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SWIMMING POOL WORKSHOP

WRESTLING, HOOPS BACK IN FULL SWING See Pages A8-9

Determine the future of the Tonasket Pool; THS Commons, Tuesday, Jan. 21, 5:00 p.m.

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Appeals Court upholds Mathis murder conviction

SLED WINNERS AWAIT SNOW

Convicted of stabbing pregnant woman in 2009 with ice pick BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OLYMPIA - The Washington State Court of Appeals has upheld the firstdegree murder conviction of Tansy FaeArwen Mathis in the 2009 murder-for hire death of Michelle Kitterman. On Thursday, Jan. 9, the court rejected Mathis’ arguments that in two instances the jury was given Tansy Mathis improper instructions. She was one of four people convicted in the stabbing death of Kitterman, 25, whose body was discovered on Stalder Road in the Pine Creek area, south of Tonasket. The victim, who had been stabbed with an ice pick, was pregnant at the time of her death. The manner of Kitterman’s death and the resulting trial shocked the

county at the time. In her appeal Mathis raised two arguments that the jury was given improper instructions, according to court documents. First, she claimed the jury was instructed that it must unanimously answer “no” to the special verdict form and, second, that the instructions on factors relied on by the State for the aggravated murder charge improperly permitted the jury to find one factor based on an accomplice’s conduct, not her own. In the court’s opinion the first assignment of error was addressed in a Washington Supreme Court Decision, Guzman Nuñez, in which it overruled two prior decisions and “found that the pattern jury instruction used in Mathis’ case correctly stated the law.” In the second argument the court agreed that there was a problem with the instruction, but “the error was harmless” and went on to explain why based on the case law. Lacey Hirst-Pavek, David E. Richards and Brent L. Phillips were also convicted in the killing. Phillips pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and first-degree manslaughter. Richards was found guilty of second-degree murder and firstdegree manslaughter.

SEE APPEAL | PG A2

Mayor Spieth makes city appointments

Brent Baker & Gary DeVon/staff photos

The Gazette-Tribune and local businesses Lee Frank Mercantile of Tonasket and Hughes’ Department Store of Oroville joined forces over the holidays to give away a sled to a local kid in each community that sent a Letter to Santa Claus that we printed in our special Christmas section in December. Above, Brody McCormick receives his sled from David Kester (left) and Richard Temby of Lee Frank Mercantile. Right, Elise Kingston, 5, from Oroville Co-op Preschool, gets her sled from Jack Hughes of Hughes’ Department Store.

Pot policy and the city still are under debate BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – While there were no surprises in Mayor Chuck Spieth’s 2014 appointment of department heads, the city council’s first meeting of the new year, Tuesday, Jan. 7, was surprisingly short. Spieth appointed, or rather reappointed: Mick Howe, city attorney; Rod Noel, city superintendent; Kathy Jones, city clerk-treasurer; Clay Warnstaff, police chief; Chris Branch, community development director; Christian Johnson, building inspector/permit administrator; Rod Noel, fire chief and Debra Donahue, ambulance coordinator. All were confirmed by the council.

The mayor and council discussed a letter from the Mayor Rick Newby of College Place, Wash., regarding marijuana legalization. His city currently has a moratorium on marijuana retail sales outlets and grows. It wasn’t quite clear, but it appears he is asking the city to become part of a coalition to help each other fight potential challenges to whatever individual cities decide about how to handle the new law. “I think it is rather well thought out,” said Councilman Walt Hart. Oroville’s position has been that if a law is against federal law, even if it is legal it the state, it will not do anything to harm its position when applying for federal grant monies. “It’s right in their in the contract... we must obey federal law,” said Mayor Spieth. “Ultimately it says we have to comply

SEE POT | PG A2

State auditor reports NVH finding BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - State auditors found in December that the North Valley Hospital District complied with state laws and regulations and its own policies and procedures in “most areas.” However, auditors did report an issue (known as a “finding”) regarding the use of internal labor on the hospital’s second floor construction project. Auditors determined that the district “failed to follow state procurement laws, limiting competition.” The audit covered the years 2011 and 2012. The audit describes the second floor project as originally estimated to cost $180,000, but

when the district found (after the project had started) that it had to bring existing systems up to current health and building code standards, it cost much more than that: $419,000 as of the time of the report. “The District did not formally bid the project as required,” the report states, “and exceeded its statutory authority when using day labor costing approximately $47,000 and acting as the project’s general contractor.” Three additional violations of public works laws were listed. Auditors found that policies and procedures were in place, and staff at the time was not knowledgeable when it came to state law regarding public works and bid requirements. “Most of the people work-

ing on the project are no longer working for the district,” said NVH Chief Financial Officer Helen Verhasselt at the Thursday, Jan. 9, Board of Commissioners meeting. “We had some trouble locating some of the documents. At that point we knew we needed more education, and we needed to update our policies and procedures.” Before the audit finding came out, we’d sent people to Spokane in October for additional training... We also joined MRSC (Municipal Research and Services Center)... which we now use for our small works roster.” Auditors recommended that the district “improve its accountability to citizens for the compliance with procurement laws by:

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Volume 110 No. 03

Newly-elected North Valley Hospital District Commissioner Teresa Hughes was sworn in by attorney Mick Howe (left) at last Thursday’s Board of Commissioners meeting. Returning commissioner Dick Larson (right) also took his oath of office.

Brent Baker/staff photo

• Requiring training that ensures employees responsible for the procurement have a complete understanding of applicable laws and regulations; • Establishing and following written policies and procedures to ensure state procurement

Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

laws are followed and competitive practices are used.” The report stated since the district couldn’t demonstrate it received the best price for its project, or provide evidence that it provided fair competition, it could be “responsible for wages

and benefits to workers paid less than the established prevailing wage rates (and)... for claims arising under the contract or payment of taxes due to the state that the contractor did not pay.” “We had already started work-

SEE AUDIT | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

A3 A4 A5

Classifieds/Legals A6-7 Real Estate A7 Sports A8-9

Community Obituaries

A10 A10


Page A2

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 16, 2014

Appeal | FROM A1 Hirst-Pavek, who was alleged to have hired Mathis for $500 to kill Kitterman, was convicted of first-degree murder and manslaughter. In June of 2012 Hirst-Pavek lost an appeal of her November 2010 conviction. In their ruling, the Court of Appeals agreed with the Okanogan County Prosecutor’s office that Hirst-Pavek “was consumed by her husband’s affair with Michelle

Kitterman and Ms. Kitterman’s resultant pregnancy. Ms. HirstPavek wanted Ms. Kitterman to terminate the pregnancy. “Her animosity toward Ms. Kitterman is amply shown by her frequent disparaging comments to others, her deteriorating work performance...and her attempts to have Ms. Kitterman arrested.... Ultimately, Ms. Hirst-Pavek contacted and facilitated others to

confront Ms. Kitterman, resulting in Ms. Kitterman’s homicide and the death of her unborn child.” The Appeals Court’s opinion in the Mathis case was unpublished in the Washington Appellate Reports, but is public record and can be found at ht t p : / / w w w. c ou r t s . w a . g ov / o p i n i o n s / p d f / 2 9 0 4 8 4 . u n p. pdf#search=Tansey Fae Mathis.

us in the loop, but don’t know what we would be committing to in this letter,” said Naillon. That seemed to the city council’s general consensus: they’d like to work together, but would not commit to anything with-

out more information of what is being asked of the city. It was also announced that there had been an application for a retail marijuana store at 2020 Main Street.

POT | FROM A1

Submitted photo

with federal policy,” added Jones. Councilman Ed Naillon said what bothered him about Mayor Newby’s letter was that it was speaking to a conflict before a conflict even exists. “I’d hope that they would keep

Nomadic Massive will be performing in Omak on Jan. 31

Nomadic Massive performs at Omak PAC on Jan. 31 Submitted by Vera Zachow Omak Performing Arts Center

OMAK - The Omak Performing Arts Center Foundation Board is excited to bring you more outstanding performances in 2014 at the Omak PAC. Nomadic Massive, from Montreal, will perform at the Omak Performing Arts Center Friday, Jan. 31 at 7:00 p.m. These musical nomads represent an open-minded Hip-Hop which finds its inspiration in the traditions of the past, combining live instrumentation and a wide variety of vocal styles. Hundreds saw then at the Lotus Music and Arts Festival Sept. 26 in Indiana. They also performed last October in Washington, D.C. and in Calgary. This multilingual, multicultural super-group has become synonymous with energetic and crowd-moving live shows. The

group has also left its mark internationally, initiating social-cultural exchanges with like-minded artists from Sao Paolo, Brazil and in Havana, Cuba. In both countries, they functioned as ambassadors. Nomadic Massive continues to redefine what Hip-Hop can achieve on a global level. As the group’s outgoing explorations open up new ways to interpret a musical style that has traditionally been marginalized, the “more” that has always existed in the Hip-Hop movement is revealed in everything that is Nomadic Massive.

More in March Bronn Journey and his wife Katherine will entertain us with harp and vocals Friday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center. Inspired by the natural beauty of their Pacific Northwest home, the

Journeys Bronn and Katherine bring music that is nothing short of glorious while entertaining comedic humor into a stunning performance. They performed last Christmas in Leavenworth, in Winthrop and in 44 states as well. They have a world-wide following of loyal fans. The harp is often called “the instrument of angels,” and Bronn’s amazing versatility and sill on this ancient instrument, along with Katherine’s radiant voice will transport you to the gates of heaven itself. Ticket prices for each event are $15.00 for adults and $15.00 for students and children. The tickets can be purchased at Rawson’s in Okanogan, The Corner Shelf in Omak, Tonasket Interiors, Oroville Pharmacy, on-line at www.brownpapertickets.com and at the door.

Family Concert on Feb. 9 Submitted by Lynn Hoover OVOC Coordinator

OMAK - Join Okanogan Valley Orchestra & Chorus on Sunday, Feb. 9 at 3 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center for the Family Concert. The chorus will feature “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” by Randy Newman, “Jabberwocky” by Sam Pottie, “Beethoven’s Wig” arranged by Michael Geiger and

more. The orchestra will perform the narrative of “Peter and the Wolf ” by Prokofiev and narrated by Omak Superintendent, Erik Swanson. This concert will include a special performance by Second Strings, a small string group conducted by Roz Nau. It’s sure to be a concert that will be fun for all ages! Ticket prices are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $8 for youth, 12 and

under are free. Tickets are available at The Corner Shelf, Omak; Rawson’s, Okanogan; Roy’s Pharmacy, Tonasket; Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville; Brewster Drug, Brewster; at the door or online at brownpapertickets.com. The Family Concert is sponsored by Community Foundation of North Central Washington. For more information, visit www. ovocinfo.com, email OVOCinfo. com, or call 509-322-0261.

Oroville Streetscape organizational meeting By Lynn Chapman Oroville Streetscape Committee

OROVILLE Oroville Streetscape is a non-profit organization, composed completely of volunteers, whose objective is to help make Oroville an attractive, welcoming town. We are supported through community donations to support our projects, which include hanging flow-

Bad November Verhasselt had told the commissioners last month that November was shaping up to be a rough one financially, and she was right. A whopping $267,000 in charity care and bad debt

It’s Showtime off to great start Next performance Saturday at Back Door Club Submitted by Rick Braman Friends of the Library

OROVILLE - It’s Showtime got off to a great start last Saturday night with a packed house to see Harvey Swanson and Hippies on Vacation.

By Dan McCarthy - Agent

er baskets, sidewalk flower pots, planting downtown flower beds and trees, and sidewalk benches. We also decorate Centennial Park for Christmas. An organizational meeting will be held at the Oroville City Hall at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 23 at 10 a.m. We want to welcome anyone who is interested in fund raising, planting, weeding, or has ideas for future

Streetscape projects. If you can attend the meeting, please leave at least four parking spaces in front of the City Hall for customers, and use the side entrance into the City Council chambers. If you cannot attend the meeting but wish to participate in spring planting or care taking of flower beds, please contact Lynn Chapman, chairperson at (509) 476-4626.

contributed to the hospital’s $397,000 loss for the month. “As we anticipated, November was a disappointing month,” Verhasselt said. For the year, the district shows a net income of $58,000, includ-

ing an $857,000 profit in the Hospital Division and a $799,000 loss in Long Term Care. As of Jan. 7, the warrants owed to Okanogan County stood at just over $699,000.

Everyone appeared to have a good time, and there was plenty of good food available. Oroville Chamber of Commerce President Clyde Andrews was the host for the evening and kept the audience entertained with his fun sense of humor. Next Saturday, Jan 18, our guests will be Brock Hires and Chuck Oakes. There will be plenty of good treats, as well as more pizza from Hometown Pizza available. The Friends of the Oroville library is help-

OKANOGAN - The Okanogan County Pest Board is offering property owners in the county free pickup of unwanted, outdated or unlabeled agricultural pesticides throughout the month. During January home owners will have an opportunity to get rid of agricultural pesticides stored in garages, shops or out buildings. This program is for property owners that may have been growers at one time and still have agricultural chemicals stored on their property or a new property owner that has dis-

covered pesticide storage areas on their property. Pesticides that are collected will be disposed of through the state Department of Agriculture’s Waste Pesticide Program. Most commercial growers are involved in a warehouse sponsored Food Safety program and have properly disposed of unusable pesticides. The reason for the collection is to remove products that if stored unsafely may be a health risk to persons coming in contact with them. Some old pesticides are outdated and have had the use label removed making them illegal to use, other pesticides have a restricted use label allowing them

CapApp_4x2_bw

only to be used by a licensed applicator. The improper use or disposal of unwanted pesticides may be harmful to the environment and again cause health risks to humans, domestic animals and wildlife. The Pest Board program will not accept household pesticides, paint, petroleum or other hazardous materials, to dispose of these products contact Okanogan County Landfill at (509) 4222602. To participate in the agricultural pesticide pickup and disposal or if you need more information contact Dan McCarthy at (509) 322-1286.

Out On The Town your guide to

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

capital update CAPITAL UPDATE

ing the Chamber of Commerce sell tickets to the upcoming Pat McManus show, and Andrews will read an excerpt from one of McManus’ books, this coming Saturday, during the break. These are free events and there are always goodies for sale to help support library projects. It’s Showtime takes place at the Back Door Club at Vicki’s Unique Boutique at 1415 Main Street in Oroville (enter via the alley).

Waste ag pesticide collection Okanogan County Pest Board

AUDIT | FROM A1 ing on those before the audit finding,” Verhasselt said. Auditors acknowledged the corrective steps and said they would review the condition at the next audit in two years. Other areas the auditors reviewed (and found the district compliant in) included other internal procedures and controls; the district’s financial condition; and compliance with the Open Public Meetings Act. Those areas are considered to be at the highest risk of noncompliance. The report itself included some outdated information, listing the district as operating a 27-bed acute care hospital (it is currently 25) and the extended care as holding 70 beds (58). Auditors also noted that a 2008 finding regarding the district’s financial state has since been resolved to their satisfaction. The full report can be found online at: http://www.sao.wa.gov

Submitted photo

Brock Hires is lined up to perform at next Saturday’s It’s Showtime at the Back Door Club at Vicki’s Unique Boutique on Main Street in Oroville.

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Public workshop Jan. 21 for Tonasket swim pool Submitted by the City of Tonasket

TONASKET - Swimming Pool Workshop: January 21, 5:30 p.m., Tonasket High School Commons The newly formed Tonasket Pool Committee, in cooperation with the City of Tonasket will host a community meeting in the Tonasket High School Commons (please note this is a change in location from what is on posters advertising the workshop). The Committee and City encourage everyone to attend to learn about potential costs and options for replacement of the City’s swimming pool. Tonasket’s swimming pool was originally constructed in the 1940’s and underwent a significant renovation in 1991 with 50% of the funding from an Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation grant. One of the conditions of accepting the grant was that the City operate and maintain a comparable swimming facility in perpetuity. By 2010, the facility was again showing its age and in need of major repairs, replacements and upgrades, some required to maintain compliance with state and federal statutes. With a declining economy and decreasing revenues the City Council had to take a hard look at the relative cost/ benefit of continuing to operate a swimming pool that required far more revenue to maintain than it generated. The City began a three pronged effort intended to: study the feasibility and costs for renovating the existing pool and preliminary concepts/costs for a new pool; updating the Park and Recreation Plan to reestablish eligibility for state grant funds; and, encourage formation of a community group to raise funds for an endowment geared towards supporting long term maintenance and operation costs as well as matching funds for renovation or replacement of the existing pool. The City, using dollars from the real estate excise tax, selected and retained a consultant team in 2010 to evaluate the existing facility, provide a list of deficiencies along with cost estimates to correct them and examine the preliminary feasibility for renovating or replacing the current facility. The consultant team, which included the respected pool experts from Swim World, completed and presented findings from the first phase of their efforts in the fall of 2010. The consultant team’s phase one report found a wide array of significant code related issues with the existing pool, bath house and facility access, many of which needed to be addressed if facility use was to continue until a major renovation could be funded and completed or a replacement facility funded and constructed. Estimates for addressing the most immediate issues ranged upward of $200,000 with an effort to correct all deficiencies costing nearly $1,000,000. Fortunately, Pool World included in the phase one report, a comprehensive, prioritized list of improvements along with cost estimates along with a manual on how to better utilize the facility as it presently exists. Unfortunately, working on some of the immediate problems required actions (e.g. removing the pool deck), that would expose areas that also needed expensive work, but not as high of priority. It became apparent that the cost to correct code related deficiencies was far beyond what the City could afford. The Council decided that 2011 swim season would be the last for the pool in its current state. One of the main benefits of the consultant’s report was enough detailed information about the existing facility to allow the City to become the first grantee in the history of the Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation (now RCO) to have a facility funded with their dollars to be declared obsolete and the condition to either replace the facility or repay the grant was eliminated. This action meant the City has no obligation to the state to maintain and operate a swimming pool. However, the Council was not willing to let that be the end of the story and efforts continued to gauge community interest and desires for a swimming facility. The City’s effort to update the Park and Recreation Plan moved ahead and included a survey of all city residents and all students in the Tonasket and Oroville School Districts during the late fall of 2010. A total of 4,696 surveys were distributed with 767 returned and tabulated (a return rate of 16.33%). The vast majority of surveys (73.01%) came from households

or individuals within the 98855 zip code, with 73.94% of those respondents residing outside the city limits. A majority of the responses (59.97%) were from youth in the 11 to 20 age groups. Not all respondents answered all questions and some listed ages for all household members. The survey featured many questions about the swimming pool. Responses indicate that 44.81% think the pool itself, 46.94% find the pool deck, 49.47% the parking, 49.20% access into and out of the pool itself, 51.60% access in and out of facility, 53.46% the fencing, 49.07% the drop off/pick up area and 45.61% the spectator viewing all fair to good, while 54.36% find the bathroom/ showers and 53.19% the changing rooms poor or fair. When asked about the need for a new pool facility, 492 responses or 65.43% said it is necessary or extremely necessary while 249 or 33.11% responded that it was only somewhat necessary or not necessary. In terms of desired amenities for a new pool, 72.21% noted slides, 66.49% diving board and 59.84% a play area for toddlers and children. 66.22% favored an indoor/outdoor facility, with 61.04% agreeing or strongly agreeing with the statement that a new swimming pool would benefit their household. The updated Tonasket Park and Recreation Plan was adopted by the City Council in October 2011 and the City’s eligibility for RCO grant funds was reestablished and renovation or replacement of the swimming pool was a top priority. The third prong of the City’s efforts, encouraging formation of a community group dedicated to fundraising for a pool project proceeded with fits and starts. Several meetings were held in 2011-2012 and the City received a contribution of $7,900 in memory of Gordon Stangland to be dedicated to the pool. While there was community interest in the renovation or replacement of the pool there was no specific vision for the facility with ideas ranging from an indoor facility, a facility at the school, acquiring new property for a new pool and a fairly broad array of desired improvements. The Council struggled with a decision to either forget about the pool and move on or invest a bit more money to provide one more opportunity for the community to come together and develop a common vision and direction for renovation or replacement of the swimming pool. However the Council did make several critical decisions regarding the location and type of pool they would support. If the City moves forward there will be a new outdoor facility located in History Park. In order to facilitate the process of identifying a vision and direction, the Council decided to proceed with the second phase of the consultants work and retained Pool World to develop several alternatives and options. Pool World submitted their report in October 2013 and included four options: • A new 25’ by 75’ lap pool with walk in steps and 8’ diving board with 10’-0” diving well and remodel existing pool building - $950,000; • A new 25’ by 75’ lap pool with walk in steps and 8’ diving board with 10’-0” diving well and new pool building - $1.5 million; • A new 25’ by 60’ lap pool with 22’ by 58’ zero depth play area with water features installed, replacement of existing pool building and 8’ diving board with 10’-0” diving well - $1.67 million; • A new 25’ by 75’ lap pool with walk in steps and ADA access ramp with a 12’-6” diving well and 1 meter diving board along with a freeform recreation pool that varies in width from 24’ to 40’ by 75’ in length with water features installed and replacement of existing pool building - $2.54 million. The purpose of the workshop is to review the alternatives and options and reach consensus on a vision for a new pool. Kurt Danison, Highlands Associates, the City’s Planner, will provide a summary of the Pool World report and facilitate a discussion and exercise geared toward identifying the type of facility and amenities the community desires. The intent is to provide the Tonasket Pool Committee and City Council with a vision and target for fundraising efforts to build, maintain and operate a new facility. The future of a protected place for youth to learn to swim and for everyone in the community to enjoy hangs in the balance so please consider attending the workshop and add to the discussion and participate in the decision making process.

Page A3

Cops & Courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court Criminal

Marcelino Corrales, no middle name listed, 47, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 8 to 11 counts of distribution of a controlled substance (cocaine), second-degree identity theft, alien in possession of a firearm and money laundering. Corrales was sentenced to 10 years in prison and fined $1,860.50. The court dismissed seven charges, including five additional distribution of a controlled substance (cocaine) charges. The crimes occurred between May 2011 and June 2013. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Jan. 21. Deena Jean Lazard, 25, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 8 to second-degree burglary and third-degree theft. Lazard was sentenced to two months in jail and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred Dec. 10, 2013 in Omak. Fain Ann Flores, 28, Omak, pleaded guilty Jan. 8 to second-degree assault (with a deadly weapon) and second-degree robbery. Flores was sentenced to 25 months in prison and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred May 16, 2013 in Omak. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Jan. 21. The court found probable cause to charge Joshua Dean Allen, 32, Oroville, with theft of a motor vehicle, third-degree theft and third-degree DWLS. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 27, 2013 near Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Alysha K.M. George, 24, Oroville, with theft of a motor vehicle and third-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 27, 2013 near Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Kyle Allen Snyder, 22, Omak, with POCS with intent to deliver (methamphetamine) and use of drug paraphernalia. The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 29, 2013 in Omak. The court found probable cause to charge Todd Anthony Perez, 40, Skykomish (formerly of Oroville), with felony failure to register a sex offender.

Juvenile

A 17-year-old Oroville boy pleaded guilty Jan. 8 to POCS (marijuana) (less than 40 grams). The boy was sentenced to two days in detention and fined $75 for the Oct. 1, 2013 crime. A 16-year-old Oroville boy pleaded guilty Jan. 8 to residential burglary and third-degree theft. The crimes occurred Dec. 9, 2013. The boy was sentenced to 16 days in detention with credit for 16 days served, and fined $100. A restitution hearing was scheduled for March 26.

District Court John Cory Lawson, 35, Omak, guilty of failure to extinguish campfire. Lawson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 88 days suspended, and fined $568. Amanda Allen Louie, 30, Okanogan, guilty of DUI, first-degree DWLS and operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Louie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 244 days suspended, and fined $3,886. Brandon Shea Marchand, 39, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Marchand was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $858. Kristy Lin Marshall, 35, Okanogan, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Joe Alex Martinez, 35, Omak, guilty on two counts of possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Martinez was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 80 days suspended, and fined $1,058. He also had an obstruction charge dismissed. Melissa Rosa McCraigie, 30, Omak, guilty of third-degree DWLS. McCraigie was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Joel Isaac Mejia Cardoza, 30, Oro-

ville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Jeremy James Monnin, 33, Omak, guilty of second-degree criminal trespass and disorderly conduct. Monnin was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 87 days suspended, and fined $358. Teresa Ann Moomaw, 36, Omak, guilty of possession of a legend drug without a prescription and third-degree theft. Moomaw was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 161 days suspended, and fined $1,166. Jeffery Scott Morelock, 53, Omak, had two charges dismissed: third-degree DWLS and no valid operator’s license without identification. Nichole Christine Mullen, 24, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 DWLS on Dayton St. in Omak. Vehicle prowl on Hwy. 97 near Okanogan. Threats on Box Spring Dr. road near Tonasket. DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Warrant arrest on Old Riverside Hwy. near Omak. Illegal fireworks on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Burglary on Jasmine St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Oak St. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Granite St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fraud on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Fir St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on S. Ash St. in Omak. Threats on S. Elm St. in Omak. Threats on W. Third Ave. in Omak. Warrant arrest on W. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Theft on Main St. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on E. Division St. in Oroville. DWLS on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Kristina Marie Gipson, 30, booked for possession of a stolen vehicle and third-degree DWLS. Damon Shane Condon, 37, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Shawna Rae Anderson, 41, booked for two counts of endangerment with a controlled substance. Rachelle Marie Stanley, 41, booked for third-degree theft, seconddegree burglary and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Monte Ray Jane, 51, booked for second-degree burglary, thirddegree theft, an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Shila Saleen Moore, 32, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: DUI and ignition interlock violation. Lisa Marie Mumm, 49, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS. Jesse Leander Abrahamson, 19, booked on two Omak Police Department FTA warrants: thirddegree theft and MIP. Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 Theft on N. Turner Lake Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Trespassing on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Malicious mischief on N. Fourth Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. DWLS on S. Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Trespassing on S. Main St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Drugs on W. Elberta Ave. in Omak. Theft on Juniper St. in Oroville. Illegal fireworks on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Bradley Allen Sweat, 24, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourthdegree assault (DV). Jeffery Wayne Cook, 53, booked for DUI. Gregorio Huerta Tinoco, 31, booked on two State Patrol FTA warrants: DUI and reckless driving. Christopher J. Simpson, 42, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant

for DUI. Wiley Francis Moulton, 28, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for burn ban violation. Henry Gene Andruss, 41, booked for second-degree assault (DV). Daniel Parks Conant Jr., 21, court commitment for communication with a minor for immoral purposes. Amanda Corlene Childers, 21, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for minor intoxicated in a public place. Falina Dawn Storm, 27, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS and an FTA bench warrant for first-degree burglary. Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Applejack Rd. near Tonasket. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Wood reported missing. Assault on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Fraud on Frosty Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Automobile theft on Danker Cutoff Rd. near Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on N. State Frontage Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Old Riverside Hwy. near Riverside. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Columbia River Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Hagood Cutoff Rd. near Tonasket. No injuries reported. Trespassing on S. Teal Lake Rd. near Oroville. Domestic dispute on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on Whiskey Creek Rd. near Tonasket. Firearm reported missing. Theft on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Theft on Omache Dr. in Omak. Theft on S. Ash St. in Omak. Drugs on N. Juniper St. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Okoma Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Fraud on Omache Dr. in Omak. Harassment on N. Ash St. in Omak. Two-vehicle crash on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Illegal burning on Ironwood St. in Oroville. One-vehicle crash on 12th Ave. in Oroville. One-vehicle crash on 23rd Ave. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Main St. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Linda Beth Clark, 56, booked for two counts of POCS (methamphetamine). Ryan Joseph Stotts, 29, booked on FTA bench warrants for residential burglary, third-degree theft, violation of a no-contact order and harassment. Jakob Stephan Parr, 20, booked for first-degree theft and firstdegree trafficking in stolen property. Bernard Alex Dick Jr., 25, booked for first-degree theft and firstdegree trafficking in stolen property. Lewis Patrick Marchand, 53, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS. Sarah Marie Ohmer, 41, booked on two OCSO FTA warrants: seconddegree criminal trespass and violation of a no-contact order. Thursday, Jan. 9, 2014 Warrant arrest on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Threats on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Automobile theft on Conconully Rd. near Omak. One-vehicle crash on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Violation of no-contact order on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Three-vehicle crash on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. No injuries reported. Assault on Omak Ave. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. No injuries reported. Fraud on Omache Dr. in Omak. DWLS on S. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Fraud on Main St. in Oroville. Harassment on Hwy. 97 near Tonasket. Melissa Marie Holcomb, 24, booked

Are You Prepared For The Unexpected? FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

When you’re working to achieve your financial objectives, you will encounter obstacles. Some of these can be anticipated — for example, you won’t be able to invest as much as you want for retirement because you have to pay for your mortgage. Other challenges can’t be easily anticipated, but you can still plan for them — and you should. Obviously, the word “unexpected,” by definition, implies an unlimited number of possibilities. However, at different stages of your life, you may want to watch for some “expected” unexpected developments. For example, during your working years, be prepared for the following: Emergency expenses — If you needed a major car or home repair, could you handle it? What about a temporary job loss? These events are costly — especially if you are forced to dip into your long-

term investments to pay for them. To help guard As you approach retirement, and during your against these threats, try to build an emergency fund retirement years, you may want to focus on these containing six to 12 months’ worth of living expenses, challenges: held in a liquid, low-risk account. Living longer than expected — You probably don’t Investment risk and market volatility — Extreme price think that “living longer than expected” is necessarily swings are unpredictable, and they can affect your a bad thing. However, a longer-than-anticipated life investment success. To defend yourself against wild span also carries with it the risk of outliving your gyrations in the market, build a diversified portfolio money. Consequently, you may want to consider containing quality investments. While diversification, investment solutions that can provide you with an by itself, can’t protect against loss or guarantee income stream that you can’t outlive. Also, you’ll need profits, it can help reduce the effect of volatility on to be careful about how much you withdraw each your portfolio. And here’s one more thing you can do year from your various retirement and investment to cope with the ups and downs of investing: Maintain accounts. a long-term perspective. By doing so, you won’t be Need for long-term care — If you had to stay a few tempted to overreact to short-term downturns. years in a nursing home, the cost could mount to Long-term disability — One-third of all people hundreds of thousands of dollars. These expenses between the ages of 30 and 64 will become could jeopardize your financial security, so you’ll disabled at some point, according to the Health need to protect yourself. You could “self-insure,” but Insurance Association of America. Disabilities can as that would be extremely costly, you may want be economically devastating. As part of your benefits to “transfer the risk” to an insurance company. A package, your employer may offer some disability financial professional can help explain your choices. insurance, but you may need to supplement it with None of us can foresee all the events in our lives. private coverage. But in your role as an investor, you can at least take Premature death — None of us can really predict positive steps to prepare for the unexpected — and our longevity. If something happens to you, would those steps should lead you in the right direction as your family be able to stay in your home? Could your you move toward your important goals. children still attend college? To protect these goals, This article was written by Edward Jones for use by you need adequate life insurance. your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

on two FTA bench warrants: second-degree criminal trespass and third-degree theft. Xavier Lewis Smith, 22, booked on an FTA bench warrant for seconddegree burglary. Friday, Jan. 10, 2014 Found property on Elmway in Okanogan. Purse recovered. DUI on Omache Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. One-vehicle hit-and-run crash on Riverside Dr. in Omak. One-vehicle rollover crash on Elmway in Okanogan. Domestic dispute on S. Granite St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Jennings Loop Rd. in Oroville. Assault on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Raelena Marie St. Peter, 18, booked for TMVWOP and second-degree DWLS. Rowan Benjamin ThompsonSapstead, 31, booked on a U.S. Marshal warrant. Dacia Lee Mackarness, 40, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and violation of a no-contact order. Timothy Keith Edwards, 40, booked on a Department of Corrections hold. Rachel Cinda Rawley, 37, booked on a drug court violation. Cory Joe Fletcher, 35, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for reckless driving. Jeannette Marie Kent, 62, booked for vehicular assault and DUI. Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 Assault in S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Drugs on Rodeo Trail Dr. in Okanogan. Burglary on E. Gold Mine Spur near Riverside. Vehicle prowl on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Burglary on Omak River Rd. near Omak. Drugs on E. Dewberry Ave. in Omak. Theft on N. Fir St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on N. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Burglary on Cherry St. in Oroville. Disorderly conduct on Juniper St. in Oroville. Assault on Golden St. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Lost property on W. Fourth St. in Tonasket. Purse reported missing. Malicious mischief on S. Antwine Ave. in Tonasket. Francis Joann Edwards, 46, booked for two counts of residential burglary, second-degree theft, second-degree burglary (bond revocation) and third-degree theft (bond revocation). Kacee Robert Webb, 23, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Darryle Clintoca Gua, 29, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. James Tauri Popkin, 45, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Darcy Kim Edwards, 41, booked for residential burglary and seconddegree theft. Sunday, Jan. 12, 2014 Littering on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Theft on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Domestic dispute on Jasmine St. in Omak. Loitering on S. Ash St. in Omak. Ricardo Medel Huesca, 24, booked for DUI. Audrey Ann Huckins, 50, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Amorita Cresenta Trevino, 26, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Martin Lee Scranton III, 21, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and making a false statement. Robin Lynn Frazier, 44, booked on two FTA bench warrants for delivery of a controlled substance.

At the

MOVIES

OLIVER THEATRE Oliver Theatre

         Regular  Showtimes     Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

Oliver, B.C. Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 OLIVER P.M. THEATRE Fri.-Sat.................7:00www.olivertheatre.ca & 9:00 P.M. 250-498-2277  

January, 2014  Programme  

Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

     R–  egular   Showtimes   Sat.  –    S  un.   Mon.  –  Tues.,   Thurs.  –  Fri.        Jan.  18  –  19  –  20  -­  21,  23  -­  24     Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.   One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

                             Visit  Our  Website  

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   In  a–  m t  ton.   he  O–liver   Theatre!   Sat.    Sovie   un.  –a  M  Tues.,   Thurs.  –  Fri.      

WALKING WITH DINOSAURS 4 –  5  –  6  -­  7,  9  -­  10     January,  2Jan.   014   Programme  

Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

Showtimes on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Jan.  18  –  19  –  20  -­  21,  23  -­  24     One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  

                             Visit  Our  Website  

www.olivertheatre.ca

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Jan.  4  –  5  –  6  -­  7,  9  -­  10     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:20  p.m.  

THURS. - FRI. JAN 16-17

AMERICAN HUSTLE

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES.,THURS. FRI.JAN 18-19-20-21, 23-24

Nominated for 7 Golden Globes Including

Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor Best Actress, Best Screenplay Nominated for 7 Golden Globes

Frequent coarse  language.  

Including

Coarse and  sexual  language,sexually  suggestive  scene,  violence.  

Best Best Actor Sat. –Picture,  Sun.  –  MBest on.  –Director,  Tues.,  Thurs.   –  Fri.       Best Actress, Jan.   25  –  26  Best –  27  Screenplay -­  28,  30  -­  31  

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Jan.  11  -­  12  –  13  –  14   Showtimes  on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Coarse and  sexual  language,sexually  suggestive  scene,  violence.  

Sat. -­  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.        Jan.  11  -­  12  –  13  –  14   Showtimes  on  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

One Showing  Nightly  @  7:30   Nominated  for  2  Golden  Globes   Frequent  coarse  language.   Best  Picture,  Best  Actor   Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Jan.  25  –  26  –  27  -­  28,  30  -­  31   One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30   Nominated  for  2  Golden  Globes   Best  Picture,  Best  Actor  

Coarse and  sexual  language,  violence.  

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Jan.  16  –  17    

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES., THURS. FRI.JAN 25-26-27-28, 30-31. ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY@7:30PM Coarse and  sexual  language,  violence.  

