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JANUARY 15-21, 2014 I VOLUME 39 I NUMBER 3

SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM I FREE

WHAT THE SOCIALISTS WANT AND WHEN THEY WANT IT. PAGE 5 | JERRY SPRINGER GOES TO HELL. PAGE 18


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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014


inside»   January 15–21, 2014 VOLUME 39 | NUMBER 3

» SEATTLEWEEKLY.COM

»27

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news&comment 5

HOUSE OF MIRTH

BY NINA SHAPIRO | Who’s a Democrat? Who’s a Republican? And will Washington’s legislature get anything done this session? Also: The ’60s live again at a fiery minimum-wage rally. 7 | SPORTSBALL

9

CYBERHEISTS

BY RICK ANDERSON | Ski masks and

getaway cars are so over: These days, you can steal millions with a few keystrokes and a willing team of launderers.

food&drink 14 MICRO-HOODS

BY SW STAFF | Interesting restaurants

tend to come in small clusters—here are a few you should know about. 16 | FOOD NEWS/TEMP CHECK 16 | BAR CODE

arts&culture 17 BORN BY A RIVER BY BRIAN MILLER | The Rust Belt

photos of LaToya Ruby Frazier. 17 | PICK LIST 18 | OPENING NIGHTS | Jerry Springer

in Hell (perhaps to be joined by Richard II) and Rigoletto at Seattle Opera.

24 FILM

OPENING THIS WEEK | Yakuza wars; an animated, Ayn Randian squirrel; English scrappers; and the Egyptian revolution. 25 | FILM CALENDAR

27 MUSIC

Damien Jurado’s evolution; Brent Amaker takes his Rodeo to Europe and back; a hip-hop news website turns 3; and more. 27 | SEVEN NIGHTS

odds&ends

26 | THE GEEKLY REPORT 33 | TOKE SIGNALS 34 | CLASSIFIEDS

»cover credits

COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY KYU HAN

EDITORIAL Senior Editor Nina Shapiro Food Editor Nicole Sprinkle Arts Editor Brian Miller Entertainment Editor Gwendolyn Elliott Editorial Operations Manager Gavin Borchert Staff Writers Ellis E. Conklin, Matt Driscoll, Kelton Sears Editorial Interns Margery Cercado, Colleen Fontana, Devon Geary, Imana Gunawan Contributing Writers Rick Anderson, Sean Axmaker, James Ballinger, Michael Berry, Sara Billups, Steve Elliott, Margaret Friedman, Zach Geballe, Dusty Henry, Megan Hill, Robert Horton, Patrick Hutchison, Sara D. Jones, Seth Kolloen, Sandra Kurtz, Dave Lake, John Longenbaugh, Beth Maxey, Jessie McKenna, Terra Clarke Olsen, Kevin Phinney, Keegan Prosser, Mark Rahner, Michael Stusser, Jacob Uitti PRODUCTION Production Manager Christopher Dollar Art Director Karen Steichen Graphic Designers Jennifer Lesinski, Sharon Adjiri Photo Interns Joshua Bessex, Kyu Han ADVERTISING Advertising and Marketing Director Jen Larson Advertising Sales Manager, Arts Carol Cummins

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

23 | PERFORMANCE

Editor-in-Chief Mark Baumgarten

3 8/6/13 6:56 PM


news&comment

The Session in Question

KYU HAN

$15 Wage, a Minimum

Rodney Tom plans to run, Democrats aim to lose, and Republicans try to defend King County, all with an eye on November. But will the Washington state legislature actually get anything done this year?

BY NINA SHAPIRO

K

BY NINA SHAPIRO

JOSHUA BOULET

W

proven to be an impeccably neat roommate who works out in the morning and “doesn’t compete for hot water.”) As for a Republican contender, state GOP chair Susan Hutchison says she knows of no one interested in running against a man who has worked so diligently for “the causes and issues we believe in.” The intrigue over Tom underscores a central truth of this legislative session: While some important matters are on the agenda, any drama that unfolds will merely set the stage for the main show in November. In the balance is control of the Senate, which picked up another Republican seat in the last election but remains in the hands of the majority coalition by a stillslim three-seat margin. In trying to take back the Senate, Democrats are eyeing a number of seats besides Tom’s. Or so King County Republican Party chair Lori Sotelo believes. In a recent e-mail to supporters, Sotelo ticked off three potential targets: Majority Floor Leader Joe Fain of Auburn, Ways and Means Committee Chair Andy Hill of Redmond, and the ever-erratic Pam Roach, also of Auburn. Noting their hometowns, Sotelo observed, “King County is ground zero for control of the state Senate in 2014.” That’s because the county is home not only to über-liberal Seattle but to suburban swing districts. Ten years ago, much of the Eastside was reliably red, observes Vance. Now many districts, including Tom’s and Hill’s, are blue or bluish-

purple. Add another swing district in Pierce County—the 28th, currently represented in the Senate by Republican Steve O’Ban but up for grabs, with Democratic state Rep. Tami Green already a declared candidate—and you have a highly contested landscape as a backdrop to the political theater that began this week. As it did last year, much of the drama will come from the friction between the Senate and the House, which is still in Democratic hands. Each chamber will likely pass bills, send them across the Capitol building’s marbled hallway, and watch them languish. We already know House Democrats’ opening game plan. On Monday, the very first day of the session, the House passed the Dream Act, which would allow undocumented immigrants access to financial aid for college. The act passed the House last year with a surprising amount of bipartisan support: 22 Republicans voted for it, including some who gave heartfelt speeches about why they were supporting immigrant students. Yet the majority leadership in the Senate wouldn’t allow the act to come up for a vote. Dream Act supporters probably won’t be able to prevent that from happening again this year, Hunter concedes. So why bring it up again? First of all, Hunter responds, raising the issue repeatedly generates public support and puts pressure on reluctant legislators.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

THE WEEKLY BRIEFING | What’s going on at seattleweekly.com: Paul Berendt, the former state Democratic Party chair, thinks socialist Kshama Sawant is a “dark cloud” for his party. Outgoing state Democratic Party chair Dwight Pelz shared his (disappointingly mundane) plans for his Southeast Asia vacation and weighed in on his potential replacements. Some drunk smashed a car into A Seahawks fan accused an off-duty King County Sheriff’s deputy working security of unnecessary roughthe Ballard Taco Time . . . again. Mars Hill meathead Mark Driscoll and beloved quarterback Russell Wilson shot the shit about Jesus. ness during the team’s playoff victory.

a

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

ith a new legislative session beginning this week, one question has been on a lot of people’s minds, and it’s not about any upcoming bills. Rather, it’s this: Will Sen. Rodney Tom run for reelection? And if he does, adds Republican political consultant Chris Vance, “Will he run as a Republican, a Democrat, or an independent? Nobody knows.” Tom is the subject of intense speculation because his four-year term is up at the end of this year—and because his role in the year past was extraordinary. In 2013, the Medina Democrat turned his back on his caucus and, along with fellow Democrat Tim Sheldon, joined forces with Republicans to take over the Senate. He then became the leader of a new “majority coalition caucus” that espoused lofty bipartisan ideals but in reality pushed a Republican agenda. The Senate coup reverberated through Olympia like an earthquake. And this November, if Tom runs, voters will get to weigh in on the unprecedented move, while furious Democrats will get a chance to seek revenge. The state Democratic Party is already collecting funds for what it calls the “Rodney Tom Retirement Project.” Speaking with Seattle Weekly and others last week, Tom solved the mystery. Of course, he’s running, he says. As for his party affiliation, he affirms matter-of-factly, “I’m a Democrat.” If the wealthy real-estate investor flirted with switching parties, he betrays no hint of it. Solving one mystery, though, only begets another: Who will run against Tom? Asked whether he’s been courted to do so, Rep. Ross Hunter, also a Medina Democrat and the influential chair of the House Appropriations Committee, says, “Oh my God, yes.” But, he says, “the current plan” is not to run. “I like the job I have.” (He also concedes that he likes Tom, with whom he shares an Olympia apartment and who has

icking off Sunday’s fiery rally for 15 Now, a new group pushing for a $15-an-hour minimum wage, MC Katie Wilson declared: “What we are witnessing now is a rebirth of the left in this county.” It was a remark that framed the two and a half hours to follow. Speaker after speaker at downtown’s Labor Temple marveled at what Philip Locker, a spokesperson for the Socialist Alternative party, called the “breathtaking” momentum toward that goal—and his warnings of battles ahead. “There’s going to be a propaganda war,” Locker asserted, contending that big business will attempt to “confuse” and “undermine” workers. Jess Spear, a 15 Now organizer, similarly warned of the “lies” that will be told by “big business.” We got to this point because of “heat in the street,” SEIU 775 vice-president Sterling Harders told the crowd, her face lit by a ferocious energy and her arm frequently gesticulating. Much more of that heat is going to be necessary now, she said. But as Wilson alluded at the beginning, the minimum-wage movement is a symbol of something bigger in the eyes of many people at the rally. Many of them are activists, far to the left of the Democratic party, who have dreamed of a real socialist-style uprising for many years. Finally, as they see it, their day has come. And so Robby Stern, a veteran of Students for a Democratic Society, a radical group from the ’60s, resurrected an old sing-songy chant. One special guest was Joe Higgins, who flew all the way from Ireland, where he serves as a socialist member of parliament. A firebrand, he denounced the “criminal” policies of “neo-liberalism,” called for the working class to take control of private resources, and said that a minimum-wage victory in Seattle would resound around the world because it would happen “in the heartland of capitalism.” At his remarks, newly elected socialist City Councilmember Kshama Sawant, who had sat impassively through much of the proceedings, smiled and clapped vigorously. Sawant’s upset victory in November gives her a chance to take her ideas to the mainstream. She has already had great success with the minimumwage issue, which she ran on and which has been adopted by the mayor and virtually all city council members. Buoyed, she shows no inclination of watering down her socialist ideals to court further mainstream acceptance. Quite the reverse. Achieving a $15 wage is an important step, she said when she finally came to the podium as the very last speaker. But it is only the first step, she stressed. Next up: fighting for rent control, a municipal tax, and “breaking our ties with those who have betrayed us again and again.” That would be the “two big business parties,” the Democratic and the Republican. E nshapiro@seattleweekly.com

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news&comment» The Session in Question » FROM PAGE 5 But there’s also another advantage of pushing the Dream Act: “Voters care about that,” Hunter says. Losing on the Dream Act and other issues that resonate with voters—like the Reproductive Parity Act, which would require health plans covering maternity benefits to also cover abortion—is not only expected by Democrats, it’s a “key part of the message,” says Sen. Democratic Caucus leader Sharon Nelson. In an interview shortly after she was named to her leadership post in November, replacing now–Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, Nelson explains that the likely losses will help her party make the case to voters that control of the Senate needs to change. Of course, legislators both Democratic and

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

nshapiro@seattleweekly.com

P

ete Carroll is different from most football coaches in many ways—one being that Chögyam Trungpa’s Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism is among his favorite books. But my favorite Carroll unorthodoxy was on display Saturday, on the long pass that clinched the New Orleans game. The Hawks BY SETH KOLLOEN faced a 3rd and 3 with an eight-point lead and 2:57 left. Conventional wisdom says you run the ball. That’s the “smart” play. Thankfully, Carroll doesn’t let what’s “smart” interfere with what makes sense. Russell Wilson dropped back and lofted a long pass down the sideline that Doug Baldwin caught for a first down. And those slaves to conventional wisdom—the TV announcers— were astounded. FOX play-by-play man Kevin Burkhardt spouted: “How about the guts to throw it on third down!” Sputtered analyst John Lynch: “When they go back to throw I’m thinking, ‘What are they thinking?’ ” The play call—made by Russell Wilson, planned by offensive coordinator Darrell Carroll Bevell, and encouraged by Carroll—wasn’t gutsy or crazy. It was the smart play. It just takes an unorthodox mind like Carroll’s to recognize it. The Seahawks had lined up with two wide receivers (Golden Tate and Baldwin), two tight ends, and one running back. This is a common personnel grouping. Defenses usually counter it by positioning at least one safety well behind the ball to prevent a deep pass. But on this play, the Saints put no one deep. Nine defenders were up close to the line of scrimmage, waiting for the run. The other two were matched man-to-man against the Seahawks’ two receivers. So you tell me: What’s the smart move here? You can run, despite the fact that the Saints have stacked their defense specifically to stop it. Or you can throw, taking advantage of the unmistakable man coverage that defenses usually try to hide. To Carroll (and, you’d assume, Chögyam Trungpa), the answer is obvious. Baldwin was able to get a step ahead of Saints cornerback Corey White, creating the space he needed to catch Wilson’s soft, high pass. After the game, Wilson revealed that the Hawks had expected this coverage from the Saints, and had worked on it all week. And now Carroll is just two wins away from having something else that makes him different from most coaches—a resume with both a Super Bowl title and an NCAA national championship on it. E

Arman Trunk Show

JEREMY DWYER-LINDGREN

Republican still want to get some things done. This being a short session that doesn’t have to tackle a biennial budget, the weightiest agenda item is a transportation package. Negotiations bogged down last year in part over the perennial debate about roads versus public transit. (Republicans favor the former, Democrats the latter.) Republicans also want the state to do away with a sales tax that, they argue, drives up the costs of projects. Democrats want to keep the tax, revenues from which flow into the general fund, where they can be used for things like education and social services. “Both sides have made compromises,” relates Tom, who has been participating in negotiating sessions convened by Governor Inslee. But the thorny talks were undoubtedly all the more strained last week when it was revealed that the Highway 520 bridge rebuild is expected to run $170 million over budget, leaving less money for other transportation projects around the state. The 2014 session also has the task of sorting out medical-marijuana regulations now that a state-sanctioned recreational-marijuana system is about to launch. The Liquor Control Board has made a series of controversial recommendations, including getting rid of medical-marijuana dispensaries and channeling all pot sales through licensed recreational stores. A number of bills are likely to amend those recommendations, including one Sen. Jeanne Kohl-Welles (D-Seattle) says she intends to introduce that would still allow some specialized medical grow operations. A state Supreme Court order issued last week also ensures that legislators will at least discuss increasing education funding this year. The order gave legislators credit for the $1 billion for schools they added in the biennial budget passed last year, the result of two grueling special sessions that concluded just in time to prevent a state shutdown. But the court warned that lawmakers weren’t moving fast enough, and urged them to take up the matter again this year in a supplemental budget. Whether they will actually do so is an open question. The ability to get things done might be aided by the time that’s passed since the Senate coup. With the shock over, legislators are likely less obsessed with the reshuffling of positions, offices, and committee assignments. Yet with losses as important come November as victories, it would hardly be surprising if this session is not only short but unproductive. E

Pete Carroll vs. Conventional Wisdom

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014


THE KEYBOARD CAPERScars are no longer needed to make it into the big time (or the big house). Guns and getaway » FROM PAGE 9

Seattle’s cybercriminals show how to lift millions: Just press “Enter.”

BY RICK ANDERSON KYU HAN

The biggest armed bank robbery in American history began shortly after closing time on the evening of Feb. 10, 1997, when two men wearing trench coats, sunglasses, and FBI caps approached the door of the Seafirst Bank in Lakewood, south of Tacoma.

n

Inside, three tellers were preparing to turn out the lights and lock the

vault. Lanky 57-year-old Billy Kirkpatrick and his diminutive partner Ray Bowman, 53, had staked out the bank for most of January, taking time to blend in with the locals. As federal documents and testimony would later reveal, the Mutt and Jeff duo lived in a Kent motel, dined at the better restaurants, and attended a piano recital at the University of Washington.

n

After weeks of casing

amount of cash to cover an upcoming payday for soldiers from nearby Fort Lewis. The onetime Midwest shoplifters—they first paired up in the 1970s to boost disco tunes from record stores—had graduated in the 1980s to taking down U.S. banks at gunpoint. Having stolen more than $3.5 million during 26 cross-country heists since then, the duo had earned the FBI honor of a bandit nickname: the Trench Coat Robbers. Agents had no idea who, exactly, they’d been pursing for almost 15 years, although this would be the two bank artists’ final, and greatest, performance.

n

Using a small prying tool,

the pair flipped the lock on the door and entered with guns drawn. They ordered the women into the vault and secured their wrists with plastic ties, then quickly began stuffing money into duffle bags. Within minutes, using a metal cart to help transport the unwieldy stack of bags, they pushed through the door and loaded their stolen Jeep Cherokee with $4,461,681 in bundled cash. As the Jeep sped off into the winter darkness, it sat low in the back, toting a payload roughly equal to a NFL lineman. n

The Trench Coats got away clean, only to be deceived by the money itself. They took so much cash they couldn’t successfully stow it in their homes and cars. Before the year

was out, Kirkpatrick would be stopped by a Nebraska state trooper for speeding seven miles an hour over the limit; during a search of his trunk, he was found to be carrying almost $2 million in a set of footlockers, some of it traceable to Lakewood. Bowman, meanwhile, would make the mistake of paying $174,000 in cash to a log-home builder, whose bank deposit caught the eye of an IRS agent. That was the germ of an investigation that eventually led to the discovery of $480,000 in cash stored by Bowman, some of it bound by a Seafirst money band. By 1999, the crooks had traded in their Trench Coats for prison jumpsuits, and were sentenced to more than 15 years.

