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SPRING FORWARD

MISSOULA CHILDREN’S

At 2 a.m. on Sunday, March 9, our clocks will move an hour ahead (or spring forward) to begin daylight savings time!

THEATRE VISITS TONASKET

See Pages A3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Tonasket to hold off on bond re-run School Board decides more time is needed to consider options, comments BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket School Board has every intention of making another attempt at passing a capital improvement bond to fund expansion and upgrades of the school facilities. When that will happen and what it will look like have yet to be determined. After two weeks of getting community feedback at the first attempt, which gar-

nered 54 percent of the vote but required 60 percent to pass, the board voted unanimously not to try again in April. A resolution would have needed to be filed by March 7 for the April election; the next potential vote would be August 5. “I’ve thought about this a lot,” said board member Lloyd Caton. “We have a lot of people here with a lot of input and questions. I would love to run it in April but I don’t think we can get the kind of work done that our constituents are asking for and that we need to do in order to run an intelligent campaign.” Caton made the motion to not run the bond next month. “It seems like we need to inform people more of what we are trying to do,” said board member Ernesto Cerrillo. “Some people ... don’t know what we are

Tonasket approves loan/grant combo for cop car

asking.” Board member Catherine Stangland, who spearheaded the recent campaign that included nearly two dozen community meetings, reluctantly made it a unanimous vote. “I hate to lose momentum that we had with the people who have been working on it,” she said. “But I do hear what people are saying; they want more informatioin, they want more input, they want more opportunity for consideration of different options. “I think that would be hard to do between now and April 22, and campaign, so I am prepared to wait.” “I think if we were half a percent off we could redouble our effort (right away,” said board chairman Jerry Asmussen. “But with where we’re at a later start

Board votes against contract extension The Tonasket School Board voted at a special meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 26, not to extend Superintendent Paul Turner’s contract. The board’s vote was 4-0. It is the second straight year the board declined to extend Turner’s contract. Turner’s contract runs through the end of the 2014-15 school year. is more prudent. All we really have to decide tonight is if whether or not to wait.” Prior to the start of the regular meet-

Ecology says new permit will correct Buckhorn environmental issues BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

YAKIMA - An updated wastewater discharge permit issued to the Buckhorn Mine near Chesaw will better protect water quality and help correct environmental problems that have challenged the mine since operations began in 2007, according to the state Department of Ecology. Ecology issued the updated water quality permit to Crown Resources (part of Toronto-based Kinross Gold), which operates the gold mine near Chesaw, following negotiations with the company and environmental interests. The permit takes effect March 1. Under the new permit, the mining company has until the end of 2014 to comply with more protective standards. The updated permit authorizes new outfalls where the mine can discharge treated water from its wastewater treatment plant back to the environment. Treated water from the mine can be discharged to surface waters in Gold Bowl Creek, Nicholson Creek and Marias Creek. Untreated non-industrial stormwater can be discharged to the ground, in compliance with Ecology’s water quality standards. The permit also requires the mine to correct failures to capture and contain contaminants from the mine that resulted

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

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Mine gets updated permit

GRAND SEND-OFF

Mayor gets WDOT’s attention regarding state of US-97 TONASKET - Three motions, two votes, one hard-won agreement by the Tonasket City Council means that the Tonasket Police Department will be in the market for a new police vehicle. Not “new” (as in a patched-together remnant from another department), but brand spanking new, with the help of a Rural Development loan/grant that will allow the city to spend up to $30,230, with just over half of that in grant money. The city would take on a loan of $12,700 and come up with a $2,330 “applicant contribution.” Where to come up with the money to take care of a monthly car payment of $237 to pay off the loan was the topic of a spirited debate amongst the council members that stretched for over an hour. In the end, thanks to a motion by council member Scott Olson, the council unanimously approved the acceptance of the loan, with 50 percent of the monthly payment to come from the regular police budget, with the other half from the capital expense fund. The grant/loan could only be used for a new vehicle and could not be used for a vehicle that was significantly less expensive. “In the past we’ve always gotten used cars,” said Sgt. Darren Curtis, on hand in place of Chief Rob Burks. “Cars we ended up with in the past, most are 60, 70, 80,000-mile cars. We get about 20,000 miles before they start nickel and diming us to death. “I put 10-13,000 miles on my car each year, 90 percent here in town. A lot of it is idle time that is not included in the milage. My car is at 104,000 miles, but if equated to actual hours it’s closer to 200,000 miles.” Curtis pointed out that a new vehicle would come fully equipped for police use, with only a radio needing to be installed. Repair bills should be significantly reduced, he said, particularly in the first few years while it is under warranty. And fuel efficiency in newer vehicles would also save the city significant money. “The grant is what it is,” said Mayor Patrick Plumb. “We don’t get it unless we get a new car. Basically we were able to

ing the board hosted a public hearing in which they had asked for further comments about the bond. In contrast to the previous week, a contingent of backers of the Alternative and Outreach programs spoke to the value of the program, the effects of hosting the program in a portable that was obsolete since the day the school purchased it, and why it needed to be separate from the main school building. Rob Inlow and Mark McMillan, who have researched the board’s proposed expansion plans, toured facility with superintendent Paul Turner and acted as liaisons with others who have concerns about the project, offered a number of their own recommendations for modifications to the project.

Oroville celebrated the OHS girls basketball team’s post-season run to the state regional round of the playoffs with a parade through town on Friday, Feb. 28,, as the team prepared to leave for its trip to Richland. The parade included a stop at the elementary school where a crowd of young fans waited with signs and wellwishes for the team. The Hornets lost to DeSales on Saturday to bring their best-ever season to an end. Details and photos from the game are on page A11. Gary DeVon/staff photos

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Legislators at odds on basic ed funding BY ELLIOT SUHR WNPA NEWS SERVICE

OLYMPIA--While the budgets the House and Senate Democrats proposed this week were nearly identical, Senate Republicans believe the debate over education funding is a battle best fought next year. The McCleary v. Washington decision in 2012 ruled that the state was not sufficiently funding basic education. According to education officials and lawmakers, the state needs to invest more than $5 billion into education by 2018. The state Supreme Court ordered earlier this year that “the pace of progress must quicken” in regard to education funding. In the Senate budget released last Monday, about $40 million would be allocated to fund technology-related materials in schools. The House version of the budget makes a $60 million invest-

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 10

ment in K-12 materials, supplies and operating costs. However, while the two budgets are similar, the House Democrats also included a plan to increase funding for education through House Bill 2792 and 2796. “The supplemental budget—it’s not another bite at the apple,” said Sen. Andy Hill, R-Redmond. “It sets us up for next year.” The supplemental operating budget proposed in the Senate would add $96 million to the state’s $33.6 billion twoyear operating budget approved last June. The budget passed last year added $1 billion to the state’s education system for the 2013-2015 biennium. Carlyle’s HB 2796 would close four tax exemptions and would raise $100 million. The increased revenue would be directed toward restoring cost-of-living adjustments for teachers and to fund early learning.

The bill is more modest than Gov. Jay Inslee’s proposed list of eight tax breaks that aim to raise more than $200 million for education. “The House budget goes further than the Senate’s in addressing our constitutional basic education obligations,” Inslee said in a written statement. “While I would like to see a bigger K-12 investment, it is significant that we all agree we must take additional action this year.” The Senate budget passed off the floor on Thursday with a 41-8 bipartisan vote. Other than the $40 million investment into materials, supplies and operating costs, the budget doesn’t provide any additional funding to the other areas of education mentioned in the court order. “I’m disappointed with the budget proposals. Neither one comes close to the $400 million that is needed this biennium to keep us on track for full funding in 2018,” state Superintendent of Public

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INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

Instruction Randy Dorn said. “If the Legislature can find a way to pass a revenue package and fund a cost-of-living adjustment for teachers, that will get us closer.” The court called for more money to pay for existing reforms—including teacher cost-of-living adjustments, additional funding for schools, and a plan to fully fund basic education by April 30. In addition to the reforms, the court called on legislators to address four areas of basic education: transportation, MSOCs (Materials, Supplies and Operating Costs), K-3 class-size reduction and fullday kindergarten. “For the first time in five decades, the state of Washington is under court order that we’re not fulfilling our public responsibility to fully fund education,” said Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle. “We’re facing pressure from the court

Schools Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion

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Community A6-7 Classifieds/Legals A8-9 Real Estate A9

Sports Obituaries

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 6, 2014

Schools

Missoula Children’s Theatre at Tonasket The Cast of Characters: Younger Beauty Lou: Jessica Heinlen; Older Beauty Lou: Maya Johann; Slim: Joey Coleman; Dusty: Cody Stirek; Fleabite Clyde: Sarah Green; Imaginary Friend: Lex Hilton; Beast: Jordan McGuire; Younger Daughters: Treshelle Caddy, Stella Crutcher, Miriam Gutierrez, Skylar Hardesty, Madison Prock, Brielle Wahl; Older Daughters: Noni Alley, Erica Breshears, Abby Duchow, Rachael Sawyer, Phoenix Willging, Kara Willson; Country Folk: Emma Alexander, Sara Alexander, Savanna Bones, Marcie Brazil, Jessie Burks, Cailee Denison, Allison Glanzer, Vanessa Gronlund, Brianna Guiterrez, Connor Hardesty, Daniel Keane, Katie Keane, Quaid McCormick, Tait Olson, Lily Reavis, Cheyenne Stirek, Alexis Swanson, Alyssa Wince; Barnyard Critters: Megan Bones, Bradon Prock, Becky Martin, Abby Martin, Chloe McFarland, Kaitlynn Cannaday, Megan Heinlen, Elizabeth Olson, Brody McCormick, Mary Lu Tafolla; Assistant Directors: Athena Rietveld, Makayla Ramsey; Accompanist: Debbie Hackett; Buckaroo Bob: Justin Braun and Director: Hali Free. For more photos see a slideshow at www. gazette-tribune.com.

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Missoula Children’s Theatre presented Beauty Lou and the Country Beast, an original country western adaptation of the classic fairy tale Beauty and the Beast on Saturday, March 1 at the THS Commons. Beauty Lou is the oldest daughter of the bronc-bustin’ balladeer Buck. At the local county fair, young Beauty Lou is upset by the ungrateful behavior of a miner who has won the blue ribbon for his beautiful roses. She calls him a beast and wishes that he would look like one too. Years later, when in danger of losing the family farm, Buck meets the miner-turned-beast. Beauty Lou agrees to befriend the Beast in order to save her family. Beauty Lou and the Beast both learn to look beyond appearances and first impressions and to see the beauty that dwells inside. The story, set in the American West, also features Beauty Lou’s six sisters, her Imaginary Friend, her dog Fleabite Clyde, farmhands Slim and Dusty, the neighborly Country Folk and the Barnyard Critters.

Maya Johann as the grown up Beauty Lou (center) with her sisters and MCT’s Justin Braun as Buckaroo Bob and Sarah Green as Fleabite Clyde

Upward Bound - Educational Enrichment Program

WSU Upward Bound students on a four-day educational and multicultural trip to Seattle Submitted by Stassia Feltes and Desirae Coe WSU Upward Bound Program Coordinators

Currently in Okanogan County there are two WSU Upward Bound programs, the first, which has been serving the Omak and Okanogan high schools for ten years and the newest program, serving a maximum of 60 students from Tonasket and Oroville high schools. WSU Upward Bound is an educational

WSU Upward Bound/submitted photos

Students pose by the fountain on a tour of the University of Washington.

and college enrichment program funded by the U.S. Department of Education and administered by Washington State University. The goal of WSU Upward Bound is to connect rural students from disadvantaged backgrounds to the necessary resources to increase the rate at which students graduate from high school and enroll in institutions of higher education. The WSU Upward Bound program melds students with college and career

resources along with leadership and multicultural opportunities. For example, WSU Upward Bound takes students on a four-day educational and multicultural trip to Seattle. In addition, WSU Upward Bound provides a six-week summer program that exposes students to hands on science, language/culture, outdoor adventures, career exploration, and includes two residential college experiences. Last summer, students stayed at

The North Cascades Institute Summer Camp that included a tour at Western Washington University.

the North Cascades Institute and were mentored by Western Washington University graduate students. WSU Upward Bound also provides internship opportunities, such as the Bridge internship. This paid internship, through the USDA Agricultural Research Services at Washington State University, provides an opportunity for graduated seniors in the program to work in science labs with scientists from all over the world. After completion, stu-

dents receive a 400-level college credit in science that is transferable to the college of their choice. Furthermore, WSU Upward Bound provides students with regular oneon-one support, academic advising, tutoring, and college and career based lessons. WSU Upward Bound is an inspiring program that enriches the northern Okanogan County high schools, guiding participants on their path to success.

Tonasket Knowledge Community invited to THS Winterfest Friday Bowl heads to state The Gazette-Tribune

Team takes third place at regional competition By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

CHELAN - Tonasket’s Knowledge Bowl team garnered a third place finish in regional competition in Chelan on Wednesday, Feb. 26, earning the team a fourth straight trip to the state finals in Arlington on March 22. The Knowledge Bowl Tigers actually finished tied for second with Okanogan, but finished third by tiebreak criteria. “It has been great to have a team to regularly compete against who is also brilliant and evenly matched,” said Tonasket coach Susan McCue. “The competition sharpens both teams. Hats off to Jeff Cheeseman and his Okanogan brain athletes and all the students who participated this season. “We look forward to representing Tonasket (at state).” The six who competed at regionals included Levi Schell, Nick Jelinek, Kahlil Butler, Dalton Smith, Alex Mershon and Thomas Kennedy. Other team members included Allison Glanzer, LeighAnne Barnes, Cheyan KinKade and Tawan

Murray. Teams competed in four verbal rounds and one written round. Cascade claimed the regional title with 103 points, with Okanogan and Tonasket scoring 97. Okanogan outscored Tonasket 42-37 on the written test to take second overall. Cashmere (73) took the fourth state spot out of nine teams competing in the 1A regional. Eighteen Class 1A teams will compete at the 2014 finals.

TONASKET - Tonasket High School’s Winterfest Celebration

has been taking place March 3-7. As part of Friday’s celebration the community is invited to the Winterfest Awards Show in the

Come visit us in friendly downtown Tonasket!

Almost Spring!

WINDSOCKS

in Colorful Hues & Patterns

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Good foR tHe MoNtH of MARCH!

P.L.L.C.

Denise S. Krytenberg, D.V.M. • Rachel Ross, D.V.M.

741 E. Riverside Dr., Omak

Alpine Veterinary Clinic P.L.L.C. Denise S. Krytenberg, D.V.M. • Rachel Ross, D.V.M.