Thurs. -­  Fri.          Jan.  16  –  17    

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  Sat.   Jan.  18  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Frequent sexually  suggestive  scenes  and  coarse  language.  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  Sat.   Jan.  18  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Frequent sexually  suggestive  scenes  and  coarse  language.  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT

106 min

PG13

STARTS FRIDAY

ACTION/DRAMA/THRILLER STARRING CHRIS PINE, KEVIN COSTNER, KEIRA KNIGHTLEY FRI, 6:45, 9:30 SAT: *4:00, 6:45, 9:30 SUN: *4:00, 6:45 WKDAYS: 6:45

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

LONE SURVIVOR STARTS FRIDAY

R

121min

ACTION/DRAMA STARRING MARK WAHLBERG, TAYLOR KITSCH, EMILE HIRSCH, BEN FOSTER

FRI. 6:45, 9:45 SAT. *3:45, 6:45, 9:45 SUN. *3:45, 6:45 WKDAYS. 6:45

NUT JOB

PG

86 min

ANIMATION/ADVENTURE/COMEDY STARRING WILL ARNETT, LIAM NEISON, KATHERINE HEIGL

FRI. 7:00, 9:30 SAT. *4:30,7:00,9:30 SUN. *4:30, 7:00 WKDAYS. 7:00

DEVIL’S DUE

R

89 min

HORROR STARRING ALLISON MILLER, ZACH GILFORD, STEFFIE GROTE FRI. 7:15, 9:45 SAT *4:45, 7:15, 9:45 SUN *4:45, 7:15 WKDAYS 7:15 Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


PAGE A4

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 16, 2014

THE TOWN CRIER

Tonasket wants a pool, but will it pay for one?

Tonasket has gone two summers without its city swimming pool, but momentum only now seems to be gaining on a plan for replacing it. The question that has yet to be answered is, are area residents truly willing to support the building and maintenance of a pool? Emotionally, the answer seems to be, “Yes,” especially amongst families with kids. In practical terms, that’s not so clear. There seems to be a community expectation that the city should try to get the pool rebuilt, but the City Council has resisted taking sole responsibility for the project. While the pool was a city attraction, it was utilized by more than just city residents. Not only that, but as the city annually sees its budget tighten, sustaining critical services like police protection and water/sewer infrastructure have become more difficult even without the cost of a pool. The council tried to encourage the formation of a pool committee in the broader community, but until recently those efforts have come in fits and starts. Finally, thanks to City Planner Kurt Danison, the council authorized a study that provided a number of options for pool designs, along with estimated costs. While getting the pool itself built at a cost range of $1-2.5 million is a big enough task to take on (witness Linda Black’s Herculean to raise less than a tenth of that for the HALF-BAKED effort privately-funded Tonasket Water Ranch), the Brent Baker more complicated question is: how will the maintenance of a new pool be funded? The pool wouldn’t truly be an asset, but a financial liability. Council member Scott Olson has said repeatedly that even if a new pool dropped into the ground free and clear, the city should not agree to take it on unless maintenance costs are accounted for. Danison pointed out that if public swimming pools made money, there would be a lot more of them being built. Many public pools have been closed because of the inability to keep up with maintenance costs. He estimates that the annual cost of a short season outdoor pool would be $25-40,000. User fees might keep that number at the low end, but charging enough to cover those costs entirely would price many families out of being able to use it often. Toeing that line would also mean many years of getting by with just minimal maintenance, setting the city up for the kind of infrastructure failure that caused the current pool to be condemned. The council noted during one budget session last fall that in 2013, the city probably would not have had enough money to keep the pool open. (An oft-discussed indoor, year-round pool would cost in excess of $300,000 a year to maintain. Danison cites the need for year-round employees, higher energy costs, the addition of sophisticated air handling equipment and need to plow or shovel to ensure winter access as reasons for this. The council has repeatedly drawn a hard line against taking on that kind of liability.) What does that mean to Joe or Jane Landowner? If city voters passed a property tax levy to fund a $30,000 pool maintenance bill, it would cost property owners $0.67 per $1,000 of property valuation (a property valued at $100,000 would see its taxes go up by $67 a year). If a Parks and Recreation district were formed that would share the costs with a larger community for example, encompassing the same footprint as the Tonasket School District - it could fund that maintenance for under $0.07 per $1,000. Getting such a district formed, though, is a lengthy process of its own that also requires voter approval. There are other ways to come up with that money, but unless an endowment fund magically appears, those ways all involve a hike in local taxes. And that always plays so well at the local ballot box. Tonasket wants its swimming pool; but is Tonasket willing to pay for its swimming pool? Until that commitment is secured, it’s best for all to proceed with great caution.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

Washington Newspaper Publishers Association member

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Public pool in Tonasket would be great

Dear Editor, This letter is addressed to the citizens of Tonasket and Oroville: Do you want a public pool? Yeah, I thought so. The (Tonasket) City Council is having a meeting on Jan. 21, 2014 at 5:30 p.m. at the Tonasket High School. Please come – your opinion will be heard! There are lots of reasons why I think there should be a pool in Tonasket. One would be that most of all the lakes are out of town, so all the people who live in town have to drive a long ways to get to a lake. If there was a pool in town, those people would save gas. Also, if there was an indoor pool, the Tonasket School District would be able to have a swim team. Some more reasons that a pool would be good for Tonasket are: swim lessons, they’re good for arthritis, and a pool is a great way to exercise. I think it would be great for Tonasket to have a public pool, so please come to the meeting on Jan. 21 at 5:30 p.m. Sincerely yours, Cora Diehl – 7th Grade Tonasket Outreach Student

Voice your opinion on need for a new pool Dear Editor, People of Tonasket and Oroville- I’m sure you all heard of this meeting at Tonasket High School. But for those of you who haven’t, the Tonasket City Council is having a meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Jan. 21, 2014. Anyone who wants to come should come. This meeting is about the new pool for Tonasket. This pool will be at the park in Tonasket. You should all come to this meeting if you want to be heard.

You all deserve to have an opinion. Say your opinion at the meeting. This pool could help both towns by getting more people to come visit the area. If we get this pool, we could relax and enjoy the warm summer ahead. So please, come to the meeting and voice your opinion. Bryan Nolan Tonasket Outreach Student

March for Life scheduled for Omak in January

Dear Editor, On Wednesday, 12 noon at Omak City Park, Jan. 22, 2014 there will be a March for Life in Omak so that we will not forget that it is legal to kill an innocent, helpless baby in a mother’s womb through abortion. Everyone is welcome to join us. Jan. 22 commemorates the sad, infamous day that the U.S. Supreme Court passed the Roe vs. Wade decision legalizing abortion on demand in the United States of America in 1973. Common sense tells us that this is wrong. It seems that not much attention is directed at the killing of these babies any longer, it seems to be an acceptable part of society’s norms. I participated in the National March for Life in Washington DC in 2008 which took place the day after President Obama was inaugurated. There were 400,000 Pro Life marchers and as usual the media did not hardly even mention this newsworthy event. One station showed a mother changing her baby’s diaper on a bench; they didn’t show the march or anything about the march. The other thing they showed were seven or eight elderly people, 70-years-old, standing on a street corner in Oklahoma who were in favor of abortion. Seven or eight for death as opposed to 400,000 fur life. At the same time

Die-Versity OPINION BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

A survey arrives from newly seated Senator Brian Dansel asking who survey takers recommend for a Republican presidential candidate in 2016. It poses an interesting dilemma. In a sane America this would not be so complicated a question. Voters would examine the records of potential candidates and choose the one (irrespective of race, sex, sexuality, party or other non-performance related criterion) with the best demonstrated record of character and achieveBill Slusher ment as determined by the voter’s value system. Voters would be able to choose from a selection of candidates of documentable, appropriate experience and proven achievement, a win-win situation for the people. But this is not a sane America. This is an America driven by trends and fads and petty political correctness at the expense of sanity. Observe the election of President Obama. For this discussion, it is irrelevant which party you hail from. What matters is that Obama was, by quite a margin, demonstrably the least qualified in 2008 to be a presidential nominee, let alone president. He was even the only candidate of any party who was flatly unqualified by virtue of absolutely no demonstrable record to hold an office of such gravity. There are many (increasing numbers from both parties, in fact) who will tell you Obama’s record in the White House bears this abject dearth of qualification out painfully for all America, but even this isn’t the point here. The point is that Obama was nominated by his own party over a clearly, massively better qualified slate of Democrats, including Hillary Clinton.

I did not vote Democrat in 2008 and I think Hillary would make a bad president, but had the final election come down to Obama or Hillary, I’d have voted for Hillary. She simply had the appropriate long record of service under the pressures of elected high office that Obama lacked. While Hillary made and makes calls I don’t think are good for America, she at least does so from experience and demonstrated ability to perform in office, at least by Democrat standards. In short, like her or not, Hillary has the gravitas for the White House, something Obama never approached. He came from still concealed and highly questionable obscurity and a dreadfully bland, brief record in politics that even for his own party was mediocre in the most generous terms. How did Obama get nominated over a vastly better qualified Hillary, and eventually elected over two later opposing candidates, the worst of whom had far better experience and qualifications? I wrote in 2012, when Romney selected Ryan as his running mate, that the election was lost for Republicans. Both men were fine leaders of demonstrated merit and their opponent was running for reelection after one of the most abysmal first term performances in American presidential history, but I said that they’d never get elected. Not in the post modern, affirmative-action brainwashed, politically correct, diversity obsessed America of 2012 would two white men get elected over a black incumbent. In the worthy pursuit of equality America has lurched over the other side of sanity into a ‘reasoning’ realm where voters have been programmed by the largely liberal media and our PC stratified academia to believe that diversity at any cost trumps all other considerations including experience, record and ability. Ergo the election of Obama. He was swept into office, unqualified, sheerly on the

that we were marching. The first bill President Obama signed was an executive order removing the ban on taxpayer funding of abortion overseas (the Mexico City Policy). In Jan, 2013, 650,000 marched for life, about 60 percent or more were college age on down to high school and toddlers. You would think that the government and media would have great interest and coverage. But once more there was little coverage and the little bit there was did not mention how large it was or the young people marching and praying. When it was mentioned on the news they did not show the march for life, but said there was an antiabortion protest, not a pro-life march. They also said it opposed reproductive and civil rights. Fox News alone had the most favorable coverage. I wonder what God thinks when He sees 1.4 million babies a year in the USA alone being killed because of our selfishness. How much longer is He going to put up with us? God is so merciful that even now if we repented He will forgive us. There is another victim in abortion that suffers immensely in the heart, the mother especially and also the father. They know that they have killed their chlld and have kept it locked inside for up to 50 years while society tries to tell them that evetytbing is OK, but they know it isn’t OK inside. My heart goes out to their silent suffering and I pray that they may know hope and healing is available. No sin is too great for God’s mercy. Turn to Jesus tor forgiveness and healing, He loves you with an unconditional love and wants to lavish His love upon you. He suffered and died on a cross for you and nothing would please him more than for you to turn to Him for His mercy. Thank You, Al and Judy Bosco Omak

momentum of racial political correctness. The “first black president!” gimmick was enough to put an unqualified, half-white candidate of an obscure past, raised almost exclusively in and by privileged white society, into the White House simply because of the politically correct color of his skin. Likewise, I go out on a limb now to predict that no two white men will win election 2016 against the probable Democrat Party candidate, Hillary Clinton, qualifications and records be damned. If Hillary runs, and she almost certainly will, the sheer political correctness momentum of becoming the “the first woman president!” will, in and of itself, get her elected over any white men who oppose her. This is the state of post-modern, political correctness stultified America. So here’s my answer to your survey, Senator Dansel: If we want any viable ideological ‘diversity’ of competitive presidential options in 2016, Republicans must get very busy, very fast coming up with not just a token woman or black candidate to run against Hillary, but a highly qualified woman or black candidate, at the very least as the vice-presidential nominee, but preferably as the presidential candidate. Exactly whom is a longer discussion for another time. But if we are to once again put leadership merit above trivial race or gender in American politics, we will need to do it ironically - with a qualified woman or black Republican presidential candidate in 2016. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his nonpartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (Amazon, cmppg. com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted atwilliamslusher@live. com.