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

the bank and devising a getaway route, they were excited to finally stand at the locked door, aware the vault was packed with an extraordinary

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THE KEYBOARD CAPERS

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In stark contrast is the biggest unarmed bank robbery in Washington state history, which took place nine months ago, and for which no one has yet been caught or named. The victims did not know they’d been robbed until three days later. The thieves had no need for guns, disguises, duffle bags, or a getaway vehicle. No need, even, to be in the state, or on the continent, for that matter: It was a cyberheist. Whoever took down the Bank of America account of a Leavenworth hospital for $1 million last April—likely Russian and Ukrainian hackers—merely used a computer keyboard. Electronic impulses were the extent of the intrusion it took to capture Cascade Medical Center funds and send them flying off over the Internet to 96 private bank accounts elsewhere. There, human mules—co-conspirators, likely most of them unknowingly recruited by the masterminds—cashed out the holdings, kept a bit for themselves, and sent the rest by wire overseas. That was the plan, at least. The Chelan County treasurer’s office says it has recovered about $415,000 of the heist, beating some of the mules to the stashed accounts. But the roughly $600,000 loss still ranks as Washington’s largest reported cyberheist—so far. Second to that is the October 2012 theft of $400,000 from the city of Burlington’s account at Bank of America. That hacked bundle was electronically transferred to business and personal accounts elsewhere over a two-day period. Little is publicly known about that Skagit County theft, but a spokesperson for the Secret Service in Seattle, which is probing the heist, confirms that $400,000 disappeared into cyberspace, and cautions that “a lot of these kind of investigations wind up being very lengthy.” In other words, Burlington can likely kiss its money goodbye. Those thefts, of a combined $1 million, pale in comparison to the global cyberheist of $45 million from two Middle East banks, revealed last year. Six New Yorkers were among those later arrested in the scheme, which involved mules (a “criminal flash mob,” as the tabloids put it) working in 20 countries. They withdrew $5 million on a single day a year ago December and $40 million more one day last February. “In the place of guns and masks, this cybercrime organization used laptops and the Internet,” Eastern New York U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch said in a memorable statement. “Moving as swiftly as data over the Internet, the organization worked its way from the computer systems of international corporations to the streets of New York City, with the defendants fanning out across Manhattan to steal millions of dollars from hundreds of ATMs in a matter of hours.” Bank databases had already been hacked by the cyberthieves, who erased card withdrawal limits and created their own access codes. It’s thought to be the world’s biggest bank robbery, with everyone from Interpol to the FBI to Microsoft’s expanded Cybercrimes Center in Redmond on the trail. (Microsoft has claimed success in combating several major cybercrime operations recently—in particular, botnet or “zombie” spam and scam operations involving networks of computers tied together by malware. MS estimates that as many as five million individual and network computers are corrupted and botnet-vulnerable.) Internet crime is an ever-expanding risk,

Durkan, before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee last year.

C-SPAN.ORG

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014

» FROM PAGE 9

and “Few things are as sobering as the daily cyber-threat briefing I receive,” says Seattle’s U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan, one of the nation’s top cybercrime prosecutors, referring to a daily Justice Department bulletin that details successful and attempted cybercrimes around the globe. Last year, Durkan told a U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee how 10 years ago the big concern was solo hackers and spammers. Today the threat comes from organized crime, terrorists, and bot-

“Just as walking down the street in a foreign city at night drunk is likely to make you a target for pickpockets and muggers,cruising around the Internet with unpatched systems and browsers is going to get your computer compromised eventually.”

net collectives, among many others. She has also watched her Seattle office expand its prosecutorial horizons, she told Congress, now that “many of our cases involve computers and electronic evidence located in other countries. Many times the offenders are located in another country. But even U.S. criminals will use computers located in another country to hide their tracks. Often it is impossible to identify, arrest, and prosecute offenders without the assistance of foreign governments.”

That’s part of the attraction of the digital underworld—the chance to pull off a caper cheaply and anonymously from afar, at considerably less risk of being discovered before making a quick getaway. Technology has democratized crime. Rather than weapons or burglary tools to gain access, a cyberthief needs only to press the “Enter” key, and he’s in. For clarity, we’re talking here about cybercrime

as opposed to most cyberwar. The latter generally involves commercial and governmental espionage and sabotage waged by electronic intruders, be they bedroom-bound teen hackers or sophisticated political conspirators. In a pop sense at least, cyberwar got its start in Seattle after the locally filmed 1983 movie WarGames became a hit. Though it was fiction, the film, starring Matthew Broderick as a Seattle high-school gamer and hacker who almost launches WWIII, provoked concern among lawmakers, generals, and CEOs. Its impact helped compel Congress to enact the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, expanding electronic protections and imposing harsher criminal sentences. Seattle is now itself a player in war games, thanks to advances by locally based computer giant Cray Inc. It supplies the National Security Agency (the former employer of whistleblower and secrets thief Edward Snowden) and other government and private entities with petaflop-speed supercomputers, ones capable of a thousand trillion operations per second, instantly calculating all sorts of arcane probabilities—or reading your e-mails in a blink. Typically, cybercrime is the Internet robbery, burglary, or scamming of any computerized site, from major institutions to the average home. It involves cons and fraud, often using malware to infect individual computer systems. Mikael Patrick Sallnert, for example, is a Swedish cybercriminal arrested in Europe last year and brought to Seattle for prosecution. Having pled guilty, Sallnert is now doing 48 months for his role in an international ring that infected computers

with scareware. Using this devious software, the ring duped nearly a million victims into believing their computers were infected, then sold them useless antivirus software to fix them, netting an estimated $70 million in the scam. Sallnert operated a credit-card service that processed about $5 million of those payments. Yet, “Most cybercrime victims are not targeted,” says cybersecurity blogger and ex-Washington Post reporter Brian Krebs, who has been tracking the Russian hackers behind the Chelan heist. “They are victims of opportunity.” Cybercrooks often succeed, he tells me, “by tricking relatively nontechnologically savvy people into compromising their systems, or by taking advantage of systems that are not up to date with the latest security fixes. People need to understand that just as walking down the street in a foreign city at night drunk is likely to make you a target for pickpockets and muggers, cruising around the Internet with unpatched systems and browsers is going to get your computer compromised eventually.” Though we’re all potential victims, it’s the highprofile, and often wealthy, figures we hear about. That was demonstrated in two quirky local cases involving the Mariners’ Felix Hernandez and Seahawks owner Paul Allen. Both were hit by low-tech bandits, prosecutors say, relying on telephones and the Web. That both are rich also made it easier for the scammers, initially at least, to escape notice. In Allen’s case, Brandon Lee Price, an AWOL Pennsylvania soldier, called up Citibank one day and impersonated the billionaire, convincing a service-center worker to change Allen’s Seattle address and telephone number on his Citibank account to Price’s address and phone, suggesting the Microsoft co-founder had moved to Pittsburgh. Price also got Citibank to send him a new debit card with Allen’s name. He then attempted a $15,000 Western Union cash transaction, which didn’t go through. Turning more practical, he used the card to make an overdue loan payment. Allen, perhaps out cruising on his 400-foot


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a $1,750 Gucci handbag, match purchases made with the Hernandez card. Peguero, who has pled not guilty and is being represented by a public defender, may have made other purchases with the card and is likely to face additional allegations of fraud, prosecutors now say. But Peguero, through her attorney, says new information is forthcoming in her defense that “may facilitate a resolution of this matter.”

yacht, never noticed. But the bank caught on, and the FBI crashed Price’s party. His attorney describes Price as undereducated and suffering from the effects of a head injury in his youth. But prosecutors say Price intended to milk America’s richest sports mogul, and even kept notebooks on how to pull it off, including a prepared script he followed when talking to the bank. According to U.S. court records, Price pled guilty to four counts of fraud in October, receiving an eight-month sentence and a requirement to pay $658 in restitution. His mother said in a letter to the court that her 30-year-old son had never been in trouble before and was remorseful to the point of tears after the FBI stormed their home. King Felix, the Cy Young Award winner whose seven-year, $175 million contract makes him the highest-paid pitcher in professional baseball, told federal investigators that he and his wife Sandra had no idea one of their credit cards was being drained in 2012 by the allegedly cyberscamming wife of another Mariners player. Maria “Jackie” Peguero, married to M’s outfielder Carlos Peguero, is facing three federal counts of wire fraud for making $180,000 in online purchases from Saks Fifth Avenue on Sandra’s card. Like soldier Price, she allegedly phoned in an address

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retail giant Target said as many as 100 million customers may have been affected by a massive pre-Christmas hack attack on its accounts (banks would cover any customer losses but could sue Target to recover those funds). Shortly after the heist, Krebs reported, the stolen card data was already flooding the black market, including to a popular underground store called Rescator, where each card was sold for anywhere from $20 to more than $100 per card. U.S. Attorney Durkan can speak to card theft not only as a prosecutor but as a victim. Mortifyingly, she admits, she was heisted by a streetlevel cybercrook, 43-year-old Ana M. Crisan of

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change that enabled her to use Sandra’s MasterCard online, placing 60 separate orders over a three-month period and having them shipped to her Fife apartment. (Husband Carlos, still with the M’s organization, also played for the Mariners’ Tacoma farm team last year.) Some single-day purchases topped $10,000. Seattle Secret Service Agent Ashleigh Audley, who investigated the case as part of the Electronic Crime Task Force, says Saks sales personnel in New York finally caught on when someone realized the items were not being shipped to the Hernandez home in Bellevue. Spanishspeaking Sandra Hernandez told investigators that because of her limited English, friend Jackie had helped her order goods and services as they sat together at Sandra’s home computer. But, as the Hernandezes also told investigators, only their accountant sees the credit/debit-card bills, and was unlikely to notice anything unusual about large purchases. Jackie Peguero, meanwhile, wasn’t exactly hiding her alleged buys: She posted pictures of herself on Twitter feeds and other social media showing off new duds. Agent Audley says that many of the stylish fashion shots, such as Peguero displaying a $200 silk blouse and

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Paul Allen (above) fell victim to an impersonator, while Felix Hernandez (top right) was duped by his wife’s supposed friend Jackie Peguero (right).

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What happened to the millionaire ballplayer and the billionaire bachelor could have happened on a lesser scale to any average Jane or Joe—though in this economy, they’d perhaps be more alert to spiking bank charges. The elderly and the uninformed are commonly victims of e-mail and social-media cyberscams: the “advance fee lottery” trick, for example, a message saying you’ve won a large sum of money but requiring an advance fee to cover prize-delivery expenses (which can lead to ID theft as well). Fortunately, as security consultant Krebs points out, “Most cybercrime against consumers is reversible: That is, if the consumer is defrauded through their debit or credit card, they may be temporarily inconvenienced, but as long as they file a fraud claim with their bank or credit-card company, they are generally not liable for those charges.” Last week,

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Renton, whose specialty was rigging walk-up and drive-up ATM machines with electronic “skimming” devices and pinhole cameras. That enabled her to obtain 237 bank account numbers and security codes throughout the West—Durkan’s among them. Before she was caught in 2012 and sentenced to four years in prison (the U.S. Attorney for Eastern Washington handled the case), Crisian managed to steal $125,000. About $1,000 of that was Durkan’s. “I, of all people, knew better,” she said. Yet who among us checks to see if their ATM is outfitted with a skimmer—a device deftly inserted into the card slot to record account numbers on a magnetic strip—or takes time to check for a tiny camera that records users punching their card security codes onto the keypad? (Thieves also use fake ATM’s—a realistic device that fits over the top of real ATM’s to record numbers and PINs—as well as skimmers that can be attached to cash registers). The experience did seem to energize Durkan for combat with digital criminals (because of her high profile as a cybercrime prosecutor, she has been targeted by other cyberfoes, including the hacker collective known as Anonymous). Today Durkan chairs or co-chairs several Justice Department cybercrime committees, and has helped draw up such federal measures as the President’s Executive Order on Cybersecurity and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Her office has brought charges against some prized cyberthieves and hackers, including Daniel Munteanu, a 29-yearold Romanian national awaiting sentencing in Seattle for scamming five eBay customers out of more than $120,000 last year. He was nabbed here attempting to board an international flight. Munteanu used counterfeit passports to open bank and mailbox accounts to pose as a seller of eBay merchandise—boats, cars, and farm equipment included. (He and co-conspirators pretended to be the sellers, and conned buyers into sending payments into his bank accounts— money he then quickly moved offshore). Another big-time cyberscammer, David B. Schrooten, a 22-year-old Dutch hacker known as Fortezza, received a stiff 12-year sentence in Seattle last year for trafficking in stolen credit-card numbers worldwide. In October, Charles T. Williamson, a 36-year-old California rap artist who performed under the name “Guerilla Black,” received a nineyear sentence as part of Schrooten’s crime ring. Durkan is a proponent of stiffer sentences for some Internet crimes. Last March she urged Congress to simplify some sentences and “enhance penalties in certain areas where the statutory maximums no longer reflect the severity of these crimes.” (She cited the five-year maximum imposed in cases where hackers break into databases and steal credit-card numbers, arguing they deserve more time.) She also urged lawmakers to make the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act subject to the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), making conspiracy prosecutions easier. But federal prosecutors are already handing out harsh penalties when they see fit—or want to send a message. Critics cite the case of 32-yearold Barrett Brown, supposed spokesperson for that Durkan-targeting hacktivist collective Anonymous, who has spent more than a year in a Texas jail and faces up to 105 years in federal prison if he’s convicted of a litany of hacking

and conspiracy charges. Another Internet activist, Aaron Swartz, 26, faced up to 35 years and a $1 million fine for wire and computer fraud after allegedly illegally downloading academic journals. When prosecutors twice rebuffed his bids for a plea bargain, the onetime Harvard fellow ended up hanging himself in his Brooklyn apartment last January. A memorial for Swartz in the other Washington drew such opposites as Republican Rep. Darrell Issa and Democrat Sen. Elizabeth Warren. “Stick it to the man,” Issa, an open-Internet advocate and author of a Digital Citizens’ Bill of Rights, told the crowd, according to a Huffington Post report. “[Aaron] and I probably would have found ourselves at odds with lots of decisions, but never with the question of whether information was in fact a human right.” Eight-year and six-year terms were handed out to Seattle cyberthieves John Earl Griffin, 36, and Brad Eugene Lowe, 39, respectively, in 2012, although their crimes were a mix of on- and offline capers. They used a technique known as “wardriving,” cruising Seattle in a vehicle outfitted with a receiver to detect wireless networks.

“The crooks behind these cyberheists are limited in how much they can steal to how many money mules they can recruit to help launder the fraudulent transfers.”

Once connected, they could electronically enter business networks and computers. They also literally broke into businesses, through doors or windows, and installed malware on computers, enabling them later to obtain codes and passwords over the Web. They accessed payroll and business accounts and bought items from Amazon and eBay. Until busted by Seattle police, the twosome hacked or burglarized 50 businesses for more than $3 million in losses over a three-year period. “They were sophisticated in technology . . . and livin’ large,” Durkan said. Her office was also hoping to prosecute a high-profile hacker named Dmitry Olegovich Zubakha, a Russian who was detained in Cyprus last summer, suspected of botnet attacks on Amazon’s network and other e-commerce sites, disrupting customer access. Zubakha’s arrest made global headlines, and seemed to reflect the cooperative nature of international agencies in combating cybercrime. “That was a great case,” a federal official familiar with the case tells me, “with Interpol and the Cypriot government aiding in the arrest.” But a less-noticed development has left U.S. officials dismayed. Though Zubakha was thought to be ticketed for Seattle, “The Russian government had a different take on the case,” says the federal source, “and actually wound up counter-extraditing him to Russia.” Aleksey


Gordon, who blogs about the Russian Mafia, writes that Zubakha was actually employed “on staff ” by the Kremlin, and though he’s in Russian custody now, “there is no doubt that this will not last long” and he’ll be freed. Perhaps because of the Zubakha arrest at the FBI’s request, Russia recently began warning its hackers not to travel abroad. As Wired reports, Russia has been mostly a safe haven for professional spammers, hackers, phishers, and fraudsters who attack the U.S. In September, the government issued a warning advising Russian “citizens to refrain from traveling abroad, especially to countries that have signed agreements with the U.S. on mutual extradition, if there is reasonable suspicion that U.S. law-enforcement agencies” have a case pending against them. “Practice shows that the trials of those who were actually kidnapped and taken to the United States are biased, based on shaky evidence” and are slanted against the Russians, the notice states. A fair number of Russian cybercriminals have been arrested by U.S. authorities in recent months, including alleged hacker Aleksander Panin, being held in Atlanta where he’s charged with a $5 million online bank fraud. When he was nabbed in the Dominican Republic last summer, Russia called his extradition “vicious” and “unacceptable.” That’s sort of how they felt over in Chelan County in April—once the treasurer’s office opened that Monday morning and officials learned the public’s money had been extradited. To Russia, no less.

be recovered. The rest, roughly $500,000 to $600,000? “It’s gone,” Griffiths said. “Probably gone to Russia.” The fake company that hired Conteras and others, Krebs notes, is part of a transnational organized cybercriminal gang operating in Russia and Ukraine. “Its distinguishing feature is that it operates its own money mule recruitment division. This eliminates the middleman and increases the gang’s overall haul from any cyberheist.” The gang has several telltale signatures and has hit small to mid-sized organizations, stealing many times more than the millions taken from Chelan County, Krebs thinks. In fact, he suspects the county may have got off easy.

