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2013: The Year that Was

LOOKING BACK AT 2013

Perhaps the two most hotly contested issues of 2013 in the pages of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune were the closing of North Valley Hospital’s Assisted Living in Tonasket and Okanogan County PUD’s continued efforts to rehabilitate Enloe Dam to generate hydroelectric power on the Similkameen River near Oroville. Right, the Assisted Living closure brought protests outside of the hospital and (below, left) members of the Lower Similkameen Band and others held a ceremony honoring nature and the river near Enloe Dam and Similkameen Falls. Not all stories were controversial, dog sled rides at the annual NCW Ice Fishing Festival, below right, were just as popular as ever.

Major news stories for January through June COMPILED BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

JANUARY • Sitzmark opens for skiers and snowboarders – The Sitzmark Ski Area is featured prominantly on the front page in photographs as the ski hill had plenty of snow and was open in time for the Christmas holidays. No such luck so far at the end of 2013. • NVH starts new tax credit program – In an effort to keep patients close to home and to thank local taxpayers for their support, North Valley Hospital debuted a new tax credit program beginning Jan. 1. • John Smith chosen to replace Morton on Senate – Smith, a Colville farmer was appointed to take the place of retired state Senator Bob Morton for the Seventh Legislative District. Smith was to later lose out to Brian Dansell in the November 2013 General Election. • No immediate solutions – The North Valley Hospital board approved the closing of the district’s Assisted Living Facility citing years of financial losses as the reason. • It just won’t go away – Parking woes continue to haunt Tonasket City Council with the issue resurrected once again like some sort of zombie after several months hiatus. • Kinross updates on impact, future plans – A representative of Kinross Gold Corporation’s Kettle River-Buckhorn Project talks to the Oroville City Council about the gold mine and mill’s economic impact, including an average employee wage that tops $82,000 a year and $4 million in payments to local and county government agencies. • Kretz introduces wolf relocation legislation – After Western Washington legislators extolled the value of wolf packs in Eastern Washington, Rep. Joel Kretz (7th District) decided he would assist in the efforts to make relocating wolf packs to Western Washington through legislation this year. • Council, chief debate video policy – Differing opinions on what is appropriate use of video surveillance and

Gary DeVon & Brent Baker/staff photos

SEE REVIEW | PG A2

Former legislator ‘Web’ Hallauer dies Oroville’s elder statesman passes at age 99 BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – Wilbur “Web” Hallauer, former Oroville City Councilman, state representative and state senator, passed away at age 99 in his Oroville home Thursday, Dec. 19. Although he was born in New York state, Oroville’s elder statesman moved to Washington when he was 12-years-old, settling in Yakima. From there he went to the University of Washington in Seattle and after graduating moved to Oroville to run the family’s fruit processing plant Valley Evaporating Company, making dried apples and other products. He served on the Oroville

Council in the early 1940s and J. Kerr for the book which was was elected to the Washington published in 2001. State House of “He distinRepresentatives guished himin 1948 and self as a masserved there ter of the state “In all things, Web for eight years. budget proHallauer was always cess, serving He was then elected to the as chair on the a compassionate state Senate in House Revenue person—this at a 1957 and served Committee there another 12. time long before the and the Senate The late goverAppropriations word ‘compassionate’ and Ways and nor, Dixie Lee Ray, appointed combecame an adjective Means Hallauer to be mittees. As a to a political ideology.” Senator, he was the first head of the newly the chairman of Robert Bailey, created state the Legislative former Washington State Senator Department of I n t e r i m Ecology. Committee The former on Water legislator was Resources -also the subject of an oral history a committee that had the disas part of the Washington State tinction of recommending ten Oral History program commis- major pieces of legislation, all of sioned by the Secretary of State. which were subsequently enactHe was interviewed by Thomas ed. He was also noted for his

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 110 No. 01

passionate defense of civil liberties, including his courageous defense of Representative John Goldmark during Washington State’s ‘McCarthy era,’” from Wilbur G. “Web” Hallauer – An Oral History (which can be read online at http://apps.leg.wa.gov/ oralhistory/hallauer/hallauer. pdf ). Goldmark, from Okanogan, was a fellow Democrat and was serving in the House of Representatives when Goldmark and his wife were accused of having ties to the Communist Party. The Goldmarks sued and eventually won a libel suit against several of their accusers and Hallauer was by their side during the trial. In the preface to the Oral History Hallauer writes, “The political circus attracts many who do not become performers within the charmed rings of public observance. Whether carrying water to the elephants or setting up the wire cables for the high

Wilbur “Web” Hallauer, former Oroville City Councilman, state representative and state senator, passed away at age 99. trapeze acts, the work of these associated workers is necessary to the gladiators who hold the public attention. Without dedicated and talented people to help, the

SEE HALLAUER | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

show could not go on. Often the political and intellectual acumen of the politician’s support group is the making of that politician. This applies in my own case.” In the forward to the Oral History, former state senator Robert Bailey writes, “In all things, Web Hallauer was always a compassionate person—this at a time long before the word “compassionate” became an adjective to a political ideology.” A lifelong Democrat and proud member of the American Civil Liberties Union, Hallauer continued to champion Democratic causes in words and deeds, including in letters submitted to the Okanogan Valley GazetteTribune. Over the years he also submitted several historical articles to this newspaper outlining the history of the local area, on both sides of the border. In the early 1950s Hallauer bought

Cops & Courts Letters/Opinion Community

A3 A4 A5

Classifieds/Legals A6 Real Estate A7 Sports A8-9

Obituaries

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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 2, 2014

HALLAUER | FROM A1

Brent Baker and Gary DeVon/staff photo

Left, Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb is sprayed down by a fire hose as part of a fundraiser for the Tonasket Water Ranch, organized by Linda Black. Above, two and a half year-old Silas Hinton of Omak strummed along with Ruby Rust when they performed at Esther Bricques in May.

REVIEW | FROM A1

February • NVH Commissioners hear outcry at board meeting – Emotions ran high at the North Valley Hospital Board meeting as more than 75 people packed the board room and adjoining offices to express their opinions on the impending closure of the Assisted Living facility. One of many contentious hospital board meetings on the subject. • Longer day at risk? – Rising costs, unexpected expenses and a cut in Levy Equalization funds could jeopardize the Tonasket School District’s two-year plan to add 45 minutes to its school day by the next school year. • Oroville Council approves rezone – Along with a report that fuel was again available at the airport, the city council approved a small rezone near the bin lot on the south end of town. • Bonaparte Creek/Mill Drive annexation completed – “It’s been a long time coming,” Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb said of the annexation that was approved that night at the council meeting. The move allows residence in the area to connect to city sewer and water. • Wolf bills pass out of Senate – Senate Natural Resources and Parks Commission approved two bills that would reduce restraints on landowners and county legislative authorities from lethally removing a wolf posing an immediate threat to livestock and/or domestic animals. Okanogan County Commissioner Shiela Kennedy testifies, “We should have the authority to make these tough decisions when they are before us and they are devastating the people of our county.” • Petition filed to recall NVH Commissioners – Two area residents, Rosa Snider of Oroville and Danny gratix of Tonasket, have filed a statement with the county auditor’s office seeking the recall of the entire North Valley Hospital board alleging malfeasance and misfeasance. • Oroville Elementary experiences lockdown – The chairman of the Oroville School Board had some harsh words for those who would spread false rumors about

a lockdown that took place at the elementary school. The lockdown occurred after a person was asked what he was doing there and it was found he hadn’t checked in at the office and a check by police could not later locate him. Some had used social media to accuse the principal of not taking the incident seriously enough.

March • TSD to mull change in vocational program – The Tonasket School District is looking at changing the focus of its vocational program and Superintendent Paul Turner is hoping that those who want to have a voice in whether to do so or not will attend the next board meeting. • Big splash – Tonasket Water Ranch Coordinator Linda Black told the council that donations had already passed $50,000 for the spray park slated to be built in Chief Tonasket Park in the summer. Tonasket Mayor Patrick Plumb marked the occasion by getting hosed down by the fire department. • Oroville approves trailhead permit – The Oroville City Council approved a Conditional Use Permit for miscellaneous improvements to the Similkameen Trailhead, including the construction of restrooms and a parking lot (both have yet to be built). • Endurance rider plans return to competition – Oroville’s Heidi Hylton has been competing for two years in horse endurance riding and for a relative newcomer has racked up some impressive results, including finishing in first place as a Featherweight rider on her horse Crazy Horse. • Passions high over Vo-Ag changes – A proposed change to the Tonasket School District’s vocational program brought out a full house to the March 11 board meeting – most defending the current program. • Oroville Assisted Living Forum – Up until now most of the meetings on the fate of North Valley Hospital’s Assisted Living facility have taken place in Tonasket, but last week many of those opposing the facility’s closure met in Oroville to say why they’re fighting the hospital district’s plan. April • Specifics of ATV ordinance debated – The Tonasket City Council takes up the issue of the new ATV ordinance and the city planner says there are no conflicts between the spray park project and swimming pool. • NVH prepares to move forward after day in court – A full day in court on March 19 resulted in a pair of favorable outcomes to the North Valley Hospital Board of Commissioners, which according to board chairwoman Helen Casey, will allow them to move forward in finalizing the closure of the Assisted Living. A temporary injunction to close the facility was struck down in Okanogan County Superior Court.

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There were all sorts of ways to participate in the Fathers Day Fly-In at the Tonasket Airport in June. • Council hears reports from Public Works, Parks – Rod Noel, who heads up the Oroville Public Works and Parks departments reported on several issues, including the opening of the city’s Osoyoos Lake Veteran’s Memorial Park for the year. • Tonasket projects slight decline – The school district projects a decline in enrollment as it prepares to set the next year’s budget. • County, Oroville, come to understanding on sewer – Although it still needs to be redrafted, representatives from Oroville and the Okanogan County Commissioners came to an understanding on several points regarding the county’s Eastlake Sewer System. • CEO stands by decisions, board – North Valley Hospital Administrator Linda Michel defended the board’s decision to shut down the Assisted Living gacility in an interview with Gazette-Tribune reporter Brent Baker. • Riverside man charged with murder – Okanogan County Sheriff ’s deputies were kept busy with reports of gun and knife play at various locations in the county. The first of the three incidents resulted in a Riverside man bing arrested in the fatal shooting of a fellow Riverside area resident. • New ambulance over budget – Stryker equipment adds $45,000 to cost of total purchase, causing the price to climb for a new ambulance for the Oroville area to $214,000. The new equipment includes a power loader, stair chair and power gurney.

May • Big splash, big party – Big Splash Barbecue brings out Tonasket Community in support of the Tonasket Water Ranch spray park. • Hometown Pizza fire caught on video – A fire in the early morning hours at Hometown Pizza and Pasta in Oroville was limited to mostly smoke damage because of the quick reporting by the owner of the recently opened Pastime Bar and Grill according to the business’ owner John Desjardin. The fire cause the restaurant to be closed for several weeks to repair damage mostly 312 S. Whitcomb

caused by the smoke. • Princes are May Festival Grand Marshals – Jim and Marilyn Prince are interviewed by editor Gary DeVon after they are selected as the 2013 May Festival Grand Marshals. The owners of Prince’s Center have a long history of serving the community both through their stores and by donating to various community events. • Okanogan expected to flood near Tonasket – Warm weather that is speeding up the annual mountain snow melt-off has brought about a flood watch for the Okanogan River, especially between Tonasket and Oroville. • Oroville weights park concession stand options – No person or group had come forward to rent the concession stand at Oroville’s Veterans Memorial Park leaving the city to look for ways to make it more attractive to potential operators. Oroville May Festival ‘Paradise in the Valley’ – Oroville’s biggest annual event is chronicled with two pages of photos, as well as parade, bass fishing tournament, fun run, car show and three on three basketball results. • Gold Digger Apples celebrating 75 years – What began as Oroville United Growers in 1938, has grown into Oroville’s last remaining grower’s cooperative, Gold Digger Apples, is marking it’s 75th Anniversary on May 24. The company is one of Oroville’s largest employers. • Legacy Park dedication – The park honoring veterans is dedicated in Tonasket and recorded in a feature page of photographs and through quotes from those that attended. • ‘Marshal Middleton’ finally gets to ride in the parade – Patti Middleton is no stranger to parades, but she’s never gotten to ride. The longtime Tonasket music teacher was chosen as the 2013 Founders Day Grand Marshal. • Oroville property valuation completed – The new assessment of property within the Oroville School District has been completed and while most people won’t notice, those with lakefront property will see taxes rise, according to Okanogan County Assessor

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June • Tonasket Founders Day and Oroville Graduation – The two events are celebrated in words and pictures in the first issue of June. • NVH faces boiler and call system issues – The hospital’s efforts to bring down its warrant levels may be slowed by urgent infrastructure needs that have cropped up, including the nurse call system and the hospital’s three boilers. • Hiram ‘Okanogan’ Smith’s gravesite a mystery no more - Two years after his death and burial, Hiram “Okanogan” Smith’s remains were disinterred, moved and lost. Oroville researcher Dorothy Petry, working with Seattle’s Lake View Cemetery’s Julie Lundquist, believe they’ve solved the century-old mystery of where the Territorial and State Legislator came to rest. • City sets Critical Areas Workshop – There was still no public comments on the updates to Oroville’s Critical Areas/ Comprehensive Plan so Chris Branch, director of community development asked the city council and received permission for a workshop to answer questions and take testimony. • Theft investigations lead to several arrests – After a lengthy investigation by the sheriff ’s office and local police departments, several arrests have been made in connection with burglaries taking place throughout the county, including in Tonasket and Oroville. • Residents react to new ordinances – After discussing streets and parking issues at several Tonasket City Council meetings new ordinances were passed, including requiring a permit and restricting the number of yard sales in residential areas. However, despite all this discussion, the ordinances seem to have taken some residents by surprise. • Bids for reservoir exceed estimates – The preliminary results of the bid to construct a new reservoir to serve the North End Water system, including the new Border Patrol Station, have gone over the engineer’s estimates by over $100,000. The city will be looking at ways to trim the cost of the project and to come up with additional funds. • Don Brazle is Chesaw Fourth of July Grand Marshal – This “real live nephew of his Uncle Sam, Born on the Fourth of July” is also the Grand Marshal for the rodeo’s 71st year.

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even some Constitutional discussion, highlighted the Tonasket City Council’s efforts to finalize a policy that would govern the Tonasket Police Department’s use of video of video or game cameras in certain situations. • May Fest Queen Candidates – Shelby Louise Scott and Angela Nelson set their sights on the crown for 2013 Oroville May Festival Queen. Shelby is the daughter of Kim and Brad Scott and Angela is the daughter of Alan and Marcie Nelson. • Honorees, future light up chamber banquet – The Tonasket Chamber of Commerce hosted its annual banquet, auction and officer installation. Julie Alley is president, Scott Smith “Citizen of the Year” and II Sisters Video is Business of the Year.

the Tonasket Times from Frank Putnam. In the oral history he tells Kerr he bought the Times to keep it out of the hands of Ashley Holden. Holden was one of the people who would accuse the Goldmarks of being communists. Hallauer hired a woman as the editor of the newspaper, but he said the equipment and advertising were poor. He said what really happened was that Holden and his son started a rival newspaper, The Tonasket Tribune, and the Times was shut down nine months after he had purchased it. Hallauer himself recalls that he was the target of 1961 newspaper ad that was part of a “smear and distortion” campaign that was run by opponents to attack him and other Democrats in state politics. Hallauer had several interests including publishing his own series of books, mining and hydroelectric power.. He was a strong supporter of the wise use of natural resources. He and his late-wife, Josephine, were also supporters of the remodeling and expansion of the Oroville Public Library as well as other local causes. She served two terms as President of the Washington State Library Association.

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JANUARY 2, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A3

2013 SPORTS IN REVIEW Top stories in Tonasket and Oroville high school sports, January - June

how much success to predict. The Hornets secured their next step in rebuilding their program on Friday, May 10, sweeping a doubleheader at Manson 26-11 and 29-17 to clinch their first district playoff spot since 2010.

Compiled by Brent Baker

Mills nabs fifth, relay 10th at 1A state CHENEY - The state 1A track and field finals proved to be a weekend to remember for the small group of Tonasket athletes that earned the right to be there. Emily Mills, Kylie Dellinger, Cassie Spear and Rose Walts went up against the state’s best on Friday and Saturday, May 24-25 at Eastern Washington University. The four of them combined for a 10th place finish in the 4x400 relay, while Mills also ran the open 400 and brought home a fifth place medal.

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Tonasket wins Apple Pie tourney TONASKET - It has been long enough since Tonasket won its own Apple Pie Wrestling Tournament that Tigers coach Dave Mitchell couldn’t remember exactly when it was. “It’s definitely been awhile,” he said after the Tigers broke that streak on Saturday, Jan. 12. “Too long.” The Tigers had last won their home tournament in 2006. Tonasket won the tournament with 206.5 points, followed by Rogers (Spokane) with 161. The Tigers’ Collin Aitcheson (120 pounds) outlasted Charles Smith of Rogers in a 10-8 decision, while Jeff Stedtfeld (132) likewise edged Marcus Phillips of Rogers 11-7 in another tight one. John Rawley (195) took most of the drama out of his final with a second period pin of Cascade’s Nathaniel Merry. Tigers coach tops mentor TONASKET - It was the kind of game the Tonasket Tigers had been hoping to play, and it came at the perfect time. With a chance to prove themselves against their new coach’s old team, the Tigers came up big on Tuesday, Jan. 8, defeating Quincy 61-46. Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon was Quincy coach Wade Petersen’s varsity assistant the past two seasons. Tonasket girls lose twice in one day

QUINCY - It’s tough enough to lose one game on the final day of the regular season. The star-crossed Tonasket girls basketball team lost twice on Friday, Feb. 1, as they fell 44-42 at Quincy just hours after they learned that a forfeit victory

Brent Baker/staff photos

Left, Oroville’s Sierra Speiker raced to a state title in the 3200-meter run in May; above, Tonasket’s Austin Booker came won win away from a state wrestling title, finishing second in the Tacoma Dome in February. awarded to them the previous day had been reversed. Kylie Dellinger hit a schoolrecord six 3-pointers and finished with 20 points to lead the Tigers. Dellinger’s hot streak broke Jessica Hylton’s old school record for triples in a game.

Lady Hornets tie for league title COULEE DAM - Oroville hasn’t had much luck against Lake Roosevelt in recent seasons, including a 13-point loss to the Raiders last month. But all along, coach Mike Bourn believed his team had what it takes to beat LR, and on Tuesday, Feb. 5, the Hornets themselves believed it as well after pulling off a 45-44 victory on the Raiders’ home floor. Tonasket falls in first playoff since ‘07 CHELAN - Chelan had too much size inside, too good of a half-court trap defense, and too much Michael Amsel, Jr. for the

Tonasket boys basketball team to handle in its first post-season appearance since 2007. The Goats outscored the Tigers in every quarter on the way to a 54-34 victory that propelled Chelan to the Bi-District 6/7 tournament in Spokane and ended Tonasket’s season.

Oroville’s Smith heads to state wrestling

TACOMA - Jordan Smith picked up a victory in his first Mat Classic experience, extending his visit to the state wrestling finals into its second day before being eliminated from the tournament. Smith, the Oroville 106-pound sophomore who rode a late-season surge to State, earned a pin of South Bend’s Austin Boyes in the second of his three state 1B/2B matches last weekend at the Tacoma Dome.

Four Tigers medal at state TACOMA - Led by Austin

Booker’s state runner-up performance, the Tonasket wrestling team earned a 10th place finish at the state 1A wrestling finals as he and three teammates earned spots on the medal stand. Booker reached the final before losing 6-4 to Levi Godinho of Castle Rock in the state 160 lb. championship. Jeff Stedtfeld (126) earned a fourth place finish; Collin Aitcheson (120) placed fifth; and Jorge Juarez (126) took sixth. John Rawley (195) also earned a state finals spot.

Hughes, Hilderbrand both MVPs OROVILLE - Sweeping a league’s Most Valuable Player awards isn’t easy. Picking up those two awards with teams that went through two vastly contrasting seasons makes Connor Hughes and Lily Hilderbrand’s accomplishment that much more unusual. Both were tabbed as the Central Washington 2B League’s North Division MVPs. Tiger, Hornet girls dominate

Oroville meet OROVILLE - Tonasket and Oroville’s girls provided the majority of big performances for North Okanogan County athletes Saturday as the Hornets hosted their annual Eagle Home Mortgage Invitatational at Ben Prince Field. Tonasket’s girls won team honors with 112 points, with the Hornets second at 83. Hornet baseball breaks streak OROVILLE - The end of the Oroville baseball team’s two-year losing streak didn’t come easily, or particularly quickly. In fact, Oroville’s 19-5 win over Manson took 19 days to complete after the game was originally suspended due to darkness prior to Spring Break. Oroville softball to playoffs OROVILLE - Oroville coach Dane Forrester knew the Hornets’ fastpitch softball squad would be better this year, but wasn’t sure

Speiker’s title leads Hornets CHENEY - The weight of high expectations can sometimes catch a runner with more ease than any human competitor. Oroville’s Sierra Speiker, a heavy favorite to win the Class 2B state 3200-meter title, felt that weight and decided to leave nothing to chance. The Hornet junior, winner of two of the last three state cross country titles, won her first track championship Friday, May 24, to lead five Oroville athletes that brought home six state medals. Other medalists included Luke Kindred in the javelin (5th place, 152-6), Kaitlyn Grunst in the high jump (6th, 5-0); Breanna Ervin in the pole vault (7th-tie, 7-0) and Tanner Smith in the 100 (8th, 12.03). Beyers claims tennis medal YAKIMA - Tonasket’s Megan Beyers shook off a first-round loss in the state 1A/2B/1B tennis finals May 24-25 in Yakima to sweep her final three matches and bring home a fifth place medal. Hughes 13th at state golf OLYMPIA - Oroville senior Conner Hughes claimed a 13th place finish at the 1B/2B state golf finals at Oakbrook Golf Course in May.

Cops & Courts Superior Court Criminal

The court found probable cause to charge Daniel Rodney Decker, 35, Tonasket, with harassment (threats to kill) and seconddegree assault (with a deadly weapon). The crimes allegedly occurred Dec. 17 near Tonasket. The court found probable cause to charge Robert Ellis Allen, 30, Oroville, with first-degree trafficking in stolen property and second-degree theft. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 20 in Oroville. The court found probable cause to charge Larry Junior Frazier, 44, Omak, with two counts of thirddegree theft and two counts of first-degree trafficking in stolen property. The crimes allegedly occurred Nov. 9 and Dec. 2 in Omak.

Juvenile

A 15-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Dec. 18 to fourth-degree assault (DV). The boy was sentenced to 10 days in detention with credit for 10 days served, and fined $100. The crime occurred Dec. 8. A 15-year-old Omak girl pleaded guilty Dec. 18 to disorderly conduct and MIP. The girl was sentenced to 10 days in detention with credit for three days served, and fined $10. The crimes occurred Dec. 15. A 14-year-old Omak boy pleaded guilty Dec. 18 to second-degree TMVWOP. He was sentenced to 15-36 weeks in a state juvenile facility with credit for 25 days served. The boy was fined $100 for the Nov. 16 crimes. A 17-year-old Okanogan girl pleaded guilty Dec. 18 to fourthdegree malicious mischief (DV). She was sentenced to 12 days in detention with credit for 12 days served, and fined $100 for the Nov. 15 crime. A 15-year-old Oroville boy pleaded guilty Dec. 18 to reckless endangerment and possession of a legend drug. He was sentenced to one day in detention with credit for one day served, and fined $100 for the Oct. 1 crimes. A restitution hearing was scheduled for Feb. 26, 2014. A 13-year-old Okanogan boy pleaded guilty Dec. 24 to MIP. He was sentenced to seven days in detention and fined $100 for the Nov. 26 crime.

District Court Randall Scott Ayers, 49, Omak, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Gagandeep Singh Bains, 46, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: failure to transfer title within 45 days. Caitlin Louise Baker, 24, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Baker was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days sus-

pended, and fined $808. Jon W. Batten Jr., 35, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Batten was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Joseph Duane Chaney, 23, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft. Chaney was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 165 days suspended, and fined $468. Armando Chavarria Hernandez, 37, Oroville, guilty of operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock device. Chavarria Hernandez was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 178 days suspended, and fined $508. He also had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Edward Francis Chilmonik II, 65, Omak, had a DUI charge dismissed. Chilmonik was fined $1,125. Michael Patrick Connors, 55, Tonasket, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Connors was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 19, Omak, guilty of third-degree malicious mischief. Counts was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 344 days suspended, and fined $1,033.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings Monday, Dec. 23, 2013 Theft on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Car dolly reported missing. Automobile theft on S. Seventh Ave. in Okanogan. Theft on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Wood reported missing. Theft on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Electronics reported missing. Three-vehicle crash on Hwy. 97 in Okanogan. Injuries reported. One-vehicle crash on Ross Canyon Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. Malicious mischief on N. Main St. in Omak. Theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Fraud on Engh Rd. in Omak. Theft on Appleway Ave. in Oroville. Robert Gene Watts, 44, booked on an FTA bench warrant for delivery of a controlled substance and bail jumping. John Andrew Hilderbrand, 20, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Taryn S. Everybodytalksabout, 21, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). Carlos Rios Herrera, 21, booked for DUI and a USBP hold. Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013 Theft on Nichols Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. First Ave. in Okanogan. Two-vehicle crash on Bide-A-Wee Rd. near Omak. No injuries reported. DWLS on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Burglary on Chesaw Rd. in Oroville. Harassment on River Ave. in Okanogan. Automobile theft on S. Second Ave.

in Okanogan. Violation of protection order on Westlake Rd. in Oroville. Burglary on Engh Rd. in Omak. Harassment on W. Fourth Ave. in Omak. Weapons offense on Golden St. in Oroville. Burglary on Ironwood St. in Oroville. One-vehicle crash on Main St. in Oroville. No injuries reported. Theft on W. Sixth St. in Tonasket. Todd Anthony Perez, 40, booked on four OCSO FTA warrants: third-degree DWLS, hit and run (attended), fourth-degree assault (DV) and DUI. Charlie Joe Craig, 20, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for MIP. Jonathon Leroy Stotts, 20, booked for third-degree malicious mischief. Segura Cisneros Israel, 33, booked on a U.S. Marshal Service hold. Jonhy Sanchez Palomino, 32, booked on a U.S. Marshal Service hold. Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2013 Burglary on Westlake Rd. in Oroville. Trespassing on Miller Rd. near Omak. Trespassing on Engh Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on S. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Harassment on Engh Rd. near Omak. Custodial interference on Main St. in Oroville. Ryan Joseph Stotts, 29, booked for residential burglary (DV), third-degree theft (DV), felony harassment (DV), and two counts of violation of a protection order (DV). Suzanna Marie Marchand, 31, booked on an Omak Police Department FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTA warrant for truancy violation.

ket. Two reports of malicious mischief on S. Main St. in Omak. Harassment on N. Ash St. in Omak. Harassment on Engh Rd. in Omak. Burglary on W. Hale Ave. in Omak. Two reports of theft on Engh Rd. in Omak. Michael William Craig, 22, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV) and third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Karen Lee Davis-Beam, 62, booked for providing false statements. Roland Ray Wolff, 57, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Todd Anthony Perez, 40, booked for third-degree malicious mischief and disorderly conduct. Adrian Jose Legarda, 19, booked for a Drug Court violation. Joshua Dean Allen, 32, booked for first-degree TMVWOP, possession of a stolen vehicle, third-degree theft and seconddegree DWLS. Gerardo Hernandez Aparicio, 44, court commitment for seconddegree trafficking in stolen property and second-degree possession of stolen property. Alysha Kay Mariah George, 24, booked for second-degree TMVWOP. Vickie Ann Hall, 46, court commitment for DUI, third-degree DWLS and hit and run. Leo Hall, no middle name listed, 47, booked for disorderly conduct.

Saturday, Dec. 28, 2013 Theft on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. DWLS on Elmway in Okanogan. Drugs on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Harassment on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 97 in Omak. Weapons offense on Green Lake Rd. near Okanogan. Warrant arrest on N. Main St. in Omak. Trespassing on Jennings Loop Rd. near Oroville. DWLS on N. Main St. in Omak. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Automobile theft on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Domestic dispute on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Violation of no-contact order on Fir St. in Oroville. Derek Justin Allen, 33, booked for POCS (methamphetamine), POCS (heroin) and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jimmy Wesley Padgett, 44, booked for fourth-degree assault. David Justice Lance Condon-Soderberg, 19, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Kristina Marie Gipson, 30, booked on a State Patrol FTC warrant for third-degree DWLS. Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013 Burglary on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan.

Key:

DUI - Driving Under the Influence DWLS/R - Driving While License Suspended/Revoked POSC - Possession of a Controlled Substance MIP/C - Minor in Possession/Consumption TMVWOP - Taking a Motor Vehicle without Owner’s Permission DV - Domestic Violence FTA - Failure to Appear (on a warrant) FTPF - Failure to Pay Fine RP - Reporting Party OCSO - Okanogan County Sheriff’s Officer DOC - State Department of Corrections USBP - U.S. Border Patrol CBP - U.S. Customs and Border Protection ICE - Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Out On The Town your guide to

Main St., Tonasket l 486-2996

* Wednesday *

Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013 Trespassing on Greenacres Rd. near Riverside. Theft on Elmway in Okanogan. Harassment on N. Third Ave. in Okanogan. Trespassing on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Robbery on S. Second Ave. in Okanogan. Assault on Hwy. 97 near Omak. Domestic dispute on Webber Rd. near Tonasket. Drugs on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Domestic dispute on Ironwood St. in Oroville. Gary Eugene Hendrickson, 32, booked for parole/probation violation. Fernando Garcia Gomez, 22, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Trudie Mapes, no middle name listed, 26, booked on an FTA bench warrant for endangerment with controlled substances. Friday, Dec. 27, 2013 Automobile theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Recovered vehicle on S. Whitcomb Ave. in Tonasket. Burglary on Sage Lane near Tonas-

Illegal fireworks on Westlake Rd. near Oroville. Theft on S. First Ave. in Omak. Arson on Hwy. 20 near Okanogan. Malicous mischief on W. Bartlett Ave. in Omak. Harassment on N. Elm St. in Omak. Theft on 14th Ave. in Oroville. Shannon May Clay, 39, booked for DUI. Kyle Allen Snyder, 22, booked for POCS (methamphetamine) and possession of drug paraphernalia.

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | JANUARY 2, 2014

THE TOWN CRIER Assisted Living closure 2013 ‘Story of the Year’

While a lot happened in 2013, the closing of North Valley Hospital District’s Assisted Living and the displacement of several residents had to be the story of the year. The opinion page of our newspaper has been awash with words for and against the closure and more space has probably been dedicated to that topic in the letters to the editor and on the front page than any other last year. The battle lines were drawn and the closure led to threats of injunctions to prevent the closure and petitions to recall hospital board members. While both attempts failed, the repercussions probably are what led to one of two commissioners up for reelection being defeated in November. The issue was such a hotly debated topic, not only because it displaced our elderly relatives Out of and friends from their homes, but also because of the closure revealed that some My Mind opponents upper management did get pay increases while Gary A. DeVon cuts were being made to programs. The assisted living was closed, as were the hospital’s clinics in Oroville and Tonasket, in what we were told were attempts to stop the district from losing money and to pay down nearly $3 million in warrants held by the county. Warrants are down by about two thirds or more, but we need to be vigilant that they continue to drop, without further decreases in services. Another big story of the year has to be the fight over Okanogan County PUD’s attempts to renovate Enloe Dam, build a new powerhouse, and begin generating electricity. The battle lines are not nearly as clear as “spend the money or don’t spend the money” on rehabilitating the dam. In fact if that was the case the “do nothing” option might be the winner. However, those that have opposed the PUD’s attempts are now leading the charge to pull out the dam entirely saying that the federal government will pick up the tab for clean up. That’s not nearly so clear and we’ve asked to see it in writing. The dam was probably the second hottest topic and while letters about the assisted living have started to taper off, the dam, like the ongoing controversy over a new power transmission line to the Methow, seems to continue to go strong. As Joyce “Boots” Emry says in this week’s This & That, some of the letters can be too long. I’ve threatened to take it back to a 300 word limit as we once had, but sometimes it’s feast or famine in the Town Crier so we let people go on about what’s important to them. However, she’s probably also correct in saying many readers just stop reading after a certain point. That’s why we try to encourage shorter, more concise letter writing – it’s just that it often falls on deaf ears when there’s a topic the writer feels is so important. What we probably will do in 2014 is return to the policy of writing just once on a topic in 30 days, with responses allowed at the editor’s discretion – hopefully without plowing through the same ground in defending one’s case. There were lots of other hot topics in 2013 and not all so controversial. Approval of the Seventh Street/Mill Drive Annexation, along with approval of the Water Ranch Spray Park and parking issues were big in Tonasket. Oroville saw increases in construction, higher property taxes for lakeside living, improvements to the Oroville Reman and Reload, a new Border Patrol Station and much more.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription.) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Assumptions about market untrue Dear Editor, I would like to address the misinformation that was printed in the paper about the Winter Farmers Market at the library. A proposal for a winter market was brought forward to the Library Board to use the Community room at the library. The Board approved it. The Regional Library was approached about liability issues and said that the library’s insurance covered events that the library sponsored. This fact must have come into consideration when the Mayor approved the first market. What is a little disheartening is that after approving the first market, no one who had voiced concerns about the market came down to the market to see if their concerns were even warranted, instead held on to assumptions that in fact are not true. For one thing the kitchen in the Library was never used by the Market vendors, for any purpose, it is the Librarian’s lunch room. Everybody who has anything to do with the library knows this. We had no intention of using the kitchen, at all. Secondly, we monitored the crowd during the market and at no time was there a crowding issue. We still have never been told what the fire limit is. We have asked and never been given a number. When the Library Board approved the market it was for a temporary period, until the end of January, just to see how it would work. I believe all involved realize that over time the space would become too small, it was just to provide a market for the community. It was just a temporary site as other options for the future could be explored. The support the market idea has in the community allows us to dream bigger. As a vendor I watch the benefits to the community the market provides. It brings the community together on Saturdays which only enhances the possibilities for all the businesses in town because of the added traffic. More than anything it is too bad that members of our city government hold these assumptions and voice opinions in the council meeting that show a general lack of knowledge as to the true facts. I have to wonder why none of those who had concerns came to the market to see if they were true. If they had chosen to inform themselves then perhaps this market could continue. In closing I would like to thank all those members of the community who support the market and have expressed concern about the market being stopped. Ask your city why. Take the time to read the council meeting minutes for December. It is a little disheartening that a lack of true facts drives this discussion and that the city has not served the community by stopping the market. If as the Mayor says that the market does not comply, why did he approve the first one? John Marcille High Mountain Farm Oroville

Enloe Dam: Missing facts Dear Editor, There have been many, many responses to the Enloe Dam issue and every one of them based on an emotional connection to the physical place itself, the environment, salmon that haven’t run for years, someone’s first

date, someone’s first beer, the bats, hiking trails, a potential park, the harm to the river, the rehabilitation of the lake, whether Canada cares about what’s being discussed and who’s ultimately responsible for the cost to remove it, cost to leave it as is, cost to build a new dam, etc., etc. There are only three factual options for people to consider: (1) Leave the dam as it currently is, (2) Remove the dam, or (3) Replace/upgrade the dam. All the supportive information that goes with these decisions like funding, EPA assessments, Department of Natural Resources (DNR) impact statements, State input, and community concerns are just part of the 3 options mentioned but still do not completely identify what’s best for the community as a whole. I will address why option (3) makes the most sense for the community. Any community should be strong and have backups and redundancies built into their development plan to tackle unexpected situations. Community Resiliency or more directly put, “Community Survival” is the key! Homeowners have smoke detectors and fire extinguishers because of the potential for fire hazards, state road crews have sand and gravel stockpiled in strategic locations during winter months because of what might happen to the roads with the next winter storm , Fire Departments, EMS, and Police Departments have contingency or back up plans for unexpected incidents. Events like long term power outages, Flu outbreaks, and forest fires have the ability to negatively affect a community if they are not handled quickly and effectively. Enloe Dam should be our community’s back up plan for potential major disasters. We would be one of the only communities with our own portable generator (the Enloe Dam), in the event of a disaster. Having our own backup power supply in our backyard allows us to have continuous power while the rest of the state is dealing with casualty management priorities. “The State” or big brother will be focused on the larger population areas first during a disaster response because that’s where the majority of the population lives and where the highest density of politicians live. That is reality and don’t let the Department of Emergency Management convince you differently. Let’s look at other important reasons why the Enloe Dam makes sense for our area: •

• • •

Washington State and Okanogan County in particular have aging infrastructure; old bridges, old power lines, dilapidated State support facilities, etc. Major Forest Fire threats have increased and disrupt normal power supply sources very easily, especially in remote areas: http://www.dnr.wa.gov/recreationeducation/topics/fireinformation/ pages/rp_fire_fireinformation.aspx Earthquake activity in the state of Washington has remained constant and even increased in some areas, see: http:// www.pnsn.org/earthquakes/recent Earthquake activity can and will weaken larger dam infrastructures and power generating capabilities. The Okanogan Highlands is easily cut off from larger support functions with the loss of one or two highways or bridges. Electro Magnetic Pulses (EMPs) Solar Flares have an 11 year cycle, we are finishing this 11 year cycle with 28 Solar Flares in the month of October 2013 alone. The next 11 year cycle is predicted to be worse. EMPs can damage

any of the current electrical/electronic infrastructure state wide. A new dam the size of Enloe could be built to withstand such an occurrence: http://www. nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/news/solaractivity.html Meteor hits on the planet are increasing and as demonstrated by the meteor hit in Russia, a relatively small meteor can disrupt day to day living very easily. Having a continuous power source provides a significant capability in maintaining all support facilities like hospitals, community centers, Fire and Police response, etc. Other local agencies like Border Patrol and DHS would benefit from it. You want local agencies with Law Enforcement and Emergency Response capabilities functional during large destructive events like earthquakes because they help keep the local community safe until normal support functions can be reestablished and are back up and running. Remember, over 50% of all Border Patrol employees have family in the local community and are invested in helping keep it safe and sound.

One final note on being better prepared and a more resilient community; we are a “just in time” society due to our semi-trucks and highways, railroads, and air-cargo delivery systems. That means the supplies our society survives on such as food in grocery stores and fuel delivered to our gas stations and simple things like batteries are delivered weekly to their destinations. There is no “in-depth” or lengthy storage facility that maintains large amounts of supplies for shipment or stocking for long term situations. The hard fact is that any catastrophe that lasts longer than 7 days will deplete everything in a normal community. That means the food is gone, the fuel is gone, and the average citizen with no preparedness or backup planning will be trying to take what they need to survive. That also means that Border Patrol in Oroville, Fire, EMS, Police, and other emergency services will be fighting for the same thing as the average citizen during an extended emergency. Now I’m sure the Border Patrol and other Emergency capable services will explain they have generators with back up fuel supplies but those backup capabilities also have an expiration time line of no greater than 30 days. It would only make sense that Border Patrol and in turn DHS invest in a new Enloe Dam facility as it would provide a stable and continuous power source to assist them with maintaining their efficiency and effectiveness without becoming the focus of community members in need of assistance and help during a prolonged emergency. This should be considered a major contingency plan priority for future budget and preparedness goals for all state and federal agencies in the area. What a great idea for the Northern Okanogan County to be prepared for almost any circumstance or calamity that might affect its general population by having a fully function dam in its back yard. The Enloe Dam has the capability to significantly reduce and mitigate potential threats against the community and that is not an emotional response, that’s a fact! Marc Alden, LCDR (retired) U.S. Coast Guard

Americanada BY WILLIAM SLUSHER

I discover to my amazement that there are serious folk on both sides of the 49th parallel who favor unification of America and Canada into one new, world superpower. Otherwise, it is suggested, neither of us can likely withstand the rising Russian and Chinese threats in the arctic, nor remain economically viable on the global market. “Without dramatic Bill Slusher change,” Canadian editor Diane Francis writes, “Canada will remain … somewhat sleepy and vulnerable. The United States will continue to go broke buying foreign oil and cheap goods from Asia, then guarding countries that could and should pay for their own protection and, while they are at it, ‘buy American’.” Call it Canamerica or Americanada. I call it slam-dunk impossible. It’s a great idea, but... no way, Jose. I grant you, both America and Canada are overrun with political correctness thought police and free-speech nannies. We at least have that in common. Just look what the Canadians did to their own Mark Steyn for suggesting that maybe Islam wasn’t all Little House On The Prairie after all. Look how they treated Anne Coulter just for the sin of being insufficiently uber-liberal in their view (on a supposedly open-minded university campus no less). Positively medieval. Canadians have whole designated courts up there to police what their people are allowed to say just like we’re getting down here, but that’s not much of a fertile field for unity. And consider: First, we’d have to reinstall all new signs to read in French and English or the Québécois would pout and declare themselves special

because their mommies said so, and secede. You know, like California. But worse, all of America’s graffiti vandals nationwide would have to repaint all their ‘art’ on all buildings and train cars in two languages, a daunting task for they who can neither read nor write English well enough to get jobs. Then there’s guns. Here in The Great Satan, we get guns for baby shower gifts. I’m talking serious blasting irons, too, not some birdrated, single-round shotgun for ‘hunting,’ as in Canada. The Canucks will blanch at our celebratory gunfire at weddings and other sad occasions. They’ll wail about gun violence even though 99% of ours comes from illegal guns in massive urban ghettoes populated greater than Canada’s total. And American good ole boys won’t give up their guns for love nor money, let alone for pinky-finger Canadian sensitivities. But all this is before we even start talking about driving on our ‘unified’ roads. Americans drive hell-for-leather, sober, awake or otherwise, right? Meanwhile, everybody knows those Canadian hockey puckers drive everywhere in Maersk, Alabama-sized motorhomes at 15-miles-an-hour under the posted speed limit on a clear, dry, empty, daylight highway. All the time. How’s that ever gonna work out? It’ll be teeth, hair and eyeballs all over the pavement from San Diego to Lourdes de Blanc Sablon, whatever that is. Further, while Americans can’t speak Frog, Canadians can’t speak Bleep. Watch a TV reality show about American loggers, then watch one about Canadian loggers. The Canadian loggers will speak near perfect proper English your grandmother could listen to even when the loggers are furious - not a single bleep - while American loggers will have so many bleeps in their dialogue soundtrack that their conversations sound like the fry boiler alarms at McDonalds. Nobody knows what they were saying when they’re

done. Even them. Come on. We’re talking major language gaps here. And those smug Canadians. What do they know about culture? Do they have wet t-shirt contests in sunny Fort Lauderdale? (In fact, do they even have dry t-shirts, sunlight and unfrozen water?) Where’s the Canadian Sturgis? Ever hear of a Canadian shopping mall festival where young people try to beat old people into a coma with a single punch? And what would Canadians shoot those latter punks with if they had them? I rest my case. A cultural wasteland, Canada. No wonder they have no illegal immigration problem in Canada, they have no naturally occurring vegetables and how does anybody mow or leaf-blow... snow? They get all the low-wage housekeepers they need from Asia. Besides, compared to ours, Canadian immigration law is about as welcoming as North Korea’s. Shoot, not even Canadians live in the vast majority of Canada! Most of them live within 50 yards or so of the American border. What’s up with that? No. It’s a nice thought, but oh the humanity. There’s just too vast a chasm between a culturally rich wet-t-shirt nation and a bunch of toothless puck whackers. Good fences make for good neighbors. Wait a minute... OK, OK, so there are no fences between us and Canada, but you know what I’m saying. It’s like the US Congress. It just wouldn’t work. William Slusher is an author, columnist and sociopolitical writer with a small ranch on the Okanogan River. Enjoy his nonpartisan Pacific Northwest political comedy: CASCADE CHAOS, or How Not To Put Your Grizzly In The Statehouse (Amazon, cmppg. com, or your local bookstore). Mr. Slusher may be contacted at williamslusher@live. com.


JANUARY 2, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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Okanogan Valley Life

Hopes for a happy and healthy new year Here we are into 2014 and our hopes sible to make. are for a Happy New Year. We face We started Christmas Eve by going many problems, especially pertaining to the “Hylton breakfast” held annuto the health problems and ally at Whitestone Church, insurance issues. So far we in lieu of sending Christmas haven’t received the “fatal” cards, a tradition they started letter saying we are no longer quite a few years ago I do covered. It is a giant mess, believe the food is secondand one that affects so many. ary to the hugs and greetSo, Christmas has come ings by those in attendance, and gone, and finally, after however Ben and Sally and many years, I do believe I see family and volunteers serve just a faint cut-back in the a hearty breakfast. The scroll spending of excessive gifts, that is brought out each year in our family. I thought our for folks to sign is getting three great grandsons, ages THIS & THAT yellowed with age and a bit eight, six and four had all Joyce Emry shop-worn, but all part of the of the Legos that had been “program.” Their Christmas manufactured, but not so. card has definitely grown! More are out there and they got them. It was good to see Emma (Kuhlman) I’m certain they may have to build on who now makes her home in Wenatchee, another room to house the Legos. But near family. And it’s always nice to they are an educational addition to all see Jennie Luhn, former administrator the video “stuff” and make a child think at the Tonasket Nursing Home and Iris while assembling the many things pos- (Preston) and oh! so many others. A spe-

Give us your old phones! Submitted by Daralyn Hollenbeck President, NCW Blue Star Mothers

If Santa updated your old cell phone this Christmas, do something good with your old one! We collect old cell phones as a way to raise funds that assist military families living in North Central Washington during times of duress created by their child’s service for our country. As a non-profit 501(c)3 organization, we receive 50 cents to $30 per phone, up to $150 for a recycled Smartphone! Working phones will be offered to Active Duty families in need of cell phone communication. Batteries can

Best wishes in the New Year Submitted by Lyle Anderson Tonasket Eagles #3002

We hope that everyone had a great New Year and that this year brings you all happiness. Thank you to all of the volunteers that have helped here at the club over the last year. With your help we have had many great events and we are sure that this year will bring the same. So remember if you have the time, the club can always

BLUE STAR MOTHERS remain inside the phone but we encourage you to remove your SIM card. Call us at the number below for a donation receipt. In Omak you can drop your phones off at KOMW Radio Station 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday or at Discount Vacuum & Sewing. In Tonasket drop them off at the Legacy Memorial site office between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday or at Lee Franks. In Oroville drop them off at the Oroville Pharmacy. We collect phones throughout the year so remember the military anytime you upgrade or replace your cell

TONASKET EAGLES use your help. This Friday, Jan. 3 at 7 p.m. don’t forget to get in here and try your hand at winning one of the bingo jackpots. At 5:30 p.m. the kitchen will be open to get one of those great hamburgers and fries before bingo starts up. This Saturday, Jan. 4 at 9 p.m. will be karaoke with Linda. From 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. There will be breakfast on Sunday, Jan. 5 and then at 1

cial surprise was seeing Roxy (Hylton) (our great niece) and her little girl and learning of the forth coming birth of twins. We braved the snow and ice and went to the Midnight Madness sale prior to Christmas. I had warned folks about not wearing their shoe treads and when I reached to where I was sure my two sets were, they weren’t. So, more searching. Mike Buckmiller has once again been at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center for evaluation and/or treatment. Thoughts and prayers should be directed to Mike. Vivian Emry received greetings and best wishes from family and friends, December 24th, honoring her 91st birthday. Had a chat with Bob Irwin, at the grocery. Shortly he will reach his 94th birthdate. To those who remember Dixie (Elgin) LeMay and wonder where she is. She now resides in Hawaii, near family, has severe memory problems, according to

phones! Blue Star Mothers is a nonprofit, non-political organization without religious affiliation. The military represents all aspects of America and so does our chapter. We meet on the third Wednesday of every month at 6:30 p.m. rotating between Oroville, Tonasket, and Omak. In January we will meet at The Bread Line in Omak. Bring your old cell phones to the meeting, pick up your 2014 Hometown Soldier Calendar, and enjoy meeting others who have children serving in the Armed Forces. Youíre a special group of parents! <Ital>> Not every soldier leaves children or spouses at home. But all of them have mothers... Join us. Contact us at 485-2906 or www.facebook.com/ ncw.blue.star.mothers p.m. we will have our weekly pinochle tourney. Our pinochle results from last Sunday are as follows. First place went to Carol Ross and Rob Wallace and second place was taken by Joanne Michels and Gladys Fifer. Low Score got snatched up by Carrol Weber and Ted Paris. The last pinochle of the day was by Carol Ross and Rob Wallace. Paul Gentry’s memorial service will be held at the Oroville American Legion on Saturday, Jan. 4 at 1 p.m. We wish all a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State.

her sister, Sally. A pile-up of 40 cars was reported just outside of Cleveland. So many folks forget to slow down when road conditions are hazardous and that can happen here as well as other places. For the first time in my memory, the parking lots at Princes Center parking lot was totally empty. Usually there is a lone car there but not this Christmas Day. This is the season of colds, flu and all the other many kinds of (stuff) and Alka Seltzer maintains they can cure it all In the ’40’s Alka Seltzer was 25 cents, came in a glass cylinder that the tablets just fit into (and when the bottle was empty they made a wonderful container for our crochet hooks. I still have one). And now, for sure they are much more than 25 cents and they don’t come in a re-usable bottle, but they’re still “great stuff.” according to the manufacturer. Does your family ever play the old game of PIT? What a noisy, fun time can be had, while everyone is yelling at the same time, “corner on wheat,’ (or rye, corn etc). My first introduction to the game was in 1947, in Nebraska, with a bunch of young Emry’s when we were first married. A quaint way of getting to know each other, to say the least. We were missing part of the Haney clan, that being their daughter Janae and her husband David, but they have now joined the group and more games and food will be had. Work and “taking

turns with in-laws makes some changes in family celebrations, but it’s the way to keep harmony within families. Word has been received that Jack Beeman, Tonasket, has passed away. He was a lengthy survivor, 21 years, of a heart transplant. Condolences go out to the family and friends he left behind. When I was a little girl (a long time ago) I thought Shirley Temple was just about the most beautiful person I’d ever seen and I was fortunate enough that I got to see some of her movies. But most of all I remember the wonderful paper dolls that I entertained myself with, hours on end. To obtain a book of paper dolls you needed to save a bunch of the black bands that came on Palmolive bar soap, to the company and in return you’d receive the paper dolls. I had everyone in the neighborhood saving those bands, so I could get mine. Letters to the Editor are fine, but they can be too long, and I know from the experience of hearing many comments, through the years of being associated with the newspaper business, folks start out reading and often say, “that’s too long to finish reading” and stop. It shouldn’t take so many words to get the point across. Gai Wisdom did it much quicker than Joseph Ensenberger!! Have a Happy New Year and keep well, at least until your insurance/ Medicare/ Medicaid or whatever, gets straightened out, if it ever does!

EYECARE

DENTISTRY

Dr. Robert Nau, D.D.S., F.A.G.D., LLC

Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry Your Complete Eyecare Centre

COTTONWOOD PLAZA PROFESSIONAL CENTRE

6511 Main St., Unit 3, Osoyoos

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

WATERFRONT

OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

eyecare centre

for Children and Adults. New patients Welcome!

Hours: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

Complete eye exam including Digital Retina Scan $110 Canadian.

232 2nd Ave., N. Wed. - Thurs. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-422-4881

w Professional Eye Examinations w Contact Lenses w Low Vision Service 1-250-495-2020 1-877-495-5665

HEALTH CARE

FAMILY PRACTICE

Call us . . . Se Habla Español “Providing our patients with the highest quality health care and service in a friendly and caring atmosphere.”

By Oroville Gun Club

The Oroville Gun Club will be starting the Spokesman Review Telegraphic Shoot on Sunday,

OROVILLE GUN CLUB Jan. 5 at 1 p.m. with practice on Saturday, Jan. 4 at 1 p.m. Come on out and start trap shooting again – great fun for

When Opportunity Knocks, Open The Door FINANCIAL FOCUS

Sandra Rasmussen Financial Advisor

32 N Main St. Suite A Omak, WA 98841 509-826-1638 www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC Reported by Edward Jones

If you’ve been around long-time investors, you’ll probably hear them say, ruefully, “If only I had gotten in on the ground floor of such-and-such computer or social media company, I’d be rich today.” That may be true — but is it really relevant to anyone? Do you have to be an early investor of a spectacular company to achieve investment success? Not really. Those early investors of the “next big thing” couldn’t have fully anticipated the tremendous results enjoyed by those companies. But these investors all had one thing in common: They were ready, willing and able to look for good opportunities. And that’s what you need to do, too. Of course, you may never snag the next big thing, but that’s not the point. If you’re going to be a successful investor, you need to be

diligent in your search for new opportunities. And these opportunities don’t need to be brand-new to the financial markets — they can just be new to you.

For example, when you look at your investment portfolio, do you see the same types of investments? If you own mostly aggressive growth stocks, you have the possibility of gains — but, at the same time, you do risk taking losses, from which it may take years to recover. On the other hand, if you’re “overloaded” with certificates of deposit (CDs) and Treasury bills, you may enjoy protection of principal but at the cost of growth potential, because these investments rarely offer much in the way of returns. In fact, they may not even keep up with inflation, which means that if you own too many of them, you will face purchasing-power risk. To avoid these problems, look for opportunities to broaden your holdings beyond just one or two asset classes.

than holding on to quality investment vehicles and waiting for the market to recover. But successful investors are often rewarded when they not only hold on to investments during declines but also increase their holdings by purchasing investments whose prices have fallen — or adding new shares to existing investments — thereby following the first rule of investing: Buy low. When the market rises again, these investors should see the value of their new investments, or the shares of their existing ones, increase in value. (Keep in mind, though, that, when investing in stocks, there are no guarantees; some stocks do lose value and may never recover.)

Instead of looking for that one great “hit” in the form of an early investment in a skyrocketing stock, you’re better off by seeking good opportunities in the form of new investments that can broaden your existing portfolio or by adding additional shares, at good prices, to your existing investments. These moves are less glitzy and glamorous than getting in on Here’s another way to take advantage of the ground floor of the next big thing – but, in opportunities: Don’t take a “time out” from the long run, they may make you look pretty investing. When markets are down, people’s smart indeed. fears drive them to sell investments whose prices have declined — thereby immediately This article was written by Edward Jones for use turning “paper” losses into real ones — rather by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000

OKANOGAN

HEALTH CARE

(509) 826-6191

A Branch of Wenatchee Valley Medical Center

Chemical Dependency

Healthcare Services

Developmental Disabilities (509) 826-8496

Psychiatric Services Drug Prevention Victim / Survivors’ Panel

In Tonasket & Oroville TONASKET

OROVILLE

509-486-2174

509-486-2174

(509) 826-5093

24 Hour Crisis Line

17 S. Western Ave. 1617 Main Street

(509) 826-6191

Toll Free

www.wvmedical.com

(866) 826-6191 www.okbhc.org

HEALTH CARE

HEALTH CARE

Family Health Centers

Centros de Salud Familiar

MEDICAL

716 First Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-5700 106 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-0114 525 W. Jay, Brewster 509-689-3455

DENTAL

1321 Main St., Oroville 509-476-4400 626 Second Ave. S., Okanogan 509-422-6705 101 6th, Brewster 509-689-3789 Toll Free: 800-660-2129

CLINIC

Physician-owned and patient-centered

Mental Health (509) 826-5600

Growing Healthcare Close to Home

Telegraphic shoot to begin soon

TONASKET

OMAK

(509) 826-6191

the whole family with divisions for youngsters to seniors. If you haven’t shot before come out and we will teach you. The telegraphic shoot runs for eight weeks – every Sunday at 1 p.m. with practices every Saturday at 1 p.m. See you at the Oroville Gun Club on County Hwy. 7.

FAMILY DENTISTRY

Emergency VA Clinic  Surgical Center  Rehabilitation (Oroville & Tonasket)  Obstetrical Services  Imaging  Full-Service Laboratory  Extended Care  Swing Bed Program  

NORTH VALLEY HOSPITAL DISTRICT 203 S. Western Ave., Tonasket Ph. 509-486-2151 www.nvhospital.org

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Call Charlene Helm 509-476-3602 Ext 3050

916 Koala • Omak, WA • wvmedical.com


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 2, 2014 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE â&#x20AC;˘ January 2, 2014

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb PUBLISHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discriminationâ&#x20AC;?. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate that is in violation of the law. To complain of discrimination call HUD at 1-800-6699777. The number for hearing impaired is 1-800-9279275

For Rent

For Rent

Health General

OROVILLE: QUIET AREA featuring 2 BR, 2 BA ground floor apt. Level entry home with walk-in closet. Relax & view your nice green yard from your covered back patio. Accepting applications. No smoking. No pets. $525/ month + $400 dep. Call 509223-3064 or 509-560-9043.

STUDIO APARTMENT, $410 per month; 1 bedroom, 1 bath apartment, $475 per month, great location in the heart of Oroville. 3 bedroom, 2 bath house with acreage, $910 per month. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121 TONASKET - 1 Bedroom $495. 2 Bedroom $595. Close to town. All appliances. Water/Sewer paid. 509-4861682 or 509-429-0873.

Announcements

OROVILLE DREAM LOT Prime Location. Panoramic Lake View. Off of Eastlake Drive. 1 acre. Public Utilities. Owner: 208-794-2447

On Call CMA Oroville & Tonasket Is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen. Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

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COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

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Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

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Crosswords

DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

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7. Charity dependent

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10. Contemptible one

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ANSWERS

Thompson Bees in Oroville is taking applications for a Mechanic with interest in Tow Truck Driving and Tire Sales and service.

Houses For Sale

8

Help Wanted

Across

53. Bullhorn 55. Having the most froth

11. Actor Arnold 12. Dress 13. Having snout beetles 14. Number next to a plus sign 21. Male hormone 25. Having natural talent 27. Female sibling 28. Antares, for one 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolutely!â&#x20AC;? 32. Fill 34. ___ Zeppelin 36. ___ Jones, of film fame 37. Coming close 38. To such an extent 40. Precambrian time 41. Comeback

1. Carried luggage or supplies

57. Temper, as metal

9. Chief Pontiac, e.g.

58. Mark

15. Veto

59. In a wise manner

45. Hit golf ball lightly toward hole on green

16. Blotto

60. Blushed

47. Before the due date

We are dedicated to our employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job satisfaction and take pride in providing a place to work that encourages growth, teamwork, communication and positive employee/supervisor relationships. FHC is a not for profit Community Health Center dedicated to providing quality health care regardless of ability to pay. EVERYONE is welcome. We have the following opportunities available: Okanogan: MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time MA-R, MA-C, LPN or CNA Full time Registered Dietitian Full time. English/Spanish bilingual preferred. Promotor(a) 4 Per Diem positions; Okanogan & BrewsterEnglish/Spanish bilingual required Brewster (Indian Ave): MA-R, MA-C or LPN 2 positions. Full time Brewster (Jay Ave.): Patient Accounts Rep. Full time Enrollment Assistance Specialist 2 positions. Full time/Temp. English/Spanish bilingual required Tonasket: Nurse Case Manager (must be an RN)0.80 FTE/32 hours per week MA-R, MA-C, or LPN 1 per diem positions LPN, MA-C or MA-R 0.80 FTE/32 hours per week See www.myfamilyhealth.org for job descriptions. Submit cover letter and resume or application to FHC, c/o Human Resources, PO Box 1340, Okanogan, WA 98840 or email: HR@myfamilyhealth.org. Open until filled. FHC is an EEO Employer.

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50. Breakfast, lunch or dinner

17. Potherb leaves 18. Stifled, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;downâ&#x20AC;?

42. Baked buckwheat dishes

HAVE YOU HEARD? WE ARE EXPANDING AND ARE HIRING ADDITIONAL POSITIONS! JOIN US AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE!

Down

51. Beach, basically 52. Locale

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54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Malcolm Xâ&#x20AC;? director

22. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Mariaâ&#x20AC;?

2. Egg-producing organs

56. ___ Squad, 1960s TV show

23. Afflict

3. Noisy partier

www.gazette-tribune.com 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-866-773-7818 gtads@gazette-tribune.com

We have a diverse business where many different skills are useful and needed. If you are interested, stop by or send a resume to 610 Hwy 97 in Oroville or call Mike at 509.476.3948

Statewides STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF DEC. 30, 2013 This newspaper participates in a statewide classified ad program sponsored by the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, a statewide association of weekly newspapers. The program allows classified advertisers to submit ads for publication in participating weeklies throughout the state in compliance with the following rules. You may submit an ad for the statewide program through this newspaper or in person to the WNPA office. The rate is $255 for up to 25 words, plus $10 per word over 25 words. WNPA reserves the right to edit all ad copy submitted and to refuse to accept any ad submitted for the statewide program. WNPA, therefore, does not guarantee that every ad will be run in every newspaper. WNPA will, on request, for a fee of $40, provide information on which newspapers run a particular ad within a 30 day period. Substantive typographical error (wrong address, telephone number, name or price) will result in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;make goodâ&#x20AC;?, in which a corrected ad will be run the following week. WNPA incurs no other liability for errors in publication. EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 6343838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS OWNER/OPERATOR -- Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. $2500 Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-on Bonus! Forward Air 888-652-5611 DRIVERS --Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great time to change! Haney Truck Line seeks top-quality, professional truck drivers for regional work! Earn up to .375 cents/mile. CDL A required. 1-888414-4467. Apply online: www.gohaney.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www.paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

Public Notices Notice of Special Election Okanogan County, State of Washington Tuesday, February 11, 2014 A Special Election will be held in the below mentioned districts for the purpose of submitting to the voters for their approval or rejection the following. Omak School District No. 19, Special Election - Proposition 1 School and Operations Levy Bridgeport School District No. 75, Special Election - Proposition 1 Bonds to Construct an Elementary School Addition Okanogan School District No. 105, Special Election - Proposition 1 Replacement Technology Levy Brewster School District No 111-203J, Special Election -Proposition 1 Replacement of Expiring Maintenance and Operation Levy Pateros School District No 122-70J, Special Election - Proposition 1 Replacement Maintenance and Operation Levy Lake Chelan School District No. 129 Replacement Maintenance and Operation Levy Tonasket School District No 404, Special Election - Proposition 1 Replacement Maintenance and Operation Levy Tonasket School District No 404, Special Election - Proposition 2 Bonds to Expand and Improve School Facilities Oroville School District No. 410, Special Election - Proposition 1 Replacement Maintenance and Operation Levy Oroville School District No. 410, Special Election - Proposition 2

Public Notices Dissolution of Directorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Districts The registration deadline for online registrations, mail-in registrations and transfers is January 13, 2014. Any qualified elector who is not registered to vote in the State of Washington may register to vote in person at the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office up to and including February 3, 2014. You can register or obtain registration forms at the Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, on line at www.vote.wa.gov, and Department of Licensing. The Okanogan County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, will be open so voters may obtain replacement ballots, drop off voted ballots, obtain provisional ballots, and use the Accessible Voting Units, at the following times. Monday - Friday 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM January 24 - February 10, 2014 On Election Day only, February 11, 2014, 9:00 AM - 8:00 PM. Drop box locations around the county for the February Election. Tonasket - Tonasket City Hall/Library Complex, 209 S Whitcomb Ave, Tonasket Omak - Next to Police Station, 8 N Ash, Omak Pateros -180 Pateros Mall in parking lot, Pateros Drop boxes will close at 8:00PM on Election Day Voters needing additional information or assistance with voter registration forms or voting may call (509) 422-7240. Voters unable to use the mail-in ballot may use the Accessible Voting Unit available at the County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office. Ballots require sufficient first class postage (before Jan 26, 2014 - .46 cents, after Jan 26, 2014 - .49 cents) and must be postmarked by the day of the election. Check with your local Post Office for deadlines to have your ballot postmarked properly. For additional information on the election or regarding voter registration. vote.wa.gov/okanogan myvote.wa.gov Local newspaper, radio, and TV Meetings of the Okanogan County Canvassing Board are open, public meetings and shall be continued until the activities for which the following meetings are held have been completed. Canvass Board meetings are held in the Okanogan County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, 149 3rd Ave N, Room 104, at the County Courthouse, in Okanogan. Wednesday, February 19, 2014 at 11:00 AM to determine the status of any provisional or challenged ballots Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM to canvass the votes cast and certify the election This notice is in accordance with RCW 29A.52. Dated at Okanogan, Washington this 27th day of December, 2013. Laurie Thomas, Okanogan County Auditor and Ex-Officio Supervisor of Elections /s/Mila M Jury By Mila M Jury, Chief Deputy and Certified Election Administrator Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on January 2, 2014. #535793 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR OKANOGAN COUNTY WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. RONALD CRAMER and SHANNON CRAMER, husband and wife, Defendants. No. 13-2-00457-9 SUMMONS TO: THE DEFENDANTS A lawsuit has been started against you in the Superior Court of Okanogan County by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, its successors in interest and/or assigns, plaintiff. Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. In order to defend against this lawsuit, you must respond to the Complaint in this action by stating your defense in writing and serving a copy upon the undersigned attorney for the plaintiff within 20 days after service of this summons and complaint within the State of Washington or 60 days if service is effected by personal service outside the State of Washington or by publication, or a default judgment will be entered against you without notice. A default judgment is one where plaintiff is entitled to what it asks for because you have not responded. If you serve a Notice of Appearance on the undersigned attorney, you are entitled to notice before a default judgment may be entered. If you wish to seek the advice of an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be served on time. This Summons is issued pursuant to Rule 4 of the Superior Court Civil Rules of the State of Washington. DATED this 27th day of August, 2013. RCO LEGAL, P.S. By /s/ Kathleen A. Allen Kathleen A. Allen WSBA# 19655 Attorneys for Plaintiff Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette on December 12, 19, 26, 2013 and January 2, 9, 16, 2014. #532329

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JANUARY 2, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

Highland Wonders Educational Series:

The Squirrel World of the Pacific Northwest are barking at in the woods, or maybe annoyed with them at our bird feeder? One of the things I like the most about squirrels is they are a relatively easy entry into the world of wildlife biology and wildlife watching, no matter where people live in our region.” David Moskowitz is a professional wildlife tracker, photographer, and outdoor educator. He is the author of two books, “Wildlife of the Pacific Northwest” and “Wolves in the Land of Salmon.” He has contributed his technical expertise to a wide variety of wildlife studies regionally and in the Canadian and U.S. Rocky mountains, focusing on using tracking and other non-invasive methods to study wildlife ecology and promote conservation. He helped establish the Cascade Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project, a citizen science effort to search for and monitor rare and sensitive wildlife in the Cascades and other Northwest wildlands. David’s extensive experience as an outdoor educator includes training mountaineering instructors for Outward Bound, leading wilderness expeditions throughout the western United States and in Alaska, teaching natural history seminars, and as the lead instructor for wildlife tracking programs at Wilderness Awareness School. David holds a bach-

Submitted by Julie Ashmore Okanogan Highlands Alliance

The Pacific Northwest is home to one of the most diverse collections of squirrel species anywhere in the world, from the tall trees of the coastal rainforest, to the alpine tundra of the high Cascades, to the deserts of the Columbia Basin. Right up there with birds, squirrels are one of the most watchable types of wildlife in our region and the specific adaptations and behavior of our tree squirrels, ground squirrels, flying squirrels, marmots, and chipmunks provide a window into one of the most successful families of rodents in the world. On Friday, January 10, join David Moskowitz, author and photographer of “Wildlife of the Pacific Northwest” for an evening of engaging photography, fun stories from the field, and more information than you ever imagined about these furry and noisy neighbors. “So much of our wildlife works hard to disappear into the landscape. However, generally being active by day -- and often quite noisy and living in very conspicuous places -- squirrels stand out,” says Moskowitz. “But how often do we actually take the time to really observe them, beyond being curious about what they

David Moskowitz/submitted photo

S. Columbianus, as photographed by David Moskowitz. Moskowtiz, a wildlife tracker and photographer, will be presenting about squirrel species at the Community Cultural Center of Tonasket on Jan. 10. tion program. Contact David directly to inquire about his photography, classes and workshops or hosting an evaluation in your region. The Highland Wonders indoor educational series brings the natural history of

elor’s degree in environmental studies and outdoor education from Prescott College. David is a certified Track and Sign Specialist through Cybertracker Conservation, as well as an evaluator for this rigorous professional certifica-

the Okanogan Highlands and surrounding areas to Tonasket from November through May (skipping December). OHA’s Education Program is designed to build the capacity of the community to steward natural habitats and resources, by helping to develop an informed and empowered population. Okanogan Highlands Alliance is a non-profit that works to educate the public on watershed issues. Highland Wonders presentations are offered free of charge to the community, and donations are welcome. The indoor educational series is offered by OHA, at the Community Cultural Center, the “CCC,” of Tonasket (411 S Western Avenue, Tonasket, WA). The January 10 presentation begins at 6:30 p.m. with desserts, tea and coffee; the dinner benefiting the CCC begins at 5:00 p.m. (the meal is $7 for CCC members or $8 for nonmembers; a dessert and one beverage is included for dinner guests). Please note that in order to accommodate the holiday season, the January event is not on the first Friday of the month, although most Highland Wonders events are. Details about Highland Wonders are provided on OHA’s website: www.okanoganhighlands.org/education/hw. For more information, email julie@okanoganhighlands. org or call 509-433-7893.

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Page A8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | January 2, 2014

SPORTS

Tonasket Tourney win sets stage for big CTL tests get past wrestlers Tigers Liberty Bell, LR 2nd at Royal City

said. “They need to just enjoy this. We have six seniors; I want them to just enjoy playing basketball and not worry about other stuff.” After Tonasket’s big run, Liberty Bell got no closer than six points the rest of the way, even with Pedregon’s lineup shuffling continuing to the final buzzer. Eight of the nine Tigers reached the scoring column, led by Dyllan Gage with 17 points. Ethan Bensing and Michael Orozco each added eight with Trevor Terris chipping in with seven. The Tigers (6-2) return to Caribou Trail League play on Friday at Brewster and Saturday at home against Cashmere. “It gets serious in a hurry,” Pedregon said. “I say this in te most respectful way, but for us, our goal is to be able to compete at the end of February for something. We have a long ways to go, but the exciting part is coming back Monday, hitting the gym and getting back to work.”

By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Aitcheson, Rawley again with big days as 10 Tigers medal By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

ROYAL CITY - Tonasket’s wrestling team finished 2013 with a flourish, earning a second place finish at the Royal City Invitational on Saturday, Dec. 28, as 10 Tigers earned tournament medals. In a tournament filled with state medalists and powerful programs, Tonasket’s Collin Aticheson and John Rawley each earned a spot atop the medal stand in their respective weight classes. Castle Rock (180 points) won the team title, with the Tigers (150) edging Warden (145) for the runner-up spot. They were followed by Granger (134), Connell (127), Royal (120), Chewelan (119), Chelan (114), Cashmere (109), Liberty Bell (91), Goldendale (89), Othello (85), Reardan (69), Wahluke (40) and Riverside (22). Though not all teams were at full strength, three of those Othello (2A), Granger (1A) and Liberty Bell (2B) won team state championships last season. That made for some stiff competition in a number of brackets. Aitcheson (120 pounds) had two wrestlers - Ricky Almaguer (Granger) and Alec Lauriano (Othello) - that were-top ranked in 1A and 2A, respectively, by the Washington Wrestling Report. Aitcheson, ranked second in 1A, knocked off Almaguer 6-2 in the semifinals and defeated Lauriano 7-3 in the championship match. Rawley (195) faced off with Connell’s Greg Heinen, the topranked 1A wrestler and a defending state runner-up. Rawley, who shot up in the rankings to no. 2 after his medal-winning performance at Tri-State last week, edged Heinen 5-2 to claim the title on his 18th birthday. With 16-man brackets, the tournament awarded medals to the top six in each weight. Fourth-place finishers for the Tigers (losing one match on the day) included Vance Frazier (106), Dyllan “Peaches” Walton (132), Austin Knowlton (170) and Chad Edwards (285). Placing fifth were Trevor Peterson 9126) and Frank Holfeltz (182), with Rade Pilkinton (112) and Dallas Tyus (160) each taking sixth. Others that won at least one match were Tim Frazier (138), Eithan Knowlton (145), Caleb Lofthus (152) and Devin Walton (113). The Tigers travel to the Warden Invitational on Saturday, Jan. 4, at 10:00 a.m., while some JV wrestlers will travel to Oroville’s NOHI, also on Saturday.

Hornet girls are ‘money’ at the line By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

KETTLE FALLS - Led by Lily Hilderbrand and Marissa Garcia, Oroville’s girls basketball team scored 21 points from the free throw line on Saturday, Dec. 28, to key a 53-44 non-conference victory at Kettle Falls. Hilderbrand was 7-of-11 at the line and Garcia hit all six of her attempts as the Hornets were able to use the consequences of a physical contest to their advantage. Trailing 11-9 after the first quarter, Oroville went on a 17-3 run to take a 26-14 lead at the half, with six different players scoring in the outburst. The Hornets hit 11-of-12 free throws in the fourth quarter to maintain their lead. Mikayla Scott and Brittany Jewett each scored 12 points to pace the Oroville (4-3) scoring attack, with Hilderbrand adding 11 and Meagan Moralez 10. The Hornets next play at Pateros on Tuesday, Jan. 7, and host Kittitas Jan. 14 for their first home game since Dec. 13.

TONASKET - It wasn’t their best basketball of the season, but it got the job done At least for now. Tonasket won its home Christmas tournament, pulling away from Liberty Bell in the second half of Saturday’s championship game for a 53-43 victory. After a disjointed first half that saw Liberty Bell lead 22-21 at the break, the Tigers looked a lot more like themselves during an eight minute, 16-2 run in the third and fourth quarters that gave them a 39-28 lead. “The guys responded well and came out in the second half and settled down and did a better job,” said Tonasket coach Agustin Pedregon. “We get into some sluggish thing on offense and don’t score and it affects our defense. It’s a funny group because sometimes we can light it up on defense and in transition. But another night if our half court offense doesn’t got it starts to affect our defense. “Overall they were able to pull out a couple of wins when it could have gone the other way.” Pedregon used a number of unusual lineups throughout the game - partly go give the guys on the bench more game experience, and partly to get his team focused. “Every time you play the nonleague (opponents) you have to work on something, especially when you see them twice,” Pedregon said of his mix-andmatch combinations. “Especially when you are working on scenarios you hope to see down the stretch. “The other reason, we were out

Brent Baker/staff photo

Tonasket’s Roberto Juarez (20) defends a baseline drive by Liberty Bell’s Connor Cooley during Saturday’s Tonasket Christmas Tournament championship game. The Tigers held off the Mountain Lions, 53-43. of character as far as our demeanor. We let things outside of the sideline and baseline get to us and we stopped playing basketball in the first half. I don’t know what that was, but it wasn’t basketball.”

There was also some chippy play between the two teams that didn’t sit well. “We have to battle containing our temper and just concentrate on playing basketball,” Pedregon

Tonasket 53, Lake Roosevelt 50 TONASKET - The Tigers struggled to get past a Raiders team that they beat by 24 points just a few weeks ago. Tonasket never trailed after the first quarter but could not put away Lake Roosevelt, which stayed in the game thanks to a 29-point performance by Chance Garvin. Leading by three points, Trevor Terris drilled a buzzer-beating 3-pointer at the end of the third quarter to give Tonasket a 37-31 lead. And after LR closed to within one point late in the game, Derek Sund hit a triple with 45 seconds left to put the Tigers up by four. Tonasket hit enough at the free throw line in the final seconds to maintain their lead. Terris scored a team-high 15 points, Sund added 13 and Gage had 10 to lead the Tigers.

Tonasket girls win tournament consolation Tonasket (3-5) travels to defending state champion and top-ranked Brewster on Friday, then hosts Cashmere on Saturday. “It’s back to the more intense presses and everything else,” Schertenleib said. “But I was proud of how they played today.”

By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - Eight Tigers scored in Saturday’s Tonasket Christmas Tournament consolation final as Tonasket raced past Liberty Bell, 45-14 “Our basketball mentality came back,” said Tonasket coach Stephanie Schertenleib, who said her team hadn’t started the previous night’s first round game with the right mindset. “It’s hard to wrap your mind around getting back into a basketball mentality and review those things. You can’t cover all that stuff you do at practice, so you go back to what you know. “We played a lot better tonight.” The Tigers shut out the Mountain Lions in the second quarter, using a 14-point run to lead 26-7 at the half. Carrisa Frazier ignited the Tonasket offense in the first quarter with six straight points to snap a 4-4 tie. “She really has improved,” Schertenleib said. “She’s getting more confident and is finding her shot more easily. It’s become instinctive - I catch, I’m in rhythm, I’m open, I’m going to take a good quality shot.” Baylie Tyus and Kathryn

Brent Baker/staff photo

Rose Walts fends off a Liberty Bell defender during Tonasket’s 45-14 victory over the Mountain Lions on Saturday, Dec. 28. Cleman shared scoring honors with eight points apiece, with Jenny Bello adding seven.

Lake Roosevelt defeated the Okanogan JV team to win the tourney title.

Lake Roosevelt 47, Tonasket 35 TONASKET - The Tigers played a solid second half, outscoring Lake Roosevelt 27-23, but it wasn’t enough to overcome the Raiders’ 20-2 run over the first 12 minutes of the game. “I know I gave my group a pretty long break,” Schertenleib said. “It’s hard to give them that many days with just one practice and we had a couple of girls not even make that. It was a week off for some of them. “We didn’t play well in the first half at all.” The Tigers played even with LR in the third quarter, and were able to force a Raider time out after Kathryn Cleman, Rose Walts and Baylie Tyus hit three straight shots to cut the deficit to 37-26. Tonasket had a couple of chances to cut the deficit to 10 or less but couldn’t convert. Tyus and Frazier led the Tigers with eight points apiece, with Kylie Dellinger adding six.

Three Hornets reach medal round Host NOHI on Saturday By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

COULEE DAM - Jordan Smith, Taylor Robinson and Eddie Ocampo each advanced to the medal rounds of the Lake Roosevelt PowerHouse Wrestling Tournament on Saturday, Dec. 28. Robinson (182 pounds)

reached the championship bout 12-3 to WCK’s Joe Peterson. but suffered his first defeat of “Jordan fought well down to the year, 7-3 to Nick the last second in a very Anderson of Wilburtough semifinal bout,” Creston/Keller in the Ricevuto said. finals. Smith pinned each of “It was a fair bathis other foes on the tle,” said Oroville day. coach Chuck Ricevuto. Ocampo reached the “Taylor (gave) up a five third place match and point move right off the lost in the final seconds whistle that cost him Taylor Robinson to Okanogan’s Austin the bout.” Warren to finish fourth, Smith (120), the Hornets’ lone just out of the medals. returning state qualifier from last Ricevuto also noted that John year, finished third after losing Marquiss (113) earned his first

Oroville falls on road By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

KETTLE FALLS - Oroville’s boys basketball fell behind soon after the opening tip and never recovered while losing 51-43 at Kettle Falls on Saturday, Dec. 28. Playing shorthanded with a couple of players missing over Christmas break, the Hornets managed to stay in the game despite allowing the Bulldogs to shoot 60 percent from the

floor. Dustin Nigg and Nathan Hugus had solid offensive games, with Nigg scoring 15 points on 6-of9 shooting from the floor and Hugus scoring 12 (4-of-6, plus 4-of-5 at the free throw line). Hugus also pulled down six rebounds to lead the team. The Hornets trailed 25-17 at halftime. Oroville (2-5) plays at Pateros on Tuesday, Jan. 7, and next plays at home on Saturday, Jan. 11.

career victory over Michael Kraft of Rainier. The Hornets host their annual North Okanogan Holiday Invitational on Saturday, Jan. 4, which normally occurs the weekend before Christmas. The tournament, starting at 10:00 a.m., includes Okanogan, Brewster, Wi l b u r- C r e s t i o n / K e l l e r, Republic/Curlew, Kettle Falls, Tonasket’s JV and Colville’s JV. “Because we had to give up our normal December date,” Ricevuto said, “we lost five teams that would normally attend.”

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STANDINGS & SCHEDULES Boys Basketball Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall

W L W L Brewster 3 0 6 2 Okanogan 2 0 9 0 Chelan 2 1 4 4 Omak 1 1 5 3 Cashmere 1 1 4 3 Tonasket 0 2 6 2 Quincy 0 2 4 3 Cascade 0 2 1 7

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B) League Overall

W L W L Lk Roosevelt 0 0 3 4 Liberty Bell 0 0 4 3 Oroville 0 0 2 5 Manson 0 0 0 6 Bridgeport 0 1 1 4

GIRLS Basketball Caribou Trail League (1A)

League Overall

W L W L Brewster 3 0 8 0 Okanogan 2 0 8 0 Cashmere 2 0 8 0 Cascade 1 1 7 1 Chelan 1 2 5 4 Omak 0 2 5 3 Quincy 0 2 2 5 Tonasket 0 2 3 5

Cent. WA League No. Div. (2B) League Overall

W L W L Oroville 0 0 4 3 Manson 0 0 1 4 Lk Roosevelt 0 0 2 5 Liberty Bell 0 0 0 7 Bridgeport 0 1 0 5

Schedules Jan. 2-14

Friday, Jan. 3 BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Brewster, 4:30/6:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 4 BB (JV/Var) Cashmere at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Cashmere at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm WR - Oroville NOHI Tournament, 10:00 am WR - Tonasket at Warden Tourney, 10:00 am Tuesday, Jan. 7 BB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Pateros, 5:00/8:00 pm GB (JV/Var) - Oroville at Pateros, 3:30/6:30 pm BB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Tonasket at Omak, 4:30/6:00 pm Wednesday, Jan. 8 WR - Tonasket at Omak, 7:00 pm WR - Oroville at Kettle Falls, 6:00 pm Friday, Jan. 10 WR - Davenport/Tonasket JV at Oroville, 5:00 pm Saturday, Jan. 11 WR - Tonasket at Cascade Invitational, 10:00 am WR - Oroville at Mary Walker (Springdale), 10:00 am BB (JV/Var) - Kittitas at Oroville, 2:00/3:30 pm GB (Var/JV) - Kittitas at Oroville, 2:00/3:30 pm BB (JV/Var) - Cascade at Tonasket, 4:30/7:30 pm GB (JV/Var) - Cascade at Tonasket, 4:30/6:00 pm

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HOBBIT THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG THURS. FRI. JAN.2-3

ANCHORMAN 2

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. JAN 4-5-6-7, 9-10

GRUDGE MATCH OLIVER THEATRE

         Regular  Showtimes  

SAT.-SUN.-MON.-TUES. JAN 11-12-13-14 Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

December, 2013  Programme  

Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

WALKING WITH DINOSAURS

Sun. –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.     Dec.  15  –  16  –  17,  19    

                             Visit  Our  Website  

www.olivertheatre.ca

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Nov.  30,  Dec.  1  –  2  –  3,  5  -­  6     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

THURS. - FRI. JAN 16-17

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Fri. –  Sat.  –  Thurs.        Dec.  20  –  21,  26  

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

THE HOBBIT: Violence, frightening  scenes.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.  –  Sat.   Dec.  7  –  8  –  9  -­  10,  12  –  13  -­  14     One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  p.m.  

 

THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

161 min

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the     Sat.  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

PG13

Fri. –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.,  Wed.  –  Thurs.  –  Fri.   Dec.  27  –  28  –  29  -­  30,  Jan.  1  –  2  -­  3     One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  p.m.  

MARTIN FREEMAN, ANDY SERKIS, RICHARD ARMITAGE, IAN MCKELLEN, STEPHEN FRY, STEPHEN HUNTER, BRET MCKENZIE, GRAHAM MCTAVISH, JAMES NESBITT, LEE PACE, EVANGELINE LILLY, ORLANDO BLOOM

01-01 WED. *3:30,7:30 01-02 THURS. *3:30,7:30

The

MIRAGE THEATER Violence.

Subject to  Classification  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

47 RONIN

PG13

119min

12-31 TUES.*3:45,6:45 01-WED.*3:45, 6:45, 01-02 -THURS. *3:45, 6:45

FROZEN

PG

108min

STARRING VOICES OF KRISTEN BELL, INDINA MENZEL, JONATHAN GROFF, & JOSH GAD 12-31 - TUESDAY

*3:30, 01-01 - WEDNESDAY *3:30 01-02 - THURSDAY *3:30

CHECK OUT WWW.OMAKTHEATER.COM

COMING UP JANUARY 3RD THROUGH10TH. OR CHECK OUT METACRITIC FOR MOVIE REVIEWS AND NEW RELEASES Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.

 


January 2, 2014 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A9

SPORTS

A ‘Half-baked’ plan to reconfigure WIAA sports A two-part look at finding new ways to maintain competitive balance, enhance local rivalries and simplify post-season tournaments in Washington high school sports A couple of years ago, the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association made some noise about reconfiguring its classification system. Everything was supposedly on the table, including the potential scrapping of existing districts, setting up a seeded football playoff system, and/or changing the way students were counted when calculating school enrollment. There were a few tweaks that survived all the politicking: using freshman through junior classes (rather than sophomores through seniors) and HALF-BAKED deducting alternative school Brent Baker students (who for the most part are not eligible for interscholastic athletics) when calculating enrollment. Good changes, but not enough. Persistent issues still exist that require a more thorough rethinking beyond what a slow evolution can accomplish. The likelihood of this happening is rather slim. What amounts to a reboot of the whole system requires a lot of momentum from a supermajority of the WIAA’s member schools, and getting so many school districts and athletic personnel - all charged with defending the best interests of their own schools’ kids (which doesn’t always fit into the big picture) - to agree on anything so comprehensive is probably impossible, especially considering the athletic, economic and social diversity of the state. Still, there is a better way to do this. I’ve been around high school sports in multiple states almost constantly for a couple of decades, both as a reporter and as a parent. I’ve talked to uncounted coaches, athletic directors, parents and athletes about issues like competitive balance, travel, and the needs of the 99 percent of high school athletes that won’t be getting athletic scholarships to play in college. Most of that has been just casual conversation, not in “reporter” mode, but over the years it’s shaped my thinking in more ways than even I probably realize. Bottom line, it’s not about capturing that rare full ride to school, but making interscholastic athletics the most beneficial experience for the athletes, schools and those that support them. So here’s my stab at it.

Sheet1

was ranked sixth in the state in the Scoreczar.org computer rankings but didn’t get to prove it in the playoffs. • The debate never ceases on getting the right teams and athletes to state competition. One of my beefs is what happens to the smaller school events. Girls soccer has a four team 1B/2B tournament. State wrestling includes an eight-man 1B/2B bracket that is virtually ignored (other classifications are 16-man). The cross country 1B/2B field is half the size of the others. Some events at the 1B state track and field finals - which also have just eight spots, rather than 16 - aren’t even filled.

district must be determined by committee. The results are often inconsistent, such as the situation that kept Liberty Bell out of the state football playoffs. You also get a different number of allocations from year to year - last year CWL 2B football had three state spots, this year just two. In track and field, for example, you sometimes have three male qualifiers and four female qualifiers for the same event, or different numbers of qualifiers for sprints and distance events. A neighboring district, depending on how many schools it has in that classification, might have only one or two ... or both. From year to year it is difficult to know what to expect, and sometimes the allocation numbers aren’t even determined until halfway into the season. There is a lack of consistency from district to district, season to season and sport to sport. Districts also each have their own rules to determine their state qualifiers. In girls soccer last fall, the CTL determined that its top four teams would advance to a Bi-District playoff with District 7, with its fifth and sixth-place teams playing to determine a fifth entry. However, District 7 had a full four-team district playoff to determine which three teams to send to the Bi-District.

Average one-way travel for league road games Caribou Trail Brewster Cascade Cashmere Chelan Okanogan Omak Quincy Tonasket Avg Miles (1-way)

BRW x 80 70 26 28 32 94 55 55.0

CWL 2B Bridgeport Entiat Kittitas Liberty Bell Lk Roosevelt Manson Oroville Riverside Chr. White Swan Avg Miles (1-way)

BPT x 59 132 63 42 48 76 164 192 97.0

CASC CASH CHEL OKAN OMAK 80 70 26 28 32 x 11 55 108 112 11 x 44 97 101 55 44 x 53 57 108 97 53 x 4 112 101 57 4 x 55 44 27 115 119 135 124 81 28 24 79.4 70.1 49.0 61.9 64.1 ENT 59 x 93 49 98 27 116 122 151 89.4

KITT 132 93 x 153 117 119 200 42 70 115.8

LB 63 49 153 x 96 68 86 202 230 118.4

QCY 94 55 44 72 115 119 x 142 91.6

LR MNSN ORO 42 48 76 98 27 116 117 119 200 96 68 86 x 86 93 86 x 105 93 105 x 156 148 238 184 177 267 109.0 97.3 147.6

TON 55 135 124 81 28 24 142 x 84.1 RVCH 164 122 42 202 156 148 238 x 33 138.1

WS 192 151 70 230 184 177 267 33 x 163.0

Classification complications The state classification system, based on enrollment, includes six enrollment groups: 4A, 3A, 2A, 1A, 2B and 1B. Hypothetical League BPT BREW ENT LR LB MNSN OKAN OMAK ORO PAT Every two years, schools are moved Bridgeport x 14 59 42 63 48 32 36 76 11 up and down in classification (or left Brewster 14 x 45 54 49 34 28 32 72 7 where they are) based on changes in Entiat 59 45 x 98 49 27 72 76 116 38 their enrollment. Every four years, the Lk Roosevelt 42 54 98 x 96 86 56 51 93 60 Liberty Bell 63 49 49 96 x 68 40 46 86 42 dividing line between classifications is Manson 48 34 27 86 68 x 61 65 105 27 renegotiated, a lengthy process which is Okanogan 32 28 72 56 40 61 x 4 45 34 currently in its final stages for the next Omak 36 32 76 51 46 65 4 x 41 38 four-year cycle. Oroville 76 72 116 93 86 105 45 41 x 78 Coming up with an equitable system Pateros 11 7 38 60 42 27 34 38 78 x Tonasket 59 55 99 75 69 89 28 24 17 61 there is a never-ending debate. There Waterville 47 57 39 71 91 43 77 81 128 50 are basically two schools of thought: Avg Miles (1-way) 40.6 37.3 59.8 65.2 58.3 54.4 39.8 41.2 71.4 37.2 divide the classifications equally by number of schools; or by keeping the because everyone gets into the playoffs. post-season play. number of students of the larger schools Dumping the districts Yes, even the woebegone 0-20 basketball Competitively, there would be the proportionate to the number in smaller The districts and allocation system team (football is the exception to the cyclical ups and downs as there have schools. represent artificial barriers to setting rule, which we’ll deal with later). always been. Both philosophies have pitfalls, up geographically appropriate leagues, Financially, it would be a big boost to because in Washington there is not an Classifications - equal number of schools as well as to keeping the playoff system just about everyone involved. R egular season even distribution of school populations. Distribution of School Population consistent and predictable. Even with Waterville and Entiat State playoffs and meets are the goal It’s not Classification somethingcut-offs that can be conEstimated – equal number of schools per classification In my benevolent dictatorship, the involved, Oroville’s average road trip for of just about every team and individual, trolled, but the fact is that there about districts as permanent entities wouldn’t and in most sports districts and region- league games would drop from its cur1B 2B 1A 2A 3A 150 schools with a WIAA enrollment of 0-50 51-100 101-150151-200201-250251-300301-350351-400401-450451-500501-550551-600601-650651-700701-750751-800801-850851-900901-950 exist. And the 4A/3A/2A classification rent1 147 miles down to 71 - less than als are the path to get there. But most Page 33 49 26 24 22 7 16 11 8 7 8 3 10 12 5 7 5 11 8 half. Other CWL teams would see simiblood, sweat and tears are shed durlar reduction in travel: Liberty Bell (118 ing those 10 or so weeks of the regular Using preliminary WIAA 2014-16 numbers Distribution of School Population miles per trip to 58); Bridgeport (97 to season. 41); Manson (97 to 54); Lake Roosevelt One thing some small school leagues 0-50 51-100 101-150 (109 to 65). in the eastern part of the state lack that 151-200 201-250 251-300 60 There’s big drops in travel for the 301-350 351-400 401-450 the larger westside leagues have are true 451-500 501-550 551-600 north end CTL teams that might move intracounty rivalries. The leagues are 50 601-650 651-700 701-750 to a more compact league: Tonasket (84 so spread out, and most fans other than 751-800 801-850 851-900 miles per trip to 57); Omak (64 to 41); the most devoted parents aren’t going 40 901-950 951-1000 1001-1050 Okanogan (61 to 39); Brewster (55 to to make 4-6 hour road trips throughout 1051-1100 1101-1150 1151-1200 30 37). the season. 1201-1250 1251-1300 1301-1350 1351-1400 1401-1450 1451-1500 Transportation costs go down; with Many leagues might stay as they are 20 1501-1550 1551-1600 1601-1650 shorter transportation times, kids miss if given the choice. But for the sake of 1651-1700 1701-1750 1751-1800 less time in class; and with more road argument, let’s look at the possibility of 1801-1850 1851-plus 10 games closer to home, it’s likely gate a county or regional league in our part receipts improve. of the state. 0 A lot more visiting fans (and maybe This currently-fictional NCW even home fans) will attend an Orovilleleague could consist of schools such as Tonasket league game than Oroville vs. Bridgeport, Brewster, Lake Roosevelt, 250 or less; there are approximately that system would be in play only for sports White Swan or Tonasket vs. Cascade. Liberty Bell, Manson (given history and same number of schools in the 250-1250 in which the vast majority of schools in Without artificial district barriers, a a lack of a better option), Okanogan, student range. all classes participate. school like Republic could be included Omak, Oroville and Tonasket all 2B Thus the challenge. If, say, the state Without the districts, the current in such a league. Or Brewster, as it and 1A schools and perhaps even divides its schools into six classifications allocation system disappears and leagues include borderline 1B schools like has historically done, may seek out of about 64 schools each, you can get a can be formed as they so choose in the tougher competition and head south to Pateros, Entiat and Waterville in nonsituation where the largest school in a absence of artificial barriers ... and even join with larger schools. Or decide to football sports. classification is three times the size of Page 36 across classifications, if so desired. play as an independent, which creates The idea is to keep it local and keep it the smallest such school. There are a few of those leagues all sorts of headaches in the current competitive. If you limit the largest member of a already - the Northwest Conference With that many schools, splitting into system but wouldn’t have post-season classification to being, say, double the ranges from 1A to 3A, for example - but divisions is almost a necessity - north implications in the Half-baked version size of the smallest, you can end up with this just adds to an already convoluted of the WIAA. and south, big school and small school, 40 schools in one class and 90 in anothplayoff qualification set-up. whichever. The goal of playing for a er. And that matters because schools But in this remake, allocations and Next week: different scenarios for runleague championship remains the same in more crowded classifications end up class-specific leagues aren’t needed ning post-season tournaments. as it’s always been. It just doesn’t affect with a much more challenging path to qualifying for a state tournament. And while that’s where a lot of the talk and negotiations have centered in recent months (and won’t be going away any time soon), nearly all the real issues are complicated by the existence of permanent WIAA districts.

Symptoms Much of what ails the current system has reared its head on several occasions this year, and close to home here in the North Okanogan. Some examples: • Oroville’s Central Washington 2B League schedules feature away games that average 148 miles. The football team played at Kittitas (200 miles) last fall; the basketball teams will travel to White Swan (267 miles) in January. • At least those trips are on weekends. Allocation blues All WIAA member schools are also The Oroville volleyball team played a members of one of nine districts, a map first round district playoff game on a of which (http://wiaa.com/subcontent. weeknight in White Swan. What should aspx?SecID=379) looks like any gerryhave been a big deal for the school was a non-event for most, as the team had to mandered political map. Both Tonasket and Oroville are part leave Thursday morning and returned of District 6, which includes all eight at something like 3 a.m. Friday. Only a handful of parents were able to make the Class 1A Caribou Trail League schools. In Class 2B it includes the six northerntrip. That’s two days of school (physical most CWL schools and in 1B includes absence on Thursday, abject fatigue and mental uselessness on Friday) - not for a 11 more CWL schools. It also includes state tournament experience, but for one five of the six Big 9 3A/4A league schools. match in an opponents’ gym. Leagues are formed with like-class • Tonasket’s travel isn’t quite as bad, schools within their own district, and in averaging 84 miles per road trip. The some cases combine with another disfootball team played Caribou Trail trict that may not have a lot of schools League road games back-to-back weeks in a particular classification (hence at Cascade (135 miles) and Cashmere Sheet1 District 5’s White (124 miles). 2B Football Allocations to State Tournament Swan and Riverside • On top of the District(s) 2012 2013 Teams in Dist. Christian ending up distance issue, there 1&2 2 3 7 in the CWL). are vast differences 3 no teams x Playoff allocathe socio-economic 4 6 6 15 tions - the number 5&6 3 2 7 base of the various 7&9 5 5 12 of entries each schools that affects 8 no teams x league is given into competitive balthe eight or 16-team ance. Drive through playoff brackets Leavenworth, are meted out to each district. Or, in Cashmere and Chelan, and you can see some cases, a combination of districts, the difference with just a glance. This like 5 and 6 in Class 2B, or Districts 6 shows up in the size of athletic budgets and 7 in Class 1A. The Caribou Trail and the resources brought to bear by League and the North East A League booster clubs, from the necessities of (District 7) combine into a bi-district to replacing used equipment to the more whittle down to state qualifying teams trivial but visible events like having and individuals. homecoming royalty delivered at halfWith schools locked into particular time by helicopter. districts though, there is no balance • Just up the road in the Methow in numbers. For instance, District 8 Valley, a deserving Liberty Bell football includes only the Greater Spokane team was denied a state playoff berth. League 3A and 4A schools. District 9 The Mountain Lions finished tied for second in the CWL with state-qualifying has (for most sports) five 2B schools and nine 1B schools. District 7 includes Oroville, who beat Liberty Bell midseven 2A, seven 1A, eight 2B and 13 season. The problem: the CWL only 1B schools. District 3 encompasses 10 had two playoff berths available for entire leagues of all classifications. seven league teams, while other leagues So, the number of teams that get around the state were afforded berths access to state tournaments from each for half of their squads. Liberty Bell

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OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

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GLOWING PERFORMANCE Concern TonasketSubscribe/Renew council Today! expressed updates on projects

over coaches resignation

City’s engineers seek to clarify priorities regarding upcoming street improvement projects The council authorized Councilwoman Jill Vugteveen and Danison to make a final decision to move forward, with a priority on creating a “straight shot” from one end of town to the other along at least one side of the road with ADAapproved curb access ramps. The airport runway seal project’s target schedule is for completion before the Father’s Day Fly-in. Meanwhile, the council granted public works director Bill Pilkinton a leave of absence of indefinite length and appointed Hugh Jensen as acting public services director.

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - The Tonasket City Council provided updates on a number of civic projects that are progressing through their planning stages at the Tuesday, March 13, council meeting. Tonasket city planner Kurt Danison said he met with three property owners affected by the need for an easement to complete the Mill Drive/Bonaparte Creek sewer project and said that they seemed to be willing to provide the easement access. “They’re willing to provide easement through their property so we can connect up the sewer through there,” Danison said. “They were under the impression that water was included in this... I don’t Police Chief Robert Burks said that know how it came about... I don’t think he is working on a policy governing the we said we were going to put in a water department’s handling of data collected system there. during video surveillance. “I think they walked away with a better Burks also announced that officer understanding.” Audra Fuller passed her civil service The council planned an open house exam and has been hired as a full-time for March 20 for residents to interact officer. with the engineers and councilmembers Burks said he is finalizing a “wish on the sewer project committee. list” to be submitted for Stonegarden The council also responded to a memo describing how potential grant money Varela and Associates seeking to clarwould be used. Stonegarden grants proify priorities on the upcoming street vide money for local law enforcement improvement projects that had been disentities to use while assisting in U.S. cussed at a previous council meeting. Border Patrol operations, although any The project was facing a delay without equipment purchased is not limited to such a prioritization as funding for the those operations. project may not be enough to complete In County, home delivery “Oroville was able to get an SUV the entire “wish list.” through Stonegarden grant money,” “We want the (hospital parking crossBurks said. “This is the initial part of the ing) beacon as the base project,” said process that we do every year. We don’t Mayor Patrick Plumb. “The rest we will have done as we have the funding to SEE COUNCIL | PG A3 complete.”

BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Teresa Hawkins expressed her concern over the resignation of varsity basketball coach Glenn Braman during the public comment portion of the Tonasket School Board meeting on Monday, March 12. Hawkins, wife of longtime varsity football coach Jay Hawkins, said she was concerned that the direction of the school district concerning its coaches was taking an ugly turn. “I’m concerned with the resignation of coach Braman,” she said. “I’m concerned because my husband is also a coach. I’m not comfortable with how that came about.” Hawkins said she had heard secondhand remarks attributed to a school board member that fed into her concern. “I’m hoping the school board acts as a board, and not on individual agendas,” she said. “I hope we’ve learned from the process that went down. “I think it’s sad if we let a group of parents who are upset or who have a vengeance with a coach from a long time ago to come in and rally people up to make a decision to not reinstate a coach. I think it would be really sad if we have to go around the community to bring in support to show that a coach has just as many people, and more, (supporting him) as those who complained 50 about him.” Citing her experience as a coach’s wife and as a mother of an athlete coached by others, Hawkins said that athletics teaches kids to deal with adversity, but that parents encourage that growth. “We want the situation to be perfect for our kids,” she said. “But what do we teach them when we run to every need they have? “(Coaches) love the game, they’re competitors, and they want to teach kids to work together, to go out in life and be successful. Kids can’t be successful if their parents don’t let them grow as individuals. That’s a part of athletics. Nothing is going to be perfect.” Hawkins said she was concerned that situations that contributed to Braman’s resignation, as well as rumors about her husband’s position, could damage the reputation of the district. “People want to come to this district,” she said. “It’s because of you guys (the school board) up here. You have done a great job of keeping this school district as one of the elite. “Don’t ruin that. Don’t let that happen, you guys.” In other business, superintendent Paul Turner read a proclamation from

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26 months (112 issues) only $54 13 months (56 issues) only $30 for Scholars and the Oroville High School Music Department on Wednesday, March 14 Kaylee Clough performs “The Glow”90 at the Variety Show and Auction presented by Dollars

in the high school commons. The eight-year-old has been taking ballet for five years and recently performed at the Seattle Dance Workshop Competition and took a silver medal. The annual talent show is used to raise funds for the Oroville Dollars for Scholars Continuing Education awards. For more from the event see page B2.

CHECK OR MONEY ORDER ENCLOSED OR CREDIT CARD PAYMENT

Former Oroville killed Check or Money Order CreditPrincipal Card Card #for TeenCredit may be charged second degree murder

Expiration Date:

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LOCAL WILDLIFE

OWL Informational presentation Friday, March 23

Crimes Detectives. He was booked into the Spokane County Jail on the charge of felony assault. Motta, who was in critical condition at Sacred Heart Hospital, died of his injuries on March 15. Information Officer Chamberlain speculated that the charges against Lewis would be upgraded to Mail to: second degree murder by the Spokane County Prosecutor’s office, but as of Monday they were still listed as first degree assault. When Motta came to Oroville in 1981 to take his first principal’s job he was just 34-years-old and stayed here for four years, according to his good friend Don DeVon, who served under Motta as a high school councilor in Oroville, as well as in Palm Desert, Calif. DeVon described Motta as a “highly innovative”

Signature________________________________________________________________

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PAGE A3

MANAGING EDITOR

SERVING WASHINGTON’S

Watch Donkey Basketball at the OHS Commons March 28 See page B3

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SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SPOKANE – Former Oroville High School Principal Frank Motta died from injuries sustained while trying to help a neighbor whose Spokane area home had been overrunWWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM by a teenage party. Apparently Motta was asked to keep an eye on the house by his neighbor and on Saturday, March 10 when he saw there was a party going on he

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Page A10

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | JANUARY 2, 2014

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

OBITUARIES

Web Hallauer

Wilbur ‘Web’ Hallauer Wilbur “Web” Hallauer, 99, died peacefully in his sleep in Oroville, Washington, on December 19, 2013. Web was born in Webster, New York, and moved with his family to Yakima at age 12. He graduated from the University of Washington in 1937 with a degree in Labor Economics and moved to Oroville to run the Oroville drying plant of the family’s fruit processing business, Valley Evaporating Company. Web became active in politics starting in 1943 as a councilman in the town of Oroville. He was very proud of his public service career, serving eight years in the Washington House of Representatives and 12 years in the State Senate. During this period, he was chair of the House Revenue Committee and the Senate Appropriations and Ways and Means committees. Web was a champion of civil liberties, who proudly defended Representative John Goldmark during Washington State’s “McCarthy era.” Appointed by Governor Dixy Lee Ray, he went on to act as the Director of the Department of Ecology from 1977 to 1980. Web was a voracious reader with a keen intellect who loved to travel. He was a proud member of the American Civil Liberties Union. Web is survived by his daughter Teri, grandchildren Lily, Andrew, Natalie and Geoff, as well as his sister-in-law, Barbara Forrester. He was predeceased by his daughter, Merry Hallauer and his wife, Jospehine Pardee Hallauer. During his last years, he was lovingly cared for by Ludie Pollard. We are forever grateful to Ludie, whose love and generosity brightened all of our lives, especially Web’s, these last years. Friends and family are invited to join in a life celebration on Sunday, May 25, 2014, at Osoyoos Lake Veterans Memorial Park in Oroville, Washington, from 1-5 p.m. Charitable donations may be made to Densho – The Japanese American Legacy Project. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

an ornery cow or judge a good horse. At last though, the cowboy grew weary; evening came, his chores were done, and it was time to rest. Jack’s legacy is made up of many things; the sage -scented breeze that wafts softly from the Pine Creek hills, the first butter cups of spring, the emeraldlike gem that is Loomis Country. These and a myriad of others – all are the pieces of his beloved life time home. Long ago, Jack shared his connection to this honest and beautiful place with his family; it is now entrusted to them. Jack knew – and smiling down, knows even now – that his legacy will be honored and passed down for generations to come. Every day, our eyes will show us what our hearts already know; when we look on his home land, we will see Jack in all the things he loved. Can Heaven be more beautiful? The cowboy lived a lusty life, spoke the language of the trail boss, trained his children to follow in his footsteps… took them to the brush and turned them loose on a half-broke horse with a bunch of cows and pointed them towards the road. The land throughout Okanogan County and beyond reflects his ability to build a fence anywhere on any terrain- that has with stood the test of time and weather - “damn straight!” He wanted his kids to experience the wonderful things that only he and a few of his kind had known. He knew that he was the last of his breed. Jack had touched many lives. He leaves behind a multitude of friends who loved him- the “boys” at the Loomis Kwik Stop Everyone in Loomis and The Transplant team at Sacred Heart inSpokane as well as his Church Family at the Community Church. His Knowledge of the Country and history of the area have gone with him. He loved us all in his Rough and Tumble way. He will be sorely and lovingly missed by us all until we meet again. He is survived by his wife Karmen Beeman, at home; children Shauna (Ryan) Beeman, Sarah (David) Grooms, Jackie (Devin) Richter, Joan (Dan) Stanfield; siblings Irene Williams, Ruth Nixon, Linda Pauley, Bert Beeman, Jerry Beeman and Phill Green; 11 grandchildren and two great grandchildren Preceded in death by his parents; son Hoot (Jon) Beeman; brothers Ward Green, Benny Beeman and Odie Beeman; sister Wanda Bear and niece Tammy Gage Services will be held Saturday, January 4, 2014 at 1 p.m. at the Loomis Community Church with the Reverend Bob Haskell and John Newton officiating. There will be a mounted escort from the church to the Loomis Mountain View Cemetery for the interment, please feel free to bring a horse and ride along. A fellowship dinner will follow the services at the Loomis Community Church. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Madalyn Lucile Nolte

Jack Beeman

Jack O. Beeman Jack O. Beeman, age 79, of Loomis, died December 26, 2013 in Omak. He was born September 7, 1934 on North Pinecreek to Harry and Pearl Beeman. On December 26, a cowboy on a tall Bay horse rode through the last gate in the clouds and dismounted in Heaven. Jack Beeman had arrived. On Earth, he had lived just the kind of the life he had wanted to live. In all seasons, his days were spent in the open. Jack experienced more that a few miracles during his 79 years here, including a heart transplant that allowed him to enjoy another 20 years with his family and friends. During that time, regardless of other health challenges he faced, his life was full and productive, and when illness or pain knocked him down, he got right back up and rode on. The back country was his brother, and no one knew better than Jack how to manage

Madalyn Lucile Nolte entered heaven to be with her savior Jesus Christ on December 15, 2013. She was born on August 18, 1919 to Neal Reuben McCulloch and Ora Mae Trimble in Sewell, Iowa. She had one sister Wanda Maxine. Madalyn attended schools in Ottumwa, Iowa. Following high school and secretarial school Madalyn worked in various positions using the skills she gained. While attending a dance in Ottumwa, Iowa mom met and later married John (Jack) Layton Nolte. Together they raised two sons John, (Jackie), Doug, (Lisa). Grandchildren Heather, (Larry) Rush; John David, (Shawnica); Josh, (Kara); Zach, (Ali). Great grandchildren: Morgan, Madison and Margaret. Their first years as a family were spent in Iowa. In 1959, Madalyn and Jack moved to Pittsburg, Calif. With both of their sons, having moved to Washington State, Madalyn and Jack soon followed in 1986. Madalyn and Jack remained in Blaine Wash. next to John until Jack’s passing in 2008. Doug and Lisa were then blessed to have Madalyn join them in their home in Oroville, Wash. Madalyn’s final years were spent in an adult family care home near by. Madalyn was a woman many of us would love to emulate. She was intelligent and talented in so many ways. Most of all she lived a life loving, accepting and giving to others so it was only natural to

love her right back. The friendships she and Dad had truly lasted a lifetime. Mom’s faith in Christ enabled her to peacefully live out her years with friends and family. We will miss you and your smiles, Mom. There will be a memorial celebrating Madalyn life on January 4, 2014 at the Oroville Free Methodist in Oroville at 1 p.m. Preceding Madalyn in death were her husband, Jack; sister, Maxine; as well as parents, Neal and Ora Mae McCulloch. The family would like to thank Golden Years Adult Home for caring for Mom like family. Frontier Home Health, nurses and staff, and the doctors, nurses and staff and Confluence Health in Oroville and Tonasket for their loving care of Mom.

City Hall Holiday Closure OROVILLE - The Oroville City Hall will be closed Wednesday, Jan. 1 in observance of New Year’s Day. Customers with a Wednesday collection day will have their trash picked up on Thursday. Knob Hill Club Dinner CHESAW - The Knob Hill Home Economics Club will be having a home cooked Beef Enchilada Dinner on Saturday, Jan. 4 at the Chesaw Community Building from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. for $7.50. The meal will include the enchilada, a salad and a dessert. Bring your friends and family and your neighbors as everyone is invited to attend. Spiritual Movie Night OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Jan. 4 at 6:30 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help

keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call (509) 476-0200.

Celebrating with Open House OROVILLE - Sterling Bank will help Peggy Shaw celebrate her 20 years in banking with an Open House on Monday, Jan. 6. The Open House will be from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. with refreshments. The public is welcome to come in any time on Monday to wish Shaw well if they’d like. The bank is located at 822 Central Ave. in Oroville. For more information call (509) 476-3603. Tonasket Food Bank TONASKET - The Tonasket food bank operates every Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Sarge’s Burger Bunker, 101 Hwy. 97 N. For more information, contact Deb Roberts at (509) 486-2192. Oroville Food Bank OROVILLE - The Oroville

food bank operates every Thursday from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., excluding holidays, in the basement of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. For more info, call Jeff Austin at (509) 4763978 or Sarah Umana at (509) 476-2386.

Listing Your Item Our Community Bulletin Board generally allows listing your event for up two weeks prior to the day it occurs. If space allows it may be included prior to the two week limit. However, our online calendar at www.gazette-tribune. com allows the event to be listed for much longer periods. You may place an event on the online calendar by going to our website and clicking on the “Add an Event” button on the homepage. Online submissions don’t always go into the hardcopy edition, so it helps if they are also submitted to us at gdevon@gazette-tribune.com or at Gazette-Tribune, P.O. Box 250, Oroville, WA. 98844.

Okanogan Valley

Church Guide Paul Gentry

Paul S. Gentry Paul S. Gentry age 79 of Oroville died Monday, December 23, 2013 at North Valley Hospital in Tonasket following an acute massive stroke. He was born July 18, 1934 in Nyesa, Oregon to parents Samuel and Reba Gentry. Paul grew up in Indian Valley, Idaho. He joined the US Navy at age 17, serving during the Korean War. He met and married Glenda Rae Quigley in Spokane and following an honorable discharge from the Navy they settled in Spokane where they had two children, Douglas S. Gentry and Lori A. Gentry. In 1972, Paul and Glenda divorced and Paul remained in Spokane until moving to Oroville in the early 1980’s where he worked in construction. Paul was also a saddle maker and enjoyed working with leather. He loved the outdoors, fishing, hunting, camping and enjoying the company of his friends. Paul was a member of the Tonasket American Legion Post #82, Tonasket Eagles and a lifetime member of the Highland Am Vets Post #69. He is survived by his special companion of 27 years Velma Hill and her children Rick Hill, Bev Tibbs and Karen Tibbs; son, Douglas Gentry of Airway Heights, Wash.; daughter, Lori Gentry of Oroville; grandson, Samuel Gentry of Creswell, Ore.; sister, Ruthie (Ed) Raney of Idaho and children, Myra Atteberry, Scottie Yantz and Beth Hancock. Paul also leaves behind many friend and a special thanks goes to his close friends, Roger Smith, Mel Gallagher, Curly Bill, Dave Sharpe, Andy Knott and Dewey Orr. Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, January 4, 2014 11 a.m. at the Bergh Chapel in Oroville with Pastor Randy McAllister and the Tonasket American Legion, officiating. A potluck luncheon will follow the service at the Oroville American Legion Hall. Inurnment will be held in the spring at the Indian Valley Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Dr. Larson’s Llama rescue or Highland Am Vets #69. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

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OROVILLE

NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 10:30 a.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville 8 - 8:30 Holy Grounds - Coffee, Tea & Conversation 8:30 - 9:45 Service@8:30 10 - 10:35 L.I.F.E.  10:35 - 11:00 Holy Grounds 11:00 - 12:00 Service @ 11:00 6 p.m. - 7:30 Pursuit (Pursuing God & Friendships) Pastor Claude Roberts Come enjoy song service with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Trinity Episcopal

Tonasket Foursquare Church

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place 415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

Where pride in craftsmanship still exist today!

Sales Representative Joy Lawson

1-509-476-2279 OUR LOVED ONES LIVE AS LONG AS THEY ARE REMEMBERED

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 02, 2014  

January 02, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, January 02, 2014  

January 02, 2014 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune