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Valley Record SNOQUALMIE

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22, 2014 n DAILY UPDATES AT WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM n 75 CENTS

Snoqualmie district seeks quarter of revenues in ops measure

Skills get tested for Wildcats’ best against tough Bellevue Page 9

BY CAROL LADWIG Staff Reporter

12th Man in the Valley

SCENE

Courtesy photo

Master of the guitar coming to Valley for concert Page 6

INDEX

The fifth grade class at Cascade View Elementary in Snoqualmie shows its 12th Man spirit, wearing green and blue on Friday, Jan. 17, above. Seahawks football fans have been fired up around the Valley, with many students, teachers, and employees at local businesses wearing team colors before the big game. The North Bend Theatre aired games on the big screen for both the Jan. 11 and Jan. 18 home games, with fans getting loud after big plays. See more local fan photos at www.valleyrecord.com.

Opinion 4 7 Calendar Classifieds 11-14 14 Obituary 15 Obituary On the Scanner 15

Vol. 100, No. 35

SEE LEVY, 15

Build it, they will come

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

North Bend Councilman Jonathan Rosen, Senior Planner Mike McCarty, Valley Little League scheduler Troy Garwood, Public Works Director Frank Page, and SVLL President Roy Baunsgard meet at the Torguson Park baseball fields. The city is partnering with the league for a major upgrade to the park.

Ballots should arrive in the Snoqualmie Valley this week for an important school vote, but probably not the one most citizens are thinking about. At issue in the Feb. 11 election are the renewals of two existing levies worth $18 million, not the much-discussed $216 million facilities bond that the Snoqualmie Valley School Board is considering for a future ballot. “These are replacement levies… we don’t see them as add-on, or new tax measures,” said Snoqualmie Valley School District Superintendent Joel Aune.

League, city have big vision for Torguson Park BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Traveling Washington with his son’s team, Snoqualmie Valley Little League President Roy Baunsgard watched boys play baseball among the rolling hills of the Yakima Valley and the wide horizons of Moses Lake. No place compared to home. SEE TORGUSON PARK, 10

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2 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Rotarians rally to make a new Valley emergency warming shelter

Courtesy photo

Rotary President Pete Bullard and Director Paula Edwards.

In Brief

When or if there is another prolonged electrical power outage in Snoqualmie Valley, residents can now seek shelter at either the Mount Si Senior Center or the Snoqualmie Valley YMCA. Mount Si Senior Center recently secured a backup generator powered by natural gas, along with three natural gas water heaters. Like the generator at the YMCA, this new generator has a switch that automatically turns it on in the event that electrical power is lost. The Center also now has an external storage shed for emergency supplies. Snoqualmie Valley Rotary president Peter Bullard sought and obtained several grants for this project. Grants included $5,000 from Snoqualmie Valley Rotary with a matching $5,000 grant from Rotary District 5030. Another $20,000 was provided by the Puget Sound Energy Foundation, $3,000 from the city of North Bend, and $2,500 from Cascade Covenant Church. Rotary secretary Nancy Whitaker helped write and edit the grants. Rotary Service Committee Chairman Rick Woodruff oversaw construction and installation at the shelter. You can learn more about Rotary at www.snoqualmievalleyrotary.org.

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Senior Center calls on Valley to save Adult Day Health The Sno-Valley Senior Center in Carnation could soon lose its Adult Day Health program, a devastating prospect for the families who use it, says program manager Karen Koenig. “I hear from our caregivers how tragic it would be for their families for us to close,” she said. Adult Day Health, serving a maximum of 12 clients per day, provides support, health care, socialization and supervision to patients four days a week. Most, but not all of the patients, have some form of dementia, Koenig said, and the program, supported by two Snoqualmie Valley Hospital nurses, helps both the patients and their caregivers by giving them some much-needed respite. Steady decreases in state funding have led to fewer referrals to the program, the only one of its kind within 20 miles, Koenig said. Community members are being asked to contribute any amount to help the program reach its goal of $55,000 annually for the next three years. Find out more at www.snovalleysenior.org.

Preschool fair returns The Sno-Valley Indoor Playground hosts its annual Snoqualmie Valley Preschool Education and Enrichment Fair, 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 25, at the Mount Si High School commons. The free event introduces Valley families to preschools, enrichment programs, day care facilities, and other services for children from birth to 5 years old. Dozens of preschools and businesses take part, and families receive a resource guide listing dozens of local schools, daycares and enrichment organizations in the area. Child-friendly activities and demonstrations keep younger folks entertained through the morning. Parents can meet face-to-face with teachers and administrators from many schools and other organizations, all in one morning and in one place. Many schools begin their open enrollment periods shortly after the January fair. To learn more, visit http://svip.wordpress.com.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 Celebrate the Year of the Horse with Muckleshoot Casino’s Lucky Envelope Money Grab promotion from 8am – 8pm! Just present your coupon mailer or earn 500 base points using your Preferred Players Club card for your chance to win up to $1,000! Then starting at 10pm, enjoy the festive Chinese Dragon Dance on the casino floor! Your festivities, Your Lunar New Year. Entertainment and promotions subject to change without notice. Must be a Preferred Players Club member to participate in promotion. Management reserves all rights.


Crisis of livability Snoqualmie City Council considers impact of sweeping flood insurance reform BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

The Biggert-Waters Act was meant to make flood insurance more realistic and more stable. But the reform act could have the unintended consequence of blighting the low-lying urban areas of the Valley, several speakers warned at last Monday’s Snoqualmie City Council meeting. Now, Snoqualmie’s government may reach out to its representatives in Congress to help ease the burden of spiking flood insurance rates on older buildings. Richelle Rose, a project manager for river and floodplains with King County’s Water and Land Resources Division, briefed the council on the Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act of 2012, which changed the way the National Flood Insurance Program is run. The act required the government to raise rates to reflect the real risk and costs of flooding. Starting last fall, new premiums hammered the pocketbooks of owners of older, non-elevated homes in the Valley. Angela Donaldson, an agent at Snoqualmie’s Farmer’s Insurance Agency, told the Record that the average cost of flood insurance for such homes in Snoqualmie jumped by seven times, doubling or tripling in North Bend. As government-subsidized policies go away, owners of older homes, built before 1984 in Snoqualmie and North Bend, or 1978 in King County, need documents called elevation certificates to sell their home or replace a lapsed flood policy. These documents, done by a surveyor or engineer, confirm how risky the building is based on the latest flood map. Having a new certificate, which costs between $500 and $1,000, will save on premiums if a home is higher than the flood level. But, as Donaldson told the council, “Just getting that elevation certificate is not a guarantee that you’re not going to get an increase. If you’re actually low, you may see more of an increase.”

Spiking rates Elizabeth Gildersleeve, who works with Donaldson at Farmer’s, has been fielding calls from worried homeowners, and from home buyers spooked by steep new flood insurance policies. “These premiums, particularly for homes in the city of Snoqualmie, are very high—four to six thousand dollars is not unusual, particularly for homes with a crawl space or basement,” Gildersleeve said. “What we’re going to start to see are people who cannot afford to continue to live in their homes,” she warned. “We’ve started saving flood quotes for homes for sale, because you’re getting called by five or six different people who are walking away from it.… They can’t afford to obtain a loan if they’re going to pay four or five thousand a year for flood insurance. “Do what you can at your level to address it,” she urged the

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council, “and help these people that are calling me, and are scared that they’re going to lose their homes.” Snoqualmie Mayor Matt Larson said the city is talking with neighboring North Bend about contacting all of the Valley’s representatives in Congress to press for relief. Nationally, flood mitigation has led to ANGELA “costs that were absolutely unacceptable that they ever got into the system,” said Larson. DONALDSON “Now, the political reaction is taxpayers shouldn’t be absorbing these costs, so let’s pass it along to all the folks impacted by flooding,” the mayor said. “It’s fundamentally unfair, and it’s going to have a devastating effect on all the efforts we’ve done over the past decade for downtown redevelopment… investments in retail centers and residential neighborhoods. It’s a very serious issue.” The city is planning a council workshop on the matter, and continuing its efforts to help owners raise downtown buildings Rose said the county is working with the city on assistance, providing elevation certificates, technical help and grants for elevations and buyouts. To date, Snoqualmie has raised 132 homes and bought up 47 lots, while the flood district has raised 42 homes and purchased 25 lots in Snoqualmie’s vicinity. More planned buyouts—more than 300—and elevations in the Upper Valley could cost up to $30 million, which the flood control district, with an annual budget of about $6 million, is “incrementally crunching away at,” Rose said. The district is considering putting priority for elevation grants for homeowners with spiking premiums. Cities and the county are rated under a Community Rating System, or CRS, a voluntary program that pushes cities to pursue the latest best practices in flood protection. Cities get their flood insurance premiums discounted as a results. Snoqualmie currently holds a rating of five, which results in a 25 percent discount. King County has a rating of two, which makes for a 40 percent discount. The city is in the process of studying the latest version of the codes with an eye on improving its rating. The county is also exploring a wider study of the Snoqualmie river basin, working with stakeholders in the Upper and Lower Valley to understand how the river has changed. “The river is a living beast,” commented councilman Bryan Holloway. “Every flood is a little different.”

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Voters in the Riverview School District will be asked to continue supporting schools on the Feb. 11 ballot, which will have two local levies on it. Both levies are renewals of previous levies, and both are four four-year periods. An $8.1 million Educational Programs Maintenance and Operations Levy, or M&O levy, would continue to bridge the 23 percent gap between state and federal education funding and the cost to fund current offerings in the district. Levy dollars pay for educational programs and school operation costs, including additional teachers to maintain class sizes, librarians, music and PE specialists, counselors, gifted and remediation programs, special education services, educational assistants, summer school, staff training, textbooks, bus drivers and custodial services, fuel, maintenance, extracurricular and athletic programs, coaches and advisors, as well as administrative and other support staff. The levy rate is estimated at $2.84 per $1,000 of assessed value. The $1.8 million Technology Capital Projects Levy funds classroom technology, which plays an essential role in education. The state does not provide any direct funding for technology. The replacement levy would augment the educational environment by adding student mobile devices, learning software, student computers, staff computer replacements and mobile devices, computer labs, network, wireless, and power upgrades, printers and copiers. The levy also continues funding for computer technicians, technology integration specialists, and professional staff development, plus unanticipated repairs, which account for 13.5 percent of the total tech levy amount. The tech levy is estimated at 65 cents per $1,000.

Citizens can meet council The Snoqualmie City Council invites local residents and business owners to an informal session to discuss current issues and offer suggestions on topics of interest. The session is 6:15 to 6:45 p.m., Monday, Jan. 27, at Snoqualmie City Hall Council Chambers, 38624 S.E. Ridge Street. The regular council meeting follows.

Nominate the best teachers The Snoqualmie Valley Schools Foundation is preparing to honor outstanding educators, and is seeking nominations now through Friday, Jan. 31. Educator of the Year is an annual recognition given by the foundation to Snoqualmie Valley staff, and presented at the annual Small Hands to Big Plans fundraising luncheon, set this year for March 20. Staff eligible for the awards are teachers and classified staff who have worked for the district at least three years. The selection criteria seeks those who: inspire students of all backgrounds and abilities to learn; have the respect and admiration of students, parents, and colleagues; and lead by example. Awards will be presented to one elementary teacher, one middle school teacher, one high school teacher and one classified staff member. Nomination forms are on the foundation website at www.svsfoundation.org/todays-fundingneeds/educator-of-the-year.

Congress is considering two bills that would delay the impact of Biggert-Waters. Of them, Senate Bill 1846 is nearer to passage. That bill includes a six-month wait before homeowners are assessed the higher actual-risk rating, halting premiums until a national affordability study and other pre-requisites are complete. “What we need to do in our communities is not going to end if these bills go through,” Gildersleeve said. “These bill are just buying time to come up with a plan. It gives us time to work with homeowners, to elevate and do other mitigations, develop plans, so we don’t end up with ghost towns.” • To learn about insurance reform, visit www.fema.gov/nfip. Homeowners with questions about whether they are affected should contact their insurance agent or local city’s building department. We have a Truck To renT for LocaL Moves

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ValleyViews

4 • January 15, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

Valley Record SNOQUALMIE

Publisher Editor Reporter

William Shaw

wshaw@valleyrecord.com

Seth Truscott

struscott@valleyrecord.com

Carol Ladwig

cladwig@valleyrecord.com

C reative Design Wendy Fried wfried@valleyrecord.com Advertising David Hamilton Account dhamilton@valleyrecord.com Executive Circulation/ Patricia Hase Distribution circulation@valleyrecord.com Mail PO Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98065 Phone 425.888.2311 Fax 425.888.2427 www.valleyrecord.com Classified Advertising: 800.388.2527 Subscriptions: $29.95 per year in King County, $35 per year elsewhere Circulation: 425.453.4250 or 1.888.838.3000 Deadlines: Advertising and news, 11 a.m. Fridays; Photo op/coverage requests in advance, please. The Snoqualmie Valley Record is the legal newspaper for the cities of Snoqualmie, North Bend and Carnation. Written permission from the publisher is required for reproduction of any part of this publication. Letters, columns and guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views of the Snoqualmie Record.

Keep the wild, exactly that

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I

t’s in the nature of a dog to protect its owner and its home. And it’s in the nature of black bears to flee when threatened. But only to a point. That point was about 100 yards into the woods, on the early hours of Thursday, Jan. 2, when this particular Ridge bruin turned and showed his teeth and claws to the pursuing dog, who did not survive the encounter. Anyone who’s ever loved their pet, as I and everyone on the Record’s staff do, is sad to learn of someone’s little dog being killed. Beyond the fact of this deadly encounter, however, is the wider truth that bears and people are both in very close proximity throughout this Valley, but nowhere, it seems, more so than in Snoqualmie. The bears aren’t going away. Neither are the people. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, the issue here is trash, trash, trash. Bears aren’t hibernating because the pickings, SETH TRUSCOTT from local trash cans, are so darn Valley Record Editor plentiful. Your food waste is a calorie bonanza. Bears aren’t dumb. Stinky, rotten food is an easy, scrumptious smorgasbord to them, and they soon equate garbage bins with buffets, teaching these food sources to their cubs. To a bear, the sight, smell and sound of human beings go from being a dangerous foe to a minor irritant. That’s a problem. And when your dog gets into a scrap with a bear that no longer fears humans, he can bring the angry bruin right back to you. That’s downright, deadly dangerous. So do yourself and your neighbors a favor. If you live remotely close to a wild area, and that’s, honestly, most of the Valley, keep your trash inside until the morning of garbage day, or lock it in a bear-proof container, which are now available in ever-smaller and more affordable forms. Or better yet, do both, if you can. It’s a tiny tradeoff for living where we do. People and bears belong to different worlds. We love the wild. Let’s keep it that way.

Letter of thanks

Deep giving for Auxiliary means packages for soldiers I’d like to send out a truly heartfelt “Thank You” to all of the students, staff and their families at the Snoqualmie Valley schools for their generous support and items donated toward the American Legion Auxiliary’s care packages. These donations, along with beautiful artwork and letters of support, were sent in care packages to a troop of soldiers deployed from Joint Base Lewis McChord. The soldiers appreciated knowing that citizens were thinking about them, while they were far from home during the holidays. We sent 33 boxes, one for each soldier, filled with items that make them a little more comfortable and remind them of home. Each package was received with a smile. The American Legion Auxiliary has adopted a second troop of 35 soldiers who will receive care packages in time for Valentine’s Day. We are in need of donations to fill these boxes. Some items needed are: Valentine cards, letters, socks, gloves, hand warmers, snacks, cans of tuna, energy bars, chewing gum, candy, beef jerky, current magazines, and travel-size personal care items. Funding for postage is also needed. Your support means more than you know. If you have items to contribute or would like to help with packing, please contact me via e-mail at suzy@ chocolate2die4.com or call (425) 831-1914. Again, thank you, Snoqualmie Valley students. Suzy Cassidy North Bend

Do you think the Seahawks OUT can win the Super Bowl?

of the

PAST This week in Valley history

Thursday, Jan. 19, 1989

“Absolutely. It’s just a matter of attittude. I dont pray for the Seahawks, but I pray for the happiness of my friends.” Kristi Madsen-Cason Snoqualmie

“Defense will take an offense anytime. There have been five times in Super Bowl history that the number-one defense has faced the number-one offence. Four out of five were won by the number-one defense.” Al Nogare Snoqualmie

• A report on high school dropout rates commissioned by Gov. Booth Gardner contained erroneous numbers. That was the message brought to the School District 410 board by Mount Si principal Scott Menard. Mount Si was listed as having the worst dropout rate, but did not report such data for the first two years of the study. • Ralph Stewart Taylor, who moved to Duvall in 1913, and wrote about the town’s early days in his memoir, “Duvall Immigrant,” has died at age 85.

Thursday, Jan. 23, 1964

“Oh yeah. It’s a no-brainer.” Colin Ward

“I’m going to say 50 (percent). I’m nervous. I think Peyton Manning is amazing. But I’m a huge Seahawks fan. I cried yesterday when they won.” Laurie Ward

• In an unusually freakish accident, William V. S. Smith’s station wagon was totaled last Thursday. A car ahead of him on the highway two miles south of Carnation, lost its gas tank and Smith could not avoid hitting it. His car caught fire. He released his seatbelt and used a fire extinguisher to escape. The other driver was unaware of the mishap until he saw the blaze in his rear-view mirror.


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Letters SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

Snoqualmie Valley Record • January 22, 2014 • 5

ment with these levies. First, 100 percent of these levies stay local. Second, of the 19 school districts in King County, the Snoqualmie Valley ranks near the top in terms The Snoqualmie Valley Record welcomes letters to the editor. Letters should be 250 of school test scores, but near the words or fewer, signed and include a city of bottom in terms of school tax rates. residence and a daytime phone number for • Our students and teachers rely verification. The Record reserves the right to edit letters for length, content and potenon the passage of these levies. One tially libelous material. Send letters to: out of every four dollars in our Letters to the Editor district is provided by local levies. The Snoqualmie Valley Record Without funds from local levies, PO Box 300, Snoqualmie, WA 98270 the impacts to our community’s or email to editor@valleyrecord.com children would be catastrophic. Last week, we received in the mail the district’s winter edition newsletter. Detailed information about the replacement EP&O and tech levies is included in it. More importantly, this newsletter highlights a few of the accomplishments recently achieved by our students. It is clear to me that fantastic work is being done by our students, teachers, and staff of the Snoqualmie Valley School District. To help our students continue to excel in the classroom, the Snoqualmie Valley School District needs the support of our community to approve the two replacement levies in this election. Please vote “yes” on both Proposition 1 (EP&O Levy) and Proposition 2 (Technology Levy).

Letters to the Editor

Businesses deserve our support

Recently, the Chinese restaurant in Carnation changed ownership. Having not been there lately, I decided to give it a try. The food was great, but I couldn’t help but notice something. When I was there, around 6 p.m. on a Thursday night, I was the only person in the restaurant. I think this makes a sad statement for our community. We want a variety of businesses in our city, but then we fail to help them become a success. We have lost the QFC, the Bank of America, then Gigi’s Cafe, which took over the Bank of America building, and then Sliders. How can new businesses have a chance to thrive, when nobody in the community patronizes them? It is a sad state of affairs when a town only continues to see business leave. It is a wonder that anyone is willing to take a chance on trying to bring new business to the city of Carnation. Ron Hopper Carnation

Levies are return on investment This week, registered voters within the Snoqualmie Valley School District will be receiving their ballots for the February 11 all mail-in election. There are two four-year replacement levies on our ballots. The Education Programs & Operations (EP&O) Levy, formerly called Maintenance & Operations (M&O), provides for nearly one-quarter of the costs of our district’s day-to-day operations, programs, and personnel needed to serve the basic education needs of our students. The Technology Levy provides funds for all technology equipment, service support, and training, because our state does not include technology in its definition of “basic education”. I encourage you to vote “yes” on both of these levies for the following reasons: • These are replacement four-year levies. In 2010, we voters approved the current levies which will expire in 2014. These replacement EP&O and Tech levies will run from 2015 to 2018. • Our property values are directly connected to the success of our local schools. Quality schools positively influence the property values of our community. • Our community is receiving an incredible return on its invest-

Kirk Harris, Chair, Snoqualmie Valley Citizens for Schools, Fall City

Worth-whiling my time: A poem about picking up litter So you are retired and live in the Valley, Perhaps picking up litter can be right up your alley?! Walking daily for our health a must, More aerobic exercise will help, we trust. I have found just the ticket for me, Picking up litter and it is absolutely free. I have a Labrador dog companion, too, I did train She fetches plastic bottles on command using her keen canine brain. All you dog walkers have built-in four-on-the-floor help, Tell them it is time to walk and you will get an enthusiastic “Let’s work” yelp. I use a Pik Stik for easy grab and go, I can pick up a cigarette butt and not even slow. Here in Snoqualmie Valley one can volunteer for the Forest service, Cedar River Watershed Education Center, King County Parks and Recreation, or DNR, All this outdoor fun with little use of your car. Folks, all you need to have with you is a plastic bag to carry out trash, This requires little or no out lay of cash.

Vote “Yes” for Snoqualmie Valley students in Feb. levy BY JOEL AUNE

Snoqualmie Valley School District Superintendent

This week, voters in our community will be receiving ballots for a very important election.  The ballot includes two levy propositions for our schools: a four-year Educational Programs and Operations Levy, and a fouryear Technology Levy.  These levies, if approved by the voters, will renew levies passed back in 2010 that are set to expire in 2014. Like us, nearly all of our neighboring school districts are proposing levies of a similar nature in their respective communities.   Levy funds provide for a substantial part of our school district’s budget.  In fact, the Educational Programs and Operations Levy provides approximately 24 percent of the funds needed to operate our schools.  This levy helps to fill the gap between what is provided by the JOEL AUNE state, and what is actually necessary to sustain the educational program for the students in our schools.  The Technology Levy is needed because the state does not provide revenue to support and maintain technology in our schools. It is important to remember that these levies are not “add-ons” to existing levies. They would simply replace levies previously approved by the voters that are set to expire in 2014.   The outcome of the election will have a profound effect on the 6,300 students attending our schools, as these levies provide funding for additional teachers, specialists, and support staff beyond what is funded by the state. These levies also help pay for technology, teacher training, transportation, textbooks, utilities, maintenance and custodial services, school supplies, and after-school academic, athletic, arts, and activity programs for students. Student achievement has been trending upward here in the Snoqualmie Valley School District in recent years, and our schools now rank among the finest in the entire state.  Even so, we are committed to making them even better.  As we continue the quest to make our schools the very best they can be, renewed support of these levies and the resources they provide is vitally important. The quality of our schools is critical to the health, economy, reputation, and future of our community.  Most importantly however, these propositions will sustain a significant portion of the funding necessary to ensure our students are fully prepared for college, careers, and citizenship. Please vote “yes” on these important levy propositions. For more information on the levy propositions, visit the school district website at: www.svsd410.org or contact the Snoqualmie Valley School District at (425) 831-8000. I know there are others out doing what I do, So I ask, why not you, too? Pick a route you frequently trek whether road, trail or walking path, It won’t take many to keep our Valley beautiful, free of litter, you do the math. I will keep my eyes out to greet you who join me in this exercise plan, Worthwhile your time, I know more of you can!

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The Snoqualmie Valley YMCA Community Campaign kickoff is 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, at Snoqualmie Brewery and Taproom, 8032 Falls Avenue Southeast. The evening celebrates the start of the annual fundraiser event, which supports Y programs, from academic enrichment to athletics, seniors to summer camp. Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available. Childcare is also offered. Learn more about the Y at www.seattleymca.org/ Locations/Snoqualmie/Pages/Home.


6 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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On the Scanner North Bend Substation

THURSDAY, JAN. 16 STOLEN HONDA: At 5:15 a.m., a caller in the 400 block of East North Bend Way reported his 1996 green Honda Accord was stolen. He said he’d parked and locked the vehicle near the park by his apartment around 12:45, but it was gone in the morning.

TUESDAY, JAN. 14 ASSAULT: At 4 p.m., a woman called police to report that she had been assaulted by her boyfriend of six or seven months. The assault occurred in a wooded area off Cedar Falls Way.

MONDAY, JAN. 13 STOLEN PLATE: At 4:23 p.m., a caller in the 1100 block of 13th Place Southwest reported a theft. Someone had stolen the front license plate from the victim’s vehicle, which had been parked in the parking lot.

SUNDAY, JAN. 12 NO GENERATOR: At 9:54 p.m., police were called to the 100 block of North Bend Way for a theft report. The victim said he’d had his Champion generator in the back of his pickup truck when he parked in the stalls behind North Bend Way when he went to work. He later checked on the generator, which was gone.

SATURDAY, JAN. 11 BREAK-IN: At 9 a.m., the owner of a business in the 200 block of Main Avenue South called police to report a burglary. The victim said that her mother had gone to the business on the weekend to feed the pet fish, and found the glass front door and a front window had been smashed. The thieves apparently entered through the broken door, then stole a plastic bin, food, and some Chinese antiques.

Fall City Fire District FRIDAY, JAN. 10 FALL: At 10:56 a.m., firefighters responded to an 84-year-old man who had fallen. He was assisted up and left at home in his wife’s care.

SATURDAY, JAN. 11 STRUCTURE FIRE: At 11:10 a.m., firefighters responded to a structure fire at a residence. The fire was extinguished. POWER LINES: At 5:42 p.m., firefighters responded to power lines down over the roadway. The roadway was shut down at both ends to await the power company.

Paid obituaries include publication in the newspaper and online at www.valleyrecord.com All notices are subject to verification.

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BROKEN COLLARBONE: At 10:42 a.m., firefighters responded to an 87-year-old woman with a broken clavicle. She was treated and transported to a local hospital via the Fall City Fire aid car. PANIC ATTACK: At 12:14 p.m., firefighters responded to a panic attack. The patient was treated and transported to a local hospital via the Fall City Fire aid car. HEART ATTACK: At 2:37 p.m., firefighters responded to a 76-year-old man in cardiac arrest. The patient was also seen by a paramedic unit from Bellevue Fire Department. He was treated and transported to a local hospital via the medic unit.

Snoqualmie Fire Department FRIDAY, JAN. 10 WINDSTORM: Snoqualmie firefighters were called out three times during the wind storm for reports of wires arcing and sparking. No damage and no injuries were reported.

SATURDAY, JAN. 11 ALARM: Snoqualmie firefighters responded to a fire alarm at Space Labs on Snoqualmie Ridge. It was caused by water that got into a smoke detector. There was no fire. ALARM: Snoqualmie firefighters responded to a fire alarm at the Salish Lodge. Upon investigation, they found that an occupant started a fire in the fireplace but forgot to open the flue. Firefighters assisted with smoke removal.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 GAS SMELL: Snoqualmie firefighters responded to a report of gas smell in the area of Maple Avenue. Upon arrival, crews noticed a reoccurring natural gas smell. PSE was called and they reported that they were working on a line break a few blocks over which was the probable cause. ALARM: Snoqualmie firefighters responded to a private residence on Stewart Street for a fire alarm. The home owner told crews that it had been a technical issue in the alarm system and that there was no problem to report. AID CALLS: In addition to the above calls, Snoqualmie firefighters responded to 15 medical aid calls, for an anWELCOME TO OUR LADY OF SORROWS CATHOLIC CHURCH nual call number of 38.

Mass Schedule

Mount Si Lutheran Church

411 NE 8th St., North Bend Pastor Mark Griffith • 425 888-1322 mtsilutheran@mtsilutheran.org www.mtsilutheran.org

Saturday 5pm • Sunday 8, 9:30 & 11am 39025 SE Alpha St. Snoqualmie, WA 98065 425-888-2974 • www.olos.org Rev. Roy Baroma, Pastor Mass at St. Anthony Church, Carnation. Sundays at 9:30am. Spanish Mass at 11am on the 1st Sunday 425-333-4930 • www.stanthony-carnation.org

8:15 a.m. Traditional, 10:45 a.m. Praise Sunday School/Fellowship 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Like” us on Facebook – Mt. Si Lutheran Youth

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Wednesday Evening Worship 7pm

...obituaries Place a paid obituary to honor those who have passed away, call Linda at 253.234.3506 paidobits@reporternewspapers.com

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Sunday Worship:

SUNDAY, JAN. 12 MEDICAL ALERT: At 9:30 a.m., firefighters responded to a medical alert alarm. Once on scene, the alarm was discovered to be false.

FALL: At 11:21 a.m., firefighters responded to a 57-year-old man who had fallen. The man also received care from a unit from Eastside Fire & Rescue. He was treated and transported to a local hospital via the aid car from Eastside Fire & Rescue.

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PUBLIC NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE #968692 CITY OF SNOQUALMIE NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT Project: Snoqualmie Valley Elementary School #6 Application: Conditional Use Permit Applicant: Brian Ho, TCF Architecture Submittal Date: December 26, 2013 Date Complete: January 7, 2014 Project Description: The applicant is proposing to construct an elementary school at the northwest corner of Snoqualmie Parkway and Swenson Ave. Project Location: The proposed project is located at the northwest corner of Snoqualmie Parkway and Swenson Ave SE, parcel 3524079024. Public Testimony: A public hearing has been scheduled before the Hearing Examiner on February 12, 2012 at 6:30pm at Snoqualmie City Council Chambers located at 38624 SE River Street, Snoqualmie. Oral comments may be given at the hearing and any person may submit written testimony on the above application. Written comments should be submitted to the City of Snoqualmie, PO Box 987, Snoqualmie, Washington 98065, Attention: Gwyn Berry, and must be received by 5pm on February 12, 2014.Notification and request of written decision may be made by submitting your name and address to the Planning Department with that request. Application Documents: The application and all supporting materials are available for public inspection at the City of Snoqualmie Planning Department Building, 38624 SE River Street, Snoqualmie. Published: January 22, 2014 in the Snoqulamie Valley Record. PUBLIC NOTICE #970188 SNOQUALMIE VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 410 Snoqualmie, Washington CONSULTANT ROSTER NOTICE RCW 39.80.030 - Agency’s requirement for professional services – Advance publication: “(2) announcing generally to the public its projected requirements for any category or type of professional services.” Informational packets of services and contact information are now being received by the Sno-

qualmie Valley School District Business Services Office, 8001 Silva Ave. SE, Snoqualmie, Washington 98065, for Architects, Engineers, and Specialty Consultants of any discipline for updating the District’s professional services roster for 2014. Mail submittals to Elizabeth Greenhaw, Accounting Technician, PO Box 400, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on January 22, 2014 and January 29, 2014. PUBLIC NOTICE #970193 SNOQUALMIE VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 410 Snoqualmie, Washington SMALL WORKS ROSTER NOTICE RCW 39.04.155, commonly known as the Common Small Works Roster Procedure, and RCW 28A.335.l90, commonly known as the Public School Bid Law, provide that school districts establish a Small Works Roster of qualified contractors who wish to receive bidding information and be considered for performing work on public works projects estimated to cost less than three hundred thousand dollars ($300,000). Applications are now being received by the Snoqualmie Valley School District Business Services Office, 8001 Silva Ave. SE., Snoqualmie, Washington 98065, for contractors who wish to be placed on the District’s Small Works for 2014. In order to qualify, contractors must demonstrate the following requirements: 1.Registered contractor in the State of Washington. 2.Pay prevailing wage rates in accordance with RCW 39.12. 3.Provide Certificate of Insurance. 4.Comply with federal, state and local laws regarding nondiscrimination. Interested contractors may contact the Business Services Office at (425) 831-8011 for an application form at any time, or write to Elizabeth Greenhaw, Accounting Technician, P0 Box 400, Snoqualmie, WA 98065. An application is also available on the district website, www.svsd 410.org under District Departments/Business Services. Published in the Snoqualmie Valley Record on January 22, 2014 and January 29, 2014.

PUBLIC NOTICES To place a Legal Notice, please call 253-234-3506 or e-mail legals@reporternewspapers.com

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cattle • horses • swine • goats llamas • alpacas • cats • dogs

PUBLIC NOTICES


Chamber breakfast seminar is on planning Making a concise business plan is the topic of a January 24 breakfast seminar hosted by the Snoqualmie Valley Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber’s “College of Business Knowledge” breakfast is 7:30 a.m. Friday, Jan. 24, at the Mount Si Golf Course Restaurant, 9010 Boalch Ave. Consultant Arnie Hendricks shares ideas on the importance of business planning, and how to do it on a single page. He will cover key questions to ask as you develop your vision, mission, strategies, objectives, and action plans. Having a business plan for 2014 will help your organization facilitate conversations, clarify expectations, assure accountability, encourage collaboration and keep activities focused on your vision. Cost is $15 for chamber members, $20 for visitors. Learn more at www.snovalley.org.

Happy cows

Snoqualmie Valley Record • January 22, 2014 • 7

Sprague Allstate agency gets nod for growth, service

Carnation ranchers doing it right: K-T Cattle Co. awarded top animal welfare certification

Courtesy photo

Belted Kingshire cattle, a miniature beef breed, graze at At K-T Cattle Company in Carnation’s K-T Cattle Co. ranch. The business was recently Carnation, Katie and Jim Haack certified for animal welfare. manage a small herd of Belted Kingshire cattle, a miniature beef breed, on 75 acres. The K-T herd was recently certified as Animal Welfare Approved. Animal Welfare Approved is a Virginia-based organization whose certification and label lets consumers know that farm animals were raised in accordance with the highest animal welfare standards in the U.S., using sustainable agriculture methods on an independent family farm. Like other AWA farmers across the country, the Haacks recognize the growing consumer interest in how animals are being raised. Raising animals outdoors on pasture is good for animals, consumers and the environment. K-T Cattle Co.’s grass-fed beef is sold at the farm; visit www.KTCattleCompany.com.

Patrick Sprague’s Allstate Insurance office in Snoqualmie was recently recognized by the Allstate Corporation as one of the top 100 of the 9432 Allstate agencies in the country in 2013, for agency growth and customer service. Sprague and his staff, Nan McCutchan and Micaela Leppell, offer home, auto, life and business insurance, as well as financial services. Sprague’s office is located at 35326 S.E. Center St., Snoqualmie. Send him an an e-mail at PSprague@allstate.com. Or, call (425) 396-0340.

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Health Benefit Exchange Office Need help with the new healthcare laws?

Free, In-person Assistance Open Enrollment: Oct. 1, 2013 – March 31, 2014 Monday – Thursday; 9:00am – Noon & 1:00pm – 3:00pm 213 Bendigo Blvd. N, Suite 1, North Bend, WA 98045 (across from Sterling Bank)

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Details www.SVHD4.org

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Assistance provided by Snoqualmie Valley Hospital District

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For bus transportation call (425) 888-7001


8 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Boomer tribute show at Center Stage

The big dance

Guitarist showcase at Grange Four-time Grammy recipient, David Grier gives a solo concert at the Sallal Grange in North Bend, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1. Grier, recognized by many experts as one of the premier acoustic guitarists in the world, spans jazz, bluegrass and other styles. For more information call (425) 888-0825 or send e-mail to info@ sallalgrange.org. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and there will be a food concession. Tickets are $15, available at the door or online at www.sallalgrange.org.

Make a blanket for Project Linus The Sallal Grange is hosting a nosew blanket event, 7 to 9 p.m., Monday, Jan. 27, to benefit the Linus Project (www.projectlinus.org). The public is invited to help cut and make the blankets, which will be distributed to children in traumatic situations. If you have rotary cutters and cutting mats, please bring them. The Grange Hall is located at 12912 432nd Ave. S.E. in North Bend. For more information, visit www.sallalgrange.org, or call (425) 888-0825.

NORTH BEND THEATRE SHOWTIMES WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22 • THE NUT JOB, PG, 11 A.M. $5 MATINEE, 6 P.M. REGULAR SHOW.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23 • THE NUT JOB, PG, 6 P.M.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24

Seth Truscott/Staff Photo

Mary Brown, center, dances with Tim Noonan, as couple John and Christa Lazenby of Fall City circle in rear, Friday evening, Jan. 17, during Sallal Grange’s monthly Contra Dance. About a dozen pairs of dancers, including several families, danced to the tunes of Tokul Road at the old-fashioned dance. Noonan taught waltz lessons prior to the evening’s dance.

Calendar SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22

STORY TIME: Young Toddler Story Time is 10 a.m. at Snoqualmie Library. For children, ages 6 to 24 months, with an adult. STORY TIME: Preschool Story Time is 10:45 a.m. at the Snoqualmie Library, for children age 3 to 6 with an adult. STORY TIME: Family Story Time is 10:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Carnation Library. For any age, but especially geared toward toddlers, and special needs children who need to move. An adult must attend and participate. STORY TIME: Pajamarama Family Story Time is 6:30 p.m. at North Bend Library. All ages welcome with an adult.

• THE NUT JOB, PG, 2 AND 5 P.M. • AMERICAN HUSTLE, R, 8 P.M.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23

SATURDAY, JAN. 25

STORY TIME: Toddler Story Time is 10 a.m. at the Fall City Library. For children, ages 6 to 24 months, with an adult. STORY TIME: Preschool Story Time is 10:45 a.m. at the Fall City Library, for children age 3 to 6 with an adult. BOOK DISCUSSION: Best of Book Club is 6:30 p.m. at Snoqualmie Valley Community Center (YMCA), Snoqualmie Ridge. Come for stimulating discussions of award-winning books written by authors recognized for their contributions to literature. Beginning in January, you will read finalists and winners of the 2012 National Book awards Fiction and Nonfiction categories.

• THE NUT JOB, PG, 2 AND 5 P.M. • AMERICAN HUSTLE, R, 8 P.M.

SUNDAY, JAN. 26 • THE NUT JOB, PG, 2 P.M. • AMERICAN HUSTLE, R, 5 P.M.

MONDAY, JAN. 27 • THE NUT JOB, 5:30 P.M. • AMERICAN HUSTLE, R, 7:30

TUESDAY, JAN. 28 • THE NUT JOB, 5:30 P.M. • AMERICAN HUSTLE, R, 7:30

The man the Oregonian called “the thinking man’s comic,” Will Durst, presents his one-man show, “Boomeraging: From LSD to OMG” Friday through Sunday, Jan. 24 to 26 at Valley Center Stage, 119 North Bend Way, North Bend. The show is a tribute to the joys, achievements, frustrations, and looming doom of the Baby Boomer Generation. Durst encourages his chronologically gifted brethren to refuse to grow old in the face of gravity, no matter how many times they forget their online banking security question. It’s a celebration of the maturation of the Boomer Nation culminating in an extra, added special treat, the meaning of life. Show times are 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $17.50, available online at www.valleycenterstage.org.

STORY TIME: Family Pajama Story Time is 7 p.m. at Snoqualmie Library. All ages are welcome with an adult. TODDLER TIME: Toddler Time with Encompass at Snoqualmie Y is 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Parents and Toddlers participate together in an enrichment class. Bundle up to learn about snowflakes, icicles and more. Pre-register for the four week session by calling 425-256-3115.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24 WYDLLIFE CLUB: Middle school-age youth can take part in games, singing and activities at Wyldlife Club, part of Young Life, at 7 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24, at 8036 Falls Ave. S.E., Snoqualmie; send an email to snoqualmievalleyyl@gmail.com. SKI BUS: Y Riders Friday Night Ski bus hits the slopes, 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., starting today. Y staff provide transportation and supervision for skiers ages 11 to 17. Learn more and register by calling 425256-3115.

SATURDAY, JAN. 25 ANIMANIA: Badge fest is 1 p.m. at the Carnation Library. Ring in the New Year with a new location for the Carnation and Duvall Library Anime and Manga club! Bring your own artwork sized to fit 1.5 inch or 1 inch badges and get ready to create. KIDS NIGHT OUT: New Year’s Party is Children can decorate cookies and enjoy a hot cocoa bar while parents enjoy an evening for themselves; 6 to 10 p.m. at the Snoqualmie Y. Cost ranges from $20 to $36 per child. Register by calling 425-256-3115.

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Crossword puzzle

Across 1. Swagger 8. Boss (2 wds) 14. Stripping gels 16. Monstrous 17. Too old? (2 wds) 18. Mural on wet plaster 19. One of Alcott’s “Little Men” 20. Igneous rock 22. Product of inflammation 23. Came down 25. Contact, e.g. 26. Stallion, once 27. Strong, flexible twig 29. Moray, e.g. 30. Reef material 31. Strata 33. Estate residents considered as a group 35. Aug. follower 37. Bakery buy 38. King or queen (2 wds) 42. Graft 46. Circa 47. Common Market inits. 49. ___ Head, New Zealand promontory 50. Beach shades 51. Perry Como’s “___

Loves Mambo” 52. Break 53. Antiquity, in antiquity 54. A series of excerpted writings (pl.) 57. Alpine sight 58. Bungle (2 wds) 60. Capital of Chad, Africa 62. An Eastern church that acknowledges papal authority but retains its own liturgy 63. Slash 64. A, B or C 65. Became half-asleep

Down 1. Tool for making small holes in wood 2. Royal emblems and symbols 3. Feature that increases attractiveness or value 4. Tennessee athlete, for short 5. All fired up 6. Moore of “G.I. Jane” 7. Brooks Robinson, e.g. 8. Homesteads (British) 9. Shrek, e.g. 10. Grand ___ (“Evangeline” setting) 11. Play boisterously

12. Pertains to a sponge’s mouth-like opening 13. Spectral 15. Public road in a city 21. Arm 24. Greek myth hero who slew the Minotaur 26. Twist or bend out of shape 28. At attention 30. Chocolate substitute 32. Marienbad, for one 34. Apprehend 36. Milk-Bone biscuit, e.g. 38. Having important consequences 39. Marine rock-clinger 40. Pipe or channel carrying water 41. Rely 43. Makes soundproof 44. Thin layers 45. Beryl variety 48. Unvarnished 51. Mill output 54. Adorable 55. “When it’s ___” (old riddle answer) 56. Kind of palm 59. Back muscle, familiarly 61. Cut grass


Sports  SNOQUALMIE VALLEY

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

Pushing your limits Experience comes even when the match doesn’t go your way, as Mount Si wrestling falls to Bellevue BY SETH TRUSCOTT Editor

Adult sports leagues starting The Si View Metro Parks adult sports leagues are rolling out the winter season in February. Offered are men’s five-on-five basketball and co-ed six-onsix volleyball. The basketball league will play on Thursday evenings at Si View Community Center. All teams are guaranteed seven games, and the top four teams will battle for the league championship in playoffs. Referees and scorekeepers are provided. The volleyball league will play self-officiated games on Thursdays evenings at local schools. Each team is guaranteed seven games with top four teams advancing to playoffs. To sign up, send an e-mail to bstanford@siviewpark. org or call (425) 831-1900.