“The bank accounts that were hacked also are used to administer 54 other junior taxing districts in the county,” he says. “My guess is this attack would have been worse, but that the fraudsters simply exhausted their supply of money mules. “Just as real-life bank robbers are restricted in what they can steal by the amount of loot that they can physically haul away from the scene of the crime,” he adds, “the crooks behind these cyberheists are limited in how much they can steal to how many money mules they can recruit to help launder the fraudulent transfers.” As Billy and Ray, the Trench Coat Robbers, might say, it still comes down to the size of your Jeep. E

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On Wednesday, April 24, five days after the Leavenworth heist and two days after it was discovered, security blogger Krebs began calling Cascade Medical Center officials to tell them who likely robbed, or burglarized, their bank account. The Russian cyberheist was carried out with the help of nearly 100 different accomplices in the United States, who were hired through work-at-home job scams run by a crime gang that has been fleecing businesses for the past five years, Krebs wanted to tell hospital officials. But nobody ever called back, he says. As he later recounted in his blog at krebsonsecurity.com, he reached out shortly after hearing of the heist because he’d spoken with two unwitting accomplices who’d helped launder more than $14,000 taken from the hospital’s accounts. One of them, 31-year-old Jesus Contreras from San Bernardino, Calif., had been out of work for more than two months when he received an e-mail from Best Inc., a company supposedly located in Australia. A representative of the “software development firm” said he’d found Contreras’ resume on careerbuilders.com and that he seemed qualified for a work-at-home job forwarding payments to overseas software developers, keeping eight percent of any transfers. All he needed was a home computer. Contreras, desperate to find work, signed on. On April 22, Krebs recounts, “Contreras received his first (and last) task from his employer: Take the $9,180 just deposited into his account and send nearly equal parts via Western Union and Moneygram to four individuals, two who were located in Russia and the other pair in Ukraine. After the wire fees—which were to come out of his commission—Contreras said he had about $100 left over. ‘I’m asking myself how I fell for this because the money seemed too good to be true,’ Contreras said. ‘But we’ve

got bills piling up, and my dad has hospital bills. I didn’t have much money in my account, so I figured what did I have to lose? I had no idea I would be a part of something like this.’ ” It didn’t pay off, either, at least for Contreras. Bank of America, tracking the transfers after Chelan County discovered the losses, froze Contreras’ account and those of others involved. The county treasurer’s office did not respond to our requests for comments, and the Spokane office of the FBI is still investigating the case. But county treasurer David Griffiths told The Wenatchee World last summer that $414,800 had been recouped by the bank, with another $100,000 in disputed funds that could later

13


food&drink Hot Pockets

Don’t miss these five vibrant culinary “micro-hoods.” BY NICOLE SPRINKLE, SARA BILLUPS, MEGAN HILL, AND BETH MAXEY

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014

South Jackson Street

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As you climb up Jackson Street away from the International District, you pass a mix of nondescript industrial buildings and aging apartments. With a few exceptions, storefront businesses and restaurants are not common here. But eventually you notice, out of the corner of your eye, the Field Roast headquarters (1440 S. Jackson St.), the company behind the high-end, grain-based fake meat so brilliantly crafted into sausage links, frankfurters, loaves, cutlets, and deli slices. This is perhaps your first indication that there’s more to this no-man’s land. It’s a few more blocks before you hit an actual restaurant, though. Cheeky Cafe (1700 S. Jackson) beckons with its bright turquoise walls and high ceilings. The best bet here is a weekend brunch, and though the food is good, you won’t have to compete for a table. Dig into an encyclopedia-sized block of Cheeky French toast, which is stuffed with pastry cream and your choice of bananas, chocolate, peanut butter, or seasonal berries and deep-fried just enough to crisp the edges while keeping the inside spongy. If that isn’t enough, it comes with two eggs and a side of bacon. This is also one of the rare places you can get your hands on Native American fry bread, served here with cinnamon sugar or plain, but always with a side of freezer jam. For now, you can cross the street and visit Umai-do, the Japanese sweets shop (1825 S. Jackson). Sticky, candy-colored mochi pack the case, and owner Art Oki happily takes questions and explains his offerings. Over at Northwest Tofu Inc. (1913 S. Jackson), you’ll find homestyle Chinese with an emphasis on—you guessed it—tofu. It’s made in-house, incorporated into the menu and also available for take-home purchase on its own. Past the busy intersection at 23rd and Jackson, you might barely notice tiny Standard Brewing peeking out from under an apartment building (2504 S. Jackson). Former home brewer Justin Gerardy is concocting hops-heavy brews like his Wet Hop Ale and Imperial IPA, a fascinating take on ginger beer, and other rotating brews. End the tour at newly opened Central Pizza (2901 S. Jackson), a welcome addition to an area

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSHUA BESSEX

W

e all know the foodie hearts of our neighborhoods—the welltread avenues brimming with restaurants and bars, like Ballard Avenue, Queen Anne Avenue, California Avenue, Occidental Avenue, Jackson Street, and so on. But what about the more hidden, off-thebeaten-path stretches within (or bordering) these neighborhoods that also have a culinary gem, or two or three? Maybe you know some well, but maybe not. We’ve come up with five microhoods—or as we like to call them, “hot pockets.” With notable restaurants, cafes, and bars both old and new, they’re well worth keeping on your radar.

Climb south of the ID to brunch at Cheeky Cafe. Below: Cheeky’s loaded French toast.

barren of more than a handful of restaurants. Thincrust pizza offers both meaty and vegetarian options, plus a choice of gluten-free dough. MEGAN HILL

Northeast 55th Street

Northeast 55th Street is speckled with independently owned, low-key eateries frequented by neighbors living within walking distance. But it’s worth the drive for the rest of us. Tucked a few blocks north of the glossy U-Village at the border of Ravenna and the U District, the street is a mini globe-trot of Greek, Spanish, English, and Thai joints strung across a series of 10 blocks that begins at 25th Avenue. The family-owned Krua Thai (2515 N.E. 55th) sits just past that intersection. The small interior is simple and unfussy, but the space becomes colorful on the weekends when families and college students tuck into plates of rama noodles and pad see ew. Krua’s kitchen churns out solid standbys that satisfy, including Autumn Curry with kabocha squash that sticks to the ribs on cold nights. Walk several doors down to Frank’s Oyster House & Champagne Parlor (2616 N.E. 55th). The menu includes classics that adorned supperclub tables decades back, including oysters Rockefeller and steak tartare, alongside cheddar biscuits and deviled eggs. Frank’s homey-meetsupscale menu and warmly lit room make it a solid pick for date night. The same couple that owns Frank’s is behind Pair (5501 30th Ave. N.E.) a few blocks to the east. Pair’s cozy dining room works its magic on long, rainy nights, with a menu serving elevated comfort food. You might have to wait for a table, but the smoked lamb ribs and potato-leek gratin easily justify sipping a glass of red for 20 minutes before being seated. If you find yourself with a couple of free hours in the middle of the day, try the traditional Eng-

lish tea service at Queen Mary Tea (2912 N.E. 55th). Opened 25 years back, Queen Mary is the oldest independent tea room in the U.S. Mismatched floral curtains and wide wicker chairs fill the dining room, where even bangers and mash are served on flowery china. Closer to 35th Avenue Northeast, you’ll find family-run Spanish bistro Gaudi (3410 N.E. 55th). Tapas like chorizo and lamb kebabs abound here, alongside paella meant for parties of two or more (try the paella negra, dyed with squid ink). Neighboring eatery Taverna Mazi (3426 N.E. 55th) glows at night with hanging orange lights. Mazi’s Greek fare covers the usual pita and dips, but its well-made cocktails, souvlaki, and feta fries steal the show. SARA BILLUPS

White Center

The main drag along Southwest Roxbury Street perfectly encapsulates West Seattle’s diverse White Center—a startling mix of autoparts stores, buildings from the neighborhood’s founding in the early 1900s, nail salons, churches, and modest homes that hint at the area’s historic diversity, thanks to cheap real estate and a wealth of small commercial spaces. It’s not uncommon to hear Spanish, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Arabic, or Somali as you walk down these streets. The neighborhood’s restaurants reflect this, too. The Salvadorean Bakery and Restaurant (1719 S.W. Roxbury) is one of the most recog-

nizable spots in central White Center, opened in 1996 by emigrant sisters Aminta and Ana. Here you’ll find traditional dishes for Holy Week, Day of the Dead, and Christmas, plus a slew of products for sale from Mexico and Central and South America. There’s a small restaurant, too, where pupusas, tamales, carne asada, and beef-feet soup grace the menu. Just down the street, Taqueria Guaymas (1622 S.W. Roxbury) serves platters of massive burritos smothered in sauces like chile colorado or salsa roja. Zippy’s Giant Burgers (9614 14th Ave. S.W.) is here, too, where Mama Lil’s peppers and secret sauce are among the toppings. For pho, wander down to Pho Tai (1521 S.W. 98th St.) or Pho-White Center (9642 16th Ave. S.W.). 16th Avenue is also home to Proletariat Pizza (9622-A 16th Ave. S.W.), known for its thin crust and fresh ingredients; patrons drive here from around the city and swear this is Seattle’s best pizza—or at least a strong contender. Standouts include The Favorite, featuring housemade Italian sausage, fresh garlic, Mama Lil’s peppers, mozzarella, and tomato sauce, and the White Center White, topped with ricotta, fresh garlic, flecks of oregano, and mozzarella on an olive-oil base. Save room for Full Tilt’s ice cream and pinball, just across the street (9629 16th Ave. S.W.). Last fall, Meander’s Kitchen (9635 16th Ave. S.W.) moved from West Seattle, bringing its legion of fans. It doesn’t matter that Meander’s has no website and is cash-only; diners come in droves for the local, seasonal ingredients featured in breakfast comfort food like scrambles and Benedicts. Two favorite drinking establishments in White Center include Company Bar and Big Al Brewing. Company (9608 16th Ave. S.W.) sits on the corner of Roxbury and Southwest 16th, serving specialty cocktails, beer, and wine to wash down kebabs, braised pork sopas, or creative twists on fries that involve either eggplant or chickpeas. The taps at Big Al’s tasting room (9832 14th Ave. S.W.) flow with favorites like the smoked porter and Big Hoppa IPA. MEGAN HILL

We all know the foodie hearts of our neighborhoods . . . but what about the more hidden, off-the-beatenpath stretches?

Japantown

Among the ID’s predominance of Chinese and Vietnamese restaurants also exist a pocket of Japanese restaurants that deserve your attention. From Uwajimaya (600 Fifth Ave. S.), walk north to South Jackson Street, the southernmost part of historical Japantown. Starting in the 1800’s, industrialization displaced many rural Japanese farmers at the same time American railroad building required them. Seattle received thousands of new immigrants a year, who settled in the neighborhood north of Jackson and started businesses like the Panama Hotel and Maneki Restaurant—which, except for closures during WWII, when Executive Order 9066


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mandated internment for Japanese Americans, have been open ever since. To this day, there is even Japanese on the street signs. Stop at the Panama Hotel (605½ S. Main St.) for tea and a handmade Japanese sweet. Be sure not to miss the display: immaculate, kimono-dressed antique dolls; old leather luggage; clothes; furniture—a bit of the lives people hoped to reclaim when they got back from the camps. These items on display never were. When you’re done with your tea, walk clear around the block. Across from a gallery on the corner, which used to be one of the many diners or barbershops where all the old Japanese men would hang out, you’ll find salmon namban (pickled, deep fried, and delicious, served with lemon and onions) at Maneki (304 Sixth Ave. S.).

When you’re ready for a full meal, cross the street and try Tsukushinbo (515 S. Main St.), my favorite sushi in the city (try their grilled salmon belly and collar). If you are up for a weekday retreat, they make amazing soba on Fridays. And if you plan ahead and give them a call, they’ll make you the wonderful Japanese steamed-egg treat, chawan muchi. BETH MAXEY

Northwest 70th Street

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Maneki’s salmon namban

slew of breweries to boot. But head up to quiet Northwest 70th Street and take in the mini–food mecca that includes The Fat Hen, Honoré Artisan Bakery, Delancey, and Essex. The only problem with brunch at The Fat Hen (1418 N.W. 70th) is that you’ll be too full to get a pastry at Honoré. No matter: Enjoy the housemade yogurt with honey and pine nuts; some of the best Benedicts with your choice of smoked salmon, speck, pancetta, or avocado; or a warm lentil salad with lardon and egg. From inside The Fat Hen, you can keep an eye out on the line at Honoré (1413 N.W. 70th)— and bust a move over when it’s died down to bring some treats home. The chocolate-almond croissants are among the best in the city and their macarons are legendary, inventive with flavors like sweet-corn maple and passion-fruit chocolate; they’re light and not overly sweet. People also seek out the Kouign-amann here—a crusty cake from Breton layered with butter and caramelized sugar. But it’s not all about breakfast. At Delancey (1415 N.W. 70th), Seattle’s best pizza—a thin-crust with just enough grease to please a New Yorker—comes with fantastic toppings like grana, housemade sausage, preserved Meyer lemon, and crimini mushrooms. Dessert almost always involves seasonal fruit, like nectarines, honey mousse, and bourbon caramel. If that’s not your thing, their big bittersweet chocolate-chip cookie with gray salt is a home-run staple for $3.50. While you’re inevitably waiting for a table (they don’t take reservations), grab a drink and some snacks next door at their sister bar, Essex (1421 N.W. 70th)—like triple cream cheese with bread, a pickle plate, or a craft cocktail like an elderflower spritz (gin, white wine, elderflower cordial) or a Queen Mary (gin, tomato water, pickled chile brine, lemon, salt, and pepper).

15


food&drink»

Boozin’ in 2014: What to Expect From Wine Lists, Bars, Breweries, and More

FoodNews BY SARA BILLUPS

German pop-up Dackel will take over the Kedai Makan kitchen while its staff are in Malaysia for some R&R. From Jan. 16–19 and 23–26, chef Josh Nebe (who also cooks at Radiator Whiskey) will prepare sausages (like “The Kurrywurst,” stuffed in milk buns topped with red curry) and more Germaninspired deliciousness. Check business hours and details on Facebook before you go. Local chainlet Tutta Bella launched its fifth restaurant at Bellevue’s Crossroads. The pizza spot’s new location is its largest to date, and features some new menu items and cocktails. Lunch service starts in about a month. The folks behind The Great Nabob and The Leary Traveler are launching Traveler Montlake in the former Montlake Alehouse location next to Cafe Lago

on 24th Avenue East. The American-style pub’s menu will include game meat like kangaroo sliders and roasted goose pot pie alongside a dozen beers on draught. Expect a February opening. Ballard-based Reuben’s Brews will distribute bottles of three different seasonal beers to western Washington grocery stores and bottle shops every three months throughout 2014. The lineup includes Imperial Oatmeal Stout in spring, Cream Ale in summer, Red in fall, and Roasted Rye in winter. The Golden Olive is moving into the former Sam’s Sushi space on Queen Anne Avenue North. The Mediterranean restaurant is set to open sometime this month; no word on whether it’s being launched by the owners of The Golden Olive that shuttered last year in Wallingford. E food@seattleweekly.com

TemperatureCheck FROM MARIA HINES,

CHEF/OWNER OF TILTH, AGRODOLCE, AND THE GOLDEN BEETLE Raw-food cooking techniques (fermenting, sprouting, cold smoking, etc.) Overly complicated food Claiming to be farm-to-table, sustainable, when you are not

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t’s true, we’re a few weeks into 2014 already. Still, I wanted to get into print a few predictions about where the drinking scene in Seattle is headed. All of these are 100 percent guaranteed or your money back. Working for a free paper gives a writer a bit of margin of error, thankfully. • 2014 will be a BY ZACH GEBALLE

THEBARCODE

landmark year for alcohol in a legal sense. Washington

state will pass more stringent drunk-driving laws in the wake of yet more tragic accidents, while Seattle will strongly consider allowing bars to stay open later than 2 a.m. Meanwhile, as we hit the second anniversary of the privatization of liquor sales, people will wonder why prices remain some of the highest in the nation, even though some of the taxes were phased out. Oddly enough, major retailers seem uninterested in lowering prices. • Someone is going to make a local apple brandy, and it is going to be amazing. Washington has such amazing apples, and with the distillery scene growing ever more vibrant, there’s no reason an ambitious and talented distiller can’t turn out our answer to calvados, the classic French apple brandy. • While there will still be a big market for intensely hoppy IPAs, several prominent local brewers will trend toward making more balanced and complex beers that view hops as just one part of the flavor spectrum. • Expect more restaurants to offer suggested pairings on their menu. This is standard practice

in plenty of New York and San Francisco restaurants, and it benefits both restaurant and diner. The restaurant can focus resources on a slightly smaller selection of beverages, whether wine, beer, or spirits, while diners can feel confident that they’ll end up with a fun and dynamic duo without the challenge of choosing it themselves. • Tequila and rum will continue to come out of their ghettoized niche, taking their place alongside the other cornerstone spirits (this is already happening at places like Rumba and Barrio). These spirits can do much more than make a margarita or daiquiri. With a continued influx of quality aged spirits into the marketplace, creative bartenders will expand the reach of these two liquors over their cocktail lists. • I’ll admit that this is biased and hopeful, but Seattle is poised to explode as a wine city. The money is here, and the city has a rapidly growing base of experienced and talented sommeliers, wine writers, and wine sellers (yours truly most certainly excluded). With the quality of Washington wine at an all-time high, the moment is now. • Wine collecting will seem passé when beer collecting hits the mainstream. Restaurants will struggle to figure out how to charge a corkage fee for a beer bottle, but they will somehow. • The Bar Code will attempt to write a column about the new Bellevue bar named Bar Code, but we’ll both vanish when we come in contact with each other . . . happy 2014! E

thebarcode@seattleweekly.com

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arts&culture

Down but Not Out in Braddock, PA

Her hometown in decline, a photographer insists on the dignity of those who remain.

BY BRIAN MILLER

In the hallway leading to the Knight/Lawrence Gallery, we see about two dozen black-and-white images of her family, often with Frazier posing among them. Many of these photos feature her grandmother Ruby, who raised Frazier and other extended family members. Mostly shot during the prior decade, these portraits have a formal quality—far from household snapshots. These are deliberate, intimate scenes of hair

Syniva Whitney has been making smart and smartypants work since she came to town a couple of years ago, mixing visual art, performance, and writing in different ways—all of it an ongoing inquiry into gender identity and sexuality. As co-leaders of Gender Tender, she and Will Courtney bring a light touch to serious issues. In Sync or Swim, their latest work, they turn their attention to families—in sitcoms, romantic comedies, and that most mysterious place, the real world. In all those spheres, Whitney aims to be “testing the fluidity of relationships and identity.” (Through Sun.) Calamus Auditorium, 517 E. Pike St., gaycity. org. $12–$15. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ FRIDAY, JAN. 17

braiding, doll collections, sick men in bed, old and gnarled feet and hands. Faces and bodies are careworn; the furniture may be a bit tattered, the wallpaper fading, but these are ordinary, functioning lives. Look at us, Frazier is saying; this is how we live. More significant, she’s not some outsider—a journalist or an aesthete dropping in to survey the decay and rubble—but a member, and staunch defender, of what she considers an embattled community. That goal becomes more apparent in the main gallery, which contains seven large color aerial views of Braddock, taken last year from a helicopter hovering over The Bottom. There’s a startling micro/macro effect as we pull up high to these impersonal views. Frazier’s family, and others like it, disappear. All we see are scrapped lots and empty fields; rusty old freight cars sitting empty; and the old Carnegie plant somehow still functioning (though now more automated and requiring fewer men to run). The people are conspicuously missing. Houses are encircled by industrial brownfields. Pointing to a small, red-roofed white house, the lone holdout on its block, Frazier names the owner: Isaac Bunn, a friend of her family. Now all his neighbors’ houses are gone, and Braddock is parking large white bags of shredded tire rubber there. “They’re storing it to occupy the land,” says Frazier. Yet those rows of bulging bags make an oddly fascinating pattern as they surround Bunn’s home, like giant abacus beads or an old Tetris game. The aerial perspective gives us a clinical view of urban decline, unlike those romantic shots of Rust Belt ruins so beloved by photo-tourists.

The artist with her grandmother in 2005.

Is urban renewal possible here? “There’s no jobs,” admits Frazier, but she sees a deliberate siphoning of Braddock’s few resources to the new, car-dependent exurbs of Pennsylvania, a strategy of disinvestment. She points to the old UPMC Braddock Hospital, now closed. “It was our largest employer. It was more than a hospital—it was our community center,” with an ATM and cafe. The sick and the poor must now travel for health care—and forget about anyplace decent to eat. “We don’t have any grocery stores,” she adds. Frazier scoffs at the municipal “land grab” we see in her aerial views—like the new townhouses erected where the old public housing was torn down. “In five years, it won’t look like this. And they’ll say there was no one here.” Some would consider Braddock post-industrial, but Frazier rejects the term. If people are still living there, still raising families, the town isn’t post- but present. What’s the right term? Maybe there isn’t one. Braddock is far from smug, booming Seattle, but there’s a kinship to our region’s old logging towns and farming communities, also depopulated. While Frazier admirably shows us “people that are being silenced, erased, or marginalized,” she’s no economist with a remedy for the relentless industrial logic of decline. She’s just one defiant artist, a holdout, like that lone white house surrounded by industrial detritus. E

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE ART MUSEUM 1300 First Ave., 654-3121, seattleartmuseum.org. $12.50–$19.50. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wed. & Fri.–Sun., 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Thurs. Ends June 22.

Author of the acclaimed 2011 novel Swamplandia!, the Iowa-based Russell continues to startle, unsettle, and enchant with her latest collection of fantasist short stories, Vampires in the Lemon Grove (Vintage, $14.95, new in paperback). Though the worlds she creates are supremely surreal—young Japanese women are sold into silk-making slavery, their bodies turned into threadreeling machines; fans of “foodchain wars” travel to the Antarctic for gruesome tailgating parties as tiny krill take on giant whales—there Russell is a past exists a terra MacArthur “genius” firma beneath award winner. her dreamlike sequences. Historical references to the Meiji restoration, political innuendo, and critiques of the Iraq War are embedded throughout, bringing necessary gravitas to what might otherwise be just strings of beautiful imagery: for example, “hunks of real ginger are unraveling in the broth, like hair.” You will—and should—get lost in these words, but Russell will finally and expertly bring you back home, dazzled yet aware. Town

MICHAEL LIONSTAR

LATOYA RUBY FRAZIER

Karen Russell

Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 652-4255, townhall seattle.org. $5. 7:30 p.m. NICOLE SPRINKLE

Nordic Lights Film Festival

Sponsored by Ballard’s Nordic Heritage Museum, this weekend program offers 10 features and two packages of shorts through Sunday. Prominent among them is the Danish A Hijacking, not seen by many last July, but which I think is a better, prior telling of essentially the

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

Born by a River comprises two sections and eras.

THURSDAY, JAN. 16

Gender Tender

W

hen the young Pennsylvania photographer LaToya Ruby Frazier visited Seattle Art Museum last month to discuss Born by a River, a documentary study of her family and hometown, she cast some shade on “this big Hollywood movie” that had recently been filmed there. Her implication was that a bunch of rich white stars were using the rusting, depopulated, and mostly poor town of Braddock as a gritty backdrop for some sort of fake, fancy drama. That film was Out of the Furnace, starring Christian Bale as a down-on-his-luck steel-mill worker, and it was anything but slick or dismissive of Braddock’s economic hard times. Still, unlike me, Frazier obviously hadn’t seen the movie, which co-starred Forest Whitaker and Zoe Saldana, so I didn’t want to correct her as she graciously led a media tour through her show, even as she insisted that Braddock’s poor black residents had been written out of that city’s boom-and-bust history. Her point is well taken, if not entirely accurate. Previously unseen in Seattle, Frazier’s images have mostly been black-andwhite studies of her kin, lending dignity to loved ones struggling with underemployment, disease, and fractured families. At 31, she’s the third recipient of SAM’s biannual Gwendolyn Knight/Jacob Lawrence Prize, announced last May. “There’s a lot of environmental degradation and toxicity,” says Frazier of the Monongahela River Valley. “Most of us are suffering from terminal illnesses like cancer and lupus” (she has the latter). The “us” is the poor, residual population, shrunk to about 10 percent of its peak during the booming years of steel production and other heavy industry. Andrew Carnegie built his first mill in Braddock in 1872, and his first library; today that mill is one of the few still functioning in The Bottom, the flood-prone industrial/residential area where Frazier grew up. She began taking photographs as a teenager during the ’90s, in part as a rebuttal of the historical images of Braddock that showed only its white faces. “I would consider us poor,” she says. “I pretty much witnessed the war on drugs in my community, and it pretty much decimated my community. The major themes of my work are communal and familial . . . to allow other people’s voices to be heard.”

ThisWeek’s PickList

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 18 17


arts&culture» Pick List

» Stage Mount as the incompetent monarch.

Opening Nights PJerry Springer: The Opera

MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Pilou Asbæk as the captive cook in A Hijacking.

references to the “greatest hits” of the classical repertory. This time he’s taken on Les Sylphides, a staple of the Ballet Russe from its origins in the 1910s through its American touring repertory in the ’30s–’50s. Back then, it was a romantic essay to a piano score by Chopin, with a poet and a group of sylphs. Now Wevers transforms it into a polyamorous dinner party, in what’s becoming his trademark slippery style for his Whim W’him company. The balance of the program is considerably darker, including Wevers’ Instantly Bound, about gun control, and an untitled new work by emerging European choreographer Juanjo Arques. (Through Sun.)

» FROM PAGE 17 same story as in Captain Phillips. Without the Hollywood budget or Tom Hanks, it’s a small, tense, and thoroughly claustrophobic drama of negotiation between a shipping-company executive and the Somali pirates who’ve seized his ship and crew. The CEO’s sole weapon is his satellite phone. Meanwhile, we follow a humble frightened cook onboard the MV Rozen, and there’s never any question of his going Bruce Willis on his AK-47-wielding captors. Instead, this is a waiting game, a slow series of bids (beginning at $15 million), rejections, and counteroffers while the human poker chips grow sick and possibly insane. There’s even a suggestion of Stockholm syndrome when the hostages catch a few fish for a communal meal. They and their captors share the only festive song they all know: “Happy Birthday.” (Tobias Lindholm’s film screens at 4 p.m. Saturday.) Beginning the fest tonight, following a reception with director Mike Magidson, is his Inuk, a coming-of-age tale filmed in Greenland with an all-Inuit cast. SIFF Film Center (Seattle

Cornish Playhouse, 201 Mercer St. (Seattle Center), 800-838-3006, whimwhim.org. $25. 8 p.m. SANDRA KURTZ

SATURDAY, JAN. 18

David Koechner

18

Whim W’him

Olivier Wevers comes from the ballet world, and even though his own choreography often ranges far from that practice, he still makes

Whim W’him dancers in rehearsal.

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SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014

Center), nordicmuseum.org and siff.net. $8–$10 individual, $50–$55 pass. 6 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. film. BRIAN MILLER

One of the small pleasures of the Anchorman sequel was seeing Ron Burgundy’s old gang reunited. Since the first picture, Paul Rudd and Steve Carell have cemented their stardom and typically get to play the lead in a big comedy (Anchorman 2 being the obvious exception). But what about Koechner, who plays doltish sportscaster Champ Kind? Too bald and bulky for leading-man material, he’s never going to get the girl in a modern American rom-com, but for me he’s always a pleasure to watch. When Ron finds Champ running a cut-rate chicken shack that actually serves deep-fried bats (or “chicken of the cave,” as he keeps insisting), Koechner gives Champ an oafish yet genuine sense of desperation. Though on the surface a bigoted, sexist, homophobic lunk, he just can’t stop hugging Ron—there’s an ardent passion suggesting something hidden deep in his cave (well, closet). Koechner isn’t a stand-up comic per se; he started in improv, did one season on SNL, and is essentially a creator of comic characters, often sourced from his Missouri roots. Since he hails from the sticks, Koechner has a special affinity for playing hicks and hayseeds. (One of his regular bits is The Naked Trucker & T-Bones Show.) Rather than us coastal elites making fun of the flyover states, he’s inviting us to laugh at yokels he knows—like Champ, who’s just too dumb to be despicable. The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 877-784-4849, stg presents.org. $26.50. 8 p.m. BRIAN MILLER E

In the spirit of this show, I’ll start with my own confession: I was a lot more impressed with The Book of Mormon before I saw Jerry Springer: The Opera, which anticipates by eight or so years the identical combination of bouncy exuberance and relentless vulgarity—sexual, scatological, religious, you name it—that made Mormon such a hit for the South Park guys. Springer is rawer, funnier, more inventive, and hits harder; British creators Stewart Lee and Richard Thomas aim less at the talk-show host and trash TV than at the country that made him a star. None of this is subtle, mind you; Americans “eat, excrete, and watch TV,” one chorus tells us. And just as you might start to feel smugly above it all (of course other people watched that garbage, not me), they hit us with “With or without Jerry’s show, we’d all end up the same . . . he merely holds a mirror to it.” The show’s not as preachy as that makes it sound, though, making room among the in-your-face camp (tap-dancing Klansmen) for the emotional sucker punch of “I Just Wanna Dance,” which leapt out of the show to become a discoremixed Pride anthem. Actually being moved was the last thing I expected by this point, but Lindsey Larson as aspiring pole-dancer Shawntel sells the shit out of it. Thomas’ score whiplashes from Handelby-way-of-Kurt Weill to ’70s cheese, bargainbasement Marvin Hamlisch; it’d be nearly as funny if not a word were sung. Act 1 is a sendup of a typical Springer episode; in the less-focused Act 2, Jerry’s sent to Hell to emcee a showdown between good and evil. Brandon Felker dials it down as Jerry, all the better to skewer the bland, paternalistic benignity of his hosting style, the ridiculous pretense that his show was therapeutic rather than exploitative. And, of course, so as not to upstage the freak parade. Among the fearless and intensely hardworking Balagan Theatre ensemble, directed by Shawn Belyea, the standout in what-the-fuck audaciousness is Kevin Douglass, double-cast as (take a deep breath) Jesus Christ and a diaper fetishist. In a show whose curveballs never let the audience get complacent, the biggest surprise comes last. The finale is built on Jerry’s traditional sign-off, “Take care of yourselves . . . and each other”—a genuinely redemptive moment of decency, or calculated smarm posing as one? Jerry Springer, startlingly, sets cynicism aside and takes the host’s side. If it sounds like easy sentiment, a pulled punch, it’s the opposite, the ultimate fuck-you. Paramount among the objects of Lee and Thomas’ contempt—including Americans’ inability to use verb tenses correctly—is our tendency to hold others responsible for our idiocy. So lighten up on Jerry; he’s not to blame. He didn’t make his guests stupid, or make them be on his show—or make you watch. GAVIN BORCHERT

JOHN ULMAN

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Richard II CENTER HOUSE THEATRE, SEATTLE CENTER, 733-8222, SEATTLESHAKESPEARE.ORG. $25–$48. 7:30 P.M. WED.–SAT., PLUS WEEKEND MATINEES. ENDS FEB. 2.

Despite lovely renaissance costumes by Jocelyne Fowler, the entire time I watched Seattle Shakes’ artistic director George Mount in the title role of this stiff yet poetic prequel to Shakespeare’s more famous Henry plays, I was thinking about George W. Bush. Differences between the divine right of kings and democracy aside, Richard’s position wasn’t all that different from W’s: He came to office through family privilege, was surrounded by flatterers, altered laws to suit his whims, bestowed hen houses to crony foxes, and was ultimately replaced by a man of sounder action. On Carol Wolfe Clay’s austere set, Mount dwindles from a coddled jackass prince to a naked nobody controlling nothing. Forget pathos, director Rosa Joshi goes for cynical laughs—and the approach does work; perhaps it’s the best way to get a modern audience to connect with the somewhat bureaucratic play. The plot in short: Smug King Richard II from the House of York is challenged for the throne by his cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, House of Lancaster. Richard banishes Bolingbroke (David Foubert), around whom the forces of the Earl of Northumberland (Reginald André Jackson) rally to overthrow Richard. At the time Richard II was written, this would have been a major dilemma for everyone, as it took divine matters into human hands. In our present age of revolving-door politics, it means little. Still, the production deftly milks scenes in which characters in the middle, such as John of Gaunt (Dan Kremer) and the Duke of York (Peter A. Jacobs) weigh divine right against popular might. With charming understatement, Kremer’s Gaunt attempts to comfort his son Bolingbroke about the upsides of banishment. The distinctly nuanced Jacobs manages to carry off the extremely improbable notion of a father seeking the death of his own son to punish the lad’s support of the old regime. This is not a revival that’s going to score a strong emotional response with the audience. On the page, at least, Richard II is an interesting precursor not only to the Henry plays, but also

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 21


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a&c» Stage Opening Nights » FROM PAGE 18 to the more mature study in failed kingship that Shakespeare would write a decade later—King Lear. MARGARET FRIEDMAN

PRigoletto MCCAW HALL, 321 MERCER ST. (SEATTLE CENTER), 389-7676, SEATTLEOPERA.ORG. $25 AND UP. 7:30 P.M. WED. & SAT., PLUS 7:30 P.M. FRI., JAN. 24. ENDS JAN. 25.

stage@seattleweekly.com

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

To anyone still inclined to oppose updating operas, modernizing their period settings, Verdi himself provides a counterargument in his 1851 Rigoletto. Nominally set in the 16th century, it opens with a party scene at the palace of the Duke of Mantua; and right away Verdi provides a perfectly anachronistic minuet in Mozartean style. If you can accept a 200-year jump forward in a piece of dance music, you should have no problem with Linda Brovsky’s Mussolinization for Seattle Opera. Fascist imagery, deco furniture, and Marie Anne Chiment’s lovely vintage costumes place this Rigoletto in the 1930s, like the renaissance a high point in Italian history for the abuse of power. Portraying, grippingly, this corrupt society’s emotional toll is Marco Vratogna as the title court jester—self-loathing in his sucking-up to power, guilt and anguish running through every passionately full-voiced line. As Gilda, the daughter he cherishes and shelters (to a fault), Nadine Sierra sings with a marvelous lightness, youthful in timbre if mature in body, flexibility, and assurance. The same is true of Francesco Demuro as the Duke, who seduces her; so well-matched are they in vocal weight that it shades the drama with a cruel irony: They’re perfect for each other in musical terms yet inevitably doomed by the libretto. Bringing his distinctively colored voice and imposing stage presence as killer-for-hire Sparafucile is Andrea Silvestrelli, memorable as Fasolt and Hunding in last summer’s Ring and a very welcome returnee. Judging by the thrill that rippled through the audience at the end of his first scene, his was the evening’s most impressive performance. Rigoletto is generally seen as a step forward among Verdi’s operas for, among other things, its unpadded and flowing dramatic action, not chopped up into discrete and formal set pieces, as had been the practice. As if to close the door on earlier Italian-opera conventions and show the ghosts of his ancestors how it should be done, Verdi takes the bel canto approach one last time in Gilda’s “Caro nome”—in a way, Rossini’s greatest aria. Its expressive method is a throwback—less a matter of sweeping melody or dramatic thrust than of palpitating ornamentation of the vocal line, emotion taking wing via the throat. Sierra sings a good bit of the aria lying on her back, surprisingly, and doesn’t shy from exploring its eroticism, making love to the image in her head—she thinks the Duke is a poor student named Gualtier—with every caressed roulade. Even this aria—usually a moment of innocence, a respite—intensifies the opera’s misanthropic take on human nature. Power corrupts, but so do lust, money, fear, the thirst for revenge, and whatever it is Gilda wants. Verdi indicts everyone—nobody in Rigoletto is honest; even Gilda, Little Miss I-methim-in-church, is kidding herself, willfully blind to the Duke’s caddishness even after she discovers what he really is. It’s all pretty dark. And a heck of a compelling show. GAVIN BORCHERT E

21


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Stage CAFE DANTE Not a cabaret in a cafe, but (as I under-

CURRENT RUNS

• 14/48 FESTIVAL Very much a case of cheap theater

•  • 

THE NORTHWEST ORCA CANNERY PRESENTS: DR. THADDEUS Q. BALLARD’S MUSICAL

Send events to stage@seattleweekly.com, dance@seattleweekly.com, or classical@seattleweekly.com See seattleweekly.com for full listings. = Recommended

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(1/15) A. Douglas Stone Einstein’s Greatest Success (1/17) Karen Russell ‘Vampires in the Lemon Grove’

ELISE BAKKETUN

(1/18) Saturday Family Concerts SuperSones (1/18) SBO presents ‘Dresden Concertos’ with Rachel Barton Pine Nadine Sierra as Rigoletto’s jilted Gilda (see review, page 21).

(1/20) Ian Haney Lopez Destroying the Middle Class One Word at a Time

FOLLIES & COMEDY REVUE Ghost Light

Theatricals’ neo-vaudeville show. The Ballard Underground, 2220 N.W. Market St., 395-5458, ghostlighttheatricals.org. $12–$20. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.– Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 19. Ends Jan. 25. PETER PAN Broadway Bound’s production, full of energetic young talent. Shoreline Center, 18560 First Ave. N.E., 526-5437. $17.50. Runs Fri.–Sun.; see broadway bound.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan 25. RICHARD II SEE REVIEW, PAGE 18.

(1/21) Scott Stossel with Marcie Sillman The ‘Age of Anxiety’

Now thru Feb. 2

TEATRO ZINZANNI: HAIL CAESAR: FORBIDDEN OASIS Frank Ferrante returns as the flamboyant,

omnisexual chef Caesar; slinky Dreya Weber, equally skilled as an aerialist and singer, plays a resurrected Cleopatra. You pay a lot more at TZZ than you might for a show at Re-Bar or the Pink Door, but the whole immersive experience still seems a bargain: You’re not just buying dinner and a show, but a lavish eveninglength party. Teatro ZinZanni, 222 Mercer St., 802-0015. $108 and up. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see dreams.zinzanni.org for exact schedule. Ends Jan. 26. TRUST ME A new musical about two friends at different boarding schools, produced by Village Theatre’s Kidstage program. Village Theatre, 303 Front St. N., Issaquah, 425-392-2202, villagetheatre.org. $16–$18. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Jan. 26. UPSIDE DOWNTON Jet City Improv’s sendup of a certain PBS costume drama. Wing-It Productions, 5510 University Way N.E., 781-3879, jetcityimprov.com. $12–$15. 8 p.m. Thurs.–Fri. Ends Feb. 14.

Jan. 8–Feb. 2, 2014 www.seattleshakespeare.org

(1/22) Deborah Cohen Overcoming the ‘Obesity Epidemic’ (1/23) Max Tegmark WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG A Physicist’s Guide to the Universe TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

ARTS & CULTURE

COMMUNITY

(1/24) Erez Aiden: Culturomics

Dance

TENDER SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 17. • GENDER • WHIM W’HIM: INSTANTLY BOUND SEE THE PICK

LIST, PAGE 18.

Classical, Etc. OPERA SEE REVIEW, PAGE 21. • SEATTLE • GARRICK OHLSSON From this masterful pianist,

music by Chopin, Schubert, and American impressionist Charles Griffes. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $41–$46. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 15. A FAR CRY Gershwin, Ives, and much more from this conductorless chamber orchestra. Meany Hall, UW campus, 543-4880, uwworldseries.org. $34–$39. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 16. SEATTLE SYMPHONY “Tchaikfest!” includes four concertos plus a polonaise for dessert. Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., 215-4747, seattlesymphony.org. $19–$122. 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 16, 8 p.m. Fri., Jan. 17. TRIO ANDROMEDA This UW student piano trio debuts with music by Mendelssohn, Part, and Shostakovich. Brechemin Auditorium, School of Music, UW campus, 685-8384, music.washington.edu. $5. 7:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. CAPPELLA ROMANA Music from the Finnish orthodox church, including Rautavaara’s Vigilia. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 732 18th Ave. E., 800-494-8497, cappellaromana.org. $18–$39. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. SEATTLE BAROQUE ORCHESTRA Handel, Vivaldi, and more, with guest violinist Rachel Barton Pine. Town Hall, 1119 Eighth Ave., 325-7066, earlymusicguild. org. $20–$42. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan. 18. AUBURN SYMPHONY CHAMBER MUSIC ASO members play Stravinsky’s Soldier’s Tale and Bartok’s Contrasts. St. Matthew Episcopal Church, 123 L St. N.E., Auburn, 253-887-7777, auburnsymphony.org. $10–$17. 4 p.m. Sun., Jan. 19.

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SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

you may not remember later, but an experience you can recommend afterwards to friends who aren’t, you know, theater people. Given that 14 new scripts are written and rehearsed in just two days, the results are never going to be Shakespeare. Yet it can be a relief to escape the expectations of serious, important drama, especially during the post-holiday doldrums. And the program, running about two hours with intermission, can also be a preview of talent you’ll see during the coming year. The plays won’t likely be restaged, but most all the cast members will be back on every stage in town. Names you’ll recognize include Hannah Mootz (so excellent in the Rep’s Bo-Nita last fall), Scott Ward Abernethy (part of the WET ensemble behind last summer’s Tall Skinny Cruel Cruel Boys), and Allison Strickland (seen in New Century Theatre Company’s The Walworth Farce last October). BRIAN MILLER ACT Theatre, 700 Union St., 1448fest.com. Shows $10–$20, passes $35–$60. 8 & 10:30 p.m. Fri.–Sat. Ends Jan. 18. JERRY SPRINGER: THE OPERA SEE REVIEW, PAGE 18. LES MISÉRABLES Director Steve Tomkins and company have created what has to be the best-ever pocket-size rendering of the 1985 smash musical. As in Victor Hugo’s 1862 class-struggle novel, French parolee Jean Valjean (Greg Stone) is pursued by inspector Javert (Eric Polani Jensen) while seeking to regain the good name he lost after stealing bread to feed a starving child. Also assisting Valjean’s salvation are Fantine (Beth DeVries), who tasks Valjean on her deathbed to care for her daughter, Cosette (Alexandra Zorn); would-be revolutionaries Enjolras (Steve Czarnecki) and Marius (Matthew Kacergis), who falls for the adult Cosette at first sight; and a riotous pair of comic foils who seek to undo Valjean at every turn, the treacherous Thénardiers (Kate Jaeger and Nick DeSantis). This Les Miz is a singular achievement in regional theater. Not a loose stitch has been left to chance in the three-hour staging (with intermission), which aspires to be as great as any production of the show ever mounted—and it’s better than any I’ve ever seen, ever. KEVIN PHINNEY Everett Performing Arts Center, 2710 Wetmore Ave., Everett, 425-257-8600. $28–$63. Runs Wed.–Sun.; see villagetheatre.org for exact schedule. Extended through Feb. 9.

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OPENINGS & EVENTS

stand it) a play about a cabaret in a cafe. Staged in a cafe. Presented by REBATEnsemble. Cafe on the Ave, 4201 University Way N.E., 800-838-3006, brownpaper tickets.com. $6–$10. 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 17–Sun., Jan. 19. DISNEY’S LITTLE MERMAID JR. Youth Theatre Northwest presents this stage adaptation. Youth Theatre Northwest, 8805 S.E. 40th St., Mercer Island, 232-4145 x109, youththeatre.org. $13–$17. Opens Jan. 17. 7 p.m. Fri., 2 & 7 p.m. Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Ends Feb. 9. THE DOCTOR Seattle Experimental Theater’s improvised Doctor Who spoof. Theater Off Jackson, 409 Seventh Ave. S., seattleexperimentaltheater.com. $12–$15. Opens Jan. 17. 8 p.m. Fri.–Sat., plus 2 p.m. Sun., Jan. 26. Ends Jan. 26. FAMILY AFFAIR Jennifer Jasper’s “sick, hilarious, and ultimately relatable” cabaret on the theme of family. JewelBox/Rendezvous, 2322 Second Ave., jennifer jasperperforms.com. $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Jan. 15. A GREAT WILDERNESS The premiere of Samuel D. Hunter’s play about a pray-the-gay-away camp in Idaho. Seattle Repertory Theatre, Seattle Center, 4432222. $12–$65. Previews begin Jan. 17, opens Jan. 22. 7:30 p.m. Wed.–Sun. plus some Wed. & weekend matinees; see seattlerep.org for exact schedule. Ends Feb. 16. DAVID KOECHNER SEE THE PICK LIST, PAGE 18. THE NORMAL HEART Larry Kramer’s groundbreaking 1985 AIDS drama, presented by Strawberry Theatre Workshop. Erickson Theatre Off Broadway, 1524 Harvard Ave., 800-838-3006, strawshop.org. $18–$36. Opens Jan. 16. 7:30 p.m. Thurs.–Sat. Ends Feb. 15.

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arts&culture» Film

Beyond Outrage RUNS FRI., JAN. 17–THURS., JAN. 23 AT GRAND ILLUSION. RATED R. 112 MINUTES.

“I’m getting too old for this shit,” says an aging yakuza after being released from jail to rejoin the gang wars. That the speaker is director and star Takeshi Kitano, now 67, and that this is the long-delayed sequel to his 2011 Outrage, only underscores his point. Ôtomo has been at it too long. He really ought to retire from the killings, vendettas, and endlessly discussed grudges among the crime clans of Tokyo and Osaka . . . but they just keep pulling him back in. The problem here—for Ôtomo, for Kitano, for us—is that we’ve all seen this movie too many times before. The old guard of Beyond Outrage insists on suits and ties and elaborate meeting protocols as they debate old feuds and plan new alliances (always with plans for future betrayal, of course). The new guard is represented by treacherous, ambitious Ishihara (Ryô Kase, back from Outrage), who demands that his elders learn how to master hedge funds and other means of modern criminality. The impudence! Next thing you know, he’ll have the yakuza using Snapchat and Skype! Ôtomo, caught between the two gangs being gamed by Detective Kataoka (Fumiyo Kohinata), is a man accustomed to traditional tools: knife, gun, and power drill. (In one concession to technology, however, he finds a novel use for a baseball pitching machine.) As usual, Kitano effectively deploys his lopsided, stroke-ravaged deadpan to the proceedings, but it’s hard to tell if Ôtomo is just weary or outright bored. As director, Kitano stages the same revenge-planning scenes over and over again, the gangsters lit from above, so that their eyes are dead and coal-dark. The first Outrage was no classic, but a solid return to yakuza-land; this one makes it seem better in retrospect. BRIAN MILLER

ROBERT HORTON

PThe Selfish Giant RUNS FRI., JAN. 17–THURS., JAN. 23 AT NORTHWEST FILM FORUM. NOT RATED. 91 MINUTES.

The British underclass has been so extensively and thoughtfully explored by filmmakers such as Ken Loach and Mike Leigh that even a socially concerned viewer could be forgiven for feeling a little exhausted by the subject. But maybe we just needed a fresh voice. And now we have one. Clio Barnard’s first feature, The Arbor (2010), was an experimental documentary about working-class English writer

The Nut Job

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The Nut Job is animation’s rebuke to Atlas Shrugged. Here we have an individualist, a practitioner of the Ayn Randian virtue of selfishness, who must learn to share with others and embrace the joys of collectivization. And by “others,” I mean other rodents. This subtext must’ve amused director Peter Lepeniotis and his co-writer Lorne Cameron, although they pepper the movie with enough dry-roasted jokes to dispel any sense of preaching. The egotist is Surly (voiced by gravelly Will Arnett), a purple squirrel whose me-first behavior gets him kicked out of the park. He and his silent rat sidekick Buddy will vie with the other park animals to raid the pantry of a nearby nut shop—which is really the front for a gangster operation, and at this point further plot description becomes superfluous. All you need to know is that the park’s raccoon overlord (Liam Neeson) exhibits too much interest in power; that the “good” squirrel (Brendan Fraser) has an oversized image of his heroism

AGATHA A. NITECKA/SUNDANCE SELECTS

SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014

OPENS FRI., JAN. 17 AT PACIFIC PLACE AND OTHER THEATERS. RATED PG. 86 MINUTES.

Chapman as scrapper in The Selfish Giant.

Andrea Dunbar. While shooting in Dunbar’s grim West Yorkshire hometown of Bradford, she became fascinated by the local adolescent boys who worked at “scrapping,” gathering and collecting scrap metal—sometimes legally, sometimes not. Such lads are the focus of The Selfish Giant, a drama that takes its title (if not actual story material) from an Oscar Wilde story. The two boys we follow are on their own all day, having been suspended at school for bad behavior. Arbor (Connor Chapman) can be hyperactive and destructive when he’s not on his medication; scrapping gives him a focus for his demon-like energy. His slow, docile buddy Swifty (Shaun Thomas) tags along and keeps Arbor settled down. Swifty has a similarly empathetic bond with animals, which leads the scrap-dealer (Sean Gilder) to see him as a driver for cart-racing his horse in local road races. Without money, Arbor and Swifty are without worth, so they’ll do anything to make some. Nobody speaks the King’s English here—the subtitles are entirely necessary. Whether she’s honoring those thick accents, finding the proper pitch for the boys’ tussling friendship, or pausing for eerie shots of the town’s nuclear towers shrouded in fog, Barnard rarely sets a foot wrong. The outcome of the story is not difficult to predict, but Barnard is more interested in place and character than in surprising plot twists. There will be no miracles in store, as both boys—wonderfully acted by newcomers—are true to who they are: Arbor will find a way to overreach and screw up what they’ve got going, and Swifty will be too steadfastly loyal. The adults are also captured with precision. We can’t know much about how they arrived at their sad places, but we can read the cycles of economic worry and deprivation in their faces. (Swifty’s mum is played by Siobhan Finneran, star of the 1987 cult film Rita, Sue and Bob Too!, penned by Andrea Dunbar.) There is almost no overt commentary in The Selfish Giant about, say, current British austerity policies or social inequality, because Barnard understands that capturing this milieu is its own indictment. The saddest indictment imaginable. ROBERT HORTON

Ahmed during the early, heady days of the Arab Spring.

NETFLIX/PARTICIPANT MEDIA

Opening ThisWeek

(not really a problem, because everybody else shares it, too); and that sensible Andie (Katherine Heigl) thinks Surly might be redeemable. One problem with these park denizens: They tend to look alike. There’s a mole and some woodchucks and other such toothy creatures, which makes for less visual variety, than, say, the fauna of Bambi. The movie’s practically stolen by the only headlining canine in sight, a pug brilliantly voiced by Maya Rudolph—her arrival goes a long way toward sweetening a story with an unpleasant hero. The film is fast-moving, even if its goal of catching the manic spirit of Bugs Bunny cartoons succeeds only about half the time. Its look (in 3-D, in some theaters) is just odd enough to be nicely distracting: a world of vaguely ’50s-era cars and buildings, decorated with saturated colors and one spectacular tree on fire. Nobody’s going to mistake The Nut Job for Disney, but the script is in the 10-gagsper-minute style that epitomizes current TV sitcoms, and it’s funny enough to keep an adult awake for most of its running time. Lepeniotis expanded the film from his 2005 short, Surly Squirrel, and financed it with Canadian and South Korean money. The latter is the only explanation for the end-credits appearance of a cartoon Psy, once again flogging his Korean novelty hit “Gangnam Style” so the other critters can join in. Until that dated reference, The Nut Job qualifies as a mildly pleasant surprise.

PThe Square OPENS FRI., JAN. 17 AT SUNDANCE CINEMAS. NOT RATED. 108 MINUTES.

One of 15 docs on the Oscar shortlist (the nominations come tomorrow), Jehane Noujaim’s The Square is both timely and behind the current news cycle. And that’s not to fault the Egyptian-American filmmaker’s brave, total, immersive commitment in a fluid and sometimes dangerous situation. She spent over two years following the protests and battles at Tahrir Square, which erupted in January 2011. No one, including her, had any idea where events would lead. Her perspective is mostly groundlevel, following a half-dozen charismatic revolutionaries, some of whom speak English. There’s no history of Egypt before the protests, almost no news footage or outside comment, and much raw video that we see being shaped into YouTube dispatches from a liberal media room where Noujaim is embedded, high above the square. (The view down at the swarm, especially at night, is breathtaking.) “The battle isn’t just in the rocks and stones,” says British actor Khalid. “The battle is in the images and the stories.” You might think that Noujaim (Startup.com, Control Room), a Harvard-educated media type, would be in full agreement. But the longer The Square goes on, the more we see how rocks and stones (and tear gas and rubber bullets) really do matter—and how they shape the images and stories. (But the Koran trumps everything, including YouTube.) One of Noujaim’s cameramen, Ahmed, is a central figure in the protests, making speeches, debating skeptics, and tossing stones at the police. He’s the one closest to the Arab Street, and we can see him grow exhausted from the cycle of taking the square, being beaten back, and returning months later. The initial euphoria eventually runs into a brick wall called the Muslim Brotherhood, here represented by the warm-hearted family man Magdy. Absent a narrator, lacking many explanatory intertitles or graphics, The Square’s granular approach makes it a very partisan doc. Noujaim is on the side of the revolutionaries—who wouldn’t be?—without ever trying to summon a thesis from all the exhilarating, power-to-thepeople process of revolution. To be fair, that may be impossible. Her film is an invaluable chronicle of an historic moment, but it’s only a moment during Egypt’s very long, fraught history. From the pharaohs to the colonialists, from Sadat and Mubarak to Morsi and beyond, regime change seems to be the only constant. And, says Ahmed with a smile, “We’re waiting for the next one.” BRIAN MILLER E

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BY BRIAN MILLER

Local & Repertory SAM’s The Golden • THE BICYCLE THIEF Launching The Bicycle Thief had

Age of Italian Cinema series, a million-dollar budget (in today’s money) and was the Gone With the Wind of Neorealism, winning the 1949 foreign-film Oscar and influencing everyone from the French New Wave to the latest Iranians. Director Vittorio De Sica, who refused to cast Cary Grant, beautifully uses real-life manual worker Lamberto Maggiorani as his broke hero questing through Rome for a lost bike, with his ageless child (Enzo Staiola) in tow. It plays as true as life, and some say this is Rome’s greatest performance onscreen. (NR) TIM APPELO Seattle Art Museum, 1300 First Ave., 654-3100, seattleartmuseum.org, $63-$68 (series), 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 16. Series runs through March 13. BIG/A CLOCKWORK ORANGE You try to create your own connections to these two repertory titles (with separate admission). First up is Tom Hanks in the 1988 boy-in-a-man’s-body-com, directed by Penny Marshall. Following and much darker is Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 treatment of the Anthony Burgess novel. Malcolm McDowell’s performance is an unhinged, bratty marvel, and part of the movie’s cautionary accomplishment is to make us feel sympathy for this thug—and contempt for the politely authoritarian society that bends him to its will. Central Cinema, 1411 21st Ave., 686-6684, central-cinema.com, $6-$8, Jan. 17-20, 7 & 9:30 p.m. FIRE IN THE BLOOD Big Pharma and restrictive drug patents are the target in this new doc by Dylan Mohan Gray. William Hurt narrates. Discussion follows. (NR) Northwest Film Forum, 1515 12th Ave., 829-7863, nwfilmforum.org, $6-$10, Sat., Jan. 18, 7 p.m. THE PUNK SINGER After bursting onto the early-’90s scene with the Evergreen College–spawned riot-grrrl band Bikini Kill, then later shifting to a mellower key with Le Tigre, Kathleen Hanna seemingly dropped out of music in 2005. Why, apart from her marriage to the Beastie Boys’ Adam Horovitz, did she stop performing? More a fan than a director, Sini Anderson mostly gets to the bottom of such questions in The Punk Singer. Back in the day, Hanna was wary of the maledominated rock press, and she’s now in full control of Anderson’s access. Generously sourced with testimonials from the likes of Joan Jett, Corin Tucker, and Kim Gordon, the doc is less a career assessment than a companion reel to Hanna’s relaunch as a performer. But if The Punk Singer partly feels like an infomercial, full of praise for Hanna, it also has a medical, service-y aspect on the dangers of Lyme disease, which led to her health collapse. In a down moment, she asks her husband, “Do I look horrible?” “No,” Horovitz quickly shoots back. You’d like to see more of these domestic scenes, as when Horovitz recalls meeting Hanna on tour in the ’90s: “Kathleen was like a force—a car accident, but a good car accident.” (NR) BRIAN MILLER Grand Illusion, 1403 N.E. 50th St., 523-3935, grandillusioncinema.org, $5-$8, Fri., Jan. 17, 10 p.m.; Sat., Jan. 18, 10 p.m. THE SPROCKET SOCIETY’S SATURDAY SECRET MATINEES The 1949 serial Batman & Robin will be

Ongoing

• ALL IS LOST Playing an unnamed solo yachtsman

shipwrecked in the Indian Ocean, the 77-year-old Robert Redford represents an old-fashioned tradition of self-reliance and competence. Writer/director J.C. Chandor (Margin Call) withholds any personal information about our near-wordless hero, whose sloop is damaged by an errant floating shipping container full of shoes. His radio and electronics are flooded, so he calmly and methodically goes about patching his boat while storm clouds gather in the distance. Like Gravity and Captain Phillips, this is fundamentally a process drama: Character is revealed through action, not words. Here is a small man adrift, stripped of technology, surviving by his wits. Here, too, is Redford without any Hollywood trappings—no chance to smile or charm. All Is Lost is a simple story, but so in a way was that of Odysseus: epic, stoic, and specific. (PG-13) B.R.M. Crest

