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THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 2014

VOL. 19, NO. 22

Front Street art gallery closes doors By Nathan Whalen Staff Reporter

After 17 years, a popular Front Street art gallery is closing its doors. The Windjammer Gallery, located across the street from Mariners Court, shuttered its doors Friday to make room for a wine shop. “We’re retiring,” owner Chuck Poust said the day before the closing. “It demands a lot of your time. We were only closed three days out of the year.” Poust and his wife Sandy, opened the gallery in the mid-1990s, featured paintings, sculptures and jewelry created by artists throughout the Pacific Northwest. Poust said he and Sandy fell in love with Coupeville about five years before he purchased the building that houses the gallery, and wanted to retire here. There are two parts to the Windjammer business. The gallery was housed in the front part of the building facing Front Street and a custom framing business in the back of the building. While the gallery portion of the building is closing, the frame shop will remain open. Longtime employee Brandy Benson, who has worked at Windjammer for 16 years, will take over ownership of the frame shop. It will eventually be cordoned off from the former gallery space. Benson takes over a business with which she is familiar and has a record of success. “We’re leaving it in excellent hands,” Poust said of Benson. A new tenant is already lined up to take the spot of Poust’s gallery. Vail Wine Shop, which has been in business for the past two years, is set to move into the brown building. The Vail’s are busy adjusting the space to fit their needs. They installed equipment needed to serve food and replaced part of the floor. Patsy Vail said she knew Poust from her days as a photographer. When Patsy and Larry heard of upcoming closure of the gallery, they decided to move in. Their new spot is twice the size of their former home and they will be able to serve small plates thanks to the help of a partnership with the Oystercatcher. Poust has been active in the community outside of owning his business. He used to be a member of the former Design Review Board and he is the current president of the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association. With Poust retiring, he has some more time to visit his children in the Midwest and will now have time to travel.

2013 in Review File photos

Above: Workers for Town of Coupeville review damage from a small landslide along Front Street. Right: A major landslide in the Ledgewood community south of Coupeville closed a road and threatened homes.

Landslides, big and small plague Central Whidbey news January n Volunteers examining the future of the Greenbank Farm recommended that the Port of Coupeville explore selling the publicly owned farm. The proposal sparked discussion about the farm’s future, but the port renewed a contract with the farm management group. n Coupeville High School senior Jai’Lysa Hoskins was honored by the Boys and Girls Club as the Youth of the Year. n With the addition of the Pole Building at the Island County Fairgrounds, the fair is the first in the state to have all its barns on the Washington State Heritage Barn Registry. n Whidbey General Hospital installed a new CT machine. n The Front Street building that previ-

ously housed the Mad Crab was purchased by Seattle businessman Thom Kroon. n Glenda Merwine was appointed to fill a Coupeville School Board seat vacated by Carol Bishop. n Langley Mayor Larry Kwarsick resigned. He had pleaded guilty the month before to falsifying city documents when he was planning director, but still earned $50 an hour working for Coupeville. n The Department of Natural Resources ruled that arson caused a fire that preceded the sinking of the Deep Sea crab boat in Penn Cove in 2012. n Whidbey Island Naval Air Station announced it would start releasing flight scheduled for the Outlying Field near Coupeville. The release of information was abandoned years prior.

n Former lovers came face to face after years apart during a court hearing in a murder case. Peggy Sue Thomas, a former beauty queen, faced a murder charge for her alleged role in the 2003 shooting death of 32-year-old Russel Douglas on South Whidbey. James Huden, her former boyfriend, was convicted of first-degree murder in a high-profile trial in 2012 and was sentenced to 80 years in prison. Thomas later pleaded guilty to a lesser charge under a plea bargain and was sentenced to four years in prison.

February n A massive landslide at Ledgewood, the Central Whidbey neighborhood, destroyed one house and left residents of 30 other homes homeless. The disaster made international

See Review page 3


Page 2

The Whidbey Examiner  •  January 2, 2014

Vail Wine Shop moves into former gallery space By Nathan Whalen Staff Reporter

Larry and Patsy Vail have a New Year’s resolution: move their Coupeville wine shop and continue with the success they’ve enjoyed for the past two years. The couple, owns Vail Wine Shop, is moving the shop’s former home in Mariner’s Court across the street into the the former home of the Windjammer Gallery, which closed Friday after 17 years in business. “I’m expecting it to go well,” Patsy said of the new location. Vail Wine Shop opened in 2011 and features handcrafted and boutique wines produced in Washington state. Larry notes there are 874 registered wineries in Washington. Despite being tucked away in the back of Mariner’s Court, Vail Wine Shop attracted visitors eager to imbibe. “People who like wine tend to find you,” Larry said. Patsy is quick to point out the Friday Night Flights and Bites events Vail Wine Shop started organizing in July. The weekly event features a different wine along with food brought in from surrounding restaurants. She said the fare served is pretty simple ranging from pizzas from Ebey’s Bowl and salmon pate from Seabolts to locally produced chees-

es and breads. The Vails are expanding the food by offering lunch once they complete their move across the street. Larry and Patsy are partnering with the Oystercatcher, which re-opened New Year’s Eve, to supply the wine shop with meals. “It’s going to be very simple but very nice,” Patsy said. The new location in the former Windjammer Gallery will double the size of the wine shop with the added benefit of extra space in front of the building and the surrounding wooden deck. They are committed to featuring and selling wines produced in Washington state. “That’s where we want to stay. It’s what we know the best,” Larry said. Prior to opening the wine shop, Vails were photographers who owned what is now known as Vail Studio, which operates between Oak Harbor and Coupeville. Their son currently runs the studio. Larry said they have 18-to-20 years invested in learning about wine, which included visits to wineries throughout the state. “It’s our hobby gone wild,” Larry said of the development of their wine shop. Vail Wine Shop’s hours vary seasonally. Go to www.vailwineshop.com for more information.

Nathan Whalen photo

Larry Vail poors a glass of wine at his shop. Vail Wine Shop is moving from Mariner’s Court to the former Windjammer Gallery on Front Street.

Patton completes nine years at Port of Coupeville By Nathan Whalen Staff Reporter

For the past nine years, the Port of Coupeville has developed plans on how the small district will operate its properties, most notably the Greenbank Farm, in the future. Those plans, along with maintaining a district that

includes the historic Coupeville Wharf and Greenbank Farm, are just some of the accomplishments executive director Jim Patton has completed over the past nine years. He finished his duties as executive director Dec. 31. He decided earlier in 2013 against seeking a new twoyear contract. “It’s a privilege to have

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served the residents of the port district. They pay the bills,” Patton said last week. Marshall Bronson, president of the port’s board of commissioners, said Patton’s experience in the Navy, business and law helped him manage the port. “He’s put in incredibly more hours than he got paid for,” Bronson said. “He’s been very wonderful to work with.” Patton said he wanted more time to spend with his 10 grandchildren. He also wants to travel too. He is embarking on a month-long cruise that will go through the Panama Canal. He highlighted several accomplishments the Port of Coupeville has completed since he replaced former

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executive director John Coyne in 2004. The board of commissioners approved a Patton new comprehensive plan for the Port of Coupeville that Patton said has been used by the Washington Public Ports Association as a model plan for small ports. In addition the port also approved a new master site plan for the Greenbank Farm, which will provide direction for staff on how to develop the historic facility. Patton also highlighted the conservation easement that was placed on the non-commercial property at the farm. That document provides another layer of protection of the agriculture, recreational and environmentally sensitive lands that are

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located at the former loganberry farm. The easement was funded by a $335,000 Conservation Futures Fund award from Island County. Patton said the commissioners haven’t made a decision yet on how to spend the award. During his tenure as executive director, the Coupeville Wharf has also seen a boost in activity. Penn Cove Shellfish refuels its vessels from the fuel floats at the end of the pier. Whale watching vessels, most notably the Victoria Clipper every spring, stop by the Coupeville Wharf and its passengers spend several hours shopping and enjoying lunch in downtown Coupeville. Patton noted several challenges the port will have to face. Finances will continue to be an issue. Patton said the port’s tax levy was intended to care for the Coupeville Wharf. Port leaders asked voters in 2008 to increase the levy, but that proposal was rejected. In addition, more

than $100,000 of the port’s revenues annually goes to pay a mortgage on the farm, Patton said. The port is expected to bring in $364,000 in tax dollars. The Port of Coupeville also has to make a decision on how the Greenbank Farm will be managed. The current leases with the Greenbank Farm Management Group expire in mid-2015 and officials have to go through a process to develop a new agreement. “The board of the port is committed to a fair and transparent competition for new management at the farm in 2015,” Patton said. He noted that his replacement will likely spend hundreds of hours drafting a solicitation for potential groups to oversee operations at the farm. Tim McDonald was hired to replace Patton. He started his new position Dec. 1 and Patton served as assistant executive director to help McDonald learn the ins and outs of the Port of Coupeville.