Snoqualmie Valley Record • January 22, 2014 • 9

Seth Truscott/Staff Photos

Above, Mount Si wrestler Cameron McLain brings down his Bellevue opponent, Jan. 16. McLain won by pin. Right, Quinn Oster locks up his Wolverine foe. Below, Mount Si sophomore Andrew Harris battles for position with his opponent.

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This is Andrew Harris’s time to learn. A sophomore, Harris is holding down Mount Si’s heavyweight class, often against older, more experienced and physically bulkier opponents. In the ring against Bellevue on Thursday, Jan. 16, he was neck and neck for points, before finally succumbing to a pin in the final seconds. “He had a lot of weight on me, and I had to fight it out,” said Harris. “It was a pretty close match in the end.” Now, Harris will work harder and condition himself during practices. He and other Mount Si wrestlers will take their losses and learn from them. All told, Mount Si is having a good season this year, but will face tough teams on the road to regionals and state. That makes practice and preparation very important. “They beat us in conditioning,” Mount Si coach Tony Schlotfeldt said of the Bellevue match. “They wanted it more.” Due to some absences, Mount Si had to shuffle some wrestlers around Thursday. That happens, and “they’ve got to be able to deal, come in confident,” said Schlotfeldt. “You’ve got to bring it in practice. “Hat goes off to Andrew,” the coach added. “He’s one of the kids who grinds it out in practice every week. He’s made some leaps and bounds from the beginning of the season.” Harris went up against a decidedly heavier heavyweight—the Wolverine probably had 25 pounds on him—and by the end, “carrying that guy’s extra weight on him definitely gassed him,” Schlotfeldt said. Still, the two wrestlers were neck and neck in terms of points for much of the match. “Every once in a while, you can peek up at the scoreboard, see where you’re at,” Harris said. A lot of it is feel. “If he’s controlling you, you can pick it up a notch and wrestle harder.” The heavyweight has been a wrestler since fifth grade, and does it for the workout. He’ll likely come back to the heavyweight spot as his high school career progresses. Look for him to bulk up as he grows in experience. Junior Gunnar Harrison faced a wrestler of similar size and build, and did his best to maintain a handle on the match and his opponent. He employed the skills he’s been drilling all week and throughout the season. “I did my best not to gas,” said Harrison—gassing is a wrestling term for running out of breath—“but started gassing toward the end.” Still, he kept control. When it comes to Bellevue competition, “they’re really good. I was expecting (us) to be a little bit better.” When Wildcats lose, “we move on,” Harrison said. “We kind of pay for it at practice.” Harrison is dropping into a lower weight class, and doing his best to get to state this year. He watched as several underclassmen wrestled their first or second time on varsity, “and really came through. They may not have won, but they did their best and made the other wrestlers proud.” Mount Si’s Cameron McLain beat his man at 195. “He was tough to pin,” the junior said. Still, McLain felt like he had control most of the match. He glanced up a couple times to check the points, but otherwise, his attention was on his foe. “You try not to think about” the score, he said. “I try to relax. For me, it’s a mental thing.” He can tell who’s the better wrestler, condition-wise, from momentum. McLain is always sensing for weaknesses, openings, ways to pin—“anything that comes up.” McLain is another who’s made a lot of improvement this year. A wrestler since fifth grade, he made it to regionals as an alternate in 2013, and would like to make it to that event in an official capacity this year. Two exhibition matches followed Thursday, involving wrestlers Isaac Flower and Kyle Haynie. Flower, a Mount Si junior varsity wrestler, took on Bellevue’s varsity man in the 126 weight class, and put up a good fight. “I was proud of myself, but in the end, he won,” Flower said. “Failing is a new chance to start more intelligently next time. I learn from everything I get beat by.”


10 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

WWW.VALLEYRECORD.COM

TORGUSON PARK FROM 1 Few vistas, he thought, compared with the backdrop of Mount Si at the Little League’s home field, North Bend’s Torguson Park. Touring newer ballfields, Baunsgard was also struck by their modern facilities, bleachers and concession stands. The decades-old fourplex of ballfields at Torguson, meanwhile, were showing their age. Bent and bowed, “these backstops had served their time,” Baunsgard said. The Valley is growing, but facilities weren’t keeping up with the growing league, which begins registration this month. So, about a year ago, Baunsgard hit on a plan. He wanted to turn Torguson Park into a showplace, a modern park where the league could host big baseball tournaments, under the face of Mount Si. Then he put the plan into action. Baunsgard’s idea has gone from a diagram on a napkin to a master plan at North Bend City Hall. It didn’t take long for Little League officials to realize that their wish list—modern backstops and dugouts, a centralized restroom and concession stand—encompassed more work, including a new water and sewer line, than they alone could fund. The league turned to the city, working with planning staff and city Councilman Jonathan Rosen. Official consideration began with the North Bend parks commission, which made changes to the park element of the city’s comprehensive plan. The council is expected to adopt the plan in April. The city had its own ideas for Torguson Park, so the league’s plan had to mesh. The league will pay for its $60,000 ballfield fix while the city is working on grants for a new walking path and exercise stations around the park, a gathering plaza by the parking lot, and new access to the growing neighborhoods to the east. Little League and the Snoqualmie Valley Youth Soccer Association both partner with the city from time to time on improvements to local fields. The league’s Majors field got a re-do last summer. The new upgrade is a bigger version of that club-city partnership. “When it’s done, it’s going to be the nicest baseball park in the Valley, if not beyond,” Baunsgard said. The new restroom/concession stand, which will be similar to Si View’s or Centennial Fields’ building, is the biggest change. The current building, shadowed by a stand of trees at the far side of Field Four, “is not usable for most parents,” said SVLL Scheduler Troy Garwood. “You can’t see it. With the transient population, you don’t send anybody under 12 to the bathroom if you can’t see them.” Besides, he adds, nobody’s going to get a hot dog if they have to walk 200 yards and miss a big play.

N O SI ES D C N N A O ST C

SEATING AREA

FLAG POLE

Courtesy photo

An artist’s vision of the new four-plex baseball field at North Bend’s Torguson Park, including dugouts, a central concession stand and restroom. “Every good baseball field (has) a center hub,” explains Baunsgard. “It’s family oriented. Everybody can hang out in the middle. It’s a group gathering spot.” Without a central hub, “The game slows down,” said Rosen. “Here, they’re in and out in seconds. It’s much safer.” To Rosen, the work will add a much-needed layer of polish to the field. And the partnership, he said, offers a lot of “bang for the buck.” Surveying and design will come this summer, with work starting next fall. The league will be fundraising for the project this year, in a campaign inspired by North Bend Theatre’s successful $100,000 digital projector campaign. “Little League is a trademark in this city,” said Garwood, who expects big local support. With growth in the city, and hotels being planned, Baunsgard sees big things in a better baseball field. “We’re primed to prepare that place for a lot of fun,” he said. Learn more about SVLL at http://www.svll.net/home.php.

Register Now! 956890

T-BALL BASEBALL SOFTBALL www.svll.net

Player evaluations for ages 8 to 14 are on Feb. 8th & 9th. Register before January 29th to ensure placement on a team!

969869

Ages 4-14


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2.3 acres between Gig Harbor and Allyn. Large Salmon Stream with Saltwater Frontage at higher tides. Power, water and 5BR septic installed. RV ready. $79,950.00. Can add 10x20 cabin for 5,000 or newer Toy Hauler RV for $10,000.00. Owner contract OK. 253-426-5137 &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE WWWNW ADSCOM ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY Real Estate for Sale Other Areas

ARIZONA SUNSHINE

(1) and (2) acre lots from only $2995 Low Down, East Terms, Warm Winters (928)753-7125 www.landarizona.com

3 BDRM, $1190/month Avail now. & 2 BDRM $960/month Avail Mar 1. 4-Plex in Snoqualmie. 10 minutes to Issaquah. No smoking, no pets. Water/ sewer/ garbage & drainage paid, covered parking and additional storage available First, last, damage required . 425-861-4081 WA Misc. Rentals Parking/RV Spaces

RV Space

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announcements

jobs

Announcements

Employment General

ADOPTION: H Adoring Financially Secure Athletic Couple, Stay home Mom, year n for 1st baby. Expenses paid 1-800-816-8424 HHH Debbie & BillHHH Advertise your product or service nationwide or by region in up to 12 million households in North America’s best suburbs! Place your classified ad in over 815 suburban newspapers just like this one. Call Classified Avenue at 888-486-2466 or go to www.classifiedavenue.net ANNOUNCE your festiva l fo r o n l y p e n n i e s. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

FORECLOSURE! 13.3 acres, trees, meadows Reach thousands of and easy access. Great ClassiďŹ eds. We’ve got you hunting or camping area! readers 1-800-388-2527 covered. 800-388-2527 O n l y $ 2 3 , 5 0 0 o n l ow P E LV I C / Tr a n s va g i n a l d ow n s e l l e r c o n t ra c t . Mesh? Did you undergo Call TLC 1-888-440transvaginal placement 9824 Ref: PR of mesh for pelvic organ Real Estate for Sale prolapse or stress uriOffice/Commercial nar y incontinence between 2005 and the BUSINESS OPPORTUpresent? If the mesh NITIES! In sunny Southcaused complications, east Washington Properyou may be entitled to ties Available: compensation. Call *Restaurant, tur n-key Charles H. Johnson Law operation, land, bldg, and speak with female equipment *CommerMoney to staff members 1-800cial/Retail bldg in DownLoan/Borrow 535-5727 town Historic Dist. *Convenience Store & Gas L O C A L P R I VAT E I N station, bldg & equip- VESTOR loans money Weight Watchers ment For fur ther infor- on real estate equity. I New mation contact South- l o a n o n h o u s e s, r aw Meeting east Washington EDA, land, commercial properin North Bend at the ty and property develop509-843-1104 Mt. Si Senior Center. ment. Call Eric at Join us on ClassiďŹ eds. We’ve got you ( 4 2 5 ) 8 0 3 - 9 0 6 1 . Monday Evenings covered. 800-388-2527 www.fossmortgage.com

financing

at 6:00pm

General Financial

real estate for rent - WA Apartments for Rent King County

DUVALL - 2 Bedroom Apt W/Dr yer, Storage Unit. 2 Covered Parking Spaces. Available 2-1-14 $1025 Month + Util. Quiet Forest Setting Just Above Town. Steve 206-930-1188 Visit our web site for great deals nw-ads.com

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Apartments for Rent King County

real estate for sale

Purchase the East King County SUPERZONE package and reach 60,854 homes each week in the Redmond Reporter, Issaquah/Sammamish Reporter and Snoqualmie Valley Record.

Lost

MISSING DOG - LOGAN. Missing since August 10th from Auburn area. Sightings in Kent and Bellevue. Mini Blue Merle Australian Shepherd. Very scared and skittish. Please call Diane at 253-486-4351 if you see him. REWARD OFFERED. 9OURĂĽNEWĂĽJOBĂĽISĂĽWAITINGĂĽATĂĽĂĽ WWWNW ADSCOM

CARRIER ROUTES AVAILABLE IN YOUR AREA Call Today 1-253-872-6610 ClassiďŹ eds. We’ve got you covered. 800-388-2527 Location: King and Snohomish County Descript i o n : F l a g g e r D o yo u want to be a part of a World Class Team? This position is responsible for Traffic Control Management. Please inquire about open positions and Flagger Certification Classes at http://www. flaggers.jobs/washington-jobs.html.

WWWNW ADSCOM ,OCALĂĽJOBSĂĽINĂĽPRINTĂĽANDĂĽON LINE &INDĂĽ)TĂĽ"UYĂĽ)TĂĽ3ELLĂĽ)T ,OOKINGĂĽFORĂĽTHEĂĽRIDE OFĂĽYOURĂĽLIFE WWWNW ADSCOM ĂĽHOURSĂĽAĂĽDAY REPORTER The North Kitsap Herald, a Friday newspaper and daily online site located i n b e a u t i f u l Po u l s b o, Washington, is accepting applications for a fulltime sports and education reporter. The ideal candidate will have solid repor ting and writing skills, have up-to-date k n ow l e d g e o f t h e A P Stylebook, be able to shoot photos, be able to use InDesign and contribute to Web updates. This position includes health insurance, paid vacation, sick leave and holidays, and a 401k (with company match). The Herald, founded in 1901, was a 2012 Newspaper of the Year (Local Media Association) and a 2013 General Excellence winner (Washington Newspaper Publishers Association). If you want to work in an ambitious, dynamic newsroom, we want to hear from you. E.O.E. Email your resume, cover letter and up to 5 non-returnable writing and photo samples to hr@soundpublishing.com Or mail to EPNKH/HR Dept., Sound Publishing, 11323 Commando Rd W., Main Unit, Everett, WA 98204 www.soundpublishing.com

REPORTER T h e C ov i n g t o n / M a p l e Valley Reporter, a division of Sound Publishing Inc. is seeking a seasoned general assignment reporter with writing exper ience and photography skills. This is a senior position and is based out of the Covington office. The primary coverage will be city government, business, sports, general assignment stor ies; and may include arts coverage. Schedule includes evening and/or weekend work. As a Reporter for Sound Publishing, you will be expected to: generate 8-10 by-line stories per week; use a digital camera to take photographs of the stories you cover ; post on the publication’s web site; blog and use Twitter on the web; layout pages, using InDesign; shoot and edit videos for the web. The most highly valued traits are: commitment to community jour nalism and ever ything from short, brieftype stories about people and events to examining issues facing the community; to be inquisitive and resourceful in the coverage of assigned beats; to be comfor table producing five bylined stories a week; the ability to write stories that are tight and to the point; to be a motivated self-starter; to be able to establish a rapport with the community. Candidates must have excellent communication and organizational skills, and be able to work effectively in a deadline-driven environment. Minimu m o f t wo ye a r s o f previous newspaper experience is required. Position also requires use of personal vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. We offer a competitive hourly wage and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Email us your cover letter, resume, and include five examples of your best work showcasing your reporting skills and writing chops to:

Skilled Trades/Construction

Employment

Employment Transportation/Drivers

Utility Locate Technicians - Paid Training Locating Inc. is hiring Utility Locate Technicians in your area. GED/HS diploma req. Paid Training. Company truck provided. Apply online at www.locatinginc.com

DRIVERS -- Whether you have experience or need training, we offer unbeatable career opp o r t u n i t i e s . Tr a i n e e , Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 centraldrivingjobs.com

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TRUCK DRIVERS. CDL+A+T - LOCAL. Now hiring company drivers for terminals in Vancouver, Centralia, Spokane, Pasco, Everett. Must have 2 years, good record. e-mail collette@washtruck.com or call 425-259-5116 weekdays for an applicaReach readers the daily newspapers miss tion.

when you advertise in the ClassiďŹ eds. ClassiďŹ eds. We’ve got you 1-800-388-2527 or covered. 800-388-2527 www.nw-ads.com

SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad.

OH NO!

CAN’T FIND RENTERS FOR YOUR HOME OR APARTMENT? CALL JENNIFER

253.861.9318

jsalscheider@kentreporter.com

ASK ABOUT PACKAGE DEALS! Log on to a website that’s easy to navigate Whether you’re buying or selling, the Classifieds has it all. From automobiles and employment to real estate and household goods, you’ll find everything you need 24 hours a day at

www.nw-ads.com.

hreast@soundpublishing.com

or mail to: Sound Publishing, Inc. 19426 68th Avenue S. Kent, WA 98032, ATTN: HR/COV Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the wor kplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com ClassiďŹ eds. We’ve got you covered. 800-388-2527

Employment Transportation/Drivers

953801

Reach 60,854 homes with an East King County SUPERZONE Package each week. Your ad will run in the Redmond Reporter, Issaquah/ Sammamish Reporter and Snoqualmie Valley Record.

Find what you need 24 hours a day.


12 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record Employment Transportation/Drivers

CAB DRIVERS Make up to $200 cash per day! • Fun job! Lots of money! We need Help!

•

Call Today:

(425) 609-7777 Advertise your service

800-388-2527 or nw-ads.com

SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad. Employment Sales & Retail

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Business Opportunities

Work From Home

Anti-Aging Business Goldmine! #1 Baby Boomer Market in US. Prime Turn-key locations available. $12K(min. Invest)=$50K+ Yearly! Call t o d ay : 8 8 8 - 9 0 0 - 8 2 7 6 24/7 Make Up To $2,000.00+ Per Week! New Credit Card Ready Drink-Snack Vending Machines. Minimum $4K to $40K+ Investment Required. Locations Available. BBB A c c r e d i t e d B u s i n e s s. (800) 962-9189

Real- Estate Careers Earn your real estate license before the market goes back up. Evening classes. We Take Payments

Reach readers the daily newspapers miss when you advertise in the ClassiďŹ eds. 953727 1-800-388-2527 or Sell it free in the Flea www.nw-ads.com 1-866-825-9001

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KENMORE FREEZER

stuff

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Appliances

953457

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Cemetery Plots

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Schools & Training

AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Tra i n fo r h a n d s o n Av i a t i o n C a r e e r. FA A approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-818-0783

953502

SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad.

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2 PREMIUM PLOTS in Washington Memor ial Park, at 16445 International Highway, SeaTac. Located toward the middle of the cemetary, in the sold-out “Friendship Garden�. Asking $4,900 f o r b o t h . Va l u e d a t $4,495 each. You may v i ew t h e s i t e s i n a d vance. Transfer fee covered by owner. Call Mike 360-601-4518.

& Transmissions

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email: classified@soundpublishing.com

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E V E R G R E E N WA S H ELLI IN SEATTLE TWO SIDE BY SIDE PLOTS $4000.00 OBO EVERGREEN WASHELLI Two side by side grave plots for sale in Section E, 23, 0309, Crypt 5 & 6. You can have both plots for $ 4 0 0 0 . 0 0 O B O. E a c h plot is valued at $5000. 00 by Evergreen Washelli so this is a great buy. Please call 206-7192887 or 425-770-7031. You can also email to swimer-skier@comcast.net. Ask for Kevin or Carrie. We will send you a map of the plots upon request. The locat i o n i s 1 1 1 1 1 Au r o ra (2) SIDE BY SIDE plots Ave. North Seattle, WA In Sunset Hills Memorial 98133 Park. In sold out Lincoln 100 section, plot # 8 and Electronics #9. Prime location for easy access. Wonderful mountain views in one of D i r e c T V - O v e r 1 4 0 the most highly sought channels only $29.99 a after cemeteries in the month. Call Now! Triple Greater Seattle Area. savings! $636.00 in Sav$9,500 each; $14,500 as ings, Free upgrade to a pair. Call Steve Scott Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Star t at 509-881-8897 saving today! 1-800-2793018 *$3000 PLOT* Beautiful mature floral landscape with fountain at the desirable Bonney Watson. Located in the peaceful Garden of Flowers. Owner pays transfer fee. Sea Tac, near Airpor t. Please text or call 206734-9079.

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Japanese Engines

910425

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953443

Make $15 monthly payments or pay off balance of $293. Credit Dept.

SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad.

Cemetery Plots

2 SIDE BY SIDE Burial lots. Highly desirable “Lords Prayer Memorial� area at EvergreenWashelli Memorial Park, 11111 Aurora Ave North, 98133. Section 17, lot 214, graves 6 & 7. Tog e t h e r, a s k i n g o n l y $ 7 , 7 0 0 . Va l u e d a t $ 5 , 7 5 0 e a c h . P r i va t e seller, please call Gloria 480-361-5074.