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David O. Russell is full of big roundhouse swings and juicy performances: It’s a fictionalized take on the Abscam scandal of the late 1970s, in which the FBI teamed with a second-rate con man (here called Irving Rosenfeld, played by Christian Bale) in a wacko sting operation involving a bogus Arab sheik and bribes to U.S. congressmen. Along with the FBI coercing him into its scheme, Irving is caught between his hottie moll Sydney (Amy Adams) and neglected wife Rosalyn (Jennifer Lawrence). Even more complicated for Irving is that one of the targets of the undercover operation, a genially corrupt yet idealistic Jersey politico (Jeremy Renner), turns out to be a soulmate. Equally unhappy is the presiding FBI agent (Bradley Cooper, his permed hair and his sexual urge equally curled in maddening knots), who’s developed a crush on Sydney that is driving him insane. Russell encourages his actors to go for it, and man, do they go for it. (R) ROBERT HORTON SIFF Cinema Uptown, Big Picture, Sundance, Bainbridge, Ark Lodge, Kirkland Parkplace, Lincoln Square, Pacific Place, Thornton Place, others AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY Tracy Letts won a Pulitzer for this play and now writes the screenplay, yet there’s almost no evidence of how this display of canned yammering could possibly have won a high literary honor. Osage County is in Oklahoma, where the lemony matriarch of the Weston family, Violet (Meryl Streep), has gathered the clan in the aftermath of tragedy. She has three daughters, and while she treats sensible Ivy (Julianne Nicholson) and silly Karen (Juliette Lewis) badly enough, she saves her special venom for her favorite, Barbara (Julia Roberts). Barbara’s marriage to an academic (Ewan McGregor) is unraveling, so she’s in the mood for a tussle, and we’re going to get one. While Streep is the savvy, surgical Muhammad Ali to Roberts’ blunt-punching Joe Frazier in that match, there’s a sense that even Dame Meryl is coasting on technique here. The gotcha dialogue is just a little too easy, and director John Wells encourages everybody to bop their lines right on the nose. (R) R.H. Alderwood 16, Guild 45th, Lincoln Square, Pacific Place, Southcenter, Thornton Place, Bainbridge, Kirkland Parkplace, SIFF Cinema Uptown, others CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Tom Hanks is hijacked and held hostage by Somali pirates, as actually happened to Richard Phillips in 2009, upon whose book this film is based. If you read that account or the newspapers, there’s nothing surprising here, though expert director Paul Greengrass—of the Bourne movies and United 93—adds as much tension as he can, chiefly through jittery cameras, screaming pirates, and the late-film addition of lethal Navy SEALs. But if I may jump to the end of the movie first: Greengrass and screenwriter Billy Ray do make the interesting decision not to treat that ending triumphantly. What we could not guess is that after more than two days of cool thinking, protecting his crew, calm negotiating, and even coaching his captors, Captain Phillips would finally lose his shit. Before that point, however, he flatters the chief pirate, Muse (Barkhad Abdi), by treating him as an equal. If not quite cogs, they’re bit players in the global nexus of commerce and power. And if they don’t like the job, plenty of others will take their place. (PG-13) B.R.M. Sundance, others DALLAS BUYERS CLUB Making a straight white Texas homophobe the hero of a film about the ’80s AIDS crisis doesn’t seem right. It’s inappropriate, exceptional, possibly even crass. All those qualities are reflected in Matthew McConaughey’s ornery, emaciated portrayal of Ron Woodroof, a rodeo rider and rough liver who contracted HIV in 1985. Fond of strippers, regularly swigging from his pocket flask, doing lines of coke when he can afford them, betting on the bulls he rides, Ron has tons of Texas-sized character. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallée, the unruly Dallas Buyers Club goes easy on the sinner-to-saint conversion story. As Ron desperately bribes and steals a path to off-label meds, he’s aided by the transvestite Rayon (an excellent Jared Leto); they’re fellow gamblers who delight in beating the house. (R) B.R.M. Sundance, Meridian, others GRAVITY George Clooney and Sandra Bullock are stranded in orbit, menaced by regular bombardments of space debris. Their dilemma is established in an astonishing 12-minute opening sequence, seamlessly rendered via CGI by director Alfonso Cuarón. (Here let’s note that the 3-D version is essential.) Dr. Stone (Bullock) at first can’t get her bearings; and the rest of the film consists of her navigating from one problem to the next. For all its technical marvels and breathtaking panoramas reflected in Stone’s visor, Gravity is both space-age and hugely traditional, though with a modern, self-aware heroine. (PG-13) B.R.M. Sundance, Oak Tree, others

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smooth, efficient near-future Los Angeles. Everyone ought to be happy, and that’s the problem for mopey Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix). Gradually it emerges that he’ separated from his wife (Rooney Mara), but won’t sign the divorce papers. Impulsively deciding to upgrade his phone and home PC, Theodore opts for the new OS1. He chooses a female voice (Scarlett Johansson’s) called Samantha, which soon takes over his life. Before long they’re going on dates together— and more. (Meanwhile, Sam is evolving at a startling rate; “Tell me you love me,” she implores.) In this ingenious and unexpectedly touching story, both humans and programs worry about being alone. And both yearn to connect across the digital divide between sentience and software. (R) B.R.M. Alderwood 16, Sundance, Bainbridge, Southcenter, Ark Lodge, Kirkland Parkplace, Harvard Exit, Lincoln Square, Majestic Bay, Cinebarre, Thornton Place, others INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS While there are funny bits in this simple story of a struggling folk musician in 1961 Greenwich Village, very loosely inspired by Dave Van Ronk’s memoir The Mayor of MacDougal Street, the situation for Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) is fairly dire. He has no money, no apartment, and no real prospects in the music industry. The Coen brothers aren’t really making a comedy here, and you should temper your expectations to appreciate the movie’s minor-key rewards. Isaac can really sing and play guitar; the sterling soundtrack, by T Bone Burnett, is built around live music performances; and the catchiest tune—an astronaut ditty called “Please, Mr. Kennedy”—is a novelty song. As a man, Llewyn is a self-described asshole offstage; he’s only at his best onstage. If music can’t save him or provide a career, it’s also his only succor against life’s crushing disappointments. (R) B.R.M. Alderwood 16, Sundance, Ark Lodge, Oak Tree, Harvard Exit, Lincoln Square, others NEBRASKA Whether delusional, demented, or duped by a sweepstakes letter promising him $1 million, it really doesn’t matter about the motivations of Woody (the excellent and subdued Bruce Dern). What counts is the willpower of this cotton-haired, ex-alcoholic Montana geezer. His son David (Will Forte, surprisingly tender) becomes the enabler/Sancho Panza figure on their trek to Nebraska, where Woody expects to get his prize. There is a lifetime of regret and bad parenting to reveal in Alexander Payne’s black-white-movie, which makes it sound more bleak than it is. There’s both comedy and pathos as Woody makes his triumphant return to Hawthorne, en route to the sweepstakes office in Lincoln, Nebraska. Also visiting Lincoln is Woody’s wife (June Squibb, a hoot), the movie’s salty truth-teller. With its mix of delusion, decency, and dunces, Nebraska is a little slow for my taste but enormously rewarding in the end, one of the year’s best films. (R) B.R.M. Guild 45th, Meridian, Lynwood (Bainbridge), others 12 YEARS A SLAVE Steve McQueen’s harrowing historical drama is based on a memoir by Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free man from Saratoga, New York, who was kidnapped and sold into slavery in 1841. One sensitive slave owner (Benedict Cumberbatch) gives Solomon—a musician by trade— a fiddle. Then he’s sold to the cruel cotton farmer Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender), who also owns the furiously hard-working Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o). Patsey, like Solomon, is caught inside the terror of not knowing how to play this hand. Do they keep their heads down and try to survive, or do they resist? This is no Amistad or Schindler’s List, tackling the big story, but a personal tale. The film’s and-then-this-happened quality is appropriate for a memoir written in the stunned aftermath of a nightmare. Along the way, McQueen includes idyllic nature shots of Louisiana, as though to contrast that unspoiled world with what men have done in it. The contrast is lacerating. (R) R.H. Varsity, Meridian, Kirkland Parkplace, others THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Hugely, rudely entertaining, Martin Scorsese’s three-hour tale of rogue stock traders during the early ‘90s stars a ferociously funny Leonardo DiCaprio as Jordan Belfort, upon whose jailhouse memoir the movie is based. Wolf almost seems like a remake of Scorsese’s Goodfellas—or two of them, given its length. Here again are the crazed, colorful criminals, the mountains of blow, the army of hookers, the venal vitality of a life lived outside the law. The crucial difference, however, is the absence of mobsters and violence; this film is a greed-com, and the clowns include Jonah Hill, Rob Reiner, Matthew McConaughey, Jean Dujardin, and Spike Jonze. (R) B.R.M. SIFF Cinema Uptown, Sundance, Redmond Town Center, Southcenter, Lincoln Square, Meridian, Cinebarre, Thornton Place, Bainbridge, others

• 

Seattle Weekly ~ Best of Seattle

‘Best Movie Theater 2013’

arts&culture»

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PARKIN G

NOW PLAYING Fri Jan 17 - Thu Jan 23

THE UPTOWN

AMERICAN HUSTLE  THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Sun Jan 19 | DocBrunch EATING ALABAMA with free Chipotle burritos WOMEN IN CINEMA | Jan 22 - 26 Opening Night with Party at Taste

ELAINE STRITCH: SHOOT ME

Director/Producer in attendance! 

THE FILM CENTER

OPENS JANUARY 17 | UPTOWN

FILM CRAFT COMMENTARY Visual Effects with Tim Everitt Thu Jan 23 | 6:30 PM

FIRST DRAFT Live screenplay reading SIFF CINEMA UPTOWN | 511 Queen Anne Ave N SIFF FILM CENTER | Seattle Center

• 

Winter Con Roundup

W

inters can be dark and isolating here in the Northwest. Our fertile imaginations and the holiday bounty of games can keep out the rain for a little while, but eventually a geek has to get out! Fortunately, there are many conventions here in the Northwest.

GEEKLYREPORT BY TERRA CLARKE OLSEN RUSTYCON Fri., Jan. 17–Sun., Jan. 19 The Northwest’s first sci-fi and fantasy con of the year, Rustycon features literature, costumes, gaming, artwork, and more. The panels cover a wide spectrum of geeky subjects, including “Being an Independent Fantasy Artist,” and “Coming Out in Comic.” Guest of honor Todd Johnson McCaffrey is the son of Anne McCaffrey and author of books in the Dragonrider of Pern series. Marriott Hotel, SeaTac, rustycon.

com. Buy badges at the door, $20–$55.

CONFLIKT Fri., Jan. 24–Sun., Jan. 26 This con is devoted to filk music and culture—a genre, dating back to the ’50s, that focuses on science fiction and fantasy fandoms and often features songs written and performed by fans. Conflikt offers workshops and panel discussions on filk, and concerts galore, with special guests including Amy McFiddler, a professional fiddler and filk favorite. Hilton Seattle Airport, SeaTac, conflikt.

org. Pre-register online or buy passes at the door, $55–$60. Children 1–12 are free.

RADCON Fri., Feb. 14–Sun., Feb. 16 In its 23rd

year, RadCon has long been a staple of Washington’s geek scene. But what sets it apart is its support of the education, writing, and filming of sci-fi and fantasy at this con and throughout the year. Among this year’s guests will be writer Mike Resnick, winner of five Hugos and a Nebula. Red Lion Inn, Pasco, Wash., radcon.org. Tickets online, $35. Children 1–13 are free.

BEYONDCON Fri., Feb. 21–Sun., Feb. 23 BeyondCon is a costumer’s haven, catering to fantasy and sci-fi fans as well as history buffs and re-enactors and offering a place to learn new costuming techniques and share your own. This year’s theme is “Celebrating the Fabulous ’40s,” so panels will discuss fashion from the 1040s to the 2240s, and Saturday’s dance party will be soundtracked by ’40s hits. Inn at Gig Harbor, Gig

Harbor, Wash., brcg.org/events/beyondcon. Tickets online, $37–$40 (to attend the con but not the panels, $15).

FAERIECON WEST Fri., Feb. 21–Sun., Feb. 23 Celebrating music and art of the faerie and mystic realms, FaerieCon West includes concerts, masquerades, workshops, panels, vendors, a fashion show, and an art show. Special guests include FAUN, the popular German pagan folk band.

Seattle Doubletree Hilton, SeaTac, faeriecon. com. Tickets online or at the door, $8–$110. Kids 12 and under are free. E geeklyreport@seattleweekly.com


arts&culture» Music

SevenNights

Silver Damien

E D I T E D B Y G W E N D O LY N E L L I O T T

With his 11th full-length record, Damien Jurado may have finally transcended self-consciousness.

Wednesday, Jan. 15

BY MARK BAUMGARTEN

BENEFIT FOR THE PHILIPPINES WITH THE REDWOOD PLAN From the first note of Green Light

Go, The Redwood Plan lets you know you’re in for a wild ride. The dance punk quartet’s sophomore album opens with “Panic On,” whose cinematic bass riff accented with trumpets immediately brings tense, exciting chase scenes to mind. Lead singer Lesli Wood (formerly of Ms. Led) has a Debbie Harry–like voice, full of both attitude and charm, that’s effective at rallying the troops to dance, especially in “We Are the Team” and “It Goes Something Like This.” Though there are a few ever-so-slightly softer moments (“The Scenery & Melody,” “The One”), for the most part, Green Light Go is The Redwood Plan at its most high-energy, and the band doesn’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon. Proceeds from this show will help the Philippines rebuild after typhoon Haiyan. With PonyHomie, Gems, Hearts as Thugs. Chop Suey, 1325 E. Madison St., 324-8005, chopsuey.com. 8 p.m. $10 suggested donation. 21 and over. AZARIA C. PODPLESKY

Thursday, Jan. 16 STEVE GULLICK

A

sonically and thematically. The album, as Jurado has told numerous interviewers, is based on a dream. It sounds that way: soaked in reverb, filled with a radioactive buzz, edged with ragged vibrations, and punctuated with devastating grooves. Lyrically, Jurado has left the stark reality where his songs have always resided. He is still concerned with heavy themes—the titular brothers and sisters, who all share the first name Silver, are awaiting the second coming of Christ, after all— but this is not an album about Jurado, at least not in the way Caught in the Trees was. Jurado is clear about whom to credit for shedding his self-conscious tendencies: Richard Swift, the producer with whom he first recorded after releasing Caught in the Trees. “Richard has this idea about recording records,” Jurado told me at the time, assuming his guru’s voice. “Don’t fake it—don’t do a guitar take and then do a vocal take after you’re done with the guitar take. I just want to put two microphones in front of you, and I want you to perform the song, and I don’t care if you mess it up. I don’t care if it’s out of tune. I just want you to perform the song and put your heart into it.” That has been the guiding force of Jurado’s music ever since, resulting in three full-lengths, each more elevated than the last: this latest album; its predecessor Maraqopa; and the duo’s first collaboration, Saint Bartlett. If you listen back to that first album, to the first song “Cloudy Shoes,” you will hear the first steps of the journey. In name, mood, and lyric, the song moves above Caught in the Trees. “Funny how we all can change, if we only try,” Jurado sings as an uplifting swell of synthetic strings plays behind him, his voice shadowed by a distorted echo. E mbaumgarten@seattleweekly.com

DAMIEN JURADO The Neptune, 1303 N.E. 45th St. 682-1414, stgpresents.org. 9 p.m. $16.50 adv., $18 DOS. All ages. Fri., Jan. 17.

Send events to music@seattleweekly.com. See seattleweekly.com for full listings.

Friday, Jan. 17

STAG With its 2012 self-titled debut finally on shelves and

a new EP, Test Patterns, getting nice airplay on KEXP, this group the station describes as “the love child of Cheap Trick and Guided by Voices” is out to bring its sound to the masses, and they’ve got the chops to put on one hell of a show. With Brother James and The Soul-Vation. Barboza, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9442, the barboza.com. 7 p.m. $8. CR Minimalist and psychedelic space rock seem like competing ideas, yet San Francisco’s WOODEN SHJIPS defies that notion. Last year’s excellent LP Back to Land shows the band can make interesting psych music without relying on constant panning effects and layers of noise; sparse arrangements allow every piece of woozy, ’70s throwback rock to be heard. With Kinski, Black Whales, DJ One Eye of Portable Shrines. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $13. 21 and over. DH

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

PHILIP H. ANSELMO & THE ILLEGALS Walk

Through Exits Only, the solo debut from Pantera vocalist Anselmo, quickly makes it clear that this isn’t a Down or Superjoint Ritual album, but rather a cacophonous, brutal, and at

» CONTINUED ON PAGE 29

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

round the time that Damien Jurado released his eighth full-length album, Caught in the Trees, in 2008, the Seattle songwriter took to playing a prank on his adoring fans during live sets. Someone would shout the name of a particular song of his, a favorite. It was always the same song, “Ohio,” the lead-off track from his 1999 album, Rehearsals for Departure. “Ohio,” replete with harmonica, is an earnest folk story-song about familial disintegration and hopeful reintegration. It’s apparent why it’s a favorite. Jurado’s vocals are clear and immediate, his innate sense of melody giving the song an unlikely muscle. Jurado would play a couple measures of the song and then pull up short before moving on. Laughs would follow. It was a middle finger to his fans, but it rarely offended because it seemed as much a middle finger to himself. What Jurado thought of the song’s subject matter itself was never really clear. What was clear was that after 10 years, he was tired of playing it. Caught in the Trees was the sound of the 35-year-old artist closing a chapter; written in the midst of a divorce, the album’s songs were largely about transformation. Jurado was slipping out of the past and into an unknown future. It was an emotional time for the songwriter, who told me at the time that he wept while recording some of those songs. On “Caskets,” he sings that “You must remove the skin, and burn it all for fuel.” On the album’s closer, “Predictive Living,” he sings, over a mournful cello, “Just when you thought you had me pegged, thinking I’m the same, then I go and change.” I dredge up this old history because it is necessary to understand the place where Jurado now finds himself, at the seeming apex of that transformation, on the cusp of releasing his 11th and finest album yet, Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son. The album is unmistakably Jurado in voice, melody, and sensibility, but it also stretches the songwriter’s craft into radical directions, both

