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JANUARY 29-FEBRUARY 4, 2014 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 5

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SUPER BOWL GUIDE, FEAT. AN AMUSING DRINKING GAME PAGE 6 WHERE TO WATCH PAGE 22 | GEEKS VS. JOCKS PAGE 31

Life in Cars

A look at the modern-day nomad. By Andrew Waits


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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014


inside»   January 29–February 4, 2014 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 5

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

Join us for an evening to remember. An elegant four-course dinner, music, wine and art, all centered in the

news&comment 4

ALTERNATING CURRENCY

BY KELTON SEARS | For goods and services from weed to watch repair, Bitcoin is gaining ground. Also: The Seahawks’ arrest record examined. 6 | SUPER BOWL GUIDE

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AUTO BIOGRAPHIES BY ANDREW WAITS | By choice or

necessity, more Americans are living in their vehicles. Here are their stories.

food&drink 21 BEYOND BARBECUE

BY NICOLE SPRINKLE | At Bourbon &

Bones, Southern cooking with Dominican and Chinese accents. 21 | FOOD NEWS/TEMP CHECK 22 | THE BAR CODE

arts&culture 23 PAN & RESCAN

BY BRIAN MILLER | Tivon Rice’s

surveillance cameras at Suyama Space.

in Georgia, homophobes in Idaho. 27 | PERFORMANCE/EAR SUPPLY

28 FILM

OPENING THIS WEEK | Diamond smugglers, gay rock stars, snowmobiles, and dirt bikes. 30 | FILM CALENDAR

33 MUSIC

A new label captures Seattle’s hippest music scene. Plus: The Maldives play the Tractor, Dweezil Zappa honors his dad, David Allan Coe goes outlaw, and more. 34 | SEVEN NIGHTS

31 | THE GEEKLY REPORT 38 | TOKE SIGNALS 39 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY ANDREW WAITS

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Weed, Grilled Cheese, Watch Repair, Dental

Thugs? Read the Seahawks’ Rap Sheet

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BY KELTON SEARS

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month, while eBay is openly looking at the alternative currency, and is supposed to make a final decision about Bitcoin next month. Yet the question remains: What the hell is Bitcoin?

ever processed. By creating sufficiently encrypted blocks, groups of competing miners not only oversee, support, and secure the network, they are also rewarded for each successful solution with 25 Bitcoins—right now worth $20,494.64, although that number fluctuates wildly with the market. “J,” like many other Bitcoin miners, is a part of a mining pool, a group of people who chain their processors together to more quickly solve the encryptions, splitting their earnings according to whose processing rig provided the most heft in the process. The result is a completely digital currency system that cuts out the middleman. Dealing in Bitcoin means dealing without banks—no 3 to 5 percent transaction fees, no foreign-exchange fees, no frozen accounts. Money goes directly from one person to another, and is secured by a network of volunteer miners. “Although they are volatile in this early stage, Bitcoin cuts out what is frankly a very expensive and antiquated financial system,” says Garrick Hileman, a University of Washington graduate who now works as an economic historian at the London School of Economics and founded MacroDigest.com. Hileman attended the first Bitcoin convention in 2013 in San Jose, Calif., and said the level of excitement was similar to that of the dot-com boom he witnessed in the ’90s. “In some ways you can see Bitcoin as the latest attempt to reform the global financial system,” Hileman says. “We tried to regulate the banks through Dodd-Frank, we saw a protest movement in Occupy Wall Street try to change the politics and culture of the system, and now Bitcoin is sort of phase three—Silicon Valley’s turn to take a crack at reforming Wall Street at a much more fundamental and structural way.” Last November, the feds signaled that Bitcoin, while still not officially recognized as currency, had hit a threshold. In a Senate hearing, U.S. officials testified that Bitcoin is protected under TIA UPLAND

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

L

ike many entrepreneurs, “J” is very interested in the way transactions work. A while back he developed a thing for bartering. “One time I traded some firewood I got for free on Craigslist for a Coke machine. Then I traded that Coke machine for an AK-47,” says J from beneath a tie-dyed beanie. We are sitting in his car, which is filled with boxes and baggies of marijuana, parked on the abandoned rooftop of a downtown parking garage. His wife is in the driver’s seat, silently licking a Dum Dum lollipop. “Then,” J continues, “I traded that AK-47 for a processor with an ASIS chip, optimized for Bitcoin mining. I’ve got three processors running now—I’ll wake up some mornings and find out they’ve generated $40 worth of Bitcoin.” J, you see, is on the forefront of the forefront. He runs a business that will deliver legal weed right to your door, and he accepts Bitcoin, a digital cryptocurrency, as payment. All you have to do is shoot him a text. He asks that I call him “J” because of the legal gray area he operates in—although he says he sells only to people with medical cards, Washington law is still a bit shaky on the whole weed-homedelivery game. “I’ll chase a buck anywhere,” he says. Although he’s based in Issaquah, J will drive wherever, often working straight from 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. the next day making deliveries all over western Washington. “If it’s $5, we’ll chase it down.” Now that J has started accepting Bitcoin, he says he’s processed three transactions that way, mostly with fellow Bitcoin miners. Even people who don’t pay in Bitcoin often mention that they reached out to him because they heard he accepts it. J isn’t alone—in addition to online retailer Overstock.com, which announced it would start accepting Bitcoin on January 9, many in the area have jumped aboard. The biggest break for Bitcoin’s legitimacy would be acceptance by local online-retail giant Amazon. Rumors that Amazon and Google are considering accepting Bitcoin have been flying around unconfirmed all

In essence, Bitcoin is a digital, alternative currency system that is managed in a peer-to-peer network, essentially a collection of civilian computers. Started in 2008, when a mysterious, yetunidentified man created the software under the name “Satoshi Nakamoto” and released a paper outlining how it works, Bitcoin has exploded from its initial value of a penny each to around $850 a Bitcoin now. At one point last November, it reached a value of $1,242, almost the price of an ounce of gold. Bitcoin derives its value the same way any currency does—simple supply and demand. Bitcoins are created by “miners,” people who download free Bitcoin mining software and agree to donate their processing power to maintaining the Bitcoin marketplace, solving and creating encrypted “blocks” that record and verify all the Bitcoin transactions

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

THE WEEKLY BRIEFING | What’s going on at seattleweekly.com: State GOP Chair Susan Hutchison talks about the tough task of revitalizing the party’s image. Bean-counter Kevin Mather is the new Mariners’ president. That should get fans excited. The annual One Night Count identified 3,117 men, women, and children without shelter in King County. “Of course it’s getting worse,” Real Change Founding Director Tim Harris tells SW. Mayor Ed Murray and Denver Mayor Michael Hancock made a stupid Super Bowl bet. Spoiler: There’s a bike and some Chihuly glass involved. Making good on a campaign pledge, Kshama Sawant announced she will take home only $40K of her $117K annual city council salary, donating the rest to social-justice causes. A bill for a $12 hourly wage hit Olympia.

a

••

SEATTLELAND

JEREMY DWYER-LINDGREN

Bitcoin is slowly gaining traction in Seattle, but what the hell is it?

y some accounts, Sunday’s Super Bowl will pit the Denver Broncos against the Seattle Thugs. Critics, from non-Seahawks fans down to politicians, see the Hawks as a blood-sport hybrid of football team and organized crime. Detractors accuse Seattle of harboring criminals in the secondary while pols such as Sen. John McCain— who lost his own BY RICK ANDERSON Super Bowl after Sherman picking a backup whose only move was to her extreme right— apparently feels the whole roster should be jailed. Even coach Pete Carroll, McCain noted, is himself “one step ahead of the sheriff.” Much of this is reaction to cornerback Richard Sherman’s memorable postgame boasting last week, making him The Face, or at least The Mouth, of the Seahawks before the media in New York this week. His “I’m the best” braggadocio was exaggerated as thuggery. He’s since been held up as an example of the NFL’s “culture of violence,” leaving some fans wondering if he and other Seahawks were actual criminals. The NFL has those, of course. In a league of men who crush bones and brains for a living, their offenses range from drunken misdemeanors to serious felonies such as the murder charge against New England’s Aaron Hernandez this season and the murder/suicide by Kansas City’s Jovan Belcher in 2012. As in the latter instance, when Belcher killed his girlfriend, domestic violence is a frequent charge against pro athletes. So do the supposedly bad-boy Seahawks, a 63-man roster (with 10 on the reserve list) have some kind of violent culture problem? In their two-season run-up to the Super Bowl, the Hawks’ rap sheet comprises eight misdemeanor and three felony arrests. Among them are four gross-misdemeanor drunk-driving charges—the latest for Spencer Ware, a rookie running back on the injured reserve list, arrested this month after driving erratically on I-5 and registering a .12 on a Breathalyzer test (.08 is the drunk threshold). Receiver Percy Harvin was arrested in June for a DUI related to marijuana, then found not to be under the influence, and released. Josh Portis, a third-string quarterback arrested in May, blew a .09; he was later waived by the franchise. Star running back Marshawn Lynch was arrested in July 2012 near Oakland with a .10 blood-alcohol reading. He has accused officers of changing their story, but apologized for drinking too much.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7


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They boast a record-setting offense run by the greatest quarterback the game has ever seen—but can Peyton Manning overcome his reputation for cold-weather failures and playoff washouts? Or will “The Legion of Boom” give him yet another offseason of gloom?

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All of the Broncos offense vs. all of the Seahawks defense Denver scored more points this year than any team in NFL history—and they still have one game left. The Seahawks’ D isn’t quite as historic, but it is designed to stop an attack just like Denver’s. The Broncos’ offensive strategy is to exploit the opposing defense’s weak points. The Seahawks’ defensive philosophy is to have no weak points. Then again, Seattle’s D waits for you to make a mistake, while the Broncos’ O specializes in precision. Does defense really win championships? I guess we’ll find out.

Seahawks

They’re young, fast, and ferocious—the 2013 Seahawks’ defense has not only lived up to its lofty expectations, it’s destroyed them. But does this confident, youthful team have what it takes to win it all? Or is “America’s Most Miserable Sports City” once again destined for disappointment? Matchup to Watch

Skittles vs. pot roast The Broncos hold opponents to an NFL-low 2.84 yards per carry on runs up the middle. Why? Because of 335-pound Terrance “Pot Roast” Knighton, the fulcrum of Denver’s D-line. While Knighton gets the attention of two or more large men—much like an actual pot roast—Denver’s speedy linebackers are free to attack, pouring into offensive-line gaps like gravy. Besides eating Skittles, Marshawn Lynch’s favorite hobby is running directly into large people and laughing when they try to tackle him. It’s the classic tale of the irresistible confectionery force meeting the immovable slow-cooked meat.

The Culturally Literate Super Bowl Drinking Game • Marshawn Lynch breaks a tackle: Drink • Percy Harvin participates in a trick play: Take a shot • Announcers call Richard Sherman “brash” or “outspoken”: Drink • Announcers call Richard Sherman a “thug”: Turn off TV, read “Letter From Birmingham Jail” • Super Bowl ad makes you laugh: Drink • Super Bowl ad makes you cry: Finish your beer • Super Bowl ad features Macklemore: Apologize • FOX shows a thermometer: Drink • Announcers reference legalized marijuana in Colorado and Washington: Well, you know what to do • Chris Christie is shown during the broadcast: Take a shot, then run outside and block two lanes of traffic for the rest of the quarter • Bruno Mars throws a shaka to the crowd: Drink • Anthony Kiedis comes out for the halftime show with his shirt off: Take it all in • Red Hot Chili Peppers play “Catholic School Girls Rule”: Finish your beer • Justin Bieber drunkenly crashes car into halftime stage: Yawn • Russell Wilson escapes a sure sack: Drink • Announcers mention that Russell Wilson played baseball: Do a headfirst slide on the floor and drink

• Announcers compare Russell Wilson to Fran Tarkenton: Run around the house clockwise, then reverse and run around the house counter-clockwise, then finish your beer • Percy Harvin finishes the game without injury: Praise Jesus • Russell Wilson praises Jesus: Finish your beer • Russell Wilson is carted off the field: Drink all the whiskey • Announcers call Peyton Manning “classy”: Drink • Peyton Manning yells “Omaha!”: Plan a trip to Omaha and while there, take a drink • Peyton Manning throws a wobbly pass: Drink water, cuz you’d die from alcohol poisoning if you used booze • Camera shows Pete Carroll smiling: Drink • Camera shows Pete Carroll leading a meditation circle: Take a shot • Announcers mention that Pete Carroll is 62 “but acts like he’s 42”: Drink an Ensure • Announcers mention that Hawks are playing without their famous crowd noise: Slurp a drink as loud as you can • Holding penalty is called, but there is no replay evidence of a hold: Try to explain to your wife or significant other, as calmly as you can, why you’re laughing and crying • The Hawks win: Drink champagne. E

sportsball@seattleweekly.com


news&comment» Bitcoin » FROM PAGE 4

The Seahawks? Thugs? » FROM PAGE 4

current regulations. Federal Reserve chair Ben Bernanke wrapped up the hearing by sending the Senate a letter saying that Bitcoin “may hold long-term promise, particularly if the innovations promote a faster, more secure, and more efficient payment system.” China, Taiwan, and Thailand have all issued prohibitions on Bitcoin, however, and India resumed Bitcoin operations just weeks ago after a December government crackdown. But for many Seattle retailers, Bitcoin isn’t a grand political statement or a Gold Rush style investment opportunity. It’s simply another way to accept payment for services.

In the other cases, John Moffitt—a reserve guard who was traded to the Broncos in the middle of the season, and who has since made waves for resigning from football entirely—was twice arrested for misdemeanor criminal trespass at Bellevue Square, where he was once seen peeing outside a bar and later fled the cops. Leroy Hill, a veteran linebacker who left the team this season, was arrested last year on two domestic-violence charges, one a felony, after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend. Tharold Simon, a currently inactive rookie cornerback, was arrested in April in Eunice, La., for a misdemeanor and a felony—resisting arrest. (An officer said a defiant Simon told him, “I own Eunice!”) He was drafted four days later by the Seahawks; the charges were dropped in December. Finally, lineman Jarriel King was arrested on felony rape charges in 2012; he allegedly sexually assaulted a South Carolina

ksears@seattleweekly.com

It’s not a proud record—but does it add up to thuggery? Numerically, if arrests were points, the Hawks wouldn’t even make the playoffs.

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woman after a night of drinking and drugs. The Seahawks quickly dropped him; court records show prosecutors closed the case in October for lack of evidence. Also, ESPN this season ranked Seattle first

among NFL teams in player suspensions for use of performance-enhancing or other drugs. Seven players have been cited since Carroll took over three seasons back: Moffitt, linebacker Bruce Irving, cornerbacks Walter Thurmond and Brandon Browner, and now-ex-players Allen Barbre, Winston Guy Jr., and Sherman, who last season successfully appealed his suspension. Not a proud record—but does it add up to thuggery? Numerically, if arrests were points, the Hawks wouldn’t even make the playoffs. An accounting by The San Diego Union-Tribune ranks the team 13th in busts since 2000. They had 20 as of last summer—a number that doesn’t include additional arrests I found, but that “officially” ties the team with New Orleans. The Minnesota Vikings, with 40 busts, lead the league— and finished last in their division this season. Today’s Hawks clearly are no outlaw team like Al Davis’s Oakland Raiders of the ’70s and ’80s—or, for that matter, like Ken Behring’s Seahawks of the ’90s. Under their former owner, this was a franchise of criminal misfits on the field and off—even a general manager was twice tried for murder. The goofy Behring, who once moved the team overnight to Los Angeles and was forced back by injunctions, was accused by one of his secretaries of requiring women to sign release forms, promising not to sue him, before he’d have sex with them. Oh, and that other thing: His Hawks never went to the Super Bowl. E

randerson@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

The Saxbe brothers run a fantasy-themed food truck called Cheese Wizards. Bo and Tom wear pointy wizard hats and serve sandwiches with names like “The Gobblin’ King” and “Voldemortadella.” Recently a frequent customer named John Stahl, who happens to work as a communications assistant at the Bitcoin Foundation, an advocacy group based in Washington, D.C., convinced the brothers to take Bitcoin. “We already had our iPad set up for Square and LevelUp, so we figured why not?” Bo says, referencing two other popular mobile payment apps that use traditional currency. He downloaded BitPay—an app that generates a QR code and allows customers to pay in Bitcoin from their phone— and started advertising the truck’s new feature. “We’ll take five to six Bitcoin transactions a day,” Bo says. “A lot of techies and Amazon employees come to our truck just because they love paying in Bitcoin. We’ve never had any problems with it—we just convert them all back into U.S. dollars at the end of the day.” BitPay has a built-in function that converts Bitcoins to U.S. dollars, guaranteeing the merchant will receive the existing exchange rate at the time of the transaction. Because a grilled cheese sandwich costs a fraction of a fraction of a Bitcoin, some customers have willingly tipped upward of $40 to $50. “The tip seems smaller psychologically when it’s in Bitcoin,” Bo says. “We’ve tried to tell them, ‘Whoa, you know how big a tip that is, right? You really don’t have to give us that much.’ But they insist.” While it might make sense that oddballs like Cheese Wizards and J, the weed-delivery guy, are accepting Bitcoin, some upscale merchants have joined in as well. A trip to bitcoindentist.com reveals an office in Anacortes that accepts the digital currency. Nesbit’s Fine Watch Service, a repair shop in downtown Seattle since 1895, has also started accepting Bitcoin. “Our son is very much into Bitcoin and got us on board,” company VP Jan Nesbit tells me. “We investigated a bit and it seemed pretty easy, so we figured why not? A lot of our customers are tech guys. We put it out on Reddit that we accept Bitcoin, and we actually just got a walk-in customer who came because they found out we accept it.” While for now a Seattleite with an interest in Bitcoin can purchase only marijuana, grilled cheese, watch repair, or dental service an hour and a half up north, many of these retailers said the same thing—they wouldn’t be surprised at all if tech-forward Seattle became a Bitcoin hub. E

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014


G ordon H empton , F o rt W a r d e n The journey is not just about getting there. The trip starts now. Slow down and enjoy what’s going on immediately around you. I didn’t want to start my journey to success in life with the suspicions of others, so I ripped out the key and put in a push-button starter. Just push that button and off you go.

F

or many Americans, a vehicle is more than just a mode of transportation. These are the people I went in search of. d Against the backdrop of the recent housing crisis and enduring economic fallout, I traveled the western United States seeking individuals who spend much of their lives in vans, trucks, RVs, and compact cars, as well as the communities that blossom from this lifestyle. d Through the photographs and interviews I’ve collected over the past two years—a handful of which are presented here—I have attempted to reveal a subculture whose existence isn’t carved into the landscape of America, but is rather a mirage upon it. I’m not trying to define an archetype; my hope is to exhibit the diversity of this disparate community and present a compelling vision of existence outside the current narratives of domesticity that dominate American life. d For some of the people I met, the vehicle as home represents a willing rejection of American dogma—challenging the meaning of “home,” detaching it from the idea of ownership. For others, it’s a necessity brought on by hardship and an inability to attain stability. For many, the vehicle is a home away from home—a temporary

reprieve from confinement to a fixed geographic location. While technically off-thegrid, many of the people I spoke with and photographed were far from disconnected. For those fortunate enough to have access, the Internet plays a meaningful role in the fostering of community and the construction of a virtual safety net of information and support. d “I think the more exposure this type of living is given, the better it will be for American society,” I was told by a man named Scott Mooiy who spends nights under the Arizona skies in his compact car. “People should be given the opportunity to see other unconventional options that are different than paying their mortgage or landlord. This is a feasible lifestyle, and it can be done in a thousand ways. . . . Whatever your comfort level is and whatever your finances look like, this lifestyle is doable.” d Surveying both urban and remote locations, from Washington state down to Arizona, I’ve attempted to show how many ways it is being done, providing a juxtaposition of different vehicles, owners, and environments while exploring ways in which survival dictates a fluidity of location, interconnectivity, and, for some, the » Continued on page 11 very concept of home.

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

What would it be like to drop out and drive off into the sunset? What if you didn’t have a choice? These are the stories of Americans who live, work, and survive in their cars.

9


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FLOWER & GARDEN D av i D , S e at t l e I’ve been out of work as a union laborer for seven months. I’ve lived in this van for about one year and two months, and I like it. Actually, I love living in my van. My biggest problem is not being able to spend time with my kids. That’s my biggest thing. If I didn’t have four kids and didn’t have that worry, psh, I’d live in my van forever. I was married for 14 years, and I was always stressed out. When we got divorced, she got everything, we claimed bankruptcy, and all of a sudden all these stresses that I had were gone. It was a totally liberating thing. With the exception of my kids, I don’t have any other responsibilities. The cops know I live in my van. I don’t trash the area, I don’t throw crap everywhere, and I don’t cause problems. I would recommend this kind of living to everybody.

» Continued on page 12

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Gizmo Joe, Slab City, Calif. What I don’t spend on rent I can put in on my ideas. If you take any machine, you can break it down into discrete components. A lot of times I’ll need a component for an idea that I’m working on and it’s part of something else, so I’ll take it apart. That’s why I got so many leftovers laying around, because you can’t make omelets without having a few eggshells.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

from page 11

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Jude, Juan, and niCk, SLaB City, CaLif. People have gone so far away from what’s true that there’s no way for them to get back on their own. We were really blessed to have a teacher, a guide, to demonstrate how to live—to help us through so many changes and transformations over time. He was there for us for 40 years. That’s how I got to where I am now. If you want to see guaranteed results, just turn around and start in the other direction. Reprogram yourself. Because heaven is real. It’s here right now inside of you. That’s where we all end up: back at the beginning after this whole journey is over and everyone’s learned all their lessons.

“Because heaven is real. It’s here right now inside of you. That’s where we all end up: back at the beginning after this whole journey is over and everyone’s learned all their lessons.”

B o B , S h av e r L a k e , C a L i f . I was forced into van-dwelling. I got divorced and could no longer live on what I was making. I saw a box van on the side of the road one day and decided I could live in it. I took out my last $1,500 from the bank and slept in it the first night. I ended up living in it for the next six years. I insulated it and used heaters. There are a lot of problems with living in a van. Where do you go to the bathroom? Shower? Cook? Get mail, etc.? But as these problems arise, you find ways to solve them. I found solutions and it became comfortable, and I fell in love with it. I can’t say exactly what I love about it. I was still working and supporting my two kids and giving half the money to my ex. But I loved not having to mow a lawn or shovel snow. I loved not having those tedious responsibilities. And I loved not having to pay rent. I’m not under any stress. In my normal life I was constantly stressed out. There is a peace and calmness out here. I’m completely off the grid. I produce my own power. I use extremely little water. I produce so much solar power I can’t use it all. The greenness of this life is a happy coincidence. The way I see it, I live in a tiny, tiny house and have an enormously beautiful backyard. In 2005 I started a website called CheapRVLiving to promote this type of living as a lifestyle choice and to show how to do it comfortably and happily. Eventually we started having gatherings, and unusually strong friendships and bonds were formed. The relationships seem deeper and more intense out here. I think part of it is that they’re based on freedom. Because of this, they’re very elastic. When I think about the future, like most Americans, I think about the economy and where things are going. Everything seems so shaky right now. It definitely colors the conversation when discussing the future. I have no desire to do anything different. I want to live this way the rest of my life. If it comes to a point where I can’t do this anymore, it’s my full plan to make good provision for my dog, try to leave my kids as much money as I can, and go into the desert as far off as I can and kill myself. That’s honestly my plan for the future. » Continued on page 14


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J a m e s a n d K y n d a l , Q u a rt z s i t e , a r i z . James: The whole thrust behind us doing this is so I would have time to work on the Internet and build a business so that eventually we can upgrade our digs, but hopefully still travel. I don’t know if a home is in our future. I had a home foreclosed in Denver a few years ago, and I look back and I think, What was going through my mind when I agreed to commit to an $1,800 a month mortgage for 30 years? What was I thinking? In that three-year period, I paid about $50,000 and all of the ancillaries, and all I have to show for it is a foreclosed home. Kyndal: In 2007 we took a poll, and James said he was going to start working on the Internet full-time. So, I went and got a second job to try to make ends meet for us. We made things work. In 2010 I came home and I said, “I can’t do it anymore.” I can’t do it one more day. We moved a couple of times and ended up in Georgia. We were there for a year and a half. James went to work, and little by little, I could see him die a slow death every single day. James: It had become circular, because it seemed like we were making just enough to pay for what being there was costing us. We weren’t gaining any ground, and it didn’t seem like we were going to. One day we were just like, Let’s go. We’re not doing anything for ourselves here. Kyndal: To me it looks like we’re a couple of crazy people in a van. But if we were in a motor home staying in camp sites. it would seem normal. Retired people do it all the time. And if we were in a sailboat, it would be considered romantic. I don’t feel destitute. I feel more hopeful than ever before. If anything, I felt destitute when I was giving the best I had to a job. James: People are living this “American dream” and feel like they have to do it because that’s the rule. I feel there is more to life than that. I don’t work that way. People think I’m crazy, but I think they’re crazy. » Continued on page 16

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Chicks dig it when you’re neutered. More than 150,000 unwanted dogs and cats will end up in Washington shelters this year. Help lower that number by having your pet spayed or neutered. During February, participating veterinary clinics are offering low-cost spay and neuter surgeries in honor of World Spay Day. Some restrictions apply.

Visit paws.org for a list of participating clinics.

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

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C h a r l e n e B e at y , Q u a rt z s i t e , a r i z . Life takes a lot of funny turns. I don’t think I ever really experienced the empty-nest syndrome like some people do, but the kind of lives my kids were living after they left home didn’t really leave much room for me. I didn’t mind so much they were gone, but I just figured I was going to be some part of that. So between losing my husband around this same time, losing my kids, and finding out my knees were basically shot, it started a downward spiral. I couldn’t walk, so I got heavier and heavier and then could do even less. It was a vicious cycle that somehow I needed to find a way out of. I ended up getting full knee replacements, and at the end of the two-year recovery process, my doctor told me I could now do whatever I wanted. I had never heard that before in my life, nor had it ever really been an option. I didn’t know what to do with myself. I was lost. I decided that I needed a goal that was bigger than life itself. For some reason that goal, I decided, was to kayak America. So three years ago I set off to do just that. I’ve now kayaked 48 states, with plans to do Alaska and Hawaii in the coming year. Sometimes you need a really, really big challenge in front of you so you can say, OK, I’m going to do this. I have a lot of things to look forward to now that I didn’t feel I had before all this happened. People sometimes say, “Well, if you had the choice, wouldn’t you rather have a house or settle down?” My response is, “Well, I do have a choice, and I don’t want those things.” » Continued on page 18

“My doctor told me I could now do whatever I wanted. I had never heard that before in my life, nor had it ever really been an option.”


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N e m o , Q u a rt z s i t e , a r i z . Before I left my job, I was at the point where I literally felt that work was killing me. I thought, If I continue down this road, I’m going to end up dead, and possibly by my own hand. The stress level had taken it to that degree, and I knew that I had to find a change or I was done. A year before the housing crash, I had just finished building a four-bedroom, twobathroom house. After the crash, the appraised value went from $220,000 to $50,000. I was so far underwater on it that I decided to give it back to the bank and walk away. I wasn’t working to better myself anymore, I was working to maintain all of the bills that are inherent in mainstream society. It was very taxing. So I purchased this box truck and cut my living expenses down to a point where I could survive off of my savings. I’ve been on the road now for four years. The biggest adjustment to this life was having to learn how to do nothing. In mainstream society, it’s all about what’s happening now—what do you have to do, where do you have to go, and what’s scheduled for today. Once you hit the road, though, that all goes away. It took me weeks before I felt like I had actually decompressed. The name Nemo in Latin basically means “nobody.” That’s who I was and that’s how I felt my whole life, so I decided to take the name. What I didn’t realize was that it would change. This group of people that I’ve met and this community that I’ve found has changed that. There’s no expectation here for anyone to be anything but who they are. I’ve been looking for that my entire life, and with this group of folks, I found it. That to me is where the heart of my comfort comes from. I look forward to the days now. I feel unconditionally happier now with my life.

Andrew Waits is a photographer working and living in Seattle. To view his complete collection of images and stories, as well as audio clips from his interviews, go to andrewwaits.com.


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. . . S ay i n g g o o d b y e Andrew Waits: Near the end of what would be one of my final trips south, my Toyota Chinook broke down 50 miles outside of Phoenix. Diagnosis: in need of a new engine. Given the high cost of fixing and the logistics of being 1,500 miles away from my home base in Seattle, I was forced to sell my trusty companion for next to nothing. Although the experience was heartbreaking, to say the least, I’m happy I found an owner (left) interested in fixing her up and hitting the road in search of his own adventures. E

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S c o t t M o o i y , Q u a rt z S i t e , a r i z . I bought this car originally as a commuter vehicle for my job as a third-grade teacher in New Jersey. I had no idea I would ever be sleeping in it. I had the classic case of teacher burnout: working too many hours, taking on too much, and working summers. Teaching is a difficult, challenging, and allconsuming job, in my opinion. You have to maintain your own interests and your own identity, and take care of yourself in that process. That’s something that I have the opportunity to do out here. Living in the car and having few possessions has so affected me that one could say I’ll never get over it. I certainly hope that the lessons, conscious and otherwise, that I learn during this time I won’t forget when I go back to the everyday working experience, so when I finally do have 25 little people to take care of, to teach, to mentor, to be a nurse to, to be a social worker to, I will hopefully still remember myself. But only time will tell. I can talk all day about how it’s going to be different the second time around, but when the rubber hits the road, that’s when I’ll find out if I’ve made that change permanently or not.

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food&drink

Smoked and Sundry

Bourbon & Bones, the new Southern spot from Mike Law, is surprisingly global. BY NICOLE SPRINKLE

G

BY SARA BILLUPS

Broadcast Coffee is launching its third multiroaster shop in an area that could use a viable independent cafe: Roosevelt. The coffee bar will open its doors in the new Kavela Apartments building at Northeast 66th Street and Roosevelt Way this March or April. McCormick and Schmick’s shuttered its First Avenue and Spring Street location. The seafood chain still operates dining rooms on Fourth Avenue downtown, in South Lake Union, and in downtown Bellevue. The “Deathcake Royale” returns in time for Valentine’s Day, and it’s now even deathier: After spending the past 12 months revamping the recipe, Cupcake Royale has released the decadent cakelet for the 10th year. It’s for sale as a baby cake, a babycake three-pack, or in limited quantities in its fullsized glory via preorder. Here’s a fine way to ease into the evening: Capitol Hill’s Mamnoon now offers afternoon drink service. From 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, the Lebanese-Syrian restaurant serves $5 cocktails with complimentary sweet and savory snacks, as well as Turkish coffee and tea.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KYU HAN

The man with his meat.

to be reckoned with: thick, squarish slices that look more like miniature steaks. From his mom, Law also grew to love a traditional “pernil”—essentially a pork shoulder marinated with a spicy “mojo” marinade that usually includes some kind of citrus. “I make a version called ‘Pique’ that’s a pineapple-fermented sauce,” Law says. And while she’d turn out a soupier version of cobbler from the North Carolina town of

Law had a 10-foot-long, 10-foot-high walk-in smokehouse custom-built: “I can smoke a whole pig, bacon, andouille sausage.”

Mt. Airy, she also made a mean flan (the South American crème caramel dessert). There were plenty of Southern traditions too: family fishing trips and the resulting fish frys; boiled blue-crab feasts. But just as vivid were his childhood summers with his grandmother in the DR, in a little village with no electricity: “We used lots of charcoal and wood, and ate lots of cold, raw things.” It’s perhaps no surprise, then, that Law had a 10-foot-long, 10-foot-high walk-in smokehouse custom-built for Bourbon & Bones—a throwback to those provincial summers, as well as to

the South’s preoccupation with smoked foods. “I can smoke a whole pig, bacon, andouille sausage,” Law says (he spent eight years as a chef in New Orleans). “The doors open up, there are lots of racks.” There’s also a spit to hang a whole pig and hooks for bacon and sausages. His excitement is palpable. He jumps to memories of the barbecue pits of North Carolina—“some guy chopping up whole pigs on a Sunday alongside the road”—and on to the state of Southern food in Seattle. “It’s all kinda watered-down . . . not that flavorful. There’s a lot of love that has to go into it. That’s why my short ribs braise for 48 hours.” And it’s all about the process, according to Law: “Anyone can take an expensive piece of meat . . . but the person who can take something that would get thrown away and make it amazing . . . ” Everything gets used in Law’s process; the end pieces of the brisket are chopped and added to the baked beans and the smothered greens. He makes his own rubs—the key to a good one is “garlic powder, onion powder, cayenne, paprika, black peppercorn” — which will even get incorporated into bitters for bourbon cocktails. In Germany (yup, he spent time there too) he became interested in fermenting, making “halfsour” pickles with no vinegar: “The recipes there just called for salting the cucumber and letting it

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

Ballard’s Bloom restaurant will host food truck Kiss My Grits for a Sunday brunch pop-up on February 9. Still under construction, it will feature South Carolina low-country fare with a Pacific Northwest twist. Tickets for the 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. seatings are available online, and the menu will include hoppin’ John black-eyed-pea and rice cakes, shrimp ’n’ grits, and “ ’Nana Puddin’.” E food@seattleweekly.com

Temperature Check FROM EDITH BLACKMAN, BARTENDER AT SOLO AND ST. JOHN’S

Beer cocktails. The hoppy note can really bring a drink to life.

‘90s night at Lo-Fi. It was hot before it blew up, but now it’s just too crowded.

Bourbon whipped cream. It always tastes like the whipped cream has turned.

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

oing into my coffee date with Mike Law, I knew that the Seattle chef was a Southerner from Winston Salem, North Carolina. You can taste it in his fried chicken, responsible for bringing a fervent following to The Wandering Goose during the small Capitol Hill restaurant’s Friday fried-chicken nights. And you can read it in the name of his new venture, Bourbon & Bones, which opened this month. So when we met at Caffe Vita on Capitol Hill last August to talk about Law’s plans for the new Ballard restaurant, I looked right past him when he walked in the door. Thing is: Law, with his dark eyes, dark hair and beard, and olive skin, doesn’t immediately register as Southern, at least not in that clichéd, good-ol’-boy kind of way. And that’s because, in fact, he’s half Dominican—something a lot of people don’t know. But when he speaks, his soft, lilting Southern accent can’t be missed. Turns out his father met his mother while in the DR with the Peace Corps (“a schoolteacher who built chicken coops”) and brought her back to North Carolina. Growing up, Law spent whole summers in the DR or in Washington Heights in New York City, visiting relatives who lived among the area’s huge Dominican population. I’d only just moved from Washington Heights a few years prior, and could still taste the addictive fried chicharons (pork rinds) that are found on nearly every corner. We talked about some of the great Dominican dishes up there. I had to remind myself that we were here to discuss “Southern” food, but, as Law made evident, that classic distinction is not as clear-cut as we’re often led to believe. He mentions, for instance, the gas stations in the South that sell pickled eggs in beet liquid, which leads him to expound on the region’s often-unrecognized diversity. “There’s a lot of Chinese influence there, Chinese immigrants who came to work on the railroads, along with Africans.” The Chinese have pickled cabbage and other vegetables for soups for thousands of years. “Chow Chow” is basically a spicy, sweet relish that has origins in Chinese cooking, according to Law—and that is often sold at roadside stands in the South. He uses it as a dipping sauce for his bourbon-soaked gizzards. Likewise, a country ham biscuit with molasses or sweet mustard is also a play on the sweet-and-sour taste profile for which the Chinese are famous. And then there’s his mother, who inspired his love of cooking and was a practitioner of a hybrid of Southern and Dominican food. “She was really good with soups, meat, pastry. She would smoke things. And we always had a garden, so we ate a lot of fried tomatoes and smothered greens. She made sancocho stew (a South American soup) that in the DR version has six types of meat in it, including ham hock and smoked bacon.” Law is smoking his own pork-belly bacon at Bourbon & Bones, and it’s something

FoodNews

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naturally ferment to get the acidity.” The result is a fresher, still-tangy but not overwhelmingly sour flavor. (He plans to even pickle things like chanterelles and ramps at B&B.) In Barcelona (yes, add Spain to the list), he fell for the cold smoked clams, oysters, and sardines often served in tapas bars, which are “cooked slowly over olive oil and then canned.” His final destination, this past fall, was to New York City, with business partner Mike McConnell, owner of Via Tribunali and Caffe Vita, to do a little R&D. Law tells me about a Brooklyn Southern restaurant called Fette Sau (“Fat Pig”) that he was particularly interested in, a place he felt was most similar to his vision for Bourbon & Bones. And while it’s unquestionable that Law knows all the right places to look for inspiration, I seriously doubt that any New York hot spot could be more helpful than his own varied and vibrant heritage. This menu of influences—the Dominican Republic, China, Germany, and Spain—proves Law is far more than just another dude doing barbecue.

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est actors has been hired to all come dressed as lumberjacks. Some, though, are holding babies. Law and his crew are clad in overalls and trucker hats. People are lining up at the register to order as they flag down seats. Meat comes by the pound or the bucket; the walls are adorned with a stuffed wild boar, the skulls of animals, and shelves of pickled vegetables. We find just about every kind of bourbon, including pricier Pappy Van Winkle, middle-of-the-road Old Overholt, and smaller-batch producers. The Grateful Dead is blaring, followed by the Cars. I want to try everything, but it’s not humanly possible. I go for a “Carolina” fried-chicken breast; the key to getting it crispy but not greasy, Law had told me, is “to fry it at 300 degrees the whole way.” He marinades it overnight and coats it in the flour mixture right before it hits the fryer. “It’s all about maintaining the proper temperature. If the oil isn’t hot enough, the chicken absorbs the oil.” I also order brisket, baked beans with pork belly, collards, those bourbon-soaked gizzards, and the slaw—tangy yet still just a tad sweet. Sadly, I have to forgo the sweet-heat ribs, the Lexington-style (“really smoked and vinegarbased”) pork shoulder, the grits (“traditional plain water grits with salt and pepper, not finished with butter”), the mac ’n’ cheese, the biscuits (“half shortening, half butter)—this time . . . When I’m finally ready to bust (all for a mere $30, including a bourbon sour cocktail and tangerine Jell-O with whipped cream), I leave the small, still-bustling space and walk out into the cold night. The flames from the smokehouse are fully ignited, its aluminum ventilator towering high above the restaurant. Across the parking lot, Bad Jimmy’s brewery is lit up, and I think how brilliant it would be, given B&B’s tiny dimensions, to order carry-out and eat it over a glass of beer in the large, soaring brewery with its radiant heater. I file that one away for my next visit. E

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

F IL M

22

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he Super Bowl. Nah, it doesn’t look right like that. THE SUPER BOWL!!!! That’s better, I think. Whatever your preferred level of font-based excitement, there’s no doubting that Super Bowl XLVIII will be absolutely must-see TV for the vast majority of Seattleites. The question is: where to watch the big game? Consider these just a few of the wealth of options you’ll have on Sunday. It goes withBY ZACH GEBALLE out saying that pretty much every place with a few taps and a TV will be open, and almost all will be utterly jammed with fans, be they casual or die-hard. As such, I tried to highlight a few viewing experiences outside the norm. As with most American sporting events (or television spectacles), food is as much a part of the day as the game. Consider grabbing some takeout ribs and brisket at Bourbon and Bones, then taking them down the street to Bad Jimmy’s Brewery to take in the game on their huge TV. If a merely massive television isn’t quite enough, and you want to watch the game on a screen so big that even pro footballers look larger than life, try trekking to one of the two Cinebarre locations, Mountlake Terrace or Issaquah, to take in the game on a movie screen. They each have a full bar, so you can have the whole “sports bar” experience with a screen even bigger than Peyton Manning’s forehead. Want a giant party? There’s Underdog Sports’ Super Bowl party at the Crocodile Cafe, where they’ll offer drink specials, a 12th Man costume contest at halftime, and door prizes. Of course, for some the Super Bowl experience can only be had in a classic sports bar. While the city is rife with them (and they’ll all be packed), here are a few of my favorites. SPORT by Seattle Center has you covered with as many televisions as is reasonable to pack into one restaurant. 95 Slide on Capitol Hill is named after arguably the greatest moment in Seattle sports history, so there are karmic reasons to go there. St. Andrews in Green Lake is better known for that other kind of football, but boasts a rowdy yet respectful clientele. And if you want to be as close to CenturyLink Field as possible, stand-bys like F.X. McRory’s and Sluggers are sure to be hopping. Lastly, some of you might be Broncos fans. That’s OK—The Bar Code is an all-inclusive place where fans of any football team can get together, enjoy a few drinks, and watch a well-played, competitive game . . . which the Seahawks win. That said, if you need the company of other Broncos fans (or want to torment them), you could check out El Borracho del Norte on Leary Way, a known Broncos bar. E

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arts&culture Pan and Rescan

Tivon Rice’s video cameras relentlessly survey the past and present of their architectural surroundings.

BY BRIAN MILLER Rice’s modern little Sony digital cameras are of our present technological world, but the two in the main gallery are mounted on grinding, spiraling, mechanical rails. Like the turning of a lathe, they produce a calming, almost industrial sound—part of the ambient room tone Rice is also recording and amplifying. Next to them are a pair of clunky old analogue monitors, CRTs into which the cameras reguOpening night for Site larly peer. In this Machines, with cameras clash of decades, and monitors in the “These two old foreground. monitors create more of a sculptural installation,” says Rice. Walking over to the modern flat-screen digital Machines is essentially giving us all those views TV, located in an alcove up a short flight of stairs, at once. The constantly flipping and shifting feels like trekking forward in time. Then you cameras make you think of a gecko’s independent reverse the trip, much as Rice’s cameras constantly eyes or a spider’s prismed vision. track and toggle back and forth. He says, “There’s Presenting so much visual information at once, a dialogue about nostalgia built into Suyama multiplying both sound and image, also puts you Space”—one that’s endlessly repeating. For Rice, in mind of an architect’s set of drawings: elevaSite Machines is about “watching sculpture, watch- tion, schematic, floor plan, reflected ceiling plan, ing architecture. This project tries to put those two etc. With an architect, of course, there’s a final in dialogue—slick new stuff and very evidently unity of vision; the design is supposedly coming old stuff . . . that new-thing-looking-at-that-oldfrom one person. (Though any working architect thing phenomenon. Suyama Space has both of will differ, given client demands.) those things happening at the same time.” Here, Rice’s goal is “to look at the space as many ways as possible.” It’s not his space, but his new visual program for seeing the space, like Curated by Beth Sellars, Suyama Space has long trying on a fresh pair of eyeglasses. Our vision been one of my favorite galleries, precisely for its is both augmented yet confounded. You can’t singular artist focus and Zen-like calm. Rice’s always be sure what—or when—you’re seeing, new project has an almost musical consonance and this is also part of Rice’s agenda: “to create a that fits the space, where we can linger through puzzle,” he says. “Is what you see live or delayed?” time and try on new perspectives. Yet Site MARK WOODS PHOTOGRAPHY

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But how much more do I really want to know about this building or its provenance? Site Machines isn’t annoyingly meta or conceptual, but I’d rather Rice’s program looked beyond the four walls—like Suyama’s prior show, Drawn From the Olympics, which referred outward to our Northwest rainforests and paper production. Site Machines is entirely interior—and never more so than when the cameras look back into their monitors, creating a pixilated M.C. Escher regress. And, no, Rice’s video isn’t being uploaded to YouTube. To see these images of the building, you have to visit the building—then perceive it through three other pairs of eyes. E

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

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very local artist wants to do a show at Suyama Space, the atrium-lit old gallery hosted in a Belltown architect’s office. Once a garage, its creaking timbered floor and wooden trusses above convey a very functional sense of integrity. It’s not a frivolous or frou-frou kind of space, and each artist (or team) selected for an exhibit is flattered by the serene expanse. Every show is a solo show, and the work only has to compete with—or complement—the gallery itself. Elsewhere, as at the Guggenheim or its Bilbao annex, that task can be overwhelming: How can the artist measure up to architectural genius? Tivon Rice’s interesting new Site Machines is in no way overmatched by Suyama Space, though it does fall into the trap, which I’ve seen here before, of engaging with the building. The light-and-video installation deploys six cameras that feed into two viewing stations. Sometimes you’re looking at the gallery from the rafters; sometimes you’re seeing old architectural models and archives kept in the basement; and sometimes the moving cameras film the video monitors themselves, creating colorfully striated feedback effects (“rescanning” in video parlance). Ten neon tubes are hung horizontally from the ceiling, stair-stepping in opposite directions, giving the gallery an eerie sheen. They, like the cameras, are following Rice’s programmed script, flicking on and off in concert with the pausing and panning cameras. (I’d advise going late in the day, or when it’s cloudy above.) “It’s not really interactive,” says Rice while walking me through the exhibit last week. “It’s more a series of composed movements. It’s about an hour long.” Though he can control the whole apparatus via laptop, those three symphonic movements never change tempo or pattern. Site Machines isn’t responding to the architects and clients who periodically wander through the atrium (unlike Sanctum, up at the Henry, also produced by members of the UW’s DXArts program, or Mirror at SAM). Rather, Rice’s piece is all about the building, its past and present uses. Since we can’t venture into the basement, those cameras reveal a hidden past—“this really bizarre series of old models and things”—like robots spelunking in a cave or diving down to Titanic.

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CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

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(1/30) CISCRP presents Aware for All Clinical Research Education Day (1/30) Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee, & Ramez Naam Surviving the Technology Revolution (1/31) Richard Fiske Kilauea: Hawaii’s Most Famous Volcano (2/2) Early Music Discovery Early Music for All: An Intergenerational Sing-Along! (2/5) McKenzie Funk Getting Rich from Climate Change (2/6) Alex Pentland ‘Social Physics:’ Engaging with the Big Data Around Us TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(2/8) Saturday Family Concerts WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG Te Fare O Tamatoa

Final Week

Must Close Feb. 2

Jan. 8–Feb. 2, 2014 www.seattleshakespeare.org

(2/9) Thalia Symphony Orchestra presents Passion, Love, and Tragedy (2/10) Jennifer Senior The Ups and Downs of Parenthood

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

(2/10) Geoff Dyer How the U.S. Can Beat China’s Global Agenda

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(2/11) ParentMap presents Richard Louv Getting Kids Back to Nature (2/12) Ignite! Seattle

ThisWeek’s PickList THURSDAY, JAN. 30

Spamalot

“If Monty Python and the Holy Grail had one great production number,” comedian Eric Idle must have figured, “how much better would it be if it were all production numbers?” So 30 years later he converted the troupe’s 1975 cult comedy into a stage musical/money-printing machine that will run forever. The show’s skeleton is the movie—a surrealist sendup of King Arthur, the Round Table, and the rest of England’s origin myth—stuffed like a fruitcake with parodies of other musicals, beloved bits from the Python TV series, and meta-commentary on the very concept of musicals. (Numbers include “The Song That Goes Like This” and “Whatever Happened to My Part?”.) The casting for this local production is as good as it gets, full of actors you’ve loved elsewhere if you’ve seen a musical anywhere in King County in the past decade: Allen Fitzpatrick, Laura Griffith, Louis Hobson, Dane Stokinger, Greg McCormick Allen, and more. (Through March 2.) 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., 625-1900, 5thavenue.org. $39 and up. 8 p.m. GAVIN BORCHERT

Albus

Skin color can be a fraught topic, no matter whether a country is majority white, majority black, or in the vast spectrum between. In South Africa, as elsewhere on the continent, there’s a special stigma associated with being albino, a subject explored in this new show by Johannesburg photographer Justin Dingwall, in which he depicts Thando Hopa in a series of formal portraits. Albus is very much a collaboration between artist and model, a consideration of race and identity. As Hopa recently told the BBC, “I’m a black girl who lives in the skin of a white person, and that alone should embody what a human being as a whole should represent.” Using different lighting and effects, Dingwell turns her skin from black to white and every shade of pigment imaginable. Shooting in both black-and-white and color, his images are both Vogue-ready and serenely classical. To be albino in Africa means being stared at (or worse), but Hopa’s gaze is always unflinching and strong. (Through Feb. 28.) M.I.A. Gallery, 1203

Second Ave., 467-4927, m-i-a-gallery.com. Free. Opening reception 6–8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER FRIDAY, JAN. 31

The Sleeping Beauty

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Jack Taylor and Michael Winters. Photo by Alan Alabastro.

The Seahawks are traveling to New Jersey to play in the Super Bowl on Sunday, but Pacific Northwest Ballet can stay here at home while they take on the same kind of challenge. The Sleeping Beauty is a 19th-century classic and a notorious gauge of a company’s strengths, packed with myriad tests of skill and stamina. From the princess of the title through the entire ensemble, choreographer Marius Petipa created a series of kinetic essays wrapped up in a pretty story. (Ronald Hynd then updated the 1890 original in 1993.) Don’t be deceived by the fairy-tale trappings, though—this is every bit as grueling a task as anything you’ll see at MetLife Stadium. (Through Feb. 9.) McCaw Hall, 321 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 441-2424, pnb.org. $28–$179. 7:30 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

Fitzpatrick as King Arthur in Spamalot. MARK KITAOKA

TOWN HALL

arts&culture»

Oscar-Nominated Short Films 2014

Split into two programs, live-action (108 min.) and animation (110 min.), this touring package of shorts is always a crapshoot. Among the former five, there’s a dying Danish boy, a harried French mother, an African child soldier, and a seriously delayed wedding party. The title with the lightest touch is The Voorman Problem, adapted by English director Mark Gill from the novel number9dream by David Mitchell of Cloud Atlas fame. It’s a pithy, witty little twohander starring Martin Freeman (Bilbo in the Hobbit movies) as a shrink and Tom Hollander (currently playing Charles Dickens’ best friend in The Invisible Woman) as a mental patient who insists he’s a god. Voorman demands worship and respect, while Dr. Williams is skeptical of his straitjacketed patient. Their conversation takes on an absurd, slyly Kafkaesque quality as the psychiatrist tries not to give offence, even while demanding proof of said divinity. It’s so hard being a god, says the soft-spoken Voorman; there are so many things to keep track of. Like what? asks the doctor. Like Belgium, says Voorman—what if I stopped looking after it? Williams is not impressed, but he should be. And perhaps significantly, for us at least, none of the nominated films come from Belgium. (Through Thurs.) Harvard Exit, 807 E. Roy St., 323-0587, landmarktheatres.com. $8–$10.50. Call for showtimes. BRIAN MILLER SATURDAY, FEB. 1

Risk!

Podcasting has opened a whole new arena for comedians and revitalized several stand-up careers. Familiar from the ’90s comedy troupe The State, Kevin Allison had the idea a few years back of asking his Hollywood pals to share their most mortifying and shameful stories. His past guests have included Janeane Garofalo, Margaret Cho, Marc Maron, Sarah Silverman, and others. Then he got the idea of touring Risk!, preferably to venues where alcohol is served, to loosen lips and lower inhibitions. Each city on Allison’s Risk! itinerary offers a new crop of confessions from local talent. His guests tonight will include Emmett Montgomery, Summer Waldron, and the editor of Capitol Hill’s leading alt-weekly newspaper . . . what’s his name? Don, Danny, Daniel? Something like that. He’ll be there, too. We hear he’s got some stories in his past. The Highline, 210 Broadway E., seattlegayscene.com and brownpapertickets. com. $20. 10 p.m. T. BOND E


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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Love Song Waltzes New Love Song Waltzes

25


CHOPSHOP

StoneDance Productions and The Theatre at Meydenbauer Present:

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a contemporary dance festival Spectrum Dance Theater (Seattle) Grand Rapids Ballet (Michigan)

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February 15th, 2014 7:30pm February 16th, 2014 3:00pm

Adam Barruch Dance (New York) Gerard Regot (Barcelona, Spain) The Stone Dance Collective (Eastside) Pocket INC (Seattle) Bryn Cohn and Artists (New York) Price Suddarth (Seattle)

Tickets on sale now at www.brownpapertickets.com Visit us at Chopshopdance.org

Anna Conner + CO (Seattle)

Opening Nights

watching bad television: You might not regret it, but nor will you be inspired by it. Yet years from now, when I think back to this production, I’ll remember that damn chandelier.

The Foreigner

A Great Wilderness

VILLAGE THEATRE, 303 FRONT ST. N., ISSAQUAH, 425-392-1942, VILLAGETHEATRE. ORG. $34–$65. RUNS WED.–SUN. (INCLUDING MATINEES). ENDS MARCH 2. THEN PLAYS IN EVERETT MARCH 7–30.

SEATTLE REPERTORY THEATRE, 155 MERCER ST. (SEATTLE CENTER), 443-2222, SEATTLEREP.ORG. $12–$65. 7:30 P.M. WED.–SUN., PLUS SOME WED. & WEEKEND MATINEES. ENDS FEB. 16.

I went to this production of The Foreigner, a 1984 comedy adored by summer-stock audiences across America, billed as being “both scrupulously clever and outrageously funny,” expecting—OK, praying for—an evening of laughter. Instead I witnessed missed opportunities more massive than the launch of Obamacare. It’s a wanton waste of resources, given Larry Shue’s reliably risible text and Brian Yorkey’s direction of a capable local cast.

A few decades ago, The New York Times ran a front-page photo showing women marching in Spain with a banner that translated to “Spanish Mothers Love Their Gay Sons More Than God.” The same cannot be said for the two American mothers in Samuel D. Hunter’s Rep-commissioned drama (a world premiere). In this uncomfortable work, an aging “conversion therapist” named Walt (Michael Winters) is contracted to cure a gay high schooler of homosexuality through scripture and friendly bonding at his Idaho camp. Within a few minutes Daniel is gone—off on a walk from which by nightfall he still hasn’t returned. In Scott Bradley’s shabbily furnished A-frame cabin, whose rafters soar like a Gothic cathedral, the boy’s frantic mother Eunice (Mari Nelson), Walt’s friends Abby and Tim (Christine Estabrook and R. Hamilton Wright), and no-nonsense ranger Janet (Gretchen Krich) come and go, conversationally unpacking the milestones of Walt’s life like the contents of a rucksack. Who is this crumbling, frustrated guy, and what did he do with Daniel? These are the twin engines that dutifully propel us into the depressing world of evangelism and homophobia. Hunter has been lauded for plays that humanize characters we theatergoers might disdain, including an obese recluse (The Whale) and a fallen pastor (A Bright New Boise). Factors humanizing Walt are his dreaded imminent transfer to an old-age home, impending senility, and woeful backstory—plus the burly Winters’ cuddly portrayal. Director Braden Abraham makes Walt chipper and clumsy as he attempts to befriend the sullen Daniel ( Jack Taylor), whose jaw visibly tenses with apprehension. Later, Eunice and Abby’s cruelly resigned attitude toward their gay sons becomes the villain in the room. Still, however topical and well-acted, A Great Wilderness feels inconclusive. Hunter’s two-act play is crafted of mostly short scenes that often cut to black just shy of a revelation. This ratchets the mystery, but also feels manipulative; the characters are privy to what comes next, but we aren’t. Most conversations flow naturally and sometimes overlappingly. Yet when a soporific video advertising the amenities of the old-age home chimes in on the Babel-esque word-jam, Hunter seems to be saying it’s all folderol— underscored by Walt’s burning of dictionary pages to destroy our conventions of reality-asimposed-by-language. Outside the cabin, a fearsome forest fire is conveyed by L.B. Morse’s lighting and Obadiah Eaves’ infernally loud soundscape. Inside Walt’s pious, deluded enclave, the play is a disturbing tour of the closed mind. And for viewers who escaped, it’s a vindication for getting out. MARGARET FRIEDMAN E

TRACY MARTIN/VILLAGE THEATRE

Ballet Arkansas (Arkansas)

arts&culture» Stage

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Charlie (Gratton) just wants to be left alone.

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BRIAN STOKES MITCHELL WITH THE SEATTLE SYMPHONY FEBRUARY 6–9

Brian Stokes Mitchell, known for his Tony Award–winning work on Broadway and his guest-starring role on Glee, returns to Benaroya Hall for a weekend of beloved ballads and romantic music. This is a concert not to be missed. SEATTLE POPS SERIES sponsored by

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In brief: Meek British proofreader Charlie (Erik Gratton) pretends not to speak English while vacationing at a Georgia fishing lodge, then wacky complications ensue among the redstate yokels. The show begins with a bang: loud sound and lighting effects that suggest a thunderstorm. Then I found myself distracted by the rain in the background. Eventually I wondered about the chandelier overhead—was it adorned with rifles? Why hang it so prominently above center stage? Would it crash down like in Phantom of the Opera? Meanwhile, below, Yorkey’s half-dozen players are directed at less-than-farcical speed. The prolonged, stagy silences are more suited to Harold Pinter, an approach that ill fits the broad performances, which are more pleasure-seeking than Rob Ford. After a sluggish start, this twoact Foreigner moseys through the middle and stalls at the end. Yet there are moments. Gratton and Anthony Lee Phillips (as Ellard, Charlie’s would-be English tutor) demonstrate bits of brilliance during their engaging educational encounters. An inspired mirror-mimicking scene between them brought down the house. Moments like these are why Yorkey, co-author of the Pulitzer- and Tony-winning Next to Normal, evidently still harbors his youthful love for The Foreigner. Thirty years after it was written, however, The Foreigner’s humor-from-hicks formula hasn’t aged well. This revival is like a day spent

ALYSSA DYKSTERHOUSE

stage@seattleweekly.com


arts&culture» Perfomance B Y G AV I N B O R C H E R T

Stage OPENINGS & EVENTS

BLACK LIKE US The premiere of Rachel Atkins’ play about

an African-American woman’s decision to pass for white in 1958. Annex Theatre, 1100 E. Pike St., 728-0933, annex theatre.org. $5–$20. Opens Jan. 31. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. plus Mon., Feb. 10. Ends March 1. ED, DOWNLOADED Michael Mitnick’s play is set “in a future where one can purchase immortality and spend an afterlife in a digital heaven of one’s favorite memories.” Washington Ensemble Theatre, 608 19th Ave. E., 325-5105, washingtonensemble.org. $15–$20. Preview Jan. 30, opens Jan. 31. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Mon. Ends Feb. 24. ERNEST SHACKLETON LOVES ME A workshop production (Balagan plans to stage the final version in April) of a new musical about a single mom who meets the explorer via time travel. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, act theatre.org. $20–$35. 7:30 p.m. Sun., Feb. 2–Tues. Feb. 4. I MIGHT BE EDGAR ALLAN POE & VIRTUAL SOLITAIRE Two solo shows written and performed by

Dawson Nichols. Poe: 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31. Solitaire: 7:30 p.m. Fri., Feb. 7. Stage One Theater, 9600 College Way N., 800-838-3006, brownpapertickets.com. $10. THE ICELANDIC ILLUMINATION RANGERS To find the missing Aurora Borealis, “the Rangers will have to dance around magnetic poles, navigate the Reykjavik synth-pop scene, and learn what it really means to be friends.” It sounds like a kids’ show—but there are also adults-only “blue” performances (10:30 p.m. Feb. 7 & 21). WET, 608 19th Ave. E., 325-5105, washingtonensemble.org. $5–$10. Opens Feb. 1. 10 a.m. Sat.–Sun. Ends Feb. 23. LEGALLY BLONDE Broadway Bound presents the musical version of the Reese Witherspoon vehicle. Shoreline Center, 18560 First Ave. N.E., 547-4555, broadwaybound. org. $17.50. Opens Jan. 31. 7 p.m. Fri., 2 & 7 p.m. Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 9. Ends Feb. 9. Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

Diabolus in Musica

EARSUPPLY

Giraudoux’s comic fable. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 292-7676, endangeredspeciesproject.org. $10–$15. 7 p.m. Mon., Feb. 3. MR. PIM PASSES BY A.A. Milne’s Edwardian comedy. Taproot Theatre, 204 N. 85th St., 781-9707, taproottheatre. org. $20–$40. Previews Jan. 29–30, opens Jan. 31. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Thurs., 8 p.m. Fri., 2 & 8 p.m. Sat. Ends March 1. PUPPET SCHOOL SEATTLE LAUNCH PARTY Based in L.A., it’s branching north. Find out all about it and its class offerings at this open house. Inscape, 815 Seattle Blvd. S., puppetschool.com. Free. 6 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31. READING TO VEGETABLES The premiere of E.M. Lewis’ thriller about a pre-med intern who participates in a chilling experiment. Penthouse Theatre, UW campus, 5434880, drama.uw.edu. $10–$20. Previews Jan. 29–30, opens Jan. 31. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 9. RED TIGER TALES UMO applies their brand of physical theater (clowning at its highest level) to ancient Buddhist, Zen, and Sufi stories. ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 2927676, umo.org, acttheatre.org. $5–$20. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31–Sat., Feb. 1, 2 p.m. Sun., Feb. 2. SPAMALOT SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 24. TEATRO ZINZANNI: ON THE AIR Their new radiothemed show features the return of emcee Kevin Kent. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $108 and up. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see dreams.zinzanni.org for exact schedule. Ends June 1. 13: A MUSICAL Our hero navigates a move from New York to small-town Indiana, on top of all else puberty throws at him. Studio East, 11730 118th Ave. N.E. 100, Kirkland, 425820-1800, studio-east.org. $12–$18. Opens 6:30 p.m. Jan. 31. 7:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 9.

• 

CURRENT RUNS

AMERICAN WEE-PIE Lisa Dillman’s comedy, set in a cup-

cake boutique. Seattle Public Theater at the Bathhouse, 7312 W. Green Lake Ave. N., 524-1300, seattlepublic theater.org. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 16. THE EQUATION Theatre9/12 presents Charles S. Waxberg’s Depression-set “examination of a capitalistic economy and what it does to humanity.” Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 332-7908. Pay what you can. 8 p.m. Fri.– Sat., plus some weekend matinees; see theatre912.com for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 15. THE FOREIGNER SEE REVIEW, PAGE 26. A GREAT WILDERNESS SEE REVIEW, PAGE 26.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 have to chant . . . We have glass rods we press against the string to make different sounds; we pluck them with paper clips.” (There’s a cute video on YouTube of the players practicing on the glasses.) As a young violinist discovering the then-new work, Bryant ate it up: “At 24, it made a big impression . . . I listened to Black Angels every day.” Another young musician floored by the piece was the Kronos Quartet’s David Harrington, who says it was the work that inspired him to found the group 40 years ago here in Seattle—the link between the classical tradition he’d grown up with and the “virtuosity and electricity” of the rock-guitar school of Hendrix. The cellist for that inaugural concert, by the way, was Walter Gray; now a SSO veteran, he’ll be the cellist for Black Angels here, too, joined by violinist Emma McGrath and violist Sayaka Kokubo. A word of warning from Gray: “In the old days we had a reviewer leave because of the volume! In the [Benaroya Hall] lobby I don’t know how far we can push it, but wait and see.” Also on the bill: music by Kalevi Aho, R. Murray Schafer, and pioneering minimalist Morton Feldman. Benaroya Hall, Third Ave. & Union St., 215-4747, seattle symphony.org. $20. 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31.

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Anything you may read in program or liner notes about George Crumb’s 1970 Black Angels—the numerological structure (it’s all about 13s and 7s, apparently), the Beethoven references, the “Dies irae” quotes, the VietBY GAVIN BORCHERT nam War subtext— will likely be pushed right out of your head by the manic scrabbling of the work’s opening bars. (“Night of the Electric Insects” is this section’s title, and that sums it up.) In this 19-minute work for string quartet—with help from amplification, gongs, maracas, and bowed water glasses—Crumb seemingly poured every shocking idea he had about what a quartet should sound like, and the piece still sounds arrestingly freakish today. Violinist Stephen Bryant, who’s playing the work Friday night on the Seattle Symphony’s [untitled] concert, says “All of our traditional training is pretty useless . . . Crumb managed to go far outside the box. I’m playing a col legno [with the wood of the bow, not the hair] riff, and in a different rhythm I

THE MADWOMAN OF CHAILLOT A reading of Jean

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arts&culture» » FROM PAGE 27

Treadaway and his costars.

inside-Hollywood tale of a closeted actor, his agent, a rent boy, and the rent boy’s girlfriend. ArtsWest, 4711 California Ave. S.W., 938-0339, artswest.org. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat. Extended through Feb. 16. THE NORMAL HEART Larry Kramer’s groundbreaking 1985 AIDS drama. Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., 800-838-3006, strawshop.org. $18–$36. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Feb. 15. RICHARD II George Mount’s embattled King Richard II dwindles from a coddled jackass prince to a naked nobody controlling nothing. Forget pathos; director Rosa Joshi goes for cynical laughs—and the approach works. MARGARET FRIEDMAN Center House Theatre, Seattle Center, 733-8222. $25–$48. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sat., plus some weekend matinees; see seattleshakespeare.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 2.

We Can Swing It!

Dance

THE BRIDGE PROJECT New work, made in a month, by

Opening ThisWeek

BALLET: THE SLEEPING • PACIFIC NORTHWEST SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 24.

Flight of the Storks

Babette McGeady, Anna Conner, Shannon Stewart, and Colleen McNeary. Velocity Dance Center, 1621 12th Ave., 325-8773, velocitydancecenter.org. $12–$20. 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31–Sun., Feb. 2. GRETA MATASSA & JOVON MILLER Jazz, both vocal and tap. Century Ballroom & Cafe, 915 E. Pine St., 324-7263, centuryballroom.com. Show only, 7:30 p.m., $20–$25. With dinner, $55; seatings at 6 p.m., 6:15, & 6:30 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1. BEAUTY

Classical, Etc.

EATTLE CHAMBER MUSIC WINTER FESTIVAL • SRecitals at 6:30 p.m., concerts at 7:30, except as noted.

Thurs., Jan. 30 Recital: a Brahms violin sonata. Concert: Mozart, Schumann, Bruch, and Bartok’s String Quartet no. 1. Fri., Jan. 31 Recital: Romances by Dvorak, Beach, and Laura Netzel. Concert: Beethoven, Kodaly, Mendelssohn. Sat., Feb. 1 11 a.m.: the tale of “The Snow Queen.” Recital: Schnittke’s Cello Sonata. Concert: Dvorak dances and a Brahms sextet. Sun., Feb. 2 1 p.m. concert: The Ehnes Quartet plays Beethoven, Bartok’s Third, Suk, and Ravel. Benaroya Recital Hall, Third Ave. and Union St., 283-8808, seattlechambermusic.org. $16–$48. SEATTLE SYMPHONY A John Adams/Shostakovich sandwich, with the latter’s wry Symphony no. 9. (Friday is a one-hour “Untuxed” concert with Shostakovich only.) Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattle symphony.org. $19–$112. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 30, 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31, 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1. UW CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Corelli, Gabrieli, and symphonies by C.P.E. Bach and Haydn. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, music.washington.edu. $10–$15. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 30. ELIZABETH A. BAKER From this Florida pianist/composer, her own works plus music by Glass, Part, and more. Chapel Performance Space, 4649 Sunnyside Ave. N., nseq.blogspot.com. $5–$15. 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31. BYRD ENSEMBLE Renaissance-flavored choral music by Part, Hallock, and others. At Northlake Unitarian Universalist Church, 308 Fourth Ave. S., Kirkland, 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31, and St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 732 18th Ave. E., 8 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1. $10–$20. byrdensemble.com. [UNTITLED] SEE EAR SUPPLY, PAGE 27. UW GUITAR ENSEMBLE Scarlatti, Vivaldi, and more. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music.washington.edu. $5. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31. UW MODERN MUSIC ENSEMBLE Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time, plus works inspired by it by Saariaho and Takemitsu. Meany Studio Theater, UW campus, 5434880, music.washington.edu. $10–$15. 7:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31. SPU ORCHESTRA Plus the SPU String Quartet and Brass Choir. First Free Methodist Church, 3200 Third Ave. W., spu.edu. Free. 2 p.m. Sat., Feb. 1.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

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FEBRUARY 6-9 CORNISH PLAYHOUSE AT SEATTLE CENTER TICKETS: SeattleWomensChorus.org

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THE LITTLE DOG LAUGHED Douglas Carter Beane’s

• BYRON SCHENKMAN & INGRID MATTHEWS

This keyboardist and violinist team up for music by Frescobaldi, Scarlatti, and others. Cornish College/ PONCHO Concert Hall, 710 E. Roy St., cornish.edu. $10–$20. 7 p.m. Sun., Feb. 2. JOSEPH ADAM Organ works by Bach, Liszt, and others. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattle symphony.org. $19. 7:30 p.m. Mon., Feb. 3. CANONICI: CONSORT OF VOICES Secular vocal works from renaissance Europe and colonial America. Trinity Episcopal Church, 609 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusic guild.org. $10–$25. 7:30 p.m. Tues., Feb. 4. BELA FLECK & BROOKLYN RIDER SEE SEVEN NIGHTS, PAGE 36. JOSHUA BELL The popular violinist plays Bach, Stravinsky, and more. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $41 and up. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 5.

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RUNS FRI., JAN. 31–THURS., FEB. 6 AT SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN. NOT RATED. 180 MINUTES.

Based on a French crime novel and previously broadcast on TV, this muddled, meandering, pan-European thriller contains loads of familiar elements. We’ve got a confused young hero, Jonathan (Harry Treadaway), who stumbles into a criminal underworld. There are diamond smugglers, illegal heart transplants, South African hit men, a sexy and lethal Israeli soldier babe (Perdita Weeks), not one but two mad scientists, and some sort of Manchurian Candidate–style mind-control scheme going on. The MacGuffin that Jonathan is following is the migration path of storks from Switzerland to Bulgaria, then from Israel to central Africa. His bird-tracking mission was originally meant to help his rich ornithologist mentor, dead at journey’s start but seen in repeated flashbacks. And as he tracks the storks, Jonathan is being tracked by a shady Swiss cop (Clemens Schick), his mustache a malign sneer. We know that naïve Jonathan’s parentage is going to be problematic when he explains to the cop that he’s been orphaned twice: first losing his English birth parents in the Congo, then losing his Swiss adoptive parents more recently. What he’s vague about is the role of ornithologist Max (Danny Keogh), a kind of surrogate father/shrink/Svengali figure to this rootless, nervous young man. Jonathan is not, jumping ahead a bit, really Jonathan; but neither is he some sort of amnesiac Bourne killer with a briefcase full of black-ops skills. He’s more like a fragile escaped mental patient in search of treatment; animal tranquilizers (!) frequently trigger hallucinations and flashbacks that both illuminate and complicate Jonathan’s quest. Treadaway sometimes suggests a younger, scruffier James McAvoy, and this film’s trippier sequences also made me think of Danny Boyle’s recent Trance—a much more compact and effective head-case thriller. Here, director Jan Kounen often seems to be borrowing from the Trainspotting/The Beach playbook, with Storks’ grotty absinthe bars and fetish clubs, but maybe that’s preferable to the sleek,

generic Euro action flicks of today. Storks ends in a flurry of Gothic nonsense—Mary Shelley meets Joseph Conrad in the jungle—that will leave you as bewildered as poor Jonathan. “Who are you?” he’s asked. “That’s what I’m trying to find out,” he replies. Viewers may not share his patience. BRIAN MILLER

PJobriath A.D. RUNS FRI., JAN. 31–THURS., FEB. 6 AT GRAND ILLUSION. NOT RATED. 102 MINUTES.

In 1974, Jobriath performed at the Paris Opéra standing atop a 40-foot penis structure while dressed as King Kong. In the press leading up to the event, Jobriath said, “The outcome will be that, as I descend into the penis, I’ll turn into a Marlene Dietrich look-alike.” Despite that, you’ve probably never heard of Jobriath—once billed as the “David Bowie of America” and “the true fairy of rock” by his sleazy manager and hypeman, Jerry Brandt. One of the first openly gay rock musicians back in the ’70s, and an inspiration to gay artists today like Jake Shears of Scissor Sisters, Jobriath was a massive failure, a textbook example of a record label dumping massive amounts of money into an artist who completely flopped. Directed by Kieran Turner, this documentary details the rise and rapid descent of this forgotten figure; in so doing, Jobriath A.D. also sheds light on an unexplored part of gay history. In the glam-rock era, when mainstream rockers were putting on lipstick and glitter and copping a feminine look to keep up with the trends, Jobriath was the real deal. A former stage actor who’d appeared in Hair, Jobriath talked openly about wanting people to imagine him when they thought about what “gay” meant, looked like, and sounded like. Unfortunately, his plan backfired, thanks to his manager’s insane overpromotion and the prevailing homophobia of 1970s America. Jobriath was one of the first notable musicians to succumb to AIDS, dying in obscurity in 1983. (A sad footnote: Morrissey attempted to book Jobriath as an opener for his 1992 tour, unaware the singer had passed.) Jobriath A.D. does a comprehensive job of presenting this little-known tale, splicing in enlightening interviews from his family, peers, promoters, and fans, and adding wonderfully executed animated segments. (These help bring the story to life in an appropriately overthe-top manner that Jobriath surely would’ve liked.) For fans of the ’70s or those interested in LGBT history, Jobriath A.D. tells a story you won’t likely hear anywhere else. KELTON SEARS


TICKETS AVAILABLE AT WWW.CINERAMA.COM Northern Light

12 O’Clock Boys

RUNS FRI., JAN. 31–THURS., FEB. 6 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 105 MINUTES.

RUNS FRI., JAN. 31–SUN., FEB. 2 AT SIFF FILM CENTER. NOT RATED. 76 MINUTES.

The lure of a dirt bike is strong, as I remember from boyhood. It’s an important step up from the bicycle in rural areas, a means to teenagerhood. But who would ride those smoke-belching, knobby-tired, two-stroke bikes in downtown Baltimore? The 12 O’Clock Boys are an informal family of black teens—don’t call them a gang—who parade on Sundays through the streets, helmetless and often popping wheelies. Lofty Nathan’s new doc includes TV news reports explaining how the Baltimore police have adopted a no-chase policy toward these unlicensed and often dangerous thrill-seekers. Frequently speeding and cutting across lawns and sidewalks, they’re a public nuisance in a city that has bigger problems on its plate. Yet when Nathan films them in slo-mo, you can see how irresistibly heroic they are to Pug, a 13-year-old boy whom the documentary follows for the next three years. The obvious danger here is ghetto tourism, which Nathan does not avoid. Most everyone here is poor and black, and subtitles are often necessary to understand their words. Pug’s single-mother Coco was once an exotic dancer; she has five kids, one of whom will die before the movie’s done; and her degree of control over Pug is tenuous at best. His only goal is to join the 12 O’Clock Boys, who are mentored by a middle-class-seeming guy named Steve. From his truck, he keeps tabs on the police helicopter watching his riders; he’s like a benevolent Fagin overseeing his flock. With his dreadlocks and love for animals, the charismatic Pug wants to be a veterinarian and a professional dirt-bike rider. The reports from school aren’t good, but Nathan evidently lacked access there. He follows Pug and company on various rides, interviews one reasonable-sounding cop (later accused of police brutality), and asks a few questions from behind the camera. His approach, like that of the exuberant bike riders, is hands-off; and he never digs for context—accidents, fatalities, etc.—that would help us separate YouTube hype from public safety. Are these kids any more obnoxious that those Critical Mass cyclists, more dangerous to themselves or others? “Don’t matter if I fall,” says Pug, the implication being that his life doesn’t have much value. There is the terrible sense here that this likable young fellow is right, and no documentary is ever going to change that. BRIAN MILLER E

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Trends are hard to judge in documentary filmmaking, but I’d point to the new immersive focus on ordinary lives, not newsmakers or hot-button topics. We’ve recently seen portraits of humble fishermen (Leviathan) and collegians (At Berkeley) at NWFF; now firsttime director Nick Bentgen ventures up to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to examine three working-class families bound by the sport of snowmobile racing. Northern Light is not a sports doc, however. It takes a good hour to reach the International 500, an endurance race run on an icy outdoor oval. It also takes most of that hour to figure out who’s related to whom, what their names are, and so forth. (There is no narration, only a few intertitles.) Bentgen seems drawn to his subjects’ sheer normalcy rather than any distinguishing quirks of character or geography. We watch as they hunt and pray, work on trucks and snowmobiles, and discuss the fear of an impending childbirth. (The camera later follows, at a discreet distance, into the delivery room.) Everyone smokes; most everyone is a little chubbier than the coastal ideal; and while no one talks politics, the town of Sault Ste. Marie is clearly in the red-state heartland. These people don’t “cling” to guns and God, as candidate Obama once so unfortunately mused; faith and firearms (and snowmobiles) are simply ingrained tradition. When one young dude, who knocked up his girlfriend, speaks of being fired and rehired at a better $11-per-hour job (“And I get paid weekly! ”), he sounds genuinely stoked at his good fortune. Later that girl’s father, a laconic but loving truck driver, withdraws $900 in cash for the entry fee to the I-500—top prize, $10,000. It’s like playing the lottery, but at least these men have a say in the odds. Bentgen’s approach is respectfully Wisemanesque here. He never judges or condescends to his inarticulate subjects. Yet neither does Northern Lights ever make the case that their lives are any more worthy of scrutiny than our own. Seattle Weekly writer, Amazon coder, Starbucks barista—would you watch a doc about such mundane Seattleites? I doubt residents of the UP would be so fascinated by us. BRIAN MILLER

SHOWING DAILY AT

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arts&culture» BY BRIAN MILLER

Local & Repertory • THE ACT OF KILLING Like Armenia and Rwanda,

Karen durbin

a Romance to Root FoR.”

Betsy sharkey

“rigHt up tHere WitH Reitman’S BeSt. ” lou lumenick

““Winslet and Brolin Have SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Wonderful CHemistry.

30

This gem is part coming-of-age drama and part thriller, as well as being

Swooningly Romantic.”

Indonesia belongs to that second tier of genocides outside modern European borders. During 1965–66, world attention was focused on Vietnam. The TV cameras weren’t rolling, an oversight that director Joshua Oppenheimer now corrects in the most unsettling fashion. There are no mass graves here dug up by backhoe, no old newsreel footage, no historians or interviews with the families of the bereaved. Instead, in making this Oscar-nominated documentary, Oppenheimer somehow ingratiated himself with Congo and his cohort, convincing them to make a movie that would garishly, heroically re-enact their past misdeeds. His naive yet murderous subjects frequently ask his opinion, off-camera, as if he were a sympathetic participant in the project. Outside Indonesia, they will be judged more harshly, but Oppenheimer bites his tongue on set. Instead of the banality of evil, we have the kitsch of evil. (NR) BRIAN MILLER Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema. org, $5-$8, Sun., Feb. 2, 2 p.m. CHILDREN’S FILM FESTIVAL Continuing through Sunday, this year’s feast includes 11 feature films and 14 short-film packages—ideal for short attention spans—that should serve children of a variety of ages. The schedule also offers live events, animation demos, and hands-on workshops. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 829-7863, nwfilmforum.org, $10-$12, Through Feb. 2. FATEFUL FINDINGS Returning from SIFF last year, this paranormal cult movie by Neil Breen has a writer (played by Breen) develop supernatural power and discover hidden government conspiracies. (NR) SIFF Cinema Uptown, 511 Queen Anne Ave. N., 324-9996, siff.net, Fri., Jan. 31, 10:30 p.m. THE GOLDEN AGE OF ITALIAN CINEMA I Vitelloni means “the young bulls,” but the best translation of what director Federico Fellini had in mind might be Slackers, or maybe Superannuated Brat Pack. His 1953 classic is about teenagers who won’t admit they’re pushing 30: five guys who sponge off Mama, dodge jobs, and scuffle aimlessly around their dead-end hometown (beachside Rimini, Italy), partying, joshing, punking one another, and pinching women they’d be terrified of spending more than one night with. If they manage to sprout a scraggly goatee or cadge 1,000 lire from a sister without instantly blowing it at the track, it’s a big accomplishment. Though it bears traces of the neorealist school in which Fellini apprenticed, and of the more circusy later spectacles we think of as Felliniesque, the movie is just its own scruffily lovely self: a softheartedly satiric look at the street life of society’s plucky losers, occasionally granted transcendent visions that tend to end in hangovers the next day. (NR) TIM APPELO Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $63-$68 (series), Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. Through March 13. GROUNDHOG DAY Bill Murray’s in fine form in Harold Ramis’ very funny 1993 time-warp comedy, in which the grumpy TV weatherman must overcome his bad karma to escape the worst day of his life, being played out over and over again. With Andie MacDowall. (PG-13) Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com, $6-$8, Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 7 p.m.; Sat., Feb. 1, 3 p.m.; Feb. 3-5, 7 p.m. IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE Wong Kar-wai’s lushly romantic 2000 adultery tale is set in early-’60s Hong Kong, where two strangers meet in an overcrowded boarding house. One is a married secretary (Maggie Cheung) accustomed to disguising the indiscretions of her boss. Adultery is in the air. With her form-fitting floral-patterned cheongsam dresses, Jackie O hair, and gorgeous eyes, she’s glamorous but alone (her husband generally absent on business trips). Grazing past her in the camped hallways is another tenant, a handsome journalist (Tony Leung) whose wife is forever working late. (Oddly, their respective spouses are always away at the exact same time—coincidence?) Together, they form a beautiful pair whose attachment seems all the stronger for its doomed indecision. Some may protest that nothing much happens in the film, but Mood takes place as much in the lovers’ past recollection as in their present infidelity. For Wong, love is felt more deeply in memory than in the fleeting moment. (R) B.R.M. Central Cinema, $6-$8, Jan. 31-Feb. 5, 9:30 p.m.

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StaRtS FRiday, januaRy 31 at theatReS eveRywheRe CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR THEATRES AND SHOWTIMES • SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT - NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT TICKETS ACCEPTED

Send events to film@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings = Recommended

MOTHER OF GEORGE SIFF continues its “Recent

Raves!” series with this New York-set drama about a Nigerian-American couple (Danai Gurira and Isaach De Bankolé) trying to have a child. (NR) SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff.net, $6-$11, 7 p.m. Tues., Feb. 4. SHADOWS OF LIBERTY Don’t trust the MSM! Discussion follows Jean-Philippe Tremblay’s new doc about media and censorship. (NR) Keystone Congregational Church, 5019 Keystone Place N., Seattle, 632-6021, Free, Thu., Jan. 30, 7 p.m. SILENT MOVIE MONDAYS Organist Jim Riggs will provide live accompaniment for the 1924 Peter Pan, starring Betty Bronson as the titular leader of the Lost Boys. (NR) The Paramount, 911 Pine St., Seattle, 877-784-4849, stgpresents.org, $5-$10, Mondays, 7 p.m. Through Feb. 10. THE SPROCKET SOCIETY’S SATURDAY SECRET MATINEES The 1949 serial Batman & Robin will be

screened in weekly installments. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$8 individual, $35-$56 pass, Sat., 2 p.m. A TOUCH OF ZIN SIFF continues its “Recent Raves!” series with Jia Zhangke’s dark, episodic view of modern China. He offers four linked scenarios, based on real news events, following an embittered coal miner, a rootless criminal, a lovelorn receptionist, and a teenage factory worker drifting from job to job. All are from villages being obliterated by new factories, railways, airports, and roads. Most are nomadic, finding jobs where they can and wiring money back home. They’re cogs in the machinery of China’s relentless modernization, so is it any wonder they dream? A short prologue leaves three dead and ends with a fiery explosion— more like a Western action movie than Jia’s prior realism (The World, Still Life, 24 City). Later in the film, bus passengers will watch such a violent Hollywood flick; these are the scenes, Jia suggests, that are displacing the old peasant songs, national mythology, and Chinese opera. (NR) B.R.M. SIFF Film Center (Seattle Center), 324-9996, siff.net, $6-$11, 7 p.m. Mon., Feb. 3. 24 EXPOSURES From Joe Swanberg (Drinking Buddies, Hannah Takes the Stairs), this new drama takes a nod back to European art-house and softcore movies of the 1960s, with murder and fetish models in the mix. (NR) Grand Illusion, $5-$8, Jan. 31-Feb. 2, 9 p.m.; Thu., Feb. 6, 9 p.m. 2014 OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORT FILMS SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 24.

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Ongoing

• AMERICAN HUSTLE The latest concoction from

David O. Russell is full of big roundhouse swings and juicy performances: It’s a fictionalized take on the Abscam scandal of the late 1970s, in which the FBI teamed with a second-rate con man (here called Irving Rosenfeld, played by Christian Bale) in a wacko sting operation involving a bogus Arab sheik and bribes to U.S. congressmen. Along with the FBI coercing him into its scheme, Irving is caught between his hottie moll Sydney (Amy Adams) and neglected wife Rosalyn (Jennifer Lawrence). Even more complicated for Irving is that one of the targets of the undercover operation, a genially corrupt yet idealistic Jersey politico (Jeremy Renner), turns out to be a soulmate. Equally unhappy is the presiding FBI agent (Bradley Cooper, his permed hair and his sexual urge equally curled in maddening knots), who’s developed a crush on Sydney that is driving him insane. Russell encourages his actors to go for it, and man, do they go for it. (R) ROBERT HORTON Ark Lodge, Big Picture, Cinebarre, Factoria, iPic Theaters, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Pacific Place, SIFF Cinema Uptown, Sundance, Thornton Place, others DALLAS BUYERS CLUB Making a straight white Texas homophobe the hero of a film about the ’80s AIDS crisis doesn’t seem right. It’s inappropriate, exceptional, possibly even crass. All those qualities are reflected in Matthew McConaughey’s ornery, emaciated portrayal of Ron Woodroof, a rodeo rider and rough liver who contracted HIV in 1985. Fond of strippers, regularly swigging from his pocket flask, doing lines of coke when he can afford them, betting on the bulls he rides, Ron has tons of Texas-sized character. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, the unruly Dallas Buyers Club goes easy on the sinner-to-saint conversion story. McConaughey and the filmmakers know that once Ron gets religion, their tale risks tedium. As Ron desperately bribes and steals a path to off-label meds, his allies and adversaries do read like fictional composites (played by Griffin Dunne, Jennifer Garner, Denis O’Hare, and Steve Zahn). Best among them is the transvestite Rayon, who becomes Ron’s right-hand woman (Jared Leto). They’re both fellow gamblers who delight in beating the house. (R) B.R.M. Sundance, Lincoln Square, Meridian, Ark Lodge, others

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ocks. Ugh. The mortal enemies of nerds since time immemorial. They pick on us and mock our love of sci-fi. They pull us from our fantasy worlds with noogies. They are bullies. And all those who associate with them—including the sports fan—must be evil too, right? But as I’ve BY TERRA CLARKE OLSEN slowly become a Seahawks fan, I’ve come to learn that the line between jock and nerd, and the supposed strife between the two, is more complicated than Revenge of the Nerds would have us believe. During the Hawks’ march to the Super Bowl, comic-book nerds, sci-fi geeks, and gaming gurus have all come out of the woodwork declaring their love for football and the Hawks. The excitement is intense; as longtime fan Susie Rantz—a sci-fi/ fantasy geek and my colleague at GeekGirlCon— notes, Seattle is tired of being underestimated and waiting our turn, and “We’re celebrating each win together, the 12th man and the team.” Cole Lundell—video-game enthusiast, comicbook fan, and another GeekGirlCon colleague— points out that the city’s frenzy has united it and thawed the infamous “Seattle freeze”; you can talk to anyone on the street wearing Hawks gear and get a “genuine response,” which is “pretty awesome in a city where most people avoid talking to each other.” Dan Tharp, Hawks fan and customer-experience manager at Card Kingdom and Cafe Mox, remembers many customers asking that a game be turned on so they could watch while gaming (Cafe Mox no longer has TVs). Yup, these geeks are just as nerdy about football as the next fan. Though as I talked to a few of these fans to learn more about their love of the game, I uncovered something else—the truth behind jocks, sports fans, and geeks. Turns out we are the bullies. Every single person I talked to said that at one point or another, a fellow geek had teased him or her for being into football. Curtis Chandler—Star Wars fan, comic-book collector, ex-football player, and host of the podcast Clinically Inane—recalls wearing an old football jersey to a con and getting accused of being a “fake geek.” Rantz and Lundell have similar stories: Geeks make fun of them for loving sports, while sports fans are either indifferent or share their nerdy interests. But the two worlds mesh so well, especially in Seattle. Rantz points out that our city has some of “the most active fans on social media” as well as local “data geeks who break down” the stats, reflecting Seattle’s techie influence. The Seahawks even have their own edition of the Hulk, known as the Seahulk. And did you know that Sherman is not only the best cornerback in the league, but a huge Harry Potter nerd and video-game junkie? Yeah, just let that sink in. And to top it off, Seahawks owner Paul Allen is the model of a nerdy hybrid—sure, he loves computers, technology, and a million other geeky things, but he’s also a huge sports fan (who also owns the Portland Trailblazers). And really, if it’s good enough for super-nerd Paul Allen, I’m thinking it’s good enough for the geeks. E

JAN ��–FEB � SEAT TLE

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

stranded in orbit, menaced by regular bombardments of space debris. Their dilemma is established in an astonishing 12-minute opening sequence, seamlessly rendered via CGI by director Alfonso Cuarón. (Here let’s note that the 3-D version is essential.) Dr. Stone (Bullock) at first can’t get her bearings; and the rest of the film consists of her navigating from one problem to the next. For all its technical marvels and breathtaking panoramas reflected in Stone’s visor, Gravity is both space-age and hugely traditional, though with a modern, self-aware heroine. (PG-13) B.R.M. Sundance, Oak Tree, Lincoln Square HER Spike Jonze’s unlikely romance is set in a smooth, efficient near-future Los Angeles. There are no poor people, no upsetting stories on the news. Technology works perfectly. Everyone ought to be happy, and that’s the problem for mopey Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix). Gradually it emerges that he’ separated from his wife (Rooney Mara), but won’t sign the divorce papers. Impulsively deciding to upgrade his phone and home PC, Theodore opts for the new OS1 ( “It’s not just an operating system, it’s a consciousness”). He chooses a female voice (Scarlett Johansson’s) called Samantha, which soon takes over his life. Before long they’re going on dates together—and more. When Theodore finally spills his secret, his friend Amy (Amy Adams) treats it like no big news. In this ingenious and unexpectedly touching story, both humans and programs worry about being alone. And both yearn to connect across the digital divide between sentience and software. (R) B.R.M. Sundance, Kirkland Parkplace, Harvard Exit, Lincoln Square, Majestic Bay, Cinebarre, others INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS While there are funny bits in this simple story of a struggling folk musician in 1961 Greenwich Village, very loosely inspired by Dave Van Ronk’s memoir The Mayor of MacDougal Street, the situation for Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) is fairly dire. He has no money, no apartment, and no real prospects in the music industry—apart from an album that isn’t selling. He’s the wrong guy at the right moment, as the movie’s poignant final scenes make clear. The Coen brothers aren’t really making a comedy here, and you should temper your expectations to appreciate the movie’s minor-key rewards. Isaac can really sing and play guitar; the sterling soundtrack, by T Bone Burnett, is built around live music performances; and the catchiest tune is a knowingly cornball novelty song. As a man, Llewyn is a self-described asshole offstage; he’s only at his best onstage. If music can’t save him or provide a career, it’s also his only succor against life’s crushing disappointments. (R) B.R.M. Oak Tree, Sundance, others THE SQUARE Jehane Noujaim’s documentary is both timely and behind the current news cycle. And that’s not to fault the Egyptian-American filmmaker’s brave, total, immersive commitment in a fluid and sometimes dangerous situation. She spent over two years following the protests and battles at Tahrir Square, which erupted in January 2011. No one, including her, had any idea where events would lead. Her perspective is mostly ground-level, following a half-dozen charismatic revolutionaries, some of whom speak English. The initial euphoria eventually runs into a brick wall called the Muslim Brotherhood. The Square’s granular approach makes it a very partisan doc. Noujaim is on the side of the revolutionaries—who wouldn’t be?—without ever trying to summon a thesis from all the exhilarating, power-to-the-people process of revolution. To be fair, that may be impossible. Her film is an invaluable chronicle of an historic moment. (NR) B.R.M. Sundance 12 YEARS A SLAVE Made by English director Steve McQueen, this harrowing historical drama is based on a memoir by Solomon Northup (here played by Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free man from Saratoga, New York, who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in 1841. Solomon passes through the possession of a series of Southern plantation owners. One sensitive slave owner (Benedict Cumberbatch) gives Solomon—a musician by trade—a fiddle. Then he’s sold to the cruel cotton farmer Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender), who also owns the furiously hard-working Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o). Patsey, like Solomon, is caught inside the terror of not knowing how to play this hand. Do they keep their heads down and try to survive, or do they resist? Instead of taking on the history of the “peculiar institution,” the film narrows itself to Solomon’s daily routine, his few possessions. The film’s and-then-thishappened quality is appropriate for a memoir written in the stunned aftermath of a nightmare. Along the way, McQueen includes idyllic nature shots, as though to contrast that unspoiled world with what men have done in it. The contrast is lacerating. (R) R.H. Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Meridian, Varsity, others

31


NTw.RlitYtlereMdhUenS.coICm LIVE COUww dinner & show

mainstage

THURS JANUARY 30TH

JUKEHOUSE HOUNDS 9PM - $3 COVER

FRI JANUARY 31ST & SAT FEBRUARY 1ST

THU/JANUARY 30 • 7:30PM

zach fleury

w/ stephanie anne johnson & nathan reed

TONY BRIDGES BAND 9PM - $5 COVER

SUN FEBRUARY 2ND

SHADRACK

9PM - $3 COVER NO OPEN MIC

FRI/JANUARY 31 • 7PM - DAVID LEONG PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

the year of the horse - a cultural

celebration of the chinese new year 2014 SAT/FEBRUARY 1 • 8PM

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32

the dusty 45s w/ the believers

happy hour every day • 1/29 brad gibson group • 1/30 sam marshall trio • 1/31 supersones / charles mack • 2/1 jelly rollers • 2/2 seahawks vs. broncos • 2/3 closed foraprivateevent•2/4singer-songwritershowcasefeaturing:gregory rawlins, justin farren and tight pants slow dance • 2/5 the winterlings TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1 HOUR PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

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109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

ACIDIC with Dig The Kid, The Thrill, The Visiting Project and Struck Red Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM All Ages/Bar W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31

next • 2/8 suzanne westenhoefer w/ alicia healey • 2/9 lisa koch birthday bash • 2/10 duncan sheik • 2/12 - 2/15 the atomic bombshells :: j’adore! a burlesque valentine • 2/16 the presidents of the united states of america (acoustic) • 2/17 an evening with greg laswell • 2/18 & 2/19 sweet honey in the rock • 2/20 hot tuna (acoustic) w/ david lindley • 2/21 tony furtado w/ lydia ramsey • 2/23 david wilcox • 2/24 jon mclaughlin • 2/26 throwing muses • 2/27 mason jennings (solo) w/ rebecca pidgeon

2222 2ND AVENUE • SEATTLE

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FRI/FEBRUARY 7 • 7PM - 6TH ANNUAL GIMME SHELTER

COCKTAILS • TASTY HOT DOGS • LOTSA PINBALL

DAVID ALLAN COE with Redneck Girlfriend, The Shivering Denizens and Jack Rabbit Starts Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM 21+. $17 ADV / $20 DOS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 El Corazon & Mike Thrasher Present:

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3

KID SLIM with The Specktators, PropaneLV, Jassiel Macias, Adam Nystrom and McAvery. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

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BLACK TOP DEMON plus guests

Lounge Show. Doors at 8 / Show at 8:30PM 21+. $6 ADV / $8 DOS

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ULTRA BIDE’

RAVEN ZOE plus guests

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6

with MTNS and Two Heads Is Twice As Many Teeth Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM 21+. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

STILL THE SKY’S LIMIT with My Cartoon Heart, plus guests Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM All Ages/Bar W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM All Ages/Bar W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

Mike Thrasher Presents:

THE MENZINGERS

with Off With Their Heads and Broadway Calls Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $13 ADV / $15 DOS

JUST ANNOUNCED 3/6 LOUNGE THE HOTELIER 3/24 EAST OF THE WALL / DIAMOND PLATE 4/2 LOUNGE FROM INDIAN LAKES 4/3 GREEN JELLY 4/21 LOUNGE PEELANDER-Z 6/4 LOUNGE TWO COW GARAGE UP & COMING 2/6 LOUNGE NEO GEO 2/7 LOUNGE ICARUS THE OWL 2/8 SUPER

GEEK LEAGUE 2/9 MICHAEL SCHENKER 2/10 BREATHE CAROLINA 2/11 FALLING IN REVERSE - SOLD OUT! 2/12 LOUNGE MICHAEL DEAN DAMRON 2/13 REHAB 2/14 ABIGAIL WILLIAMS 2/15 LOUNGE THE EPILOGUES / NIGHT RIOTS 2/16 LOUNGE BOATS! 2/17 ARLISS NANCY 2/17 LOUNGE TIME AND DISTANCE 2/18 DARK TRANQUILITY 2/19 LYNCH MOB 2/20 LAWRENCE ARMS 2/22 PENTAGRAM 2/22 LOUNGE MAJOR LEAGUE

Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com


arts&culture» Music

With Friends Like These

Truckin’ With the Tractor

The drunken, pizza-filled story of Help Yourself Records, the promising upstart label capturing the city’s most vibrant scene. Jacob Muilenberg, Matt Kolhede, Sam Mouser, and Kim Roberts show off their label’s wares.

KELTON SEARS

I

Belt’s HY002 ended up beating as the label’s first release). Kolhede and Mouser wanted to roll out at least a few more bands on the label to start with. Still students at the time, the duo hosted a UW radio show, Monday Night Pizza Party, on which they would order Domino’s and ask bands to perform in studio. One night Kolhede and Mouser invited their favorite Seattle band, punk trio Wimps, on the air. Bassist Matt Nyce proceeded to eat six slices of pizza. “Wimps are great because their tunes are short, simple, and have a sense of humor,” Mouser says. “Those pretty much became the core tenants of our label,” Kim Roberts, the label’s 23-year-old financial manager, chimes in. At a house show, Kolhede and Mouser drunkenly pitched their then-nonexistent label to Nyce. Wimps had already signed over their debut LP to End of Time Records, but said they would consider a 7-inch if the HY crew could convince them. “We asked them to send us a PowerPoint presentation about what they would do if we joined the label,” says Wimps’ frontwoman Rachel Ratner. “They Facebooked one to us that had charts with buzzwords like ‘SYNERGY’ and lots of clip art—so we knew they were the label for us.” Wimps and HY agreed that they would figure out who got digital distribution rights in the record contract through a two-on-two basketball game at now-defunct punk venue The Funhouse. Wimps won, and it was decided that all the bands on the label would be given complete digital rights to their music; HY operates under the principle that since they only press the records, they should take portions of physical sales only. It should be noted that everyone at HY works a job on the side, and that, thanks to Roberts’ financial work, the label operates just above the red line. “She keeps us from going over the edge,” Mouser says. Part of the reason Help Yourself Records seems

so vibrant is that it’s grown from the social network at the core of Seattle’s most exciting young scene. “A lot of these bands . . . are sort of casually formed out of extensions of friendships,” says Wimps drummer Dave Ramm—who was once

As goofy as the Help Yourself crew may seem on the outside, their success isn’t just happenstance. Kolhede, Mouser, Roberts, and Jacob Muilenburg (the final member of the HY team, in charge of art and aesthetic direction) gather every Monday at Linda’s Tavern for weekly “bidness meetings.” Roberts lays out the label’s finances, Kolhede and Mouser present potential promotional and media-outreach strategies, and everyone combs their list of contacts from past internships at labels and radio stations to seek help and mentorship when they need it. “We’ve gotten so much help from other labels in Seattle,” says Mouser. “We ship all the records out ourselves from my parents’ house in Poulsbo, but Light in the Attic has helped us do distro before.” “Sub Pop have been hella mentors too,” Roberts jumps in. “We want the label to be DIY but we also want it to be stable, and they’ve helped us so much by letting us pick their brain.” But even the world’s most organized label wouldn’t survive without good music. Help Yourself succeeds by taking a complete snapshot of a new, thriving Seattle scene. “We all hang out in this scene,” Ratner says. “We all come from this sort of similar life outlook in our music—you know, life’s shitty but it’s OK, things suck but they’re also funny. We aren’t trying to say ‘Nobody understands our pain or my artistic vision!’ It’s more like ‘No, everyone understands things are shitty sometimes.’ All these bands are sort of saying that same thing in their own way. It’s just all of us having fun.” E

ksears@seattleweekly.com

The Maldives

T

he Maldives’ tenacious, aggressive country sound seems tailor-made for the Tractor Tavern. So it’s fitting that playing there was a benchmark for the band, as Maldives frontman Jason Dodson claims. Dodson’s affinity for the venue goes back to 1997, when he saw renowned singer/songwriter Vic Chesnutt, who was paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair, play there. “They wheeled [Chesnutt] in through the audience, and I was awestruck,” Dodson says. “I had never been to a club or seen a show where I was that close to one of my heroes. And I realized that someday I could be up on that stage too.” Since the Maldives formed in 2005, the band has played the Tractor so many times, Dodson says, that they all blur together. And he’s seen his fair share of absurdity at the Ballard mainstay: “Fistfights on the floor, some flattering graffiti in the bathroom, drunken make-outs on the stage monitors, general sweaty debauchery, silly inappropriate hippie dancing, and sold-out singa-longs,” he says. “But that’s nothing to compare with what happens backstage. Oh, brother.” This weekend Dodson and his band will honor all the insanity both on- and offstage when they kick off the venue’s 20th anniversary. “It is just as much old Ballard as Hattie’s Hat. And there isn’t much old Ballard left. To celebrate the Tractor is to celebrate history,” Dodson says. “Many bands got their foothold in the Seattle music scene there. It is a small club that produces and attracts national acts. That’s saying something too.” Alongside its “kick-ass sound system,” Dodson says, the Tractor feels comfortable, comparing it to a cabin. While many venues try to manufacture Americana, he says, the Tractor’s feeling and aesthetic aren’t “put on”: “The Tractor has earned its leather. Those boots have been hanging from the ceiling for all 20 years.” The tavern’s legacy lives on. Just as Chesnutt’s performance inspired Dodson that he could someday play that stage, he hopes the same for future artists. “Hopefully, the Tractor will continue to inspire bands to get out of the basement or the garage or whatever, and get up on that stage to show us what they’ve got.” E

music@seattleweekly.com

THE MALDIVES Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. $15. 9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 31.

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

ask Matt Kolhede, the 22-year-old cofounder of Seattle’s Help Yourself Records, if he was surprised when his label’s first release, Chastity Belt’s No Regerts, sold out its 500-copy run in three months. “Funny story,” he says. “I actually cleaned my room the other day and found 12 more copies, so I guess we’re not sold out anymore.” Kolhede also informs me that although No Regerts was HY’s first release, it’s catalogued as HY002 thanks to a screwup at the vinyl factory. As charmingly shambolic as Help Yourself Records is, the four recent grads who run the label are garnering the most national press for local music, aside from Macklemore. Unlike the earnest rapper, they are doing it by releasing an onslaught of funny, slackadaisical punk music from Seattle about menopause, cheeseburgers, and taking horse pills. Yet while the HY crew may subsist mostly on pizza and beer, they are anything but slackers. This month, the label has released three records—Childbirth’s It’s a Girl, Wimps’ Party at the Wrong Time, and Dude York’s Dehumanize—all of which have already landed on multiple national media outlets including Spin, Pitchfork, and Stereogum. More important, they are all really good records. And No Regerts has set an impresive highwater mark for the label, becoming an international success, gaining plays on BBC radio, and winning over the British post-punk godfathers in Wire, who asked Chastity Belt to join them on a recent West Coast tour. For a city that can sometimes get stuck on its bloated musical legacies, HY is bringing Seattle back to the core of what’s important about music. It’s built into the label’s drunken origins. Finding themselves inebriated “somewhere” in Ballard in 2012, Kolhede, 22, and his friend Sam Mouser, 23, agreed that starting a label “would be awesome.” Some time after they sobered up, the two music-industry neophytes started looking for music to put out. Kolhede’s own shambling party band, Ubu Roi, was a given (the band’s Nice Dude EP was the delayed HY001 that Chastity

Kim Roberts’ manager at the U District Barnes & Noble. When Mouser was 16, Ratner was his internship coordinator at KEXP; and Ratner often goes out for bingo nights with members of Chastity Belt and Childbirth. Chastity Belt and Dude York, who jointly spearheaded the music scene at Whitman College before both bands moved to Seattle, were also swept up in Help Yourself thanks to this friendliness. “We got to know the Help Youself guys after they started going to our shows more, and we’d started hanging out,” says Chastity Belt and Childbirth frontwoman Julia Shapiro. “When they asked us to be on their label, we were like, ‘Oh, these are just normal people, they are our friends, we don’t have to go through any weird, businessy label stuff with these guys.’ ” Dude York shares a similar story. The band had agreed to sign to an independent British label, but were quickly disheartened by a series of impersonal messages, dead ends, and what they say were shady dealings on the label’s part that threw its record’s fate up in the air. “The Help Yourself people were the exact opposite,” says Dude York frontman Peter Richards. “They were really personal and came to a bunch of our shows before signing us. I appreciate that they really tried to get what Dude York was about and what it meant before they signed us.” Drummer Andrew Hall nods in agreement. “I feel like I can truthfully say they are the most honest music-business people I’ve ever dealt with.”

HAYLEY YOUNG

BY DUSTY HENRY

BY KELTON SEARS

33


arts&culture» Music

SevenNights

1303 NE 45TH ST

E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

Wednesday, Jan. 29 Listening to 2009’s Lonely Woman Blues, it’s apparent that vocalist/guitarist BETSY OLSON, who is joined by Sera Cahoone on drums, has had it up to here with whomever each song is about. Her bluesy voice is often frustrated and emotional with a touch of grit, and she sings with a determined spirit that vows to prove wrong everyone who has ever doubted her. With Shakey Blankets, Lonely Mountain Lovers. Tractor Tavern, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern. com. 8 p.m. $8. 21 and over. AZARIA PODPLESKY

Thursday, Jan. 30

A name like CHRISTA SAYS YAY might lead you to believe this band flexes its musical prowess in the fun-loving pop realm. But soulful and stalwart songstress Christa Kae belts out the blues with a raw intensity that ought to resonate with anyone who’s ever experienced burning desire or tasted a new lover and felt the excitement and awe of it. With Blackheart Honeymoon, The Bend. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009, columbiacitytheater.com.  8 p.m. $6 adv./$8 door. 21 and over. JESSIE MCKENNA CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED In 1995, the rhythm section of drummer Doug “Cosmo” Clifford and bassist Stu Cook from the former Revival got back together with some fill-ins to tour the world playing classic CCR tunes. Though they may be without a Fogerty, the river keeps rolling on. Snoqualmie Casino, 37500 S.E. North Bend Way, Snoqualmie, 425-888-1234, snocasino.com. 7 p.m. $40.55. CORBIN REIFF A NIGHT OF UNCLE TUPELO VS. THE JAYHAWKS

2033 6th Avenue (206) 441-9729 jazzalley.com

The world seemed a little simpler in the ’90s, back when Jeff Tweedy and Jay Farrar actually liked each other and the Jayhawks’ Mark Olson had yet to strike out on his own away from the pop influence of Gary Louris. This benefit for Musicares, supported by some of Seattle’s rockingest alt-country acts, takes its cues

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

34

The Pack A.D.

BILL FRISELL’S GUITAR IN THE SPACE AGE FEATURING GREG LEISZ, TONY SCHERR & KENNY WOLLESEN THURS, JAN 30 - SUN, FEB 2 ANA POPOVIC TUES, FEB 4 - WED, FEB 5

The 4x Blues Music Awards nominee blends smoking electric fund slide guitar, jazzy instruments and tight blues groove with soulful feminine vocals.

TOWER OF POWER THURS, FEB 6 - SUN, FEB 9

World renowned horn-driven American soulful funk

JOHN ABERCROMBIE ALL-STAR BAND TUES, FEB 11 - WED, FEB 12 American jazz guitarist steeped in jazz fusion and post bop

MINDI ABAIR THURS, FEB 13 - SUN, FEB 16

Chart-topping contemporary sax sensation. “Mindi Abair is #1 for her original sound, perfect melodies, grooves and overall sense of fun.” - Jazziz Magazine

all ages | free parking full schedule at jazzalley.com

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

JAZZ ALLEY IS A SUPPER CLUB

from those bands’ respective collaborative periods— proving the sweetest music results when friends come together for a good cause (or just good fun). Hosted by Don Slack. With Barb Hunter, Cooper Smith, Evening Bell, Gavin Guss, In Cahoots, Low Hums, Massy Ferguson, Radio Nationals, Red Jacket Mine, Star Anna, Starkey & the Detasselers, the Swearengens. Tractor Tavern. 8 p.m. $10. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT

Friday, Jan. 31

THE PACK A.D. Except for surprisingly soft album-

closer “Needles,” Do Not Engage features all the fuzzy garage rock listeners have come to know and love from Vancouver-based duo The Pack A.D. The pair’s fifth album, a follow-up to 2011’s Unpersons, finds drummer Maya Miller and singer/guitarist Becky Black as brash and in-your-face as ever, with Black adding even more venom to each snarled lyric. With the Dee Dees. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, thebarboza. com. 7 p.m. $10. 21 and over. AP Alexandra Niedzialkowski’s project CUMULUS is an adrenaline shot of guitar rock. Hooks buzz with overdriven distortion and poppy bliss throughout the group’s debut album I Never Meant It to Be Like This. While staying away from straightforward punk, Niedzialkowski is more than adept at giving melodic indie rock a much-needed rugged edge. With Dresses, Tomten, the Hoot Hoots. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. $10 adv./$13 DOS. 8 p.m. 21 and over. DUSTY HENRY Led by vocalist/guitarist Jake Hemming, BIG SUR has built a solid reputation for its soaring melodies and tendency to perform folk songs that are both incredibly sad and undeniably beautiful. The Seattle folk sweethearts will continue that tradition here, with the help of some friends. With Brite Lines, Ruler. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., 722-3009. 9 p.m. $8 adv./$10 DOS/21 and over. KEEGAN PROSSER For this edition of the Starbucks’ Little Big Show, singer/songwriter and producer Ernest Greene, aka WASHED OUT, brings his dreamy and chilling brand of pillow talk-worthy electro-pop to a familiar stage. The last time he played the Neptune, the college kids and lovestruck hipsters couldn’t help but sway. With Kingdom Crumbs and Kisses. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414. 9 p.m. $15. All ages/bar with ID. KP JUDY COLLINS WITH THE PASSENGER STRING QUARTET As a child, Judy Collins showed great

promise as a concert pianist. She began piano lessons at age 5 after her family moved from Seattle


Zappa Plays Zappa Thursday, Jan. 30

I

to Los Angeles. In her teens, she fell under the spell of folk music, and rose to fame through her interpretations of other peoples’ music. Over her 50-year career, Collins, now 74, has ventured into showtunes and cabaret, and has often featured classical arrangements, as in her most recent studio release, 2011’s Bohemian. The Passenger String Quartet, accompanying Collins on this four-concert swing, grew out of the Seattle Rock Orchestra and recently stepped into the national spotlight accompanying Mary Lambert on The Tonight Show. Pantages Theatre, Broadway Center for the Performing Arts, 901 Broadway, Tacoma, 253-591-5894, broadway center.org. 7:30 p.m. $28–$64. MICHAEL F. BERRY In many ways, ETERNAL FAIR is the ideal classic-rock group. Though the Seattle group formed in 2010, the lineup has a ’70s flair with its prog-rock sensibilities. The band is tight and polished right down to Andrew Vait’s smooth and pristine vocals, at times channeling Roger Waters. With Animal Eyes, the Magic Mirrors. Sunset Tavern 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. $8. 10 p.m. 21 and over. DH ULTRA BIDÉ Dokkiri Record, a compilation record from 1980, is commonly regarded as the very first Japanese punk album. Dokkiri, translated as “heart pounding,” led off with none other than Ultra Bidé, a band that went on to release its 1995 album God Is God, Puke Is Puke through Jello Biafra’s Alternative Tentacles label. Thirty-four years after that first compilation, the band just put out a new album, DNA vs DNA-C, and is bringing its Japunk to our unsuspecting shores. With Two Heads Is Twice as Many Teeth, MTNS. El Corazón, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 3813094, elcorazon.com. $10 adv./$12 DOS. 21 and over. KELTON SEARS THE BLUE TRACKS This Seattle-based five-piece “roadhouse-blues-rock” band is either way ahead of itself or behind the times—in the most delightful way! The Blue Tracks combine traditional blues rock with modern influences (like the White Stripes) to create a killer original sound. Kelsey Alina’s pipes take center stage; behind her are a ripping blues guitar, a solid rhythm section, and additional female vocals that give a charming hat tip to Motown. With GreenhornBluehorn, Friendly Gomez. Conor Byrne Pub, 5140 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-3640, conorbyrnepub.com. 9 p.m. $9. 21 and over. JESSIE MCKENNA

PHOTO BY  BJÖRN SÖDERQVIST 

don’t care if you call us a tribute band,” Dweezil Zappa, son of Frank Zappa, says in a promotional video for his latest tour. “I’m paying tribute to my father in the truest sense of the word. I really respect his music and I feel like it deserves to be honored.” The tour hit the road for the first time in 2006, and Frank’s second-born has gone back out every few years since. The latest trek celebrates Roxy and Elsewhere, the 1974 live album by Frank Zappa and the Mothers that Rolling Stone said is “about as close to a traditional musical form as the Mothers are ever likely to come”—though that still doesn’t land the band anywhere near the mainstream. Blending jazz and rock with whatever else inspired him, Zappa was an eccentric musical genius. He released more than 60 albums before he passed away from cancer in 1993, and his relationship with his audience defines the term “cult following.”

Adored by musicians more than by casual rock fans, there’s no denying he was a true original. And who better to carry his torch than Dweezil, who got his first guitar at 6 and has become a virtuoso in his own right. You’d have to be to tackle the Zappa catalog. Other artists have been similarly inspired: Natalie Cole sold seven million copies of Unforgettable, which paid tribute to songs her father Nat King Cole made famous; Roseanne Cash’s Dweezil Zappa 2009 album The List comprised some of her father Johnny’s favorite tunes; and Rufus Wainwright included a cover of his dad Loudon Wainwright III’s “One Man Guy” on his 2001 album Poses. Dweezil hasn’t had the same commercial success as these artists, but neither did his father. For those hoping to get the full-on Zappa treatment and are willing to shell out nearly $200: A ticket to the show will run you $40, access to sound check plus a tour poster another $65, and a preshow guitar masterclass from Dweezil runs an additional $75. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents. org. 8 p.m. $40. All ages. DAVE LAKE

Saturday, Feb. 1 CHASTITY BELT wears its duality well. While the band’s

guitars shimmer with a strong indie-rock footing, leader Julia Shapiro sings brash punk lyrics in a slow and sultry voice. Her wit inspires endlessly quotable lyrics: “I’m so drunk I just want some chips and dip” and “So turn off the lights and take off your pants, just dance.” With Wishbear, Mega Bog. Columbia City Theater. $7 adv./$8 DOS. 9 p.m. 21 and over. DH The newest project from Minus the Bear’s Alex Rose, NGHTBLND is about as far away from that popular band as you can get; Rose trades his keyboard for meaty beats, sharp synths, and husky vocal delivery. The result is exciting in the same way STRFKR is: fuzzy, inspiring, and unexpectedly vibey. With Slow Bird, Piano Piano. Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 4414618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $15 adv. All ages/bar with ID. KP SIR MIX-A-LOT In the past year, Macklemore and the Seahawks have brought about another Seattle moment in America—just as, a generation earlier, Sir Mix-a-Lot (plus a few other local luminaries) helped put Seattle on the map with his now-classic ode to voluptuous women. While he hasn’t been nearly as active on the national scene, the 50-yearold hip-hop legend has kept up his local profile: He opened for Macklemore and Ryan Lewis at KeyArena in December, produced Ayron Jones and the Way’s debut album, and performed the Washington State Lottery’s holiday jingle. Sir Mixa-Lot’s sold-out Tacoma show goes down the night before the Seahawks play in the SuperBowl. He told The Denver Post that since he stopped watching the games live and started recording them to watch later, the Seahawks have been on a winning streak. It’s only weird if it doesn’t work, right? With the Staxx Brothers, MC S.A.V., and Mr. Von. Jazzbones, 2803 Sixth Ave., Tacoma, 253-396-9169, jazzbones.com. 8 p.m. $15 SOLD OUT. 21 and over. MFB MARY LAMBERT is the definition of a triple threat. A talented writer, last year she released a book of poetry, 500 Tips for Fat Girls, which she describes as “a collection of poetry surrounding body image, rape, and relationships.” An accomplished spokenword artist, she won Seattle’s Grand Slam Poetry


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arts&culture» Music Competition in 2011. But perhaps most notable, the Cornish grad is a musician. Her soulful voice is instantly recognizable thanks to her contribution to Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ “Same Love,” and the emotion with which she sings her incredibly honest lyrics often brings audiences to tears. After signing with Capitol Records, the chanteuse released her second EP, Welcome to the Age of My Body, in December, featuring songs “Sarasvati” and “She Keeps Me Warm” (an extension of the hook on “Same Love”) plus two spoken-word pieces. That month Lambert also revealed that her debut album is scheduled for a spring release; and in early January, she performed on The Tonight Show. Mack and Ryan may have ruled 2013, but 2014 could be Lambert’s year. With Lemolo, Pollens. Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., 628-3151, showboxpresents.com. 9 p.m. $15 adv./$18 DOS. All ages. AP After leaving Sepultura in 1996, singer/guitarist/songwriter Max Cavalera formed SOULFLY, releasing a debut album in the spring of 1998, and continuing the direction his former band had displayed on its wildly influential Roots. Several lineup changes have taken place over the years, but this project has always centered on Cavalera. The band’s ninth and latest record, Savages, is easily one of its finest. With Asema, UnHailoed, Avoid the Void, Minimum Age. Studio Seven, 110 S. Horton St., 286-1312, studioseven.us. 7 p.m. $20 adv./ $23 DOS. All ages/bar with I.D. JAMES BALLINGER ALICE STUART is an aberration. In the ’60s and ’70s, when guitar heroes were supposed to be men, she was out front playing with Zappa and touring on a bill with Van the Man and Mississippi John Hurt. The great forgotten female trailblazer of rock ’n’ roll, she paved the way for other women guitarists, including Nancy Wilson and Bonnie Raitt, to make their own mark. The Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, triple door.net. 8 p.m. $20. CR

Sunday, Feb. 2

Presidents of the United States of America frontman Chris Ballew formed CASPAR BABYPANTS in 2009 as a vehicle to make music for kids and parents. While the project is obviously focused on silly sing-along songs

David Allan Coe Friday, January 31

36

ou’re not likely to have too many more chances to see 74-year-old outlaw country legend David Allan Coe before he rides off to that great biker bar in the sky. It’s a wonder he’s survived this long, given his irascibility and the hard living documented in his songs. This is especially true about his 1970 debut Penitentiary Blues, written during several stints in the slammer for crimes ranging from armed robbery to car theft. Though he didn’t score any hits as a solo act until the following decade, he wrote several number-ones for other artists, including 1973’s “Would You Lay With Me (in a Field of Stone)” for Tanya Tucker and “Take This Job and Shove It” for Johnny Paycheck. But this is only part of Coe’s legend. The other part involves the X-rated albums he released after being inspired by Shel Silverstein, whom he used to pal around with. The albums went viral before there was such a thing, and Coe estimates he sold 200,000 to 300,000 copies exclusively out of the backs of

Monday, Feb. 3

On his third studio album, July’s Where Does This Door Go, crooner MAYER HAWTHORNE modernized his classic style of soul with elements of R&B and hip-hop—no doubt thanks, at least partially, to producers like Pharrell Williams, Warren “Oak” Felder, and Steve “Ace” Mostyn and a collaboration with Kendrick Lamar on “Crime.” With Quadron. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $20. All ages. AP

Tuesday, Feb. 4

Layering ambient tones with sporadic and oft-times maddening noise samples, ONEOHTRIX POINT NEVER embodies the popular perception of “experimental music.” But it’s an immersive experience you can’t understand unless you let go of those perceptions and step into the group’s ethereal, ponderous world. With The Sight Below, Dawn of Midi, Nordic Soul. Crocodile. $15. 8 p.m. 21 and over. DH What Earl Scruggs did with his three-finger picking style back in the ’50s and ’60s, BELA FLECK did for the banjo in the ’80s, and continues to do today. His classically inspired compositions reinvented the instrument’s sound and image while earning him 14 Grammy awards. Tonight with the string quartet Brooklyn Rider, he’ll perform “Night Flight on Water,” the second premiere from his latest release, The Imposter. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. 7:30 p.m. $48–$53. GE PURE BATHING CULTURE spans the gamut of creepiness, dreaminess, and lushness. The Portland act’s last release was inspired by a wide array of unconventional thoughts: tarot, astrology, and the universe at large. These themes continue in the songs from the band’s newest release, Moon Tides—even if it’s a little less abstract. With La Luz. Neumos. 8 p.m. $25 adv. 21 and over. KP

biker magazines, the only place they were originally sold. Neil Strauss, writing about Coe for The New York Times in 2000, said those works were “among the most racist, misogynist, homophobic, and obscene songs recorded by a popular songwriter.” But that was the point. They include “Don’t Bite the Dick,” “Fuckin’ in the Butt,” and “Nigger Fucker,” about a woman who leaves her lover for a black man. Coe says he couldn’t be further from a racist. “I’ve got a black drummer who’s married to a white chick,” he told Country Standard Time in response to the Times piece. The allegations didn’t tarnish his legend, however, and Coe found a younger audience in the 2000s through touring with Kid Rock as well as his country-metal collaboration with members of Pantera called Rebel Meets Rebel. With Johnny and Waylon gone, Coe is literally one of the last of a dying breed. Like the Harley-Davidsons he was once fond of riding onto the stage, Coe’s songs and stories get better with age. With Redneck Girlfriend, the Shivering Denizens, Jack Rabbit Starts. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 262-0482, elcorazon.com. 8 p.m. $17 adv./$20 DOS. 21 and over. DAVE LAKE PHOTO BY  MATTHEW WOITUNSKI 

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

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for kids, Ballew’s songs are just catchy enough that parents won’t daydream about smashing the CDs out of repeat-listen-fueled rage. The Neptune, babypants music.com 11 a.m. $10 adv./kids under 1 free. JB


arts&culture» Music LocaLReLeases Benjamin Verdoes, The Evil Eye (out now,

Brick Lane Records) Ever the experimentalist, Benjamin Verdoes has previously given listeners a pop twist on math rock with his band Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band as well as Sufi-poetry-inspired post-punk with Iska Dhaaf. Yet the Seattle songwriter’s solo debut, The Evil Eye, doesn’t feel very experimental, foregoing new sounds for new conceptual ideas. The Evil Eye tells a story all about perceptions. While an evil eye is typically associated with malice or ill will, through his songs Verdoes explains how it’s also a sign of protection. He calls it “a love story.” Verdoes’ blending of storytelling and cross-cultural influence is impressive, though it is his piercing harmonies and lower-key-than-usual aesthetic that marks this effort, conjuring at times a striking resemblance to Jeremy Enigk’s own solo work. Yet there’s little else to distinguish The Evil Eye from Verdoes’ other projects. While it’s clear that Verdoes has great prowess as an indie rock composer, musically this album feels like a bit more of the same. Vocal melodies still rise triumphantly over fuzzy, grooving, calculated electric guitar lines in ways we’ve already heard from him. The album’s finest moments are those that stray most from his norm—the haunting falsetto on closer “So Bari” feels transcendental and the eerie “When We Were Young” creates a lush atmosphere before pummeling into a folk-rock burner. As a first solo outing it’s a decent start with great attention to conceptual details, but hopefully next time Verdoes will give us something a little more unexpected. DUSTY HENRY Dum Dum Girls, Too True (out now, Sub Pop

self-released) To the consumer, words like pop, soul, punk, country, rap, grunge, metal, dubstep, hip-hop, rock, new wave, and anything with the -core suffix can elicit a smile, a frown, a smirk, or just good oldfashioned indifference. Without those categories, chaos would reign in the music market. And yet what’s great about The Zoo at Night is its ability to defy labels. As soon as you think you’ve figured out The Jesus Rehab, it takes a turn in a completely different direction. The album opens with “Mind Readers,” which prominently features a Pantera-level overdriven guitar riff and a wailing vocal delivery leading you to think OK, this is gonna be a hard-rock deal. The next two songs, “Lickin’ My Wounds” and “Evil Eye,” find the guitar gain turned down a bit, bringing us square into the realm of White Stripes–esque garage rock. From there it’s straight into indie land, with the next three numbers sounding something akin to Wilco, Elliott Smith, and of Montreal, respectively. The latter end of The Zoo at Night wades into full-tilt Strokes mode before concluding with the meandering “Vertigo,” which very well may be the demon offspring of Tool, Television, and Velvet Underground. The Jesus Rehab, or more specifically brothers Jared and Dominic Cortese, have done something that all good bands do: By sounding like so many disparate sources, they end up sounding distinct. At the end of the day, it might be easy to just call this a rock record, but that’s just a cop-out. How about indiegarmetalcore? (Sunset, Feb. 1) CORBIN REIFF

Mark Lanegan, Has God Seen My Shadow? An

Anthology 1989–2011 (out now, A Light in the Attic, lightintheattic. net) Mark Lanegan sounds like Seattle— perhaps never more than in this anthology, which adds a dozen unreleased tracks to material from the former Screaming Trees singer’s first six solo records. The tempos are slow, the moods gloomy, and his voice a roadhardened rasp. These are not songs for sunny Seattle summers, but rather the long winter nights or even the early mornings that follow— like the one depicted on the cover of his 1994 album Whiskey for the Holy Ghost, with a halfdrunk bottle of booze on the table alongside the Holy Bible and a burning cigarette, each bristling at the golden rays of dawn. Though the collection includes appearances by PJ Harvey, Josh Homme, and J Mascis, it does not feature any of his collaborations with Isobel Campbell or Duke Garwood. Lanegan lovers likely have most of the first disc in their collection, but for the curious looking to dive into his catalog but unsure where to start, Shadow is that place. DAVE LAKE

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ARcAdE FIRE AT ThE GORGE!

Following the fantastic, global chart-topping success of Reflektor, Arcade Fire have announced a huge arena tour traversing North America. They make their stop at the Gorge Amphitheatre Friday, August 8, 2014.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: WhITE LIES!

White Lies are an English post-punk band described as “Franz Ferdinand-styled pop with cheeky clap lyrics”. Dedicated to the UK post-punk scene this dark-edged trio recently released Big TV. With a new album comes a nationwide headlining tour that hits the Showbox at the Market stage Friday, February 7th.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY:

ThE PRESIdENTS OF ThE UNITEd STATES OF AMERIcA! February 15th - 7pm @ Showbox

Twice Grammy-nominated Seattle natives The Presidents of the United States of America have been making Seattle proud. With tours reaching Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Japan.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: SPAMALOT!

February 11th - 7:30pm @ 5th Avenue Theatre

Lovingly ripped off from the classic film comedy Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Spamalot skewers the story of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table as they embark on a shenanigan-filled quest to find the legendary Holy Grail.

TIcKET GIvEAWAY: SUN KIL MOON!

February 21st - 8pm @ The Neptune

Mark Kozelek & Desertshore and Perils From The Sea made Mojo’s top 100 best albums of the year. In 2012, Mark Kozelek released an 18 track album under his Sun Kil Moon moniker, entitled Among The Leaves. Mark toured solo in support of the album and made his debit TV appearance on Fallon performing with The Roots.

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Records, subpop.com) If there is one thing to take from the opening notes of this album, it’s that Dum Dum Girls have come a long way from their humble beginnings in front woman Dee Dee Penny’s bedroom. The follow-up to 2011’s Only in Dreams and last year’s End of Daze EP, Too True once again finds Penny working with producers Richard Gottehrer and Sune Rose Wagner (the Raveonettes) to create a shiny batch of lo-fi, ’80s-influenced garage rock. Like her band’s previous releases, Too True capitalizes on Penny’s knack for luxuriant songs framed by melodic guitar-pop arrangements and beachy undertones. But where the earlier songs are moody and gothic, Too True introduces a bouncier Dum Dum Girls. Yet, some edge remains; these songs are for the women wearing leather and smoking cigarettes at the back of the party. Recorded in a New York apartment as well as at East West Studios and Hollywood’s infamous Chateau Marmont, the heart of Too True is still the lo-fi grit that caught our attention on End of Daze—even if Gottehrer and Wagner worked hard to give these songs a sleeker, more glittery sound. KEEGAN PROSSER

The Jesus Rehab, The Zoo at Night (out Feb. 1,

SEATTLE WEEKLY PROMOTIONS

37


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be considered a top-shelf strain in many shops. The hybrid has neither the skunky bouquet of SS nor the fuelish aroma of ECSD, but rather a slightly dank and (surprisingly) slightly sweet smell. It felt like a stronger strain than the Blue Dream during my testing, and also tilted slightly more to the skunky-indica side of things, while still retaining the sativa zing of Sour Diesel. These flowers are a great buy for $10 a gram. Cali Wildfire has spectacularly pretty flowers: light green calyxes whitened with thick, sticky trichomes punctuated by a tiny forest of red hairs. It has a fruity, tangy taste, and hits with

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

STEVE ELLIOTT

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38

an eighth, $70 a quarter, $120 a half, and $225 an ounce. Butane hash oil (BHO) is also available at $30 a gram. I tried two of the mid-grade strains, Blue Dream and Super Skunk x East Coast Sour Diesel, and two of the top-shelf strains, Cali WildFire and Tahoe OG Kush.

Like the mountain lake, Tahoe is deep, clear, and pure—and so encrusted with trichomes, it’s like it’s coated in sugar. Blue Dream is a solid but not spectacular representation of that popular strain’s uplifting sativa genetics. It’s quite worth $10 a gram—a good choice, I discovered, for nausea control in the morning without sacrificing much functionality. The Super Skunk x ECSD had some fat, gorgeous, subtly purple-tinged flowers; this would

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lightning speed around midway through the second toke. The effects stick around for a while, too; you’ll be well-medicated for at least two hours after lighting this Wildfire. Then there’s the delectable Tahoe OG Kush. Like the high-altitude mountain lake, Tahoe is deep, clear, and pure. These dark, skunky flowers are so thickly encrusted with trichomes, it’s like they’re coated in sugar. Tahoe is a sativa/indica hybrid, and accordingly has both the uplifting, euphoric mental effects of a high-THC sativa and the soothing body stone and pain relief of a heavy indica. Due to its sativa genetic heritage, Tahoe can be used all day long; due to the indica, it can be used at night. If you have deep or chronic pain and a high tolerance, Tahoe makes a good choice. Sean thinks it’s some of the best weed he’s ever grown, and I tend to agree. E tokesignals@seattleweekly.com

Steve Elliott edits Toke Signals, tokesignals.com, an irreverent, independent blog of cannabis news, views, and information.

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2 Bedroom, 2 Bath manufactured home. Located at Bel Mor Park Golf and Country Club. 1500 Square feet. New deck, large kitchen, large living room, dining room. Master bedroom with bath. $6,950 or best offer. 206-335-1223 or 206-795-6495

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University District 3 bedroom apts available for rent. 206-441-4922 9am–2pm

WA Misc. Rentals Rooms for Rent

ALGONA

2 BR: MOUNT RAINIER View duplex! Features garage, fresh paint, refurbished & all new appliances! Near Supermall & Freeway. $1,000 per month, first, last & damage dep. No pets. Purchase $219,950. Call 253-293-8817. BURIEN

Greenlake/WestSeattle $400 & up Utilities included! busline, some with private bathrooms • Please call Anna between 10am & 8pm • 206-790-5342

U-DISTRICT $450-$550 All Utilities Included! Call Peir for more info (206) 458-0169

WA Misc. Rentals Want to Share

3 BEDROOM Rambler. Washer, Dryer. New Carpets. Fenced Yard. Close to Schools and Shopping. $1400 month, first, last. $1000 damage deposit. Call: 206-3919082

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Auto Events/ Auctions

WA Misc. Rentals Condos/Townhomes

BURIEN LARGE 1 Bedroom Condo. All appliance including washer/ dryer. Fireplace, on busline, close to shopping. 15 minutes from Seattle. $750 per month. 206-816-0422

TUKWILA $550 MONTH. Your own private living room, bedroom, bath. Private Entrance. Sink, fridge and counter area plus free TV. View, off street parking. Own parking place. Laundry on-site. Large quality home. Employed with steady income. References and deposit required. No Smoking, No Pets. 1 Adult Only. 206-246-4700 or 206-243-4171 Evenings.

Musical Instruments

ET TOWING AUCTION

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THE NORTHWEST! SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 29 — FEBRUARY 4, 2014

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@seattleweekly ADOPTION Devoted, nurturing, loving gay couple in Seattle, looking to adopt first baby into a family offering education, fun, travel, laughter, and unconditional love and support. Call, TEXT, or email anytime about Kyle & Adrian; 971-238-9651 or kyleandadrianfamily@gmail.com or visit kyleandadrianadoption.com

WE ARE SCHEDULING INTERVIEWS FOR DIRECT MARKETING REPS

Help us Keep Trees Safe & Beautiful! The Tree Industry can provide you steady year round work. As a Marketing Rep for TLC4Homes Northwest Inc. you will help Generate Leads for Arborists employed by Evergreen Tree Care Inc. Our Arborists Provide Home Owners Free Estimates and Free Safety & Health Inspections for Tree & Shrub Trimming, Pruning & Removal Services. We Provide Paid Orientation, Marketing Materials, Areas to Work and Company Apparel.

Reps AVERAGE $30,000-$60,000/ YEAR Generating Leads for Tree Work. Work Outdoors- Year Round Work. Set your own schedule- Work Part time or Full time. Travel, Cell Phone, Medical Allowance Available. We do require a Vehicle, Driver’s License, Cell Phone & Internet Access in order to be considered for our Position.

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PROMPT - RELIABLE Home Repair. All phases. Senior Discount. Call Peter 206-659-2680 (Local) PETERB*860BG Lic’d/Ins. Employment General MARKETING COORDINATOR The Daily Herald, Snohomish County’s source for outstanding local news and community information for more than 100 years and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, daily deals, event sponsorships and special publications as well as the daily operations of the Marketing department. Responsibilities include but are not limited to the coordination, updating and creation of marketing materials across a range of delivery channels, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and working closely with the Sr. Marketing Manager to develop strategies and implement the marketing plan. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem-solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to hreast@soundpublishing.com No phone calls please. Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

Employment General

Employment General

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HELP WANTED!! Make up to $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.needmailers.com

Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking an Outside Advertising Sales Consultant. This position will be responsible for print and digital advertising sales to an eclectic and exciting group of clients. Applicants should be hardworking self-starters, competitive, outgoing and goal- oriented. The ideal candidates will demonstrate strong interpersonal skills, both written and oral, and have excellent communications skills; must be motivated and take the initiative to sell multiple media products including on-line advertising and special products, work with existing customers and find ways to grow sales and income with new prospective clients. Sales experience necessary; Print media experience is a definite asset. Must be computer-proficient with data processing and spreadsheets as well as utilizing the Internet. Position requires use of personal cell phone and vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. We offer a competitive salary (plus commission) and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Parking is also provided. If you meet the above-noted qualifications and are interested in working for the leading independent newspaper publisher in Washington State, then we want to hear from you! Email us your cover letter and resume to:

Employment Computer/Technology Sr Qlty Asrnce Engnr sought by Providence Health & Services in Renton, WA. Estblsh biz & fincl plns & bdgts for team & dvpmt of lng-rng strg pln. BS in CS, Biz Mgmt, Info Svcs, Engrg (Elec Mech Comp) or rltd + 6 yrs QA/QC exp, 3 yrs App Dev exp. Undstd stnd SQL & qryng. Know rltnl dbs, esp Oracle or SQL srvr. Abl to mng code mgrtn from Devmnt to QA to Prodn in cplx web envt. Know bk-end tstg. Know Biz Prcs Dsgn & intgrn specs. Know auto Scrng Langs & Tls. Skl crtng prob slvng in QA/QC envir. Know 2 of flwg Langs: HTML, DHTML, JavaScript, Visual Basic, VB Script, C#, RUBY, XML. Skl to admr QA/QC lfcycl mgmt sys. Ablty in QA/QC & Dvmt Lfcycls & Mthdlgs. Undstnd Src Code Ctrl & Prod Rlse procs. Abl to wrk clsly w/ custs & IS stf to dsgn & dcmt func rqmts & tech specs for sys. Auth to wrk in US. Apply @ www.jobpostingtoday.com #1798.

Employment Computer/Technology Nokia Inc. is looking for a Head of Security Services – North America in Bellevue, WA: Exp. with strategy creation, development & implementation; manage efficient utilization of security processes and tools to ensure consistent & effective practice; perform information security mgmt., security mgmt, business admin & investigations &. Mail resume to Nokia Recruiter, 3575 Lone Star Cir, Ste 434, Ft Worth, TX 76177 & note Job ID# NOK-WA13-HSS NVIDIA Corporation, market leader in graphics and digital media processors, has an engineering opportunity in Redmond, WA: Tool Development Engineer (TDE03), validate and test Voice and Data platform for NVIDIA’s reference design. Position may travel up to 40% domestically. If interested, ref job code and send to: NVIDIA Corporation. Attn: MS04 (L.Lashgari). 2701 San Tomas Expressway, Santa Clara, CA 95050. Please no phone calls, emails or faxes.

Employment Social Services VISITING ANGELS Certified Caregivers needed. Minimum 3 years experience. Must live in Seattle area. Weekend & live-in positions available. Call 206-439-2458 • 877-271-2601

Your source for uncut, uncensored, no-holds-barred, non-corporate-controlled cannabis news.

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hreast@soundpublishing.com

ATTN: HR/SEA. No phone calls please.

Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

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Seattle Weekly, January 29, 2014