*UNDER WARRANTY*

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homes apartments houseboats vacation homes

Cemetery Plots

Repo Sears deluxe 20cu.ft. freezer 4 fast freeze shelves, defrost drain, interior light

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Appliances

S U P P L E M E N TA L I N COME - Place and supervise international high school students in host families. Training, incentives and international travel available. Call Pam at 253-2295784

Live Instructed. Blue Emerald Real Estate School Front counter sales associate wanted for InKing Co: dustrial Supply house, for sales to the commercial construction & mar i n e t r a d e s . Yo u w i l l need a STRONG background in sales of power tools/equipment, lifting & safety products, along with basic construction hardware. Also, strong customer support on the floor & on the phone Full time insurance & 401k p r o gra m s p r o p h e t 2 1 computer knowledge is a plus. compensation b a s e d o n ex p e r i e n c e please sent resume & contact info to: steve@ dunlapindustrial.com

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ACACIA Memorial Park, “Birch Garden�, (2) adjacent cemetery plots, #3 & #4. Selling $4,000 each or $7,500 both. Located in Shoreline / N. Seattle. Call or email Emmons Johnson, 2067 9 4 - 2 1 9 9 , * R E D U C E YO U R CABLE BILL!* Get a 4eaj3000@msn.com Room All-Digital Satellite E v e r g r e e n Wa s h e l l i , s y s t e m i n s t a l l e d f o r Seattle, 4 plots in sec- FREE and programming tion 19 on corner. Seller star ting at $19.99/mo. t o p a y t r a n s f e r f e e . FREE HD/DVR upgrade $3,000/each or all 4 for for new callers. CALL $10,000 (425)482-0996 NOW!! 877-388-8575

We are community & daily newspapers in these Western Washington Locations: • King County • Kitsap County • Clallam County • Jefferson County • Okanogan County • Pierce County • Island County • San Juan County • Snohomish County • Whatcom County Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. We offer a great work environment with opportunity for advancement along with a competitive benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401k.

Accepting resumes at: hreast@soundpublishing.com or by mail to: 19426 68th Avenue S, Kent, WA 98032 ATTN: HR Please state which position and geographic area you are applying for.

Sales Positions

• Multi Media Advertising Sales Consultants - Whidbey - Thurston - Kitsap - Seattle • Advertising & Marketing Coordinator - Port Angeles

Reporters & Editorial • Reporters - Poulsbo - Everett - Covington

Non-Media Positions • Circulation Manager - Kirkland • Circulation Assistant - Whidbey

Production

• Insert Machine Operator - Everett • General Worker - Everett

Featured Position

Current Employment Opportunities at www.soundpublishing.com

CIRULATION MANAGER - KIRKLAND Sound Publishing, Inc. is currently accepting applications for a Circulation Manager at the Kirkland and Bothell/Kenmore Reporters. The primary duty of a Circulation Manager (CM) is to manage a geographic district. The CM will be accountable for the assigned newspaper as follows: Recruiting, contracting and training independent contractors to meet delivery deadlines, insuring delivery standards are being met and quality customer service. Position requires the ability to operate a motor vehicle in a safe manner; to occasionally lift and/or transport bundles weighing up to 25 pounds from ground level to a height of 3 feet; to deliver newspaper routes, including ability to negotiate stairs and to deliver an average of 75 newspapers per hour for up to 8 consecutive hours; to communicate with carriers and the public by telephone and in person; to operate a personal computer. Must possess reliable, insured, motor vehicle and a valid Washington State driver’s license. We offer a competitive compensation and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you are interested in joining the team at the Kirkland and Bothell/Kenmore Reporters, email us your cover letter and resume to: hreast@soundpublishing.com CIRCMGR Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the workplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

For a list of our most current job openings and to learn more about us visit our website:

www.soundpublishing.com


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Professional Services Professional Services Attorney, Legal Services Instruction/Classes

U TA H & O R E G O N CONCEALED FIREARMS PERMIT TRAINING CLASSES Mon 2/17 & Mon 3/10, 9am2pm in Ravensdale/Kent area $99 Contact: aaclaybusters.com for info & to sign up online.

Home Services Property Maintenance

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All Things Basementy! Basement Systems Inc. Call us for all of your basement needs! Waterproofing ? Finishing ? Structural Repairs ? Humidity and Mold Control F R E E E S T I M AT E S ! Call 1-888-698-8150 SOLD IT? FOUND IT? Let us know by calling 1-800-388-2527 so we can cancel your ad.

Home Services Electrical Contractors

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Home Services Hauling & Cleanup

Home Services Landscape Services

A+ HAULING

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Home Services Pole Builder/Storage

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Home Owners Re-Roofs

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Hundreds of Designs Available!

2 Stall Barn w/Tack Room 24’x30’x10’

401/mo.

ROOFING & REMODELING

Home Services Plumbing

As Of 11/30/13

$

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4� Concrete floor w/fibermix reinforcement & zip-strip crack control, 12’x13’ metal framed sliding door w/cam latch closers, (2) 10’x12’ raised panel steel overhead doors, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/selfclosing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 10’ continuous flow ridge vent.

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Domestic Services Child Care Offered

ROOFING ALL TYPES

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41 s t

Toy Box 32’x48’x14’

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CONCRETE INCLUDED!

(2) 10’x12’ Permastalls w/ (2) 4’x8’ split opening Dutch doors, 10’x12’ tack room w/(2) CDX walls, 4’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 4’x3’ double glazed window w/ screen, 18� eave & gable overhangs, 10’ continous flow ridge vent.

$

19,388

$

17,298

Deluxe Barn 30’x36’x11’

$

248/mo.

4� Concrete floor with fibermix reinforcement and zip-strip crack control, (2) 10’x8’ raised panel steel overhead doors, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 3’x3’ double glazed vinyl window w/screen, 10’ continuous flow ridge vent.

$

17,931

$

16,450

$

236/mo.

Deluxe Carport 20’x20’x9’

CONCRETE INCLUDED!

4� Concrete floor w/fibermix reinforcement & zip-strip crack control, (1) 10’x12’ & (2) 9’x8’ raised panel steel overhead doors, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 3’ wainscoating, 2’ poly eavelight, 5/12 roof pitch w/coffer truss, 10’ continuous flow ridge vent.

$

28,222

$

25,583

$

CONCRETE INCLUDED!

CONCRETE INCLUDED!

4� Concrete floor w/fibermix reinforcement & zip-strip crack control, 16’x8’ raised panel steel overhead door, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges (1) 10’x8’ & (1) 4’x4’ Metal framed split sliding door w/cross hatch & cam-latch closers, (3) 4’x8’ & stainless steel lockset, 2’ poly eavelight, 10’ continuous flow ridge vent. cross-hatched split-opening wood Dutch doors, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 18� eave & gable overhangs, 24� cupola w/PermaBilt weathervane.

$

$ $ 12,616 181/mo. 13,898 0RGLÀHG*ULG%DUQ¡[¡[¡

$

$ $ 21,844 287/mo. 19,973 L-Shape Garage 20’x40’x8’ w/20’x10’x8’

CONCRETE INCLUDED!

10’x9’ Metal framed split sliding door w/cam-latch closers, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 2’ poly eavelight, 10’ continuous flow ridge vent.

$

18,985

$

17,259

$

367/mo.

3 Car Garage 24’x30’x9’

4� Concrete floor w/fibermix reinforcement & zip-strip crack control, 16’x7’ raised panel steel overhead door, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/self-closing hinges & stainless steel lockset, (2) 3’x2’ double glazed cross-hatch vinyl windows w/screens, 18� eave & gable overhangs, 10’ continous flow ridge vent.

18� Eave & gable overhangs, 2� fiberglass vapor barrier insulation.

$ 7,535 8,389 109/mo. Large Garage & Shop 24’x24’x9’ w/16’x36’x14’ $

$

4� Concrete floor with fibermix reinforcement and zip-strip crack control, (3) 8’x8’ raised panel steel overhead doors, 3’x6’8� PermaBilt door w/selfclosing hinges & stainless steel lockset, 10’ continuous flow ridge vent.

$

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Notice to Contractors Washington State Law (RCW 18.27.100) requires that all advertisements for construction related services include the contractor’s current depar tment of Labor and Industries registration number in the advertisement. Failure to obtain a certificate of registration from L&I or show the registration number in all advertising will result in a fine up to $5000 against the unregistered contractor. For more infor mation, call Labor and Industries Specialty Compliance Services Division at 1-800-647-0982 or check L&Is internet site at www.lni.wa.gov

Home Services Appliance Repair

Snoqualmie Valley Record • January 22, 2014 • 13

Financing based on 12% interest, all payments based on 10 years (unless otherwise noted), O.A.C.. Actual rate may vary. Prices do not include permit costs or sales tax & are based on a flat, level, accessible building site w/less than 1’ of fill, w/85 MPH Wind Exposure “B�, 25# snow load, for non commercial usage & do not include prior sales & may be affected by county codes and/or travel considerations. Drawings for illustration purposes only. Ad prices expire 2/2/14.


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Exercise Equipment

Miscellaneous

$300 TREADMILL S300i Heathrider. Folds up for easy storage. Digital display. Low hours. Manual included. Original owner. Great cond! North Bend. Call Ron 425-831-7879.

SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -- Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free I n f o / DV D : w w w. N o r woodSawmills.com 1800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

Firearms & Ammunition

Wanted/Trade

GUN FANCIER Wants t o bu y p i s t o l s, r i f l e s, shotguns. Old or new! P h o n e q u o t e s g l a d l y. Cash of course. Call 206-526-8081. Thanks

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Call: 800-388-2527 E-mail: classified@ soundpublishing.com or Go Online 24 hours a day: www.nw-ads.com to place an ad in the Classifieds.

Dogs

Free Items Recycler

FREE: JOHN Deere Riding Lawn Mower. Does not start. Call to arrange pick up. 425-736-1700 Mail Order

Canada Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90% on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-418-8975, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping.

***AKC WESTIE PUPS* We s t H i g h l a n d W h i t e Te r r i e r s. M a l e s & fe males, $1,000. Will take deposits. Call with any questions. You can’t go w r o n g w i t h a We s t i e 360-402-6261 A K I TA P U R E B R E D Puppies. Champion bloodlines. Parents on site. 7 weeks old. Will have first shots and puppy packet. 4 Females, 3 Males. Black & White; Black, Brindle & White and Brindle. $850 obo. Call Tony, 505-507-5581 or email: tepiercejr@gmail.com

pets/animals

Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. FREE Equipment. FREE Shipping. Nationwide Service. $29.95/Month CALL Medical Guardian Today 866-992-7236

AKC MINI Schnauzer P u p p i e s. R e a d y f r o m m i d Fe b r u a r y t o l a t e February. More to come! N ow t a k i n g d e p o s i t s. Shots and Worming Up To Date. Tails and Dew Claws done. $400 Males, $500 Females. 253-223-3506, 253-2238382 or

VIAGRA 100mg or CIALIS 20mg. 40 tabs + 10 FREE all for $99 including FREE SHIPPING. Discreet, Fast Shipping. 888-836-0780 or pre- gonetothedogskennel.com miummeds.net

AKC Poodle Puppies Te a c u p s ; 5 G i r l s , Parti, Apricot, Chocolate, Black & Cream; 4 Boys, Parti, Chocolate and Phantom. Darling Little Bundles Full of Love and Kisses. Reserve your puff of love. 360-2493612

Miscellaneous

K I L L ROAC H E S ! B u y Harr is Roach Tablets. Eliminate Bugs- Guaranteed. No Mess, Odorless, Long Lasting. Available at Ace Hardware & The Home Depot.

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GERMAN SHEPHERD female, 3 years, beautiful, black & red, large 95 lbs, obedience trained, spayed. Selling for home companion/protection. RedOakShepherds.com $800. 360-262-0706 GERMAN SHEPHERD pups, AKC. Ger man lines. Selectively bred for work & family companions. Loving protection temperament. Parents on site. RedOakShepherds.com $900 360-262-0706

MINI AUSSIE Purebred Pups, raised in family home, sweet parents, 1st shots, wormed, dew claws & tails done, many colors, $450 & up, good4u219@gmail.com 360-550-6827

Pickup Trucks Ford

PUPPY KISSES FOR Sale! Bernese Mountain Dog cross puppies. Last two litters, only 5 days apart! Various colors, 5 puppies, choose your color today! 10 week old boys & girls! Super cute! Great family dogs! Both p a r e n t s o n s i t e. C a l l Christine for details $300 - $600. 360-858-1451. www.facebook.com/ SeedMountainFarm

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1990 BLACK FORD F150 XL pickup truck for sale. 2 wheel drive, Tires are 31x10.50’s on Ultra wheels (need cleaning), tires in excellent cond. Repainted 5 years ago & engine replaced (July ‘03) at 71,186 miles by Whidbey Island Ford. Stock 302, V8 fuel injected! Twin gas tanks and cruise control. Canopy is 4 years old w/ bed liner. Runs Great! Ver y dependable. 29,619 miles on new engine. Have all receipts since I bought in 2001. Odometer reads 00805. $3,500 Firm. Call or text 360-320-8390.

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ROTTWEILERS, Purebred German, AKC Papered. $800. HUGE & Great with Kids. 425280-2662. Serious Inquiries only.

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1999 JEEP WRANGLER Sport. Tow behind ready AT, 4 W D & 1 7 0 , 0 0 0 miles. Good running gear. Nice driving rig, great shape. All stock with hard top. $10,000 obo. Granite Falls. Call Travis 425-315-6817 or 360-691-6105.

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Interested in Great Dane ownership? Be informed before you buy or adopt, visit daneoutreach.org, 2007 37’ 340 SEARAY gdca.org, gdcww.org. Sundancer Boat! Fully L o a d e d i n n ew c o n d . Sea Ray’s Flagship for their Cruiser Line-Up. You’re not going to find anything else in this size range that provides the comfort & spaciousness. $139,000. 425-623-5203 morrisnet@msn.com

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28’ BAYLINER FULLY stocked, ready to hop in & go! Must see in person, a steal at $15,000! Comparable boats this size w/equipment are in the $30,000 price range. Won’t last long, act quick before it’s gone! Serious offers will be considered. Also willing to entertain vehicle or property trade. Call Tony 785-320-1448. Auto Events/ Auctions

‘01 DODGE+5th WHEEL 1 Ton Dually, 5.9 Turbo Auto Service/Parts/ Diesel 3500, crew cab, Accessories excellent, 134,000 miles, upgraded Laramie pkg + many after market items $15,995. Also a 29’ 2005 Forrest River Wildcat 5th Wheel 29BHBP $14,995 JUNK CARS & G r e a t fo r a l l a r o u n d TRUCKS camping & more storage than you can ever use! Two pass throughs, custom rear storage with shelving and peg board. 253-335-3932 Perfect for young family o r gra n d p a r e n t s w i t h r o o m f o r g r a n d k i d s . Misc. Recreational Vehicles Used for about a dozen trips - time to upgrade. WANTED: RV’s OF Great trailer in like new ANY TYPE - WILL BUY cond! 206-660-8034. FOR CASH OR TRADE FOR CAR. B & B RV SALES 1-888-631-1192

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*OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Gibson, Mar tin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prair ie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401DACHSHUND PUP0440 PIES. Mini. Black and *OLD ROLEX & PATEK Ta n , D a p p l e . Fa m i l y P H I L I P P E WAT C H E S Raised, First Shots, Vet WA N T E D ! * * D ay t o n a , Checked and Wormed. Sub Mariner, etc. TOP Parents on site. $300 to C A S H PA I D ! 1 - 8 0 0 - $400. 253-653-8346 401-0440 Field bred English Springer Spaniels. Born 29 Nov, excellent hunters and pets. parents o n s i t e, p a r e n t s aw e some birdogs and have won many hunting awa r d s. A l l l i ve r a n d white. AKC registered, dew claws removed tails docked and first shots. 550.00 Oak Harbor Call 559-816-2591. Hardchargin- springers@yahoo.com ready Dogs mid JAN

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14 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

Vehicles Wanted

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Makes!. Free Towing! We’re Local! 7 Days/Week. Call 1-800959-8518 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Tr u c k T O D AY. F r e e Towing! Instant Offer: 1-888-545-8647

Relax... Whether you’re buying or selling, the Classifieds has it all. From automobiles and employment to real estate and household goods; You’ll find everything you need in one website 24 hours a day 7 days a week: www.nw-ads.com.


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headquarters in Renton weekdays starting Jan. 24, or to a drop box in Bellevue City Hall Feb. 10 or 11, during business hours. King County Elections reminds voters that the price of a first-class stamp increases to 49 cents on Jan. 26. Next week, the Record will explore the district’s technology in the classroom program and the levy that funds it. For more information, visit the district website at www.svsd410.org, or find Snoqualmie Valley Citizens for Schools on Facebook. Citizens on fixed incomes may qualify for tax exemptions. Visit King County Dept. of Assessments, www. kingcounty.gov/Assessor. aspx.

Moms Club meet-and-greet planned The Moms Club support group of the Valley holds a Meet and Greet, 10 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, at 35018 SE Ridge St, Snoqualmie. MOMS Club is an international, nonprofit support group for mothers who stay home with their children, including those who have home-based businesses and those who work part time but are home with their children during the day. Open to mothers and children of all ages, they meet during the day when at-home moms most need support. Children are welcome at all MOMS Club activities. To learn more, send e-mail to info@momsclubofnorthbend.org.

Valley grads make dean’s list at Eastern The Dean’s List for the Fall 2013 quarter at Eastern Washington University includes students from the Valley: Snoqualmie: Zachariah Storm, Kaitlyn Usselman, Alek Behrends, Jessareh Helm, Kolton Auxier, Kyle Whitworth, Shelby Peerboom, Charles Corriveau, Kelly Kole, Kyle Takacs, Lindsay Kirby, Catherine Shintah, Hannah Masbaum, Cameron Hilsmann, Micah Masbaum. Carnation: Annika Browne. An undergraduate student who earns 12 credit hours and receives a GPA of 3.5 or better is placed on the Dean’s List for the quarter.

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“Essentially, both levies would replace levies that were approved by the voters in 2010, that are set to expire in 2014,” Aune said. The four-year levies are a flat $2.7 million technology levy specifically for technology in the classroom, a program the district is now training other districts on, and a $15.5 million Educational Programs and Operations (EPO) levy, which increases by $1 million each year. Their effect on tax-payers is an additional 47 cents per thousand levy for technology, and an additional $2.70 per thousand for operations. Both levy amounts are increased from the current levies, (calculated at 44 cents and $2.48 respectively for this year), reflecting enrollment growth and “the increased cost of doing business,” Aune said. A widening gap in state and other funding makes local levies critical. “The problem that we have is that the state is … not funding a whole lot of programs and staff that are essential to day-to-day operations,” Aune said, offering the example of classified staff (custodians, cooks, secretaries, etc.) for which the state covers only half the district’s budget. “They very rarely ever fully fund any mandate or requirement.” Of the school districts in King County, Snoqualmie Valley receives the least state funding per pupil, $8,858 to its general fund in the 201112 school year, according to the latest OSPI data, but spends more than it receives — $8,985 from the general fund in that same year. Local tax dollars are bridging the gap. In Snoqualmie Valley, 24 percent of all general fund revenue is from local levies, and most levy dollars go to staff compensation, not just salaries and benefits, but also incentive pay for teachers, additional school nurses, counselors, bus drivers and coaches, and more teachers to help reduce class sizes. The number of students in classrooms has been a big issue for the district, in negotiations with teaching staff last fall which nearly led to a teacher strike, and in recent discussions with the community about building new schools. Snoqualmie Valley has more teachers than state funding provides for, but fewer teachers than the state recommends for appropriate class sizes, Business Services Director Ryan Stokes said.

“If we staffed at what the state funded, our schools would look drastically different,” he said. District-wide, they would have 19 fewer general education teaching positions, according to an OSPI report, which shows the district FTE teacher count at 250, although the state allocation is for 231. The effect is easily seen at Mount Si High School. The district requires students earn 22 credits to graduate, but “the state is funding at 20 credits,” Stokes said. “That’s five periods a day, but the students are there six periods a day.” Staffing costs make up 80 percent of the district’s annual general fund expenditures, $55 million in the current budget, and “a fairly good portion of what we negotiate locally comes out of the levy,” Aune said. A failed levy, he said, would “have a devastating effect” on the district. He admits that the operations levy amount is “moderately aggressive,” and that the district could exceed its state-imposed levy authority or “levy lid” — there is no limit on technology levies — but adds that the district calculated the bond amounts strategically. “Most school districts in the region run a max levy,” he explained. “When you look at our neighbors, levying at a higher percentage, we feel we must go to our levy lid in order to be competitive and on par with those districts.” Ballots should be mailed to all registered voters this week. Return marked ballots by mail, or to election

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16 • January 22, 2014 • Snoqualmie Valley Record

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Snoqualmie Valley Record, January 22, 2014