JANUARY 16, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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Okanogan Valley Life

Family is a circle of strength and love

Half way through the first month of With every birth and every union the cir2014. I had another birthday cle grows. Every joy shared yesterday. That makes quite adds more love. Every crisis a few. Also had a 67th wedfaced together makes the ding anniversary. Didn’t do circle stronger. anything special this year. Lloyd Curtis finally made Watched a rotten basketball it all the way home and game where Portland beat hopefully is on the mend. Gonzaga so badly, I don’t And hopefully the same can even want to think about it. be said for Bud Gerken. So, we went to bed, listening John Lawson has recovto a CD our grandson made ered enough from his “setfor our anniversary a year back” to be back at the or so ago beginning with THIS & THAT Senior Center for lunch “Be My Life’s Companion” Joyce Emry and tomorrow (Friday) the and ending with Bob Hope’s Lawson’s, Dal Wilder and theme, “Thank’s For the their musical friends, from Memories” with other sentimental Canada, will play music after lunch, at songs through the years from 1947 to 12:30. Come and listen. It will brighten 2012. We’ve got really great grand- up your day. kids! And we got phone calls from Had a visit, by phone with Donna Missouri and Nebraska, so we’re not Forney, in Yakima. She reports she and so old that a few still know we’re Virgil are doing well and have little or alive. no snow…yet. Family is a circle of strength and love. Guess what? I found my snow tires

for my shoes! I hope I don’t have need for them. I hope the voters in Colorado and Washington are happy now that “pot” is legal and the kids and adults can sit around in circles passing the pipe from one mouth to the next…so sanitary. I saw a tee shirt with this inscription on the front. I saw it…I liked it…I threw a fit…I got it…. That’s what lots of kids do to get what they want these days. Another moose (or perhaps the same one) has been sighted by Joan Morris and her German shepherd south of Oroville above Highway 7, on Ernie Robinson Road. Gaia rock shop will be moving to the opposite side of Main Street and north a half block, and purchased the two buildings that were owned by Spence Higby and will be neighbors of Mary Lou’s gift shop, in the old Engstrom Variety building. Sandra’s on Main Nails is now located in the Frontier Grocery Building, and next to her is AJ’s Barber Shop. Oroville now has three barber shops, all operated by ladies, and of course the other salons cut men’s hair too. Keep hearing of fraud with debit cards. Think I’ll just use cash, as long as it lasts. If it’s the middle of January, I’ll bet the Tonasket Kiwanis Club are getting

sausage made and making arrangements for the annual ground hog feed. Yum!! And also about that same time the Episcopal Church has their annual Shrove Tuesday Pancake Feed. (I’m always thinking about food, it seems) I just finished reading “Lion Gold,” true story by Bea Alden, Tonasket, of her life growing up in South Africa during Apartheid. It is said the criteria of a good book, is that you don’t want it to end. I’m ready for the sequel. How about these recent temperatures up to as high as 55 degrees? I like that. I was reminded that I had mentioned of getting a head start on spring cleaning. I keep telling myself that I “must bite the bullet” and really get rid of a lot of stuff. People, like me, that used to do a lot of crafts, can always see a need for keeping things for the next project. I believe that I have proven to myself that my head still has a lot more ideas than my body can follow through with, so out it MUST go. Laughter is like changing the baby’s diaper: it doesn’t permanently solve any problem, but it makes things more acceptable for a while. Lot’s of folks having the flu and for some it hangs on and on! Rip Daniels said to his friend, “A fellow I know had a cough like yours and

he died from it. Of course, he was hiding in a neighbor’s closet at the time. Each time I hear the siren of the ambulance, it makes me sad, because I know it is trouble for someone. In the city, that sound is just another traffic noise, but in small places, it is often someone we know. And don’t forget to stop in for a chat with friends (or relatives) who are in care centers. Winter days get even longer, it seems, when they are away from family. A stop in at The Golden Years, near Riverside, where our Aunt Ellen Roberts is, found her recovering quite nicely from her broken leg. Two lady residents from Oroville, were moving in soon, as two of the residents had passed away during the holidays. The place still had a large Christmas tree, beautifully decorated, adorning the middle of the room. And their dining table is always most inviting looking and when they are baking home made bread the fragrance permeates the whole house. There are just six residents, so it is more “homelike” than large facilities, or so it seems to me. The address of the place is 48 Hubbard Road, just north of the Riverside turnoff. Sign on the back of a horse-drawn wagon: “This vehicle runs on oats and hay. Don’t step in the exhaust.”

Tonasket Chamber banquet Jan. 23 The Gazette-Tribune TONASKET - The annual Tonasket Chamber of Commerce Banquet andAuction in will take place Thursday, Jan. 23, at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket. Beginning at 5:30 p.m., there will be live music and a silent

Come watch the play offs on the big screen By Sue Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

A few days last week were over 50 degrees I thought spring was coming but guess not. The dinner desert auction on Jan. 18 has been cancelled. Sorry for any inconvenience. On Jan. 19 there will be two, yes two, play off games for the Super

50’s Dance – Elvis will be there. By Jackie Valiquette North Valley Community Schools

The Third Annul 50’s Dance is for the entire family and Saturday, Feb. 15, is the date. You don’t want to miss it. Tons of drawings, prizes for best period costume, best dancers, best hoola-hoopers; and music by Project 3:16. And, maybe a new twist or two this year. Hamburgers, hot dogs, ice

auction, with dinner by Lola Orr of Orr’s Enterprises. The Chamber will be installing its officers and board members, as well as announcing Tonasket’s 2013 Citizen of the Year, Business and Organization of the Year, and Grand Marshal for the 2014 Founder’s Day

Parade. Following is a Live auction of items to support the Chamber’s upcoming functions and activities, such as the Founder’s Day Parade and Winterfest. The theme this year is “Tonasket: Through A Child’s Eyes.”

TONASKET EAGLES

taste the good job they do and not at a lot of cost to you. We always want to thank all of our volunteers for all that they do. You can pat yourselves on the back (awesome job). Pinochle scores from last Sunday as follows: first place Jo Porter, second place Neil Fifer; low score went to Penny Smith and last pinochle to Neil Fifer. We wish all a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

Bowl. We will be having a snack/ pot luck and happy hour during the games come and enjoy our big screen TVs. Games will be starting around 11:30 a.m. Don’t forget to get out you baking hands for our bake sale on Jan. 24. Sunday breakfast has new cooks (they do a great job). You have to come in to see and

LEARNING TREE cream sundaes, and adult and child beverages will be available. Mark your calendars now for this fun event! Classes coming up next week include: Pixel Picture Perfect, Jan. 22 & 29 (manipulate your photos) and Body Lotion and Scrub, Jan. 23 (never buy lotion again). The following week you

will find these classes: Mommy and Me in the Kitchen, Jan. 27 & Feb 3 (dads are welcome, too); Make Your Own Laundry Soap, Jan. 28 (save gallons of dollars); and Cream Puffs, Jan. 30 (oh so yummy). Catalogs are located in several stores around Oroville and Tonasket and you can see all classes online at: www.northvalleycommunityschools.com. To register for classes call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville.wednet. edu, or use the website.

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John and Joy Lawson and their Canadian Friends will be here on Friday, Jan. 17 for our entertainment and enjoyment. Their style of vintage western music always has us tapping our toes and fingers to the beat. Have a request? They will do their best to play it for you. Or maybe you could

hum part of the number. Larry Smith has informed me that they will be having Potluck Lunch the second Sunday of each month, but will be playing cards every Sunday. Bring snacks. A new addition to the news is a request to print the upcoming menus for the week. I won’t print the menus, but will let you know the entrees. Tuesday, Jan. 14

Knob Hill Club election meeting Jan. 22

HILLTOP COMMENTS

By Marianne Knight

Now if we can just get them out of the camera or phone. While we were away the Pinochle folks over to Molson took the holidays off, but here are the catch up weeks since then. Jan. 6 went like this: George Penner took High along with Ina Visser. Al O’ Brian and Mary Louise Loe took Low scores, with Ken Chaplin taking the Traveling award. On Dec. 30: George Penner and Ina Visser took High. Can you guess who was keeping score, George? The Low went to Wayne Adams and Mary Lou Barnette with Harold Harper taking the Traveling. The next BINGO night at Molson will be on Jan. 17 at 6 p,m.

Highlands Correspondent

Well here we are in the middle of January with Christmas and New Years as part of our past. We had a very nice Christmas over the mountains in the Issaquah area of Seattle with our kids and grand kids and great grand kids. This is the third time all of us have been together, ever. Needless to say we had a great time. We were still missing a granddaughter and her son Luke. They live in Tennessee. We sat 21 at the dinner table this year. There were some from Puyallup, Whidbey Island, Stanwood, North Carolina, Issaquah, Seattle, and of course Chesaw. We took lots of pictures.

Latest Results 16 Yards 24 - Jeff Taylor 24 - Noah Olmstead 23 - Robert McDaniel

TONASKET GUN CLUB 23 - Lloyd Caton, Jr. 19 - Bob McDaniel

will be pot roast; Thursday, Jan. 16 will be Country Fried Steak; Friday, Jan. 17 will be German Sausage and Potato Casserole; Tuesday,Jan. 21 will be Ham and Cheese Quiche; Thursday, Jan. 23 will be Meatloaf and Friday, Jan. 24 will be Chicken Cordon Bleu. Pinochle Scores for Jan. 11 follow: The door prize was won by Dal Wilder; most pinochles by Ed Craig; High scoring man was Dal Wilder, and High Scoring woman was Mary Lou Barnett. More next time. The Knob Hill Home Economics Club will meet on Jan. 22 to elect new officers for the new year. All are welcome. Dues are $8 for a family or $5 per person and must be paid prior to the start of the meeting. Potluck starts a noon. For more information call Marianne at (509) 485-2103. The next meeting of the Grange will be an open meeting with a potluck starting at 6:30 p.m. All are welcome. Come and hear guest speaker, Steve Quick, Superintendent of Oroville schools. Ice Fishing will be on Feb. 15, starting at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast. More details to come. The first Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser will be on Feb. 23. Don’t forget to purchase you raffle tickets for a basket of goodies. Hope you all had good Holidays and are starting the new year well and happy. 19 - Josh Brazil 18 - Jeff McMillan 17 - Josh McDaniel Handicap 23 - Lloyd Caton, Jr. 16 - Jeff Taylor

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 16, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • January 16, 2014

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GAZETTE - TRIBUNE

Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHER’S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination�. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

Houses For Sale

For Rent

Announcements

OROVILLE: QUIET AREA featuring 2 BR, 2 BA ground floor apt. Level entry home with walk-in closet. Relax & view your nice green yard from your covered back patio. Accepting applications. No smoking. No pets. $525/ month + $400 dep. Call 509223-3064 or 509-560-9043.

Orville: 3 Bedroom 2 Bath, lake view, nice, clean $750/1st/last/damage. Airport LITTLE HOUSE on very nice Rd. 509-560-0240 city lot. Poor condition needs lots of work. Seller terms to reliable, able buyer only. Seller is licensed RE Agent. $44,500 Call 509-4763121 Subscribe to the...

1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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For Rent Similkameen Park Apartments Oroville, WA.

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Oroville Garden Apartments Senior & Disabled Housing

2 units available with subsidy – based on 30% of your income Located downtown Applications available at 617 Fir St., Oroville Call: 509-476-3059

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Announcements

American War

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

12. “Naughty you!�

38. Something to which a mountain climber’s rope can be secured

13. Institutions and culture of a distinct group

40. Provide cover or protection 42. Kind of center 44. Pink, as a steak 45. Child’s stomach, shortened 48. Massage target 50. Soup cracker 52. More swift 55. One trying to lose weight 56. Amigo Across

57. Having to do with where homes are 59. Bauxite, e.g.

1. Balaam’s mount

60. Anxious

4. Fibrous material in rope (pl.)

61. Clear, as a disk

9. 100 lbs.

62. Bit

12. Impertinent ones

63. Feed, as a fire

14. Santa’s reindeer, e.g.

64. “___ calls?�

15. “___ Town Too� (1981 hit)

17. Taste, e.g. 21. Muster 23. Australian cockatoo 27. Gastric woe 29. Cable network 30. “___ will be done� 31. Win over 32. Book of maps 34. “Silent Spring� subject (abbrev.) 35. Always, in verse 36. Backed out of a situation in a sneaky manner 38. Straightaway 40. Hard to miss

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Down

19. Punish with an arbitrary penalty

1. Lack of vigor

20. Bergamot flavored tea (2 wds)

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Statewides

This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a “make good�, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com FOR SALE - MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $4897.00 -Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N HEALTH/BEAUTY PELVIC/TRANSVAGINAL Mesh? Did you undergo transvaginal placement of mesh for pelvic organ prolapse or stress urinary incontinence between 2005 and the present? If the mesh caused complications, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Charles H. Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS

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Public Notices Notice of Call for Bids For Gasoline and Diesel Requirements For 2014 & 2015 Sealed bids to supply gasoline and diesel for the years 2014 & 2015 will be received by the City of Tonasket until February 11, 2014 at 7:00 p.m., at which time the bids will be opened at the regular City Council meeting. Regular-grade, mid-grade, and super unleaded gasoline and diesel shall be available 24 hours a day at a key lock or guard card supply station located within or close proximity to the City of Tonasket and to deliver diesel to the Waste Water Treatment Plant on request. Bids shall be quoted at a set amount over supplier’s cost at time of delivery and verification of that cost must accompany monthly billings. Bids shall exclude Federal taxes. Bids are to be submitted on a form available at the City Clerk’s office at 209 S. Whitcomb Avenue or call 509-486-2132. Mailing address: P.O. Box 487, Tonasket, WA 98855. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any informality. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 16, 23, 2014. #538148

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www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: January 20, 2014 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1999 Honda Accord Lic#: GAB1221 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 16, 2014. #536263

continued on next page

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Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

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SUPERIOR COURT, STATE OF WASHINGTON, COUNTY OF SPOKANE In the Matter of the Estate of: EDITH E. HOLMES, Deceased. No. 14-4-00007-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the

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Public Information Meeting City of Tonasket The City of Tonasket is applying for a USDA Rural Development Grant/Loan for a Police Car. A Public Information Meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 28th, 2014, during the regular City Council meeting that begins at 7:00 pm. The purpose of this meeting is to give the citizens an opportunity to become acquainted with this proposed project and to comment on such items as economic and environmental impacts, service area, alternatives to the project, or any other issue identified by Rural Development. This meeting is open to the public and those with special hearing, language or access needs should contact City Hall, 509-486-2132, 24 hours prior to the meeting. Alice J. Attwood Clerk-Treasurer Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 16, 2014. #538412

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PUBLIC AUCTION THOMPSON BEES 1869 HWY 7 OROVILLE, WA 98844 (509) 476-3948 DATE OF AUCTION: January 20, 2014 Viewing Time: 10:00 AM Auction Time: 11:00 AM 1994 Ford Taurus Lic# AEG0274 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 16, 2014. #535843

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Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.010(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication: January 9, 2014. Barry W. Merrell, Personal Representative Address for Mailing Notice: c / o Donald K. Querna Randall | Danskin 601 West Riverside Avenue, Suite 1500 Spokane, WA 99201 RANDALL | DANSKIN A Professional Service Corporation By Donald K. Querna, WSBA #6081 Attorneys for Personal Representative Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 9, 16, 23, 2014. #536826

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sponse, if any, may be served on time. This Summons is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington. DATED this 27th day of August, 2013. RCO LEGAL, P.S. By /s/ Kathleen A. Allen Kathleen A. Allen WSBA# 19655 Attorneys for Plaintiff Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on December 12, 19, 26, 2013 and January 2, 9, 16, 2014. #532329

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SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. RONALD CRAMER and SHANNON CRAMER, husband and wife, Defendants. No. 13-2-00457-9 SUMMONS TO: THE DEFENDANTS A lawsuit has been started against you in the Superior Court of Okanogan County by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, its successors in interest and/or assigns, plaintiff. Plaintiff’s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint in this action by stating your defense in writing and serving a copy upon the undersigned attorney for the plaintiff within 20 days after service of this summons and complaint within the State of Washington or 60 days if service is effected by personal service outside the State of Washington or by publication, or a default judgment will be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where plaintiff is entitled to what it asks for because you have not responded. If you serve a Notice of Appearance on the undersigned attorney, you are entitled to notice before a default judgment may be entered. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written re-

Sudoku

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JANUARY 16, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune January 16, 2014 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | January 16, 2014

SPORTS Hornets edged at Pateros, wallop Kittitas By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

PATEROS - The shooting was as cold as the temperature, but that wasn’t what led the Oroville girls basketball team’s 29-27 loss at Pateros on Tuesday, Jan. 7. Hornets coach Mike Bourn was pleased with his team’s overall effort, but said he planned to reintroduce box-out drills the next day in practice after the Nannies scored 10 points off of short-range put-backs. “In a game where they scored 29 points, it’s so frustrating,” Bourn said. “But I take the blame for that; I didn’t have one boxout drill over vacation. I thought they had it down, but if you don’t do it every day it goes away.” The Hornets trailed virtually the whole game but frustrated the Nannies with solid half court defense. An eight point deficit may not seem like much, but considering the Hornets had only scored 16 points in the first 26 points of the game and only had six minutes to make up the deficit, the fact they got back in it at all took quite an effort. Bourn said he flat out told Lily Hilderbrand to take the game over, and she responded with nine of her game-high 18 points down the stretch. “I finally said, ‘We’re giving you the ball to dominate the game right now,” Bourn said. “Take it right at them, and she did. They couldn’t stop her.” Meagan Moralez hit a long 2-pointer with 47 seconds left to cut the Nannies’ lead to 25-24, but Pateros’ Katarina Wilson hit a triple to make it a four point lead. The Hornets nearly lost the ball in scramble at their end of the floor, but with six seconds left Hilderbrand drilled a 25-foot trey to get it back to 28-27. Oroville almost forced a turnover in the final seconds - forcing a Pateros time out on the inbounds play, and then nearly forcing the ball Pateros’ Lorie LeDoux to tight-rope along the sideline - but the Nannies were

Fay Aitcheson/submitted photo

Tonasket’s wrestlers host their team championship trophy after dominating the Cascade Invitational on Jan. 11.

Tigers dominate Cascade tourney By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Left, Brittany Jewett serves up a pass into the paint during Oroville’s two-point loss at Pateros on Jan. 7. Above, Lily Hilderbrand drained a long 3-pointer in the final seconds to give the Hornets a chance at a miraculous comeback. She finished with 18 of Oroville’s 27 points. Brent Baker/staff photos

able to run out all but the final tenth of a second to deny the Oroville comeback. Moralez added six points for the Hornets. LeDoux paced Pateros (6-1) with 10 points. “That was a great game for us,” Bourn said. “Chesaw (Brittany Jewett) was sick and gutted it out. We cut down our turnovers. We just needed to box out better. Pateros’ only loss is to (topranked in Class 1A) Brewster, so

that’s a good team, and we were right there with them.”

Oroville 54, Kittitas 17 OROVILLE - The Hornets won their first Central Washington League game of the season, blasting South Division foe Kittitas 54-17 on Saturday, Jan. 11. Oroville raced to a 20-4 lead after one quarter as Lily Hilderbrand, Mikayla Soctt and Megan Moralez tallied six points

apiece in the quarter. Bourn substituted liberally after that as there had been no JV game, giving him 13 available players for the full game. Hilderbrand finished with 16 points and Scott had 10 for the Hornets (5-4, 1-0 CWL North Division. Kittitas fell to 3-7 (1-1). The Hornets travel to Bridgeport on Thursday and host Riverside Christian on Saturday, Jan. 18.

Oroville boys experience growing pains By Brent Baker

Tonasket 55, Omak 22 OMAK - Tonasket won its first

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

PATEROS - With a young team, especially one adjusting to a new coach, you often get the good, the bad and the ugly. Sometimes all within minutes of the same game. The Oroville boys basketball team was at its best and its worst on Tuesday, building a 12-point lead in the third quarter and holding a 47-40 lead with six minutes to play. But then the lead, and eventually the contest, unraveled as the Billygoats ran off the game’s final 18 points to come away with a 58-47 victory in the Hornet’s final non-conference battle of the year. “We’re finally seeing glimpses of who we’re going to be,” said Oroville coach Jay Thacker of the Hornets’ first three quarters of play. “That team beat two of the best teams in our league. We knew they were going to have a run in them. “We’re just learning how to persevere. When things get tough, learning how to react. When it gets hard, are we going to freak out and make more mistakes because we’re upset that we made one, or are we going to do what we need to do and move onto the next play?” Crisp offensive execution in the first half enabled the Hornets to build a 31-23 halftime lead, which was topped off by Bryce Glover’s one-handed halfcourt buzzer beater. Back-to-back 3-pointers by Glover (a freshman who finished with a career-high 18 points) and Dustin Nigg built the Hornets’ lead to 39-27. That’s when Pateros slapped on its full court pressure. The Billygoats went on a 13-2 run to finish the quarter, capped by another buzzer-beater as Julian Median flipped in a trey as he was falling out of bounds in front of his team bench. The Hornets scored the first six points of the fourth quarter - aided by a technical foul on Pateros coach Marcus Stennes but after Nathan Hugus’ 3-point play with six minutes to play gave the Hornets a 47-40 lead, the well went dry. Pateros converted turnovers into a quick 7-0 run to tie it at 47-all with five minutes left, then

LEAVENWORTH - Tonasket’s wrestling team broke a string of runner-up team finishes on Saturday, Jan. 11, with a dominating performance at the Cascade Invitational, advancing 10 to the championship round and winning eight individual titles. Tonasket (248 points) more than doubled up the score of runner-up Okanogan (116). Also at the tournament were Naches Valley (115), Omak (111), Cascade (102), Quincy (78), Brewster (74), Eastmont (64), Royal (35) and Cle Elum (32). Individual champions included Rade Pilkinton (113 pounds), Collin Aitcheson (120), Dyllan (Peaches) Walton (126), Jorge Juarez (132), Zach Lofthus 145), Austin Knowlton (170), John Rawley (195) and Chad Edwards (220). Runners-up were Trevor Peterson (126) and Frank Holfeltz (182). Vance Frazier (106) and Caleb Lofthus (152) both placed third while Dallas Tyus (160) as fourth. The Tigers host Cascade for a Caribou Trail League dual on Friday, Jan. 17, at 7:00 p.m., then their annual Apple Pie Invitational tournament on Saturday beginning at 10:00 a.m.

Terry Mills/submitted photo

John Rawley (left) continued his winning ways, earning a pin at Omak on Wednesday and winning one of eight individual championships Tonasket earned at the Cascade Invitational on Saturday, Jan. 11. Caribou Trail League dual match of the year on Wednesday, Jan. 8, 55-22 at Omak. Winners included Vance Frazier (106, pin); Devin Walton (113, forfeit); Rade Pilkinton (120, forfeit); Trevor Peterson (126, pin); Peaches Walton (132, decision); Zach Lofthus (145, decision); Caleb Lofthus (152, forfeit); Austin Knowlton (170, pin); John Rawley (220, pin); and Chad Edwards (285), pin). Also wrestling were Austin Rimestand (138), Dallas Tyus (160), Lucas Vugteveen (182) and Frank Holfeltz (195).

Four Hornets medal at Mary Walker By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

SPRINGDALE - Four Oroville wrestlers reached the medal stand at a 16-team tournament hosted by Mary Walker on Saturday, Jan. 11. Though no team scores were kept, Oroville coach Chuck Ricevuto said Kettle Falls, Colfax, Newport and East Valley (Yakima), “Probably took top honors with a half dozen or more placers.” John Marquiss (113 pounds) and Jordan Smith (120) were the Hornets’ top finishers, each reaching the championship match before falling, placing second. Eddie Ocampo (160) and Taylor Robinson (182) each placed third after losing semifinal matches. Leo Curiel (132) and Ruben Renfro (170) each reached consolation semifinal matches before being eliminated, while Charles Arrigoni (170) lost both of his

Above, freshman Bryce Glover celebrates with Dustin Nigg (11) and other teammates after Glover hit a mid-court buzzer beater at halftime of the Hornets’ game at Pateros last Tuesday. Right, another freshman, Nathan Hugus, battles for an inside hoop against the Billygoats.

Hornets win 11 of 13 in mix-andmatch

KETTLE FALLS - Oroville’s wrestlers won 11 matches out of 13 on Wednesday, Jan. 8, in a mix-and-match at Kettle Falls that also featured Selkirk and Mary Walker. John Marquiss (106) pinned each of his three opponents - all from Selkirk - in the first period of his matches. “(He had) his best performance of the season,” Ricevuto said. Jordan Smith (120, pin and technical fall) and Eddie Ocampo (160, decision and pin) both went 2-0 on the night. Charles Arrigoni and Ruben Renfro (both at 170) each went 1-1, while Leo Curiel (132) won a major decision in his only match, while Lukas Mieirs (195) earned first period pin in his match.

