tenth Ave. E., 8 p.m. Sat., April 5, and Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 3 p.m. Sun., April 6. $15–$25. 397-3627, byrdensemble.com. SEATTLE HISTORICAL ARTS Baroque opera as children’s theater? Here are excerpts from Handel’s adventure fantasy Alcina. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild.org. $5–$10. 1 p.m. Sun., April 6. THE LOST VOICE SEE EAR SUPPLY, LEFT. TRIO CON BRIO COPENHAGEN Two Korean sisters and one Danish pianist play Norgärd, Beethoven, and more. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries. org. $34–$39. 7:30 p.m. Tues., April 8.

•  •  • 


arts&culture» Film

Opening ThisWeek

Anita Hill today.

PAnita

OPENS FRI., APRIL 4 AT MAJESTIC BAY AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG-13. 136 MINUTES.

The recent spate of superhero movies all share the same peculiar dynamic. After being dropped from buildings, incinerated, and slammed with high-speed projectiles, their characters invariably end their epic battles with a definitive . . . fistfight. You can’t kill them with incredible punishment, but a bout of pugilism is supposed to settle things. In the end, of course, a black hole or something opens up and withers the villain’s magic skill set. But it says something about these oversized productions that they need to bring everything down to hand-to-hand basics—as though somebody realized how dull a movie can get when the antagonists can’t actually be hurt.

Cheap Thrills RUNS THURS., APRIL 3–THURS., APRIL 10 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN AND SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 85 MINUTES.

Intentional or not, the setup to Cheap Thrills recalls Joel Schumacher’s 1993 man-in-a-rage thriller Falling Down. In that film, Michael Douglas played an uptight, bespectacled man

RUNS FRI., APRIL 4–THURS., APRIL 10 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 81 MINUTES.

thwarted by divorce, a pink slip, and a busted air conditioner. Here the bespectacled hero is Craig (Pat Healy), a failed writer beset by a needy (yet loving) young family, a pink slip, and an eviction notice. It’s not a particularly artful way to start a story; in both these films the tear-down’s clumsy quickness ups the anxiety but spares the nuance. And yet this is an effective hook, as old as George Bailey: With a man stripped almost entirely of ego at a point of pure desperation, a filmmaker can do anything he wants. Schumacher sent his bottomed-out protagonist on an angry rampage fueled by white-male entitlement. Director E.L. Katz takes Craig on a very different journey of human debasement. Here’s how it goes. Craig walks into to a bar, runs into an old skateboarding buddy named

In his first feature, writer/director Daniel Patrick Carbone follows a motley group of boys, 9-ish to teenaged, as they tromp through the woods, swim in a pond, explore an old railway viaduct, ride bikes, and wrestle in the grass. Not much is said during these endless summer days, and the lovely widescreen scenes could almost pass for Terrence Malick until the plot kicks in. One of the younger kids has a compulsion, the way some boys do, to borrow and show off his father’s handgun. It gets passed around, pointed (none check to see if it’s loaded), and becomes the object of some roughhousing. Naturally we expect the worst, but Carbone follows a very meandering path through his forest. Teenaged Eric (Nathan Varnson) is usually tailed by his timid little brother Tommy (Ryan Jones), who’s afraid of heights, afraid of the water, and maybe hoping that Eric’s muscled confidence will rub off on him. Eric naturally teases his kid brother, but he’s also protective; they seem closer to each other than to their parents. (Only

Jones as the impressionable young Tommy.

TRIBECA FILM

Captain America: The Winter Soldier

The same outline prevails in the second top-lining film for its old-fashioned superhero. And the first thing to be said about this one is that, unlike 2011’s Captain America: The First Avenger, which existed purely to set up Marvel’s 2012 ensemble summit meeting The Avengers, Winter Soldier is actually a movie: It has a story, a subtext, and a few fun pulp surprises along the way. Chris Evans returns to the title role; his cheerful calm is the closest anybody in this cycle has come to summoning Christopher Reeve’s buoyant comic-book presence from the first couple of Supermans. Cap finds his 1940sera mindset challenged by the surveillance-state approach of a government minister (Robert Redford, cleverly cast), and his existence threatened by the mysterious Cold War–era nasty known as the Winter Soldier. Someone had the useful idea to let Samuel L. Jackson, returning to duty as one-eyed Nick Fury, actually get knee-deep in the action here. Same with Natasha Romanoff (Scarlett Johansson), who is allowed much teasing of the allAmerican hero. New to the squad is an Iraq War vet (Anthony Mackie, from The Hurt Locker) game for some dedicated male bonding. The film scoots right along and scatters around some effective jokes, which is more than can be said for the previous comedies by directors Anthony and Joe Russo (Welcome to Collinwood; You, Me and Dupree). It builds to the inevitable gigantic special-effects smackdown with the fate of millions hanging in the balance—and of course a preview scene at the end, pointing the way toward Joss Whedon’s 2015 Avengers sequel. The computer-generated climax will either be tedious or thrilling, depending on your tolerance for the digital battlefield, but there’s something to be said for the movie’s basic competence. And if, on top of all the hardware and massive destruction, you really need to see Captain America and the Winter Soldier socking each other in the jaw, you won’t be disappointed. ROBERT HORTON

Hide Your Smiling Faces

Vince (now the muscle for a bookie), and shares his misfortune. Then a rich guy and his cellphone-twiddling wife show up and begin throwing money around, paying Vince (Ethan Embry) and Craig to do shots and act like clowns. These dares-for-cash lead the two buddies to the couple’s house, where they realize they’ve stumbled into a high-stakes contest that Colin (David Koechner) has arranged to entertain his wife Violet (Sara Paxton) for her birthday. There’s nothing clever about the plot or interesting about the characters, briefly sketched by Katz as a formality before pushing his pawns into the game. But there is a kind of Jackass-style

one adult figures prominently in the film.) How should these siblings respond to death? The film is full of it, beginning with the very first shot, yet it’s mostly animals who meet their demise. Tommy’s at the age where poking dead birds and dogs with a stick is natural and normal. Eric’s past that and impatient with the morbid natterings of his friend Tristan (Thomas Cruz). Why would anyone want to die? To the strappingly physical Eric, that’s crazy talk. In this somber never-never land without cell phones or videogames, Carbone certainly creates a mood, but it’s the atmosphere of a terrarium.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

You may find yourself wondering, in the opening minutes of this new documentary, which returns to the events of 23 years ago, why now? It’s a short-lived question. Within minutes, you find yourself immersed in a tale as riveting now as it was in 1991, when an unknown University of Oklahoma law professor named Anita Hill spoke up about the sexual harassment she said she’d endured at the hands of then–Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Hill’s astonishing poise during a nine-hour grilling by a Senate committee continues to amaze. And Oscar-winning director Freida Lee Mock (Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision) deftly blends in details about Hill’s life. We visit the Oklahoma farm where she grew up as the youngest of 13 children, watch her close-knit family rally around her, and much later meet the man who’d become her long-term partner. The unseemly reception this 35-year-old black woman got from a panel of mostly hostile, insensitive senators—all of them old white men—is perhaps even more striking now than it was then. Even current Vice President Joseph Biden, then the chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, comes off looking bad as he asks Hill to repeat the lurid details of Thomas’ reputed harassment again and again. Yet Anita is equally about Hill’s second act in life. It’s a dramatic story, as she’s vilified by Thomas’ defenders and driven out of the teaching job she loves, then later finds a job at an even more prestigious university (Brandeis) and a new orientation as a passionate advocate of gender equality. There are moving moments here, like when we follow Hill to her basement where rows of file cabinets contain thousands of supportive letters she has received over the years. The film loses some of its power as it drifts into scenes of Hill at various female-empowerment talks and workshops. And it makes no pretense at balance: Thomas’ side of the story is absent. But you forgive Anita its sins, because it brings us closer to a woman whom we’ll likely still be talking about 20, 30, even 50 years from now. NINA SHAPIRO

STAN HONDA/SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS

OPENS FRI., APRIL 4 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. NOT RATED. 77 MINUTES.

tension here, as we try to guess what new disgusting trick will be requested of these two marionettes. Cheap Thrills is a dumb gross-out flick at its core, salted with a bit of social commentary. Its obvious subject is the voyeurism that drives the ratings for shows like Survivor or—as seems more the inspiration here—the dearly departed Fear Factor. Instead of eating Madagascar hissing cockroaches, though, Katz has his contestants chopping off digits and eating the neighbors’ dog. (Note: Healy will introduce Thursday’s screening at SIFF Cinema Uptown.) MARK BAUMGARTEN

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 25


arts&culture» Film

@seattleweekly “A TRUE HERO OF OUR TIME!” -Melissa Silverstein, Indiewire’s Women and Hollywood

“Where’s my husband?” Carano on the hunt.

» FROM PAGE 25 The suspense goes nowhere; and the death of a child becomes mere contrivance for much angsty moping. The film never achieves any mortal profundity, only pokes it with a stick. BRIAN MILLER

PIl Sorpasso

Rarely screened in the U.S., newly restored for its Criterion DVD release later this month, STIRRING this 1962 Italian road comedy was a huge hit AND POTENT at home but virtually unseen here. Why? It ACCOUNT OF came out during the art-house epoch of Fellini A LANDMARK and Antonioni, whose L’Eclisse gets a succinct MOMENT… critique from Bruno (Vittorio Gassman): “I ANITA HILL IS A FIGURE OF couldn’t keep my eyes open!” Speeding into TREMENDOUS the picture in his Lancia convertible (equipped RESOLVE AND with a record player!), the 40-year-old Bruno is COURAGE.” open to everything in life. He flirts with every -Nick Schager, Time Out New York woman in sight; he drives like a maniac; he makes shady business deals on the fly; and he spontaneously befriends shy young law student Roberto ( Jean-Louis Trintignant), dragging him along on a weekend road trip. DIRECTED BY Their picaresque circuit leads north from ® ACADEMY AWARD WINNER Rome, shuttered during August vacation, to FREIDA MOCK various beach towns, restaurants, and clubs. Meanwhile we hear self-conscious Roberto’s SUNDANCE CINEMAS SEATTLE STARTS FRIDAY, Reserved 4500 9th Avenue NE, Seattle interior monologues; he frets that he’s “too Seats +21 All Shows APRIL 4 sundancecinemas.com uptight,” the type who always looks before WWW . ANITAHILL - FILM . COM leaping. On one level, the lusty, vital Bruno will teach Roberto how to live il sorpasso (“the easy life”), but Dino Risi’s film is far slyer than 2.31" X 4" WED 4/2 its odd-couple construct. In an astonishingly forceful and unfolding performance, Gassman SEATTLE WEEKLY SE AT TLE reveals Bruno to be a man of depth and soul, DUE MON 5PM not just some rogue. Equally, these antics show 4500 9TH AVE. NE • 206-633-0059 traditionalist Italy lurching into the ’60s. The space race, Jackie Kennedy, Khrushchev, and AE: (circle one:) Artist: (circle one:) ART APPROVED Sophia Loren are all referenced; yet a bikinied Angela Maria Josh Heather Staci teenAE can also mock the brooding Roberto as APPROVED Tim Jane “YoungAPPROVED Werther”—Goethe and go-go dancing Emmett Steve Philip CLIENT go together, along with pratfalls, philosophy, Deadline: ation #: and young love. Back to the issue of respect. Il Sorpasso is beloved by Martin Scorsese and Alexander Payne, who saw it decades after The New York Times misjudged the film as an “examination of GIRLS MOVIE NIGHT OUT an aimless wastrel and his destructive effect on an Guilty Pleasures… idealistic youngster.” Wrong and wrong. Nothing No Kids...A Movie...A Glass of Wine is wasted on Bruno, who opens Roberto’s eyes to life lived both high and low, where risk is insepa$5.00 Admission Per Ticket Every Tuesday rable from reward. BRIAN MILLER for groups of two or more ladies**

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 2 — 8, 2014

ANITA

26

Full Bar & Bistro Fare • Reserved Seats $2 Parking After 5pm at Nearby Lots* +21 At All Times FOR SHOWTIMES VISIT SUNDANCECINEMAS.COM CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER IN 3D & 2D ANITA BREATHE IN ON THE OTHER SIDE THE PLAYERS OF THE TRACKS BAD WORDS IN THE BLOOD THE GREAT BEAUTY NOAH TIM’S VERMEER DALLAS BUYERS DIVERGENT CLUB A BIRDER’S GUIDE TO EVERYTHING *Pay & validate at our Box Office ** Tix Avail At Box Office Only

In the Blood OPENS FRI., APRIL 4 AT SUNDANCE. RATED R. 108 MINUTES.

We have Steven Soderbergh to thank for making former MMA fighter Gina Carano into a bigscreen action heroine with his 2011 Haywire, but he’s moved on to other things. So does Carano fade back into B-movies, or does she have the charisma to complement her elbow punches and knee stomps? To be sure, she carries this thriller about a woman trying to rescue her husband from kidnappers in an unnamed banana republic; but then, it’s not a very big lift. Directed by John Stockwell (Turistas, Blue Crush), the movie has a much different pedigree than Haywire. In this honeymoon-gone-bad is a Club Med aesthetic of GoPro cameras, zip lines, selfies, Snapchat,

ANCHOR BAY

★★★★ A SHARP,

OPENS FRI., APRIL 4 AT VARSITY. NOT RATED. 102 MINUTES.

and narcoterrorists. Carano is supported by veteran faces (Treat Williams, Danny Trejo, Luis Guzmán, etc.), but the real test is whether she needs a man to save her in the end—or the other way around. In flashbacks, we see how young Ava’s father (Stephen Lang) taught her the art of self-protection. A decade later, her new WASP family is suspicious of this interloper from the barrio. Ava’s husband (Tacoma native Cam Gigandet) reads like a bland, handsome Bennington dropout; he’s the one who’s married up. In truth, we don’t really miss him once he’s been nabbed, but Ava is relentless in her battles with corrupt cops and Caribbean drug lords. “Where’s my husband?” she snarls, beating confessions out of suspects like Jack Bauer. Instead of Tiger Mom, we have Tiger Wife. Though not a great actress, Carano moves with a healthy, physical pride—ready to be somebody’s mentor and martial-arts trainer. If Carano could only grab better roles, she might be the tough older sister to the Hunger Games’ Katniss Everdeen or Divergent ’s Tris Prior. BRIAN MILLER

PThe Missing Picture RUNS FRI., APRIL 4–THURS., APRIL 10 AT SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 92 MINUTES.

The Holocaust was well documented, both by Nazi bureaucrats in their ledgers and Jewish families with their diaries and photo albums. This was not the case during the 1975–79 Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia, when some 1.8 million perished (about 21 percent of the population) under the genocidal policies of Pol Pot. I give you those numbers because Cambodian director/survivor Rithy Panh does not in his unique and harrowing personal essay film. There’s no voice but his, no perspective but his, and an evidentiary void that he fills by hand. Panh’s whole family was exterminated, leaving hardly a photo or letter behind. Four decades later, living in France, he decides to recreate their record—and by extension Cambodia’s—using crude little painted-clay figurines, placed in tiny film sets, plus archival footage and Khmer Rouge propaganda films. Panh’s narration muses on many subjects: his schoolteacher father’s love of literature; his musician brother’s disappearance in Phnom Penh before Pol Pot’s “Year Zero” was declared; then the brutality of four years in a labor camp—starvation, children denouncing parents, executions, and worse. “How is it that I’m here?” the grown Panh asks. He works through the answers in small, static dioramas: atrocity reduced to the tabletop, human suffering at 1/32˝ scale. While the Khmer sought to “perfect” society by destroying the bourgeoisie, Panh’s little clay

figures—eyes and mouths sometimes locked open, as if screaming—are rough-hewn and defiantly imperfect. Each tableau illustrates Panh’s account with almost childlike simplicity, so unlike the Khmer’s chillingly staged propaganda reels. In the latter we see the endless snaking line of a basket brigade, moving earth by hand to create a dyke or levee. The procession has been cruelly choreographed for the camera, a revolution realized only on film, says Panh. His humble effigies contradict that totalitarian impulse. This is an alternate handmade history, incomplete and sometimes opaque, unlike anything you’ve ever seen. BRIAN MILLER

Nymphomaniac Vol. II OPENS FRI., APRIL 4 AT HARVARD EXIT. NOT RATED. 130 MINUTES.

Seeing Nymphomaniac Vol. II a couple of weeks after Vol. I is more than just a case of cinema interruptus. It proves how much the opus needs to be seen as a single picture, preferably in one go. So intriguing in its first couple of hours, Nymphomaniac scrambles to get back into gear as Vol. II resumes the story; more nagging still is the feeling that while the material darkens, it doesn’t necessarily deepen. We return to the room where Joe, a nolonger-young sex addict—though she prefers the term nymphomaniac—is recounting her life story to the intellectual Seligman (Stellan Skarsgård). Joe continues her journey through a variety of partners, willing to lose husband (Shia LaBeouf ) and child in order to be on time for her abusive appointments with a whip-cracking sadist ( Jamie Bell). Joe is once again played as a young woman by Stacy Martin, though Charlotte Gainsbourg takes over the lion’s share of the flashbacks before long. Lars von Trier appears to be making a movie about female sexuality—but maybe not. I wonder whether this half of the film suggests more strongly that Nymphomaniac is really about everybody else in Joe’s life, all the people who must grapple with her brazenly stated appetite for sex. From the enigmatic Seligman (the film’s real suspense is how the present-day segment will end) all the way down to the hapless translator who facilitates a bilingual liaison, the ranks are filled with people who can’t handle Joe’s ongoing search. And the movie viewer, having been drawn toward this mostly non-erotic movie full of nudity and brutal sexual violence, is implicated in that circle as well. It’s hard to settle on von Trier’s purpose, although he baldly offers many possible readings, from people’s desperate need to fill the void of their existence to the idea that power and pleasure might be gained by ceasing to strain against one’s chains. Any conclusions are complicated by reports that von Trier’s preferred cut of the whole movie is an hour longer than these two combined installments, which might explain why the final chapter—involving Joe’s curious work as a bill collector for gangster Willem Dafoe—seems under-dramatized. One thing would presumably remain the same in a longer movie: the bleakness of the fadeout. Von Trier’s view of humankind has not sweetened in the course of this journey, and we shouldn’t be shocked if he leaves us literally in the dark. ROBERT HORTON E

film@seattleweekly.com


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SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

Artist: Heather

27


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arts&culture» Film BY BRIAN MILLER

Local & Repertory AS YOU LIKE IT This British film retrospective continues

with Father Brown (1954), with Alec Guinness as the titular cleric/detective, the hero of a popular crime series by G.K. Chesterton (NR) Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $63$68 series, $8 individual, Thu., April 3, 7:30 p.m. BREADCRUMB TRAIL The history of the ’90s band Slint is related in this new doc by Lance Bangs. (NR) Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org, $5-$8, Thu., April 3, 7 p.m.; Sat., April 5, 2:30 p.m. DIVE BAR FILM FEST SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 21. FATEFUL FINDINGS This indie thriller, made by and starring Neil Breen, is being marketed as one of those “so bad it’s good” cult films a la The Room. You decide how awful-wonderful it actually is. (NR) Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema. com, $7-$9, Thu., April 3, 8 p.m. LABYRINTH Before she was an Oscar winner and sex symbol for the Hubert Selby Jr. set, Jennifer Connelly was a 16-year-old ingénue starring opposite Kabukistyle, feathered-hair-metal goblin king David Bowie in Muppet master Jim Henson’s 1986 one-of-a-kind fantasy flick. This film is a loony artifact from the pre-CG era when the rights to Lord of the Rings were apparently still tied up. (Henson uses puppets instead of computers, of course.) It’s a fairy-tale take on pubescence, as reluctant babysitter Connelly rashly wishes her wee crying brother would be taken by goblins—which naturally occurs. (PG) BRIAN MILLER Central Cinema, $6-$8, Fri., April 4, 7 p.m.; Sat., April 5, 3 p.m.; Sun., April 6, 3 p.m.; Mon., April 7, 7 p.m.; Tue., April 8, 7 p.m. MUSIC CRAFT: THIN LIZZY The British metal band is captured live during a 1975 concert in Dublin. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 829-7863, nwfilmforum.org, $6-$11, Thu., April 3, 8 p.m. PUMP UP THE VOLUME Radio host Christian Bale becomes a shock jock in this 1990 teen drama. (R) Central Cinema, $6-$8, April 4-8, 9:30 p.m.

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Newly elected city council member Kshama Sawant has brought socialism back to the national spotlight. Now there’s an entire film retrospective that will program titles (some still pending) looking back to our 1999 WTO protests, the great strike of 1919, and other touchstones of the left. See nwfilmforum.org for ongoing schedule. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, $6-$11, Through May 1. A ROOM WITH A VIEW The Merchant Ivory filmmaking team scored an international hit with this fairly beloved 1985 adaptation of the E.M. Forster novel. Helena Bonham Carter is the female object of attention between prim Daniel Day-Lewis and passionate Julian Sands. The film is being screened in connection with the upcoming stage musical adaptation at the 5th Avenue Theatre, running April 15-May 11. (NR) SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff.net, $6-$11, Sun., April 6, noon. THE TERMINATOR VS. LADY TERMINATOR James Cameron’s 1984 time-travel hit made an unquestioned star out of Arnold Schwarzenegger, spawning several sequels (with another possibly in the works). The object here, however, is to compare the film to an unauthorized Indonesian rip-off made in 1989. (R) Grand Illusion, $7.50-$12, Fri., April 4, 9 p.m.; Sat., April 5, 9 p.m. TERMS AND CONDITIONS MAY APPLY Taken as a whole, this Monet of a documentary leaves a terrifying impression of an odious Facebook Industrial Complex that has destroyed our privacy. It begins by parsing the fine print we all accept when setting up social-media accounts, and ends somewhere in the Utah desert at a secret government data farm. Director Cullen Hoback samples damning public statements from the gods of Silicon Valley and hops among continents to interview an eclectic set of experts, including Ender’s Game author Orson Scott Card, Wired editor Chris Anderson, and even Moby (?!?). Cullen is stronger with the allegations than the clarity. After seeing Terms and Conditions, you’ll probably find yourself thinking twice about your next Google search and Facebook status update. You just won’t know exactly why. (NR) DANIEL PERSON Keystone Congregational Church, 5019 Keystone Place N., 632-6021, keystoneseattle.org, Free, Fri., April 4, 7 p.m.

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cinebarre AE: (circle one:) Angela Maria Josh

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• THE THIN MAN/AFTER THE THIN MAN William

Powell and Myrna Loy starred as elegant married sleuths Nick and Nora Charles in a half-dozen Thin Man films between 1934-47. Based on the Dashiell Hammett characters, the pair were introduced in 1934, aided by their crossword-puzzle favorite of a pet, Asta. Cocktail swilling sophisticates during the height of the Great Depression, Powell and Loy are free of children or worldly cares—they’ve got money, and lots of it, so how better to spend their leisure time than solving crimes? The plot doesn’t matter terribly (the titular thin man is the murder victim, not Nick); it’s the married panache that Powell and Loy brought to their roles that you remember. See grandillusioncinema.org for screening schedule of both films (G) B.R.M. Grand Illusion, $5-$8, April 4-8.

A R T S A ND E NTE R TA I NM E NT

RED RENEWAL: SEATTLE’S SOCIALIST SPRING

4.81" x 3.5" SEATTLE WEEKLY WED 4/2 DUE MON 5PM

PR O M O TI O NS

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

Ongoing

• THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL By the time of its

1968 framing story, the Grand Budapest Hotel has been robbed of its gingerbread design by a Soviet (or some similarly aesthetically challenged) occupier—the first of many comments on the importance of style in Wes Anderson’s latest film. A writer (Jude Law) gets the hotel’s story from its mysterious owner, Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham). Zero takes us back between world wars, when he (played now by Tony Revolori) began as a bellhop at the elegant establishment located in the mythical European country of Zubrowka. Dominating this place is the worldly Monsieur Gustave, the fussy hotel manager (Ralph Fiennes). The death of one of M. Gustave’s elderly ladyfriends (Tilda Swinton) leads to a wildly convoluted tale of a missing painting, resentful heirs, a prison break, and murder. Also on hand are Anderson veterans Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Bill Murray, Jason Schwartzman, and Owen Wilson. (R) ROBERT HORTON Ark Lodge, Guild 45th, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Lynwood (Bainbridge), SIFF Cinema Uptown, Big Picture, others THE GREAT BEAUTY Paolo Sorrentino’s fantastic account of an aging playboy journalist in Rome casts its eye back to La Dolce Vita (also about a playboy journalist in Rome). Yet this movie looks even further back, from the capsized Costa Concordia to the ruins and reproachful marble statues of antiquity. “I feel old,” says Jep (the sublime Toni Servillo) soon after the debauch of his 65th birthday party. He’s been coasting on the success of his first and only novel, 40 years prior, content with his goal to be king of Rome’s high life. Jep is a dandy with thinning hair brushed back and a girdle beneath his silk shirt. False appearances are all that count, but it takes intelligence to deceive. Disgust—and then perhaps self-disgust—begins to color his perception of the whole “debauched country.” (NR) B.R.M. Sundance THE LUNCHBOX In teeming Mumbai, a network of Dabbawallahs delivers hot lunches to desk-bound bureaucrats like Saajan (Irrfan Khan), a lonely widower nearing retirement. His food is commercially cooked, while luckier office workers have wives back home who employ the same Dabbawallah delivery service. Somehow the lunches get switched, regularly, between Saajan and neglected housewife Ila (Nimrat Kaur). What’s worse, her distracted and possibly adulterous husband can’t even taste the difference! She’s hurt and offended, while Saajan is delighted with his misdirected meals. The Lunchbox is the simple story of their epistolary friendship. Saajan and Illa communicate by notes, and nowhere does writer/director Ritesh Batra seriously suggest his two leads will ever hook up. The Lunchbox merely describes an increasingly hectic, impersonal city, where two kindred spirits crave human connection. (PG) B.R.M. Harvard Exit NYMPHOMANIAC: VOL. I By titling his new project Nymphomaniac, and letting it be known that this fourhour, two-part picture includes marquee names and unsimulated sex, Lars von Trier is acting up again. There goes that old devil Lars, fanning the flames as always. Within a few minutes, there is little doubt about the filmmaker’s seriousness. Not that the film is without a playful side; droll Danish humor is abundant. But this is a real journey, recounted to us by a woman named Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg), who is discovered, beaten up, in an alley. Her rescuer, Seligman (Stellan Skarsgård), listens intently to her account of a life in thrall to sex, but he also interjects his own spin on things. She is no mere slave to her libido, however— this story is about how Joe frames sexuality, uses it (to borrow a phrase from Pat Benatar) like a weapon, studies it, or succumbs to it. (Stacy Martin plays Joe as a young woman, in an impressive film debut.) Joe describes herself as a sinner, but is von Trier really going to take that at face value? (NR) R.H. Varsity

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arts&culture» Music

SevenNights E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Wednesday, April 2 A HAPPY DEATH I’m going to be honest: I asked to

write about this band before I even heard its music based solely on its name, which the Portland group lifted from Albert Camus’ first (and only posthumously published) novel. A sort of rough draft for The Stranger, the book holds a place in my heart for its more hopeful brand of existential quandary. As it turns out, the band is fantastic, too (thank God). Dark and psychedelic, A Happy Death delivers rumbling, brooding barn-burners as likely to erupt with existential angst as to shimmer with transcendental synth washes. A sort of delightful darkness—a happy death indeed. With the Madcaps, the Sun Thieves. 2 Bit Saloon, 4818 17th Ave. N.W., 708-6917, the2bitsaloon.com. 9 p.m. $5. MARK S. BAUMGARTEN While branding itself in black and white, stagewear and music videos included, California-based five-piece THE NEIGHBOURHOOD combines indie rock with R&B vibes to create an original urban-rock sound. The band had a big year thanks to its smooth single “Sweater Weather” from 2013’s I Love You, and will try to keep the momentum going with upcoming project #000000 & #FFFFFF. With Kitten, Born Casual. Showbox SoDo, 1700 First Ave. S., 652-0444, showboxonline. com. 8 p.m. $26.50 adv./$29 DOS. All ages. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY SHARON JONES & THE DAP KINGS Sharon Jones was already an unlikely story, her career as a fiery soul singer not starting until age 40. Now 57, the Atlanta native is recovering from stage 1 bile-duct cancer and touring on an excellent album that sat on the shelf for a year while she underwent chemotherapy. This unfortunate, harrowing, and scary period has refocused the music media’s attention on Jones for the moment—and it’s a good moment for the singer and her backing band, as reports suggest the act is delivering some of the most vibrant performances of her powerful career. The attention will, one hopes, elevate her to her proper place in pop-music history as one of the soul greats. So, yeah, you should go to this show. (Repeats Thurs.) With James Hunter. The Showbox, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxonline.com. 8 p.m. $29.50 adv./$31.50 DOS. All ages. MSB PAPER MACHETE takes modern indie rock and filters it through funky grooves. Thudding, R&B-drum-machinelike thumps and ethereal organ sounds resonate underneath chunky guitar chords throughout the band’s 2013 album Birthday!. Its sonic experimentation doesn’t distract, but instead underlines its emotive Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

melodies and lyrics. With Last Great Fire, Gerhardts. Sunset Tavern, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. $6. 9 p.m. 21 and over. DUSTY HENRY When Zach Davidson first formed Seattle’s Vendetta Red, he served as the city’s mainstream emo offering, and his voice fell right in line with the genre’s ragged yet soaring essence. Now he’s debuting a new project, ZACH DAVIDSON AND THE IRRESISTIBLES, live. With Aaron Daniel. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. $5. 8 p.m. 21 and over. DH

Thursday, April 3

Gothic doom surrounds STRAP ON HALO’s discography. Layla Reyna’s vocals rise like smoke over reverby guitars and electronic drum loops. The haunting sounds of industrial rock suit her vocals as she belts out frightening songs about the occult, and dreamy melodies only serve to advance the nightmare ideas she’s trying to get across. With DJ Augustine Strange, DJ Coldheart. the Spider Ferns. Highline, 210 Broadway Ave. E., 3287837, highlineseattle.com. $8. 9 p.m. 21 and over. DH In a 180-degree turn from Deftones, the metal band he’s fronted since the late ’80s, singer Chino Moreno gathered Chuck Doom and Far’s Shaun Lopez to form †††, or CROSSES. The band’s self-titled debut features remastered versions of its first two EPs, plus five new songs. Lead single “†he Epilogue” shows a new side to Moreno’s voice that’s both soothing and powerful. With JMSN. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/neptune. 8:30 p.m. $20 adv./$22 DOS. All ages. ACP

Friday, April 4

Good to Die’s CONSTANT LOVERS is constantly loving its thrash-guitar lines. The band’s new album, Experience Feelings, is guitar hook after guitar hook of roaring buildups and hard stops. Joel Cuplin’s voice shrieks with fervor, never releasing the listener from his intensity. With Gaytheist, Tartufi. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005. chopsuey.com. $8. 9 p.m. 21 and over. DH G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE We will always have a soft spot for the performer of “Cold Beverages.” With Ethan Tucker. The Showbox. 9 p.m. $25. SW It’s far too easy to take GIRL TROUBLE for granted. The Tacoma garage-rock stalwarts have been bouncing around western Washington’s club circuit and beyond for three full decades, propelled by Von Bondie’s thumping drums and the Big Kahuna’s gritty guitar lines. But performances have become more of a rarity and should be treasured. As Von Bondie told Seattle Weekly when the band celebrated the reissue of its debut Hit It or Quit It last year, “We have been very involved in caring for elderly parents. Not very ‘rock,’ but it’s a responsibility we take seriously.” With Dirty Sidewalks, DJ Tim Hayes. Slim’s Last Chance, 5606 First Ave. S., 762-7900, slimslastchance.com. 9 p.m. $10. 21 and over. MSB

SAM STENSON

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

Susy Sun plays the Triple Door Tuesday, April 8.

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El Corazon www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2

FROM INDIAN LAKES with The American Scene, Naive Thieves, Matt Bacnis and American Island Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

THURSDAY, APRIL 3

GREEN JELLY with Headless Pez,

The Triple Sixes, Hurry Up And Die and Raw Dogs w/ Noel Austin’s Phreaks in the LOUNGE

before & after The show!

Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

FRIDAY, APRIL 4 Mike Thrasher Presents:

DEAD MEADOW with The Pharmacy, X Suns and Entmoot

SATURDAY, APRIL 5 El Corazon & Mike Thrasher Present:

BLACK N’ BLUE

with American Bastard, Prophets Of Addiction, December In Red and Tyranny Theory Doors at 7/ Show at 8PM 21+. $20 ADV / $25 DOS

SATURDAY, APRIL 5

MOTION (TOUR KICKOFF SHOW)

with Lo’ There Do I See My Brother, Singled Out, Umbra, Dissimulator and No Future Lounge Show. Doors at 7/ Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

SUNDAY, APRIL 6

MOURNING MARKET

Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM 21+. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

Doors at 12:00pm Market Closes at 5:00pm $1

FRIDAY, APRIL 4

SUNDAY, APRIL 6

POKE DA SQUID (CD RELEASE /

TOUR KICKOFF) with Burn Burn Burn, The Rushmore Incident, Harvest States and The Waywards. Lounge Show. Doors at 7/ Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $7 ADV / $10 DOS

THE VIRUS with Evacuate,

The Bad Engrish, Misuse Of Power and On The Ground Lounge Show. Doors at 8 / Show at 8:30PM 21+. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 4/26 PRESTIGE 5/1 LOUNGE VERDANT MILE 5/27 DEVILDRIVER / WHITECHAPEL 6/10 A WILHELM SCREAM 6/25 LOUNGE SLEEPWALKER 8/11 LOUNGE NOUVEAU EXPO UP & COMING 4/7 AUGUST BURNS RED 4/7 LOUNGE SO MUCH LIGHT 4/9 THE CREEPSHOW 4/10 MOTHER CRONE 4/11 MINDLESS SELF INDULGENCE 4/12 PANCAKES & BOOZE ART SHOW 4/13 OFF! 4/13 LOUNGE KR / ALEX WILEY 4/15 KING PARROT 4/16 LOUNGE LION I AM 4/17 DIRECT DIVIDE (CD RELEASE) 4/18 SEVENDUST 4/19 DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN 4/20 LOUNGE GLOOMSDAY 4/21 LOUNGE PEELANDER Z 4/22 LOUNGE PAT HULL 4/25 LOUNGE LIKE VULTURES 4/26 LOUNGE MIGGS 4/27 YOU ME AT SIX Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

arts&culture» Music RA SCION AND VOX MOD Former Common Market

Simon Hutchinson, a composer and instructor at the University of Montana, plays his iPad like an erhu, making long strokes across the screen to elicit exotic sounds for Western ears. For the fifth time since 2008, students from UM and Western Washington University will present the ELECTROACOUSTIC INTEREXCHANGE, a description of which is just as elusive as the title suggests. Suffice it to say that music from iPads will be just the beginning, with Kinect controllers, a Wiimote inside a ball, and something called “computer vision” all employed in the performance of songs like Hutchinson’s “Ballad of Mike Mansfield,” proving that it’s not just students from Evergreen who can be complete and awesome weirdos. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., 906-9920, theroyalroomseattle.com. 5 p.m. Free. All ages. DANIEL PERSON MICHAEL MCDONALD The former Doobie Brother is still going strong. Emerald Queen Casino, 2024 E. 29th St., Tacoma, 253-594-7777, emeraldqueen.com. 8:30 p.m. $50 and up. SW DUM DUM GIRLS Sub Pop’s lo-fi girl-pop group released its third full-length, Too True, in January. With Blouse, Grave Babies. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 7099467, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv. SW BRUCE COCKBURN The Canadian folk rocker always brings a political bite to his tunes. The Neptune. 9 p.m. $46.50. SW

affiliate RA Scion has teamed with synth-pop producer Vox Mod for a decidedly “turnt” crossover project. The partnership seems mutually beneficial as it gives newfound energy to Scion’s flow and viciousness to Vox Mod’s vibrant beats. It’s a Watch-the-Throne-like pairing, but it strives for experimentation over luxury. With Noah Gundersen, Daniel Blue. Sunset Tavern. 9 p.m. $7. 21 and over. DH CHINOOK FEST LINEUP Perhaps no festival in Washington is making so valiant an attempt to bridge East and West than Chinook Fest. The annual event, held at Jim Sprick Community Park in the southeastern foothills of the Cascades, was started by members of local outfit Cody Beebe & the Crooks and is a sort of roots-rock rave, enveloping a wide range of acts that fall somewhere on the flannel spectrum. Who exactly will rattle the leaves off the trees at Jim Sprick this fall will be revealed tonight, along with a taste of some raucous country blues, courtesy of Southern California band and Chinook alum, Robert Jon & The Wreck. With Rust on the Rails, Sweetkiss Momma, Nick Foster, and more. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618. 8 p.m. $10. All ages. MSB

Saturday, April 5

Mind Over Matter, the second album from Californiabased alt-rock quintet YOUNG THE GIANT, is full of the same guitar-driven rock jams fans have come to know and love, including lead single “It’s About Time.” But there are a few surprises. Songs like “Firelight” and “Camera” show a more subdued side of the band, while “Paralysis” closes the album on a synth-heavy note. (Repeats 8 p.m. Sun.) With Vance Joy. The Showbox. 9 p.m. $29.50 adv./$32 DOS. All ages. ACP JOE ELY is a chameleon. He has spent the last 40-plus years jumping from album to album, alternating genres and styles with every new project. Joined onstage by David Ramirez, look for Ely to take a break from the Tex-Mex flavored rock & roll of late for a new exploration of traditional American folk music. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.com. 8 p.m. $25 adv./$30 DOS. CORBIN REIFF

Sunday, April 6

CHARLIE PARR’s history does not stretch back as far

as his rousing and rugged folk blues suggests. In fact, the Minnesota guitarist didn’t start recording music until the 21st century, but his precise expression on that old National resonator guitar is timeless, delivered with the natural flair of an old hand and putting him alongside heroes like Charley Patton, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and Leadbelly. With Betse Ellis of the Wilders, The Blackberry Bushes Stringband. Tractor Tavern. 8 p.m. $10 adv. MSB STANLEY JORDAN’s guitar playing is truly awe-inspiring. His two-handed tapping technique makes Eddie Van Halen look like a schmo, allowing him to play more than one guitar at a time and even guitar and piano

The songwriter continues the narrative on her second Bloodshot release, Somewhere Else. Her voice registers as strong as ever—like a steelwinged songbird—but the record’s tone has softened some, working in more rock and pop themes and more polished production. “I’m just a

Lydia Loveless Friday, April 4

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f June Carter played in a rock band, there’s a good chance she’d sound like alt-country singer/songwriter Lydia Loveless, whose whiskey-soaked songs about heartbreak and vulnerability are rendered with a clear, visceral twang. More often, though, she’s compared to Neko Case. “I’ve actually never met her,” Loveless says about the indie songstress who formerly released albums on Bloodshot, Loveless’ label. “I do like her music, but it’s not an influence.” She adds that the first album she ever bought was “Britney Spears’ Baby One More Time.” Loveless, only 23, is actually 20 years Case’s junior. Her age comes up frequently, too. “So many people I admired growing up were men that were ageless and cool. For whatever reason, when you’re a woman, people want to hammer your age in. At least I’m not old,” she surmises. “I’m as old as I’ve ever been.” Loveless’ songwriting, though, does have a streak of world-weariness. Her first release on Bloodshot, Indestructible Machine, was a hardhitting alt-country rocker, and you need look no further than its cover art, featuring a young woman guzzling motor oil, for a good idea of the blast of spitfire it contains. “I have a lot of time to sit around and make trouble for myself,” says Loveless, who grew up in rural Ohio. “My songs are based on that, with a creative twist. I know a lot of people with really screwed-up lives.”

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

SEATTLE WEEKLY • AP RI L 2 — 8, 2014

I

more relaxed songwriter, more willing to weave in and out of different styles, better at playing guitar,” she says. “I’ve become a little more receptive to advice and direction . . . I did want it to be more put-together this time.” On tour since performing at South by Southwest last month, Loveless says the biggest challenge of taking the act on the road is “trying not to eat at Denny’s all the time.” The biggest comfort, she adds, is traveling with her husband and bandmate, Ben Lamb: “It’s nice having someone around who will put up with you.” With the Tripwires, the Swearengens. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $10. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT


Neutral Milk Hotel Friday, April 4

F

our years before indie darlings Neutral Milk Hotel gained cult status with its breakthrough release In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, front man Jeff Mangum had a brief stint as a Seattleite. During a set at the Moore in 2012, he told the crowd that the song “Engine” had been written a few blocks away from the venue. But his local ties run even deeper: The band’s first single, “Everything Is,” came out on the shortlived Seattle label Cher Doll Records, run by Nancy Ostrander. Ostrander formed the label in 1993 with the intention to release one-off 7-inch singles in combination with a free fanzine she managed at the time. At the time, Mangum was on break from the band and living in Seattle to be near his girlfriend. He discovered Cher Doll’s first release— a split single by Crayon and Veronica Lake, with handmade cover art—at Fallout Records in Capitol Hill, and was inspired to send the label a tape of his music. “I think Jeff was pretty excited to get his music out there,” Ostrander recently told Seattle Weekly in an email. “Though why he wanted me, who had absolutely zilch experience in the music business, is anyone’s guess.” Ostrander’s boyfriend encouraged her to put out the single, and she did, initially pressing 400 copies, then re-pressing 500 more (it’s since been reissued with two additional songs by various labels). Since Neutral Milk Hotel went on to release only two full-length records before calling it quits, for fans, “Everything Is” is an essential listen that foreshadows the band’s first album, On Avery Island. The single itself is lo-fi and sparse,

with fuzzed-out guitars and minimal drum snaps in the background. The newer reissue features found-audio segues between tracks and brief interviews about Kiss and punk rock. It’s a bizarre look into the mind of Mangum, one that’s treasured by his many fans. He left Seattle in August 1993 for Athens, Geor-

mainstage

dinner & show

WED/APRIL 2 • 7:30PM

tommy castro THU/APRIL 3 • 8PM - SEALED WITH A KISS PRESENTS

tyrone wells w/ ty mayfield gia before the single ever came out; and Cher Doll released, in all, nine 7-inch singles, a full-length LP, and a CD compilation before folding in 1998—the same year Aeroplane was released on Merge Records. Ostrander now works in a gardening store, which she says “is more than enough excitement for me now.” Mangum, as we all know, by popular demand got the band back together and back to the road. His songwriting, Ostrander insists—not her willingness to take a chance on the relatively unknown artist—was crucial to the band’s success: “Someone else surely would have put his music out there eventually if it wasn’t me.” With Elf Power. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877784-4849, stgpresents.com/neptune. 8:30 p.m. $45. All ages. DUSTY HENRY

FRI/APRIL 4 • 7:30PM & 10PM

left hand smoke SAT/APRIL 5 • 8PM

joe ely w/ david ramirez SUN/APRIL 6 • 7:30PM - AN EVENING WITH

stanley jordan MON/APRIL 7 • 7:30PM

simultaneously. But he’s not a soulless shredder either, moving between jazz and pop as elegantly as he plays. The Triple Door. 7:30 p.m. $25–$35. DAVE LAKE

Monday, April 7

Tuesday, April 8

With LCD Soundsystem gone, the disco-dance-pop crown is up for grabs. Fellow DFA Records artist FACTORY FLOOR seems like a suitable successor. Mixing glitch

little bill 75th birthday tribute show! TUE/APRIL 8 • 7:30PM

susy sun

w/ naomi wachira and whitney lyman next • 4/9 cedric watson and sidi toure • 4/10 lady rizo • 4/11 v. contreras • 4/13 andy daly • 4/14 & 4/15 slow music w/ the humans • 4/16 - 19 through the looking glass: the burlesque alice in wonderland • 4/20 portland cello project w/ alialujah choir • 4/21 juana molina • 4/23 simon townshend • 4/24 jose james w/ moonchild • 4/25 brent amaker and the rodeo • 4/26 craig shoemaker • 4/27 lady “a” presents: “sunday night gospel” • 4/29 destroyer w/ valley maker (solo) • 4/30 johnny clegg

happy hour every day • 4/2 dirty rice • 4/3 first thursday art opening w/ jason tang / warren g. hardings • 4/4 the djangomatics / swindler • 4/5 jelly rollers • 4/6 tba • 4/7 crossrhythm session • 4/8 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: peter spencer, eric miller and alice howe • 4/9 the sunshine junkies TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1.5 HOURS PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net

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McCaw Hall is the perfect setting for BRYAN FERRY, well suited to his sartorial sophistication and his orchestrated musical output both as a solo act and as the leader of influential art-rock band Roxy Music. At 68, Ferry is just as musically active—and musically daring—as he was as a young man. In 2012 he released The Jazz Age, in which he reworked his older songs as 1920s jazz numbers, while last week saw the release of his version of Robert Palmer’s “Johnny and Mary” remixed by Norwegian dance-music king Todd Torje. Ferry is one of those rare artists who can segue seamlessly between his own material and covers without creating a chasm between the two. His Seattle stop, one of just a few West Coast dates surrounding his Coachella performances, promises “40 years of career highlights,” which will likely include the staples (“Do the Strand,” “Love Is the Drug”) alongside covers of John Lennon, Van Morrison, or even Lana Del Rey. One thing you know Ferry will indubitably deliver, however, is class. With Dawn Landes. McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St., 733-9725, mccawhall.com. 7:30 p.m. $45–$65. DL CHUCK RAGAN was one of the first punks to reinvent himself as a troubadour when Hot Water Music broke up in 2005. His fourth album, Till Midnight, is his best yet, and his touring band features members of Lucero, Social Distortion, and the Wallflowers. With The White Buffalo, Jonny Two Bags. Showbox. 8 p.m. $20 adv./ $22 DOS. 21 and over. DL

synth lines and harsh drum claps, the band captures the feeling of fever-dancing across an abandoned warehouse. Think Footloose with an experimental, underground soundtrack. With DVA Damas. The Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9467, thebarboza.com. 8 p.m. $12 adv. 21 and over. DH MARTIN TAYLOR has spent the great part of his celebrated career working in collaboration, holding his own while trading guitar licks with the likes of Jeff Beck, Tommy Emmanuel, and Chet Atkins, to name a few. In the intimate confines of Jazz Alley, one of the world’s greatest acoustic-guitar players will show what he can do while riding solo. Through Wednesday. Jazz Alley, 2033 Sixth Ave., 441-9729, jazzalley.com. 7:30 p.m. $25.50. CR On his debut album, Sweet Disarray, bespectacled British musician DAN CROLL bounces from folk to indie pop to electronica and back, often within the same song. Rather than muddle the music, the 23-year-old Croll’s genre-juggling adds a bit of funk to more heartfelt lyrics. And touches of Afrobeat influence and steel drums make an already lively album even more vibrant. With Panama Wedding. Neumos. 8 p.m. $15. All ages. ACP More than a year after it was released, “Pompeii,” the fourth single from indie-rock quartet BASTILLE’s debut album, Bad Blood, is still a radio staple, both in the U.S. and the band’s native England. The group’s lyrics about the city destroyed by Mount Vesuvius make for a percussion-heavy song that’s cinematically vivid and engaging. With To Kill a King. Showbox SoDo. 9 p.m. SOLD OUT. All ages. ACP For singer/songwriter/globetrotter SUSY SUN, naming her sophomore album Wanderlust was a no-brainer. Sun, who has spent time in London, Greece, and Spain, sings about love lost and gained in her textbook indie-pop voice while backed by the Passenger String Quartet. As a special treat, Wanderlust includes “Piano Impromptu,” which lets Sun’s background as a classically trained pianist take center stage. With Naomi Wachira, Whitney Lyman. Triple Door. 7:30 p.m. $15 adv./$18 DOS. All ages. ACP

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arts&culture» Music LocaLReLeases

Gifted Gab, Girl Rap (out now, self-released,

Goodbye Heart, Restless Nights (out now, selfreleased, goodbyeheartband.com) It’s been only a year since Sam Ford and Nila K Leigh relocated to Seattle from New York City, but the duo has kept busy playing shows all over town and working on this, their debut EP. Aside from

“Seconal,” released in March 2013, the five-track Restless Nights is all new, atmospheric material, created with only the pair’s Celebrating our New Low Prices voices, two and New Summer Clinic Hours synths, a guitar, and a drum machine. The EP begins with ** Starting June 28, 2011 ** Celebrating our New Low Prices “Just Kids,” which sounds like a more restrained New Clinic Times: Tues 4–6 Fri 12-2 version of M83’s “Midnight City.” “Seconal,” a Sat **starting JULY Clinic 2ND ** 10–2 and New Summer Hours song about sticking together when everything is Bring this ad and receive falling apart, featuring a great guitar interlude, ** Starting June 28, 2011 ** follows. “How to Make Friends in a New Town” an additional $25.00 OFF New4021 Clinic Times: Tues 4–6 Fri 12-2 shows how well the huskiness in Ford’s voice Aurora Ave N. Seattle, WA 98103 pairs with Leigh’s more pristine vocals, and seattlealt@yahoo.com Sat206-632-4021 **starting •JULY 2ND ** 10–2 closer “Don’t Slow Down” successfully experiments with a variety of tempos, from slow and somber to upbeat and dancey. The EP’s lush, ethereal quality makes it easy to enjoy, and the combination of synth and drum machine adds an almost electro-hip-hop feel. Recorded with 4021 Aurora Ave N. Seattle, WA 98103 producer Shawn Simmons (The Head and the Heart, Lemolo, Kithkin), Restless Nights is as dreamy as dream-pop gets, though dark tones keep it from wandering into sugary-sweet territory. Ford and Leigh illustrate the balance Now accepting all major perfectly on the bright yet reflective “Wish”: “I credit/debit cards! dream in neon/I live in gray.” (Thurs., April 3, Lo-Fi Performance Gallery) AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

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Virgin of the Birds, Winter Seeds (4/8, Abandoned Love Records, virginofthebirds.com) A project of singer/songwriter Jon Rooney, Virgin of the Birds recorded this debut LP at Fremont’s Her Car studios with studio proprietor and Foghorns member Colin J. Nelson on drums and Mark Laurick (of China Sea Recordings) on bass. The nine-track album contains four new tracks and reworkings of five songs from his EP releases. Overall, Winter Seeds is a step forward for Rooney. It’s a bit more folk-sounding than his previous releases: Textures are thinner, and there’s generally less distortion and rhythmic activity. Reverb and recording techniques (the saxophone in the distance on “Nine Sisters,” for example), along with generally sparse structures and slow tempos, project wideopen spaces, which leave Rooney’s well-crafted tales almost naked for inspection. This was a risky choice, but Rooney’s adventurous songwriting backs the new direction with confidence. Indeed, the songcraft is the brightest star here and rewards multiple listens, with engaging tales delivered effortlessly with vocals reminiscent of the late Lou Reed’s. (Sat., April 5, Conor Byrne) MICHAEL F. BERRY

Send your upcoming release to

reverbreviews@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

1giftofgab.bandcamp.com/album/girl-rap) For all of Seattle hip-hop’s perceived positivity, the one thing this album really drives home is our city’s incredibly polarized, complex rap identity. On her first fulllength, Gifted Gab—aka 22-year-old Gabrielle Kadushin—is getting lots of support, including a nice push from her all-male rap crew, the Moor Gang, and praise from her female peers in the biz, like Miss Casey Carter and Thee Satisfaction. They’re right, of course: This girl can rap. The beats on this 11-track album are solid enough but pale next to the record’s best quality: the rapper’s quick rhymes and lyrical agility. Gab can spit and snarl a stream of words like the best, alternating tone and feeling as the subject demands. For her brassy confidence and braggadocio, she’s been compared to Queen Latifah, and it’s a good fit. The singular irony here is that for an album called Girl Rap, Gab still plays a man’s game. Bitches abound, and with them the inherent misogyny and all the other trappings of gangsta rap: money, drugs, thuggish threats. The problem this poses, not just for Gab but for this particular genre of hip-hop, is compelling, because we’re living in a world in which the NFL is considering banning the use of the “n-word” (liberally used on the album) among its players; anti-bullying awareness is at an all-time high; and sensitivity campaigns denounce the use of frequent gangsta slurs like “gay” and “faggot” (not heard here, to the rapper’s credit). There is, however, a sense that Gab feels conflicted about where she should direct her skills in this medium. On opener “Problems,” she’s just one of the Moor Gang guys, echoing the agenda of misogynistic bravado heard throughout the crew, rapping “We’re the goddamn Moors/Got a lot of whores.” Picasso himself is on the next track, rapping about how he “killed that bitch.” Gab changes her tune a little on “Pop It,” when she quasi-advocates for female sexual empowerment: “The bitch already sucking dick and fucking for nothing/Bitch is fucking trippin’/ Stop it/Pop it for a profit.” While Gab can turn a rhyme on a dime, it’s worth paying attention to what is actually being said here. With every casual dis of her gender, she helps proliferate the Moor Gang’s rapey, thuggish worldview, one I’ll leave you to explore at your own risk. And as long as Gab’s preaching this kind of sermon, she’ll have to be OK with being the First Lady of the Moor Gang—not the president of her own club. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

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Employment Restaurant SOUP DADDY SOUPS Monday through Friday. Cashier and line help w/ catering and dishwasher. 206-682-7202

Employment Computer/Technology Senior Structural Engineers (Multiple openings) for Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Inc. in Seattle, WA. Dsgn longspan, high rise & complex struct, many in difficult geologic &/or seismic areas. Prep & review struct dsgns; assess for seismic, geologic, & wind issues; apply industry codes & stds; prep & review drawings & BIM models detailing struct systems; mng other dsgnrs/modelers on project teams; attend mtgs & maintain communications w/ clients. MS or higher CE or Struct E; in depth knowl of: high rise building dsgn; mnging large struct projects; engg in seismic zones, highwind regions & difficult geologic areas; struct engg s/ware incl SAP, ETABS, MIDAS, ANSYS, Revit, & CSI Perform 3D Nonlinear. Strong interpersonal & communication skills to work both independently & lead engg dsgn team. Ext. natl & int’l travel.CV & cover letter to Carol Olsen, 1301 5th Ave., Ste 3200, Seattle, WA 98101 w/in 30 days & refer to Job #13073 to be considered.

Sony Computer Entertainment America is responsible for producing and marketing Sony’s signature PlayStation® family of interactive computer entertainment products in the U.S., Canada and Latin America markets. We have openings in our Bellevue, WA office for a Sr. Graphics Programmer and a Rendering SW Eng to design & dev SW sys & render algorithms. Pls mail resume to 2207 Bridgepointe Pkwy, San Mateo, CA 94404, Attn: Annie Mach. DB2/ 24829402.1

Employment Transportation/Drivers

DRIVERS Premier Transportation is seeking Tractor-Trailer Drivers for newly added dedicated runs making store deliveries MondayFriday in WA, OR, ID. MUST have a Class-A CDL and 2 years tractortrailer driving experience. • Home on a daily basis • $.41 per mile plus stop off and unloading pay • $200/day minimum pay • Health & prescription insurance • Family dental, life, disability insurance • Company match 401K, Vacation & holiday pay For application information, call Paul Proctor at Premier Transportation: 866-223-8050. EOE • $1,000 longevity bonus after each year • Assigned trucks • Direct deposit Employment General

Attention Women! Learn Skills to Pay the Bills. We train women for nontraditional employment. To find out more, Call ANEW 206.381.1384 www.anewaop.org MARKET DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Development Coordinator to research, plan and implement market programs throughout the organization. This position acts as a consultant and resource to Sound Publishing’s National/Regional Advertising Sales team and senior-level management; and is responsible for developing and implementing brand, market, and account specific sales and marketing presentations. The successful candidate will bring extensive marketing/advertising experience in the print and/or digital media industry. Must be proficient in InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat Pro, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and html5; have the ability to communicate effectively; possess excellent presentation skills as well as basic math and English skills. Candidate will also be a problem solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. Position requires a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing or related field and three to five years of marketing/brand experience. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Employment General

COME JOIN THE WAVE TEAM! Wave Broadband is now seeking an Broadband Technician I, II, III Provide outstanding customer service contributing to Wave’s success in making customers happy. Under supervision, perform basic installations, disconnects and service changes for residential customers. Perform basic troubleshooting from tap to customer’s electronic devices (TV, CPE, Modem, MTA, etc.) For a full job description, visit www.wavebroad band.com/careers www.wavebroadband.com/careers

Competitive salary and benefits including service discount! To apply, send resume and cover letter to cjones@wavebroad band.com cjones@wavebroadband.com

Employment Professional Management Consultant (Value Prism Consulting, Seattle, WA). Must hold a Master’s or foreign equiv. deg. in bus. admin. or a related field & 4 yrs. of exp. in the job offered or client-facing consulting roles utilizing process improvement methods to perform current state gap identification & analysis of processes & present future state recommendations. Also req. is 4 yrs. of exp.: leading/managing the lifecycle of projects involving the implementation of technology solutions; performing data research & analysis; & performing cost/benefit analyses of technology solutions investments. Domestic travel up to 25% req. Apply w/resume to: Marek Omilian, Value Prism Consulting, 1601 5th Ave, Suite 2060, Seattle, WA 98101. No relo. avail. No 3rd party responses. EOE.

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LOST: RING. Antique Gold Wedding Band with Raised Lettering: MIZPAH. Area of Fauntleroy Ferry Dock or Vashon. Dates: February / March. Reward $300. Call Randolph, 206-718-1374

Diverse Workforce / EEO MARKETING COORDINATOR The Daily Herald, Snohomish County’s source for outstanding local news and community information for more than 100 years and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, daily deals, event sponsorships and special publications as well as the daily operations of the Marketing department. Responsibilities include but are not limited to the coordination, updating and creation of marketing materials across a range of delivery channels, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and working closely with the Sr. Marketing Manager to develop strategies and implement the marketing plan. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem-solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com No phone calls please. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Employment Career Services THE OCEAN Corp. 10840 Rockley Road, Houston, Texas 77099. Train for a new career. *Underwater Welder. Commercial Diver. *NDT/Weld Inspector. Job Placement Assistance. Financial Aid avail for those who qualify 1.800.321.0298

Employment Social Services VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Must live in Seattle area. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

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WATERFRONT APT. Fully furnished. Newly remodeled w/ spectacular views of the water from every window. Separate entrance. Quiet location at the end of the lane, water only 30’ away! Makes this a hiker, kayaker or bird watchers paradise. Eagles and Otters are part of the local crowd. Comfortable w/ heated floors & lots of windows. Newly painted. Granite tile bath with jacuzzi tub. Large bedroom with closet & king bed. All new kitchen. Open dining & living areas. Laundry available. No smoking or pets. Includes utilities, phone, Wi- Fi & cable TV. Flexible options: $750 / wk (2 wk min.), $2500 / mo (summer / short term), $1300 / mo (year-round). 360-3788332.

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interior light *UNDER WARRANTY* Make $15 monthly payments or pay off balance of $293. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

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AMANA RANGE Deluxe 30” Glasstop Range self clean, auto clock & timer ExtraLarge oven & storage *UNDER WARRANTY* Over $800. new. Pay off balance of $193 or make payments of $14 per month. Credit Dept. 206-244-6966

GE PORTABLE Dishwasher, 3 years old, like new, Black and White, $350 or best offer. 206932-1391

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Avg. Reps are earning $500-$750/ week working 25 hours/week. Top Reps are earning $1,500+/ week Travel, Medical, and Cell Phone Allowances Avail. Req. Vehicle, Driver’s License, & Cell Phone

Call 855-720-3102 ext. 3304 or 3308

or apply online at www.tlc4homesnw.com

SEATTLE WEEKLY • APRI L 2 — 8, 2014

Project Manager - Hydro & Fish Collection Projects, F/T (Seattle, WA) Manage overall project direction, completion & fin’l outcome. Admin owner & subcontractor relationships for assigned projects. Direct & mentor on-site staff. Utilize knowl & exp to perform fish enhancement projects related to the Hydro Dam Power industry. Manage & coordinate co. personnel & resources. Perform constructability reviews. Prepare & execute the Project Executive Plan. Oversee project permit process. Obtain Notice of Commencement. Prepare trade contracts & bid packages, as well as oversee procurement process. Oversee cost control & change mgmt systems. Maintain relationships w/ clients, dsgnrs, consultants & internal co. clients. Prepare initial master schedule & oversee updates. Compile reports regarding fin’l performance of the project, incl PSRs, PFCs & CI reports. Prepare monthly owner project status reports, as reqd. Review & approve Trade Contractor Payment Applics w/ Superintendent. Review co. pay applic to owner & ensure monthly submission when costs are incurred. Attend & lead project meetings, incl progress, pre-construction & pre-award. Review inspection & test data for compliance w/ specs. Dvlp & maintain site logistics plan, in coordination w/ Superintendent. Set-up QAQC procedures & conduct quality inspections. Communicate & enforce co. Safety & Health Mgmt Prgm. Oversee project close-out. Identify & execute on new business dvlpmt opportunities w/in the industry as well as w/ other service groups. Prepare & make presentations to clients as requested for projects in progress. Prepare proposals for new work. Maintain professional relationships w/ clients & eval & approve all proposals & invoices for clients & monitor all participation projects to ensure adherence to all methods & standards. Utilize exp w/ Programmable Logic Controls (PLC’s), Hydrology for Floating Surface Collectors, & Active Ballasting Systems. Must have Bachelor’s deg in Engg, Construction Mgmt, or related. Master’s deg will be accepted in lieu of Bachelor’s deg. Must have exp w/: Fish Enhancement Projects, Hydro Power facilities & large infrastructure projects; & Floating Surface Collector (FSC) construction. Must have built at least one Floating Surface Collector Project. Must have exp building barges over 1,000 Ton w/ active ballasting systems. Must have exp launching large floating flat bottom barges. Must have exp, managing & coordinating commissioning of at least one Floating Surface Collector project. Must be exp’d in Prolog. Must have exp working on & around hydro reservoirs. Must have 3 yr exp in job offd or 3 yr exp in a position w/ same duties in the architectural or construction field. Send resumes to Christyn Johnson, Sr HR Service Mgr, Skanska USA, Inc., 221 Yale Ave. North, Ste 400, Seattle, WA 98109

Employment Computer/Technology

35


10338 Aurora Ave N, Seattle

DANCING BARE Âť HOT BABES & COLD DRINKS ÂŤ

Classified

Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad HAPPYHAULER.com Debris Removal • 206-784-0313 • Credit Cards Accepted! HomeWell Senior Care Franchising is growing! Recession proof business. Only 8 available territories in Western Washington. $85K Initial investment includes Franchise Fee. Next Step: Visit www.HomeWell.biz

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM Seasonal Allergies? Are you allergic to Pollen, Weeds, Food or have other allergies? Earn $100 for each qualified plasma donation. Call Today! 425-258-3653

www.plasmalab.com

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

Singing Lessons

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

$ TOP CASH $

PAID FOR UNWANTED CARS & TRUCKS

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY p ½ OFF DOOR 11PM-4PM 2,4,1 TUESDAY p2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 @ THE DOOR BOEING RECOGNITION WEDNESDAY p½ OFF DOOR* MICROSOFT RECOGNITION THURSDAY p ½ OFF DOOR* MILITARY FRIDAY p½ OFF DOOR* *I.D. Required American Liberty Adult Store

Select from a variety of DVDs, Mags, and Toys. Buy, Sell, Trade!!!! Ask Clerk for details about how you can save $$$ on your next purchase.

www.seadancingbare.com OPEN MON-SAT: 11AM - 2:30AM & SUN 2PM - 2:30AM

Blossom Fest & Springtime Guide to the Gorge

$100 TO $1000

7 Days * 24 Hours Licensed + Insured

April 12-27

Visit the spectacular Hood River Valley and experience the scenic beauty of blossom time.

ALL STAR TOWING

Nothing is prettier in spring than the spectacular Hood River Valley. Drive the famous 35-mile Fruit Loop to see the beautiful blossoms—visit farm stands, alpacas, wineries, and more. hoodriver.org/blossom-fest

425-870-2899

Pick up a Free Blossom Fest map!

facebook.com/seattleweekly Home Services

House/Cleaning Service

Home Services Electrical Contractors

DS ELECTRIC Co.

New breaker panel, electrical wiring, trouble shoot, electric heat, Generator transfer switch, Fire Alarm System, Intercom and Cable,Knob & Tube Upgrade,Old Wiring Upgrade up to code... Senior Discount 15%

5 STARS HOUSE CLEANING

10% OFF First Clean

Lic/Bond/Insured DSELE**088OT

Free Estimate 10 Yr Experience Local References Residential/Comm.

(206)498-1459

Free Estimate

206-327-7285

Home Services Lawn/Garden Service

Professional Services Music Lessons

Plant, Prune, Mow, Weed, Bark, Remove Debris Henning Gardening Call Geoff Today:

LISCENSED.BONDED.INSURED veronicacisneros134@gmail.com

GUITAR LESSONS Exp’d, Patient Teacher. BFA/MM Brian Oates (206) 434-1942

206-854-1794 LICENSED & INSURED

Do you have PTSD and alcohol problems?

Map Pick-up Stations Open 10am–4pm

hoodriver.org • (541) 386-2000 • (800) 366-3530 Photos: David Cobb (blossom), Peter Marbach (orchard)

Seeking free treatment? Paid research opportunity. Call the APT Study at 206-764-2458.

ADOPTION Devoted, nurturing, loving gay couple in Seattle, looking to adopt first baby into a family offering education, fun, travel, laughter, and unconditional love and support. Call, TEXT, or email anytime about Kyle & Adrian; 971-238-9651 or kyleandadrianfamily@gmail.com or visit kyleandadrianadoption.com

15 Now’s conference will bring together activists from

across the country to exchange experiences and begin building a cohesive, nation-wide movement. We’re calling for activists, labor organizers, 15 Now action groups and low wage workers to come together to win a $15/hr minimum wage in Seattle and beyond.

Join us at this historic conference to take the fight for 15 to the next level!

Saturday, April 26

Franklin High School 3013 S Mt Baker Blvd, Seattle, WA 98144

Visit 15now.org aUR@N[Q`<[YV[RP\Z

Seattle Weekly, April 02, 2014  

April 02, 2014 edition of the Seattle Weekly

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