509-826-5882

A students-only Winterfest dance will follow, with Kelly Denison available to take photos of the event.

509-486-0615

312 S. Whitcomb

MARCH MARCH

509-826-5882

High School Commons, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. There is not cost for the award show but desserts will be on sale for $2.00.

741 E. Riverside Dr., Omak

Good foR tHe MoNtH of MARCH!

Bronn delivers a widely varied repertoire, including many Broadway hits, with wit and humor while Katherine joins him in glorious song.

Friday, March 14th, 7 p.m. Omak Performing Arts Center 20 S. Cedar, Omak

Ticket outlets: Rawson’s in Okanogan, The Corner Shelf, Omak, Tonasket Interiors, Oroville Pharmacy or at the door The Omak PAC Foundation would to thankJones the sponsors of the Sponsors: Douglas and Jacque Sklarlike of Edward Investments; Bronn Journey concert: Douglas and Jacque Sklar of Edward Jones Community FoundationFoundation of NCW, ArtWa, EagleArtWa, Home Mortgage, Investments; Community of NCW, Eagle Home Mortgage, Grillo Robeck Dental, Omak Inn, The Breadline Grillo Robeck Dental, Omak Inn,The Breadline, Confluence Clinic-Omak

omakpac.org

“OmakPAC”


MARCH 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

On the Avenue coffee shop opens in Okanogan THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – Douglas and Janet Burts and Kodi EricksonGreene opened a coffee house called “On the Avenue” on Feb. 8 in Okanogan. On the Avenue offers coffee, espressos, smoothies, Italian sodas, hand baked muffins, sandwiches, soup, hot dogs and an assortment of coffee accompaniments. “We also sell T-shirts, coffee beans, travel mugs and consignment art work,” they say. In the near future they are looking to offer hard packed ice cream and possibly adding a regulation pool table. “We opened this business to

provide a place to relax and enjoy for all who enter,” they said, adding they provide a “fun atmosphere that ha something to offer to all age groups. The Burts owned an air charter business before moving to Okanogan about seven years ago. Erickson-Greene moved to Okanogan in September of 2013. The Burts have three children and Erickson-Greene, their niece, has a daughter. “We own horses, dogs and cats,” the Burts add. Although they plan a grand opening, they haven’t set a date as of yet. On the Avenue is located at 134 2nd Ave. S. in Okanogan. The phone number is (509) 557-6161.

Charlene Helm/staff photo

On the Avenue has opened in Okanogan. It is owned and operated by Douglas and Janet Burts and their niece Kodi Erickson-Greene. The coffee shop is open Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 7

p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Generator repair set to begin BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Repair of the broken down generator at North Valley Hospital should begin in about two weeks, Chief Information Officer Kelly Cariker reported at the Thursday, Feb. 27, meeting of the NVH Board of Commissioners. “All of our funding got approved,” Cariker said. “We had to fill out a credit application because it is such a large undertaking. We will get a check back from the insurance company; we have to pay the vendor and the insurance will cut us a check.” The generator will have to be removed from the hospital by crane March 13-14, Cariker said,

and transported to Spokane for repair. “Someone from the insurance company will be there for the teardown to see what the catastrophic problem was,” he said. “They will rebuild it with a short block and in about two weeks will bring it back.” The generator, an 800 kilowatt diesel that was installed as part of the new building construction project in 2010, experienced a catastrophic failure during its monthly load test in early January. Cariker also reported that the hospital had changed coding and transcription vendors. Also, he said that John Sanchez had been hired as plant supervisor. The former owner of Sarge’s Burger Bunker has been working at a

ACCOUNTING MOVE The Verbeck Building, into which physical therapy has moved (with an open house this Friday at noon) will be moved for accounting purposes from the Extended Care division to the Hospital division. The building previously housed the assisted living facility that closed about a year ago.

Now that the building is fully occupied by hospital functions, CFO Helen Verhasselt said, the move could be made. “What’s happened as we were transitioning from extended care, occupying the space, we’ve been increasing the interdivision rent the hospital was paying to the Extended Care side,” Verhasselt said. “Now that it is fully occupied by the hospital - it is still falling under the district’s umbrella - it’s just moving the asset and the liability (the bond) to the hospital’s books. Now we’ll get the reimbursement based on the depreciation, instead of the interdivision lease expense.” The Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, March 13.

eration to our functional issues with stormwater. Also the talk of heavy haul to Pateros... without significant investment, myself and the city council continue to oppose this effort. I urged DOT to discuss stopping all of these projects and coming up with a solution that would benefit all people in the state instead of just making our problems worse. “I was just throwing out a last Hail Mary,” Plumb admitted. Plumb received a response from Daniel Sarles of the DOT, expressing a willingness to meet with the city council to discuss the transportation issues. The email also pointed out: • the chip seal project planned for this summer will cost about $100,000, while the needed improvements to the city core’s infrastructure would likely cost in excess of $5 million; • the DOT shares the council’s concerns about the overall condition of the pavement structure in regards to creating a Heavy Haul corridor and estimated that not only downtown Tonasket, but the entire stretch of roadway to Pateros, would need roughly $55 million of work for that designation to be successful. Sarles encouraged the city to pursue grants in an attempt to find the kind of funding necessary to get the work done, as the state transportation budget is not

likely to allow that to happen in the foreseeable future. “DOT is not responsible for your water or sewer lines,” city planner Kurt Danison pointed out. “They are responsible only for the pavement. There are times they do curbs and gutters. “The city’s approach needs to continue to be we can’t do it piecemeal.... We’ve been arguing it does us no good to address stormwater and curbing when we don’t know where the road is going to end up. It could all get torn out. We want it done all at once. My suggestion is to approach DOT – they will be here in a couple weeks – and let them know that we want to work cooperatively with them. If there is a hard line with them where they will only be responsible between the curbs and we want to do the outside – we want to work with (in such a way as to coordinate projects).” “I just want local people to understand that it isn’t a matter of the city not doing anything for 10 years,” Plumb said. “We’ve tried to address this issue but no one has taken it up with us. We have businesses closing in the afternoon when we have a flood, and we have basements under those that flood. It’s not staff, it’s not leadership; we are where we are. I want to move forward and fix it with whoever will help us.”

federal funding would be redirected from classrooms to outside tutoring services if the waiver is lost. The bill would have required the use of statewide tests in teacher and principal evaluations, a step the federal government said was necessary for Washington to maintain its waiver. According to Steve Litzow, R-Mercer Island, some school districts—like Seattle and Tacoma— could stand to lose as much as $2 million in the 2014-2015 school year.

Inslee met with U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan earlier last week to find a way for Washington to keep federal NCLB funding in schools. Inslee and Dorn are currently working on proposing a House bill that would give the state time to change its teacher and principal evaluations in order meet federal requirements. “The court was clear, we need to act,” said Sen. Rosemary McAuliffe, D-Bothell. “We have to act and fund those promises we made now.”

casino on the west side of the state. “He also brings experience in the hospitality side that ties into some things we do,” Cariker said. “He has spent some time observing and adjusting to our culture and is starting to make some improvements where he sees the need in some departments.”

COUNCIL | FROM A1 get it because our fleet sucks (due to age) and we need to do something about it before we really eat it big.” The council wasn’t unconvinced as to the need for the new car, considering that even with the recent purchase of a used vehicle over the winter, the department’s four officers are one breakdown away from having to share vehicles. But management of the department’s finances became the central topic of debate. “”I’m comfortable with this to a point,” said council member Jill Vugteveen. “Getting under a reasonable amount of expenditures on (on call and overtime hours)... that’s a big issue there. It just seems its’ been so difficult to work with Rob and get that to manageable level. “He’s already struggling to find a balance between the demands of the police station, which I get, and the hours of the officers. To say now, he has to work on those hours better, plus we’re throwing a $237 a month car payment for him to manage in the same budget... I don’t have faith we’ll be successful. It just compounds the issue.” The original motion by Jean Ramsey to accept the loan/grant as is failed 3-2. Olson’s original motion, that would have placed spending restrictions on the

department, failed to draw a second. “This is a good deal,” Olson said, prior to his motion that actually passed. “This should save the money. When I made my original motion, I just wanted to make sure Rob looks at these numbers. It doesn’t seem like we’re asking a lot of money each year.” “If we’re going to sacrifice and take risk on Rob, if this is his priority, I am asking he make some sacrifice too,” Vugteveen said.

HEAVY HAUL TALK A frequent topic of discussion of late, the Heavy Haul Corridor debate is still simmering throughout the county. Plumb said he was finally able to get the Washington Department of Transportation’s attention by sending an email to every contact on the DOT’s web site after learning that a project bid had been awarded to chip seal the travel lanes on Whitcomb Avenue through the downtown Tonasket core. The city has been trying for years (and had at one time been promised) a much more significant project that would more thoroughly repair the road, as well as take care of sidewalk and drainage issues. “I expressed displeasure over the chip seal project,” Plumb said. “It was awarded without consid-

AT ODDS | FROM A1 and pressure from the public to invest in one million school kids.” House Bill 2792 addresses all four areas indicated by the court. However, the bill has not had a hearing. It is unclear where the funds would be appropriated from and how much would be appropriated. In contrast to the tax-loophole closures backed by many Democrats, a bipartisan bill would sell $700 million in bonds backed by lottery revenue to construct classrooms for full-day kindergarten and to help reduce

K-3 class sizes. Despite efforts to draw revenue into education, the Legislature also struggled to maintain existing funding for schools in this session. Senate Bill 5246, which modifies teacher and principal evaluations, failed to pass the Senate floor on February 18. Without modifications to evaluations, Washington’s federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) waiver was put on “high-risk” status. According to state education officials, up to $44 million dollars in

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BOND | FROM A1 The discussion that followed in the regular meeting didn’t take long. “My motion was just for not running it in April,” Caton said, emphasizing that it did not mean the board wouldn’t run the bond again at a later date. “We just need more time.”

HIGHLY CAPABLE? Elementary principal Jeremy Clark discussed the Highly Capable program (a program that provides accelerated learning and enhanced classroom opportunties for advances, or “highly capable,” students) and the fact this year there were a number of changes that amounted to an unfunded mandate. “The most significant changes are with the identification process,” Clark said. An approved screening program must be in place, he said. “It is not an inexpensive process,” Clark said. “There is not additional funding for this. The ESD is working on plans to provide support for districts but nothing is finalized. At this time we are waiting for more information so maybe they can purchase (the screening program in a) bundle for the county or region and we could go to them for a reduced cost for that testing. “New stipulations for that will make it a much more complex process.” Clark said the district would receive about $10,000 for the entire program. “That is minimal compared to the cost of doing it,” he said. “So, we’re going to spend more

money than we’re going to get to run this,” Asmussen asked. “Definitely,” Clark said. “The legislation is very specific,” Turner said. “You can’t opt out; you will do it; you won’t get any money to do it; and this is how you’re going to do it. “We always gripe about unfunded mandates; this sounds like one to me,” Caton said. “What if we tell them, ‘No?’ ... Where does the money come from? Who do we rob (in terms of other district funding) to do this?” Clark’s report required board approval; after some more discussion, Stangland moved “that we obey the law,” which despite Caton’s remarks did pass unanimously.

TIMBER DOLLARS Turner reported that bills in both the State Senate and House of Representatives that would restore timber dollars to rural school districts were “dead. “There is still going to be a hearing in the Senate Budget Committee,” he added. “If you can still get the budget committee to fund it, it is still alive even if the bills are dead.” OTHER ITEMS Turner read a proclamation from Gov. Jay Inslee declaring March 10-14 Classified Employees Week. The consent agenda included the resignations of boys basketball coach Agustin Pedregon and tennis coach Dave Buccheim. The school board next meets on Monday, March 10, at 7:00 p.m. in the administration building board room.

BUCKHORN | FROM A1 in a penalty in 2012. A good faith effort towards the issuance of this permit was one of the conditions for the settlement of the $395,000 penalty issued in July 2012 to Crown Resources/ Kinross for permit violations, according to the Okanogan Highlands Alliance (OHA), an environmental watchdog group. “This new permit is a significant improvement over the old permit,” said David Kliegman, Executive Director of the OHA. “It will take a concerted effort on the part of Kinross to bring the gold mine into compliance with the new permit, but I have no doubt that it can be accomplished with adequate resource commitment and cooperation.” When Crown Resources’ Kettle Falls Operations office in Republic was contacted they said they had no comment on the new permit at this time. In a previous statement to the Gazette-Tribune regarding the OHA bringing a lawsuit against the company over their handling of water issues, the said, “Kinross is strongly committed to the ongoing protection of water quality at Buckhorn and will continue to work with the WDOE to ensure that water quality is protected in the vicinity of the Buckhorn Mine.” Known as a federal National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit (NPDES), the permit is required for the mine’s operation and complies with the federal Clean Water Act and the state’s water pollution control laws. Every five years the NPDES permit must be renewed. The Buckhorn Mine’s permit expired on Nov. 30, 2012. Ecology temporarily extended the

permit due to complications stemming from the significant violations that were issued in July 2012, which Crown/Kinross appealed. Violations of the NPDES can bring penalties of up to $10,000 per violation per day. OHA submitted over 200 pages of comments, including a 3D visualization of the capture zone, which is posted online at: youtu. be/SPE5waXRjfU. “Although the mine has pumped massive amounts of groundwater from Buckhorn Mountain so they could mine, this has not been sufficient to keep mine contaminants from escaping into the environment. Now with the new permit issued, it should be universally understood that all mine contaminants must be captured and treated before they are discharged, and that no amount of inadvertent discharge from the mine is permitted,” writes the OHA in a press release, following the announcement of the new permit. Ecology received comments from 77 individuals, groups and agencies while drafting the permit and has prepared a summary addressing those comments. The permit, fact sheet and response to comments may be viewed at the Ecology website: https://fortress. wa.gov/ecy/wqreports/public/ f?p=110:302:0::NO:RP,302. To obtain copies of the permit and related documents or to arrange to view copies, please call Roger Johnson at (509) 4547658, e-mail roger.johnson@ecy. wa.gov, or write to: Cindy Huwe, Department of Ecology, Central Regional Office, 15 W. Yakima Ave., Suite 200; Yakima, WA 98902. E-mail requests to cynthia. huwe@ecy.wa.gov

Oroville Aerie #3865 Invites You To An

40 oz.

On Sunday, February 24 , 2014

STANLEY S. PORTER passed away at his home in Oroville, WA.

Stan loved people and life! Please join us on

Sat., March 29, 2014 for a memorial of Stan’s life.

There will be a notice in the paper at a later date.

Dinner

Crown Royal C

40 oz. Bottle of

$21. 80, 40 oz. (750ml) Bottle of

Crown Royal Canadian Whisky 40 oz. Bottle of Saturday, March 8th 2014 Crown Royal Canadian Whiskey Crown Royal Canadian Whisky 5:30 to 7:00 pm

$21. 80,not ax…

$21 . 8 0 ,9 n o t a x … o 2 5 0 4 5 7 2 8 8

There will be a silent auction for pies, cakes, & gift certificates with a live 25 04-9 57$15.00 288 os oyoos dut yf r ee. c om auction of donated items from 7:00 9:00 2504957288 os oyoos dut yf r ee. c om tickets sold at the bar. Please come and support It’s better at the border… your Eagles and our local charities. better at at the It’sIt’sbetter theborder… border... Open to the public.

It’s better at


PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | MARCH 6, 2014

COPS & COURTS COMPILED BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT

SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Scott Anthony Smith, 40, Tonasket, pleaded guilty Feb. 20 to attempted third-degree assault and unlawful imprisonment. Smith was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $960.50 for the Feb. 19, 2012 crimes. Frances Joann Edwards, 46, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 25 to residential burglary, third-degree malicious mischief and two counts of second-degree theft. Edwards was sentenced to 25.5 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the January 2014 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for April 14. In a separate case, Edwards pleaded guilty Feb. 25 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Edwards was sentenced to five months to run concurrent with the above sentence, and fined $1,110.50. Those crimes occurred Nov. 27, 2013. A restitution hearing was scheduled for March 18. Joshua Dean Allen, 32, Oroville, pleaded guilty Feb. 25 to tampering with a witness. Allen was sentenced to 12.75 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Dec. 27, 2013 crime. In a separate case, Allen pleaded guilty Feb. 25 to second-degree TMVWOP. Allen was sentenced to 12.75 months in prison to run concurrent with the above sentence, and fined $1,110.50. That crime also occurred on Dec. 27, 2013. Joseph Gerald Scholz, 24, with addresses in both Tonasket and East Wenatchee, pleaded guilty Feb. 26 to two counts of fourth-degree assault. Scholz was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 363 days suspended, with credit for one day served. He was fined $1,010.50, with restitution in the following amounts: $2,425.66 to Zachary Kuhlmann of Tonasket and $2,310.66 to LifeWise Health Plan of Washington. Travis Wesley Orr, 29, Kelowna, B.C., pleaded guilty Feb. 27 to POCS (cocaine). Orr was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended and credit for two days served. He was fined $760.50. The crime occurred Sept. 20, 2013 at the Oroville Point of Entry. Dustin Thomas Hayes, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 27 to POCS (heroin). Hayes was sentenced to 30 days in jail and fined $1,610.50 for the Oct. 1, 2013 crime. Johnny Barton Woodward, 56,

Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 27 to attempting to elude a pursuing police vehicle and POCS (methamphetamine). Woodward was sentenced to 25.5 months in prison and fined $3,110.50 for the Nov. 3, 2013 crimes. The court dismissed Feb. 25 charges against Gina Marie Anderson, 30, Omak. Charges dropped: welfare fraud, false verification of a welfare document and forgery. The charges were dismissed without prejudice. The court dismissed Feb. 27 charges against Kevin Bert Priest, 48, Omak. Charges dropped: residential burglary, seconddegree theft and third-degree malicious mischief. The charges were dismissed without prejudice. The court dismissed March 3 charges against Kristina Marie Gipson, 31, Omak, Charges dropped: possession of a stolen motor vehicle and third-degree DWLS. The charges were dismissed without prejudice. The court found probable cause to charge Shannon Cersten Strader, 22, Okanogan, with possessing a stolen firearm and first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 13. The court found probable cause to charge Shaun Anthony Baker, 27, Omak, with two counts of POCS (heroin), two counts of use of drug paraphernalia and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 9. The court found probable cause to charge Randy Benjamin Lepire, 24, Okanogan, with possessing a stolen firearm, first-degree trafficking in stolen property, second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm and resisting arrest. The crimes allegedly occurred between Feb. 13 and 15. The court found probable cause to charge Garry Jack McDonald Jr., 39, Omak, with assault in violation of a no-contact order. The crime allegedly occurred Feb. 15. The court found probable cause to charge Jesus Alberto Castaneda, 19, Tonasket, with POCS (methamphetamine) and POCS (marijuana)(less than 40 grams). The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Jeannette Deann Dudley, 47, Okanogan, with three counts of delivery of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) within 1,000 feet of a school zone. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 18. The court found probable cause to charge Jesus Duarte Vela, 31, Malott, with second-degree murder, alien in possession of a firearm, carrying a concealed

weapon and unlawful carrying a loaded pistol in vehicle. The crimes allegedly occurred Feb. 20 near Okanogan.

DISTRICT COURT Joshua Allen Howard Aggers, 19, Oroville, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief and two counts of second-degree vehicle prowling. Aggers was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended and fined $1,058. Trevor Samuel Arrington, 20, Omak, had an MIP/C charged dismissed. Arrington was fined $400. Eric Andres Bakken, 49, Omak, had a charge dismissed: violation of a no-contact order. Gregory Karl Behrens, 56, Okanogan, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Hector Berry Cardenas, 39, Okanogan, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Cardenas was fined $600. Frank Buckskin Rider Bigwolf III, 35, Omak, guilty of making a false statement to a public servant. Bigwolf was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $808. Jason Alber Boyd, 26, Omak, guilty of making or having burglary tools and third-degree theft. Boyd was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and fined $1,058. Tod Ashley Brandt, 42, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Brandt was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended and fined $858. Kyle Albert Cantlon, 21, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree theft and guilty (deferred prosecution revoked) of fourth-degree assault. Cantlon received a 364-day suspended sentenced and fined $1,701. Brandon William Cate, 27, Omak, guilty of hit-and-run (attended) and third-degree DWLS. Cate received a 180-day suspended sentence and fined $1,058. Joshua Micael Chapa, 22, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Chapa was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $858. Chad Cleveland, no middle name listed, 44, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: operating an off-road vehicle while under the influence. Cleveland was fined $200. Karilyn Ann Cline, 24, Omak, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed. Jennifer Lynn Coffey, 37, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Sandra Dee Cooper, 44, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 Domestic dispute on Oak St. in Omak. Illegal burning on Epley Rd. near Omak. Assault on Engh Rd. near Omak. Theft on Vinmar Lane near Okanogan. iPod reported missing. One-vehicle crash on Tunk Creek Rd. near Riverside. No injuries reported. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Public intoxication on Engh Rd. in Omak. One-vehicle roll-over crash on Swanson Mill Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on E. Bartlett Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Central Street Bridge in Omak. No injuries reported. Theft on S. Locust Way in Tonasket. Light reported missing. Christopher Charles Anaya, 23, booked for second-degree burglary, making or possessing burglary tools and seconddegree malicious mischief. Jessica Kendra Mills, 22, booked for thirddegree malicious mischief (DV). Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Vehicle prowl on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Jasmine St. in Omak. Trespassing on Golden St. in Oroville. Drugs on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Alicia Jonele Wilson, 20, booked for TVMWOP and POCS (methamphetamine). Julie Aspen Wise, 22, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Gregory Clark Will, 61, booked for DUI. Brett Steele Pakootas, 24, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Wendy Joe Martin, 34, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Zachariah Dacey Zaiss, 35, booked for DUI. Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 One-vehicle crash on Chesaw Rd. near Oroville. No injuries reported. Fraud on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Threats on Robison Canyon Rd. near Omak. Vehicle prowl on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Ferry St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Ferry St. in

Omak. Trespassing on E. Third St. in Tonasket. Daniel Shane Nanamikin, 27, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Michael Paul Utigard, 61, booked for first-degree DWLS. Shelly Ann Edwards, 47, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and third-degree DWLS. Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014 Drugs on Sandflat Rd. near Omak. Harassment on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Engh Rd. near Omak. Warrant arrest on Mill Dr. near Tonasket. Loitering on S. Main St. in Omak. Assault on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Albert James Onepennee, 33, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams) and use of drug paraphernalia. Macario Daniel Ibarra, 31, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Pedro Camarena Balbuena, 56, booked for third-degree DWLS, two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and hit-and-run (unattended); two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI and thirddegree DWLS; and a USBP hold. Dacia Lee Mackarness, 40, booked for violation of an anti-harassment order. Gustavo Diego Garcia, 33, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Robert Joe Storm, 33, booked on an FTA bench warrant for POCS with intent to deliver. Scott Anthony Smith, 40, court commitment for attempted thirddegree assault and unlawful imprisonment. Friday, Feb. 28, 2014 Harassment on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Violation of a no-contact order on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. DUI on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. DWLS on S. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Violation of a no-contact order on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. Public intoxication on Central Street Bridge in Omak. DWLS on Main St. in Oroville. David James Lavin, 53, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. David Lee Fitzgerald, 56, court commitment for fourth-degree assault (DV). Dylan Everett Pier, 18, booked on two Oroville Police Department FTA warrants: resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. Doreen Louise Carden, 24, booked for DUI. Patrick Lee Day, 44, booked for POCS and a Department of Correc-

tions detainer. Juan Hernandez Arevalo, 29, court commitment for DUI. Ezra Thomas Chapman, 32, court commitment for three counts of unlawful possession of a firearm. Norman Edward Whited, 62, booked for DUI. Saturday, March 1, 2014 Domestic dispute on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Harassment on S. Teal Lake Rd. near Oroville. Harassment on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Ash St. in Omak. Port-a-potties reported tipped. Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Assault on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Alejandro Solis Florentino, 26, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Michael Vincent Burke, 26, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Scott Joseph Garrick Girard, 51, booked for four counts of unlawful possession of a firearm, making false statements, seven counts of unlawful hunting of game bird, seven counts of unlawful hunting of game bird (closed season), seven counts of unlawful hunting of game bird (no tag), seven counts of unlawful hunting of game bird (baiting), five counts of unlawful hunting of game bird (over limit), seven counts of unlawful hunting of game bird (with rifle), and three counts of unlawful hunting of game bird (turkey without beard). Jonathan Muniz Valdovinos, 24, booked for DUI and on USBP and ICE holds. Sunday, March 2, 2014 Harassment on Engh Rd. near Omak. Threats on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. DUI on Hwy. 7 near Oroville. Warrant arrest on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on E. Grape Ave. in Omak. Automobile theft on Engh Rd. near Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Child abuse on Engh Rd. in Omak. Child reported left in car alone. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Assault on 14th Ave in Oroville. Patrick T. Watt, 39, court commitments for DUI and third-degree DWLS. Anthony Ray McFarlane, 45, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Irene Ornelas, no middle name listed, 42, booked on a juvenile FTA warrant for truancy. Jerry Lee Lane, 37, booked for DUI. Christine Marie Mix, 47, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), possession of drug paraphernalia, and third-degree DWLS. Delia Ann Marie Cheer, 26, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

Our Values: Putting people first • Outstanding corporate citizenship • High performance culture • Rigorous financial discipline

The Kettle River – Buckhorn commitment to safety The Kettle River – Buckhorn oper- is applied when an injury is one that ation takes the safety of our employ- results in an employee being unable ees at both the Buckhorn Mine and to report to work the next day that would otherwise the Kettle River Mill very seriously. Lookbe a workday, or an ing back on previous injury that results news articles, many in that employee of them focus on the being restricted in site’s attention to a what he/she can do for a time, so that all safe working environaspects of the job ment. It is with a great sense of pride in our cannot be done. employees that we are Perhaps you recall from previous arable to, once again, highlight our safety reticles an example of cord to the local coma LTI, if MSHA clasmunity. sifications were apRecently, the Ketplied in your home. tle River Mill and the In that example, if The Kettle River Mill site has Buckhorn Mine both you were cleaning operated for eight years—1.2 your gutters and fell reached significant million man hours—without a off a ladder, injuring milestones with regard lost-time injury. to safety. In the last your ankle to the quarter of 2013, the mine reached extent that the doctor told you that two years without a Lost Time In- you had to stay off your leg for three jury. A Lost Time Injury (LTI) is a weeks and do nothing while it healed, Mine Safety and Health Administra- that would be considered an LTI. tion (MSHA) injury classification that In early February 2014, the Kettle

River Mill reached a significant eight years with no LTI, or 1.2 million manhours. “This milestone did not occur by accident, no pun intended. What was accomplished was every employee’s

tions of them. Our safety milestones have occurred through everyone’s involvement and accountability to working safely. Our commitment is and always will be to perform our work in a safe, healthy and environmentally friendly manner,” states Ernie Mir a n d a , Kettle River – Buckhorn Safety Manager. The Kettle River – Buckhorn Kinross puts its employees first. Rigorous attention to training, equipment and safety procedures has allowed the Buckhorn Mine o p e r a t i o n to operate for over two years without an injury requiring time off is proud of of work. our employcommitment to health and safety and ees and would like to express our to looking out for one another. This sincerest appreciation to everyone is also a testament to our contractors, for maintaining such a strong comas we have the same safety expecta- mitment to safety.


MARCH 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A5

THE TOWN CRIER

Schools can’t afford to have legislature kick the can down the road

Schools continue to tighten their belts because they haven’t been given the constitutionally guaranteed basic education funding they need by the state. Each year the have to play a waiting game to see just what their funding will be. It seems like every school board tries to plan for the future when it comes to their school district, but more often than not we hear – ‘of course it all depends on when the legislature lets us know what kind of funding we will be receiving.’ Everyone knows that you base budgets and spending on how much you expect to receive, but if you work for someone and that number could change arbitrarily depending on their mood or spending on something else – not necessarily economic factors – then you’re stuck. Making contingencies is something we’re all supposed to do when we make budgets, like saving something Out of for a rainy day and/or a leaky roof. But when the My Mind legislature continues to argue about how to fund Gary A. DeVon schools, as ordered by the courts, then making realistic budgets are all the harder. As part of the Washington Newspaper Publisher’s Association we are able to bring you some additional coverage of what’s going on at the state capital. Elliot Suhr, with the WNPA News Service, writes this week about how the legislators are addressing or not addressing basic education funding. Some legislators would like to push the issue into next year. This causes additional uncertainty and the last thing our students, teachers and administrators need is uncertainty when it comes to budgeting for next year. It’s hard enough when you don’t know for certain whether enrollment will go up or down, even though that’s how the state determines how much basic education funding the school will get. So districts often budget conservatively on their best guess on how many students they will have and hope that number doesn’t drop. Many of the district’s basic costs generally don’t go down even if the student population does. It still costs to heat and cool the buildings and to maintain them. So having some idea of how much funding will be coming from the state is vital. One thing we’ve been promised for years is that the state’s primary goal is to educate our children. It’s in Washington’s Constitution. Sure there are many other things we rely on from the state and we could have an argument about what programs are and aren’t worthy, but education is supposed to be number one. The legislature wasn’t fulfilling that promise and got caught with their hand in the cookie jar. They were told by the court that it was their job to fund basic education and they weren’t doing so. Suhr writes in a front page article in this week’s G-T, “The McCleary v. Washington decision in 2012 ruled that the state was not sufficiently funding basic education. According to education officials and lawmakers, the state needs to invest more than $5 billion into education by 2018. The state Supreme Court ordered earlier this year that ‘the pace of progress must quicken’ in regard to education funding.” The argument, drawn mostly along party lines, seems to be where the money to educate some one million children is going to come from -- cutting other state programs or new revenue. The Republicans would like to address the issue next year. The legislature and the governor need to do their jobs and not kick the can down the road. They need to let our school districts know how much they will be getting so they can set their budgets accordingly. They need some certainty and expecting school boards to guess whether or not their will be enough funding to properly educate their charges is unfair. Expecting the local communities, which have been generous in the past, to make up the difference is unfair too. It’s time to stop kicking the can down the road and address the number one job expected from our state leaders and fund our public schools.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call (509) 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at (509) 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Appreciate the help with Killer Bee Tourney Dear Editor, The Granby Club would like to say “Thank You!” to OHS students and staff, wrestlers, wrestling alumni, parents and friends of wrestling that helped last Saturday host the Killer Bee wrestling tournament. We had over 200 preschool through sixth grade wrestlers from the valley that experienced a great day of competition and sportsmanship, making new friends and renewing old friendships. We couldn’t have done it without you. AnneMarie Ricevuto The Granby Club Oroville

‘Lying to the American people just another tool’ Dear Editor, In view of the many things that continue to take place in our government, the words of Solomon from Proverbs 28 seem to fit more perfectly than ever: V.15 Like a roaring lion or a charging bear is a wicked ruler over a poor people, V.16 A ruler who lacks understanding is a cruel oppressor. These verses fit our president, when we look at the actions and statements he and others have made about events like the Benghazi killings, the I.R.S. targeting conservative groups and the one that got him the Lie of the Year award; “if you like your health care plan

you can keep it.” Many people in government have become addicted to prestige, position and power. Whether they are called organizers, legislators, or heads of a bureaucratic agencies, these elites look upon the society and the culture as something to be formed into whatever whimsical shape they deem best, in their conceit even the bad things done to society are good, because it keeps us on the progressive path, doing the next new thing, which leads to it’s main purpose, more control. Lying to the American people is just another tool used on this road to control. Now that the nation is beginning it’s fifth year of suffrage under this “demonstrably least qualified” “president” (as William Slusher defined him in his Jan. 16th column), I am thinking that maybe the people of this country have become the new form of Caspar Milquetoast, the cartoon character invented by H. T. Webster in 1924. Webster described Caspar as: “the man who speaks softly and gets hit with a big stick.” We must speak softly when discussing the decisions Obama makes, because the label “racist” is pasted on any who dare question his infallible wisdom, regardless of how much corrupt cronyism, outright ineptness, or deficit spending is connected to any given situation or program. We are hit with the “stick” every time his decisions prove to be the socialist inventions that he made them out not to be. Governing outside the bounds of the constitution has been the norm for Obama, while Congress sits by like timid souls wondering what else this man will do to the docu-

ment that both he and they took an oath to defend…, against all enemies foreign and domestic, that last part may have been dropped by now, because we have both home grown and foreign enemies of the constitution in positions of government. As one man put it, America has taken an I.Q. test and Obama was the result two times. Now that political correctness has become our new guide to candidate selection, can we look forward to a new tidal wave of tyranny from Hillary Clinton in 2016? Steve Lorz Tonasket

Stroke Support Group is very helpful

Dear Editor, This the only way I know to thank Linda and Dave for doing what they do. Every fourth Thursday of each month anyone that has ever had a stroke and wants to come, is welcomed with coffee, good treats, good conversation, a guest speaker, or a pertinent video. It’s so nice to know there are others that understand what one has gone through, and are still going through and can talk about it. I know I come away feeling much better and am sure the others who come would agree with me. Thank you Linda and Dave. (I don’t know their last names, but hopefully, they will know who I mean. Beverly Holden Oroville

You can bank on it

OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

As my throngs of adoring readers will attest, I believe in ‘Catman’s Axiom’: There are always at least two sides to every story and the truth is never any of them, but is something between we must always determine for ourselves. For instance, westside based, political power front Conservation Northwest and Okanogan County’s largely liberal Bill Slusher enclave in the Methow Valley have sued to lawyer-bully our compliance with their divine vision of how we must live, specifically what of our roads they will, in their benevolent generosity, graciously permit us to ride our ATVs on. Their argument is posited the way only a creative, paid-mouthpiece lawyer can do. In their view, our county commissioners failed to pay homage to the omni-controlling edicts of environmental power players, state road usage laws, safety concerns, and inadequate law enforcement when the commissioners followed the wishes of most of their constituents by opening many county roads to ATV use. It is the sort of throw-every-conceivablecontrivance-at-the-wall legal approach that prays something sticks. Being fossilized with bad knees for horseback and hiking, I am one of a growing population of boomers who need and greatly value our ATVs as the best means we have of enjoying, working and spending money in much of our beautiful county. So forgive me if I’m moved to wonder what other sides to this story might prevail. This lawyer-attack on Okanogan County rural folk certainly has the classic ‘footprint’ of a quintessential liberal power play using myriad internecine environmental laws and

regulations as pretexts to obtaining one’s petty political way. On the currently permitted roads, ATVs will actually only traverse far, far less than one percent of the square footage of the lands they pass through. These roads are already present and open for full-seized vehicles, remember. Even generously allowing for the highly debatable noise impact of our microengined, lawfully muffled and spark-suppressed ATVs, we’re still talking transit upon way less than one percent of the square footage of the lands traversed. Moreover, ATVs burn only a minuscule fraction of the fuel of the trucks/SUVs that woodsy folk would otherwise drive the same roads with, and, being vastly lighter, ATVs leave a much tinier trace than the trucks/SUVs that would otherwise be used. So realistically, ‘environmental impact,’ here, enjoys only specious legitimacy at best as anything but a political power pretext. Conflict with state road laws is equally internecine and again seems more pretext than legitimate cause for concern. It’s hard to imagine how driving far lighter ATVs creates any more threat to our roads than the trucks/ SUVs that will otherwise take their place. Safety is always a legitimate concern, but... whose... safety, exactly? As with common road-legal motorcycles, most ATVs weigh much less than 1000 pounds. (even with their newly state-mandated, turn signals, brake lights, road lights, mirrors, car-volume horns and expensive inspections and state license plates required for ATV road use). Other motorists thus seem well safer in their 2000 pound car-or-larger vehicles in any potential collision with an ATV, no? We ATVers are deeply moved by all the kind lawyerly concerns for our safety but, as with motorcyclists, bicyclists, or even the drivers of frail econo-cart cars, that is our risk by American free choice, and not anyone else’s to meddle with. Not to appear ungrateful, but how about you just drive safely and

let us see to our own safety. We live in a county larger than Connecticut with a law enforcement budget far less than most cities, so yes we sometimes do not enjoy adequate law enforcement in many respects despite the harried and underpaid cops’ best efforts. But attempting to selectively use this regrettable county-wide reality affecting everyone against a minority composed of ATV riders alone is odiously discriminatory. It further reeks of the bigoted implication that somehow ATVers are more lawless than, say, bird watchers. It’s ‘unconstitutional!’ as lawyers are wont to cry. Environmentalist and conservationist clubs enjoy many like-minded judges among them which is why they concentrate their power plays in the courts. A handful of elderly ATV riders in some outback county are easy enough to step on when you’re awash in urban causist money. But may all know this: Dang, us, dang us, they ought to take a rope and hang us, but we ATVers live, work and pay taxes here too, and – go figure – we consider ourselves equally worthy citizens, conservationist self-superior disdain notwithstanding. So you can bet we’re going to drive either our ATVs or our 6000 pound, 300 horsepower trucks/SUVs, everywhere you disallow us from peacefully enjoying our harmless and useful ATVs in our own county. Bank on it. And we’ll be thinking hard on innovative new ways to combat and undermine your other intrusive crusades in return. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his nonpartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (Amazon, cmppg. com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@live. com.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 6, 2014

Okanogan Valley Life

Just right for sledding down our street The new month really slipped up on me… I still had some things to do in February. But I did get the photo project all completed. At the entry of our house I have a corkboard with photos that accumulate throughout the year, and some very old ones. It is such a great conversation piece and keeps in sight those that I like to see every day. It would be called “tacky” by an interior decorator, I’m sure, but, to me, it is special. Twenty-first Street, on which we live, has a hill that is good for sledding but it is also a very busy street and not too often used for fun, but that wasn’t the case last week when the snow kept coming down. Fun going down but a long ways back up, but when you’re young

Honoring IT1 Christopher Rojeski Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck President, NCW Blue Star Mothers

For the month of February we honored Naval Information Systems Technician First Class Christopher Rojeski from Tonasket. His mother Georgie Hayden Berry is married to Retired Navy SR Chief Cliff Berry. Both call Tonasket their home. Georgie has served as the NCW Blue Star Mothers vice president and is currently our April: Month of the Military Child chair. Chris, Georgie’s only son, married Joanna whom he met while stationed in Japan. Chris has 3 young sons (Connor and Logan will be 13 and 11 respectively this year, and Alexander turns one year old this month). He, himself, was born April 30, 1982. Chris currently serves as

The Chemistry of It Submitted by Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Just two classes coming up next week, and only ten remain in winter quarter! Have you ever wondered why water and oil don’t mix? Why does baking soda make the refrigerator smell better? It’s all about chemistry and the way materials are put together and their behavior under different condi-

Joint meetings this week, Bingo on Friday Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

The weather has been chilly and we hope you all have been staying warm and enjoying the snow and being careful out on the roads. It looks like it may warm some so break out those gardening books and start thumbing through them for garden ideas. Our beginning of the month meetings are this week. The Joint meeting will be Wednesday, March 5 at 6:30 p.m, followed by the Aerie meeting at 7 p.m.

Speakers scheduled for March, 11, 25 and 28 Submitted by Dolly Engelbretson Oroville Senior Center

No speaker for March 4, but James Knowlton of Allied Medical will be here on March 11 to discuss Respiratory and Home Medical Equipment March 25 speaker will be Sylvia Williams of Aging and Adult Care regarding the Crime Victim Service Center. Sylvia says there is help. A special meeting with a representative of MedStar will be here on March

those things don’t matter so much. I received a phone from a person asking that I tell folks out there to beware of phony sounding calls that claim to be from Medicare. Don’t give them your name…they called you didn’t they, so they should know your name. Don’t give any other information as it could be the beginning of some sort of a scam. By the way when this person refused to give her name, they hung up. Please Note Change of Date: Last week I had the announcement of Ellie Cook’s death and at that time we were told of a Memorial next summer. That has been changed. On Saturday, March 15, there will be a graveside service at 1 p.m. conducted by Rev. Leon Alden, at Riverview Cemetery, followed

by those in attendance returning to the to the other, “Windy, isn’t it?” “No”, United Methodist Church, for moments the second man replied, “It’s Thursday.” And the third man chimed of remembrances and sharin, “So am I. Let’s have a ing, and a light lunch will be beer.” served. A reader, at the grocery, March 14 the talent show who had read of so many and silent auction, sponsored deaths in my column, told by Oroville Scholarship me to write about new babies Foundation formerly or something more fun, so “Dollars for Scholars” will here goes: My great niece, be held at the high school Roxy Hylton, had two little commons. Come out and boys, born Feb. 17 and they support this most worthy were very little, like three cause, which helps students pounds, and are still in hosfinancially along their way THIS & THAT Joyce Emry pital in Spokane. in college. Our computer decided to When you’re finished with quit…(the mouse died or your shopping cart, take notice of where you leave it. Sometimes something), grandsons with computer they go wild as one did last week and savvy are the greatest! Took a while before we figured out ran into my car making several small scratches and they aren’t ones that can what all the commotion was last Friday, be buffed out. No way of knowing who when the fire trucks had their sirens on the guilty party was but the cart was still and all kinds of official cars were going down the road, making a racket, so the sitting, touching my car. I can hear just fine! Three retirees, girl’s basketball team got quite a send each with a hearing loss, were playing off as they were off to Richland to be in golf one fine March day. One remarked the play-offs. Reports are that they lost,

Chinese Dinner on March 8

BLUE STAR MOTHERS Lead Petty Officer at the Hopper Information Services Center in Whidbey Island, WA for the Northwest Information Technology Services Department. They provide communication, data, and IT Services in support of the Fleet. He has achieved three warfare designations: Surface, Aviation, and Information Dominance. Stationed in Yokasuka, Japan Chris was there during the 9.0 magnitude earthquake that took place in Sendai March 2011 generating a 135 foot tsunami which took out the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant 215 miles from his base. Whidbey Island Naval Base communications network operations center supports home-ported and transient ships, submarines, aircraft, and service members throughout Washington, Oregon,

THE LEARNING TREE tions. Why does alka-seltzer fizz? We will explore these questions and more with hands-on experiments on Wednesday, March 12 in Oroville. Curious About Alpacas? Learn about this amazing animal with its coat that is softer than cash-

TONASKET EAGLES The Auxiliary meeting will be Thursday at 6:30 p.m. This Friday don’t forget there is bingo at 7 p.m, so get on down here and try your luck at the pick 8 jackpot. The kitchen will be open at 5:30 p.m and gives you plenty of time to enjoy one of our great hamburgers or other hot items before bingo starts. The special of the week will be our delicious Hawaiian burger. Saturday, March 8, there will be a dinner and auction to help benefit the High School Washington, DC

OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER 28 to discuss their service. (Air flights to Spokane, Wenatchee or even Seattle are activated through the EMS System and directly to MEDSTAR). Entrees for next week are: Tuesday, March 4: Sloppy Joes; Thursday, March 6: Turkey Ala King; Friday, March 7: Hamburger Steak and Gravy; Tuesday, March 11: BBQ Pork Riblets; Thursday,

Submitted by Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles

Submitted photo

IT1 Christopher Rojeski Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and Alaska. The Puget Sound is the Navyís third largest fleet concentration area: Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Naval Station Everett, Naval Base Kitsap and Naval Magazine Indian Island. Thank you and your family for your service, Chris! mere. You will make cowboy soap, a bird nester project, and a surprise to take home. This is a two session class on March 13 and 15, and for the second session you will want to bring a bucket to collect some Alpaca Gold for your garden! To register for these classes call Ellen Bartells at (509) 4762011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu or sign up on our website at www. northvalleycommunityschools. com. trip. Come and help support their upcoming trip. Karaoke by Linda will follow at 9 p.m. Sunday, March 9 from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. is our Sunday breakfast. It is a great way to come enjoy some good company and get your day going. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows. High Score was snatched up by Leonard Paulsen and in a close second place was Joanne Michels. Low score was taken by Sue Wisener and the last pinochle of the day was by Joanne Michels and Leonard Paulsen. We wish all those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the state. March 13: Scalloped Potatoes and Ham; Friday, March 14: Corned Beef and Cabbage; (of course! What else could you have to honor St. Patrick?) Guess I need to clarify the meetings for the Stroke Support Group meetings are scheduled for the fourth Thursday of the month. Sorry for any confusion over this from last week. Pinochle Scores for Saturday, March 1: The door prize was won by Sally Eder; Most Pinochles by Wilma Colburn. High Scoring Man was Ed Craig and Wilma Colburn was High Scoring Woman. More next time.

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Time is running out to get your tickets for a Special Chinese Dinner by Linda Darrow on Saturday, March 8. An auction will follow. Tickets for $15 are on sale now at the club or from Eagle members, all tickets sold in advance by March 6. Please come out and support your Eagles and our local charities. This is open to the public. We won’t have Steak Night on the 7, but will resume next week. There will be a 4-5-6 game, a

but it was a great honor that they played well enough throughout the season to be ranked high enough to attend. Coming out of church, Mrs. Peterson asks her husband, “Do you think that Johnson girl is tinting her hair?” “I didn’t even see her,” Mr. Peterson admits. And that dress Mrs. Hansen was wearing,” Mrs. Peterson continues. “Really, don’t tell me you think that’s the proper costume for a mother of two.” I’m afraid I didn’t notice that either.” Mr. Peterson says. “Oh, for heaven’s sake, Mrs. Peterson snaps. “A lot of good it does you to go to church.” Thanks to Bob Hilderbrand to have noticed that one of our senior citizens, Zane Gazaway, had fallen and was lying on the road. He suffered minor scratches from the face down fall, and is doing okay, but if he hadn’t been seen, the cold temperatures could have been disastrous for him. Strawberries in the winter are usually big, red and tasteless, but recent ones have been so tasty. Not cheap but tasty. And sometimes we need a treat, don’t we?

EAGLEDOM AT WORK Texas Hold’em game, and a pool tournament for members only from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, March 8 for Eagle members only. On Sunday March 16 we will have our annual chili and cornbread cook off. Eagle members can sign up by March 15 to bring their favorite recipes for judging by all tasters. On Saturday March 22 North Half will be playing for your enjoyment. And on Sunday, March 23 we will hold a Pool Meat Shoot at 1 p.m., sign up by

Community Cultural Center of Tonasket in March

CCC MARCH EVENTS

Friday, March 7 - Grassland Ecology and Grass ID; Dinner, 5:00 p.m., presentation 6:30. Sunday, March 9 - Community Meal, 2:00 p.m.

Thursday, March 13 Corporations are NOT People!!; 5:00 p.m. Friday, March 14 - Coffee House - Ruby Rust; 6:00 p.m.

branch

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12:30 p.m. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Monday is Taco Night, during Pool League we have Burgers on Wednesdays, Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night, Karaoke and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

Sunday, March 16 - Artist Paint-in, 10:00 a.m. Friday, March 21 - Musical Performance - Ian McFeron; Dinner 5:30 p.m. Music 7:00. Wednesday, March 26 Community Theater Auditions, 6:00 p.m. Sunday, March 30 - Community Meal, 2:00 p.m.

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MARCH 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A7

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

Honors recital upcoming SUBMITTED BY KATHLEEN CHRISTENSEN

OKANOGAN CO. MUSIC TEACHERS ASSN.

OMAK - The Honors Recital for students chosen during recent adjudications for Okanogan County Music Teachers Association (OKMTA) will be held Thursday, March 13, 7:00 p.m. at the Omak Community Presbyterian Church, 9 S. Birch. Also presented are winners and

alternates of the State Honors Recital Competitions. Representing OKMTA will be Gloria Fast, student of Elizabeth Grunst, Oroville. Alternate is Joe Mintzer, student of Kathleen Christensen, Omak. Representing District V of the State MTA for non-keyboards will be Bethany Fast, violin student of Roz Nau, Tonasket. Nau’s violin student Brennan Ramsey was alternate.

Also performing are the following teachers’ piano students chosen by adjudicator Dr. Yelena Balabanova, Mulkiteo, WA: Elizabeth Grunst (teacher): Nathan Rise, Eliza Sylvester. Roz Nau (teacher): Sterling Ritch, Joseph Schell. Sandy Sheets, Omak (teacher): Madison Gariano, Daniele Sparks. Lois Rhoads, Tonasket (teacher): Emily Williams, Jessica

Laurie honored for 25 years SUBMITTED BY BROCK HIRES

TONASKET- Sherri Laurie was recently awarded a certificate of appreciation for her service at the Tonasket Senior Center. Laurie began working for the Okanogan County Nutrition and Transportation (OCNT) program in 1989, as the site director for the meal program in Tonasket. A few years later she took the position of a cookís helper. Laurie has also served as the head cook, from time to time. “A lot of people have come and gone since I started here, 25 years ago, but new people are always coming,” Laurie says. Laurie

Sherri Laurie

Submitted photo

Ruth Moody and her band performed at the CCC of Tonasket last Saturday.

Moody charms CCC crowd

enjoys being around people and helping the senior citizens. Besides working for the OCNT, she is an active member of the Tonasket Senior Citizens organization, volunteering with their country store, and leading the SAIL exercise program. Laurie plans to continue her position and involvement with the program for as long as she can. Laurie says, “I feel very privileged to be working with Lola Orr, the cook, and Kathy Anderson, our bus driver.” Dinners are served; Mon., Wed., and Thurs., at 12 p.m. at the Tonasket Senior Center, 22 E 5th St, Tonasket, WA.

SUBMITTED BY HEATHER STRAUB CCC OF TONASKET

TONASKET - The internationally acclaimed artist Ruth Moody and her band of top-shelf musicians graced the stage with their style of fun, folksy music to a packed house

at the Community Cultural Center last Saturday evening, March 1. Ruth wowed the crowd with her skills on the guitar and banjo, and a voice that would put the birds to shame. Her band left everyone impressed with their accompaniments on fiddle, electric guitar, mandolin, upright bass, even the

accordion and ukulele on some of the songs! After the show Ruth stayed to meet and greet her fans and sign CDs, sharing her genuine kindness and expressing her gratitude to all that came.Not one in attendance left without a smile on their face, a song in their hearts, and a jig in their step!

COMMUNITY CALENDAR TONASKET - Tonasket Preschool Story Time will Thursday, March 6 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library at 209 S Whitcomb Ave. Story times will be the first and third Thursday of each month. Any questions call the Tonasket Library at (509) 486-2366.

STARTING SEED LIBRARY

OROVILLE - The Oroville Public Library is housing a Seed Library. Do you like to garden? If you want to help out, there will be a volunteer orientation at the Oroville Library on Thursday, March 6 from 3 to 5 p.m. Watch for flyers at the Library and around town, announcing open dates. Free seeds will be available. We are looking for old photo albums to use for seed cataloging, and we need them before opening this spring. If you have any kind of photo album you could donate, please contact LaVonne at (509) 485-2403 or lavomsn@hotmail.com; 3 ring binders and sheet protectors would also be useful.

WHAT’S FOR DINNER? CLASS

OROVILLE – What’s For Dinner? In this North Valley Community School class we will knead some whole wheat non-GMO bread and, while that rises, we’ll talk about redefining our dinner culture for better health. Then, we’ll prepare some healthier choices. Bring a bread pan to class and you will prepare a loaf to bake at home. For this Thursday, March 6 class, call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu, or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

OPEN HOUSE FOR NORTH VALLEY HEALTH & REHAB.

TONASKET - Unveiling our new space on Friday, March 7, from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at 118 S. Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket. Please join us for a tour of the new facility, meet our therapists and enjoy cake and refreshments. For more information go to www.nvhospital.org.

GRASSLAND ECOLOGY AND GRASS IDENTIFICATION

TONASKET - Okanogan Highlands Alliance announces the return of one of the region’s premier grass experts, Don Gayton, who will discuss local grassland ecology and grass plant identification at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket, Friday, March 7, 6:30 p.m. Topics covered will include grassland types, invasive plants, grazing and fire interactions, and simplified methods of identifying grasses. A display of local grass samples will provide examples of some of the species being discussed. Highland Wonders presentations are offered free to the community, and donations are welcome. The meal (beginning at 5 p.m.) is $7.50 for CCC members or $8.50 for non-members; a dessert and one beverage is included for dinner guests. Dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5 p.m.

BENEFIT FOR ALEX CLARK & FAMILY

OROVILLE - The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 84 will be hosting a benefit dinner for Alex Clark and family on Saturday, March 8 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Alex was injured in a head on car accident on Jan. 2, 2014 and has not been able to return to work due to his injuries. The dinner will at the American Legion Post on 14th & Cherry St. in Oroville. Spaghetti, salad, French bread and deserts for just $6 per plate.

OROVILLE EAGLES BENEFIT DINNER

OROVILLE – The Oroville Eagles is inviting the public to a Benefit Chinese Dinner prepared by Linda Darrow on Saturday, March 8 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be a silent auction for pies, cakes and gift certificates with a live auction of donated items from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Eagles Aerie is located at 1319 Golden St. Tickets are $15, sold at the bar. Come and support the Eagles and local charities. For more info call (509) 476-3039.

SPIRITUAL MOVIE NIGHT

The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, March 8 at 6:30 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call (509) 476-0200.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

RIVERSIDE - The March meeting of the Okanogan Habitat for Humanity will be Tuesday, March 11 at 7 p.m. at the home of Mike and Peggy McDaniel. 170 Hubbard Rd Riverside For further information or questions call Arlene Johnson (509) 429 8369.

4-H TRAINING

OKANOGAN - On Tuesday, March 11: there will be 4-H Basic Training for adult volunteers at the WSU Extension Office at 5 p.m. Future meetings include: Thursday, March 13: 4-H Leaders Council, WSU Extension Office, 6 p.m.; Saturday, March 22: 4-H Super Saturday, Virginia Granger Elementary School in Okanogan, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. For more information call (509) 422-7245

CURIOUS ABOUT ALPACAS

OROVILLE - It’s a charming, quirky animal, responsible for bearing some of the silkiest, most versatile fiber found in nature. Its coat is softer than cashmere. In this class you will learn about the Alpaca and some fast, fun things to do with its lovely and warm fiber and a surprise craft project for everyone to take home. Classes are Thursday, March 13 and Saturday, March 15 through North Valley Community Schools. The second session will be a field trip to Mowry Mountain Alpaca Ranch. To register call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email community.schools@oroville.wednet.edu.

rates or how much product you need to put in your sprayer based on label recommendations. There will be a $5 charge for the class, and possibly several pesticide license credits will be available. For more info call the Weed Office at (509) 422-7165, or stop by the office, Room 102 in the courthouse.

Your Complete Eyecare Centre

TONASKET FOOD BANK

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

OROVILLE FOOD BANK

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

LISTING YOUR ITEM

BOOSTER CLUB AUCTION

TONASKET - Tonasket Athletics Booster Club annual Dessert Auction is Saturday, March 15 at the Kuhler. Live dessert auction starts at 7 p.m. All proceeds benefit Tonasket Schools Athletic Programs.

BEST OF WOMEN FAIR

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan Valley Soroptimist present the Best of Women Fair on Saturday, March 15, 2014 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Okanogan High School Cafetorium. Free admission, baked goods, drawings for prizes and silent auction.

TONASKET PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

TONASKET - Tonasket Preschool Story Time will be Thursday, March 20 at 10:30 a.m. at the Tonasket Library at 209 S Whitcomb Ave. Story times will be the first and third Thursday of each month. Any questions call the Tonasket Library at (509) 486-2366.

OVOC SOUNDS OF SPRING

OMAK - The Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus presents the Sounds of Spring, Sunday, March 23 at 3 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center The Orchestra and Chorus will feature “The Stafford Poems” by local composer Terry Hunt.

BACKPACK SPRAYER CALIBRATION

OKANOGAN - The county Noxious Weed Control Board will be holding a Calibration Class for backpack sprayers and ATV’s on Thursday, April 17. In the class you will learn how to calibrate your sprayer, figure out how much product your sprayer is actually putting out per acre and practice calculating application

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HEALTH CARE

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The calender allows listing up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune.com allows the event to be listed for longer. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a more info phone number. Place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking “Add an Event” on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t automatically go into the paper, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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Toll Free

                               Visit  Our  Website  

www.olivertheatre.ca    Mon.    Tues.        March  2  -­  3  –  4                        Sun.            V–isit   O–ur   Website   Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        March  2  -­  3  –  4   www.olivertheatre.ca   Beston.   Supporting Actress: Julia Roberts Sun.  –  M –  Tues.        March   2  -­  3  –  4  

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

Nominated for 2 Academy Awards Best Actress: Meryl Streep Best Supporting Actress: Julia Roberts

www.olivertheatre.ca

THE NUT JOB

HEALTH CARE

Oliver, B.C.

Violence,  coarse  language.   Violence,  coarse  language.  

Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  20  –  21     Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  20  –  21     Showtimes  on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.   Showtimes   n  Fri.   @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.   Violence,  co oarse   language.  

Coarse  language.   Coarse  language.  

250-498-2277 Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  6  –  7     Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  6  –  7    

Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  20  –  21     Showtimes  on  Fri.  @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.  

Coarse  language.  

Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  6  –  7    

pg

THURS.-FRI MaR. 6&7. +MaTInee SaT. MaR.8 2pM

There  will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  Sat.,  March  8     There   ill  aplso   be    Aa  ll   msatinee   this  sfhow   n  Sm at.,   March  8      at  2w :00   .m.   eats  o$f  6.00   or  tohe   atinee.    at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Sat.  -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        March  8  -­  9  –  10  –  11   Sat.  -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        March  8  -­  9  –  10  –  11   Showtimes   n  Sat.    7show   :00  o&n    S9at.,   :20  arch   p.m.   There   will  also  be  a  moatinee   of  @ this   8     Showtimes  on  Sat.   @  7:00   &  9:20  pM.m.    at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

MONUMENTS MEN

Sat.  -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        March  8  -­  9  –  10  –  11   Showtimes  on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.  

SaT-SUn-MOn-TUeS. MaR. 8-9-10-11. SaT. 7&9:20pM

RidE AlONg THURS.-FRI. MaR 13-14

Violence,   coarse   language.   Violence,   coarse   language.  

Thurs.   March   arch   Thurs.  -­  -­F  Fri.   ri.                  M 13  1–3    1–4    1   4    

Violence,  coarse  language.   Violence,  coarse  language.  

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       March  22  –  23  –  24  -­  25,  27  -­  28     March  22  –  23  –  24  -­  25,  27  -­  28     Violence,  coarse  language.  

Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       March  22  –  23  –  24  -­  25,  27  -­  28    

also   a  sm atinee   of  Sat.   this  show  on  the  Sat.   There  will  aThere   lso  be  a  w mill   atinee   of  bte   his   how   on  the   :00  p .m.    fAor  ll  the   seats   $6.00  for  the  matinee.    at  2:00  p.m.      aAt  ll  2seats   $6.00   matinee.  

Thurs.  -­  Fri.          March  13  –  14    

DENTAL

There  will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the  Sat.    at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Sat.  -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.      March  29  -­  30  –  31,  Apr.  1  

pg

OMAK THEATER Violence,   coarse   language.   Violence,   coarse   language.  

 

MEDICAL

un.   Mon.    Tues.   9  -­1    30  –  31,  Apr.  1   Sat.  -­  SSat.   un.  –  -­M  Son.   –  T–  ues.      M–arch   29  -­    3  M 0  –arch    31,  A2pr.  

Violence,  coarse  language.  

OMak and MIRage THeaTeRS aRe nOw dIgITal

SON Of gOd NEBRASkA

Explicit  violence.  

Programme  Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

 

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

dRaMa . STaRRIng dIOgO MORadO, aMbeR ROSe Revan, SebaSTIan knapp FRI. 8:15 SaT. 6:15 SUn. 6:15. wkdaYS. 8:00

Explicit  violence.   Explicit  violence.  

Programme   Subject   To  Unavoidable   change   without  notice   Programme   Subject   To  Unavoidable   change  without   notice  

 

Violence,  coarse  language.  

pg13

138 min

R

115 min

HEALTH CARE

Phone  250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

OPTICAL

 Emergency  VA

Clinic

 Surgical

Center

 Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical  Imaging

Services

 Full-Service

Laboratory Care  Swing Bed Program  Extended

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

HEALTH CARE

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

300: RiSE Of AN EMpiRE

103min

R

aCTIOn/waR/dRaMa STaRRIng SUllIvan STapleTOn, ROdRIgO SanTORO, eva gReen. FRI. 6:45, 9:45 SaT. *4:00, 6:45, 9:45 SUn.*4:00,6:45, 9:45. wkdaYS.6:45

NON-STOp aCTIOn/MYSTeRY/THRIlleR

STaRRIng lIaM neeSOn, JUlIanne MOORe, lUpITa nYOngO. FRI. 6:45, 9:45 SaT. *4:00, 6:45, 9:45 SUn. *4:00, 6:45. wkdaYS. 6:45

MR. pEABOdy & SHERMAN

92min

pg

anIM./COMedY/advenTURe. TY bURRell, Max CHaRleS, STepHen COlbeRT. FRI. 7&9:30, SaT. *4:15, 7 & 9:30 SUn *4:15, 7:00 wkdYS 7:00 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

l Your

826-7919 For eye exams, 826-1800 UGO BARTELL, O.D.

Complete Respiratory Equipment Center l Oxygen Concentrators l Portable Concentrators l Sleep Apnea Equipment l Nebulizers l Home Sleep Tests Open: Monday - Friday

Office: 509-826-1688

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com

Coagulation Clinic

 Ophthalmology  Radiology

 Behavioral

Health In Clinic  Family Practice  Laboratory  Surgery Center  Chemo Infusion  Walk

509-826-1800

916 Koala, Omak, WA 98841 MASSAGE Licensed Massage Practitioner

We would be honored to work with you!

dRaMa/advenTURe STaRRIng bRUCe deRn, wIll FORTe, JUne SqUIbb. FRI. 5:30, SaT. *3:30, 9:15. SUn *3:30. wkdYS 5:00 The MIRAGE THEATER

 Anti

Su Ianniello

Sat.  -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        March  15  -­  16  –  17  –  18  

Nominated for 2 Academy Awards Best Actress: Meryl Streep Nominated for 2 Academy Awards Best Supporting Actress: Julia Roberts Best Actress: Meryl Streep

Oliver Theatre Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.      Segular   at………….……….7:00   Sun.  –  M  on.   T–ues.   –  Thurs…7:30   p.m.   &  9:00  p.m.    Fri.        –    R Showtimes                          (unless  otherwise   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00   &  9:00  p.m.  stated)                            (unless  otherwise  stated)   Sun.   –  Mon.   –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30   p.m.   Phone   250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,   BC   at………….……….7:00   Phone  Fri.   250-­‐–  4S98-­‐ 2277        Oliver,  BC   &  9:00  p.m.   Sat.  -­  Sun.  –          M –  Tues.        March  1stated)   5  -­  16  –  17  –  18        on.            (unless   otherwise   Sat.  -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        March  15  -­  16  –  17  –  18  

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Chemical Dependency (509) 826-5600

           Regular  Showtimes              Regular   Showtimes    

                 2        014        Visit  POrogramme   ur  Website   March,   www.olivertheatre.ca  

HEALTH CARE

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Psychiatric Services

OLIVER THEATRE OLIVER THEATRE OLIVER THEATRE March,  2014  Programme  

MOViES

OKANOGAN

Mental Health

www.wvmedical.com

Enjoy  your   evening   out,  taking   March,   2014   Programme   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

TONASKET

OMAK

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

Enjoy  your  evening  out,  taking   In  aEnjoy    movie   at  etvening   he  Oliver   heatre!   your   out,  tT aking   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

FAMILY DENTISTRY Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OSF VARIETY SHOW

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation’s annual Variety Show and Silent Auction fundraiser will be Friday, March 14 at OHS Coulton Auditorium. To donate auction items you may call G. Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416 or Terri Barker at (509) 476-3145.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

TONASKET PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

patty.evans@soundoxygen.com 646 Okoma Drive, Suite D, Omak

Offering various techniques for Relaxation & Pain Relief

Massage allows you to relax in your own body...have more energy and Flexibility.

Ph. 509-486-1440 Cell: 509-322-0948

39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket suinlo@yahoo.com WA Lic#MA21586

YOUR AD HERE

Call today and see your ad in this space next week! Call Charlene at 476-3602


Page A8 8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | march 6, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • March 6, 2014

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale LITTLE HOUSE on very nice city lot. Poor condition needs lots of work. Seller terms to reliable, able buyer only. Seller is licensed RE Agent. $44,500 Call 509-4762121

www.gazette-tribune.com

For Rent Oroville Garden Apartments

Senior or Disabled Housing

Units Available

Subsidized Unit if eligible Located downtown Applications available at 617 Fir St., Oroville Call: 509-476-3059

Found

For Rent

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711

FOUND TOOLS on Hwy 7. Call to identify, (509)4864115

www.gazette-tribune.com NICE APARTMENTS Available, $410 - $650. Located In Oroville And Okanogan. CALL TODAY, You Could Get One Month For FREE! Call Sun Lakes Realty, 509-476-2121 Orville: 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, lake view, nice, clean $750/1st/last/damage. Airport Rd. 509-560-0240

Help Wanted Okanogan County Department of Public Works is recruiting for the position of

Solid Waste Manager Starting wage is $3,819/ month with a full benefit package. First review is March 12, 2014, open until filled. For more information go to

www.okanogancounty.org/HR www.okanogancounty.org/HR

or call 509-422-7300.

Announcements Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Crosswords

Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

www.gazette-tribune.com

8. Gorge

28. Oolong, for one

9. Information about information

29. ___ and outs

10. Bikini, e.g.

30. Houses and land (2 wds)

11. Hairy-chested

35. “Likewise�

12. Excessive drinker

38. “The ___ Daba Honeymoon�

14. Owl, e.g.

39. “Rabbit food�

20. Chop (off)

40. Cumulonimbus, e.g. (2 wds)

21. Salad green

43. “... ___ he drove out of sight�

24. Boosts

44. ___ blood group system

25. Jersey, e.g.

45. Highlands hillside

27. Shish ___

47. Ballpoint, e.g.

31. Those honored for great achievements

51. Methuselah’s father

32. The first transfinite cardinal (mathematics)

53. Post-diaper discipline (2 wds)

33. Container weight

56. Bridge toll unit

34. “Our Time in ___� (10,000 Maniacs album)

58. Be a monarch 60. Equal 61. Architectural projection

1. “-zoic� things 5. Come together

62. The Kennedys, e.g. 63. Annexes 64. Contact, e.g. 65. “___ for the poor�

9. “Oh, ___!� 13. Bowed 14. Strategy board game 15. And others, for short 16. ___ carotene 17. Circle 18. Honky-___ 19. In a tactful manner 22. It’s a snap

We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: Clinical Informatics Specialist – Full time Dental Hygienist Part time/20 hours per week. Travel between Okanogan, Brewster & Oroville required. Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Okanogan Dental: Dental Assistant – Full time Patient Registration Rep. Full time

26. Benefit

57. Beat

ANSWERS

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Brewster (Indian Ave): Patient Navigator .80 FTE/32 hours per week. On Call CMA Bilingual English/Spanish Oroville & Tonasket required. Is seeking a caring, compas- MA-R, MA-C or LPN sionate, patient oriented ap- Full time plicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with com- Tonasket: puters and able to multitask. MA-R, MA-C, or LPN Current Washington State Li- 1 per diem positions cense required. Must suc- LPN, MA-C or MA-R cessfully pass a background 0.80 FTE/32 hours per week check and urine drug screen. Oroville Dental: Visit our website, Dental Assistant – Per Diem wvmedical.com See www.myfamilyhealth.org for more information for job descriptions. and to apply online Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, www.gazette-tribune.com WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. 6. Goya’s “Duchess of ___� 23. Not quite Open until filled. 7. Forger 24. Alias (abbrev.) FHC is an EEO Employer.

48. Stone mounds erected as markers

Across

Health General

Health General

36. Excerpts advertising new films 37. 18th-century card game 41. Check 42. 1973 Elton John hit 46. Long, long time 48. Served as helmsman

www.gazette-tribune.com

Firewood

Statewides

NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx

No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Miscellaneous

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: CHARLES FREDRICK SIEGRIST, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00013-7 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: February 10, 2014. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 20, 2014. /s/ Susan Siegrist SUSAN SIEGRIST Personal Representative /s/ Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Siegrist Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 20, 27, March 6, 2014. # 544580

agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

Alfalfa Grass Hay, small square or large round bales $170- $220 per ton (509)4298829, (509)486-4301

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF MARCH 3, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make goodâ€?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS NEED CLASS A CDL Training? Start a Career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Classâ€? training. • New Academy Classes Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor) • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package Please Call: (602) 730-7709 DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children.

Think Green!

MISCELLANEOUS DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/month (where available.) Ask About Same Day Installation! Call Now! 1-800-430-5604

Public Notices

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: 3/13/2014 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1998 Chevrolet C1500 Lic# B25347W WA Published in the Okanogan ValleyGazette on March 6, 2014. #546413

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF OKANOGAN In re the Estate of: JOHN W. UMBERGER, Deceased. NO. 14-4-00014NOTICE TO CREDITORS The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time

Legals Continued On Next Page

Did you know?

We use... ď Ź Soy Ink ď Ź Recycled Paper ď Ź Excess paper recycled for

gardens, ďŹ re starter & more!

49. Had a bug 50. Abundance 52. About

Down 1. “Chicago� lyricist 2. Bassoon, e.g. 3. Italian appetizer 4. Kind of infection 5. Resembling marble

53. Spanish appetizer 54. Archaeological site 55. ___ rock, e.g. David Bowie 59. “Star Trek� rank: Abbr.

1420 Main St., Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602

www.gazette-tribune.com


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Post your comments on recent articles and let your voice be heard.

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www.gazette-tribune.com

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 10 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.42)

www.gazette-tribune.com

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Request for Proposals to Operate a Concession Providing Lodging and Commercial Services The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) is seeking a qualified person(s) or business to operate and maintain concession facilities and provide commercial services to the public at Conconully Reservoir (Reservoir), at the concession known as Liar’s Cove Resort. This opportunity is for a recreational concession under the terms and conditions of a 20-year contract. Liar’s Cove Resort utilizes approximately 4.18 acres of the northeasterly shore of Conconully Reservoir, ¼ mile south of the town of Conconully, Okanogan County, Washington. Concession facilities include: 35 RV sites total; a double-wide mobile/cabin rental; 3 hotel rooms; 2 freestanding cabins; 4 tent sites; a small store, a separate bath and shower site; and a custom-built boat dock. The concession is required to provide services to the public during the operating season from the Friday proceeding April 30 through October 15 A prospectus and draft contract may be obtained from: Ephrata Field Office Attention: Mr. Richard Honey Bureau of Reclamation P.O. Box 815 Ephrata, WA 98823 (509) 754-0267 phone rhoney@usbr.gov The prospectus contains additional information on the concession, items to be included in a proposal, submittal dates, and the selection process. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 6, 13, 2014. #546865

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PUBLIC NOTICE School is hereby given that the Oroville School District No. 410 will hold a public hearing on March12 at 6:30 PM, in order to review the re-districting boundaries set by Okanogan County for the Oroville School District. The hearing will be held in the district office. The public is invited to attend. Re-districting boundaries will be available on our webiste www.oroville.wednet.edu. Written comments can be sent to the district office, 816 Juniper Street, Oroville, WA 98844. The district will accept public comments until March 21, 2014 with adoption of the re-districting at the March 24, 2014 school board meeting. Steve Quick Superintendent of Schools Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 6, 2014. #547254 PUBLIC NOTICE The Oroville Civil Service Commission has rescheduled their Monday, March 24th meeting to Monday, March 10th at 4:30 pm in the City Council Chambers. Regular meetings are held the fourth Monday of each month at 4:30 PM in the City Council Chambers. If you have any questions, please call JoAnn Denney at the Oroville City Hall, 476-2926 ext. 13 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on March 6, 2014. #546430

Sudoku

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FILING COPY OF NOTICE TO CREDITORS with Clerk of Court: February 3, 2014. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: February 13, 2014. /s/ John Wayne Umberger JOHN WAYNE UMBERGER Personal Representative /s/ Anthony Castelda Anthony Castelda, WSBA #28937 Attorney for Umberger Estate P.O. Box 1307 Tonasket, WA 98855 (509) 486-1175 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 20, 27, March 6, 2014. #543806

Public Notices

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MARCH 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE March 6, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Legals Continued From Previous Page

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Beautiful young orchard! Well cared for! Great income potential. Nearly 20 acres of cherries: 6 acres of Chelan cherries planted in 2008, 4 more acres planted in 2011. 10 acres of Coral Champagne cherries planted in 2009. Trees planted on 16x9 spacing on Mazzard rootstock. Some equipment available for additional sale. MLS#488534 $275,000

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | MARCH 6, 2014

SPORTS ALL-LEAGUE SELECTIONS 195 - Cody Hoffman, Selkirk 220 - Joey Dickinson, Selkirk 285 - Octavio Alejandre, Lake Roosevelt

Collin Aitcheson - Wrestling MVP Wrestling

(Based on finish at District tournament)

Caribou Trail League

Wrestler of the Year: Collin Aitcheson, Tonasket 1st Place 106 - Payton Anthony, Okanogan 113 - Raul Barajas, Quincy 120 - Collin Aitcheson, Tonasket 126 - Julio Vera, Chelan 132 - Jorge Juarez, Tonasket 138 - Raf Varelas, Brewster 145 - Isaias Jimenez, Quincy 152 - Alex Aguilar, Omak 160 - Antonio Melendez, Quincy 170 - Jacob James, Cashmere 182 - Cody Harvill, Omak 195 - John Rawley, Tonasket 220 - Asa Schwartz, Chelan 285 - Michael Sorensen, Cascade 2nd Place 106 - Victor Salgado, Quincy 113 - Angel Hernandez, Chelan 120 - Ivan Reyes, Chelan 126 - Dyllan Walton, Tonasket 132 - Jalen Moses, Okanogan 138 - Ethan Visser, Cashmere 145 - Jairo DeLaCruz, Chelan 152 - Juan Garcia, Chelan 160 - Caleb Riggle, Omak 170 - Austin Knowlton, Tonasket 182 - Rowdy Kruse, Omak 195 - Nathaniel Merry, Cascade 220 - Austin Morris, Quincy 285 - Jose Solorio, Quincy 3rd Place 106 - Vance Frazier, Tonasket 113 - Elvin Montiel, Brewster 120 - Nathan Thompson, Cashmere 126 - Ismael Guerrero, Quincy 132 - Justin Buyas, Chelan 138 - John Lindquist, Quincy 145 - Julian Buyas, Chelan 152 - Brock Steele, Cashmere 160 - Matt Barnes, Chelan 170 - Steven Gomez, Quincy 182 - Bernardo Maravilla, Cascade 195 - Cade Wallace, Quincy 220 - Adrian Urias, Brewster 285 - Dreyton Acord, Okanogan

Northeast 1B/2B 1st Place 106 - Jose Paco Marin, Kittitas 113 - Justin Chantry, Selkirk 120 - Trent Skelton, Liberty Bell 126 - Jose Kike Marin, Kittitas 132 - JD Gallegos, Kittitas 138 - Meritt Fink, Liberty Bell 145 - Kodie Horn, Lake Roosevelt 152 - Emmett Fink, Liberty Bell 160 - Milo Holston, Liberty Bell 170 - Blake Phillips, Republic 182 - Lucas Rittel, Republic

2nd Place 106 - Ben Weber, Kittitas 113- Julio Espino, Pateros 120 - James Monaghan, Lake Roosevelt 126 - Colton Williams, Lake Roosevelt 132 - Oscar Pakootas, Lake Roosevelt 138 - Clark Rabe, NW Christian 145 - Luis Gutierrez, Pateros 152 - Ben Alford, NW Christian 160 - Eddie Ocampo, Oroville 170 - William Fager, Mary Walker 182 - Taylor Robinson, Oroville 195 - Andrew Carney, Kittitas 220 - Izzy Sungalu, Mary Walker 285 - Kolten Fanning, Republic 3rd Place 106 - Ryan Issakides, Selkirk 113 - Jamie Mendez, Pateros 120 - Logan Weber, Kittitas 126 - Danny Humiston, Liberty Bell 132 - Kaleb Marten, Liberty Bell 138 - Walker Baumbach, Republic 145 - Jacob McMillan, Liberty Bell 152 - Nick Forbes, Kittitas 160 - Dallas Pierce, NW Christian 170 - Wyatt Ginter, Pateros 182 - Lane Clifner, Mary Walker 195 - Lukas Mieirs, Oroville 220 - Payden Cates, Mary Walker 285 - Jacob Klingensmith, Republic

Megan Robinson, Sr., Chelan Kaycee OíBrien, Jr., Cascade Johnna Rieke, Sr., Cascade Shawnee Covington, Sr., Omak Kaelyn Marchand, So., Omak Liz Nielson, So., Quincy Kylie Dellinger, Sr., Tonasket

NCW North Division League MVP: Lily Hilderbrand, Oroville Coach of the Year: Brandon Boyd, Bridgeport Sportsmanship: Manson 1st Team Lachelle Bearcub, Lake Roosevelt Riley Epperson, Lake Roosevelt Mikayla Scott, Oroville Jennifer Salazar, Bridgeport Brittany Jewett, Oroville 2nd Team Meagan Moralez, Oroville Alana Epperson, Lake Roosevelt Samantha Martinez, Bridgeport Anita Velazquez, Bridgeport Kaitlyn Grunst, Oroville Honorable Mention Marissa Garcia, Oroville Baylee Ward, Manson Lauren Fitzmaurice, Liberty Bell Rachel Vanderholm, Manson

Boys Basketball Caribou Trail League Player of the Year: Justin Rivas, Sr., Okanogan Coach of the Year: Mike Carlquist, Okanogan Team Sportsmanship: Quincy 1st Team Easton Driessen, Sr., Brewster Dylan Boyd, Sr., Cashmere Jim Townsend, Jr., Okanogan Hank Hollingsworth, Jr., Chelan Justin VanderWeide, Sr., Okanogan 2nd Team Chance Williams, So., Omak Timbo Taylor, So., Brewster Hunter Read, Jr., Cashmere Ivan Rodriguez, Jr., Chelan Tristin Parton, Sr., Cascade

Lily Hilderbrand - Hoops MVP Girls Basketball Caribou Trail League Player of the Year: Chandler Smith, Sr., Brewster Coach of the Year: Brent Darnell, Cashmere Team Sportsmanship: Quincy 1st Team Breanne Knishka, Jr., Cashmere Jill Townsend, Fr., Okanogan Monica Landdeck, Sr., Brewster Abby Phelps, Sr., Chelan Lauren Johnson, Sr., Cashmere 2nd Team Brette Boesel, Sr., Brewster Jordyn Boesel, Fr., Okanogan Sydney Coffin, Sr., Cascade Mikayla Sites, Sr., Cashmere Emma Stockholm, So., Chelan Honorable Mention Abbie Johnson, Fr., Cashmere Tianna Helm, Sr., Cashmere Markie Miller, So., Brewster Cayden Diefenbach, So., Okanogan

Honorable mention Jason Perez, Sr., Okanogan Tyler Morris, Jr., Okanogan Josh Hammons, So., Brewster Cade Smith, So., Brewster Mason Elliott, Jr., Cashmere Kai Clausen, Sr., Chelan Dennis Merritt, Jr., Cascade Jaxon Watson, So., Cascade Leighton Boyd, Sr., Omak Luis Zogaib, Jr., Quincy Trevor Terris, Sr., Tonasket

NCW North Division League MVP: Chance Garvin. Lake Roosevelt Coach of the Year: Matt Simpson, Lake Roosevelt Sportsmanship - Bridgeport 1st Team Jaymis Hanson, Liberty Bell Bailey Evenson, Bridgeport Joseph Sarmiento, Oroville Austin Watson, Liberty Bell Logan Szafas, Lake Roosevelt 2nd Team Jake Palmer, Lake Roosevelt Nain Sanchez, Bridgeport Willie Picton, Manson Austin Rosenbaum, Lake Roosevelt Juan Lopez, Oroville

League landscape comes into focus Tonasket-Oroville games will take on new meaning By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

NORTH COUNTY - The Central Washington 2B League will look a lot different next year. In fact, it will look a lot like the Caribou Trail League did about a dozen years ago, before the advent of the 1B classification. And the decimated CTL will look ... well, barely like a league at all. After a lengthy process that included the every-fouryears reclassification by the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association, appeals by three of the four remaining CTL teams, and finally a decision by an arbitrator, high school sports leagues in the central part of the state have finally been sorted out and have for the most part gotten their fall and winter schedules pulled together. Tonasket and Oroville will be league rivals for the first time since 2006 in the expanded 2B league, joining Okanogan, Brewster, Liberty Bell, Bridgeport and Manson in the North Division in most sports. Lake Roosevelt will belong to the South Division in football but come north for most everything else. LR doesn’t offer boys and girls soccer; Entiat, a 1B school, will join the other soccer-playing schools in the 2B league. White Swan, Mabton, Soap Lake, Kittitas, Waterville and Warden make up the South, adding LR for football. Waterville, which has played 8-man football as a 1B school, apparently won’t be able to field an 11-man team in 2B. Tonasket athletic director Kevin Terris said that the arbitration process nixed what had been a plan to include Omak (still in Class 1A) in the 2B league for regular-season contests. Chelan, Cashmere and Cascade

had repeatedly been turned away in their attempts to join SCAC, a south-central Washington 1A league that, because it is based in a separate district than the CTL teams, was not required to take them in. The arbitrators didn’t force the SCAC to take those three schools in; rather, it ruled that the CTL needed to stay intact, with those three schools and Omak, but that the SCAC schools needed to accommodate the CTL schools in scheduling non-conference games. “The arbitrators decided the Caribou Trail League needed to stay together, with the caveat there would be a grand scheduling meeting where all 2B, 1A and 2A, south central, central and north central Washington schools would get together for a scheduling bonanza, for lack of a better word,” Terris said. “It was interesting. We sent in our schedules. We had it up on a screen: Who doesn’t have a (football) for Week 1 (for example), who doesn’t have games for Week 2. All the bargaining took place. “When they started the meeting, they said if the scheduling meeting didn’t work, the Caribou Trail League teams will be in the SCAC. As soon as that was said, there were people dealing left and right. It was amazing.” As a result, Terris said, fall schedules and girls and boys basketball schedules are pretty much completed, though how to handle wrestling is still in the planning stages. Oroville athletic director Tam Hutchinson fought to keep Lake Roosevelt in the North Division, primarily to keep an even number of teams that would simplify scheduling (such as not ending up with a mid-season open date in football.) “I was writing down things to try to help them,” Hutchinson said. “But then they said they would play football to the south to benefit the league, and I knew the guys to the south might complain if they didn’t. They kind of

gave up on it at the last minute. “I really was fighting for what pretty much would have been an Okanogan County league.” Hutchinson said he didn’t attend the scheduling “bonanza.” “I’d missed so many days of school dealing with this stuff,” he said. “A lot of those guys must not actually teach; I’d been out of class enough.” One consequence of Omak staying with the CTL - in which it will play two league games against each of the other three opponents - was that Oroville football lost a date with the Pioneers in Week 5. “Instead, we’re playing Chelan,” Hutchinson said, admitting it wasn’t a game he thought was good for the Hornets’ program. “We are still trying to find a game for Week 2. Week 1 we’re playing an extra game with White Swan. They’re a good challenge, a good group of guys that I like that coach them.” He said in other sports having the newly-minted 2B schools join the league would be a mixed bag. “Some of them will have a tough go of it,” Hutchionson said. “I think the girls in basketball will do well, except for playing Okanogan, but that will be true for everyone. Volleyball it’s hard to say. Soccer, that’s going to be a tough league but we’ll still be pretty young.” Tonasket is pleased that for the next two years it will be one of the largest schools in the 2B classification instead of a minnow among sharks in 1A. Just don’t get used to it. With the WIAA, nothing is forever, and that especially includes the makeup of leagues. In two years, the schools, appeals board, arbitrators and schedule-makers will be starting from scratch yet again.

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OROVILLE KILLER BEES Two Hundred and fifty-five Wrestlers from Pateros, Oroville, Omak, Okanogan, Liberty Bell, Brewster, and Tonasket made for a good start to the Valley Wrestling Tournaments for our pre-schoolers through sixth graders. Kindergarten: Dodge Holcomb - 2nd place. Also Wrestling: Mason Wall, Brody Booker, and Dylan Kingston

First/Second: Ivan Bugarion 2nd; Isaiah Ocampo - 3rd; Kane Booker - 3rd. Also wreslting: Austin Darrow, Frisco Sanchez, Lance Fox, and Riley McCoy Third/Fourth: Kolo Moser - Champion; Shane Marquiss - Champion; Travis Darrow Champion; Oscar Cervantes 2nd, Victor Ocampo - 3rd; Katie Maynard - 3rd; Alex DelRasario

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MARCH 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A11

SPORTS

Hornets’ season ends at regionals Oroville’s bestever season falls one game short of Spokane Arena BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

RICHLAND - Oroville’s record-breaking girls basketball season came to an end Saturday in Richland as the DeSales Irish pulled away in the second half to post a 50-32 victory over the Hornets in 2B regional action. DeSales advances to the eightteam state tournament at the Spokane Arena, March 6-8. “They were just too good,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “They closed out hard (on defense). We had to take quick shots. We were way outsized. We gave up too much size at every position except point guard. And they never shot like that in the videos we watched. Air balls all over the place, and you didn’t see those tonight. “They’re a lot better in person than they looked like on tape.” The Hornets, playing in their first-ever state regional game, used a 6-0 run to end the first half to stay in the game, trailing 23-18 at the break. The Irish, led by sharpshooting guard Teresa Acock and posts Allison Wujek and Hannah Leahy, used a 14-5 run in the third quarter to build a 15-point lead. “(Wujek) was really good,” Bourn said. “She don’t look like much but she was a load. She’s a lot stronger than she looks. “We wanted to double down on her with Lily (Hilderbrand) to help out Kaitlyn (Grunst). We knew we had to keep an eye on the other girl; they would try to dump it to her and when we started the second half they got a couple right away. The key was to try to stop her. Kaitlyn did a nice job being in position but that little post-up turnaround shot was tough to stop.” Hilderbrand scored six straight points to pull the Hornets to within 41-32 early in the fourth quarter, but Oroville missed on a couple of opportunities to cut the lead even further. Back-to-back buckets by Wujek with less than four minutes to play put the game out of reach. Hilderbrand, a junior, led the Hornets with 16 points. Seniors Brittany Jewett, Meagan Moralez and Kaitlyn Grunst combined for 14 in their final games. Wujek scored 13 and Acock added nine for the Irish. District 5/6 champion White Swan also was eliminated from the post-season on Saturday with its loss to St. George’s, thanks in large part to playing without 6-2 post Emily Botkin. Oroville (15-8) set a school record for wins in a season, won its first outright league title in school history and advanced to the round of 16 for the first time as well. Jewett, Moralez, Grunst and the injured Marissa Garcia will be lost to graduation. Grunst also received the WIAA Sportsmanship Award, given to one player from each team after state tournament contests. “First team to get to state; it says ‘Hardwood Classic’ over there on the sign,” Bourn said of the much-criticized regional format. “We didn’t make the Elite 8. It would have been nice to see if we could come back, hopefully against a little weaker team (than DeSales). But that’s not the way it is any more. “These girls had just a great work ethic, though, and it really paid off. We had a lot of ‘firsts’ this year.”

Give a Holiday Gift That Doesn’t End When the aBatteries Give Holiday Run Gift Out. Doesn’t End When Clockwise from top, Brittany Jewett andThat the Hornets found themselves vertically challenged against DeSales’ big line-up; Meagan Moralez whips a baseline pass around a defender; Kaitlyn Grunst won the WIAA Sportsmanship the Batteries Runfrom Out. Award; Hornets realize their season is over; Lily Hilderbrand drew constant double-teams the Irish. www.edwardjones.com

Brent Baker/staff photos

Why not start a new holiday tradition? Make this the time of year that you help save for a child’s college education.

Alumni game March 12 SUBMITTED BY STEPHANIE SCHERTENLEIB TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL

TONASKET - The Third Annual Tiger Classic Alumni Game will be held at the Tonasket High School Gym on March 12 at 6 p.m. The focus of this year will be “Past, Present and Future” halftime of the game will feature the local youth AAU basketball players. We want to show three separate generations of basketball players right here in our community. This is a fun event that I have seen people take more

and more interest in. We want graduating players to “want” to come back to play in the game. There are a lot of players past and present whose hearts reside on that basketball court; this just gives them the ability to play with others with that same love for the game. This is a fundraiser event for the Tonasket Junior Baseball Association. The gate cost will be $5 for adults and $2 for anyone in grades K-12. There is no charge for players participating in the game or at halftime. Please come and support our youth activities and participants.

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | March 6, 2014

Obituaries safely, but to skid in sideways screaming holy #*@& what a ride! That saying epitomized my Grandma Ellie. She lived life to the fullest and had a blast the whole journey. Gonna miss ya Grandma!” As we all will miss our mother, mother-in-law, grandmother, aunt, great-grandmother and dear friend. A Graveside Service for family and friends will be March 15 at 1 p.m. at Riverview Cemetery in Oroville.

Eleanor Cook

Eleanor Gappert Cook Eleanor (Hoffman) Gappert Cook of Oroville, Wash. and Valle del Oro, Mesa, Ariz. went to heaven on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 with her family by her side. Eleanor (Hoffman) Gappert Cook, known to all as “Ms. Ellie,” was born on July 15, 1929 to George and Barbara Hoffman. She grew up on a farm near Center, N.D. with six sisters. Ms. Ellie attended a country oneroom school house near the family farm. She did not attend High School because her father thought it was not important for girls. As always with her spunk and determination, Ms. Ellie completed her GED in later years. Ms. Ellie married Gordon Gappert on March 21, 1944. Gordon and Ellie farmed for 27 years near New Salem, N.D. where they raised six children. The family enjoyed many horse drawn sled rides to Grandpa Gappert’s and Grandpa Hoffman’s homesteads for holidays and card games. At the age of 20, Ms. Ellie, pregnant with their fourth child, was accidentally shot in the foot while rabbit hunting across the rough fields. She was fortunate to be treated by a WWII doctor who was well-known for his expertise in gunshot wounds. In 1972, Ms. Ellie and Gordon relocated to Washington State where they worked together in the apple orchards until 1984 when Gordon passed away. Ms. Ellie met Lon Cook, known for his long handle bar mustache, at Fao’s Restaurant. They were married on New Year’s Eve 1986. She started “Ms. Ellie’s Jellies” with Lon. They grew and processed their huckleberries which were sold all across the country. Ms. Ellie and her jellies were wellknown at Pike Place Market in Seattle. After Lon’s death on July 5, 2006, Ms. Ellie began wintering in Mesa, Ariz. at Valle del Oro. Ms. Ellie enjoyed many wonderful activities with dear friends and family such as, church, active singles, Red Hat Group, riding the buses to the casino, Bingo and many, many more events. Ms. Ellie’s summers were spent in Oroville, Wash. where she celebrated July 4th and the Chesaw Rodeo with many of her family members. In the recent years, Ms. Ellie and Russell Sellars, a good friend, enjoyed traveling to Las Vegas for the National Finals Rodeo. Ms. Ellie is survived by five sisters of Bismarck, N.D., Clem Hoff, Josephine Mosbrucker, Clara Ferderer, Irene Miller, Lorraine Hoffman along with numerous nieces and nephews, her five children and spouses, 14 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren and soon to be great-great grandchild; daughter-in-law, Charmaine (Gappert) Hayfield (husband, Kirk and daughter, Melissa), grandson, Greg Gerald Gappert, son of Gerald Gappert. DaughterBonnie (Derald) Johnson, children: Randy (Michelle) and three children, Russ (Dawn) and three children and Robbyn (Scott) Creel. Daughter-Joan (LLoyd) Woodbury, children: Jessie VanLishout and three children, Nichole (Chris) Glens and three boys, Walt (Stephanie) and 4 boys. Son-Jim (Kathy) Gappert, children: Heather (Aaron) GappertHochhalter and two girls, Holly (Eric) Gappert-Provost and two boys, Jimmy Gappert (Kate) and one boy. Son-Roy (Becky) Gappert: children: Beth Gappert and Sarah Gappert and two girls. Daughter-Joy- (Larry) Hirsbrunner, children: Dustin (Amy) Hirsbrunner and three children, Heidi Hirsbrunner. She was preceded in death by her oldest son, Gerald Gappert, and husbands Gordon Gappert and Lon Cook, and one sister who died in childhood. Ms. Ellie taught her friends and family how to play cards and games, tell stories and dance to old time music. Her life can only be summarized by her grandson, Dustin Hirsbrunner’s quote: “There’s a saying, “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave

Bill LaFrance

William ‘Bill’ La France William “Bill” LaFrance passed away suddenly on February 21, 2014 in Oroville, Washington. Bill was born on January 27, 1934 in Kalispell, Montana, the middle child of nine siblings. During his youth, Bill especially enjoyed hunting and fishing with his grandfathers; “good times” he called them. Bill acquired a strong work ethic at an early age. For example, he worked on a hay farm for a time at age 11 for room and board while providing the remainder of his wage to help support his family. At age 18, Bill enlisted in the Navy and served as a gunner’s mate on a destroyer escort during the Korean War. After serving his nation, Bill returned to Montana and went to work driving 18-wheelers. It was in 1961 when Bill met and wed the love of his life, Ruth. Bill and Ruth moved to the coast and lived in east King County for many years, raising three wonderful children: Rick, Greg and Patti. Bill worked in construction for 34 years for Roxbury, Inc., retiring in 1990. Bill and Ruth have lived in Oroville permanently since 1996. Bill was not only an avid fisherman, he was prolific, the Raging River was his favorite. He was always willing to share his fishing and hunting knowledge but was careful to never give away his secret spots. When asked where did you catch the fish he would always respond with “Right in the lip.” Bill was always ready to help, whether it was tying a hook, building a shed, baking a sweet William apple pie or working with the children at the church. He made sure people had what they needed before he considered his own needs. He will be greatly missed by all who had the privilege of knowing him. Bill is survived by his everloving wife Ruth, son Rick and daughter-in-law Marita of Duvall, Wash., son Greg and daughter-inlaw Adrienne of Plummer, Idaho and daughter Patricia, son-in-law Gary, grandson Erik Johnson of Battle Ground, Wash. A Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, March 8, 2014 at 11 a.m. at the Oroville Free Methodist Church, 1516 Fir St., Oroville. Remembrances may be made to the Streetscape Committee at P.O. Box 299, Oroville, WA 98844, Attention Hillary Blackler. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Ed W. Figlenski Edward W. Figlenski went to the next world on his own Friday, Feb. 22, 2014 at Apple Springs Assisted Living due to pancreatic cancer. He was born Nov. 20, 1951

at Omak to Wills and Violet Figlenski. Graduated high school with the Class of 1970 from Okanogan, then attended college at Wenatchee and Western Washington, returning to Okanogan in 1973 where he began working at the sawmill, driving front end loader. In 1978 he came up to the family cattle ranch and built his A-frame home in Tunk Valley. Ed loved music of all kinds, amassing a huge recording collection and stereo component systems. Reading, hiking and enjoying friends and family were his greatest joys. Eddie is survived by Willis and brother Ernie of Tunk Creek, aunts Myrna Featherly and Betty Morris of Okanogan, Marge Garett of Yakima; uncles Lnard Garett of Yakima, Meb Morris of Omak and Gerald Schultz of Tonasket. Numerous cousins also survive. He was preceeded in death by aunts Arlene Joy, Gwen Cowlishaw and Dolores Scholz, uncles Pib, Don, Bub and Orval Morris and mother Violet. The family would like to thank the staff at Apple Springs for their wonderful care during Ed’s illness. Also, special thanks to cousins Mary, Jerry and Roberta Scholtz, Debbie Burberry and Steve Payne, Myrna and Betty, Sheryl Curtis, Victoria and Tim Nelson, Jerry Simpson and Darrel Green for helping feed the cattle. And, all the valley ladies for the great food. No services will be held, but a memorial wake will be announced at a later date. Precht-Harrison-Nearents Chapel is in care of arrangements.

tioned at Camp Campbell, Ky. He loved to recall his time playing on the base softball team with their bright red uniforms. The DuPont-Ft. Lewis school district saw Russ begin his career as a junior high teacher, then Principal, and was later named Superintendent. He taught for two years at the University of Idaho while simultaneously obtaining his doctorate. He then served as Superintendent in Oroville, and in the North Beach school district on the coast . He finished his career as the assistant Superintendent of Educational Service District 113 in Olympia. Volunteering was a way of life for Russ. He was active and held leadership positions in several Kiwanis clubs and served on the Greater Lakes Mental Health board, an organization he helped found. He spent 18 years serving on several supervisory committees, then the board of directors with Twin Star Credit Union. He also served on the board of Capital Clubhouse. He was on the board of the North Central Washington Boy Scouts of America advisory commit-

tee, which tied back to his time in Scouting when he became an Eagle Scout. The church has played a critical role in the life of Dr. Neff. Spending time in small communities around the state meant that denomination of church was not as relevant, but that the people were. He was an elder with the Little Church on the Prairie (Presbyterian) in Lakewood, was a lay speaker at the United Methodist Church in Oroville, and was president of the congregation at Galilean Chapel (Lutheran) in Ocean Shores. In Olympia he has been a proud member of the First United Methodist church in Olympia, serving in several positions and being chief paint “toucher upper.” Russ has always enjoyed doit-yourself projects, gardening around the home, and he loves sports, baseball and especially the Mariners. He can also lay claim to the title of best fishing story in a group by catching 35,000 salmon in one day while working on a fish trap in Alaska as a teenager. Russ is survived by the love of his life, his wife of 66+ years

Come join us!

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

Russell Charles Neff passed away Sunday, March 2. He was born on July 5th, 1926 in Tacoma to Russell and Ione Neff, and was joined in the family several years later by his sister JoAnne. Education played a central role in his life, beginning in Tacoma, where he was a proud graduate of Stadium High School. Russ received a bachelor’s degree in Zoology from Texas A&M, earned his principal’s and superintendent’s credentials from the University of Washington, a master’s degree in education from University of Puget Sound, and a doctorate in education from the University of Idaho. W h i l e in College Station, Texas, Russ met his best friend, first and only love, Margaret Medbery. They joined in marriage on June 7th, 1947. Russ lived most of his life in Washington, spending his first 17 years in Tacoma, three plus years in the Army, two years in College Station, Texas, another year in Seattle, and then starting a family in Lakewood, where his career in education began at DuPont-Fort Lewis. After spending 17 years there, his career took the family to Moscow, Idaho for two years; then it was off to Oroville for seven more, to Ocean Shores for five years, before finally settling for good in Olympia 32 years ago. Dr. Neff served in the US Army late in World War II, where he received training in civil engineering at both Texas A&M and at the University of Idaho. He served as Troop Clerk and an armored car driver while sta-

Emert J. Verbeck, age 97, of Tonasket passed away February 20, 2014 in Tonasket. A full obituary and memorial services will be published at a later date.

CHURCH GUIDE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

Russell Charles Neff

Emert J. Verbeck

Okanogan Valley OROVILLE

Russell Neff

Margaret; daughter Suzanne Davis of Snohomish, son Tom of Warrenton, Va.; son Russell Jr. (Rusty) of White Salmon, sister JoAnne Cross Jurin; eight grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; five nieces and five nephews. He always lived by the rule that God is first, others second and himself third. His unfailing politeness and integrity are treasured by many. A memorial service and celebration of Russ Neff ’s life will be held Saturday, April 5 at 11 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church of Olympia. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that gifts be directed to a memorial fund in his name at the First United Methodist Church of Olympia, 1224 Legion Way SE, Olympia, WA 98501.

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville 8 - 8:30 Holy Grounds - Coffee, Tea & Conversation 8:30 - 9:45 Service@8:30 10 - 10:35 L.I.F.E.  10:35 - 11:00 Holy Grounds 11:00 - 12:00 Service @ 11:00 6 p.m. - 7:30 Pursuit (Pursuing God & Friendships) Pastor Claude Roberts Come enjoy song service with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Trinity Episcopal

Tonasket Foursquare Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Tony Rivera • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place 415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, March 06, 2014