Hosted by North Valley Hospital. 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 509-486-2151

Subjects include: • Finding local resources Support Group offering practical information & care giving suggestions • Decreasing your stress level

Brent Baker/staff photos

scored six of their final 11 points on offensive rebound put-backs. “They don’t have the experience together yet to handle that kind of pressure,” Thacker said. “We’ve been on the other end of that. We did that to Omak and they freaked out, and if not for a couple things that happened at the end we would have won that. “You saw a good glimpse tonight of where we want to be. The kids are trying to believe, but

matches. The Hornets travel to Tonasket for the Apple Pie Tournament on Saturday, Jan. 18.

they’re not quite there yet.” Nigg added 17 for the Hornets. Mikey Piechalski led Pateros (5-2) with 15 and Macen McLean of Mansfield had 13.

Kittitas 47, Oroville 23 OROVILLE - The well ran dry on the offensive end for Oroville on Saturday, Jan. 11, as Kittitas rolled to a 47-23 victory in the Hornets’ Central Washington 2B League opener. The Hornets shot just 30 per-

cent from the floor for the game - and 22 percent from the free throw line - in recording their season low on the scoreboard. Kittitas used a 12-4 run in the second quarter to take a 21-11 halftime lead, and finished the game with a 15-3 run in the fourth quarter to blow it open. Joseph Sarmiento led the Hornets (2-7, 0-1 CWL) with 10 points and five rebounds. Bryce Helgeson paced Kittitas (7-3, 2-0 with 14.

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January 16, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

SPORTS Tigers keep the faith in Cascade loss ‘Winning’ the second half a step forward for Tonasket girls By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tigers’ Ethan Bensing fires over Cascade’s Jaxon Watson during Tonasket’s 51-48 victory on Friday.

Tonasket earns key victory with defense By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - It wasn’t easy; in fact, it was outright frenetic at times. But Tonasket’s boys basketball team wasn’t about to give back Friday’s 51-48 victory over Cascade on the basis of style points. “Every win counts for something here,” said Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon after the Tigers second straight Caribou Trail League victory. “It might be ugly, but I’ll take it any day.” The Tigers, who’ve shot 63 percent from the free throw line for the season, hit just 6-of-16 from the line Friday (38 percent) to give the Kodiaks an opening. Tonasket trailed just once - 10-9 in the first quarter - but could never pull away. And though they led by five with under 15 seconds to go, the game came one missed shot from going into overtime after Tristin Parton rebounded a missed free throw with six seconds left, dribbled the length of the court and launched a 3-pointer at the buzzer that fell short. Free throws aside, it was the Tigers’ defense that won this one. Michael Orozco had four steals in the fourth quarter that led to six points and the Tigers picked up a number of points off fast break layups throughout the game. “Whenever Michael goes head to head with anyone, he’s as quick

as any guard in the league, in the top two or three,” Pedregon said. “But our offense was silly at times. We just had to regroup, slow it down and get an assist. It seemed like every time we got the ball moving, we scored with ease. On the other hand, (Derek) Sund did a good job on transition and the guards did a good job pushing the ball down and being unselfish. Unselfish basketball results in easy transition baskets.” Cascade had won just one game entering into the week, but on Thursday had pulled out a road victory at Quincy and has improved as the season has progressed. Parton and the quick-asOrozco Dennis Merritt kept the Kodiaks in it with three 3-pointers apiece, while both teams dealt with physical play inside and ticky-tack fouls on the perimeter. The Tigers took a quick 6-0 lead but it evaporated before the end of the quarter. Tonasket edged out to a 25-20 halftime lead and opened up their biggest lead at 28-20, but a 10-2 Cascade run tied it briefly at 30 before Dyllan Gage hit his only 3-pointer of the night to put the Tigers ahead for good. With Cascade determined not to let Gage, the Tigers’ (8-4, 2-4 CTL) leading scorer, beat them, it fell to others to put the ball in the hole. Orozco led the way with 17 points, some off his own steals and others in finshing off turnovers forced by teammates. Sund added 14 points while Gage,

Ethan Bensing and Trevor Terris had six apiece. Parton had 17 and Merritt 16 for the Kodiaks (2-10, 1-5). “We’ll take this game and use it as a close game that can help us down the stretch,” Pedregon said. “Like I’ve said before, these are the games we were waiting for. It went our way because we did certain things right toward the end. You have to keep your composure and execute, defensively and offensively.”

Tonasket 54, Omak 47 OMAK - Tonasket held Omak to just 10 points in the first half, then held on for the Tigers’ first CTL victory of the season Tuesday, Jan. 7, 54-47. Pedregon shuffled his lineup for the game, and the result, he said, was a true team effort. That showed up in the scoring column as Ethan Bensing and Dyllan Gage finished as high scorers with 12 points, with Michael Orozco adding 11. “Everyone has to bring something to the table to win games,” Pedregon said. With the Pioneers threatening to make things interesting in the fourth quarter, Jesse Manring came off the bench to hit a pair of crucial 3-pointers that helped the Tigers preserve the lead. “Our ball movement was really a focus this game,” Pedregon said. “That’s what led Jesse to being open twice.”

TONASKET - The team that took the floor wearing Tonasket girls basketball uniforms for the second half of Friday’s 53-34 loss to Cascade didn’t play anything like the team that fell behind 32-9 at halftime. That was just fine for coach Stephanie Schertenleib, whose squad “won” the second half against the Kodiaks, forcing a time out at one point early in the fourth quarter when the Tigers had a chance to cut the deficit under 10 points. “They were pleased with how they played in the second half,” Schertenleib said. “They should be. The challenge is to play that way the whole game. We’ve played well for sections of games, halves, but we need to play a whole game like that if we want to beat some of these teams.” Since entering Caribou Trail League play, which especially in girls basketball is not for the faint of heart, the Tigers have struggled to score and did so again in the first half. Schertenleib said that at halftime, she put in some plays that the team hadn’t even had time Brent Baker/staff photo to practice yet, but combined Tonasket’s Baylie Tyus drives for two points against Cascade on Friday, Jan. with some drills that they’d gone 10. The Tigers cut a 23-point deficit in half before falling 53-34. through in recent weeks, paid off after the break. “We switched up our offense, followed with a pair of free throws Omak 50, Tonasket 19 OMAK - Omak used a 16-0 got better ball penetration and, to cut Cascade’s lead to 39-27. really, stopped standing around,” The Tigers forced a turnover and second quarter run to break open she said. “We ran some special had a chance to cut further into their game with Tonasket on plays and got some good looks. Cascade’s lead, but a series of Tuesday, Jan. 7, on the way to a turnovers result- 50-19 victory over the Tigers. Considering ed in a quick 6-0 Tonasket trailed 8-5 after the we hadn’t run to first quarter but didn’t score even prac“Even if things aren’t Kodiak build the lead again until the third, when Kylie ticed some going well and you’re back to 18. Dellinger hit three of her four of those, the K y l i e 3-pointers in the game. girls ran them down a lot, there is still Dellinger led Dellinger finished with 12 really well. a chance, but you have the Tigers (3-9, points but no other Tiger had D efensively Caribou more than two. we played to keep working at it to 0-6 Trail League) Baelie Meese led Omak (7-5, with a lot get there.” with nine 2-4 CTL) with 13 points. more intenpoints. Cascade sity. Stephanie Schertenleib improved to 9-3 “ W h a t Tonasket girls basketball coach MOTORHOMES • FIFTH WHEELS (3-3). we’ve worked TOY HAULERS • TRAVEL TRAILERS Schertenleib on a lot has TENT TRAILERS • CAMPERS & MORE hopes the attibeen mental conditioning, digging down for tude she saw in the second half holds going forward as the league that fight to come back.” That combination paid off season nears its halfway point. “Some of those drills have been right away in the third quarter as the Tigers were able to work hard to complete,” she said. “But the ball for open shots - and hit the girls are starting to underthem - on the way to outscoring stand that even if things aren’t Sponsored By going well and you’re down a lot, the Kodiaks 13-7. Baylie Tyus opened the fourth there is still a chance, but you quarter with an old-fashioned have to keep working at it to get three-point play, and Rose Walts there.”

JANUARY 23rd-26th

STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Boys Basketball Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Okanogan Brewster Cashmere Chelan Tonasket Omak Cascade Quincy

6 0 13 0 5 1 9 3 4 2 7 4 4 2 6 6 2 4 8 4 1 5 5 7 1 5 2 10 1 5 5 6

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

Lk Roosevelt 0 0 5 4 Oroville 0 1 2 7 Bridgeport 0 1 2 6 Manson 0 1 0 9 Liberty Bell 0 2 5 5

Cent. WA League So. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

White Swan 2 0 4 7 Kittitas 2 0 7 3 Riverside Chr. 1 0 5 5

GIRLS Basketball Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall W L W L Brewster Cashmere Okanogan Chelan Cascade Omak Tonasket Quincy

6 0 12 0 6 0 12 0 4 2 10 2 3 3 7 5 3 3 9 3 2 4 7 5 0 6 3 9 0 6 2 9

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B)

League Overall W L W L

Oroville 1 0 5 4 Lk. Roosevelt 0 0 2 6 Liberty Bell 1 1 1 9

Bridgeport 0 1 1 8 Manson 0 1 2 6

43. Oroville 9.56 48. Manson 12.09

Cent. WA League So. Div. (2B)

Girls Basketball (1A)

League Overall W L W L

White Swan 2 0 8 3 Kittitas 1 1 3 7 Riverside Chr. 0 1 1 8

State RANKINGS Boys Basketball (1A)

(ScoreCzar.org - last updated Jan. 8) Top 10/CTL with power rating 1. Zillah 3.72 2. Vashon Island 3.97 3. King’s 4.06 4. Kalama 4.10 5. LaCenter 4.29 6. Okanogan 4.42 7. Lakeside 4.46 8. Lynden Christian 4.48 8. Naches Valley 4.48 10. Seattle Academy 4.50 18. Cashmere 5.30 19. Brewster 5.33 30. Chelan 6.09 34. Tonasket 6.35 39. Quincy 6.60 59. Cascade 8.14 62. Omak 8.28

Boys Basketball (2B)

(ScoreCzar.org - last updated Jan. 8) Top 10/CWL with power rating 1. Morton/White Pass 3.50 2. St. George’s 3.60 3. Bear Creek 3.79 4. NW Chrisitan-Colbert 4.28 5. Lind-Ritzville/Sprague 4.42 6. Liberty-Spangle 4.47 7. Tri Cities Prep 4.72 8. North Beach 4.83 9. Onalaska 5.00 10. Auburn Adventist 5.01 22. Riverside Chr. 6.82 28. Kittitas 7.26 32. White Swan 7.61 34. Liberty Bell 7.68 35. Lake Roosevelt 7.76 39. Bridgeport 8.75

(ScoreCzar.org - last updated Jan. 8) Top 10/CTL with power rating 1. Brewster 2.62 2. King’s 2.95 3. Woodland 3.00 4. Okanogan 3.12 5. Cashmere 3.13 6. Lynden Christian 3.15 7. Montesano 3.22 8. University Prep 3.37 9. Cascade Chrisitan 3.41 10. LaSalle 3.45 24. Cascade 4.57 31. Chelan 4.96 40. Omak 5.74 64. Quincy 9.58 66. Tonasket 9.69

Girls Basketball (2B)

(ScoreCzar.org - last updated Jan. 8) Top 10/CWL with power rating 1. Toutle Lake 2.46 2. DeSales 2.73 3. Bear Creek 3.56 4. Darrington 4.12 5. Wahkiakum 4.17 6. Willapa Valley 4.20 7. Orcas Island 4.31 8. NW Christian-Colbert 4.42 9. LaConner 4.51 10. Colfax 4.54 11. White Swan 4.56 22. Oroville 5.96 32. Lake Roosevelt 7.33 37. Kittitas 8.22 42. Bridgeport 9.77 43. Manson 10.91 46. Liberty Bell 14.45 48. Riverisde Chr. 15.06