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January 2, 2014  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Page 3

Review: 2013 news in review shows community support, caring people From page 1

n More than 100 volunteers participated in the annual Central Whidbey Hearts and Hammers workday.

headlines. Gov. Jay Inslee later visited the site and a fundraiser netted more than $10,000.

n Coupeville Town Council member Larry Cort decided against running for election.

n A section of eroding bluff along Northeast Front Street cause part of the sidewalk to crack and had officials looking at how to repair damage and deal with future erosion.

n Officials at Whidbey General Hospital prepared to run a new $50 million bond to pay for a new wing.

n Under one of several options being considered by the Coupeville Town Council to address staffing woes in the Marshal’s Office, law enforcement services may be contracted out to a neighboring agency. Council approved a contract for consulting services to look at the issue.

n Bill Hawkins was appointed as the new judge in Island County District Court, which is also the Oak Harbor Municipal Court. Hawkins was formerly the county prosecutor and was briefly the city attorney for Oak Harbor before being fired by Mayor Scott Dudley.

March n Festival season kicked off with record numbers attending the annual Mussel Festival. n Two visiting pre-med students discovered a human jawbone on a beach about 200 yards west of Coupeville Wharf. The remains appeared to be very old and possibly Native American. n Former Island County Superior Court Judge Richard Pitt passed away March

n Island County filed a lawsuit against a Greenbank property owner in an attempt to reclaim a disputed public beach access on Wonn Road. The civil action for ejectment and quiet title, declaratory relief and abatement of a public nuisance is ongoing. n U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen announced that a $7 million investment in a hangar for P-8A Poseidons at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station.

April n 3 Sisters Beef opened a shop in the San de Fuca area. n Whidbey Island residents and business owners raised $10,000 to help victims of the landslide that damaged homes in Ledgewood. n David Broberg, owner of the Blue Goose Inn on North Main Street in Coupeville has a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration certified weather station installed at his historic bed and breakfast. n Ebey’s Forever Fund granted $100,000 to 13 projects in Central Whidbey. n The Muzzall family, the owners of 3 Sisters Beef, negotiated a conservation easement to preserve 113 acres of farmland located north of Penn Cove.

n Just before leaving his job as county planning director, Bob Pederson ordered Island County Commissioner Kelly Emerson to pay $37,000 she owes to the county in civil fines related to a sunroom and other accessory structures built at her Camano Island home in violation of land-use rules. n Law-and-justice leaders lobbied Island County commissioners to allow them to ask voters this fall for more than $2.6 million in funding through a levy measure. n In a 2-1 vote, Island County commissioners killed a curbside recycling program on Earth Day. n A community-driven

funding program that to preserve historic buildings in Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve kicked off its third year with the award of $100,000 from the Ebey’s Forever Fund to 13 different property owners on Central Whidbey. n Roger Case, 78, announced his resignation as Island County health officer and commissioner for Whidbey General Hospital.

May n The Navy announced plans to more than double the number of P-8A Poseidons destined for Whidbey Island Naval Air Station. Instead of the planned 24 planes, the Navy will station 49 of the

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sub-hunting jets at the NAS Whidbey. n Greg Lange, owner of Draft Works Horse Logging and Custom Farming, brought his two draft horses up from his Freeland-based farm to plow 7 acres of land located on the edge of Ebey’s Prairie off Fort Casey Road near Coupeville. n Commissioners for Port of Coupeville approved to extend a lease with the Greenbank Farm Management Group.

n A command master chief from Whidbey Island Naval Air Station and his wife were plunged into the chilly waters of the Skagit River when a portion of the Interstate 5 bridge collapsed. n Canoe racers from tribes all over the Pacific Northwest gathered to take part in the annual Penn Cove Water Festival canoe races.

June n Coupeville officials inadvertently violated the state Constitution by paying bonuses to town employees over

See Review page 12

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n In response to public concern, the Washington State Department of Transportation, working with Island Transit and Island County, unveiled plans to alter three intersections on Highway 20 near Outlying Field and Island Transit’s headquarters.

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n A longtime Coupeville artist and educator Roger Purdue was honored for his work helping the Penn Cove Water Festival.

n Island County commissioners hire David Wechner as the new planning director.

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n Statistics show that the new ferries for the Coupeville-to-Port-Townsend route are plagued by fewer riders and canceled trips.

n Coupeville Mayor Nancy Conard reports the town’s sales tax revenue is steady.


Page 4

The Whidbey Examiner  •  January 2, 2014

viewpoints

Deciding marshal’s office fate should include public input For the past year, Town of Coupeville officials have been exploring options in dealing with staffing issues within the marshal’s office. Mayor Nancy Conard said the issue began a little more than a year ago with a sudden turnover within the department. Megan Hansen The town is looking at Some perspective two options, to keep its department with changes to staffing, or to contract with the Island County Sheriff’s Office. Regardless of which route they choose, the recently approved 2014 budget will accommodate the roughly $400,000 expenditure. And neither option will provide 24-hour, seven-daya-week patrol coverage. Conard said she plans on bringing a contract from the sheriff’s office for review to Coupeville Town Council Jan. 12 during its regular council meeting. The council has not made any decisions one way or the other. But what do citizens want? If both options cost roughly the same amount and have similar coverage, then one of the biggest issues will be identity. Conard said if the town contracts with the sheriff’s office, there will be a designated “marshal” and a set Coupeville deputy. They will also wear Coupeville uniforms and drive Coupeville patrol vehicles. But will it really be the same? Do residents inside town limits really care? Before making decisions on this issue, Coupeville officials need to ask. Sure they talk about it during regular council meetings. Those meetings are rarely attended. Representatives need to go talk to citizen groups, hold a community meeting and get input from the public. Lay out each plan in detail to the people and let them help the town decide which direction to go. It’s a town service, funded by the citizens and businesses, let them be a part of the decision. — Megan Hansen is editor of The Whidbey Examiner. She can be reached at mhansen@whidbeynewsgroup.com

CONTACT US: Scan this QR code with your phone and find us online. Keep the app and look us up anytime!

news@whidbeyexaminer.com The Whidbey Examiner, 107 S. Main St., Suite 101, Coupeville, WA 98239 ph. 360-678-8060 • fax: 360-678-6073 Online: www.whidbeyexaminer.com

Thankful for town’s response to snow Editor, Early in the morning on Dec. 20, I drove through falling snow to bake at our restaurant, the Knead & Feed, on Front Street. Less than an hour after arriving at work, the Town of Coupeville snow plow was carefully plowing our street and others. Shortly after that, town employees wielding snow shovels were busily clear-

ing the boardwalks and sidewalks. I want to thank the crews who responded so rapidly!

Doug Kroon Knead & Feed Restaurant

Town decorations much appreciated Editor, Thank you to the town employees

who decorated Cook’s Corner Park and Coupeville Recreation Hall. It’s a beautiful job and admired by many. We also have enjoyed seeing all of the snow people decorating our streets. Thanks to the person who started this tradition and to the helpers who have repainted when needed and placed them around town. The snow people are very unique.

Nancy and Bill Lane Coupeville

Share your opinions The Whidbey Examiner welcomes letters to the editor. Letters express the views of their writers, not those of this newspaper or its employees. Letters should be factually accurate and reflect the original thoughts of a single writer. If your opinion differs from those you see printed, you’re encouraged to write a letter and give your perspective. Subject matter should be relevant to readers, provocative, constructive and timely. Our first priority is to publish letters by local people that address local issues. We will publish letters on other subjects depending on available space. We do print brief “thank-you” letters when space is available, but letters about more in-depth concerns receive first priority.

Executive Editor & Publisher.....................................................................Keven R. Graves Editor.............................................................................................................. Megan Hansen Reporters..................................................................................Jim Waller & Nathan Whalen Columnists............................................................................................................ Toni Grove Advertising Manager......................................................................................Teri Mendiola Advertising Sales..............................................................................................Nora Durand Production Manager......................................................................................... Connie Ross Lead Creative Artist........................................................................Michelle Wolfensparger Creative Artists........................................................Adine Close, Rebecca Collins, Jen Miller Circulation....................................................................................................Diane Smothers

Sign your letter and include your street address and daytime and evening telephone numbers. Phone numbers are used for verification only, and will not be published. All letters are subject to editing for length, content, grammar and punctuation. Letters must be submitted by 5 p.m. Monday to be considered for publication on Thursday. We strive to print all letters we receive, but publication is not guaranteed. Shorter letters of 350 words or less have a better chance of getting into print. That’s roughly the amount of double-spaced text that fits on a single page. To submit a letter by e-mail, send it to news@whidbeyexaminer.com

IDENTIFICATION STATEMENT AND SUBSCRIPTION RATES

Established in Coupeville in 1996, The Whidbey Examiner is published weekly by Sound Publishing on Thursdays. Subscriptions are delivered by mail (USPS 015-276) for $19.50 on Whidbey Island and $23 off-Island. Copies are available at newsstands for 50 cents. To start a subscription, call toll-free 888-838-3000. To place a classified ad, call 800-388-2527. Periodicals rate postage paid at Coupeville, WA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Whidbey Examiner, PO Box 445, Coupeville, WA 98239. Copyright 2013

READER INFORMATION: ADMINISTRATIVE: The Whidbey Examiner is a member of the Washington Newspaper Publishers Association, the National Newspaper Association and Suburban Newspapers of America. While the Examiner endeavors to accept only reliable advertisements, it shall not be responsible to the public for advertisements nor are the views expressed in those advertisements necessarily those ofTthe Whidbey Examiner. The right to decline or discontinue any ad without explanation is reserved. DEADLINES: Advertising: Display: 4 pm Friday; Classifieds: 4 pm Friday; Legal Notices: Noon Tuesday; News, Events & Letters: Noon Monday.


January 2, 2014  •  The Whidbey Examiner

Peace, goodwill and a few resolutions

Harry Anderson Rockin’ a Hard Place This is the time of year when we pray for peace and goodwill on earth, and resolve to do better in the future. We need some of that peace and goodwill to wash ashore on the rock right about now. It’s been a tough year for peace and goodwill on Whidbey Island. We rock dwellers, usually so blissful and content, have become stranded at the intersection of Jets = Jobs and Jets = Deafness, hung up by the nexus of Tourists = Dollars and Tourists = Crowding, tangled in the Gordian knot of taxed too much versus not enough services. Since everybody else has,

I may as well join the verbal jousting. Here’s how I see it: We live on a small island, finite in space and resources. Nobody gets everything they want. Either we share and share alike, or, like petulant children, we scream and pout. Point One: Navy jets are loud, and there are a more of them here than there used to be. Even if you don’t live by Outlying Field, you may feel your car shake and your fillings hurt as you drive by during a touch-and-go practice. Point Two: Navy pilots are brave patriots. They put their lives on the line for all of us. Their mission is essential; their training is vital. But, for most, home is elsewhere. A few stick around. But most just touch-and-go. How much empathy can you have for people you fly over, but don’t talk to? I hope the Navy commanders make a New Year’s resolution to spend more time thinking about the people who live near the OLF as the Navy’s neighbors and not

just as unavoidable collateral damage. Point Three: Those who object to jet noise sometimes bark as if the Navy is an evil, alien enemy that must be defeated. The Navy’s defenders, in response, bark right back that the objectors are whiners, elitists or traitors. Our military has been on the rock since the Spanish-American War. It has been prepared to ward off Spanish and Japanese invasions through the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Go visit Fort Casey if you need a history lesson. Today, the Navy trains here to ward off threats from China, North Korea and God knows where else. How do we, the “fly-over” people, support those efforts and yet help the Navy understand that our legitimate concerns are also a part of its mission? There is a middle ground if we stop ignoring and insulting each other. Let’s make a New Year’s resolution to have our jet noise dialogue sound more like the

civil and polite Whidbey we love and less like a cable talk show. Point Four: The growth of tourism has also been disturbing the rock’s peace and goodwill. It’s one of the few private economic sectors that is actually growing. But summer traffic is becoming America-like. Finding a good parking spot in Langley or Coupeville is a fool’s errand. Some say we’re losing our way of life. Others argue that we ought to follow the lead of communities like Walla Walla and build a new economy around our unique rural and agricultural heritage. Promote agri-tourism, foodie travel, reunions, conferences, weddings, etc. Will that turn us into Whidbeyland? It could, if we aren’t smart about it. Let’s make a New Year’s resolution to get serious about this. Point Five: I shake my head with pity at our beleaguered Island County government. There is no joy in Coupeville. Anybody

who has ever stood in line, sought a permit or tried to get a quick answer knows the problem. County government has been starved to the point of emaciation. Everybody who works there is swamped; everything is backed up. A lot of this results from lower property tax revenues caused by the collapse of home prices and new construction during the Great Recession. But it’s been made worse by the escalation of loud anti-tax voices that insist we shouldn’t spend another dime on anything. It’s just about impossible for the county to do real long-term planning. We end up getting only what we could afford yesterday. Those here before us formed a consensus that public investment helps build our communities. Let’s make a New Year’s resolution to get it back. OK, I’ve made my points. Snark away, if you must. But please resist posting signs on my lawn.

Giving mental health equal standing

When I was a kid, Jimmy Carter was in the White House. His wife, Rosalynn, was quite an active First Lady. She sat in on official meetings held by her husband and was said to be one of his closest advisors. Many First Ladies have used their position to promote a cause. One of the things that most interested Rosalynn Carter was mental health research and treatment. She has remained active in promoting those areas since leaving the White House. So it was fitting when Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius recently addressed the Rosalynn Carter Symposium on mental health policy in Atlanta. Sebelius announced new federal rules that will beef up the 2008 mental health equity

The 2008 law, “combined with the Affordable Care Act, will expand and protect behavioral health benefits for more than 62 million Americans,” Sebelius said, as reported by CNN. But it’s certainly not all peaches and cream for people suffering from mental illness. “The not-so-good news is, you are eligible for treatment now, but often the services are not available,” said Caro-

First Quarter

lyn Reinarch Wolf, a lawyer whose specialty is cases related to mental illness. According to the American Psychiatric Association, there are not enough psychiatrists in the nation to treat the people already seeking treatment. To be sure, medical research into mental health maladies is ongoing, but the number of medical students choosing to specialize in psychiatry has been going down.

Full Moon

And most psychiatrists are age 55 or older, with many soon to retire. Bit by bit, the stigma associated with psychiatric maladies is lessening and research is leading to more and better treatments. At least from where I stand, leaders like Rosalynn Carter deserve credit for working throughout their lives to help make such progress possible.

Last Quarter

New Moon

MARK

THE DATE January Holidays New Years 1-1-14 Martin Luther King Jr 1-20-14

• January Specials PLAY IT AGAIN! ADVERTISING SPECIAL Pick Up Any Ad You Ran In 2013 And Run It For 50%* Off In Any Issue In January! (Pick Up With No Changes Only) Pick Up Any Ad With Changes And Receive 25%* Off Any Issue In January *not good with any other special. And discount based on open rate

• January Publications Destination Whidbey Weddings sales deadline Jan. 7 publication Jan. 29

This special pull out guide to wedding business will be inserted into the Whidbey News-Times and the South Whidbey Record, and additionally, to increase viewership and market scope we will insert it into the Bellevue Reporter and the Mercer Island Reporter.

• February Holidays

Groundhog Day 2-2-14 Valentine’s Day 2-14-14 President’s Day 2-17-14

February Publications Whidbey Almanac

January 7th

Source: WSU Island County Extension

E. Kirsten Peters Rock Doc

law. Back in 2008, President George W. Bush signed the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. The basic notion behind that law is that doctors — and insurance companies — should treat mental illness as they do physical illness. In other words, it shouldn’t matter whether you have fallen on the ice or have fallen into depression. What’s new about a law signed in 2008, you might ask? Although the law has been on the books for a while, it has rarely been enforced. “Up to now, the law has not been complied with. Companies have only sort of adhered to it,” said Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman, head of the American Psychiatric Association. He spoke about the law in an interview with CNN. The new rules Sebelius announced will require private insurers to make similar co-payment charges to patients whether the problem they have is one of physical or mental health. That could have real impact. Sebelius pointed out that twice as many Americans die from suicide as from homicides. And, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, about 25 percent of Americans experience a diagnosable mental disorder each year.

Page 5

January 15th

January 23rd

WHIDBEY WEATHER SUMMARY

January 30th

Dec 23rd - Dec 29th, 2013

HI Temp

LO Temp

Wind MPH

Rainfall

Fawn Run, Bachert

44

34

0.85

19.63 26.87

Fort Casey, Barnes

49

34

0.02

19.14 26.29

Greenbank, Mercer

47

37

11

0.26

18.84 28.12

NAS Whidbey, Weather Desk

51

33

45

0.19

18.33 22.20

Crockett Lake, Haglund

49

30

29

0.35

18.99 26.69

Polnell Point, Seaward

50

32

18

0.21

20.36 24.79

Blue Goose Inn, Coupeville

50

36

26

0.16

15.23

REPORTING STATIONS

YTD Rain

Last Year

0.00

gloss sales deadline 1-5 sales deadline 1-10 publication 2-15

”The complete guide to living on Whidbey Island” is an annual publication of the Whidbey News Group. The Almanac reaches countless readers, as copies are distributed through our papers, online and surrounding Whidbey areas.

March Holidays

St Patricks Day 1-17-14 Spring Begins 1-20-14


Page 6

The Whidbey Examiner  •  January 2, 2014

Coupeville Sports 2013

Highlights punctuate year in athletics By Jim Waller Staff Reporter

Extraordinary events, key contests and the resignation of several influencal figures highlighted the sports scene on Central Whidbey in 2013.

January The Coupeville High School boys basketball team ended a 33-game losing streak by defeating Mount Vernon Christian 51-41 Jan. 18. In the frantic finish,

Coupeville forced five consecutive turnovers and made nine of 14 free throws. Ben Etzell scored 24 points to lead the way.

ed States Merchant Marine Academy set two Landmark Conference indoor track records in the distance medley and 4x400 relays.

February

March

Rival South Whidbey eliminated the Coupeville High School basketball teams from the district tournament. The Falcon girls won 43-36 Feb. 6 and the boys won 5645 Feb. 7. Coupeville graduate Dylan Tack helped the Unit-

Bessie Walstad, Makana Stone and Nick Streubel were honorable mention all-Cascade Conference choices in basketball. Stone, a freshman, won two events (100, 200) and ran on two winning relay teams (4x200 with Jai’Lysa Hoskins,

Photo by Jim Waller

Josh Bayne dives safely back to first for the Coupeville baseball team. Bayne, with a strong day on the mound and at the plate, helped the Wolves win a critical game over Lakewood in April.

Madison Tisa McPhee and Sylvia Hurlburt; and 4x400 with Marisa Etzell, Hoskins and Tisa McPhee) at the Tridistrict Preview meet March 23. Tisa McPhee also won the 300 hurdles, and Matthew Hampton took the 3,200.

April

Seventh-grader Lauren Bayne, competing for the Island Flyers, won the Level 6, Division 13-14 trampoline title at the Washington Association of Tumbling and Trampoline Championships April 6. Bayne, who won two state titles in three previous trips, also finished second in double mini and fourth in tumbling. Coupeville’s James Steller and Laura Luginbill led a strong showing by Central Whidbey runners in the four events associated with the Whidbey Island Marathon Saturday and Sunday, April 13 and 14. Steller, 36, finished 10th among the men and 13th overall out of 249 in Sunday’s marathon in 3:13.34. Luginbill, 28, placed sixth among the women and 29th overall in the marathon in 3:34:28. Andre Stone finished second in the 5K event. Jeremy Copenhaver recorded a hat trick and the Coupeville High School boys soccer team picked up its first win of the year in a 5-1 drubbing of Friday Harbor April 17. The Coupeville baseball team defeated Lakewood 4-2 April 29, avenging two earlier losses to the Cougars and locking up third place in the conference, the top 1A seed into the playoffs and a first-round home game. Josh Bayne pitched a complete game and added three hits, including a home run, in the win. Makana Stone set a new

Photo by Jim Waller

Aaron Trumbull shoots over the defense of a Mount Vernon Christian player in a big win for the Wolves in January. Coupeville High School track record in the 200 meters April 25 by clocking a 27.13.

May

Coupeville set three school track records at the Cascade Conference meet May 2. Stone won four events, including breaking her own school record in the 200 with a 26.74. She joined Hoskins, Kirsten Pelroy and Marisa Etzell to run a school-best 4:15.92 in

the 4x400 relay, breaking the old mark of 4:17.09. Stone, Hoskins, Tisa McPhee and Hurlburt broke their own record in the 4x200 by three seconds with a 1:47.51. Tisa McPhee was the conference champion in the 100 hurdles and 300 hurdles. The Coupeville High School baseball team, which surged at the end of the regular season to reach the SEE SPORTS, A7

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SPORTS CONTINUED FROM A6 playoffs, lost 5-2 to Nooksack Valley in a loser-out district game May 2. Kurtis Smith, Ben Etzell and Morgan Payne each had two hits for the Wolves. Coupeville grad Kyle King, running for the University of Oklahoma, placed 11th in the 10,000 meters and 17th in the 5,000 in the Big-12 conference meet May 3-5. His brother Tyler, a sophomore at the University of Washington, was 29th in the 5,000 at the Pac-12 championships May 11-12. Jordan Wilcox, a CHS grad, helped the Western Washington University club baseball team win the regional title and qualify for the national tournament. At the 1A state golf tournament May 21 and 22, Coupeville siblings Christine and Austin Fields placed 15th and 29th. A week earlier, sophomore Christine was sixth and senior Austin 20th in the district tournament. Tisa McPhee finished third in the 100 hurdles and 12th in the 300 hurdles at the state 1A track meet. Tisa McPhee teamed up with Hoskins, Hurlburt and Stone to take fifth in the 4x200 relay. The 4x100 team of Etzell, Hoskins, Hurlburt and Stone

placed 11th. Coupeville athletes receiving first-team, all-Cascade Conference spring honors were Stone (four events), Tisa McPhee (three events), Hoskins, Hurlburt, Marisa Etzell and Pelroy in track; Christine Fields in golf; Ben Etzell and Kurtis Smith in baseball; and Hailey Hammer in softball. Second team honors went to Tisa McPhee, Etzell, Hurlburt and Hoskins in track; Austin Fields in golf; Nathan Lamb and Luke Pelant in soccer; Payne in baseball; and Madeline Strasburg in softball. Receiving honorable mention were Walstad, Madi Roberts and MaKayla Bailey in softball; and Jake Tumblin and Aaron Curtin in baseball. Amanda d’Almeida and Danny Savalza were selected Coupeville High School’s Athletes of the Year May 30. D’Almeida was a threetime district doubles champion in tennis and a multi-year all-league selection in soccer. Savalza, who played football and soccer, was noted for his efforts to promote school spirit. Walstad and Drew Chan received the Cliff Gillies Award, given for participation in student activities, academic achievement, sportsmanship and citizenship.

Page 7

October

Ben Etzell and Curtin won the doubles championship and Sebastian Davis finished second in singles at the district 1A tennis tournament Oct. 15. Etzell and Curtin then placed third in the tri-district tournament Oct. 29 to earn a berth in the state tournament.

November

Jim Waller photo

Madison Tisa McPhee placed third in the state in the 100 hurdles and was all-Cascade Conference in three events for the Coupeville High School track team.

June

The North Whidbey Soccer Club GU-12 team, coached by Mike Lonborg and Sean Hutchinson, won the silver division of the Skagit Firecracker Tournament June 14-16. The GU-15 team, coached by Ryan Baker and Troy Cowan, placed second in its division. Orson Christensen, a veteran of 49 years of coaching high school and college football, joined the Coupeville staff for spring ball and continued during the upcoming season. Coupeville said goodbye to Jim Copenhaver, long-time leader in youth soccer on Central Whidbey. Copenhaver coached more than 40 teams at all levels, served on the Central Whidbey Soccer Club board and was the Whidbey Island Soccer Association commissioner.

July

Jim Waller photo

Coupeville’s Nick Streubel was named to the Associated Press’ all-state second team as an offensive lineman.

Central Whidbey, coached by Bob Brown, placed second in the 11/12 Little League District 11 tournament completed July 6 in Sedro-Woolley. Central Whidbey’s Jake Pease, who slugged a home run earlier in the tournament, hit a double in the championship game. In a 6-3 semifinal win over North Whidbey, JoJo Welling went 3-for-3 with a home run and double, Matt Hillborn also went 3-for-3 with a double and Shane Losey added two singles. The North Whidbey 9/10 Little League softball team, which included two players from Central Whidbey, Mollie Bailey and Chelsea Prescott, thumped Sedro-

Woolley 17-7 July 8, at Volunteer Park to claim the District 11 championship and a berth in the state tournament. Prescott pitched the final two innings. She also threw a three-hit complete game with nine strikeouts in the semifinals. Cole Weinstein and Jillian Pape of the North Whidbey Aquatic Club represented Coupeville at the Pacific Northwest Swimming Championships July 25-28. Weinstein nabbed three top-20 finishes, while Pape finished in the top 30 twice.

August

Islanders’ soccer teams won two divisions in the Marysville Strawberry Classic Tournament Aug. 2-4. The GU-18 Islanders defended their title with two wins in three matches, and the GU15 Islanders swept their four matches to reach the winners’ circle. The second annual Race the Reserve Aug. 10 was a huge success for its sponsors, the parents of the class of 2014. The group met its goal of 350 runners and the race went off smoothly with the help of 60 volunteers, including 25 CHS seniors. James Steller of Coupeville placed second in the 10K. Paul Mendes resigned as the Coupeville High School boys soccer coaching, ending a 33-year coach career which included the final eight at CHS. Mendes won two state championships at Bellevue’s Newport High School and led the Wolves to the round of 16 twice, earning Coupeville’s first trip to state in 2009.

Coupeville High School began the fall season with two new coaches: Kirsty Croghan in volleyball and Troy Cowan in soccer.

September

Croghan picked up her first win as the Wolves defeated Port Townsend 3-0 Sept. 14. Stone, Jennifer Spark and Tori Wellman scored to lift Coupeville to a 3-2 win over Sultan Sept. 26 to give Cowan his first win. The Coupeville football team forced five turnovers and defeated host Nooksack Valley 20-12 Sept.27.

The University of Washington’s Tyler King placed 31st in the Pac-12 cross country championships in Colorado Nov. 2. Tumblin ran for 315 yards and the Coupeville High School football team closed out the season with a 54-0 win over Chimacum Nov. 8. Tumblin finished with over 1,000 yards for the season, and the Wolves won four games, equaling the total of the previous three years combined. The Cascade Conference announced its all-league honors Nov. 19. Stone was selected to the second team in soccer; and Breeanna Messner, Hammer and Amanda Fabrizi were honorable mention in volleyball. Sylvia Arnold stepped down as the Coupeville High School cheer coach after the football season ended in November. Arnold led the CHS cheer squad for 20 years, beginning in 1994 when her younger sister was a team member.

December

Streubel, a senior, was named to the Associated Press 1A all-state football team as a second-team offensive lineman.

Jim Waller photo

Sylvia Arnold stepped down this fall after 20 years as the Coupeville High School cheer coach.


Page 8

The Whidbey Examiner  •  January 2, 2014

whidbey island’s community calendar Friday, Jan. 3

Food Forest work party, noon-2 p.m., Jan. 4, next to Hal Ramaley Park on Bayshore Drive, Oak Harbor. Volunteer work parties to meet every Saturday at noon to help prepare for community garden downtown. Efforts will include soil building activities such as laying cardboard and compost as well as sharing ideas and plans for the future of the community garden. Volunteers will meet beside Hal Ramaley Park.

First Friday Photo Walks, noon, 2 p.m., 4 p.m., Jan. 3, Greenbank Farm, 765 Wonn Road. Greenbank Farm is offering a free opportunity for amateur photographers to join in with photographers David Sharpe and Tom Trimbath. They’ll be leading three different photo walks. Depending on the weather, you might be walking the ridge trail, catching the wigeons on the pond, or framing up images of the lights and decorations in the entryway. No matter, you’ll head home with a few tips shared amongst the photographers in the group. Bring camera and curiosity. Free. 360-678-7710, or dave@infoservice.com

Sunday, Jan. 5 Meet fine art photographer Kelly Kellogg, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Jan. 5 at Penn Cove Gallery. Kelly has more than 20 years experience capturing the scenic wonders of the Pacific Northwest. Kelly uses a variety of camera formats and photographic techniques in his art, bringing composition, exposure and light together in an interesting way. The end results are frequently realistic, sometimes impressionistic, but always memorable and unique. Penn Cove Gallery, Front Street, Coupeville. www.penncovegallery. com

Saturday, Jan. 4 Dance for actors workshop, 1-3 p.m., Jan. 4, Whidbey Playhouse, Oak Harbor. Eight-week workshop that will be taught jointly by Daunne Zinger and K. Sandy O’Brien. Begins Jan. 4 and is Saturdays, 1-3 p.m. Pre-registration required. 360-679-2237, or office@whidbeyplayhouse. com

sudoku Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.47)

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This week’s solution

Monday, Jan. 6 Whidbey to the Arctic on a bike, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Jan. 6, at Coupeville Library. In 2006, Pat Rodden took off on his bike from his Whidbey Island home and rode 2000 miles through the Canadian wilderness to the Northwest Territories. Hear the stories, enjoy the photos, and learn some tips on bicycle touring. Funded by Friends of the Coupeville Library.

Wednesday, Jan. 8 Senior Affairs Series, 2-3:30 p.m., Jan. 8, Coupeville Library. Rick Castellano will be showing the new video documenting the unique history of the Sunnyside Cemetery. It features stories and images of the pioneers that settled here. General discussion will follow. 360-632-5687. Wednesday Night with the Stars: “Oz the Great and Powerful,” 5:30 p.m., Jan 8. at Coupeville Library. When Oscar Diggs, a small-time circus magician with dubious ethics, is hurled away from dusty Kansas to the vibrant Land of Oz, he thinks he’s hit the jackpot—fame and fortune are his for the taking— that is until he meets three witches, Theodora, Evanora and Glinda, who are not convinced he is the great wizard everyone’s been expecting. Reluctantly drawn into the epic problems facing the Land of Oz and its inhabitants, Oscar must find out who is good and who is evil before it is too late. Putting his magical arts to use through illusion, ingenuity—and even a bit of wizardry—Oscar transforms himself not only into the great and powerful Wizard of Oz™ but into a better man as well. Popcorn provided by Friends of the Coupeville Library.

Thursday, Jan. 9 Ebey’s Forever grant workshop, 5:30-7 p.m., Jan. 9, Coupeville Library. If you own one of the many historically significant buildings within Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve, you’re encouraged to attend a workshop on how to apply for a 2014 Ebey’s Forever Grant. You’ll find out the how the grant works and what it means for your historically significant building. Hosted by the Trust Board of Ebey’s Landing NHR, this is a free workshop and open to the public. If you’re not sure if you’re building is on the Na-

tional Historic Register or need help in determining a workscope on your project, please call 360-678-6084.

Friday, Jan. 10 Seattle Opera Preview: Rigoletto, noon, Jan. 10 at Freeland Libray, 5495 Harbor Ave. Join Seattle Opera educator Robert McClung at the library for an engaging hourlong multimedia presentation that covers the basics of history, music and stagecraft of Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi. Hugely popular ever since its Venice premiere, Verdi’s tense and brutal tale of a deformed court jester caught in a web of corruption, lechery, and revenge runs the full emotional gamut in true operatic fashion. The iconic melodrama boasts an action-packed plot, memorably complex characters, and a hit parade of brilliant music. www.sno-isle.org

Saturday, Jan. 11 Legislative Brunch, League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island, 9:30 a.m., Jan. 11, Whidbey Golf Club, 2430 S.W. Fairway Lane, Oak Harbor. Speakers will be Sen. Barbara Bailey and Representatives Norma Smith and Dave Hayes. Cost $20. Checks may be sent by Jan. 6 to: LWV, P.O. Box 1933, Oak Harbor, WA 98277, or you may pay at the door. 360-675-5596.

Tuesday, Jan. 12 New camera for Christmas?, 5:30 p.m., Jan. 12 at Coupeville Library. This introductory class with local photographer Dave Sharpe will help you set up your new camera to make great images. Learn about ISO, aperture, white balance, and other settings your camera has available to you.

Saturday, Jan. 18 Memoir writing, Telling Your Story: A Quick Introduction to Writing Memoir, 10 a.m.-noon, Jan. 18, Langley Library. Do you have a story to tell? In this fun class, Margaret Bendet will show you how to write with ease as you explore your own personal stories. Bendet is a professional writer and editor who also creates personal and family memoirs as a hobby. Class size is limited; please preregister. 360-2214383.

Thursday, Jan. 23 Saratoga Chamber Orchestra Preview, 2 p.m., Jan. 23 at Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor Ave. Meet Chao Li, one of three finalists for the position of Artistic Director and Conductor of the Saratoga Chamber Orchestra. Mr. Li will give a talk about the upcoming “Brahms #1” concert in an informal meet and greet with the community. The concert will feature music of Puccini, Chausson and Brahms with guest soloist Whidbey’s own Gloria Ferry-Brennan on violin. www.sno-isle.org Introduction to Encaustic Painting, 1 p.m., Jan. 24, at Freeland Library, 5495 Harbor Ave. Encaustic artist Ron Ward will introduce you to the tools and demonstrate the methods for creating in this unique medium. Participants will have the opportunity to try their hand as well. Space is limited, so please preregister. www.sno-isle.org

Friday, Jan. 24 Art lesson, Introduction to Encaustic Painting, 1 p.m., Jan. 24, Freeland Library. Encaustic artist Ron Ward will introduce tools and demonstrate the methods for creating in this unique medium. Participants will have the opportunity to try their hand as well. Space is limited, so please preregister. Free. 360331-7323, or tmiller@sno-isle. org Star Party, begins at dark, Fort Nugent Park, 2075 S.W. Fort Nugent Road, Oak Harbor. Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas at this free public Star Party hosted by the Island County Astronomical Society. No telescope is needed and people of all ages are welcome to attend. Be sure and dress warmly and note that the event will be canceled if the weather is cloudy. 360-679-7664, or icaspub@ juno.com, or www.icas-wa. webs.com

Wednesday, Feb. 5 AARP TAX-AIDE Free Tax Return Preparation, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Feb. 5, at Oak Harbor Library, 1000 SE Regatta Drive. AARP Tax-Aide Program provides free tax return preparation to low and moderate income taxpayers with special attention to those age 60 and older. Please make a reservation for this service by calling 360-678-3000. You

will be asked to bring information and paperwork in order to have your 2013 tax return completed. www.sno-isle.org

Friday, Feb. 7 Nature books talk, 10-11 a.m., Feb. 7, Langley Library. Nature and its wonders are a source of endless delight, and literature has the power to inspire and nurture that love. What books have inspired you? Come join Susan Zwinger, author, field illustrator, and journaler, as she leads a thoughtful discussion of the books people loved that grew their love of nature. All are welcome. Supported by the Friends of the Langley Library. Free 360-221-4383.

Saturday, Feb. 8 Alfred Hitchcock talk, 1011:30 a.m., Feb. 8, Langley Library. The “Master of Suspense” is known for his scary movies, nail-biting thrillers, and innovative film techniques. But off the set, Alfred Hitchcock was a genius with many faces: obsessive, sadistic, unrelenting, and funny. Funded by the Friends of the Langley Library. Free. 360221-4383.

Sunday, Feb. 16 Fort Ebey Kettle Run, 10 a.m., Feb. 16, Fort Ebey State Park, Coupeville. 10K, Half-marathon, 20mile and full marathon trail run through Fort Ebey State Park. Run among forested kettle depressions on this rolling course with a blufftop finishing stretch and waterfront view. $27-60. 206200-2840, mark@mergeo. com, or www.nwtrailruns. com/content/fort-ebey-kettle-run

Thursday, Feb. 20 Orca presentation, “Orca Tribes of the Salish Sea,” 6:30-8 p.m., Feb. 20, Langley Library. The orca, or killer whale, is a wondrous creature that brings a thrill to the heart when spied in the waters off Whidbey. Learn more about these impressive beings, and the importance of providing them with healthy, safe habitats. Presented by Howard Garrett of Orca Network. 360-221-4383, or www.orcanetwork.org

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Call: 800-388-2527 E-mail: classified@ soundpublishing.com or Go Online 24 hours a day: www.nw-ads.com to place an ad in the Classifieds.


Page 10 January 2, 2014 Lost

jobs R E WA R D F O R L O S T cat! Large 15 lbs gray cat. Nuetered male with white muzzle, chin and belly plus 4 white paws. Answers to the name “Fred”. Last seen at our barn on 10/30, on Moran Road, just outside NAS Whidbey, Northgate. He has ID microchip under s k i n o n s h o u l d e r. I f found, call Bill Simon 360-679-4837. GAIL ~ PLEASE CALL AGAIN. Speak slowly, we could not contact you from the phone number we got on your message. Thank you so much for calling. Will gladly pick up, if you have any knowledge of him, good or bad, please call.

Employment General

CNA’s Part & Full Time

Please apply in person: Careage of Whidbey 311 NE 3rd Street Coupeville, WA. 360-678-2273

ISLAND COUNTY JOB OPENING Public Health Nurse II Public Health Coordinator

The Northwest’s largest www.islandcounty.net/hr for more information. classified network in EEOC. print and online. Go to nw-ads.com find Find your perfect pet what you need or to in the Classifieds. place an ad. www.nw-ads.com

www.whidbeyexaminer.com Employment General

Employment General

Employment General

AD SALES CONSULTANT

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE T h e Pe n i n s u l a D a i l y News is expanding it’s sales force. Opening for a well organized, creative professional with the ability to develop strong customer relationships. Manage an existing account base as well as developing new clients to meet ever changing marketing needs. Solid presentation skills and the ability to work in a team environment a must. Competitive compensation package including full benefits and 401K plan. Submit cover letter and resume to sperry@peninsula dailynews.com or by mail to Steve Perry Advertising Director Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362

REPORTER T h e C ov i n g t o n / M a p l e Valley Reporter, a division of Sound Publishing Inc. is seeking a seasoned general assignment reporter with writing exper ience and photography skills. This is a senior position and is based out of the Covington office. The primary coverage will be city government, business, sports, general assignment stor ies; and may include arts coverage. Schedule includes evening and/or weekend work. As a Reporter for Sound Publishing, you will be expected to: generate 8-10 by-line stories per week; use a digital camera to take photographs of the stories you cover ; post on the publication’s web site; blog and use Twitter on the web; layout pages, using InDesign; shoot and edit videos for the web. The most highly valued traits are: commitment to community jour nalism and ever ything from short, brieftype stories about people and events to examining issues facing the community; to be inquisitive and resourceful in the coverage of assigned beats; to be comfor table producing five bylined stories a week; the ability to write stories that are tight and to the point; to be a motivated self-starter; to be able to establish a rapport with the community. Candidates must have excellent communication and organizational skills, and be able to work effectively in a deadline-driven environment. Minimu m o f t wo ye a r s o f previous newspaper experience is required. Position also requires use of personal vehicle, possession of valid WA State Driver’s License and proof of active vehicle insurance. We offer a competitive hourly wage and benefits package including health insurance, paid time off (vacation, sick, and holidays), and 401K (currently with an employer match.) Email us your cover letter, resume, and include five examples of your best work showcasing your reporting skills and writing chops to:

Whidbey Island’s community newspapers seek an enthusiastic, creative individual to work with local businesses. Successful candidate must be dependable, detailoriented, possess exceptional customer serv i c e s k i l l s a n d e n j oy working in a team environment. Previous sales experience a plus; reliable insured transportation and good dr iving record required. We offer a solid base plus commission, work expense reimbursement, excellent health benefits, paid vacation, sick and holidays, 401K and a great work environment with opportunity to advance. EOE. Send resume with cover letter in PDF or Text format to kgraves@whidbeynewsgroup.com

kgraves@whidbey newsgroup.com or by mail to: PUBLISHER Whidbey News Group P.O. Box 1200, Coupeville, WA 98239 No calls, please. Find what you need 24 hours a day.

Log on to a website that’s easy to navigate Whether you’re buying or selling, the Classifieds has it all. From automobiles and employment to real estate and household goods, you’ll find everything you need 24 hours a day at

www.nw-ads.com.

Find what you need 24 hours a day.

sperry@peninsuladailynews.com

ISLAND COUNTY JOB OPENING SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION COORDINATOR www.islandcounty.net/hr

for more information. EEOC.

REPORTER The North Kitsap Herald, a Friday newspaper and daily online site located i n b e a u t i f u l Po u l s b o, Washington, is accepting applications for a fulltime sports and education reporter. The ideal candidate will have solid repor ting and writing skills, have up-to-date k n ow l e d g e o f t h e A P Stylebook, be able to shoot photos, be able to use InDesign and contribute to Web updates. This position includes health insurance, paid vacation, sick leave and holidays, and a 401k (with company match). The Herald, founded in 1901, was a 2012 Newspaper of the Year (Local Media Association) and a 2013 General Excellence winner (Washington Newspaper Publishers Association). If you want to work in an ambitious, dynamic newsroom, we want to hear from you. E.O.E. Email your resume, cover letter and up to 5 non-returnable writing and photo samples to hr@soundpublishing.com Or mail to EPNKH/HR Dept., Sound Publishing, 11323 Commando Rd W., Main Unit, Everett, WA 98204 www.soundpublishing.com

hreast@soundpublishing.com

or mail to: Sound Publishing, Inc. 19426 68th Avenue S. Kent, WA 98032, ATTN: HR/COV Sound Publishing is an Equal Opportunity Employer (EOE) and strongly supports diversity in the wor kplace. Check out our website to find out more about us! www.soundpublishing.com

www.nw-ads.com Employment General

Health Care Employment

Health Care Employment

Caregivers

General

Maple Ridge Currently Hiring

Skagit Farmers Supply Oak Harbor Countr y Store is now accepting applications for the following full time position:

RETAIL SALESPERSON Lawn & garden supplies and equipment knowledge a plus. It’s a great time to join our growing business! To read full job descriptions and instructions for applying, please visit: www.skagit farmers.com/careers Applications may also b e o b t a i n e d a t a ny Skagit Farmers Supply Country Store location. www.skagitfarmers.com/careers

WHIDBEY ARMS is hiring part-time Support & Sales Staff Our shop is growing and we need your help. Federal background check required and must present a personable demeanor. No phone calls please - email your resume and availability or stop by our shop at Kens Korner in Clinton. Multiple positions available. Reply to:

james@whidbeyarms.com

Reach thousands of readers by advertising your service in the Service Directory of the Classifieds. Get 4 weeks of advertising in your local community newspapers and on the web for one low price. Call: 1-800-388-2527 Go online: www.nw-ads.com or Email: classified@ soundpublishing.com Employment Transportation/Drivers

DRIVERS --It’s a great time to change! Haney Truck Line seeks topq u a l i t y, p r o fe s s i o n a l truck drivers for regional work! Earn up to .375 cents/mile. CDL A required. 1-888-414-4467. Apply online: www.gohaney.com OWNER/OPERATOR -Dedicated Home Weekly! Solos up to $175,000/year. $2500 Sign-on Bonus! Teams up to $350,000/year. $5,000 Sign-on Bonus! Forward Air 888-6525611 Find your perfect pet in the Classifieds. www.nw-ads.com

Whidbey Island, Mt. Vernon Days, Swing and Awake overnight, shifts available. Working with Adults with Disabilities. $10.50/hr, Paid training, KILLER benefits! Good for part timers too! EOE

Service Alternatives Call or email for info: 1-888-328-3339 employmentopps@ servalt.net employmentopps@servalt.net

Whidbey Island, Mt. Vernon

P/T MAINTENANCE POSITION Apply in person at: 1767 Alliance Ave. Freeland, WA. 98249 Business Opportunities

Make Up To $2,000.00+ Per Week! New Credit Card Ready Drink-Snack Vending Machines. Minimum $4K to $40K+ Investment Required. Locations Available. BBB A c c r e d i t e d B u s i n e s s. (800) 962-9189 Wo r k a n d Trave l * * * * 6 O p e n i n g s N ow , F u l l Time Travel, Paid Training, Transportation Provided, must be 18+. **BBB rated Company/ apply online www.protekchemical.com or www.mytraveljob.com 1877-252-9323 Extremely Fun Job.

Days, Swing and Awake overnight, shifts available. Working with Adults with Disabilities. $10.50/hr, Paid training, KILLER benefits! Good for part timers too! EOE

Service Alternatives Call or email for info: 1-888-328-3339 employmentopps@ servalt.net employmentopps@servalt.net

Health Care Employment

General

CNA’s Part & Full Time

Please apply in person: Careage of Whidbey 311 NE 3rd Street Coupeville, WA. 360-678-2273

stuff Auctions/ Estate Sales

OAK HARBOR Public Auction/ Landlord Lien Foreclosure Sale 1/13/14 at 10:30 AM.

1994 LEXIN 28X48 manufactured home VIN: 2T910659GAB Wagon Wheel MHP #7 2920 Heller Rd PH (360) 639-8148 Electronics

Maple Ridge Currently Hiring F/T P/T HCA/CNA/Med Tech Positions. Seeking motivated, caring, and responsible applicants. Apply in person at: 1767 Alliance Ave. Freeland, WA. 98249

Maple Ridge Currently Hiring HOUSEKEEPING POSITION Apply in person at: 1767 Alliance Ave. Freeland, WA. 98249

DirecTV - Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call Now! Triple savings! $636.00 in Savings, Free upgrade to Genie & 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free!! Star t saving today! 1-800-2793018 Dish Network lowest nationwide price $19.99 a month. FREE HBO/ Cinemax/Starz FREE Blockbuster. FREE HDDVR and install. Next day install 1-800-3750784 DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! & Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL - 877-9921237

Give someone the opportunity to stop and smell the roses… Reach thousands of subscribers by advertising your landscaping business in the Classifieds. Get 4 weeks of advertising in your local community newspaper and on the WEB for one low price! Call: (800) 388-2527 Go online: www.nw-ads.com or e-mail: classified@soundpublishing.com


www.nw-ads.com Wanted/Trade

M y C o m p u t e r Wo r k s. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections - FIX IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-866998-0037

*OLD ROLEX & PATEK P H I L I P P E WAT C H E S WA N T E D ! * * D ay t o n a , Sub Mariner, etc. TOP C A S H PA I D ! 1 - 8 0 0 401-0440

Dogs

GERMAN WIREHAIR Pointer Pups. AKC Registered. 12 Weeks Old. 1 Male, $700. 4 Females, $800 Each. Bred by Pro Dog Trainer. Natural Retrievers on Land or WaReach over a million ter. Good Pointers, Easy potential customers to Steady. Very Stylish when you advertise in a n d A t h l e t i c . H e l p with Training. the Service Directory. Available Wor med, First Shots, Call 800-388-2527 or go Health Guarantee. Call: 360-383-7164 online to nw-ads.com

flea market Flea Market

pets/animals

BEAUTIFUL heavy oval solid oak pedestal coffee table with scratch-free Dogs glass top. No room in new house. A steal at $150. 360-675-8397 LAWN MOWER Black D e cke r, 1 8 ” , e l e c t r i c . Purchased last fall, used 3 times on small lawn, moved to no lawn care, like new condition. $150. Still under warranty. ascend36k@aol.com or A B S O L U T E L Y call 360 279 0355 ADORABLE Miniature Au s t r a l i a n S h e p h e r d Free Items pups. 6 weeks, ready Recycler just in time for ChristFREE: GE Stove and mas. So much cuter in Refrigerator, both need person! Beautiful markcleaning. Also Hide-a- ings, many blue eyes. bed sofa with mattress. Ve r y e n e r g e t i c , i n You haul. 360-321-2162 credibly smar t people Freeland area pleasers. Should be FREE: Mini-Mate Organ. 20-30 lbs mature. Can Needs work? Not sure work in apartment setwhat it needs. You haul ting if exercised regularly. Wormed, docked, first 360-424-4141 shots, one year genetic health guarantee. Sold Mail Order as pets only. You won’t be disappointed! $450. Canada Drug Center is 360-697-9091 Poulsbo your choice for safe and sayheytj@comcast.net affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90% on all your medication needs. Call today 1-800-418-8975, for $10.00 off your first prescription and free shipping. Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7 monitoring. FREE E q u i p m e n t . F R E E ABSOLUTELY Adorable S h i p p i n g . N a t i o n w i d e Purebred Pitbull PupService. $29.95/Month p i e s. B l u e B l o o d l i n e. CALL Medical Guardian B o r n O c t o b e r 2 8 t h , 2 0 1 3 . 1 s t S h o t s, D e Today 866-992-7236 wormed. Family Raised. VIAGRA 100mg or CI- $ 3 5 0 . o b o. 2 5 3 - 7 5 3 ALIS 20mg. 40 tabs + 10 0423 FREE all for $99 including FREE SHIPPING. Discreet, Fast Shipping. 888-836-0780 or premiummeds.net Wanted/Trade

CASH for unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! Free Shipping, Friendly Service, BEST p r i c e s a n d 2 4 h r p ay ment! Call today 1- 877588 8500 or visit www.TestStripSearch.com Espanol 888-440-4001 *OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Gibson, Mar tin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prair ie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-4010440

January 2, 2014 Page 11

www.whidbeyexaminer.com

Electronics

AKC Mini Longhair Dachshund. Only one Female left! First shots and wormed. Dew claws removed. Ready to go Call 360-675-0128. AKC YORKSHIRE Terrier puppies. Tea cups & smaller then usual sizes. An adorable 10 weeks old. First shots and wormed. All ears stick up, brown teddy bear faces with black backs. Adorable, pick you new friend for the new year, today! 4 boys at $950 each. 3 girls at $1,575 each. 360-384-3181.

ROTTWEILER Purebred Puppies, sweet, great temperament, fa m i l y - ra i s e d , n i c e markings, lst shots, wormed, dew claws & tails done, $585 & up, joann@ scattercreek.com 360-910-0995 STANDARD POODLE

AKC POODLE Standard Super sweet puppies, very intelligent & family raised! Two year health guarantee. Adult weight b e t we e n 5 0 - 5 5 l b s. Black coloring; 2 litters 15 puppies available. 3 Brown coloring. 13 Black coloring. Accepting puppy deposits now! $1,000 each. Please call today 503-556-4190.

wheels Automobiles Jeep

1995 JEEP Grand Cherokee. Red, V8, 4 wheel dr ive, Needs work. $1500 obo. 360341-1387 Vehicles Wanted

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Makes!. Free Towing! We’re Local! 7 Days/Week. Call 1-800959-8518 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Tr u c k T O D AY. F r e e Towing! Instant Offer: 1-888-545-8647

LEGAL NOTICES SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR ISLAND COUNTY In the Estate of: PATRICIA ANN SOLT, Deceased. NO. 13 4 00245 2 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of the above estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim wo u l d b e b a r r e d by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address below stated a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty (30) days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided u n d e r R C W 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, t h e c l a i m i s fo r eve r barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the deced e n t ’s p r o b a t e a n d non-probate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: December 26, 2013 Personal Representative: Amanda Sue Neighbours 4531 Alamo Way Oak Harbor, WA 98277 /s/Paul A. Neumiller PAUL A. NEUMILLER, WSBA #28124 Attorney for Personal Representative Address: 390 NE Midway Blvd., Suite B201 Oak Harbor, WA 98277-2680 T e l e p h o n e : (360) 675-2567 Court of Probate Proceedings and Cause Number: 13 4 00245 2 Superior Court Of Washington For Island County LEGAL NO. 534623 Published: The Whidbey Examiner December 26, 2013 and Januar y 2, 9, 2014.

t e r e d b a n k s, a t t h e time of sale the following described real proper ty, situated in the County of Thurston, State of Washington, to wit: PARCELA: THE SOUTH HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE SOUTHEAST Q UA RT E R O F T H E NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHE A S T QUA RT E R I N SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 33 NORTH, RANGE 2 EAST OF THE WlLLlAMETTE MERIDIAN; (ALSO KNOWN AS LOT 2 OF SHORT PLAT 71-101 , R E C O R D E D O C TO BER 27, 1971, UNDER AUDITOR’S FILE NO, 245154, RECORDS OF ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON), SITU AT E IN THE COUNTY OF ISLAND, STATE OF WASHINGTON. PARCEL B: THE NORTH 110 FEET OF THE SOUTH 305 FEET OF THE EAST 90 FEET OF THE WEST 200 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST Q UA RT E R O F T H E SOUTHEAST QUARTER IN SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 33 NORTH, RANGE 2 EAST OF THE WlLLlAMETTE MERIDIAN. S I T U AT E I N T H E COUNTY OF ISLAND, STATE OF WASHINGTO N . PA R C E L C : A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES REC O R D E D AU G U S T 10, 1971, UNDER AUD I TO R ’ S F I L E N O. 242935 AND AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED MARCH 15, 1974, UNDER AUD I TO R ’ S F I L E N O. 270800, RECORDS OF ISLAND COUNTY WASHINGTON; ALSO A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES RECORDED OCTOBER 10, 1973, UNDER AUD I TO R ’ S F l L E ; N O. 269168, RECORDS OF ISLAND COUNTY, WASHINGTON. SITUATE IN THE COUNTY O F I S L A N D, S TAT E O F WA S H I N G T O N . which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 7/24/2007, recorded on 7/31/2007, a s I n s t r u m e n t N o. 4208272 of Official Records in the Office of the County Recorder o f I s l a n d C o u n t y, Washington, from SUSAN K BURROW, AS HER SEPERATE ESTATE as the original Grantor(s), to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS U R A N C E C O M PA N Y, A C A L I F O R N I A C O R P O R AT I O N , a s the original Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of OPTION ONE

MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Beneficiary. The current Beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Trustee for Soundview Home L o a n Tr u s t 2 0 0 7 OPT5, Asset-Backed C e r t i f i c a t e s, S e r i e s 2007-OPT5, More commonly known as 3337 GARFIELD CT , OAK HARBOR, WA II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Tr u s t / M o r t g a g e . I I I . The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary;. The total amount of payments due is: $15,189.00; the total amount of late charges due is $403.31; the total amount of advances made is/are $2,094.11. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $167,358.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 9/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided b y s t a t u t e . V. T h e above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 1/10/2014. If the defaults is subject to reinstatement r e fe r r e d t o i n Pa ra graph III must be cured by 1 2 / 3 0 / 2 0 1 3 , ( 1 1 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. If default is subject to reinstatement, sale will be discontinued and terminated if a t a n y t i m e b e fo r e 12/30/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default(s) as set forth in Pa ra gra p h I I I i s / a r e cured and the Tr ustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 12/30/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the

D e e d o f Tr u s t , p l u s costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the tenms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): 3337 GARFIELD CT OAK HARBOR, WA98277-7873 3337 NORTH 375TH EAST OAK HARBOR, WA 98277 by both first class and certified mail on 4/12/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Tr ustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Pa r a g r a p h I a b o ve , and the Tr ustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described proper ty. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds fo r i n va l i d a t i n g t h e Tr u s t e e ’s s a l e. N O TICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the proper ty on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE

FORECLOSURE S A L E O F YO U R HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DEL AY. C O N TA C T A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. S e e b e l o w fo r s a fe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determing your rights and opp o r t u n i t i e s t o ke e p your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Comm i s s i o n : To l l - f r e e : 1-877-894-HOME (4663); Website:http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/hom e o w n e r ship/foreclosure_help.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Developm e n t Te l e p h o n e : 888-995-HOPE (4673) W e b s i t e : http://www.hud.gov/off i c es/hsg/sfh/hcc/hcs.cfm? w e b L i s t A c tion=search&seachstate=WA The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and att o r n e y s Te l e p h o n e : 1-800-606-4819 Website: www.ocla.wa.gov SALE INFORMATION C A N B E O B TA I N E D ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOM AT E D S A L E S I N FORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 DAT E D : Au g u s t 2 0 , 2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSUR A N C E C O M PA N Y, Trustee 11000 Olson Drive Ste 101 Rancho C o r d ova , C A 9 5 6 7 0 P h o n e N o : 916-636-0114 John Catching, Authorized Signature P1058092 12/12, 01/02/2014 Legal No. 531553 Published: The Whidbey Examiner. December 12, 2013 and January 02, 2014.

TS No: 13-00070-5 Loan No: 7142018212 APN: 101151 AND 101106 NOTICE OF T RU S T E E ’ S S A L E PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 1/10/2014, 10:00 AM, At the main entrance to Oak Harbor City Hall l o c a t e d a t 8 6 5 S. E . Barrington Drive, Oak Harbor, WA. , Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, the undersigned Tr ustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the for m of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State char-

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Page 12

The Whidbey Examiner  •  January 2, 2014

Review: November election sees returning names and several new faces From page 3 two years, the Washington State Auditor’s Office found. n Coupeville Lions Club held its annual garage sale at the middle school. The event was widely attended and is one of the club’s main fundraisers each year. n Heni Barnes earned first place in the Senior Individual Documentary division at National History Day in College Park, Md. n Whidbey General Hospital commissioners voted to put a $50-million expansion proposal on the ballot. n The majority of people attending a public meeting at Coupeville Recreation Hall said they wanted the Navy to close the Outlying Field near the town.

July n Mark Priess resigns his position as manager of Ebey’s Landing Historic Reserve. Lisbeth Cort was named acting manager in his place. n Island County Commissioner Kelly Emerson and her husband settled one

Pearl & Bead Stringing

part of a three-year dispute with the county planning department by agreeing to pay $5,000 in fines, which was a fraction of the $37,000 fine levied against them for building code and critical areas violations. n County commissioners Helen Price Johnson and Jill Johnson voted to revoke Commissioner Kelly Emerson’s status as chairperson after she sent out special-meeting notices against the will of the board majority. n Members of Coupeville United Methodist Church served more than 200 pounds of strawberries during the annual Strawberry Social. n Coupeville Liquor Store announced its closing at the end of the summer. n A Central Whidbey man was arrested after leading deputies on a slow-speed chase down State Highway 20 on a stolen John Deere farm tractor. n Citizens of the Ebey’s Reserve filed a lawsuit against Whidbey Island Naval Air Station in federal court, alleging that the Navy failed to meet requirements outlined in the National Environmental Protection Act in regard to practice at the Outlying Field in Central Whidbey. The group asked a federal judge to require an in-depth review, known as an environmental impact statement; the Navy later announced it would conduct

an EIS and halt practices at OLF for the year. n Joseph Itaya, a 1996 graduate of South Whidbey High School, announced plans to film his first feature film on Whidbey Island. His plans for filming fell through, but he is still hoping for the future.

Landing last week to install a cedar shake roof on the Comstock Barn, which is located off Engle Road south of Coupeville. n Karla Jacks, a Camano Island resident, announced she will run for the county commissioner seat currently occupied by Kelly Emerson.

August

September

n Coupeville resident Jim Sebastian won $440,000 playing Washington’s Lottery Hit 5 game. The winning ticket was purchased at Coupeville Country Store.

n An episode of “Shut Up and Drive” was filmed in Ebey’s Landing as part of the Fox Sports 1 TV show. The segment featured race car drivers racing around a sharp corner on Hill Road.

n Greenbank Farm held its annual Loganberry Festival, which featured pie eating contests, live music, food and more. n Island County Commissioner Jill Johnson pushed officials to drop plans for a law-and-justice ballot measure, which would have increased property taxes to increase funding for the sheriff’s office, the prosecutor’s office and the courts. n Artist and vendors filled the streets of downtown Coupeville for the 49th annual Coupeville Arts and Crafts Festival. All proceeds from the festival go back into the community each year in the form of grants to other community organizations. n Students participating in the University of Oregon’s Pacific Northwest Field School visited Ebey’s

October

n Downtown Coupeville became a wireless hotspot with the help of the Coupeville Historic Waterfront Association. The organization headed a project to make wifi access available in the downtown cooridor.

n The shutdown of the federal government furloughed employees at Whidbey Island Naval Air Station. n Harvest Fest raises $10,000 for Gifts of the Heart food bank with its annual relay race.

n Citizens of Ebey’s Reserve held a meeting with experts to discuss the health effects of jet noise.

n Hundreds of people filled Front Street for the annual Halloween Torchlight Parade.

December

n Coupeville School Board discusses renewing two levies in early 2014, including a technology levy.

n The Coupeville Arts and Craft Festival Association awarded $30,000 in grants to local organizations.

n Fewer students means fewer funds for Coupeville Schools. The district braces for an estimated $124,000 less in its 2013-2014 budget.

n A jury found 63-yearold Robert “Al” Baker of Greenbank guilty of murdering his wife, Kathie Baker, in June of 2012.

n Town of Coupeville approved a $5.1 million budget for 2014.

n The guild for sheriff’s deputies claimed county officials don’t understand their budget and demands that the county retain an outside budget expert. The county declines.

n Whidbey Island Bank announced a merger with Olympia-based Heritage Financial Corporation.

n Lyla and Phil Snover were the 2013 Greening of Coupeville parade grand marshals. n Coupeville School District got a new phone system and with it, new phone numbers.

November n Voters approved a $50 million bond for Whidbey General Hospital’s new expansion.

n The Navy announces it will conduct an Environmental Impact Statement for Outlying Field and Whidbey Island Naval Air Station. n Port of Coupeville hires new director Tim McDonald, who began in December. n Gifts of the Heart food bank announced a new program providing weekly food supplies to needy students at Coupeville Elementary.

n Pat Powell was elected to serve on Coupeville Town Council in place of Larry Cort, who did not seek reelection. Vanessa Matros, Chris Chan, Glenda Merwine and Kathleen Anderson all ran uncontested for Coupeville School Board. Mike Diamanti and Bill Larsen were elected to the Port of Coupeville.

n The Navy announced it will limit the number of practice touch-and-goes at the Outlying Field. n Local historian Roger Sherman was honored by the Island County Historical Society for his years of service. n Coupeville Rec Hall will get a new heating system after the existing furnace dies.

Whidbey Island Worship Guide 

Call today for an appointment.

1609 E. Main Street Freeland 360.221.6111 www.lindsjewelry.com

Open Sundays

Come join us for Lutheran Worship Services in Coupeville! Pacific Rim Institute St. Mary’s Church Sundays • 6:30pm Oak Harbor Lutheran Church invites everyone to experience a casual evening of prayer, worship and friendship in Coupeville. Call 679-1561 for information. WELCOME TO

St. Mary’s Catholic Church MASS SCHEDULE

Sundays • 11:15 am & Thursday • 12:10 pm 207 N. Main St., Coupeville • www.staugustineoh.org

THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH ON WHIDBEY ISLAND WELCOMES EVERYONE!

St. Augustine’s in-the-Woods

Julie Spangler, Director of Christian Formation Nigel J. Taber-Hamilton, Rector

Sunday Eucharist 8 & 10:30 am

Child care available at 10 am Youth programs at 10:30 am Sept - June 5217 S. Honeymoon Bay Rd Freeland • 360-331-4887 www.staugustinesepiscopalchurch.org

Coupeville United Methodist Church

8:45 Contemporary Service 10:00 Sunday School 11:00 Traditional Service

Child care available Pastor Jin Ming Ma 608 N. Main St. • 360-678-4256

A Church, A Family

A Spiritual Home Grace By The Sea An Anglican Expression of Faith The Rev. Paul Orritt

SUNDAY SERVICE

8:00 AM TRADITIONAL WORSHIP SERVICE 9:15 AM SUNDAY SCHOOL 9:30 AM FAMILY WORSHIP SERVICE www.gracebythesea.org

Island Vineyard Community Church Pastor James Gallagher

9:15 AM SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:00 AM WORSHIP SERVICE www.islandvineyard.org

2 Churches - 1 Building 679-3431 555 SE Regatta Dr., Oak Harbor

ISLAND VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH

LINDs highly qualified pearl and bead stringing expert Pamella, can help you with all your needs.

GRACE BY THE SEA • AN ANGLICAN EXPRESSION OF FAITH

To advertise in this directory, call the Whidbey Examiner at 360-678-8060.


Whidbey Examiner, January 02, 2014