Folk music isn’t just about perfect harmonies and tranquil finger-picked guitars. POCKET PANDA embraces the genre’s gritty, country roots, juxtaposing qualities like warm violin tones and gruff vocals. These are simple songs carrying a worrisome load, and Pocket Panda defers to downer ballads and wilting orchestral arrangements instead of upbeat celebrations. With Sebastian & The Deep Blue, Maiah Manser. Chop Suey. 8 p.m. $7. 21 and over. DUSTY HENRY LAZER KITTY, in its own words, specializes in making “soundtracks for the cosmos.” Its new album, Moons, begins with just a whisper that conjures images of a massive ship (spaceship?) sounding its foghorn on a calm, misty sea. The record takes you on a wild ride, both peaceful and contemplative. Catch these musical space cadets tonight supporting touring Los Angeles ambient pop band StaG. With Kairos. Columbia City Theater, 4916 Rainier Ave. S., columbia citytheater.com, 722-3009. 8 p.m. $8 adv./$10 door. 21 and over. JESSIE MCKENNA Portland-based LEFT COAST COUNTRY marries upbeat fiddle-driven tunes and traditional Carolina bluegrass with Dawg-style mandolin and a West Coast jam aesthetic. It’s the sound of Appalachia zipping through our forests of Douglas fir. Justin Timberlake With American Nomad, the Blackberry Bushes Stringband, Lucy Horton Band. Nectar Lounge, 412 N. 36th St., 632-2020, nectarlounge.com. 8 p.m. $5 adv./$8 DOS. GWENDOLYN ELLIOTT JONNY LANG Before Fight For My Soul hit the shelves last year, it had been seven long years since Lang’s previous solo release. In that time, Lang grew up, and so did his sound. Sure, there are the obligatory displays of epic bluesguitar virtuosity, but overall his songs are tighter and surprisingly more contemporary. Snoqualmie Casino, 37500 S.E. North Bend Way, Snoqualmie, 425-888-1234, snocasino.com. 7 p.m. $40.55 and up. CORBIN REIFF GOLDEN GARDENS’ mesmerizing dreampop is filled with sinister magic, foreboding mythos, and gothic auras. Aubrey Bramble and Gregg Neville use electro beats and

shimmering guitar lines to conjure a bleak atmosphere, and Bramble’s fascination with the occult and mythology seeps through in her otherworldly lyrics and wistful vocals. With Wind Burial, Kylmyys. The Sunset, 5433 Ballard Ave. N.W., 784-4880, sunsettavern.com. 9 p.m. $6. 21 and up. DH SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS Despite the creative stall generally signaled by remaking an old record, as SCOTS did with last year’s Dig This: Ditch Diggin’ V.2, the Southern-fried rockabilly trio remains a live band worth experiencing, where instrumental chops and exuberance sit nicely side by side. With King of Hawaii. Through Friday. The Tractor, 5213 Ballard Ave. N.W., 789-3599, tractortavern.com. 9 p.m. $15. 21 and over. DAVE LAKE

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El Corazon

Global Rhythms 2013-14 w Brian Faker, Curator

www.elcorazonseattle.com

109 Eastlake Ave East • Seattle, WA 98109 Booking and Info: 206.262.0482

THURSDAY, JANUARY 16

STATION TO STATION with DionVox, Purr Gato, plus guests Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM All Ages/Bar W/ID. $5 ADV (until 12/27) / $8 ADV (after 12/27) / $10 DOS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 17

Mike Thrasher Presents:

PHILIP H. ANSELMO & THE ILLEGALS with Author &

Punisher, Hymns and Sanction VIII Doors at 7 / Show at 8PM All Ages/Bar W/ID. $22 ADV / $25 DOS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 17 The Philip H. Anselmo & The Illegals After Party Featuring Live Music From:

WITCHBURN Music Begins Lounge Show. 21+. FREE.

immediately after the conclusion of the Philip H. Anselmo & The Illegals show in the main showroom.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 19

SHYAN SELAH AND THE REPUBLIC OF SOUND with Klyntel, Black Stax and E. Pruitt Band. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $5 ADV / $7 DOS

“VIP will entail gift bags at $150 value, special seating and a chance for additional giveaways throughout the night”

SUNDAY, JANUARY 19

JAKE ORVIS AND THE BROKEN BAND with James

Hunnicutt, Devilwood and City Bear Lounge Show. Doors at 8 / Show at 9PM 21+. $10 ADV / $12 DOS

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23

SONS OF THE SOUND

with Audentia, Sin Cicus, brotherinferior, plus guests Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM All Ages/Bar W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18

THURSDAY, JANUARY 23

D.R.I. (DIRTY ROTTEN IMBECILES) with The Accused, Toe Tag, Regional

CALABRESE with Dead Bats

Faction, Misuse Of Power and Anticulture Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $15 ADV / $17 DOS

Jan. 24

Krar Collective with Gabriel Teodros

Society, HadesMachine and Raw Dogs Lounge Show. Doors at 7 / Show at 7:30PM ALL AGES/BAR W/ID. $8 ADV / $10 DOS

Mind-Blowing Ethiopian Grooves

JUST ANNOUNCED 2/12 LOUNGE MICHAEL DEAN DARMON 2/17 ARLISS NANCY 2/22 PENTAGRAM 2/23 LOUNGE RINGO DEATHSTARR

2/28 LOUNGE WE BUTTER THE BREAD WITH BUTTER 3/11 LOUNGE NEW YOUNG PONY CLUB (NYPC) 3/25 ANIMALS AS LEADERS 3/26 THE TOADIES / SUPERSUCKERS 9/25 SONATA ARCTICA UP & COMING 1/24 EMERY 1/25 THE EXPENDABLES 1/26 LOUNGE THE PERSEVERING PROMISE 1/27 LOUNGE SELF DEFENSE FAMILY 1/28 THE TOASTERS 1/28 LOUNGE RED CITY RADIO 1/29 LOUNGE OH DEAR! 1/30 LOUNGE ACIDIC 1/31 DAVID ALLAN COE 1/31 LOUNGE ULTRA BIDE’ 2/3 KID SLIM 2/6 THE MENZINGERS 2/6 LOUNGE NEO GEO 2/7 LOUNGE ICARUS THE OWL 2/8 SUPER GEEK LEAGUE

Tickets now available at cascadetickets.com - No per order fees for online purchases. Our on-site Box Office is open 1pm-5pm weekdays in our office and all nights we are open in the club - $2 service charge per ticket Charge by Phone at 1.800.514.3849. Online at www.cascadetickets.com - Tickets are subject to service charge

TOWN HALL

CIVICS

SCIENCE

WWW.TOWNHALLSEATTLE.ORG presents

LAUNCH PARTY SEATTLE WEEKLY • JAN UARY 15 — 21, 2014

COMMUNITY

$20 advance/$25 at the door ALWAYS $20 seniors/$17 Town Hall members/$10 students

The EL CORAZON VIP PROGRAM: see details at www.elcorazon.com/vip.html and for an application email us at info@elcorazonseattle.com

28

ARTS & CULTURE


arts&culture» Music Seven Nights » FROM PAGE 27 times atonal one, which, while unequivocally metal, also borders on the avant-garde, with a frenzy of blast beats, arpeggiated guitar runs, and Anselmo’s growl. In a word: challenging. With Author & Punisher, Hymns. El Corazon, 109 Eastlake Ave. E., 262-0482, elcorazon.com. 8 p.m. $22 adv./$25 DOS. DL 2013 was a banner year for JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE. He briefly reunited with ‘N Sync, appeared in the Coen Brothers’ Inside Llewyn Davis, and hosted and guested Saturday Night Live twice. He also managed to find time to release two much-lauded albums, parts 1 and 2 of The 20/20 Experience. If he took the stage tonight and did nothing but smile and wink for an hour and a half, would anyone leave disappointed? KeyArena, Seattle Center, 684-7200, keyarena.com. 8 p.m. SOLD OUT. CR LOS LOBOS is 40 years young! The genre-bending fivepiece will play a trifecta of anniversary performances at the fabulous Triple Door. Los Lobos has been called Latin rock, cowpunk, Americana, folk, roots rock, and just plain rock, but you can’t slap a label on a band that essentially created a genre all their own—and that’s something to celebrate! Through Sunday. Triple Door, 216 Union St., 838-4333, thetripledoor.net. 7 p.m. $65–$80 adv. All ages. JM

rytelling that keep the masses coming back. Barboza. 7 p.m. $10 adv. 21 and over. KP PHARAOHS OF THE SUN’s music doesn’t move in slowly. It rushes at you with math-rock guitar arpeggios and ever-ascending vocal lines. It’s very in the tradition of ’90s emo, like Diary-era Sunny Day Real Estate. The rhythm section grooves relentlessly to lay down the foundation for its post-rock embellishments: a vibrant mix of testosterone and meditation. With Heartless Breakers, We Say Bang, The Great Um. High Dive, 513 N. 36th St., 632-0212, highdiveseattle.com. $8. 9 p.m. 21 and over. DH MARTIN LUTHER KING CELEBRATION No better way to celebrate the venerated civil-rights icon’s 84th birthday than this evening of joyful noise, sorrow-tinged blues, and gospel tunes performed by a triumvirate of the city’s best chanteuses: Elnah Jordan, Lady A, and Josephine Howell. The Royal Room, 5000 Rainier Ave. S., 906-9920, theroyalroomseattle.com. 9 p.m. No cover. CR D.I. Casey Royer started as the drummer for Social D before forming D.I. in 1982, whose success never quite equaled that of the bands it influenced, like Pennywise and Face to Face. When Royer was last in the news, in 2011, it was for OD’ing in front of his 12-year-old son, but let’s hope that’s all behind him. With Hedon, Dying Off, Expired Logic, The Sky Rained Heroes. Studio Seven, 110 S. Horton St., 286-1312, studioseven.us. 7 p.m. $10 adv./$12 DOS. DL

The fellas of THE BGP have put in a lot of work to perfect their live act over the past 10 years, and it continues to show. Known for its lively brand of blue-eyed soul, the act’s biggest break might have come in 2011 with a spot on season six of America’s Got Talent, but it’s the electric mix of husky soul vocals and hip-swaying sto-

time he was hanging out in Memphis with a couple of cops from Colorado when they got a hankering for a Denver delicacy called the Fool’s Gold Loaf: a hollowed loaf of bread stuffed with peanut butter and a pound of bacon. So they hopped in Presley’s private jet, flew to Colorado, and downed a couple of the bad boys on the tarmac of Denver International. Presley’s

Saturday, Jan. 18

10TH ANNUAL ELVIS BIRTHDAY TRIBUTE BENEFIT SHOW My favorite story about Elvis Presley is the

dinner & show

mainstage THU/JANUARY 16 • 7:30PM

kelly joe phelps

w/ dave mcgraw & mandy fer FRI/JANUARY 17 - SUN/JANUARY 19 • 8PM

los lobos - 40th anniversary WED/JANUARY 22 • 7:30PM - KBCS 91.3 WELCOMES

george kahumoku jr and led kaapana FRI/JANUARY 24 • 8PM

the big gig: 6 speeds, lo to hi Brent Amaker and The Rodeo Thursday, January 16

S

DAVE LAKE

Brent Amaker (second from left) and The Rodeo

SAT/JANUARY 25 • 8PM

kim virant and gerald collier SUN/JANUARY 26 • 7:30PM

cheryl wheeler w/ jill cohn MON/JANUARY 28 • 7:30PM

chieli minucci & special efx next • 1/31 the year of the horse - a cultural celebration of the chinese new year 2014 • 2/1 alice stuart & the formerlys • 2/5 patty larkin • 2/6 habib koite • 2/7 6th annual gimme shelter w/ the dusty 45s and the believers • 2/8 suzanne westenhoefer w/ alicia healey • 2/9 lisa koch birthday bash • 2/10 duncan sheik • 2/11 dawn of midi • 2/12 - 2/15 the atomic bombshells :: j’adore! a burlesque valentine • 2/16 the presidents of the united states of america (acoustic) • 2/17 an evening with greg laswell • 2/18 & 2/19 sweet honey in the rock • 2/20 hot tuna (acoustic) w/ david lindley

happy hour every day

JOHNNY PODHRADSKY

• 1/15 seattle jazz composers ensemble • 1/16 gin creek • 1/17 supersones / danny godinez • 1/18 si limon • 1/19 nick vigarino • 1/20 crossrhythm session • 1/21 singer-songwriter showcase featuring: miss lopez & the wandering few, nick foster • 1/22 daniel rapport trio TO ENSURE THE BEST EXPERIENCE · PLEASE ARRIVE EARLY DOORS OPEN 1 HOUR PRIOR TO FIRST SHOW · ALL-AGES (BEFORE 9:30PM)

thetripledoor.net

216 UNION STREET, SEATTLE · 206.838.4333

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

eeing Brent Amaker (pronounced OM-uhker) and The Rodeo on any night is a party, but couple them with the closing gig of Neumos/ Moe Bar’s weeklong birthday celebration and you’re in for a real treat. The show will double as a release party for the quirky country band’s forthcoming EP Country Sky (out 1/21), which Amaker says “really represents the band well.” We chatted with the singer about the upcoming gig, birthdays, and his unique baritone. Have you ever played a birthday party before? I’m going to turn 50 and we’re going to throw something together for that, but this will be the first time I’ve really played a birthday party. How does turning 50 affect the rock-&-roll lifestyle? The only change I notice is, we’ve toured in Europe a few times, and the cobblestone streets and cowboy boots for three weeks straight gets a little tiring. We don’t ever change out of the [stage]

clothes when we’re on tour. How does that go over on the ChampsÉlysées? It’s like a cultural experiment, rolling together like that and finding out how people react. We’ve walked up to a packed discotheque in Berlin, and there’s a door guy and a velvet rope, and they see us and don’t know who we are, and they just open the door and we get in for free. Where do you like to eat and drink around Neumos? If my wife and I are going to see a show at Neumos, we go to Quinn’s across the street and have dinner. They’ve got the best burger. I love the Fish Fry that’s attached to Neumos if I’m going to do something casual. Sometimes we hit Unicorn and eat some grubby food. You’ve got a really unique voice. Was it hard to find to find the right way to use it? It took me a while to settle in and figure out who I was. But that’s what I’ve got. It’s my voice, it’s who I am. I’m inspired by singers like Iggy Pop. I don’t think I have the best voice, but I think my voice is unique, and if I have a strength, that’s it. With Fox and the Law. Neumos, 925 E. Pike St., 709-9951, neumos.com. 8 p.m. $15.

29


Buy, Sell & Barter age Stereo

Records, Guitars & Vint

op, Fair prices.

sh Good selection, Fun

We pay more for your vinyl Lots of punk, wave and alt Closed Monday • Tue-Fri 1-8 • Sat 11-8 • Sun 11-7 9632 16th Ave SW, White Center, WA

In beautiful downtown White Center

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arts&culture» Music

Miss Casey Carter Third Anniversary Monday, January 20

I

n the three years since its launch, Casey Carter’s website (misscaseycarter.com) has become a go-to source for news about hip-hop culture in the Pacific Northwest. It began as a blog in 2009 after, Carter says, “I just realized one day I know a lot . . . why not comment on it?” The project soon took on a life of its own, and has grown to include a team of writers who cover not just music but lifestyle as well. There is, of course, celebrity gossip, fashion news, and other trappings of mainstream hip-hop, yet Carter has landed interviews with major artists like Big K.R.I.T, Waka Flocka, and Curren$y, centering the site’s focus on hip-hop and discovering up-andcoming artists from Seattle and beyond. Carter and her team take their job seriously, and she’s not shy to promote what she believes to be its unique tastemaking abilities. “Everything we throw up, blows up,” says the site’s motto. For the anniversary show, Carter curated a showcase of “the hardest-working, most-talked-about local acts” from 2013, rap-

Sunday, Jan. 19

It’s no surprise that White Lighter, the latest release from Portland-based TYPHOON, made a number of best-of lists last year. The band’s emotive indie rock is the type of stuff that rivals the music of the National or of previous tour mates Frightened Rabbit. Its textured orchestral arrangements and smooth melodies translate well to the stage, too. With Ages and Ages. Neptune Theatre, 1303 N.E. 45th St., 682-1414, stgpresents.org/ neptune. 8 p.m. $15. KP

Monday, Jan. 20

Imagine Jonathan Richman were in his 20s . . . now. What kind of weird shit would he be making? With his new EP Unltd Cool Drinks, the music of Zach Burba—known onstage as IJI—is a good candidate. Burba’s irreverent, nasal tone wraps cheeky lyrics around a lush pop landscape full of everything from ’80s synth (with serious Spandau Ballet vibes on “No Monument”) and drum machines to congas, bossa nova rhythms, and playful sound effects. With Netherfriends. Lo-fi, 429 Eastlake Ave., 254-2824, thelofi.net. 8 p.m. $7. GE

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The Los Angeles–based SUPERHUMANOIDS have been earning rave reviews lately—accolades like “Band to Watch” (Amazon) and “Best Live Set of 2013” (San Francisco blog Yours Truly). Its debut LP, Exhibitionists, has roots in ’80s synth pop, with catchy, danceable, moody beats. With James Supercave. Barboza. 8 p.m. $12 adv. 21 and over. MICHAEL F. BERRY

Tuesday, Jan. 21

Convene. Improvise. Record every moment. Those three goals brought CROOKS ON TAPE together in 2010. After capturing hundreds of hours of material over two years, the psych-pop band released its debut album, Fingerprint, in October. Pieced together from those improvised sessions, Fingerprint is surprisingly cohesive given its spontaneous origins. Spurts of various instruments, including brass, keys, and synthesizer, create a spacey landscape for vocals that bounce between sounding natural and mechanically affected, and drummer Joey Galvan’s percussion adds stability to guitar and bass riffs that can sometimes seem on the edge of derailing. This, though, is all intentional—the Los Angeles–based trio is only three years old, but its members are already industry pros: John Schmersal and Rick Lee were members of indie-rock group Enon, and Galvan is a former member of alt-country band Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash. The Crocodile. 8 p.m. $10. All ages. ACP Kansas City, Mo.’s KUTT CALHOUN is among the artists being groomed by Tech N9ne via his Strange Music label. His flow can turn on a dime, and the production on his most recent album, Black Gold, gives him plenty of space to maneuver. All this adds up to radio-friendly songs that don’t sacrifice technique. With Saint Warhead, Ripynt & Carl Roe, MC Sav, Cliff Tha Sav, Chris Kemp, and Filthy McNast; hosted by Neema. Nectar Lounge. 8 p.m. $13 adv./$15 DOS/$30 meet and greet. MFB

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

an American original who deserves a federal holiday, but for now, in Seattle, a tribute show marking his birthday, to feature the full range of his chameleonic catalog, is a great start. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Downtown Seattle Emergency Service Center. With Roy K. Combo, Andrew McKeag (PUSA), Hart Kingsbery, Mark Klebeck (King of Hawaii), Country Dave, Liam Fitzgerald (The Rainieros), Marshall Scott Warner, Angelatini (The Starjays), Tony Laborie (The Still Creek Brothers), Kevin Campion, Nick Streeter (The Western Bluebirds), Marieke Benner. Tractor Tavern. 9:30 p.m. $10. 21 and over. DANIEL PERSON

pers that she and her writers have followed for some time and hope will “make it.” Carter explains, “I may not make music, but I see all the things that go into the career. All the hard work and dedication it takes. All the time you have to put in, and the money too. Studio time isn’t cheap, and neither is mixing, mastering, or artwork.” The perspective is valuable: Listeners need to know that what’s enjoyable to them was born from someone else’s sweat and tears. (The site explored the idea further in an October post about the full-time jobs held by a dozen local hip-hop artists: Jarv Dee, for example—who’s hosting tonight’s showcase—is an ironworker). With such a stacked bill, no doubt other interesting facts about Jet City’s hard-working rappers will come to light tonight. Well, that, and probably a little self-promotion on the side. “We want to show the world that there’s more to the West Coast than just California, and that Seattle has more to offer than coffee, weed, and Macklemore.” With Dave B, Cam the Mac, Kung Foo Grip, Porter Ray, Thaddeus David, Sam Lachow, Romaro Franceswa, Cassow. The Crocodile, 2200 Second Ave., 441-4618, thecrocodile.com. 8 p.m. $8. Free to first 206 guests. MICHAEL F. BERRY

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AMEL LARRIEUX THURS, JAN 16 - SUN, JAN 19

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21 year old music fusion master - singer, songwriter, saxophonist, composer, arranger and educator melds her background in jazz with groove, pop and world music

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One of the most versatile and prolific acoustic guitarists on the contemporary jazz landscape who combines elements of jazz, pop and classical

OLIVER MTUKUDZI AND THE BLACK SPIRITS TUES, JAN 28 - WED, JAN 29 Zimbabwean afro-beat roots music against oppression

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arts&culture» Music LocaLReLeases Deadkill, No, Never! (1/21, Good to Die, goodtodierecords.com) Formed from members of several notable local acts (Absolute Monarchs, Himsa, Whiskey Tango), Deadkill began with the simple notion of starting a twoguitar punk band. On its self-titled debut, released in May 2012, the band smashed its punk rock over collective skulls around town. Sure, the foursong 7-inch didn’t break any new ground, but it didn’t need to. If anything negative can be said, it’s that the release doesn’t accurately capture the explosive chaos of Deadkill shows—the unnerving feeling that shit could go haywire at any moment, and you are right in the thick of it. On the quintet’s first proper full-length, the energy is captured to perfection thanks to the always-stellar production of Matt Bayles (Russian Circles, Isis, Botch). Recorded at Bayles’ Red Room Recording, the band tears through 14 tracks with ease. A classic American punk-rock influence is undeniable—specifically, earlier, pre-Rollins Black Flag and the Circle Jerks, among others. It’s not just the fast tempos and monster riffs that embody that sound, but a particular style of vocal phrasing that is distinctly deserving of a Black Flag comparison, overtly exorcising the demons in vocalist Bryan Krieger’s head. Hardly a throwback record, No, Never! ’s guitar tones are more modern and metallic, adding a slight thrash element that might divide purists. Overall, the album’s mood doesn’t change; it’s full of no-frills, up-tempo rage-punk, a buzzsaw of a record that really only changes directions on the album’s slightly slower-paced, fist-pumping closing track “The Desert” (at three and a half minutes, one of the lengthier tracks here). Shorter songs work in Deadkill’s favor, allowing them just enough time to get stuck in your head. Sit back, relax, and close your eyes. You can practically taste the cheap canned beer and smell the bodily fluids. (Tues., Jan. 21, Easy Street Records) JAMES BALLINGER

Partman Parthorse, Wet Sounds (1/18, ggnzla

Records, ggnzla.bandcamp.com) Next to Fly Moon Royalty, Partman Parthorse might be Seattle’s horniest band. Wet Sounds arrives as if it had sprung forth fully formed from the mind of a hormone-laden pubescent boy. “I did some coke/I hit the bong/It stopped my cum/But not for long” speedo-sporting Gary Smith moans on “Didn’t Come.” And then there’s “Hardcore Fucking,” in which Smith repeats the title and “BLOW BLOW BLOW BLOW” over and over, replete with squealing female backing vocals exclaiming “I want you right now.” Sealing the adolescent

vibe are multiple references to “daddy issues” throughout. The band belongs squarely in the local school of jester-rock acts like Childbirth, Tacocat, and Wimps—the latter of which happens to be fronted by Partman Parthorse bassist Rachel Ratner. The classic ’70s “fuck everything” attitude Partman Parthorse cops is straight out of an issue of Pork magazine—a world full of vomit-stained sidewalks, switchblades, and endless supplies of greasy pepperoni pizza. The band’s love for fellow punks Thee Oh Sees shines through in Smith’s slapback-heavy, John Dwyer–style vocals. Musically, Wet Sounds veers toward darker jams, eschewing the lighthearted, shambling nature of its local contemporaries for something more menacing. Songs often devolve into squalls of malevolent feedback or switch tempo halfway into jarring, frenzied speeds—sounding something like pre-Unknown Pleasures Joy Division but without the dystopic moping. The only moping Partman Parthorse will be doing is if someone forces them to put their pants back on.(Sat., Jan. 18, Highline) KELTON SEARS Trentalange, Same Illusion (1/28, self-released, trentalangemusic.com) Motherhood, for songwriter Barbara Trentalange, has sharpened her approach to songwriting, and this third album markedly reflects that change. Musically, Same Illusion has much in common with her first two releases; the biggest difference appears in her lyrics. The pain and loneliness that characterized her earlier work is replaced with themes of love and relationships, a shift apparent from some of the song titles: “Without Your Love,” “Freedom,” and “Reconnected.” The latter, in fact, Trentalange says, “is about this journey towards forgiving myself for all of the self-destructive beliefs I have been holding onto, and learning to love my spirit again.” You see further growth in Trentalange’s sinewy, twisting melodies, a result of the juxtaposition of contrasting elements: “Uh Huh,” in particular, plays with phrase lengths and moves abruptly to pitches outside the key, while “Reconnected” features bold harmonic contrasts nestled in an otherwise unobtrusive texture. Among the album’s more beautiful moments is the counterpoint between Trentalange’s vocals and the cello (played by Janice Lee) on “Lies.” Such moments offer a respite from the grittier, distorted guitars of the title track and “Uh Huh.” Vocally, Trentalange has a wonderful range: It’s clear and particularly compelling in the low registers, but her high notes never sound forced, recalling traces of PJ Harvey, Dido, and Sarah McLachlan. Overall, this album will please fans of Trentalange’s first two, and the optimistic turn is welcome. (Fri., Jan. 17, Columbia City Theater) MICHAEL F. BERRY

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arts&culture» The Green Comfort of Frankenstein

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effects. This isn’t surprising in view of its sterling genetic background: Afghani, Hash Plant, and Northern Lights are all part of this stout bush’s family tree, and all that indica will speak to you loud and clear after a few deep-lung tokes. It just so happened that the days I had Black Domina were some of the worst nausea days I’ve had in a while, and Black Domina could stop the nausea in its tracks. Patients get a free joint at Green Comfort, not just on their first visit, but every time they come by—a nice little perk, and just another way these nice folks make you feel welcome. E

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get more Frankenstein), I was helped by vivacious budtenders Ashley and Amanda, who told me it was my lucky day: The grower who produced Frankenstein had just visited and restocked them with the popular indica. Ashley (who told me she’s Dan’s daughter) also recommended Black Domina. Black Domina’s sparkly, trichome-covered flowers have a smoky, almost hashy spiciness and a heavy indica high with noticeable body

STEVE ELLIOTT

I

’ve had pleasant experiences on both of my recent visits to Port Orchard’s Green Comfort, a good solid dispensary with a smallish but high-quality flower selection and friendly budtenders. Green Comfort, open since last July, offers about a dozen strains of flowers, and everything is $10 a gram, with one exception: The indica strain Frankenstein is $12. On my first visit, proprietor Dan helped BY STEVE ELLIOTT me select Frankenstein when I asked for the best indica in the place, along with The Hog, another worthy pain strain. I won’t say I’m jaded about flowers, as plenty of dabbers do. I actually prefer flowers over hash oil for smoking, due to their superior terpene profile. Many of the aromatic terpenes and flavinoids are too fragile, too subtle, to survive the extraction process. Solvents like butane and alcohol take away most of the subtle tastes and smells along with the vegetable matter; in the process of concentrating the cannabinoids, some of the healing properties of the raw flowers are lost. And these Frankenstein flowers were some of the best I’ve smoked in a while. What’s so special about Frankenstein? Well, most decent strains work medically for me, to a greater or lesser extent, in controlling my pain and nausea; I usually don’t get high on them, though. When any strain breaks through the elevated tolerance I’ve developed due to my daily use of full-extract cannabis oil (for which alcohol was used as the solvent), I know it’s something special, and I got quite high indeed on Frankenstein. The Hog is effective for pain as well, and displays some tendency toward couchlock, but doesn’t offer as heady an experience as Frankenstein. Bred in the Tennessee mountains a few years back from Afghan forebears, The Hog offers as pure an example of Central Asian genetics as you are likely to find anywhere, and is sure to please indica fans. On my second visit to Green Comfort (yes, to

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IMPORTANT ESTATE Sale in Everett! Save The Dates! January 17th & 18th, 9 AM to 4 PM, 240 Alverson Blvd. Numbers given out at 8:30 AM. No prior admittance. Louis the XV pair of chairs circa 1780, Tracey Davenport, Baby Grand Piano, Birds Eye Maple Low Boy set. Fourteen (14) Oriental Rugs (2x3 prayer rugs to 11x16) Kerman, Hamadan, Dergazine, Borchalou, Sarouk, Khanabad represented. Maple Dining set with Windsor Chairs, Maple Blonde Mid Century dining room set, 1920s Karpen Dining room suite in Walnut, Egg & Dart. Teacart, Spinning Wheel. 2 Bedroom Suites, 2 Hickory Log Chairs circa 1910, Huge collection of Maps & Nautical Charts. Lots of other upholstered chairs in Louis XV style. Blacksmithing Tools: 100# Vulcan Anvil, Forge, etc; WA. State Legal Library - 1880s to 1950s, Books Galore including original Wizard of OZ books. Ephemera of all types, vintage art prints and originals in water color, signed etchings. Vintage dolls from Kewpie to Armand Marseille 20” Florodora and 18” Hard Plastic Hollywood Style Dolls, Ginny with Cinderella #1 shoes. China from Rose Chintz dishes, Old Britton Castle, Syracuse “Old Ivory”, Havilland and Noritaki. Home tools, wood working and yard tools and lots of bric-a-brac for everyone. $1.00 and up.

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FREE LAUNDRY BASIC UTIL. INCL. Easy commute to Seattle or airport. Call for rents & details

MISSING DOG - LOGAN. Missing since August 10th from Auburn area. Sightings in Kent and Bellevue. Mini Blue Merle Australian Shepherd. Very scared and skittish. Please call Diane at 253-486-4351 if you see him. REWARD OFFERED. Beauty & Health HCG Weight Loss Plan Works Lose Weight Fast, 20-30lbs/mo Call Today 1-888-541-9754

Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

A+ SEASONED FIREWOOD Dry & Custom-Split Alder, Maple & Douglas Fir

Speedy Delivery & Best Prices!

425-312-5489

Toke Signals with Steve Elliott Your source for uncut, uncensored, no-holds-barred, non-corporate-controlled cannabis news.

>> tokesignals.com - Activism - Culture - Dispensaries - Legalization - Legislation - Medical - News - Products & More

WE ARE SCHEDULING INTERVIEWS FOR DIRECT MARKETING REPS

Help us Keep Trees Safe & Beautiful! The Tree Industry can provide you steady year round work. As a Marketing Rep for TLC4Homes Northwest Inc. you will help Generate Leads for Arborists employed by Evergreen Tree Care Inc. Our Arborists Provide Home Owners Free Estimates and Free Safety & Health Inspections for Tree & Shrub Trimming, Pruning & Removal Services. We Provide Paid Orientation, Marketing Materials, Areas to Work and Company Apparel.

Reps AVERAGE $30,000-$60,000/ YEAR Generating Leads for Tree Work. Work Outdoors- Year Round Work. Set your own schedule- Work Part time or Full time. Travel, Cell Phone, Medical Allowance Available. We do require a Vehicle, Driver’s License, Cell Phone & Internet Access in order to be considered for our Position.

FILL OUT OUR ONLINE APPLICATION AT: WWW.TLC4HOMESNW.COM

OR EMAIL RESUME TO RECRUITING@TLC4HOMESNW.COM CORPORATE RECRUITING DEPT. FOR SNOHOMISH, KING, PIERCE, KITSAP & THURSTON COUNTY 855-720-3102 EXT. 3304 OR 3308

SEATTLE WE EKLY • JANUARY 15 — 21, 2014

The Daily Herald, Snohomish County’s source for outstanding local news and community information for more than 100 years and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking a Marketing Coordinator to assist with multi-platform advertising and marketing solutions of print, web, mobile, e-newsletters, daily deals, event sponsorships and special publications as well as the daily operations of the Marketing department. Responsibilities include but are not limited to the coordination, updating and creation of marketing materials across a range of delivery channels, social media, contesting, events, house marketing, newsletters and working closely with the Sr. Marketing Manager to develop strategies and implement the marketing plan. The right individual will be a highly organized, responsible, self-motivated, customer-comes-first proven problem-solver who thrives in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment with the ability to think ahead of the curve. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) If you meet the above qualifications and are seeking an opportunity to be part of a venerable media company, email us your resume and cover letter to

Seattle Weekly, one of Seattle’s most respected publications and a division of Sound Publishing, Inc. is seeking an Outside Advertising Sales Consultant. This position will be responsible for print and digital advertising sales to an eclectic and exciting group of clients. Applicants should be hardworking self-starters, competitive, outgoing and goal- oriented. The ideal candidates will demonstrate strong interpersonal skills, both written and oral, and have excellent communications skills; must be motivated and take the initiative to sell multiple media products including on-line advertising and special products, work with existing customers and find ways to grow sales and income with new prospective clients. Sales experience necessary; Print media experience is a definite asset. Must be computer-proficient with data processing and spreadsheets as well as utilizing the Internet. Position requires use of personal cell phone and vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. We offer a competitive salary (plus commission) and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Parking is also provided. If you meet the above-noted qualifications and are interested in working for the leading independent newspaper publisher in Washington State, then we want to hear from you! Email us your cover letter and resume to:

Employment Career Services

35


VA seeks adults with schizophrenia and adults without schizophrenia for a research study investigating how genetics may affect the development of schizophrenia.

Classified

Call

@ 206-623-6231, to place an ad Earn $100 per donation!

$ TOP CASH $

If you have severe or life-threatening Allergies or an Autoimmune Disease your Plasma is vital. Learn more at www.plasmalab.com 425-258-3653

PAID FOR UNWANTED CARS & TRUCKS

Experience the Power of Oxygen Call or text Alex (206) 707-6959 Fremont Clinic in Seattle

$100 TO $1000

7 Days * 24 Hours Licensed + Insured

MOST CASH PAID 4 GOLD JEWELRY 20%-50% MORE 24/7 CASH 425.891.1385

ALL STAR TOWING

425-870-2899

WWW.KIRKLANDGOLDBUYER.COM

Singing Lessons

FreeTheVoiceWithin.com Janet Kidder 206-781-5062

• Participants should be age 18-65 with no current drug or alcohol problems. • Participants will be paid $15/hour for their time and provided lunch.

WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil & gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557, Denver, Co 80201

10338 Aurora Ave N, Seattle

DANCING BARE » HOT BABES & COLD DRINKS «

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY p ½ OFF DOOR 11PM-4PM 2,4,1 TUESDAY p2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1 @ THE DOOR BOEING RECOGNITION WEDNESDAY p½ OFF DOOR* MICROSOFT RECOGNITION THURSDAY p ½ OFF DOOR* MILITARY FRIDAY p½ OFF DOOR* *I.D. Required American Liberty Adult Store

Select from a variety of DVDs, Mags, and Toys. Buy, Sell, Trade!!!! Ask Clerk for details about how you can save $$$ on your next purchase.

www.seadancingbare.com OPEN MON-SAT: 11AM - 2:30AM & SUN 2PM - 2:30AM

Please call: 206-277-1163

Meds Mari

PAKALOLO MEDICAL AUTHORIZATIONS YOUR LEGALLY DEFENSIBLE RECOMMENDATION

80Flat Fee

$

OPEN ON SATURDAYS (1) Original Patient Watermark aka “green card” (1) Original Designated Provider Watermark 24 HOUR VERIFICATION WEBSITE 360-275-2004 Located in AVOID STRONG OPIATES Belfair

AND BARBITUATES

Alternative Therapies, for pain, all qualifying conditions a healthier means of achieving your goals.

The Only Safe Access in Mason County!

Massage Therapy $60 Auto & L&I with Prescription, not limited to MMJ Patients By appointment only.

Belfair

Your Hours: Mon-Sat 9a-8p Sun 9a-6p 23710 E. State Rt 3 360-275-1181

Shelton

Your Hours: Mon-Thurs & Sat 10a-7p Fri 10a-8p Sun 11a-5p 3811 St Rt 3 (Bayshore) 360-426-0420

FLAX FX Research Study Looking for Volunteers Flaxseed and many nuts contain lignans. These “phytochemicals” are thought to be beneficial to health but it is not clear how they work. Help us research how flaxseed lignans affect the colon.

Men and women, ages 20-45, non-smokers

f

Don’t eat a lot of vegetables

f

Not on any prescription medications (including oral contraceptives)

Adjuncts and Contingents Together Washington/SEIU Local 925 and The Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies invite adjunct and contingent faculty at private universities to join an action oriented forum on academic labor practices, how they reflect social inequity, and the growing contingent faculty response.

Main Activities Over a period of 12 months

f Take study capsules f Blood draws, stool and urine

collections f Sigmoidoscopies f Receive $700 for participating

More at www.FlaxFX.info or call 206-667-4353 or e-mail FlaxFX @ fhcrc.org

Saturday, January 25 9:30am - 5pm UW Seattle RSVP at www.actogetherwa.org

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

IRB approved 07/31/2012

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

SYMPOSIUM ON CONTINGEN

Who is Eligible f

AX FX Study .FlaxFX.info 6-667-4353

CONFRONTING INEQUITY CATION IN HIGHER EDU T ACADEMIC LABOR


Seattle Weekly, January 15, 2014