Wrestling (1A) Team

(WashingtonWrestlingReport.net last updated Jan. 7) 1. Forks 2. Blaine 3. Granger 3. Quincy 5. Kiona-Benton 6. Elma

7. Castle Rock 8. Lakeside 9. Warden 9. Vashon 11. Tonasket 17. Chelan 18. Cashmere 19. Omak

Tonasket (Individual)

120 lb - Collin Aitcheson (1st) 126 lb - Trevor Peterson (6th) 132 lb - Jorge Juarez (8th) 195 lb - John Rawley (1st)

Wrestling (1B/2B) Team

(WashingtonWrestlingReport.net last updated Dec. 8) 1. Liberty Bell 2. Raymond 3. Kittitas 4. Lake Roosevelt 5. Wahkiakum 6. Darrington 7. Northwest Christian 8. Selkirk 8. Mary Walker 8. Liberty (Spangle) 8. Concrete Oroville unranked

Oroville (Individual)

170 lb - Taylor Robinson (4th)

Schedules Jan. 15-25

Thursday, Jan. 16 BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (Var/JV) - Oroville at Bridgeport, 6:00/7:30 pm Friday, Jan. 17 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Chelan, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Chelan, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Cascade at Tonasket, 7:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 18 BB (JV/Var) - Riverside Christian at Oroville, 1:00/2:30 pm

INDOORS AT

GB (Var/JV) - Riverside Christian at Oroville (1:00/2:30 pm) WR - Tonasket Apple Pie Tourney (incl. Oroville), 10:00 am Tuesday, Jan. 21 BB (JV/Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Manson, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (Var/JV) - Oroville at Manson, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Okanogan at Tonasket, 6:00/7:30 pm WR - Oroville at Okanogan, 6:00 pm

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Thursday, Jan. 23 WR - Tonasket at Cashmere, 7:00 pm Friday, Jan. 24 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Cashmere, 4:30/7:30 pm BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (Var/JV) - Oroville at Lake Roosevelt, 6:00/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Cashmere, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Eastmont JV at Oroville, 7 pm Saturday, Jan. 25 WR - Chelan at Tonasket, 7 pm

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 16, 2014

OBITUARIES

Bill Cottrell

William V. (Bill) Cottrell

On the night of December 20, 2013, William Vincent Cottrell cleanly slipped his anchor-hawse and set sail on the trade winds for his final voyage. He left port with fair winds, dry decks, and seas on the quarter. B i l l Cottrell was born on March 30, 1924 to Clement Vincent Cottrell and Pearl (Bair) Cottrell, in Toronto, Ohio. After graduation from Toronto High School, he enlisted in the US Navy in 1942, and served throughout WWII in the South Pacific Theater as a signalman/quartermaster aboard the

USS Apache. After the cessation of hostilities, he attended the University of Illinois and University of Missouri under the auspices of the US Naval Reserve Officers Training program (ROTC) and obtained a BSc degree in Civil Engineering. While in Columbia, Missouri, he met Julia Francis (Judy) Maley of Omak, Wash., who was attending Stephens College in that city. They married in Omak on Aug. 3, 1947. Afterward, Bill served both Clallam County and Okanogan County as County Engineer, while raising his three children in Port Angeles and a fourth child later in Omak. In 1961, he moved his family back to Columbia, Missouri while he attended law school there, again at the University of Missouri. The family returned to Omak where Bill set up his practice in law and later became District Court Judge in Okanogan County in the late 1960’s. He was very active in the community, being a lifelong Scouter, Omak School Board member and director, and a high-school sports official in football and basketball until the age of 72. He cared greatly for the youth of our communities in Okanogan County. He also felt great empathy for the underserved in our population, and did much legal work on their behalf. He was active in the US Naval Reserve, retiring from same as a LT, USNR. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clement and Pearl, and sister Betty Mae of Steubenville, Ohio, his wife Julia Cottrell of Omak, and his son-in-

VALLEY LIFE

law Dr. John B. Coombs, late of Gig Harbor Wash. He is survived by his sister Miriam Cottrell Heaton of Mingo Junction, Ohio, and a brother, Harold R. (Bob) Cottrell also of Ohio, along with his direct descendants: Martha C. Coombs of Ocala, Florida, William V Cottrell Jr of Oroville, Wash., Julia B. TerHark (and husband Bill) of Kennewick WA., Matthew A. Cottrell (and wife Yolanda) of Johannesburg, South Africa. He is also survived by grandchildren Joshua Coombs, Maley Coombs, Lexi (and husband Greg) Emerson, Jocelyn Cottrell, Miguel A. Herrera, and great-grandchildren Ally and Billy Emerson. The Cottrell family wishes to express their profound thanks to Shellie Sandoval and her staff at Park Place in Omak, for their loving care of both of our parents in their final years and days.

Dean Leslie Stansbury Dean Leslie Stansbury lost his battle with cancer and neuropathy at his home on Palmer Lake January 1, 2014. He was born July 30, 1927 in Oroville, Washington to Leslie Carl Stansbury and Pearl Marie (Peterson) Stansbury. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, February 1 at 1 p.m. at the Tonasket Eagles. Memorials may be made to the Tonasket Scholarship Fund or to the Relay for Life Cancer team, c/o Donna Zabreznik, P.O. Box 813, Tonasket, WA. 98855.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR Planning Meeting Cancelled OROVILLE - The Oroville Planning Commission has cancelled their Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 meeting. Regular meetings are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 4:30 p.m. in the city council chambers. For more information call JoAnn Denney at (509) 4762926, ext. 13.

First Aid & CPR Classes LOOMIS - All day First Aid Classes are being offered in English & Spanish. The English class is on Friday, Jan. 24 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the Spanish class is on Saturday, Jan. 25 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Both classes will be held at Whitestone Church. For more information contact Ben Hylton at (509) 223-3412.

Friday Night Coffee House The Community Cultural Center of Tonasket will be having a Friday night coffee house Jan. 17, presenting Martin and Don Elliott at 6:00 p.m. Doors open at 5:30, and a pizza dinner is available thanks to Morningstar. Cost of the program is free, the dinner is $6.00 for members and $7.00 for non-members. Call 486-1328 for more information.

NVCS Photo Workshop OROVILLE – What is DPI, JPG, TIFF AND PNG? In this workshop style class you will learn how to manipulate your photos… size them, edit to remove mistakes, make them look more stylish or even weird! Bring your laptop and your photos and use online tools via the school’s wifi. Our instructor, Clyde Andrews, has been editing and publishing photos in brochures and on the internet for 15 years. This two-session class takes place on Wednesdays, Jan. 22 and 29. Call Ellen Bartells at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@ oroville.wednet.edu or register online at northvalleycommunityschools.com.

County Democrats Meeting The Okanogan County Democrats will be meeting on Saturday, Jan. 18 at the Breadline Café at 102 Ash St. South in Omak between 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. City Hall Closure OROVILLE - The Oroville City Hall, Shop and Police Department Office will be closed Monday, Jan. 20 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday. Customers with a Monday trash collection day will have their trash picked up on Tuesday. Earn L&I Card Class OROVILLE – Students will receive a Department of Labor & Industries card, valid for three years, in this FirstAid/CPR class. It’s three sessions beginning Monday, Jan. 20. Course covers medical, injury, and environmental emergencies, and adult, child and infant CPR. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu, or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com First Aid & CPR Classes OROVILLE - First Aid and CPR Class will be held on Jan. 20, 21, 22, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Oroville Grade School Library. Bring a pillow for the first night. For more information contact Ben Hylton at (509) 223-3412. Christians in Action meeting OMAK - Information about the Omak Stampede Gospel Stage, the KMBI FM translator, the Sonshine Cross on Shellrock Point and other outreaches will be shared during the annual meeting of Christians In Action, Tuesday, Jan. 21. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. at the home of president Kathleen Christensen, 312 Canyon Court, Omak. The Board needs to hear from those who value the continuation of these activities and other events in order to make future plans. Please call 422-4660 or visit website to share your thoughts,www. okchristiansinaction.org.

School Levy/Bond Discussion TONASKET – Do you have questions or concerns about the upcoming Tonasket School District M&O Levy and bond proposal? Here’s your chance to become a more informed voter. You are invited to a coffee hour for questions and open discussion with members of School Board and Administration on Wednesday, Jan. 29 from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the P.T. Works building at 39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket (one mile south of Midway Building Supply). Call (509) 486-1616 for more information. School Retirees’ Meeting OMAK - Okanogan County School Retirees’ Association meets at 11 a.m. Friday, January 31, at Koala Street Grill, Omak. Wendy Schrable from the Council on Aging will discuss Alzheimers and dementia. Information: (509) 422-2954. CCC Talent Show The CCC will be having their annual Winter Talent show on Saturday, Feb. 8, at 6:30 p.m. We are reaching out into the communities for talent. Are you a singer, player, speaker, or do gymnastics or dance? We are wanting to put you on our stage for a 5-10 minute performance. We will furnish the sound equipment and stage lights; you will be able to showcase your performance. Please call 486-1328 to sign up. Backpack Sprayer Calibration OKANOGAN The Okanogan County Noxious Weed Control Board will be holding a Calibration Class for backpack sprayers and ATV’s on Thursday, April 17. We need a minimum of 20 participants in order to hold the class, so pre-registration

BLUE STAR MOTHERS

Honoring SrA Brandon Swenson Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck President, NCW Blue Star Mothers

For the month of January we are honoring Senior Airman Brandon Swenson and his family from Oroville. His mother Shannon has been a military wife and is now a Blue Star Mother. Brandon’s father, Brian (Retired Air Force), and his two brothers, Nate and Cody, are currently serving in the Air Force. Born Nov. 21, 1993, Brandon has trained as Security Police and now serves with the Air Force Security Forces currently based in the State of Qatar, a†sovereign Arab state, located in Western Asia, occupying the small Qatar Peninsula on the northeasterly coast of the Arabian Peninsula. Its sole land border is with Saudi

Arabia. The rest of its territory is surrounded by the†Persian Gulf. A strait in the Persian Gulf separates Qatar from the nearby island state of†Bahrain. Qatar has a reputation as a nice assignment as far as that part of the world goes for deployments. It is one of the rare Arab states where you can get a beer but are limited to two per day. The smell, however, during the spring and summer months can be pretty rank in some parts due to old sewage plants that serve the bases and surrounding communities. The humidity is a higher there so the 100-112 degrees temperatures can make it a little more uncomfortable in some ways unlike the dryer heat of Kuwait where the humid-

Okanogan Valley

CHURCH GUIDE OROVILLE

by March 1 is required. In the class you will learn how to calibrate your sprayer, figure out how much product your sprayer is actually putting out per acre and practice calculating application rates or how much product you need to put in your sprayer based on label recommendations. There will be a $5 charge for the class, and possibly several pesticide license credits will be available. For more info call the Noxious Weed Office at (509) 422-7165, or stop by the office, Room 102 in the County Courthouse.

Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192. Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 476-3978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 4762386. Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. Please include day, date, time and location, as well as a for further information phone number. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Please, list your event only for the day or days of its occurrence. Once your request is submitted, it can take up to 48 hours for the event to appear on the calendar. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

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ity is much lower but temperatures higher. It generally cools down, however, around mid-late November. Two of the three American bases in Qatar are air bases that serve as the jumping off points for north going military so there are a lot of transient personnel. Security Forces are busy because of all this flight line activity. Qatar has served as the U.S. Central Commandís Forward Headquarters and the Combined Air Operations Center. Qatar and the United States coordinate closely to manage security in the Persian Gulf. We have extensive economic links, especially in the hydrocarbons (crude oil) sector. Qatar benefits not only economically and in security, but in education as well. Six U.S. universities have branch campuses in Qatar open to all Middle East students. Thank you and your family for your service, Brandon!

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville 8 - 8:30 Holy Grounds - Coffee, Tea & Conversation 8:30 - 9:45 Service@8:30 10 - 10:35 L.I.F.E.  10:35 - 11:00 Holy Grounds 11:00 - 12:00 Service @ 11:00 6 p.m. - 7:30 Pursuit (Pursuing God & Friendships) Pastor Claude Roberts Come enjoy song service with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Trinity Episcopal

Tonasket Foursquare Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place 415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 16, 2014  

January 16, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 16, 2014  

January 16, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune