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SEATTLE SEAHAWKS WIN

BONAPARTE LK. SNOW DRAG

SUPER BOWL XLVIII

Saturday, Feb. 8 Registration 7:30 a.m. Races begin 10:00 a.m.

See Page A3

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Swimming pool yes, Heavy Haul no Tonasket City Council looks to move forward with swimming pool, questions transportation designation BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The possibility of a rebuilt Tonasket swimming pool again took center stage at the Tuesday, Jan. 29, Tonasket City Council meeting. And while a meeting the previous week brought the desire of the community further into focus regarding what such a pool might look like, getting from Point

A to Point B in terms of funding is still going to take some doing. City planner Kurt Danison of Highlands Associates, who “MC’d” the swimming pool town hall meeting on Jan. 21, said that after the discussion and various votes taken by the 50 or so attendees, his proposed solution would cost in the neighborhood of $1.5 million. “I’d propose adopting a plan for a 25x75 lap pool, with a 12-foot 6-inch diving well, 1-meter diving board and a water slide,” Danison said. “Joining that would be 20x30, somewhere in that realm, zero depth entry recreation pool with connection to the lap pool, and new building. “The reason I suggest the zero-entry instead of a ramp, the ramp isn’t that wide. If you are in a wheelchair or with a

NVH repairs ongoing

toddler, the lap pool will be a minimum “We need to determine if you are three feet deep and that’s too deep to be ready and willing to proceed with a grant in. With zero entry, you can go in as deep request to the Recreation Conservation as you are comfortOffice,” Danison able with, and still said. “If we’re going have a connection to to do that we need to the main pool if you “(The Heavy Haul dispute) very soon (to meet are comfortable with is about our infrastructure, deadlines for the that.” current grant cycle). and communication. This The next step, “The committee Danison said, would should meet and is a vital piece to us. We be to have either the prepare and implelive and die on US-97.” city or the commument a fundraising nity pool committee strategy, and find Patrick Plumb, Tonasket Mayor (which is still sorting out if the commitout its leadership) to tee is going to stay pay Pool World to together and move provide a final revised site plan and cost forward. Also we can explore doing the estimate based upon those recommenda- job without grant funds and the limitations. tions involved with the public works pro-

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

Festival kicks off with Pat McManus play Friday, Feb. 14

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

SEE REPAIRS | PG A2

SEE HAUL | PG A2

NW Ice Fish Fest more than fishing

HAPPY GROUND HOG DAY

Generator, server, nurse call system at various stages of refurbishment TONASKET - Repairs for one of North Valley Hospital’s generators, as well as well as the server the contains patient records, were ongoing after both experienced various levels of failure during the past month, reported facilities and IT director Kelly Cariker at the Thursday, Jan. 31 Board of Commissioners meeting. The generator, an 800 kilowatt diesel that was installed as part of the new building construction project in 2010, expereinced a catastrophic during its monthly load test in early January. The Western Avenue sidewalk has been blocked off for several weeks as repairs are being dealt with. “We have the (repair) quotes now,” Cariker said. “They are steep ... but after the deductible, the insurance will cover the rest.” The generator was past its two-year warranty but only had 94 hours of use on it, but he said it threw a rod through the block during its load test and not while actually being used by the facility. He said the two bids being evaluated range between $80-100,000, but involve different approaches to the repair work. Either way, he said, the generator will have to be removed by crane and shipped to Spokane for repair. He added that insurance will cover all but the $10,000 deductible for the repair. Additionally, Cariker said that two drives that hold the operating system for the server that holds electronic medical records failed last week. “That’s always alarming,” he said. “These were not the drives that held the patient data; we were in jeopardy of losing the server itself. “As it was, our EMR vendor flew a person out here with a new controller and new drives. They stayed until everything was back up; we were able to get them back up 100 percent.” The commissioners approved the purchase of a $27,000 nurse call system in the Extended Care facility to replace the one that failed last year in the west wing of the building. “We’ve been renting a system for several months to keep us in compliance until we could afford a new one,” Cariker said. Long Term Care director Linda Holden said the temporary system was only adequate as a stop-gap. “I feel that we could get into hot

cess... (but) if we’re not asking for grant funds then the amount of money that needs to be raised doubles. We’re talking in the vicinity of $1.5 million.” Regardless of the method used for raising funds (public or private), Danison said architectural and design costs will be about 30 percent of the project’s cost. Council member Jill Vugteveen noted that if the city were to apply for a grant that required matching funds, it currently doesn’t have money on hand to match a large grant. Finding a source of funding to maintain the pool is still a priority as well. Mayor Patrick Plumb said that past maintenance costs, including staffing, ran at about $36-40,000 per year, with money generated from entry fees cutting

MOLSON – The last couple of years the fisherman got skunked at the NW Ice Fishing Festival, however reports have been coming in all winter of “fish on” so chances are there will be prize winning trout caught on Saturday, Feb. 15. There have been 5000 “fishable” fish planted in anticipation of the tournamen which is sponsored by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. The ice fishing starts with registration at the Molson Grange Hall or at the lake office, set up on Sidley Lake. Sidley, along with Molson Lake is where the fishing takes place. Registration starts at 7 a.m. at the Grange and 8 a.m. at the lake. Angling continues until 4 p.m., with the Award Ceremony at the Grange Hall at 4:30 p.m. Prizes for biggest fish and a number of other categories are awarded. Before and while the tournament is going on there are a number of other events, like the pancake breakfast from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and the Dog Sled Demos from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. New for this year is a Pinewood Derby at 3 p.m. The derby is for young and old alike, use one of your old cars or go to www.oro-

Above, Aaron Kester (left) and David Campbell serve up ground sausage patties and potatoes at the Tonasket Kiwanis annual Groundhog dinner on Saturday, Feb. 1. The dinner is usually the Kiwanis’ top fundraiser of the year. Right, Julie Colbert dishes up desserts for visitors while in the background, rolls of ground sausage were being packaged up for customers. Brent Baker/staff photo

SEE FISH FEST | PG A2

Getting DNA from strawberries; loving iPads BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – In addition to hearing about what was going on at the legislature, Oroville’s school directors heard reports from teachers, principals and students at their Monday, Jan. 27 board meeting. Teacher presentations were given by Cynthia Poynter, a sixth grade teacher at the elementary and Stassia Feltes, coordinator for Gear Up. Poynter gave a Power Point presentation that was created by her sixth-graders. She said her kids loved their iPads and listed several projects in which the students used them. It is part of the school board and the district’s goal to get iPads into the hands of all students. “The students have also extracted DNA from strawberries and we worked with Julie Schilgen’s class for the second part of the project. They’ve been recording data,” said Poynter.

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 06

She also talked about student growth in math, reading and science. Growth in math has been 100 percent, she said. Feltes talked about WSU Upward Bound, a program described as a Bridge Internship that provides opportunities for graduated seniors to participate in a paid internship with the USDA/Agriculture Research Services of Washington State University. The purpose of the program is to “help students build skills, confidence and relationships that will help them succeed as entering freshman at a college of their choice.” Oroville is the fifth program at WSU, while Okanogan and Omak have been working in the program for 10 years, according to Feltes. Oroville has partnered with Tonasket in working in the program. “The requirements are the high school student has at least a 2.0 GPA, is low income and a first generation student,” said Feltes, who adds that her students

have participated in several no-cost field trips – including trips to Wenatchee, Spokane and Seattle. The field trip to Wenatchee concentrated on the medical field and job shadowing. They went to the hospital because several students have expressed an interest in pursuing that as a career, she said. In Spokane the students went to District Court for a for a mock trial. In Seattle the kids were immersed in urban life, according to Feltes. “Between Oroville and Tonasket we can have up to 60 students, we have 53 now. This month we are focusing on resumes and doing mock interviews. “We want to motivate kids to stay in school and get them graduated. The two student representatives to the school board, Lily Hilderbrand and Jacob Scott, discussed student happenings at the school. They said there had been a Martin Luther King Jr. Assembly. “Visitors said it was short and sweet,

SEE SCHOOL | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

just like the Veterans Day one,” said Hilderbrand, who added that the sophomores had put on a Tolo dance. Scott said that Dawn Miller’s science class had been working with telescopes and that they had also gone to Seattle to see the Boeing Assembly Plant. Elementary Principal Joan Hoehn said her students were starting the Principal’s Challenge again and that this year’s goal was to read 6000 books. The principal will offer students various incentives along the way, including changing her hair color and wearing a color-matching outfit for that day from head to toe, including red, green, blue and purple. “Maybe orange,” said Hoehn. “In the past we have always given one point for every book read, but some kids are reading more advanced level and longer books. So this year we will be saying for every 6000 words that is equal to one

Super Bowl A3 Letters/Opinion A5 Community A6-7

Schools A8 Cops & Courts A9 Classifieds/Legals A10

Real Estate Sports Obituaries

A11 A12-13 A14


PAGE A2

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 6, 2014

HAUL | FROM A1

TESTING THE WATERS

Robin Stice/submitted photo

Fishing is looking better at Sidley Lake this year and reports are folks are ice fishing and catching fish and the water quality is better. James Iler lives on Fletcher Mountain and was on his fourth trip ice fishing this winter. He said he limited out each trip and noticed some techniques work better than others. He’s is looking forward to the Ice Fishing Event and hopes some of his friends from Seattle will come over and join him.

FISH FEST | FROM A1 villewashington.com/icefestival for more information. Meanwhile there are arts and crafts, raffle tickets and baked goods for sale at the Grange Hall throughout the day. And this year the Oroville Chamber of Commerce has gone out of its way to create a full weekend around the annual event. As part of the Northwest Ice Fishing Festival weekend the chamber is sponsoring a performance by Tim Behrens as Pat McMannus in “A Fine and Pleasant Misery.” The show will be at 7 p.m. on

Friday, Feb, 14 at the High School Commons. Tickets are going fast but can still be obtained at Prince’s Center, Frontier Foods and the Camaray Motel. You can also buy them online at www. orovillewashington.org. The one-man Show introduces 12 zany McManus characters, from Rancid Crabtree to daft old Mrs. Swisher and from Strange the Dog, to a deer on a bicycle. From the website www.mcmanusplays.com: “Join Pat and his sidekick Crazy Eddie Muldoon as they try to conquer their fear

of the dark so they can become mountain men. Watch Rancid Crabtree convince you that baths are bad because soap and water will eat holes in your protective crust. Listen as Pat explains how to execute a proper full bore linear panic and its cousin, modified stationary panic. See Mr. and Mrs. Muldoon react to Pat and Crazy Eddie’s airplane as it teeters on the barn roof headed straight towards oblivion. And learn how not to hunt your first deer with nothing more than a bicycle.”

to higher education, 25 percent competitive employment and 25 percent other education or employment,” Sarmiento said. The school board passed several motions by consent. These included accepting the resignation of Krystal Wiltse from her teaching position as of June 2014 and Brad and Justin Scott as junior high football coaches for next year. They approved hiring Billy Monroe as junior high

HEAVY HAUL? The mayor has been at odds with the Okanogan County Commissioners over a proposal to extend a heavy haul transportation corridor from Oroville to Pateros, which would run on US-97 through Tonasket’s business core. Plumb said he was upset that the city was not included in the discussions that led to the proposal and were not even informed directly about it, but learned of it through media reports. “The issue is for me, not about how many axles and how that works and whether or not I support heavier trucks (running

through town),” he said. “But when I saw the documentation, it was decided at a higher level than us, and implied that everyone was already in agreement about it. “We know what the infrastructure issues are on our mile of 97. We have aging infrastructure. The stormwater capacity is not good by any means. It will affect our downtown business core. We’ve been clear the last 15 years, that (repairing Whitcomb Ave. with a) grind and mill is what we’re looking for, not just patching the driving lanes.” Oroville does have a heavy haul corridor, but it was implemented in a far different fashion. It has aided existing businesses in Oroville like Oroville Reman and Reload, which takes dimensional lumber from Canada and other Canadian products that arrive by truck and reloads them onto rail cars. In addition, the designation has led to new customers for the Cascade and Columbia River Railroad. Building permit administrator Christian Johnson, on hand to discuss other issues, said that the proposal would be a departure from what other heavy haul corridors are used for and could undermine that good it has done for Oroville and the railroad. “The idea was to make it more advantageous for the trucks to not go on the highway through Tonasket, that they get on the rail,” Johnson said. “It makes it more competitive to provide for this rail, which is an immense infrastructure investment that is already here that does two things: fuel economy, and keeping trucks off the highway for safety. “It mirrors what’s around the state. Nothing about trucks from Oroville to the south end back and forth, or trucks that were

REPAIRS | FROM A1

SCHOOL | FROM A1 book,” she said. “We need to read 400 books per class or 19 books per student to reach our goal.” High School Principal Kristen Sarmiento discussed a state study which follows students after they have left school, both graduates and non-graduates. It tracks whether the students go on to pursue higher education, gain competitive employment or some other type of education or employment. “We have 50 percent that go on

about $7,000 off that figure. “The city is asking how we can continue to do that,” he said. “We can’t. And there’s no contingency. The last 10 years, when pumps broke we spent money to just get buy, or we didn’t turn the heaters on. There wasn’t the volume of heating capacity.” He noted that an endowment fund helps pay the maintenance costs at a similar pool in Davenport. Council member Scott Olson, who has been the council’s primary interface with the community pool committee, said he would take the proposal back to that group to determine what to do next. “There was some grumbling and some dissatisfaction that we didn’t move forward on an indoor pool,” Olson said. “I feel like we have given the community enough chance where we enabled another committee to take off and do it, and I’m just convinced that it’s time for us to move forward with our own pool ... I think we did as much as we could for that option.”

wrestling coach and Joe Kelly as a volunteer for that program. The board also thanked the Booster Club for making donations to the crow’s next, high school baseball catcher’s gear, high school football pads and bags, high school basketball team photos and an editing program for the basketball teams. The fall coaches were approved and Mary Marchand was hired as a para.

water... if we don’t move on this,” she said. Commissioner Teresa Hughes asked if the two bids being considered were adequate. “Those were the only ones that actually responded to us that were in the state,” Cariker said. “The out of state ones, it’s hard to be competitive when you have to get on an airplane. You’ll also notice, in that bid, they are doing the affidavit and following the small works roster. “The competing bid, even

originating in Okanogan and moving elsewhere. Nothing about that. It was narrow and specific. And that’s why Oroville supported that.” “We also have no idea who it is supposed to benefit,” Danison added. “There’s only speculation.” “It’s not about money,” Plumb said. “It’s about our infrastructure, and communication. This is a vital piece to us. We live and die on US-97. “The commissioners said, ‘We had a state representative and this state senator discussing it,’ but where were we? Was there not some big controversy in Okanogan over putting a roundabout in on US-97? The commissioners’ point (at the time) was that a decision was made behind their backs and they didn’t like it. “Well, join the club.”

MISCELLANY Other actions taken by the council include the denial of a peddlers’ permit for selling wood in town; the approval of the Mill Drive Long Plat after Christian Johnson answered a number of questions from the council; and the authorization of the police department to pursue grant funding for an additional vehicle. Danison also said that the city will receive $192,000 in grant funding fro the Washington Surface Transportation Program (STP) for a bridge that will cross Bonaparte Creek to give access to pedestrians from town trying to access the U.S. Armed Forces Legacy Park. The project will be combined with a separate project that will add a sidewalk from there to the corner of Whitcomb and Fourth Street. The Tonasket City Council next meets on Tuesday, Feb. 11, at 7:00 p.m. OKANOGAN VALLEY

though it was for more money, they required us to do all the wiring internally. That would be a large hidden cost - you’d have to pay the man hours and material costs. So accepting this bid would keep us out of that.” The hospital warrants, after dipping to $475,000 earlier in the week, were at $652,000 on Jan. 31, down from $699,000 at the previous (Jan. 10) board meeting. The NVH Board of Commissioners next meets on Thursday, Feb. 13.

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GET UP TO $500 OFF YOUR HOSPITAL BILL TAX DISCOUNT PROGRAM How does it work? If you own property in the North Valley Hospital District then you qualify for this discount. The discount can be applied to your account balances at North Valley Hospital, or to your dependent’s account balances. To find out how much you qualify for look at your Okanogan County tax statement for the amount paid to Okanogan County Public Hospital District #4.

Apply your discount to any of the following services! • State of the art MRI, CT, Ultrasound, DEXA, Digital X-rays and Digital Mammography.

Get credit for the amount you pay into our Hospital District on your Okanogan County Property Taxes!

• Full-service Laboratory, Nutritional Services, and Respiratory Care. • Beautiful New Birthing Center. • General Surgery.

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• 24/7 Emergency Department staffed with highly trained physicians.

203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph: 509-486-3107 www.nvhospital.org


FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

Super Bowl XLVIII: SEAHAWKS 43, BRoncos 8

BOOM!

Jennifer Lawrence/The Daily Herald of Everett

The Seattle Seahawks won the first Super Bowl in the history of the franchise on Sunday, Feb. 2, walloping Peyton Manning and the Denver Broncos 43-8. Left, Quarterback Russell Wilson holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy following Seattle’s 43-8 Super Bowl victory over the Denver Broncos on Sunday at MetLife Stadium. Above right, Seahawks wide receiver Jermaine Kearse breaks a tackle by Broncos linebacker Wesley Woodyard en route to a touchdown during the third quarter of Super Bowl XLVIII. Middle, Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith, the MVP of Super Bowl XLVIII, holds the Vince Lombardi Trophy; Seahawks linebacker K.J. Wright tackles Broncos wide receiver Wes Welker during the third quarter.

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PAGE A4

Burglars surprised by homeowner with baseball bat BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OKANOGAN - Dustin C. Smith of Omak was out at a birthday party with his wife when they returned home on OmakRiverside East Side Road around 4:55 p.m. to find their home had been broken into. “As they entered the residence Smith saw a male and a female burglarizing there residence. Smith grabbed a baseball and hit both the male and the female several times. The male suspect was able to run from the residence but Smith was able to detail the female until law enforcement could arrive,” said Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers. Arrested at the scene was Shanyce R. Rodriguez, 20 of Omak and Oroville. Rodriguez had minor injuries but was held overnight at Mid-Valley Hospital for a possible concussion. After release from the hospital Rodriguez was booked into the Okanogan County Jail for burglary and malicious mischief. Deputies are following leads on the male suspect that fled the scene, according to Sheriff Rogers. “I am sure he is a little bang up to. Smith said he didn’t know how many times he hit the suspect but

WSU DOUGLAS COUNTY EXTENSION

WATERVILLE - A one-day workshop on cover crops and soil health will be held February 18th and sponsored by WSU Chelan/ Douglas and Okanogan County Extension offices, USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Services, Foster Creek/South Douglas and Grant County Conservation Districts. The workshop will be held at the NCW Fairgrounds in Waterville. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the workshop concludes

BOYS BASKETBALL

W

Okanogan Brewster Cashmere Chelan Tonasket Omak Quincy Cascade

League L 12 11 8 7 3 3 2 2

0 1 4 5 9 9 10 10

W

Cashmere Brewster Okanogan Chelan Cascade Omak Quincy Tonasket

Overall L 19 15 12 9 9 7 7 3

Liberty Bell Lk Roosevelt Bridgeport Oroville Manson

OCSO photo

Burglary suspect Shanyce R. Rodriguez several times with the baseball bat. Smith said the male suspect was in the back bedroom which was dark at the time. Smith said he wasn’t taking any chances,” said Rogers. The sheriff added, “While we don’t recommend this all the time, we definitely do not have a problem with Mr. Smith protecting his family or his property, especially in his residence. I wonder if these two will think twice the next time they break into someone’s home. Oh, yea, nothing was stolen.”

at 3:30 p.m. The program will include a presentation on Soil Health and Quality, a local farmer panel and a live video feed from the National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Heath from Omaha, Nebraska. Lunch will be provided, however, we will need a head count so please call WSU Douglas County Extension (509-7458531) to register or for further information. WSU Extension programs are available to all without discrimination. Evidence of noncompliance can be reported to your local WSU Extension office

League L 6 4 1 1 1

2 3 6 6 7

W

0 3 6 9 9 11 11 15

W

Oroville Lk Roosevelt Bridgeport Manson Liberty Bell

5 7 13 13 16

League L

Kittitas White Swan Riverside Chr.

5 5 4

0 1 2

W

Overall L 11 8 8

League L 6 5 3 2 1

1 2 4 6 7

League L

W

White Swan Kittitas Riverside Chr.

18 17 15 11 11 8 4 3

0 1 3 7 7 10 14 15

Overall W L 10 7 5 4 1

6 8 11 12 15

3 3 1

0 2 5

Overall W L 14 5 3

3 10 13

WRESTLING CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

4 9 9

Quincy Quincy Tonasket Okanogan Cashmere

GIRLS BASKETBALL CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

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0 1 3 5 7 9 11 12

Overall L

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B)

CENT. WA LEAGUE SO. DIV. (2B) W

12 11 9 7 5 3 1 0

W

Omak Cascade Brewster

1 1 0

4 5 7

SCHEDULES

League Duals W L 7 0 6 1 5 2 3 3 2 3

In County: Seniors In County: Out of County: Out of State:

Tuesday, Feb. 11 BB - Tonasket at TBA (road playoff game, if qualify), 7:00 pm GB - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville (Var/JV), 6:00/7:30 p.m. BB - Lake Roosevelt at Oroville (JV/ Var) - 6:00/7:30 pm

FEB. 5-15

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B)

Overall L 12 9 3 3 1

League L

W

CARIBOU TRAIL LEAGUE (1A)

W

Sponsored By The

& the 10th Annual

SPORTS STANDINGS & SCHEDULES

CENT. WA LEAGUE NO. DIV. (2B)

Cover Crops and Soil Health SUBMITTED BY DALE K. WHALEY

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 6, 2014

Thursday, Feb. 6 BB (JV/Var) - Manson at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (Var/JV) - Manson at Oroville, 6:00/7:30 pm Friday, Feb. 7 BB (JV/Var) - Quincy at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) Quincy at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Tonasket at Cashmere (District tournament) - Day 1, 5:30 pm Saturday Feb. 8 WR - Oroville at NW Colbert (District tournament), 11:00 am WR - Tonasket at Cashmere (District tournament) - Day 2, 10:00 am

Thursday, Feb. 13 GB - Manson at Oroville (Var/JV), 6:00/7:30 pm BB - Manson at Oroville (JV/Var), 6:00/7:30 pm Friday, Feb. 14 WR - Oroville qualifiers at Kittitas (Regional tournament), Day 1, 3:00 pm BB - Tonasket (if qualify) at district tournament at Omak or Okanogan, TBA Saturday, Feb. 15 WR - Oroville at Kittitas (Regional tournament), Day 2, 9:00 a.m. BB/GB - Playoff tiebreak (if necessary) BB - Tonasket (if qualify) at district tournament at Omak or Okanogan, TBA

1 year / $30.50 1 year / $28.50 1 year / $32.50 1 year / $45.50

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Return to:

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Oroville Chamber of Commerce

McManus Plays Presents “A Fine & Pleasant Misery” on Friday, Feb. 14th

NW ICE FISHING FESTIVAL Saturday, Feb. 15th in Molson Washington Fish Molson & Sidley Lakes Adults & Youth Prizes

$500

Grand P

rize

5000 Catchable Fish Planted THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS:

Fishing Tournament

Registration at 7am in the Molson Grange Hall & 8am at Sidley lake office $20 adult, $10 Youth All entries must be turned in by 4pm Award ceremony at 4:30pm.

Other Activities at the Molson Grange Hall NEW This Year

Pinewood Derby For All Ages

With Up to $250 in prizes from Pastime Bar & Grill

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14th 7pm Oroville High School Commons

Saturday, February 15th 3pm at the Molson Grange

Buy Tickets at: Princes Center, Frontier Foods, Camaray Motel,

For more information, including rules, go to:

Sponsored by: Oroville Chamber of Commerce (509) 476-3684

www.orovillewashington.com/icefestival

$17 Advance $20 at the door

Online at www.orovillewashington.org

• Pancake Breakfast 7am-10am • Pinewood Derby at 3pm • Raffle Prizes • Dog Sled Demos 12:30pm-2:30pm • Arts & Crafts Fair • Baked Goods

Ice Fishing Weekend Local Events

• Pat McManus Show: Friday, Feb. 14th, 7pm at Oroville High School. • 50’s Dance: Saturday, Feb. 15h, 6pm at Vicki’s Back Door Club in Oroville. To become a sponsor or donate a raffle item, contact Sandy at 509-476-3684. For a table at the Grange (arts, crafts, eats, etc) contact Marylou at 509-476-3200 For more information call Robin Stice, Eden Valley Guest Ranch, 509-485-4002. For a cpmplete list of local events visit www.orovillewashington.com


FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

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THE TOWN CRIER

LETTERS Now for some serious Gonzaga TO THE EDITOR B’ball watching Most years I could care less who wins the Super Bowl, except for the camaraderie and snacks at a Super Bowl Party. I make an exception when it is the Seahawks, being a fan, albeit fair weather, of professional teams from our fair state. However, I don’t watch a lot of pro-sports anything anymore – I kind of gave up when the Sonics left town. And other than watching a whole lot of Mariners Baseball with my late father after he retired, I pretty much keep my sports viewing to Gonzaga basketball. Both on television, and thanks to a greatly appreciated pair of tickets from Jim Prince each year, in person. Since I’m a fair weather Seahawks (Mariners - Sounders, I guess) fan I was especially happy that this year Seattle had finally made it back to the Super Bowl. Now I just need to find a pennant to match my vintage 78-79 Sonics NBA Out of Champion one. And to my ex-pat friends living My Mind in Oregon who say just substitute the Blazers Gary A. DeVon for the Sonics, I always answer, “You must be joking, right?” I’m especially happy the ‘Hawks beat Denver so handily – it was getting tiring hearing all those “I’m going with the Broncos” comments from national (non-sports) network news commentators. Now it’s all sour grapes about how it was a boring game. I thought it was pretty exciting, although the second half might not have been quite the thrill of the first, especially the first few seconds of the game. What was boring were the television commercials; with only a few exceptions I don’t think most of the advertisers got their $4 million worth. If you’re not in it for the football, or the hometown team isn’t playing, us fair weather, in it for the party Super Bowl watchers, are at least supposed to get to enjoy some new, thought provoking, hilarious, product selling, commercials. This year it was just a good thing Seattle was playing and won. Other than the Coke commercial which was beautifully done, thought provoking was limited to “isn’t that cute.” To the “America” should only be sung in English grouches, you know who you are, get a grip. There is no official U.S. language and celebrating our great country in any language has to be a good thing, right? Isn’t it too bad that while that commercial was going on many of us were thinking in the back of our minds, this is going to upset some people? Anyway, my favorite was the Doberwawa – that probably upset those guys too – you know hybrids and all. It was a pretty good halftime show, that is when I wasn’t channel surfing during the mid-game break. The Seahawks did a great job and should be treated like local royalty for awhile. They’re a fun team to watch and not one of those “best team money can buy to win a championship” teams. Let’s hope this is the beginning of a dynasty and it doesn’t take another decade or so before I can get really excited about another Super Bowl. The Super Bowl’s over, now I can get back to some serious Gonzaga basketball watching. I’m just glad the Bulldog’s opponents aren’t Doberwawas.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

Chamber supports school levy

Dear Editor, I am writing on behalf of the Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors in support of the Tonasket School Levy and School Bond. We believe that strong schools contribute to strong communities. Good schools are an important draw to people looking to move into our area. Often, the first question potential residents and entrepreneurs ask is about the school system. We have a vibrant and strong school district with beautiful facilities. We can proudly answer that our community supports our schools. What has not been a focus in the conversation about this bond and levy is that our vibrant and strong district will be in jeopardy if these measures do not pass. Without these necessary funds, cuts will have to be made to meet the state mandated longer day and also, some of the state equalization funding will not be available. Please consider the impact this can have on not just the school district and the children, but the community and businesses. The circle of community, business, and school is currently strong and we ask that you vote yes to keep it strong. Respectfully, Julie Alley, President Tonasket Chamber of Commerce

Cantwell out of touch

Dear Editor, The following is a letter to Senator Maria

Cantwell: Senator Cantwell, Based on the Bipartisan Budget Act (H.J. Res 59), the legislation you just voted on in December 2013, you have broken the faith with all military members, especially military retirees in all our categories and definitions. I recently met with Congressman Derek Kilmer and senior Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Leadership earlier this month. I will not sit on the side lines while you attack military member’s benefits, dishonor their service, and cast them aside. I did not see any recommendations for cutting Congressional perks like retirement with less than 20 years of service, private medical plans, reduced staff support, setting term limits so elected officials do not make a career of positions which were designed for continual turnover so we wouldn’t end up in our current stagnation. (Term limits would also limit the retirement perks associated with becoming part of the furniture in Washington D.C.) As a newly retired disabled veteran with 28 years of honorable service, I now consider

you out of touch with the military members of this state. More importantly, I will make it my mission to keep a grassroots movement going to vote you out of office at the very next opportunity. Thousands and thousands of disabled military members, who have served honorably get to return to a state where their service is devalued and the contract they signed with their country is considered a pawn in a debt reduction budget that they had no part of creating. Great job Senator Cantwell, through your inaction and the inaction of those serving as our congress, you have allowed the national debt to become almost unmanageable and all of your highly educated counterparts believe going after the “EARNED” retirement benefits of the less than 1% that fight for this county is the right decision. To be that out of touch with the people you represent and serve must be a special kind of perspective. Marc Alden, LCDR (retired) U.S. Coast Guard

Low minimum wage is bad for women, families and business OPINION BY SHERRY STEWART DEUTSCHMANN

As a small business owner myself, I don’t see the logic in business people arguing against increasing the minimum wage. It’s just not logical to pay people a wage that doesn’t even cover basics like food, housing, utilities and transportation needed to get to work. At $7.25 an hour, the minimum wage comes to just $15,080 a year for full-time employees. Think about cashiers or health aides, childcare workers or fast food servers trying to make ends meet on $15,080. How can you keep people fully engaged in the success of your business when they are distracted with worry about how they are going to pay rent or keep the lights on? How can they provide the best customer service when they are struggling to feed their family? I know firsthand, you don’t need to pay poverty wages to succeed. In fact, paying higher wages is truly beneficial for business. Since opening our doors in 2002, LetterLogic has grown fast. We have no debt, have annual revenues approaching $30 million, and occupy a large processing center in downtown Nashville with 50 employees. The Women’s Presidents Organization named us one of the “Top 50” Female-Led Businesses in North America for three years running and we made the INC 5000 list for seven consecutive years. I know we would not have had this success if we paid minimum wage. Paying better

wages has helped our bottom line, not hurt it. My company has been successful because of our employee-centric culture. We believe that if we take good care of our employees, they will in turn take great care of the customer. It works. Our starting pay is $12 an hour, not $7.25. And we increase wages by an average of 20 percent as soon as the probationary period is over. We also pay 100 percent of our employees’ medical, dental, disability and life insurance. We give them 10 percent of our profits monthly, distributed evenly regardless of job or title. We help them buy their first homes with grants toward down-payments. We allow them to bring their children to work when they need to. We reimburse tuition. And these aren’t all of our employee benefits. It’s very good for our business. We can count on dedicated employees and higher productivity and morale. We save money with lower turnover and training costs and reduced mistakes. We have better customer service and satisfaction. We don’t count on other businesses and taxpayers to subsidize our profits by underwriting food stamps and other safety net assistance for our employees. Why should I be subsidizing the profits of companies that pay wages their employees can’t live on? When I pay a starting wage of $12 plus benefit my employees have more money to spend at other businesses. The very least other businesses can do is pay a wage that allows their employees to

afford the basics. But today’s minimum wage locks workers into a nightmare of poverty. It isn’t a building block of the American Dream. Adjusted for inflation, the current minimum wage of $7.25 is worth less than it was in the 1950s. The typical minimum wage worker is an adult woman. As Margot Dorfman, CEO of the U.S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce, has said, “Keeping the minimum wage low keeps women and families down. Last increased in 2009 to the inadequate level of $7.25, the minimum wage is overdue for a raise. The proposal to increase the minimum wage in three annual steps to $10.10, and then adjust it yearly after that for the rising cost of living is very reasonable. After all, the minimum wage would already be over $10 now if it had kept up with the cost of living since the 1960s. Today, women own 30 percent of American businesses. The success of my company – and my personal success – is proof that the American Dream is still possible. But it’s a possibility built on fair wages – not poverty wages. Public opinion polls show that across the political spectrum, Americans want to raise the minimum wage. President Obama, many members of Congress and many business owners want to “Give America a raise.” Let’s make 2014 the year we get it done. Sherry Stewart Deutschmann is the founder and CEO of LetterLogic in Nashville, Tenn.

More trade opportunities create more Washington jobs Millions of Americans across the nation are still looking for work and there is no question that Congress must remain focused on job creation. In trade-dependent states like Washington, this means preserving access and opening up new markets overseas for our goods and services. International trade supports nearly 850,000 Washington jobs and our state exports tens of billions of dollars in goods and services annually, including agricultural goods produced by our farmers Rep. Doc and ranchers, aerospace Hastings products, computer software, and travelWA-4th Dist. related services. In fact, billions of dollars of Washington-grown and manufactured products are sold annually to customers in 214 countries around the world, including top markets like Canada, China, and Japan. However, we can and must do more. I support fair trade agreements that put our farmers, manufacturers, and service providers on a level playing field with foreign competitors. Failure to tear down the barriers that put our

job creators at a competitive disadvantage not only means missed opportunities for growth, but can actually jeopardize their current market share. I am pleased that the United States is currently engaged in negotiations on a TransPacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement with countries including Australia, Canada, Mexico, Japan, Singapore, and Vietnam. I am watching these negotiations closely to ensure our producers are treated fairly. To that end, I wrote a letter to the U.S. Trade Representative encouraging him to ensure that these trading partners cannot impose unfair, non-science based policies on U.S. growers of fresh produce under a final agreement, and that the U.S. dairy industry is treated fairly. If done right, the TPP has the potential to provide real opportunities for Central Washington farmers and small businesses. (In January), bipartisan legislation was introduced in the House and the Senate that would set guidelines for the Administration on what Congress expects out of negotiations on trade agreements. H.R. 3830, the “Bipartisan Congressional Trade Priorities Act” (TPA) sets clear and ambitious objectives for fair trade in the 21st Century and ensures Congress has the final say on any new trade agreements negotiated by this Administration. Fair trade agreements remove costly bar-

riers and open doors to new markets for Washington state companies, helping our companies sell more goods and services abroad. Reducing obstacles to imports also help hundreds of Washington retail and manufacturing companies provide high quality, low-cost goods to consumers. Congress must act soon to pass this bipartisan TPA legislation or risk delaying important fair trade agreements that could create jobs by opening new markets for American goods. I look forward to joining my colleagues in support of this pro-jobs bill, and I am committed to supporting similar efforts in the House to create more opportunities for our businesses to grow and get Americans working again. Hastings is Chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources. The committee has jurisdiction over most federal land use and water policies, including national forests, national parks and monuments, wilderness areas, national scenic areas, Indian reservations and BLM lands. Of importance to Central Washington and the Pacific Northwest, the Committee oversees the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation irrigation projects (Columbia Basin Project and Yakima Project), endangered species recovery, federal hydropower projects, Payment-In-Lieu-Of-Taxes (PILT) payments and firefighting on federal lands.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | FEBRUARY 6, 2014

OKANOGAN VALLEY LIFE

One week until NW Ice Fishing Derby Another month and closer to spring and who isn’t ready for that? Another week ‘til the ice fishing derby! A man from the Ozarks says, “the fact that three-fourths of the earth is water and one-fourth is land, is proof enough that the good Lord intended that man spends three times as much time fishing as he does plowing! I believe one of the most difficult things to teach a child is how to be a loser, gracefully, when playing games. We all like to win but there has to be a winner and a loser. We teach kids to try their best, and when they do, and still lose... then what do we say? We have an eight-year-old, who is very bright (and likes to win, always) and when he didn’t it wasn’t a very picture, sometimes. I think the thing that worked best, was to say, “No, I’m not gonna play with you, unless you promise to not cry and be naughty.” His babysitter taught a phrase

to the children that we adults have all profited by many times. “Take what you get and don’t throw a fit.” Do you ever wonder why the dentist tells us to open our mouth wide, he then shoves in a tube, a mirror, a clamp, some cotton and then says, “Now tell me, what’s your problem?” Word from family of Charles Allie has verified that after an extended illness, Charles passed away, Friday, Jan. 24. His wife, Kathleen (Harden) said there will be a memorial to be determined at a later date. Condolences go out to the family, from friends and the community. I have learned of the serious health issues that Allan Wall has encountered. He has been moved back to Wenatchee hospital, where he is receiving regular kidney dialysis. Hopefully this will get him stabilized and on the road to better health. I am sorry Norma Verbeck is having

to endure the plague of the shingles… burned the motor home, above menthey can be so painful!! The effects from tioned fire. the malady are different from person to Whether we liked it or not, snow person. I certainly don’t want did come and covered the to have them again and hopeground, and that even hapfully the “after shot” will pened before February, as keep that from happening. I’ve kept reminding folks of. When I saw the street Word has been received number of the persons applyof the death of Wally ing for a “pot” license, I Rainsberry. He has been in thought “Hey! that’s getting poor health for quite some pretty close to my house, so I time, and his brothers, Allan, was very pleased that the city Grant and Lynn have preis considering not allowing ceded him in death leaving for a business to be estabhis sister, Donna Forney THIS & THAT only lished in the town. of Yakima. The item in the Chronicle Joyce Emry I’m not a football fan but concerning the fire that took watched “bits and pieces” the life of our good friend, of the Super Bowl game and Neil Friesen, had an error. He attended watched as the score for the Seahawks the United Methodist Church and con- kept going higher and higher. Don’t sidered them his “church family”. think the populous of the country was There will be a memorial at a later expecting that upset. date, when his Saskatchewan family get Beverly Lee has been transferred to their paperwork in order to come here. the hospital in Wenatchee, while she Warning! If you are using “space” recovers from severe pneumonia. heaters to supplement your heat supply, Bob Hirst is once again in Tonasket take lots of precautions. Don’t leave hospital, recuperating from the broken them on when you go from your house arm/shoulder. and be very careful they aren’t touching Uncle Ned told the airline stewardess, anything that could ignite a fire. That is believed to be the cause of the fire that “Dear you don’t need to apologize to me.

Punxatawney Phil says six more weeks of winter

I know all about holding patterns. I have a wife, four girls and one bathroom.” When a politician changes his position on an issue, it’s sometimes hard to tell whether he’s seen the light or felt the heat. Another great crowd of folks were on hand at the annual groundhog feed, sponsored by the Tonasket Kiwanis Club. Don’t have a head count as they were still coming when we were leaving and many had a package that contained sausage to have for another meal, at home. Remember that next week is the Patrick McManus show Friday night, at the high school commons, and the fishing derby is the next day in Molson and even if you don’t care for the fishing, you can still go for breakfast for the good pancakes and other things that help warm ya’ up during these cold mornings. A note from Mary Ellen Lemmond from Michigan, says it has been more than a little bit cold there, reminding her of the days when she lived in Saskatchewan. She always says to greet her friends she made while living and visiting in Oroville. So, consider it done!

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

BY DOLLY ENGELBRETSON OROVILLE SENIOR CENTER

Submitted photo

Here we are carrying on for another year with the Terrific Kids and they are Terrific. From The Kiwanis Club of Tonasket is the President Jerry Anderson and long time Kiwanian Ralph Longanecker with 20 terrific kids from the Tonasket Elementary School.

TONASKET COMANCHEROS

Looking back, looking ahead BY ROGER SAWYER TONASKET COMANCHEROS

The Tonasket Comancheros are off to a BIG start in 2014. But first we have many thanks to some great people that helped make 2013 an outstanding year. The Tonasket Lions Club is our organization of the year with all their help assisting with parking and helping the public. Steve Lorz is our non-member volunteer of the year, and McMillan Construction is Business of the Year with the time and effort they have put toward our demo derby. Without Steve’s skidder, and McMillian’s water truck, this event simply could not take place. JW Fox was voted our Comancheros Member of the year due to his selfless and unrelenting work he puts toward all the events. Also thank you to our 2013 Queen Karlie Henneman. This young lady did an outstanding job for the Comancheros and the town of Tonasket. Karlie traveled over 5,000 miles throughout the year to many rodeos, radio stations, banquets, fund raisers and yes, she even had to put up with Mark Peterson from KXLY HD4 in a live broadcast. Big thanks

go to Mike and Toni Henneman for the help they gave her during her reign as Queen. She also found time with her best friend, Breanna Howell (2013 Omak Stampede Queen), to do a restoration project of the grandstands for their senior project. It turned out great and was a much needed improvement to the stands. Help us welcome our new 2014 Queen Brisa Leep. This beautiful young lady will be very busy and is sure to do a great job as our representative and ambassador for our rodeo and town. Elections were held at our Jan. 9 meeting. The results are as follows: Lloyd Caton-President; Mike Stansbury-Vice President; Lori Sawyer-Treasurer; and Rosalyn Ray-Secretary. Board Members are Burt Beeman, JW Fox, Don Johnson and Roger Sawyer. We would like to express our gratitude to Bev Montanye for 12 years of service as the treasurer for our organization. She has done an outstanding job.

2014 EVENTS: Starting off the year of events will be the benefit dinner and auction on March 22 at the Tonasket Eagles, then the Junior Rodeo April 12-13, and the consignment auction on May 3. Please watch the papers for more information on these as events as the dates draw closer. This year Tonasket

County road crew HILLTOP doing a good job COMMENTS BY MARIANNE KNIGHT HIGHLANDS CORRESPONDENT

Congratulations Seattle Seahawks! 43 to 8. What a game. The predicted snow fall came down for two days in a row but has now stopped but it is in the one figure digits – like between one and nine. We did have some blue skies and sunshine. The roads are good thanks to our county plows and drivers. The groundhog says six more weeks of winter. Something new at the Ice Fishing Festival this year – a Pine Box Derby race. If you have a soap box car from days gone by

your can enter it or if you want to build a new car, you can purchase a kit from the Camaray Motel in Oroville and get it ready for the race. The race will be at 3 p.m. in the Grange Hall. Registration and the Pancake Breakfast start at 7 a.m. Fishing starts at 8 a.m. There will be arts and c craft tables available, all day. There will also be baked goods and of course the raffles. Try your luck for a great prize. There will also be Dog Sled Demonstrations from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. All of the fish caught must be

Comancheros will be hosting for the Founders Day Rodeo the “Shane Proctor Invitational” PBR Touring Pro Division bull riding with the World Class Bucking Horse Association, and our own local team ropers and barrel racers. Many new plans are in the works for this event. If you have any ideas we welcome you to come to a meeting and join in. In July, we have another kind of horsepower happening in our arena with the loud and powerful tractor pull! Bring the family and come watch both professional and local talent show off the custom built super-stock and modified tractors on July 18-19. These aren’t your farming tractors so you may want to bring your ear plugs! Don’t forget the Demo Derby on August 31. Come cheer for your favorite car or driver as they crash and bash their way into the winner’s circle. This is fun for all ages and is always followed by the tug of war with drivers and anyone from the audience who would like to join in and get muddy! Tonasket Comancheros meetings are second and fourth Thursdays of the month at 7:00 p.m. at the Tonasket Eagles. These meetings are non-alcohol, kid friendly, and you do not need to be an Eagles member to attend . Next meeting Jan. 23. We hope to see you there!

turned in by 4:30 p.m. for judging. This will be an all day event for the entire family. For more information call Robin Stice a (509) 485 4002. I guess you would like to know when this Ice Fishing Festival is going to be. It is going to be the Saturday of Presidents Weekend, Feb. 15. Don’t forget your Sweetheart on Feb. 14, Valentines Day. The next BINGO night will be on Feb. 21. at 6 p.m. Cost $10. On Jan. 27 with 36 players at the Grange Hall in Molson the pinochle winners were: Ken Ripley and Ina Visser in the high division. The winners in the Low division were: Rodney Fields and Eunice Godwin. The Traveling was awarded to Jim Fry. Until next week.

7: Baked Fish. Feb. 11: Baked Ham. Feb. 13: Tuna Noodle Casserole. Valentine’s Day Feb. 14: BBQ Chicken. Don’t forget,.they always have bread or rolls, salad, and vegetables. And always a dessert in addition to milk, buttermilk, iced tea, coffee and water. Doris Hughes still has a few tickets for the Humor of Pat McManus in a Fine and Pleasant Misery, scheduled for February 14 at 7:00 P. M. at the High School Commons. Lewis Wilson still has tickets for the Crab Feed

It appears that we (and the rest of the country) will be having six more weeks of winter; at least according to Punxatawney Phil. Beverly Holden has asked that I put a reminder in this column announcing that the Stroke Support Group meets at the YAC every fourth Thursday of the month. She says the meetings have been a great help to her and anyone who has a stroke, or knows of someone who has had one, should attend. Entrees: Feb. 4 Cabbage Patch Stew. Feb. 6: Sloppy Joes. Feb.

Coming up at the CCC this month

TONASKET CCC

SUBMITTED BY JANET CULP COMMUNITY CULTURAL CENTER

10:00-2:00. Barbara Conner Reed will be presenting a workshop in watercolors and acrylics for experienced artists, and beginners. Call Sandra Walters at 826-5372 for more info. Feb. 19, 6:00-9:00 p.m. -Game and Music jam night-bring a favorite game, a snack to share, and/or your musical instruments. Feb. 21st--Friday Night Coffee House featuring the music of Pete Seeger by local musicians. Snacks & Beverages available by donation. This is a Free event. Every Thursday from 1-4p.m. is Crafting Day. Bring your project and enjoy visiting with others. Beverages Provided. LOOKING AHEAD CCC Spring Concert Series March 1 -The Ruth Moody Band (of “Wailin’ Jennies” fame), performing on stage at 7:00. Cost: $10.00 members/$12.00 for the public. Dinner will be served at 5:30-6:30 p.m., desserts and beverages will be available throughout the evening by donation. The cost for both the dinner and the concert will be $18.00 for members, $20.00 for the public.

Friday, Feb. 7--Okanogan Highlands Alliance presentations--”The Saga of Washington Fish & Wildlife” by Ken Bevis. Dinner from 5:00-6:15 p.m., $7.00 for members/$8.00 for public. Presentation begins at 6:30. Admission is free--snacks and beverages available by donation Feb. 8 --CCC Annual Talent Show and Dessert Extravaganza-doors open at 6:00 p.m., show begins at 6:30. Admission is $7.00 for members/$8.00 for the public; children 0-10 are free. Call 486-1328 by Thursday Feb. 6 if you would like to perform Feb. 9 and 23--Community Free Meal--serving the public from 2:00-3:30 p.m. Feb. 15--Valentines Dance with music by “Sparrow” (Mariliz Ramono, Doug Wilson, Steve Sher, Rose Wahl, and Tim Alley). Special desserts and beverages will be available. Cost: $7.00 for members/$8.00 for the public. This group of local musicians will be performing a variety of songs for a fun filled evening. Feb. 16--Artist Paint-In from

Give a Holiday TONASKET GUNGift CLUB That Doesn’t End When Ryan Anderson 16 16 Run Out. Noahthe OlmsteadBatteries 25 Give Holiday Gift H Bob McDaniela 24 Lloyd Caton, Jr. 20 Robert McDaniel 23 Bob McDaniel 20 Jeff Taylor Doesn’t 20 That End When Jeff Taylor 19 Randy Cline 20 Lloyd Jr. 17 theCaton,Batteries Run Out. Noah Olmstead 18 YD

ANDICAP

on Feb. 8 at the American Legion Hall at 6 p.m. The Garden Club will be meeting at the Senior Center on Friday, Feb. 14 after lunch. John and Joy Lawson, and their Canadian friends, will be providing music for our entertainment and enjoyment on Friday, Feb. 21, right after lunch. Raleligh Chinn is the co-ordinator for the Oroville Chamber of Commerce LakeOsoyoos Cup 2014 planned for June 28 and 29, right before the Fourth of July. All are invited to participate in this jet ski even. Pinochle Scores for Feb. 1: The door prize was won by Leonard Paulsen; most pinochles by Jim Fry; Men’s high score was won by Ken Ripley and Ladies high score went to Evelyn Dull. More later. A tip jar and CD sales will benefit the musicians. March 21 -The Ian McFeron Band entertaining with original songs--folk, humorous, blue grass, old time rock and roll. This five piece band will be providing a variety of tunes to dance to. Cost: $10.00 for members/$12.00 for the public. Dinner will be served at 5:30-6:30 p.m. Cost for dinner and Concert will be $18.00 for members, $20.00 for the public. May 3 - Laura Love and Orville Johnson will rock our room with great, energetic, music. Always a favorite duo on our CCC stage, their music draws a crowd of happy people. Dinner precedes the performance at 5:30 p.m., Concert at 7:00. Costs: Show is $10.00 for members/$12.00 for the public. Dinner and Show is $18.00 for members/$20.00 for the public.

OLIVER THEATRE OLIVER THEATRE February, 2014  Programme   Enjoy  your  evening  out,  taking   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking  

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February, 2014  Programme   www.olivertheatre.ca  

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Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

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PhILomena www.olivertheatre.ca February,  2014  Programme  

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Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

Thurs.-Fri. Feb. 13-14

Nominated for 9 Academy Awards Including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor Best Adapted Screenplay

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Feb.  1  -­  2  –  3  –  4  

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Frequent violence  and  coarse  language.  

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Thurs. -­  Fri.  

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Frequent violence  and  coarse  language.  

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Feb.  13  –  14    

www.olivertheatre.ca Coarse language.  

Best Picture, Best Best Origin

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Feb.  15  -­  16  –  17  –  18   Showtimes  on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:30  p.m.  

                             Visit  Our  Website  

Showtimes on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.  

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  MInclu o

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Coarse and  sexual  la Nominated for 6

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Feb.  8  -­  9  –  10  –  11      R@egular   howtimes   Showtimes  on      S    at.    7:00  &  9S :20   p.m.  

Nominated for 4 Academy Awards Including Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Adapted Screenplay

Sexual violence,  coarse  language,  violence.  

Nominated for 4 Academy Awards Including Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Adapted Screenplay

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Feb.  6  –  7    

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Feb.  20  –  21    

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509-826-0860 |

www.omaktheater.com Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Feb.  8  -­  9  –  10  –  11   Showtimes  on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.  

Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Feb.  22  -­  23  –  24  –  25  

Violence, coarse  language.  

Thurs. -­  Fri.  –  Sat.          Feb.  27  –  28,  March  1  

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Feb.  13  –  14    

Nominated for 4 Academy Awards Including Best Picture, Best Actress, Best Adapted Screenplay

Coarse and  sexual  language.  

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the  Sat.    at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

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Showtimes on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:25  p.m.  

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No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Okanogan Valley Life COMMUNITY CALENDAR Kids are welcome until 10 p.m.

Blues Band to Perform at Winery CCC Talent Show OROVILLE – The Randy Battle Blues Band will perform for the first of February’s concerts at Esther Bricques Winery this Thursday, Feb. 6. The following Thursday, Feb. 13 will see Ruby Rust on stage to set the stage for Valentine’s Day, followed by Sunny Lanigan on Thursday, Feb. 20. Doors open at 6 pm. Light refreshments are available. The winery is located at 42 Swanson Mill Road, Oroville. For more information, please call the winery at (509) 476-2861.

Bonaparte Lake Snow Drag

BONAPARTE - Snowmobile Drags, Saturday, Feb. 8, racing begins at 10 a.m., registration 7:30-9:30 a.m. Ten racing classes, including youth division. Stay tuned for more information, or contact Mike Sterling at (509) 486-2277 or bigrockranch@ wildblue.net.

A Fine & Pleasant Misery OROVILLE - Oroville Chamber of Commerce sponsors the Patrick McManus Show “A Fine and Pleasant Misery on Saturday, Feb. 14 at Oroville High School at 7 p.m.

NW Ice Fishing Festival

MOLSON - The Northwest Ice Fishing Festival will be Saturday, Feb. 15 at Molson and Sidley Lakes. Tourney starts at 7 a.m., register at Sidley Lake office. Other activities include pancake feed at Grange Hall, Dog Sled Demos, Pinewood Derby, arts and crafts, raffles & baked Goods.

FFA Steak Feed

Tonasket FFA Alumni and Friends invite you to enjoy a barbecued 8-ounce top sirloin steak, baked potato, cole slaw and roll at the Tonasket Eagles on Saturday, Feb. 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Members and guests are invited; cost is $10 per person.

Rock Around the Clock for NVCS By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

Just 10 more days and the Third Annual 50’s Dance will have you boogying away to the sounds of Project 3:16 on Saturday, Feb. 15. Not only will there be contests for Best Dancers, Best Costumes, Best Hoola-hoopers and Best Yo-yoers, but the King of RockN-Roll will be there to entertain! Regardless of age, Elvis is an icon known to all.

The CCC will be having their annual Winter Talent show on Saturday, Feb. 8, at 6:30 p.m. We are reaching out into the communities for talent. Are you a singer, player, speaker, or do gymnastics or dance? We are wanting to put you on our stage for a 5-10 minute performance. We will furnish the sound equipment and stage lights; you will be able to showcase your performance. Please call (509) 4861328 to sign up.

Father Daughter Dance

OROVILLE - Father Daughter Dance for girls ages Pre-K to 6th grade and their father figure (bring your dad, uncle, brother, grandfather or friend) on Saturday, Feb. 15 from 7 - 9 p.m. at the OHS Commons. There will be sweets and light refreshments along with lots of dancing and music. Tickets are by donation at the door all proceeds will benefit Oroville PTO. Pictures will be available for an additional cost. Come enjoy a night to remember, all are welcome!

Molson Family Bingo

MOLSON - Family Bingo Night is Friday, Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. Come and enjoy, bring a snack and a friend. Children are welcome, this is a fun night. We have fun and have snacks at the break at half time.

The King is Coming

OROVILLE – He lives! The King of Rock-N-Roll will be here for the Third Annual 50’s Dance on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Vicki’s Back Door Club. Believe it! Even small children, who weren’t a blink in anyone’s eye back in the 1950’s, will be enamored with the singing and gyrations of this cultural icon. Start preparing now for the contests: Best Dancers, Best Costumes, Best Hula-hoopers, and Best Yo-yoers. Prize drawings throughout the evening. Tons of food and adult and child beverages available. And, don’t forget the ice cream bar with

LEARNING TREE This event is for everyone adults, children and families. Food galore, adult and kid beverages, and ice cream bar will be available. Door prizes will be given throughout the evening. Doors open at 6 p.m., the band begins playing at 6:30 p.m., and the King arrives at 7: p.m.! Our thanks to North Cascades Broadcasting for the snazzy pink and green publicity posters you will see throughout our community.

its floats, pop, sundaes and banana splits! The doors open at 6 p.m., live music with Project 3:16 begins at 6:30 p.m. And, the KING, well, he’ll arrive about 7 p.m.

Heart to Heart

Tonasket Free Methodist Church will be hosting Heart to Heart, a women’s evening of praise, worship and fellowship, on Thursday, Feb. 27. The church is located at 1 Stanton Loop Road, Tonasket, just up the Havillah Rd. from the high school softball field. Social begins at 6:30 p.m. with the event starting at 7 p.m.. Jen Willson, recently returned from a long-term mission to Malawi, Africa, will be the speaker. Contact Pat Richey (509) 486-4680 or Kristi Hutchins (509) 486-2910 for more information.

OSF Variety Show

OROVILLE - The Oroville Scholarship Foundation’s annual Variety Show and Silent Auction fundraiser will be Friday, March 14 at OHS Coulton Auditorium. Those that would like to participate in the variety show are encouraged to contact Oroville Music Director Eric Stiles at the high school, (509) 476-361 or email him at eric.stiles@oroville. wednet.edu. To donate auction items you may call G. Hauenstein at (509) 476-2416 or Terri Barker at (509) 476-3145.

CCC Talent Show, Feb. 8 Acts needed by this Thursday, Feb. 6

Submitted by Janet Culp CCC of Tonasket

TONASKET - The 19th Annual Community Cultural Center’s Talent Show will be Saturday, Feb. 8 at 6:30 p.m.

Local music students to perform Submitted by Kathleen Christensen

Again this year, Bud McSpadden will be our MC, entertaining us with his costume changes and his own brand of Tonasket humor in song and commentary. Also performing: Melinda Millard (belly dancing), The Alley Family (gymnastics), Kyle McConnell (singing, guitar, fiddle), Sam Howell and Mark Kubiak (on instrumentals), Nick Watt (orator), and many others.

The acts will be 5-10 minutes long, with an intermission in the middle of the evening to enjoy desserts and beverages by donation. Admission will be $7.00 for members, $8.00 for the public, with children 0-10 Free. To be included in the show, please call (509) 486-1328 by†Thursday.

COUNTY MUSIC TEACHERS

Elizabeth Grunst, Oroville (Gloria Fast); Sandy Sheets, Omak (Ashley Blakemore, Chelsee Johnson, Sarah Dixon, Madison Gariano, Daniele Spark); Lois Rhoads, Tonasket (Julie Bello, Emily Williams, Mandi Wilson, Jessica Heinlen, Reese Vassar); Roz Nau, Tonasket (Emily Nissen, Joseph Schell, Cole Davison, Sterling Ritch, Bethany Fast) and Kathleen Christensen, Omak (Emmalee and Kennadee Irving, Esther and Stuart Law, Eva Robeck).

Okanogan Co.Music Teachers Assoc.

OMAK - The public is invited to a recital presented by students of Okanogan County Music Teachers Association (OKMTA) Saturday, Feb. 8, at 3:00 p.m. at Cornerstone Fellowship, 328 N. Riverside Drive, Omak.

Donations will be received for chapter expenses and scholarships. For more infomation, contact President Kathleen Christensen, 509-422-4660. Teachers (and their students) are:

Tonasket Food Bank

TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192.

Oroville Food Bank

OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Classes coming up: Red, White and Brew (Sat Feb. 8, three sessions – may still be room if you call quickly); Intro to Squash (Saturday, Feb. 8, two sessions – might still be space…); Heartsaver First Aid/ CPR (Monday, Feb. 10, two sessions); Science Experiments You Can Eat (Wednesday, Feb. 12, two sessions); and Is Your Dog Training You? (Monday, Feb. 17, six sessions). For information or to register for a class call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email community.schools@oroville.wednet or sign up online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

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Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

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New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

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Oroville Eagles

We are having a special Valentine’s Day Steak Night on Friday, Feb. 14. Dinner will be followed by a DJ and a 50’s - 60’s sock hop. There will be a dance contest and a costume contest. So dig out you poodle skirt and your bobby socks and come join the fun! On Saturday, Feb. 15 there will be a Sweetheart Scotch doubles Pool tournament. Sign up by

Way to go Seattle Seahawks

12:30 p.m., games start at 1 p.m. Ten dollar buy-in per couple. Payout depends on participation. Members and guests welcome. We are planning a special fundraiser for Saturday, March 8. A Chinese buffet by Linda Darrow followed by an auction to raise funds to replenish our coffers after the burglary and support our local charities. Watch here for more info. Our Aerie meetings are the first

TONASKET EAGLES

By Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

Way to go to the Seattle Seahawks just wait until next year and it was warmer in New Jersey than here. We are having our crab feed and this year will include clams for $30, crab only $20 and clams only for $10. We have ham for those people that or can’t have

Help coming for Okanogan homes by Lael Duncan Exec. Director, Community Action

OKANOGAN Senior Citizens and Disabled persons living in the town of Okanogan may be selected to have their homes fixed up and spruced up this June by a group of youths coming from all over the nation as

shellfish for $10. Come and enjoy. The feed will be Feb. 15t from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Get your pre-paid tickets at the lounge. If not sold out tickets will also be available at the door, get them early before there gone. On Feb. 8 we are having our FFA Steak Feed this event is to support the future farmers of this area the cost is $10 (Great

COMMUNITY ACTION part of a religious Mission Camp sponsored by Okanogan County Community Action Council and Group Cares. “Group Cares has been arranging these mission trips for over 30 years and has offered these services in communities across the nation. We are excited to start with the town of Okanogan and hope to bring the

Steaks). The ladies of the kitchen will be having a special breakfast on Feb. 16 in honor of Valentine’s day, French toast filled with fruit and side of ham, bacon or sausage for $6. Pinochle scores from last Sunday as follows: first place Penny Smith; second place, Jo Porter; low score went to Ken Cook and last pinochle to Nellie Paulsen. We wish all a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

program to other towns in coming years as well,” said Lael Duncan, of Community Action. Work performed in the past has included wheel chair ramps, new porches and steps, windows repaired, painting, and more Duncan said. To apply for services on your home, you can pick up an application at Community Action located at 424 South 2nd in Okanogan or call the office at (509) 422-4041. Email requests for the application can be sent to laeld@occac.com.

HEALTH CARE

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

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24 Hour Crisis Line

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HEALTH CARE

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Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

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Psychiatric Services

and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day. We have free pool every Sunday. Monday is Taco Night, during Pool League we have Burgers on Wednesdays, Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night, Karaoke and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

OKANOGAN

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

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Page A8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 6, 2014

SCHOOLS

FFA Alumni Steak Feed Feb. 8 By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

In Elizabeth Moore’s (top left) Textile and Apparel class, (l-r) Darbee Sapp, Brooke Nelson, Darian Ward, Michael Biernacki and Lea Berger work on an embroidery project.

Community volunteers aid THS textiles class By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Tonasket High Schools Textile and Apparel class covers lot of ground including variety of different skills. The students benefited from some community support as a couple of volunteers brought materials, tools and their expertise to share with the class. Mary Lou Richardson, member of the Family and Consumer Sciences Advisory Committee in Tonasket and retired Family and Consumer Sciences teacher now living in Omak, and Dave Campbell, a Tonasket High School graduate now living in Omak, were able to demonstrate a breadth of materials and their uses to Elizabeth Moore’s class. “The students and I appreciate their time and help immensely,” Moore said. Mrs. Richardson brought samples of unspun plant and animal fibers, how to spin fibers into yard using drop spindles, and demonstrated the use of her spinning wheel. Mr. Campbell brought with in an Inkle loom, discussed weaving and demonstrated (and allowed the use of) his loom with

TONASKET - The Tonasket FFA Alumni and friendswill host its annual steak feed fundraiser to benefit the Tonasket FFA program on n Saturday, Feb. 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m., at the Tonasket Eagles. “Everybody is welcome,” said Tonasket FFA adviser Matt Deebach. “It’s the neatest thing. There is no auction or anything; it’s just neat to see everyone come.” Dinner features a barbecued 8-ounce top sirloin steak, baked potato, cole slaw and roll. Members and guests are invited; cost is $10 per person. Kids are welcome until 10:00. Meanwhile, the FFA program itself has been busy with a number of events since last fall. A group of nine shooters competed at a trap shoot in Kettle Falls that included most of the state’s top teams. “They shot well,” Deebach said. “Jenna Valentine was the high girl, third place. It was really a hard shoot - arguably the top five teams in the state were there. It was a neat thing to gage where the standard is. Kettle Falls, Colville, Omak and Freeman were there and they are always serious teams.” He said trap shooting has grown within his program in the past couple of years. “The neat thing is we have one full squad of just freshmen,” he said. “A few years ago we thought we’d have to close it down, but now we have a lot of interest.” A group also participated in a shop contest, hosted by Chelan, finishing in the middle of the pack in that event. “The kids were asked to build a camp hatchet from scratch,” Deebach said. “They were in teams of four. They gave them the steel and they had to put them together... They had to form it, sharpen it and polish it up. They had to MIG weld it, temper it all out and the handle had to go through the head. “They had to do self grading and had their judging judged as well. They also learned time management. Their comment was that they needed more time, but that’s a good skill to know when you’re in

Brent Baker/staff photo

Cade Hockett (left) and Trevor Peterson show off some of the tools Tonasket FFA received thanks to a donation from the North Country Car Club last fall. the business field.” The FFA, in conjunction with the FFA Alumni and Shannon O’Brien, is also working this week’s hort convention at the Okanogan County Fairgrounds. “It’s a neat organization,” Deebach said. “They’re providing the sandwiches.” Finally, the Tonasket FFA was the beneficiary of a donation from the North Country Car Club. “They donated five DeWalt drills and three or four half inch drills for the shop to use,” Deebach said. “It was a very generous donation. We got them from Lee Franks, and they were nice enough to give us a great price break on those to help the kids, too. “The entire system worked well. The car club helped out, the store helped out - it was nice to see the local community organizations and businesses help give the kids every opportunity they possibly could.”

TONASKET HONOR ROLL Brent Baker/staff photo

Darbee Sapp and Brooke Nelson lend one another a hand during their project. Tonasket blue and gold fabric. “He left with us some booklets he has written about Inkle weaving and promises that when he finishes the band on the loom, he will bring back to the students the parts they wove,” Moore said. Richardson also started the students with knitting, as well as showing them how to begin embroidery stitching samples. “They finished (the projects) with my help and the support of each other,” Moore said. “Mrs. Richardson also shared dozens

of embroidered pieces and crazy quilts wall hangings with both the Textiles and Apparel class and the Housing, Interiors and Furnishings class on her last day with us.” Moore said she looks forward to their help in the future. “Mrs. Richardson will undoubtedly return to enhance future units,” she said. “Mr. Campbell, a chef, will return to demonstrate culinary knife usage to the Introduction to Foods classes this second semester.”

Seniors Honor (3.500-4.000)

Kathryn Cleman (4.0); Savannah Clinedinst (4.0); Leslie Iniguez (4.0); Brisa Leep (4.0); Lupita Ornelas (4.0); Norma Ramos (4.0); Cassandra Spear (4.0); Jamie Wilson (4.0); Phillip (Collin) Aitcheson; Elizabeth Jackson; Madaline Coffelt-Richardson; Christa McCormick; Anna Chavez; Norma Ornelas; Levi Schell; Kjeld Williams; Michaela Rampley; Amber Monroe; Baylie Tyus; Caio Baumstein; Walker Marks; Marcelino Ruiz-Martell; Sarah Green; Sara Holan; Selena Cosino; Makalapua Goodness; Michael Goudeau; Diante Haney Williamson; Chance Stucker; Trevor Terris.

Merit (3.000-3.499)

Abigail Gschiel, Mahter Warren, Tucker Pardue, Daniela Capote, Kenneth Freese, Kaitlyn GildroyMcGregor, Amanda Johnson, Lainey Olveira, Matthew Goff, Madison Villalva, Eric Chavez, Martine Bjerke, Jeffery Fry, Timothy Jackson, Elias Abrego, Lindsay Rhodes, Jair Chavez, Tyler Farver, Kylie Dellinger, Clayton Fry, Dyllan Gage.

Juniors Honor (3.500-4.000)

Alexander Mershon (4.0), Abraham

Podkranic (4.0), Aspen Verhasselt (4.0), Abran Alvarez, Jesse Manring, Dalton Smith, Johannes Weber, Lea Berger, Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, Anna St. Martin, Aiza Dahman, Mary Naylor, Jensen Sackman, Ulukbek Beishekeev, Frank Holfeltz, Brooke Nelson, Hilda Celestino, Travis Deggeller, Tiffany Ferdon, Allison Glanzer, Amber Burton, James Coleman, Lucas Vugteveen, Charlie Sanchez, Darbee Sapp.

Ashley Tobel, Daisy Alcauter, Janelle Catone, Esmerelda Flores, Bryden Hires, Treven Nielsen, Kendra Davisson, Hugo Jimenez Sanchez.

Merit (3.000-3.499)

Micala Arnesen, Adrian McCarthy, Rosared Walts, Blake Anderson, Vanessa Pershing, Nicholas Crandall, Kyra Whiting, Alexee Howell, Ulyses Morales, Jonathan Freese, Dimas Ayala Alas, Cayden Field.

Merit (3.000-3.499)

Rebeccah Holberg, Deoha Braggs, Devyn Catone, Colt Hatch, Colton Leep, Daniela Bravo, Chad Edwards, Alissa Young, Kahlil Butler, Cesar Reynoso, Elvira Alvarez, Smith Condon, Jose Ortega, Diego Goudeau, Sydney Nielsen, Rosemary Luna, Brock Henneman, Dallas Tyus, David Curtis, Jeffery Wilbur.

Freshmen Honor (3.500-4.000)

Brenden Asmussen, Thomas Kennedy, Hunter Swanson, Samuel Nelson, Bonnie Siegfried, Elijah Antonelli, Wyatt Pershing, Johnna Terris, Lexie Wahl, Timothy Freese.

Merit (3.000-3.499) Sophomores Honor (3.500-4.000)

Pablo Chavez (4.0), Madeleine Graham (4.0), Kasey Nelson (4.0), Trevor Peterson (4.0), Rade Pilkinton (4.0), Rachel Silverthorn (4.0), Jenna Valentine (4.0), Baillie Hirst, Jaden Vugteveen, Omar Calderon, LeighAnne Barnes, Jordan Hughes,

Tawan Murray, Zion Butler, Taundra Chaska-Webber, Cheyan Kinkade, Brenda Perez, Seth Smith, David Ornelas, Lorena Sanchez, Bradley Keener, Ally Mershon, Jacob Villalva, Chelsea Vazquez, Lucas Scott, Conner Timm, Beau Cork, Sadie Rojas, Paola Rivera Covarrubias, Dylan Kalma, Vance Frazier, Serenity Poletti-Brereton, Trinity DeJong.

OROVILLE HONOR ROLL Seniors

Freshmen

4.0

Nathan McAllister (4.00); Sierra Speiker (4.00)

Superintendent (3.75-3.99)

Gabriela Capote, Aya Cruspero, Ashley Marcolin, Meagan Moralez, Brittany Jewett, Cruz Ortega, Kaitlyn Grunst ,Tanner Smith, Jacob Scott.

Principal (3.50- 3.74 )

Diego Santana, Kaylee Foster, Stephon Robinson, Shelby Scott. Gary DeVon/file photo

The Oroville Scholarship Foundation is looking for talented people to participate in this years Variety/Talent show to raise money for the foundation. Auditions are Feb. 25-27. Applications are available online at www.gazettetribune.com and at the Oroville High School office.

Variety/Talent Show applications available The Gazette-Tribune

OROVILLE - It’s that time once again for the Oroville Scholarship Foundation (formerly Dollars For Scholars) Variety/Talent Show. The show will occur this year on Friday, March 14 at 7 p.m. in the Oroville High School Commons. To participate in the show, an application (available at

www.gazette-tribune.com) must be completed, and participants must audition. Not all applicants for the variety show will be selected for participation at the discretion of the OSF Selection Committee, according to Oroville Music Director Eric Styles. Auditions are Feb. 25-27 (Tuesday-Thursday), at the Oroville High School Music

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room (#301) from 3:10 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 10-minute intervals. Acts must be limited to 3.5 minutes. Additional copies of the application will be available in the Oroville Schools offices once the high school copier is up and running again, according to Stiles. “Please write with your questions, and we hope to see you at the show,” said Styles.

Merit (3.49-3.00)

Michael Ortiz-Camacho, Angela Nelson, Menze Pickering, Bridget Clark, Stephany Cisneros.

*BaSed on Statewide SurveyS ShowinG 2.3 people read each copy of a community newSpaper.

Courtnee Kallstrom (4.00)

Superintendent (3.75-3.99) Yessica Nemecio.

Principal (3.50- 3.74 )

Narya Naillon, Nathan Hugus, Sandra Hilstad.

Merit (3.49-3.00)

Liliana Nava, Phoebe Poynter, Lindsey McKinney, Brentt Kallstrom, Jennifer Vazquez, Palton Johnson, Itzell Castillo-Diaz.

8th Grade 4.0

Katherine Egerton, 4.00; Sydney Egerton, 4.00

Juniors Superintendent (3.75-3.99)

Leonardo Curiel, Kyle Scott, Bethany Roley

Principal (3.50- 3.74 )

Nahum Garfias, Serina Finley, Adriana Silva, Kylee Davis.

Merit (3.49-3.00)

Brian Wise, Kali Peters, Jessica Galvan, Elena Beltran, Lane Tietje, Dustin Nigg.

Sophomores Superintendent (3.75-3.99)

Bailey Griffin Samantha Walimaki.

Merit (3.49-3. 00)

Riley Davidson, Ellamae Burnell, Kaylha Blanchard, Emily Finsen, Faith Martin; Mikayla Scott, Logan Mills.

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Superintendent (3.75-3.99)

Alexia Garcia, Kambe Ripley, Hannah Hilderbrand, Esmeralda RosalesCortez, Maxwell Turner, Victoria Kindred, Sean Maher.

Principal (3.50- 3.74 )

Dean Davis , Marissa Varney, Esti-

fenny Carrillo, Havannah Worrell, Brittaney Minarcin, Luis Vazquez, 3.56; Jeffrey Rounds.

Merit (3.49-3.00)

Adolfo Hernandez-Delgado, Paz Lopez, Mariah Burruss, Macharra Richter, Yohnny Castillo, Hannah Hill, Stephanie Ruvalcaba, Ryan Scott.

7th Grade 4.0

Jennifer Cisneros-Medjna (4.00)

Superintendent (3.75-3.99)

Lindsay Koepke, Madison Whiteaker, Hunter DeVon,Sugeysi Layata.

Principal (3.50- 3.74 )

Alexis Allenby, Katherine Rawley, Angela Viveros, Matthew Galvan, Wendy Ortega, Jingy Sykes, Brandon Duran Jessie Deaqulno, Jamen Griffin, Gilberto HernandezDelgado.

Merit (3.49-3.00)

Spencer Martin, Elijah Burnell, Brigodo Ocampo, Sergio Contreras, Justan Vaughan, Mikayla Rounds.


FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE A9

COPS & COURTS SUPERIOR COURT CRIMINAL

Carlos Antonio Castillo, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 28 to conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance. Castillo was sentenced to 37 days in jail with credit for 37 days served and fined $1,160.50 for the Dec. 9, 2011 crimes. Korey Douglas Bevel, 21, Oroville, pleaded guilty Jan. 29 to failure to register as a sex offender (homeless) (felony). Bevel was sentenced to four months in jail and fined $1,110.50. Tanya Paige Hayner, 25, pleaded guilty Jan. 29 to residential burglary. Hayner was sentenced to 49 days in jail and fined $1,110.50 for Dec. 9 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for March 18. Lynda Diane Fry, 29, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 29 to harassment (threats to kill) and third-degree malicious mischief. Fry was sentenced to 38 months in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Dec. 9 crimes. Ezra Thomas Chapman, 32, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 30 to three counts of second-degree unlawful possession of a firearm. Chapman was sentenced to 10 months in jail and fined $860.50 for the Oct. 6 crimes. Michelle Lynn Carden, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 30 to two counts of forgery and two counts of third-degree theft. Carden was sentenced to 45 days in jail and fined $1,110.50 for the March 2013 crimes. Carden was also ordered to pay $486.32 in restitution to Gene’s Harvest Food, Omak, and the same amount to The Shorthorn Tavern, also Omak. Larry Lee Graves, 59, Oroville, pleaded guilty Jan. 31 to discharging a firearm in a public place. Graves was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 361 days suspended with credit for three days served. He was fined $600 for the Dec. 20 crime. Frederick David Batson Jr., 29, Omak, pleaded guilty Feb. 3 to two counts of unlawful possession of a legend drug. Batson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, with credit for one day served. He was fined $760.50. The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Dean Allen, 32, Oroville, with two counts of tampering with a witness. The court found probable cause to charge Raelena Marie St. Peter, 18, Omak, with first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm, second-degree DWLS, making a false statement and hit-and-run (unattended). The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 29. The court found probable cause to charge Jose DeJesus Porras Vega, 18, Tonasket, with firstdegree unlawful possession of a firearm. The crime allegedly occurred Dec. 29. The count found probable cause to charge Rachel Dawn Morales, 33, Oroville, with second-degree assault (strangulation) (DV). The crime allegedly occurred Jan. 23. The court found probable cause to charge Luis Gallegos Villegas, 30, Omak, with second-degree possession of stolen property, attempted first-degree trafficking in stolen property and violation of a no-contact order. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 26. The court found probable cause to charge Francisco Murillo Heredia, 31, Oroville, with POCS (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Jan. 27 in Omak.

DISTRICT COURT Billy Dale Anderson, 45, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Anderson received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $618. Miranda Leona Joy Bishop, 39, Omak, guilty on two counts of third-degree DWLS. Bishop was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,636. Kristen Ann Bob, 31, Omak, guilty on three counts of third-degree theft. Bob was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,616. Jerome Franklin Callum, 69, Tonasket, guilty of DUI. Callum was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,808. Leah Marie Cate, 33, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault dismissed. Cate was fined $500. Marianne P. Cohen, 38, Loomis, had two charges of reckless endangerment dismissed. Thomas Lee Cohen Jr., 43, Omak, guilty of first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Cohen was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 274 days suspended, and fined $1,308. Richard Pershing Comer, 58, Oroville, had a first-degree criminal trespass charge dismissed. Comer was fined $500. David J.L. Condon Soderberg, 19, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Condon Soderberg was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $808. Marcelino Corrales, no middle name listed, 47, Omak, had a charge dismissed: supplying liquor to minors. Corrales was fined $500.

Michael William Craig, 22, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief and disorderly conduct. Craig was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 356 days suspended, and fined $1,283. Daniel Dominguez Martinez, 27, Tonasket, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Dominguez Martinez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 362 days suspended, and fined $1,033. David John Donovan, 57, Tonasket, guilty on two counts of thirddegree DWLS. Donovan was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $1,358. Susan Elizabeth Ecklor, 48, Okanogan, had an obstruction charge dismissed. Ecklor was fined $500. Nathaniel James Edenso, 33, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Edenso was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 85 days suspended, and fined $658. Darcy Kim Edwards, 41, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Edwards was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $808. Joshua Cane England, 19, guilty of fourth-degree assault. England received a 364-day suspended sentence and fined $808. Joseph Alexander Felix, 18, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Felix was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 179 days suspended, and fined $808.

911 CALLS AND JAIL BOOKINGS Monday, Jan. 27, 2014 Harassment on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on Rodeo Trail Rd. near Omak. Fraud on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Trespassing on Juniper Place in Omak. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Fuses reported missing. Domestic dispute on Koala Ave. in Omak. DWLS on N. Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on S. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on S. Ash St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Luis Gallegos Villegas, 29, booked for violation of a protection order, second-degree possession of stolen property and attempted first-degree trafficking in stolen property. Francisco Heredia Murillo, 31, booked for violation of the Uniform Controlled Substances Act. Brandon Shea Marchand, 39, booked for third-degree DWLS. Tuesday, Jan. 28, 2014 Malicious mischief on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Injuries reported. DWLS on Elmway in Okanogan. Found property on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Bicycle recovered. Malicious mischief on S. Douglas St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on W. Second Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. First Ave. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Window shot out. Malicious mischief on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Ash St. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Malicious mischief on S. Granite St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Ash St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Kenwood St. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Cash reported missing. Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in Omak.

Malicious mischief on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Assault on W. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Theft on Koala Ave. in Omak. Drugs on Ferry St. in Omak. Burglary on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. Bradley Allen Sweat, 24, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Waylon Dean Hobrecht, 33, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Michael R. Tucker, 48, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV) and two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and second-degree DWLS. Robert Esteve A. Salazar, 20, court commitment for second-degree rape of a child. Patrick Dale Bilby, 21, booked for five counts of second-degree malicious mischief and 12 counts of third-degree malicious mischief. Jacob Ryan Atkinson, 19, booked for five counts of second-degree malicious mischief and 12 counts of third-degree malicious mischief. Danyille Mariah McCarter, 20, booked for distribution of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and third-degree theft. Wednesday, Jan. 29, 2014 One-vehicle crash on Swanson Mill Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Tires reported slashed. Trespassing on Toroda Creek Rd. near Wauconda. Theft on S. Fifth Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Havillah Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Public intoxication on N. Juniper St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Apple Lane in Omak. Mark Donald Wells, 53, booked for DUI. Jeremy Wayne Hill, 29, Department of Corrections 24-hour detainment. Eric Lea Reid, 41, booked on State Patrol FTA warrants for DUI and third-degree DWLS. David Allen Gorr, 55, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014 One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. No injuries reported. DWLS on N. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle crash on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. Domestic dispute on Ed Louis Rd. near Okanogan. Public intoxication on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Central Ave. in Omak. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. First Ave. in Omak. Vehicle window shot out. Domestic dispute on S. Ash St. in Omak. Public intoxication on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Drugs on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Robert Wendell George, 44, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for DUI and for POCS. Terry Matthew Vranjes, 35, booked on two FTA warrants, both for third-degree theft. Wesley Paul Wiorth, 36, booked for obstruction. Marisa Ann Seavey, 28, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants, both for third-degree DWLS. Friday, Jan. 31, 2014 Assault on S. Columbia St. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Wannacut Lake Rd. near Oroville. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Fig Ave. in Omak. Theft on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Drugs on S. Cedar St. in Omak. Drugs on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Domestic dispute on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Xavier Lewis Smith, 23, booked on a Department of Corrections warrant.

Doctors’ Discovery Helps Diabetes

PHILADELPHIA – A team of doctors has found that a formulation of exotic sounding herbs and spices gives diabetics new hope. The formula, called Cinnatrol™ promotes healthy blood sugar levels by effectively metabolizing glucose into energy. In a research study, all patients taking just one capful of the liquid (one ounce) daily, dramatically lowered their blood sugar levels compared to a placebo group. Another scientific study found that an ingredient in Cinnatrol™ made insulin 20 times more capable converting blood sugar to energy. While individual results vary, one patient in the study lowered his blood sugar from 220-245 to the 100-130 range in only 28 days, despite

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being instructed not to change his dietary habits or physical activity. Some patients, under their doctors care, have been able to reduce or eliminate their need for diabetic drugs. Scientists say that Cinnatrol™ actually helps diabetic drugs to work more efficiently. Additional information is available at www.cinnatrol.com. Cinnatrol™ is available without a prescription at pharmacies and nutrition stores or call 1877-581-1502. Now at select

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Cecilia Betty Barton, 58, booked on two Tonasket Police Department FTC warrants: obstruction and resisting arrest; and an OCSO FTC warrant for reckless driving. Michelle Lynn Carden, 25, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) with intent to deliver, possession of a legend drug without a prescription and possession of drug paraphernalia. Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014 Warrant arrest on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Illegal burning on O’Neil Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Wards Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Pine St. in Okanogan. Warrant arrest on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Theft on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Eight-foot tall Seahawk reported missing. Malicious mischief on W. Fifth Ave. in Omak. Window reported broken. Assault on N. Main St. in Omak. TMVWOP on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on Paintbrush Lane near Omak. No injuries reported.

Juan Carlos Gonzalez Martinez, 30, booked on a USBP hold. Fred Albert Jordan, 31, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Michael Aaron Cornella, 23, booked for making a false statement. Terry James Weaver, 42, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Adrian Rodriguez, no middle name listed, 31, booked for first-degree DWLS. Jimmy W. Harmes, 57, booked on an OCSO FTC warrant for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Timothy Allen McFarlane, 44, court commitment for third-degree DWLS. Ryan Joseph Stotts, 30, booked on six OCSO FTA warrants: residential burglary, third-degree theft, two counts of violation of a nocontact order and two counts of harassment. Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014 Warrant arrest on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. iPhone reported missing. Malicious mischief on E. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Trespassing on Westlake Ave. near

Oroville. Violation of a no-contact order on S. Second St. in Riverside. Trespassing on Omak-Riverside Eastside Rd. near Omak. Weapons offense on S. Seventh St. in Tonasket. Drugs on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on Pine St. in Okanogan. Disorderly conduct on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Okoma Dr. in Omak. Kory John Lester, 45, booked for hitand-run (unattended). Matthew Aaron Velasquez, 37, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Robert Trevor Richardson, 34, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Joseph Gerald Johnson, 31, booked for felon in possession of a firearm. Heidi Nicole Thomas-Nyman, 28, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Donnie Jackson Spearman, 34, booked for violation of a nocontact order. Regina Marie Pakootas, 42, booked on a juvenile warrant.


Page A10 10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 6, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • February 6, 2014

$MBTTJĂ FE %FBEMJOF  /PPO 5VFTEBZ r $BMM  UP QMBDF ZPVS BE

O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

Announcements

American Legion Housing

CRAB TICKETS are now available for the American Legion Crab Dinner on February 8th at 6pm. $25 per ticket. Get yours at The American Legion Post, 314 14th Avenue or at Vicki’s Unique Boutique, 1415 Main. Call 509-476-2761 or 5609396

1105 Appleway, Oroville

Now Accepting Applications

for 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts. 6XEVLGL]HGIRU,QFRPH4XDOLÂżHG+RXVHKROGV z Great Oroville Location z Picnic area z Spacious Floor Plans z On-site laundry z Park-like setting

Call for information and application

509-476-2808 TTY 425-562-4002

Similkameen Park Apartments Oroville, WA.

Farm Worker Preference

1 Bedroom

www.gazette-tribune.com

Houses For Sale TONASKET HOME

Starting @$365 per month + security deposit. z Water,

Sewer, Garbage and Dryer z Air Conditioning z Play Area z Storage Space Must be income eligible. Updating Waitlist 301 Golden St. #16 Oroville, WA. 98844 z Washer

509-476-9721 509-476-3059

www.gazette-tribune.com Large Home, beautifully landscaped, fenced very private backyard, accents this home in established neighborhood. 2319 sq ft. with 4 bedrooms, 1 ž baths, hobby room, open spacious kitchen, Lots of parking, sprinkler system, all this within walking distances of schools and shopping. Price reduced to $249,500. Call 509-486-2359 for appointment.

Subscribe to the...

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

LITTLE HOUSE on very nice city lot. Poor condition needs lots of work. Seller terms to reliable, able buyer only. Seller is licensed RE Agent. $44,500 Call 509-4762121

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Think Green!

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

Employment Education FAMILY/HEALTH SUPPORT AIDE For Tonasket ECEAP Program to provide support for teacher in classroom, assist families, and data entry support.. Bilingual/Spanish preferred. Requires high school diploma /GED. CDA or 12 college credits in ECE required or must obtain after hire. . Salary 9.35 – 10.00 per hr. 28/30 hours per week. Applications can be picked up at 101 4th Ave. W – Omak. Send cover letter, resume, application to OCCDA- P.O. Box 1844 Omak, WA 98841 Equal Opportunity Employer.

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WE WOULD like to extend our heartfelt Thanks to the Nurses, Aides, Respiratory Therapist, Social Worker and Dr. Crawford of the NVH ER and The Staff of the VA Clinic. Thank you all for allowing our Family Member to maintain his Dignity and Giving Comfort and Peace in his final hours. Sincerely, The Family of Charles Allie

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

Health General

www.gazette-tribune.com 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, very nice home, $910. Some acreage may be included. Nice Apartments for rent, $410 - $475. Call to see how you can get One Month Free. Call Sun Lakes Realty, 509476-2121

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 Orville: 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, lake view, nice, clean $750/1st/last/damage. Airport Rd. 509-560-0240 TONASKET

2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH MOBILE HOME with washer, dryer & large indoor storage area. No smoking. No pets. $650 per month plus $350 deposit. 509-429-2288.

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

On Call CMA Oroville & Tonasket Is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

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Help Wanted Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is currently recruiting for Seasonal Firefighter and NRW2 Engine Leader positions. Positions are open until filled. For more information, or to apply please visit our website, www.dnr.wa.gov. If you have further questions (after reviewing our website) contact Heidi Seitters at (509) 684-7474. DNR is an equal opportunity employer.

Crosswords

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38. Obvious (hyphenated)

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53. Blatant

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56. Steals

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59. Government income (2 wd)

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62. .01 of rupee

37. Pair

63. Dumfries denial

39. Color retention

64. American symbol

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66. Armageddon

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HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE! We are dedicated to our employees’ job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: Dental Hygienist Part time/20 hours per week. Travel between Okanogan, Brewster & Oroville required. MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN Full time Brewster (Jay Ave.): WIC Peer Counselor Part time/10 hours per week. English/Spanish bilingual required. Tonasket: Nurse Case Manager (must be an RN)0.80 FTE/32 hours per week MA-R, MA-C, or LPN 1 per diem positions LPN, MA-C or MA-R 0.80 FTE/32 hours per week See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

Firewood NOTICE Washington State law requires wood sellers to provide an invoice (receipt) that shows the seller’s and buyer’s name and address and the date delivered. The invoice should also state the price, the quantity delivered and the quantity upon which the price is based. There should be a statement on the type and quality of the wood. When you buy firewood write the seller’s phone number and the license plate number of the delivery vehicle. The legal measure for firewood in Washington is the cord or a fraction of a cord. Estimate a cord by visualizing a four-foot by eight-foot space filled with wood to a height of four feet. Most long bed pickup trucks have beds that are close to the four-foot by 8-foot dimension. To make a firewood complaint, call 360902-1857. agr.wa.gov/inspection/ WeightsMeasures/Fire woodinformation.aspx agr.wa.gov/inspection/WeightsMeasures/Firewoodinformation.aspx

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51. Blew it 54. Barn topper

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1. Beanies

55. Brio

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57. Stubborn beast

21. Burning

3. Court enclosed by columns

58. Caught in the act

22. Assistant

4. House rodent genus

60. Backstabber

23. Kama ___

5. ___ Wednesday

61. Certain intersection

TONASKET FINAL MOVING SALE! This Thursday and Friday as an indoors moving sale event! Furniture, antiques, clothes, few tools, kids stuff, jewelry, etc. Feb 6th and 7th from 8 am until 4 pm, each day, in Tonasket. Located at the Crossroads Meeting Place, next to II Sisters Video, across Highway 97 from Subway.

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF FEB. 3, 2014 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make goodâ€?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. ADOPTION ADOPTION -HAPPY, loving, stable, professional couple would be thrilled to expand our family and give your baby a secure home. Call Veronica and James 1-800-681-5742 EVENTS-FESTIVALS EARLY BIRD Automobile, Antique and Collectible Swap Meet. Puyallup Fairgrounds, February 15 and 16, Saturday 8-5, Sunday 9-3, admission $5.00. For information call 1 (253) 863-6211. ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HEALTH/BEAUTY PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL Mesh? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS NEED CLASS A CDL Training? Start a Career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer “Best-In-Classâ€? training. • New Academy Classes Weekly • No Money Down or Credit Check • Certified Mentors Ready and Available • Paid (While Training With Mentor) • Regional and Dedicated Opportunities • Great Career Path • Excellent Benefits Package. Please Call: (602) 730-7709 OWNER/OPERATOR Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. $2500 Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-on Bonus! Forward Air 888-652-5611

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Garage & Yard Sale

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49. Navigational aid

14. Bailiwicks

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24. Gifts

65. Artist Max

9. “Beat it!�

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13. Moliere comedy, with “The�

1. Dried coconut meat

15. “___ to Billie Joe�

Health General

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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509-476-3602

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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PUBLIC NOTICE Contractors and Vendors Lists As authorized under RCW 35.23.352(2), and RCW 35.23.352(8), the City of Oroville is updating their Small Works Roster, consisting of contractors interested in performing work for the City of Oroville which is estimated to cost less than $100,000 and their Vendor’s List, consisting of vendors interested in providing supplies, materials, equipment or services between $7,500 and $15,000 through tele-

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

Puzzle 6 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53)

8

CALL FOR BIDS City of Oroville Central Ave. and Cherry St. Overlay and Water Improvements Fed. Aid Proj. No. STPR-Z924(002) Sealed bids will be received by the City of Oroville at City Hall located at 1308 Ironwood, Oroville, Washington, 98844 until 2:00 P.M., Pacific Time on February 27, 2014 and there publicly opened and read. The City of Oroville Central Avenue

phone and/or written quotations. In awarding contracts for such projects, the City of Oroville shall invite proposals from all appropriate contractors or vendors who have requested to be included on the Small Works Roster and/or Vendors List, and shall select the lowest responsible bid. All contractors and vendors, where required by law, must be properly licensed or registered in this state. The City of Oroville actively seeks participation by minority or women owned firms who otherwise qualify. Individual Assurity Bonds acceptable. Forms may be secured at the Oroville City Hall or by calling 509-476-2926. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 6, 13, 2014. #540993

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PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: February 11th 2014 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1991 Pontiac Grand AM Lic#: 046YXV Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on February 6, 2014. #540599

FOR CENTRAL AVENUE & CHERRY STREET OVERYLAY AND WATER IMPROVEMENTS”, on the outside of the envelope. Bids must be completed on a lump sum and unit price basis as indicated on the BID PROPOSAL, and the total price shall be used for comparison of bids. The City of Oroville reserves the right to reject any or all bids for cause Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on February 6, 13, 2014. #542060

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Public Notices

& Cherry Street Overlay and Water Improvements consists of grinding and overlaying existing pavement, installing new water main and services, curb, gutter, and sidewalk replacements to accommodate ADA ramps, pavement markings, traffic control, and utility adjustments. The City of Oroville in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d-2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. Plans, specifications, and bid documents are available for electronic download at the Engineer’s web site at www. scjalliance.com. Insert the eBidDoc #2634231 to download the digital documents for $10.00. Plans, specifications, and bid documents are also available at the office of SCJ Alliance, in Wenatchee at 15 Palouse Street, Wenatchee, WA 98801 upon payment of $40.00. Contract documents are on file for inspection at Oroville City Hall and area Plan Centers. A bid bond in the amount of 5% of the bid shall accompany all bids. All bids shall be marked “SEALED BID

Sudoku

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DISH TV Retailer. Starting $199/month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/month (where available.) Ask About Same Day Installation! Call Now! 1-800-430-5604

Public Notices

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Statewides

PAGE A11 11

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FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE February 6, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.57)

HOME

If you are buying or selling a home, you want someone you can rely on with years of experience to represent you.

Call one of our local Real Estate agents today to find the home of your dreams or to list your home! SUN LAKES REALTY

#1 Top Producer Office in North County! 1411 Main St., P.O. Box 547 Oroville, WA 509-476-2121 Stan & Tamara Porter & Joan Cool

Next to Ell Lake this home has great fishing and conservancy, easy access, and a desirable recreation area. Home has in addition to 3 bedrooms, den & 2 bath an additional 1 bedroom or family room with 2nd Kitchen, laundry and full bath. All on one level for a great private hide-a-way. Property has 3500 sq ft hay barn & 2900 sq ft equipment shed. Fenced & cross fenced. Seasonal lake too. Additional 39 acres with certified water right & equipment also available. True working farm. MLS® $239,500

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Lake and Country

1510 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4444 Call Cindy or Rocky DeVon

Just Reduced! Classy home built with style and elegance! Pride in ownership everywhere. This beautiful home has 2238 square ft of living space and is located on .25 acre in town. There are 3 bedrooms and 2 full bathrooms. The expansive deck is built for entertaining and runs the full length of the home! It’s nicely shaded by mature trees and overlooks fabulous landscaping, fountains, ponds and beautiful flower beds. Don’t miss this one...it’s priced to sell! MLS#485675 $186,500

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The coffee is always on! Windermere Real Estate / Oroville

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1019 Golden St, Oroville, 2bd/1 -1/4 bath. Great starter home or could be rented right away. Freshly painted, repaired, new slider, some new windows, new tub surround, ready for occupancy. Chain Link full fenced yard, close to town. NWML# 496168 $78,500

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in our Real Estate Guide

Call Charlene at 509-476-3602 to advertise in the Business & Service Directory Air Conditioning

Edwards Refrigeration Rick Edwards

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Page A12

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 6, 2014

SPORTS

Down to the wire

Tiger wrestlers fall to Quincy in unofficial CTL title match By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Now, that was wrestling as it was meant to be. That had a lot to do with Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell’s broad smile as he milled through his players and their families after the Tigers’ 46-26 defeat to Quincy on Saturday, Feb. 1. The loss kept the Tigers from sharing the Caribou Trail League title with Quincy and Chelan, but the score didn’t tell the story. This was an all-out brawl until the final couple of matches. “It was awesome,” said Tonasket coach Dave Mitchell. “We battled.” Quincy finished with a perfect 7-0 mark in league duals; Chelan, with a win over Tonasket last week, was second at 6-1; the Tigers finished 5-2. “Cole (Denison) and I both told the guys that’s the best they’ve looked all year,” Mitchell said. “There was no quit in them. The way some of the those matches ended wasn’t indicative (of how they went).” It also left fans from both sizable fan contingents at less than full vocal strength for Sunday’s Seattle Seahawks’ Super Bowl game. The stakes were high, the level of competition higher, and the intensity higher yet. Thirteen of the 14 matches featured at least one competitor ranked in Washington Wrestling Report’s top 15 for each weight class, including eight projected state medalists. Considering the third-ranked Jackrabbits had just beaten the Chelan team 41-21 that knocked the Tigers off last weekend, and looked dominant while doing so, the Tigers needed a confidence builder right off the bat. They got one from Austin Knowlton, who led off at 170 pounds. His mild 12-10 upset of 11th-ranked Iche Ramirez gave the Tigers and early 3-0 lead, but the way he did it - surviving three third period lead changes, and holding his feet just inside the circle boundary as he made the match-winning takedown in the final seconds - made a statement. The teams traded leads throughout the early matches, with Tonasket’s John Rawley earning a pin at 195 sandwiched between Quincy’s Steven Gomez (182) pinning Frank Holfeltz

Class 1A District 6 at Cashmere Friday, Feb. 7, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, 10:00 a.m. Top four advance to regionals

Top Tonasket Seeds 1. Collin Aitcheson (120) 1. Jorge Juarez (132) 1. John Rawley (195) 2. “Peaches” Walton (126) 2. Frank Holfeltz (182) 3. Rade Pilkinton (113) 3. Austin Knowlton (170) 3. Chad Edwards (215) 4. Vance Frazier (106) 4. Trevor Peterson (126)

Brent Baker/staff photo

Charles Arrigoni and the Oroville wrestling team will be wrestling at their district tournament in Colbert, near Spokane, this weekend.

Above, Austin Knowlton got Tonasket’s match against Quincy off to a rousing start with a dramatic come-from-behind victory in the final seconds of his 170-lb. bout. Middle, Zach Lofthus had Quincy’s John Lindquist flustered and had the lead over one of the state’s top wrestlers until the final seconds. Left, Dyllan “Peaches” Walton continued his outstanding senior season with a technical fall victory against Quincy.

Brent Baker/staff photos

and 215-pounder Austin Morris earning a technical fall over the Tigers’ Chad Edwards. Morris’ win began a stretch of four straight Jackrabbit victories, each of them more intensely fought than the last. Senior rookie Jose Lopez, up against Quincy’s Jose Solorio, was nearly pinned on several occasions but held out until midway through the third period. Vance Frazier followed at 106 against Quincy’s fifth-ranked Victor Salgado and nearly pulled off the upset, losing 6-5. A toss-up match between Rade Pilkinton and Raul Barajas went the distance and then some, with Pilkinton scoring a late reversal to tie it at 7-7 but losing in overtime. “Vance and Rade’s matches, both were against tough, tough guys,” Mitchell said. “I couldn’t have asked for more from them; those were so close. And the way Jose battled against that guy, wow.” Trailing 23-9, the Tigers hit meat of their own lineup. Collin Aitcheson (126) pinned Quincy’s Abraham Avalos; Peaches Walton (126) earned a 19-4 technical fall over Carlos Guaddarama; and Jorge Juarez (132) pinned Jesus Guzman to give the Tigers a

26-23 lead. With four matches to go, though, the Tigers were lined up against four Quincy wrestlers ranked among the top seven in the state. Zach Lofthus (138) nearly pulled off what would have been a monumental upset of John Lindquist. Lofthus trailed by one in the third period, then actually took the lead with 30 seconds left when Lindquist was penalized a point for stalling, and another point for his response to the official. Lindquist responded by slamming Lofthus to the mat - though not ruled an illegal slam - and pinning him with 15 seconds remaining. “People who read the box score might see that he got pinned,” Mitchell said. “But Zach was ahead of the top guy in our league. People who were here saw there was a whole lot more to that match than that.” Ryan Rylie (145) followed up against second-ranked Isaias Jimenez and lasted deep into the third period before getting pinned; and Quincy’s Andy Vargas (152) pinned Caleb Lofthus to give the Jackrabbits and insurmountable lead. And though the match was lost, Dallas Tyus (160) bat-

Cascade beats Tigers

Tonasket 44, Okanogan 31 OKANOGAN - The Tigers set up Saturday’s showdown with a 44-31 victory at Okanogan on Thursday, Jan. 30. Winners included Frazier (106, 12-3 major decision), Pilkinton (113, forfeit), Aitcheson (120, forfeit), Trevor Peterson (126, 13-0 major decision), Walton (132, pin), Rylie (152, pin); Holfeltz (182, forfeit), Rawley (195, 9-1 major decision) and Edwards (220, forfeit).

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LEAVENWORTH - Cascade’s big first quarter put the Tonasket girls basketball team in a hole from which they could never recover, but the Tigers played a solid second half in a 59-22 loss at Cascade on Saturday, Feb. 1. The Kodiaks led 27-4 after one quarter and 40-9 at the half, but only held a 19-13 edge after halftime. Kylie Dellinger scored 11 points to lead the Tigers, with Baylie Tyus adding five points. Tonasket also lost on Jan. 28 at home to Brewster, 74-7.

tled to avoid getting pinned by top-ranked Antonion Melendez before losing by technical fall. “I’m proud of how we wrestled,” Mitchell said. “Dallas, that guy was third in the state last year, and he never gave up anything. “We just battled and battled. Now, we’ve got four days (before districts) to clean up a few little things.” The Tigers started off the evening with a 35-6 victory over eighth-place Brewster. Winners included Holfeltz (pin), Edwards (pin), Frazier (pin), Pilkinton (pin) and Juarez (technical fall). Lopez picked up a forfeit victory and the Tigers opted not to contest Brewster’s seven other empty weight classes.

Republic rescues Hornet wrestlers’ senior night OROVILLE - For awhile, it looked as if Hornets’ senior wrestlers would be deprived of their Senior Night after Eastmont canceled a trip to Oroville on Wednesday due to weather. “We were extremely worried,” Ricevuto said. “So on the phone and email we go. Old and dear friend (coach) Jack Hamilton from Republic came through.” Republic made the trip down the hill on Thursday, giving the Oroville wrestlers a chance to enjoy thre traditional festivities. The teams also matched up well, Ricevuto said, with each team’s 10 wrestlers getting in a mat. Taylor Robinson (182) and Republic’s Lucas Rittel faced off to start the night. Rittel edged Robinson 18-14. “(It was) a see-saw battle of two of the best 182 pound wrestlers in the ‘B’ state,” he said. “These two will probably see each other again at districts and regionals.” Also winning for the Hornets were John Marquiss (106, first period pin); Leo Curiel (132, 7-1 decision); Eddie Ocampo (160, Granby Cradle pin); Charles Arrigoni (160, 17-6 major decision); Lukas Mieirs (195, Granby Cradle pin); and Jordan Smith (120, first period pin). Also wrestling were Ruben Renfro (170) and Roger Carranza (170). “Ruben wrestled his best bout of the season,” Ricevuto said. “(He went) into the third period with Blake Phillips of Republic, who is ranked second in the state.”

League mixer sets up seeding OROVILLE - The Hornets hosted their final league mixer of the year on Saturday, Jan. 31, to help with setting up seeding for this coming weekend’s district

Class B District at NWC-Colbert Saturday, Feb. 8, 11:00 a.m. Top six advance to regionals

Top Oroville Seeds 1. Taylor Robinson (182) 2. Eddie Ocampo (160) 4. John Marquiss (106) 4. Jordan Smith (120) 4. Charles Arrigoni (160) 4. Lukas Mieirs (195) tournament. Teams from the state’s northeast district included Oroville, Pateros, Selkirk, Northwest Christian (Colbert), Liberty Bell, Mary Walker, Lake Roosevelt, Republic/Curlew and Kittitas. “The ‘Who do you need to wrestle to gather a better District seed?’ Mixer would be a better name for this event,” Ricevuto said. The coaches met for more than 90 minutes before the mat action started to determine which wrestlers hadn’t seen others in their weight classes all season and set up matches to fill those gaps. As a result there was no team scoring or individual placing. Some wrestlers had strong enough seasons that no one was willing to wrestle them Saturday. Oroville’s Taylor Robinson (182 pounds) was one, along with defending state champion Trent Skelton of Liberty Bell. Others wrestled as many as four matches on the day. “There were a lot of good bouts where two contenders were giving their very best to reach the top of the district ‘food chain’ next Saturday,” Ricevuto said.

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GAZETTE-TRIBUNE 1422 Main St., P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


FEBRUARY 6, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A13

SPORTS

Oroville boys look to make playoff push By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WHITE SWAN - With ever more signs that his team is on the verge of a breakthrough win, Oroville boys basketball coach Jay Thacker thinks his team is ready for a stretch run that would land the Hornets in the postseason. “The stats show we’re playing way better even than just a couple of weeks ago at the start of the league season,” he said after Oroville’s 63-44 loss at White Swan on Saturday, Feb. 1. The second time around we’re expecting to play better. We’ll just try to get into districts and then see if we can get some magic going. The kids know and I know that

we’re really close.” The Hornets, despite a 3-13 (1-6 Central Washington League) record, haven’t backed down from the league’s top teams. They trailed White Swan 22-20 at halftime and were within shouting range in the fourth quarter before the Cougars made a final run to pull away. “We got caught up in trying to play their style, which we can’t do,” Thacker said. “We were going for the win; we weren’t going to sit back and be happy with losing by five or six. It doesn’t matter if its five or 19, a loss is a loss. We’re not in it just to keep the score respectable. “We just need a little better focus down the stretch. Whether it’s just relaxing or what, it’s a

combination of little things.” Joseph Sarmiento led a balanced Oroville scoring attack with 12 points, with Nathan Hugus adding nine, Bryce Glover and Juan Lopez scoring eight apiece and Dustin Nigg adding seven. Trevor Shavehead led White Swan with 23. “The kids continue to believe,” Thacker said. “They’re still into basketball; they come and talk to me about it every day (during the school day). They are thinking they can do it, not already looking ahead to other things. “The freshmen don’t play like freshmen any more. They have the experience of our sophomores and juniors. They just have a ways to go strength-wise, but even that we’re seeing a lot

of improvement during the year. We’ll see if we can make a run at the end... It’s been a rough season as far as the wins and losses go, but I’m really happy with the kind of growth we’ve shown.”

Liberty Bell 49, Oroville 32 OROVILLE - The Hornets put up a solid defensive effort against the division-leading Mountain Lions, holding them to 41 percent shooting on Jan. 28. But after staying within 16-15 through one quarter, the Hornets struggled to get points on the board, scoring just 17 over the final three quarters. Sarmiento scored 10 and Lopez added seven for the Hornets. Austin Watson led Liberty Bell with 16 points.

White Swan ends Oroville win streak By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

WHITE SWAN - The Oroville girls basketball team had its sixgame Central Washington League come to an end on Saturday, Feb. 1, 58-33 at White Swan in a battle of the last two remaining unbeaten league teams. The day got off to a rough start for the Hornets, who were delayed thanks to their bus breaking down on what is already a nearly sixhour road trip each way. “We had to stop at Safeway for food; we didn’t have time for lunch,” said Oroville coach Mike Bourn. “The referees had another game they had to work that night, so we only had about 12 minutes to warm up (rather than the customary 20). “White Swan came out in a 2-2-1 press, and we were down 15-0 right off the bat. We settled down but never really got back into it.” Despite the issues getting to the game, Bourn said it was clear that at this point White Swan is a superior team.

“They are good enough to do well at state,” he said. “We did some things well. I wish we could play them more because it would make us better. They’re better than we are right now.” Mikayla Scott scored 14 points to lead the Hornets offensively. Leading scorer Lily Hilderbrand scored just six, but Bourn said she was a victim of bad luck on a number of around-and-out shots and played an outstanding defensive game, holding White Swan post Emily Botkin to six points. “The girls kept battling,” he said. “The second half was 29-22; I had hoped we could stay within 10-12 points of them. We’re in good shape; we just need to keep working and keep improving.” The Hornets (10-6, 6-1 CWL) host Manson on Thursday and Lake Roosevelt next Tuesday. White Swan improved to 14-3 (6-0).

Oroville 64, Liberty Bell 17 OROVILLE - The Hornets raced to a 23-4 lead after one quarter and were never threatened on the way to a 64-17 vic-

Senior project to benefit Little Wishes

OROVILLE - Senior Night for the Oroville High School basketball teams will double up as a fundraiser for the Little Wishes Foundation, the senior project of the Hornets’ Brittany Jewett. On Tuesday, Feb. 11, the Hornets host the Lake Roosevelt Raiders for the last home match-up of the the year. As well as honoring the seniors on the last home game of their high school careers, both Hornet teams will be raising money for a the Little Wishes Foundation of Spokane. For every point scored by the Hornet basketball teams, sponsors will be donating money to the foundation. The Little Wishes Foundation is a non-profit organization that raises money to grant wishes of limited dollar amounts, but of significant value, to seriously ill children during their hospitalization. As well as the generous people and businesses donating per point, many people are giving flat donations to the cause. Every dollar counts! If you would like to make a donation please contact Jewett at (509) 485-2204, or if you are planning to attend the game, there will be opportunities to donate and show your support. Games start at 6:00 p.m, beginning with the Lady Hornets. Followed by the boys team at 7:30, at Oroville High School’s Coulton Auditorium. tory over Liberty Bell. Ten Hornets reached the scoring column, led by Lily

Hilderbrand with 16 points, Meagan Moralez with 12 and Kendal Miller with nine.

Terry Mills/submitted photo

The Tigers’ Michael Orozco scores against Brewster during the Tigers’ 64-48 loss to the Bears on Jan. 28.

Tigers get big win By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

LEAVENWORTH - The Tonasket boys basketball team needed a win to keep their playoff chances from going on life support. The Tigers held off Cascade on Saturday, Feb. 1, 59-51, beating a team on the road that had pushed them to the limit at home just a few weeks ago. The victory lifted the Tigers into a tie for fifth place in the Caribou Trail League with Omak, which they played Tuesday after press time. The upshot is that Tonasket only need one more win to return to the district play-in game for the second straight year. A victory over Omak ensures a trip to Chelan next Tuesday, rather than a far less desirable matchup at Cashmere. The Tigers built a 10 point lead heading to the fourth quarter, saw the Kodiaks cut it to five in the final minutes, then hit their free throws to earn the critical victory. “Cascade matches up well with us,” said Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon. “They give us fits on the perimeter. They’re pretty feisty; there’s no small enemy, that’s for sure.” The Tigers had one of their most balanced scoring efforts of the season, with four reaching double figures, and a huge contribution in Adrian McCarthy’s varsity debut. “It was time to bring him up,” Pedregon said. “He had a lot of positives, starting with 14 rebounds, and six other posses-

sions where he kept balls alive by tipping them or going after them.” Michael Orozco finished with 13 points, with Dyllan Gage adding 12, Kevin Terris and Derek Sund 11 apiece and McCarthy seven. “Everyone brought something to the table,” Pedregon said. “I know you’ve heard this all before, but there’s no cheap wins in this league, especially on the road.”

Brewster 64, Tonasket 48 TONASKET - For the second time this year, the Tigers managed to contain Brewster’s Timbo Taylor. They could not do the same with Easton Driessen, who led the Bears past Tonasket 64-48 on Jan. 28. “Driessen is tough as nails,” Pedregon said. “His combination of strength and quickness pretty much guarantees he’ll get his (points) regardless of what you do.” The Tigers trailed 29-22 at the half, but turnovers gave Brewster the fuel it needed to pull away in the second half. “We played well in the first half,” Pedregon said. “Turnovers hit us, and they hit a lot of shots that we weren’t able to match. We’d play well in a stretch but then give up an 8-0 run, which we can’t afford to do. Driessen finished with 21 points. Taylor, who scored one point in the teams’ first meeting, was held to seven points this time around. Gage led the Tigers with 13 points, Orozco added 12 and Sund scored 10.

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Page A14

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | FEBRUARY 6, 2014

OBITUARIES Madeline and four children, Richard Gale, Rodney (Kathy), Gregory and Michelle (Terry) all of Oroville; ten grandchildren, Olivia, Elijah, April, Molly, Sarah, Jarrod, Derick, Hunter and Tyson; their spouses and thirteen great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents George and Mary of Oroville, brothers Henry, Wilford and Buster and a sister, Dorothy. A memorial service is planned for Saturday, February 15, 2014 at 11 a.m. at Bergh Chapel in Oroville. Bergh Funeral Services of Oroville/Tonasket in charge of the arrangements.

Victor Noel

Victor Lewis Noel

Victor Noel, age 84 of Oroville passed away Wednesday January 29, 2014 at his home in Oroville. He was born on December 20, 1929 to parents George and Mary Noel at Menlo, Washington where his parents and older siblings owned and operated a dairy. In 1938 he moved to Oroville with his family where they bought a small farm on County #7. Victor started school in Oroville and continued until the war broke out. His father and mother were alone on the farm milking dairy cows and it was decided to began his life as a farmer. They continued with the dairy operations until there was a fire in the milk house which destroyed everything. After the fire they expanded the farm and went into the beef cattle operation which Victor continued to operate until his retirement a few years ago. In 1947 he met and married the love of his life Madeline (Tunie) Farmer where she joined him on the farm to raise their family. Victor loved hunting and fishing, if there wasn’t work to be done on the farm, he was doing one or the other. Victor was a kind person always willing to give his neighbors a helping hand when he could. Victor’s life was the farm and his “cows”. Victor is survived by his wife

Charles Allie

Charles R. Allie

Charles R. Allie, age 68, Oroville died on Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket. He was born on Nov. 25, 1945 in Omak to parents Roy and Vera Allie. The majority of his life has been spent in Oroville, where he grew up. In 1963, Charles entered the U.S. Navy and served his country with the Pacific Fleet for 10 years. Following an honorable discharge he moved back to Oroville. On March 24, 1964 he married Kathleen Harden in Lancaster, California and was a devoted

husband for 50 years. Charles was an orchardist for 14 years and then became a dispatch correction officer at the Oroville Jail and then later for the Okanogan County Jail. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and playing pool. He loved tormenting his children and spoiling his grandchildren. Charles was a member of the National American Legion and the Chesaw AmVets Post #69. Charles is survived by his wife Kathleen at home; mother, Vera and husband Jordon Bulger of East Wenatchee; daughter, S. Lyn (Joe) Self of East Wenatchee; sons, C. Allen (Kerrie) Allie of Oroville and W. Brian (Diane) Allie of Hermiston, Ore.; three brothers, Wayne Allie, Clifford Allie and LeRoy Allie all of East Wenatchee; four sisters, Carolyn Rawls of Monitor, Verniece Watson of East Wenatchee, Jeanette Dooley of East Wenatchee and LaWanda Olmstead of Tonasket; five grandsons, Jason and Brandon Buckmiller, Thomas Patton, Aaron Allie and Carson Allie; two great granddaughters, Sierra and Rilee Buckmiller and many nieces and nephews. Charles was preceded in death by his father, 1 brother and 1 sister. A Celebration of Life with a potluck luncheon will be held on Saturday, Feb. 15, 2014 from 1 p.m. to 4: p.m. at the Oroville American Legion. Memorials may be made to the Oroville Schools or the North Valley Hospital. Bergh Funeral Services of

Oroville/ Tonasket in charge of the arrangements.

Wallace Jay Rainsberry

Wallace Jay Rainsberry Wallace Jay Rainsberry, Sr, a long time resident of the UmpquaValley, died on Saturday, February 1, 2014 of acute renal failure. Wally was born the third son to the late Cecil “Doc” and Opal Rainsberry in Eureka, Montana on March 30, 1935. Wally graduated from high school in Oroville, Wash.. Following high school Wally served in the US Army. Wally married Jackie Bonnell and they had three children, Wallace Jr., Debra and

Dennise. Wally spent 34 years with the US Forest Service. He was responsible for overseeing the construction of hundreds of miles of trails in the Umpqua National Forest, but was most proud of the work he did locating the Pacific Crest Trail. The favorite part of his job was spending time on horseback in the forest.   Wally’s first love was horses. He started training horses for money at 13 years in fact broke his first bronc at that time. He was a cowboy at heart and lived the life of a cowboy as best he could. He had a smile and a laugh that melted many a cowgirl’s heart. From rodeos to show arenas, cattle gatherings and mountain trails, anywhere there were horses, you’d likely find Wally and folks that knew and loved him and the many horses he had trained. Wally has always been big-hearted, kind, fun-loving, off-color, irreverent, tough and stubborn.   He is a lifetime member of the Douglas County Mounted Posse, and founded the Roseburg Chapter of Oregon Equestrian Trails. Wally is preceded in death by his son, Wallace, Jr. and a granddaughter, Raechel Barnard, and three brothers. He is survived by his sister, Donna (Virgil) Forney of Yakima, Wash.; his daughters Debby (Jon) Rainsberry-Barnard of Rouge River, Ore. and Dennise Turner of Whitefish, Mont.; granddaughters Celina Rose Turner and Sarah Barnard; greatgrandson, Tucker Barnard; and

14 nieces and nephews. There will be a Celebration of Life on March 29th  at the Poco Loco Ranch, in Melrose, Or. “I grew up a dreamin’ of bein’ a cowboy and lovin’ the cowboy ways.”  Happy Trails to You, Until We Meet Again....

Biff & Lucille Siegrist

Siegrist Memorial

A memorial service for Charles “Biff” and Lucille Siegrist will be held Saturday, February 15th from twelve noon to 2 p.m. at the Community Cultural Center, 411 Western Ave in Tonasket. Please bring a pot luck dish and a story and join in remembering Charles and Lucille. Call Jack at 429-8796 for more information.

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The Buckhorn Exploration Project: An Overview When Kinross opened the Buckhorn Mine in 2008, the anticipated Life of Mine (LOM) was seven years, as predicted by extensive geologic modeling and results of exploratory drilling activities. The original LOM plan has not significantly changed, with the current operation expected to conclude mining activities in mid2015. This schedule is not a surprise to the company or the community, and for many years Kinross has been searching for additional ore bodies in an effort to continue supporting the local economy. The Buckhorn Exploration Project is a 9,160-acre area surrounding the current Buckhorn Mine, comprised of federal, state and private land that is targeted for exploration. In 2010, the company filed the initial Plan of Operations (PoO) with appropriate federal and state agencies describing proposed exploration activities within the project boundaries. Primary project components include roads, drill pads and drilling activities on less than 6% of the total project area. Filing the PoO initiated a joint federal and state environmental review under the Na-

tional Environmental Policy Act and the State Environmental Policy Act, or the NEPA/SEPA process. This effort is being led by the United States Forest Service and the Washington Department of Natural Resources. NEPA/SEPA Process: Understanding the Impacts The NEPA/SEPA process provides for a thorough agency review to identify and assess potential environmental effects, while providing opportunities for public input. When a proposed project has the potential for significant environmental impacts and/or requires a government action, this type of review takes place. The Buckhorn Exploration Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is analyzing the effects (both beneficial and adverse) for many environmental aspects, including air, land, cultural, socioeconomics, water, noise, transportation and many others. It is important to remember that this EIS is only looking at exploration drilling. Should the drilling results be favorable, a Plan of Operation and NEPA/ SEPA analysis, along with permitting,

would have to occur before any mining could begin. Throughout the EIS process, agency specialists work to ensure that the proposed project is clearly defined, baseline studies are conducted, project alternatives are identified and assessed, potential impacts for each alternative are identified, and mitigation measures are defined. As a result of this process, a “preferred alternative” is determined by the lead agencies, and associated impacts and mitigation measures are clearly outlined in a Draft EIS (DEIS) document. The agencies are currently in the process of reviewing alternatives and identifying the preferred alternative. The DEIS, once complete, will be made available by agencies for public comment. This step in the process should take place late this year. The ROD is not a Permit, but a Decision Resulting from the Process Once comments are received, reviewed and addressed by the lead agencies, the Final EIS (FEIS) will be issued along with a document en-

titled a Record of Decision (ROD). The ROD is the decision document that results from the NEPA/SEPA process, and includes the preferred alternative and mitigation. The ROD is scheduled to be issued in late 2015, and should it allow for exploration activities to commence, additional federal, state and local permits will be necessary. NEPA/SEPA is not a permit, but rather requires that the prospective impacts be understood and disclosed. Kinross Kettle River – Buckhorn is committed to the Buckhorn Exploration Project, and has invested a significant amount of time and resources into the process. Although the current operation and the anticipated exploration schedule do not synchronize as well as we would like, we are hopeful that the combined efforts of the agencies and the company will allow us to continue serving as a vital economic driver in the region. For answers to questions regarding this project, or on other mining-related topics, please contact Deana Zakar at 509-775-3157 x125.

End of Buckhorn  Mine Life  Exploration Public Scoping 

Initial PoO   Submitted 

2011

Exploration DEIS  Public Comments 

2012

2013

Exploration Draft EIS Preparation 

2014

2015

Exploration Drilling 

2016

Exploration Final EIS and ROD 

2017

* Dates are estimations  based on best available data  and are subject to change 

2018

2019

2020

Potential PoO & Mining EIS 

2021

2022+

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 06, 2014  

February 06, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, February 06, 2014  

February 06, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune