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SERVING WASHINGTON’S

OKANOGAN VALLEY

SINCE 1905

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE WWW.GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | 75 CENTS NEWSSTAND PRICE

Father and son accused in killing appear in court Suspected of shooting grouse hunter, each held on $1 million bail BY ZACHARY VAN BRUNT SPECIAL TO THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

OKANOGAN – Two Chesaw men remain behind bars this week after at least one of them allegedly shot and killed a Hoquiam man who was hunting grouse near their property in September. John W. Jennings, 57, and his son Adam S. Jennings, 27, both made prelim-

inary appearances in Okanogan County neither man spoke much. Both were Superior Court last week. The two men, assigned public defenders, though speeach picked up on cific attorneys arrest warrants, were have yet to be charged with firstdetermined. Their degree premeditated “He described the shot as a arraignment was murder. for Dec. .22 caliber.... He was certain scheduled Authorities con2. tinue to hold both In addition to the two shots came from suspects in sepamurder charges, (the Jennings home)” rate cells at the Adam Jennings Okanogan County was also charged Witness statement to Detective Rob Heyen, from court documents Corrections Center. with unlawful Bail was set at $1 possession of firemillion each. arms. His father During their first court appearance, was charged with delivering firearms to

Getting ready for the holidays

an ineligible person. The men are accused of the Sept. 1 shooting of Michael R. Carrigan, 52, Hoquiam, while Carrigan was hunting near the Jennings’ property along Pontiac Ridge Road. Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said the case is still under investigation, John W. Jennings and that officials are waiting for more results from ballistics testing. There appears to be no motive as of last week,

he said. Okanogan County Prosecutor Karl Sloan said he moved forward with murder charges on both men, regardless of who allegedly pulled the trigger. “A person can be charged with the same crime based on accomplice liability,” he said. “And that’s Adam S. Jennings what we’re doing in this case.” Carrigan was found dead roughly 150

SEE KILLING | PG A2

Free holiday dinner offered

POPPER CROP

Thanksgiving celebrations in Oroville, Chesaw

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

NORTH COUNTY – Tonasket and Oroville will be celebrating the upcoming Christmas Holidays with Winterfest, a lighted tractor parade and the traditional community Christmas Tree lightings. Tonasket Winterfest is slated for Friday and Saturday, Dec. 6-7, with some events beginning on Thursday. Friday night’s Winterfest celebration begins at Founders’ Day Park at 5:30 p.m. The Hyde brothers’ A Cavallo carousel will be on site with lights and rides available. Also scheduled is Santa’s arrival on a fire truck at about 6:00 p.m., with the Eaglessponsored wood cutting contest running from 6:30-8:00 p.m. Other activities will include caroling, music in the gazebo, chili offered by the Tonasket Co-Op, roasted chestnuts from the Lions Club; hot chocolate from the Kiwanis, fire truck rides and face painting inside the TVBRC, as well as other foods and fundraising items from various local groups. In Oroville, the annual Oroville Tree Lighting Ceremony will take place on Saturday, Dec. 7 at Centennial Park. There will be free hot dogs and hot cocoa available. The Tree Lighting Ceremony will also include nearly 30 singers from the Okanagan International Chorus. The event concludes with a visit from Santa as well as free hot dogs and hot cocoa. Prior to lighting up the tree will be a lighted Christmas Tractor Parade down Main Street. “Akin’s Harvest Foods, in addition to providing the hot dogs and cocoa at the Tree Lighting in Centennial Park, will also be providing $200 in prizes to the first and second place tractor entries, and 5 other honorable mention awards,” said Clyde Andrews, president of the Oroville Chamber of Commerce. The Parade will start at 5 p.m. on Saturday at the High School and will conclude at Centennial Park (next to Sun Lakes Realty) on Main Street. Anyone that would like to enter their tractor in the parade should contact Sandy Andrews at the Camaray Motel (509) 476-3684.

BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

The first crop has been harvested from the Tonasket School District’s school garden, and Christine Olson’s Elementary Outreach class of kindergarten through third graders were eager to show off the fruits of their labor on Friday, Nov. 21. Ambassador Abby and her classmates explained that a crop of Tom Thumb popcorn was planted with the help of older students last spring to enrich the soil for future crops of vegetables,. Once harvested, the hardened kernels were stripped from the cobs and then oil-popped for the class to enjoy. “We were the only class that was involved all the way from the beginning,” Olson said. “We wanted to be one of the first classes in our school garden to try something we grew. We hope we inspire some of the other classes to try some things next spring.” Brent Baker/staff photos

Free Thanksgiving dinners are being offered in Oroville and Chesaw this Thursday and everyone is invited to come in and share the holiday with family, friends and neighbors. The dinner in Oroville is put together by Eva’s Diner with help serving from several local volunteers, dinner starts at 1 p.m. at the diner located at 712 14th Ave., and goes to 5 p.m. The free traditional turkey Thanksgiving dinner will include all the trimmings, as well as a selection of different pies for desert, including pumpkin and apple. John Desjardin, from Hometown Pizza and Pasta will be helping prepare some of the pies. Eva’s is carrying out a tradition started many years ago by Linda’s Bakery which was located at the same spot. Another traditional turkey dinner with all the trimmings is being offered at the Chesaw Community Hall from noon to 3 p.m. The dinner is being put on by the Chesaw Community Bible Church and all that is asked is you bring your appetites. After dinner there will be pumpkin pie for desert, say organizers.

Oroville looks at $8.3 million budget New budget will complete several 2013 projects BY GARY A. DEVON MANAGING EDITOR

OROVILLE – The Oroville City Council is looking at a 2014 budget of $8,267,700, about $204,600 more than the amended 2013 budget, according to City Clerk Kathy Jones. Jones told the mayor and

OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE Volume 109 No. 48

council at the preliminary budget hearing held during the Nov. 19 council meeting that most of the increase was due to carryovers. These include the Central/Cherry Street water main replacement and STP street improvement project; the payment of the new ambulance, which was delayed until 2014 and a carryover of the tank and installation portion of the North End Reservoir Project. “There are no proposed utility rate increases at this time,” Jones said, adding that the next budget workshop is scheduled for Nov. 26 at 6:30 p.m.

OLD BUSINESS

The council agreed to reduce a water penalty by 50 percent if the water bill was paid in full or a payment schedule was created. If a payment plan is submitted it would stop future penalties from accruing, which is allowed under the city ordinance if the council agrees, according to Jones. “I’d be comfortable with that... there were some very extenuating circumstances,” said Councilman Tony Koepke. The rest of the council agreed as long as the discussed conditions were met. Rod Noel, Superintendent of Public Works, reported on the progress of construction of the new water reservoir that will

serve the North End Water System and the new U.S. Border Patrol Station near the border. “We are still waiting on the tank, it is supposed to arrive on Dec. 9 and they will start putting it together that day depending on the weather,” said Noel. He added that it has to be warm enough to use a certain type of glue involve in the construction. “Once the ground gets frozen really hard it is a nightmare,” he said Chris Branch, director of Community Development, reported on the proposed Mosquito District and gave an

SEE BUDGET | PG A2

INSIDE THIS EDITION

CONTACT US Newsroom and Advertising (509) 476-3602 gdevon@gazette-tribune.com

update on the Similkameen Trailhead. “We had an open house on the Mosquito District to discuss boundaries in the Oroville area and nobody came. We also didn’t have a quorum of planning commissioners,” said Branch. “It’s the wrong time of year,” suggested Councilman Ed Naillon. “If the bite was on they would be here in full force,” replied Branch, who suggested more discussion on the actual boundaries of the Oroville and surrounding areas part of the district.

Letters/Opinion A4 Community A5-6 Obituaries A7

Cops & Courts A7 Schools B1 Sports B2,3,6

Classifieds/Legals B4-5 Real Estate B6


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Secret Service investigating fraud THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

SPOKANE - According to a an announcement posted by URM Stores, Inc., of Spokane late Monday afternoon, law enforcement officials are investigating a criminal cyber attack against the grocery store chain’s payment processing system that has resulted in numerous reports of credit and debit card fraud throughout the region. KREM television in Spokane

also reported Monday that Secret Service agents have joined the investigation into fraudulent purchases made at URM stores throughout Eastern Washington. Store banners include Family Foods, Harvest Foods, Center Place Market, Trading Co. Stores, Rosauers Supermarkets, Super 1 Foods, and Yokes Fresh Market. According to the release, which can be read in its entirety at www. urmstores.com, many grocery stores may not be accepting debit

or credit transactions until the investigation is completed and security upgrades are enacted. The attack is targeting the data found in the magnetic strips on the back of credit/debit cards. Investigators encourage the use of check or cash at URM stores, as well as close monitoring of transactions on debit and credit accounts. URM has set up a dedicated call center regarding the issue at 877-237-7408.

HAIRCUTS AND MORE

KILLING | FROM A1 yards from the Jennings residence around 8 p.m. on Labor Day. His hunting partner, George Stover, also Hoquiam, said Carrigan took two shots at a grouse – firing away from the Jennings house – and missed. Then “somebody at a house across the road started shooting at him,” he told investigators at the time. The cause of Carrigan’s death was later ruled as a gunshot wound to the back. According to a statement from sheriff ’s Detective Rob Heyen, Stover did not see who shot Carrigan. “He described the shot as a .22-caliber from his years of hunting experience,” the statement says. “He was certain the two shots came from (the Jennings home).” After securing a search warrant, authorities uncovered a substantial number of firearms on the property – 18 in total – including seven loaded weapons in Adam Jennings’ bedroom. Of the firearms seized, none were registered to the younger Jennings. The weapons that were registered returned in John Jennings’ name. Ammunition was also seized, including numerous boxes of Stinger.22 long rifle bullets that are similar in color and structure as the one found in Carrigan’s body. The bullets Stover was hunting with were a different color. Officials have since ruled him out

as the shooter. During the search, detectives discovered a window in the Jennings home where Carrigan would have been clearly visible. Court documents show that the window’s aluminum frame had scrape marks on it that authorities said appeared to be from a rifle barrel moving across it. A wall-mounted gun rack was found covered in dust except for the top rung. There authorities found sections clean from dust, indicating an object had been recently removed. A gun safe was found, which included a .22-caliber rifle with a mount scope that had “light, metallic colored scrape marks,” documents read. “These marks were consistent with the rifle being pointed out the aluminumframed window and bumping the frame and sliding on the round bar at the bottom.” That gun had dust on it, which detectives say indicate it had not previously been held in the safe. Officials interviewed both Jennings men separately. Both denied shooting Carrigan, or even firing a weapon. Both men said they heard two shots from the road, that they took cover laying on the floor of their home, and that they heard two additional shots and a vehicle driving away. Both father and son have a criminal history involving fire-

arms. In 2003, a then-17-year-old Adam Jennings pleaded guilty in Okanogan County Juvenile Court to second-degree assault. He was sentenced to 15-36 weeks in a state juvenile detention facility. According to court documents, he opened fire on a neighboring family, firing off 20-30 shots after they were shooting at a pack of dogs that had killed one of their cows. The neighbors believed the dogs belonged to the Jennings family. Documents also show that Adam Jennings was initially charged with four counts of second-degree assault. The court later dismissed three of those charges. As part of his sentence, the man lost his right to possess firearms until restored by the courts. According to probable cause documents filed last week, no such rights have been restored, hence the additional charge of illegal possession of firearms. Five years prior, in 2008, John Jennings pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful display of a firearm, a charge brought down from second-degree assault. He received a 364-day suspended sentence after threatening two people with a firearm in an apparent property dispute. According to court documents, John Jennings admitted to firing a shot after initially denying it.

ingness to go along with helping us where his department can,” said Branch, referring to county planning department head Perry Huston. “Some of the dollars were donated by Kinross and some are Title III federal funds. The commissioners can’t touch those and they can’t be used for much else,” he said. There is also the question of whether the city would be willing to maintain the trailhead on Kernan Road, work on the rest rooms and finish the parking lot. “Some of these things have to be addressed to get further along,” said Branch. Supt. Noel also reported that additional time is required for

Dan Haller, Aspect Consulting, to keep working on finalizing the water rights transfer that the city has been working on for several years. A Contract Amendment, increasing the fee by $2000 and extending the contract term through Dec. 31, 2013 was reviewed. The council agreed that much time, effort and money has been spent on getting this transfer processed through the Department of Ecology that the city can’t afford to quit before it is finalized. The next meeting of the Oroville City Council is scheduled for Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. in the Oroville City Council Chambers located at 1308 Ironwood St.

BUDGET | FROM A1 Branch asked and got approval for a resolution allowing those areas within the city limits to be included in the formation of the district. “We’re still working on rounding up and coordinating all the parties involved in the trailhead, like Okanogan County Public Works, DOT, the county planning department,” said Branch. “Right now the city is not in a position to take over the that federal grant. Our bid laws are much more restrictive than the county’s.” Branch suggested that the county might bust parts of the proposed improvements out to be completed as they can. “Perry has expressed his will-

Gary DeVon/staff photo

Corene Curtis has moved and started her own business, Haircuts and More, at 718 Central Ave in Oroville. The Oroville native has many years of experience cutting hair, as well as giving perms. Haircuts and More is open for men, women and children. No appointments are necessary. She is also offering perms, she says. Curtis is inviting people to come in for a haircut, perm or just to say hello and have a cup of coffee. Haircuts and More is open Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Wednesday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. She may be reached at (847) 946-1078 or by email at corene-curtis@hotmail.com.

Otte returns home as new NVH occupational therapist BY BRENT BAKER BBAKER@GAZETTE-TRIBUNE.COM

TONASKET - Aloe Otte didn’t set out to be an occupational therapist. In fact, for a time she was working in Seattle, applying her Recreational Management degree to managing an indoor Go-Kart racing facility. “I had a really good time with that,” she said recently. “ I just felt like I wanted to contribute a little bit more. I just really enjoy helping people and serving others. I wanted more; I just didn’t know what.” That desire for more led Otte on a path that eventually returned her to her hometown, where she has been working as North Valley Hospital’s newest occupational therapist since June. The 1997 Tonasket High School graduate didn’t envision returning home when she left -- first for some European travel, then for Eastern Washington University after returning home and working at the school through Americorps. “There were things I took for granted when I was younger, like the outdoors,” Otte said. “I just love being back in the area and being able to do that stuff and spend time with the family. I never thought I would end up back here. But it was definitely meant to be .” When she realized she wouldn’t be satisfied with a life of managing Go-Karts, Otte had never heard of occupational therapy. But in researching graduate programs, the description she found of what they had to offer fit what she was looking for without her really even knowing it beforehand. “A big influence was my grandmother going through

Aloe Otte Alzheimer’s,” she said. “My mom was her caregiver for a little bit. I saw that process and the effect it had on everyone around her. “I just felt like there was something more that could have made her quality of life better. And that’s the big thing with occupational therapy: our slogan is, ‘Living life to the fullest.’” Otte finds the slogan more than appropriate. Her job involves helping people to be able to find ways to function in their desired environment, whether it be recovering from a suddenly acquired disability or learning to cope with something they’ve dealt with for a long time. “That can mean adapting the environment, or introducing adaptive equipment to increase their independence,” she said. “Or it could be working with the person with things like strengthening. I do a lot with self-care activities, getting the person back to where they need to be as far as dressing, bathing, and living safely to their desired environment. To be as independent and

functional as possible. “I’ve also done work station evaluations, ergonomics, and that kind of thing. Occupational therapists can work in a school setting. Or it can be acute care, skilled nursing, outpatient, or women’s health. It can be very general or very specific.” Otte said that variety, as well as the “client centered” nature of the work, makes it easy to envision staying with it for the long haul. “One lady I talked to had been an occupational therapist for 17 years,” she said. “The reason she did it for so long was because there were so many different areas. She could switch areas when she felt like she was getting close to burning out. “It really is about what the patient wants and needs. If I feel like they can do this and this, but all they want to do is go from their recliner to the commode, that’s what we’ll focus on. I may try to add a little encouragement to try some different things, and make life as meaningful as it can be.” As for coming home to join the NVH staff, it was all about family and bringing up her six-yearold daughter in the kind of rural environment she preferred. “Going through my internship I felt like if I was going to put so much time into this career, I didn’t want my daughter at childcare all day long,” Otte said. “I have support and my family here, so I contacted the hospital, toured the facility and met people, had an interview ... Everything just kind of fell into place and I ended up moving here. “It’s been great seeing people I haven’t seen in awhile,” she added. “I’m really excited to be back in Tonasket and to be able to give something back to the community that I grew up in.”

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 28, 2013

THE TOWN CRIER

Thanksgiving is a good time to stop and reflect

While it should be easy to write my column at Thanksgiving time, what’s hard is to try and make it sound different from last year’s column, or all those from Thanksgivings past. I’m still thankful for my family and friends. Like many of us, they make it worth getting up in the morning. Unfortunately, we don’t always see as much of them as we’d like, but when we do, it makes it extra special. This year I won’t be seeing my daughter, son-in-law and granddaughter, health issues make traveling just too hard for them at this point. Son-in-law Alex got his liver transplant, so for that I am especially grateful. There just isn’t time this year to drive to the coast and that means I won’t see my middle brother, sister-and-law and Out of nephew either. My youngest brother is still on My Mind Guernsey in the English Channel, so seeing Gary A. DeVon him, my other sister-in-law, nephew and niece is definitely out. I will get together with family though - my mom and a few of the cousins - so I won’t have to do the old cook a turkey breast and frozen pumpkin pie, like I tried to do with a couple of roommates one year when we were working in Spokane and couldn’t get time off to travel home when only having the one day off. Actually it was a turkey breast and three pumpkin pies. As is often the case we didn’t get cooking soon enough or some such; we each just ate a pie. Good times. Of course that might have had something to do with our recent invention of Scotch-Schnapps, or was it Schnapps-Scotch? Nonetheless, we were spending our Thanksgiving in good company and that’s important. That’s why I’m glad Eva’s Diner decided to continue on the tradition of offering a Thanksgiving meal to anyone who wants to stop and share in the holiday. I’m also happy to see that the Chesaw Community Church is offering a free Thanksgiving dinner again this year. Of course I’m thankful for my job – hard to believe 26 years in the same place. When I was stuck in Spokane that year, my roommates and I just had the day off, but I’ve had jobs where we worked part of the holiday. I can’t imagine what its like to be expected to work all day on the holiday just because certain stores want to push Christmas Shopping up a day. It’s bad enough some of the television commercials for Christmas are starting before Halloween. I tell myself I won’t shop at places that advertise so early or make their people work all day Thanksgiving (at regular pay) in pursuit of the almighty dollar. Of course that’s often hard to do as you start eliminating the places that you can deal with – soon you may run out of options. Better yet, just shop at home. This Saturday, Nov. 29, has been designated small business Saturday. It’s a good time to give your business to those that help to keep our local economies strong, and thus generate paychecks for our friends and neighbors. And, if they’re not open on Saturdays, come back when they are. So this Thanksgiving, like most Thanksgivings, I’m thankful for my family and friends, my old dog Sophie, a roof over my head and a job that keeps me busy and fulfilled. I hope everyone has similar things and more to be thankful for. Today and every day is a good day to stop and count our blessings. Happy Thanksgiving.

GAZETTE-TRIBUNE SERVING WASHINGTON’S OKANOGAN VALLEY SINCE 1905 OROVILLE OFFICE 1420 Main St., PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Toll free: (866) 773-7818 Fax: (509) 476-3054 www.gazette-tribune.com OFFICE HOURS Oroville Mon.-Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONTACT INFORMATION Managing Editor Gary A. DeVon gdevon@gazette-tribune.com Reporter/Production Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 Advertising Sales/Ad Design Charlene Helm chelm@gazette-tribune.com (509) 476-3602 | (509) 322-5712 Classifieds Shawn Elliott classifieds@soundpublishing.com 1-800-388-2527 Circulation 1-888-838-3000 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Classified ads can be placed during normal office hours by calling 1-800-388-2527 Weekly Rates: $6.75 for the first 15 words 25 cents for additional words Borders, bold words, headlines, logos and photos subject to additional charges The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune (USPS 412 120) is published weekly by Sound Publishing / Oroville 1420 Main St. PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 Phone: (509) 476-3602 Fax: (509) 476-3054 Periodical postage paid at Oroville, WA, and additional mailing offices POSTMASTER Send address corrections to: The Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, PO BOX 250, Oroville, WA 98844

SUBSCRIPTIONS In County (yearly) $30.50 In State (yearly) $32.50 Out of State (yearly) $40.50 Senior (yearly) $28.50 (65+ take $2 off per year of subscription) The Gazette-Tribune does not refund subscription payments except to the extent that it might meet its obligation to publish each week, in which case the cost of the issue missed would be refunded as an extension. Subscriptions may be transferred to another individual or organization. DEADLINES Calendar listings: Noon Monday News Submissions: Noon Monday Display Advertising: Noon Monday Legals: Noon Monday Classified Ads: Noon Tuesday LETTERS POLICY The Gazette-Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be accompanied by the author’s name, a home address and a daytime phone number (for verification only). Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and fairness. No letter will be published without the author’s name. Thank you letters will only be printed from non-profit organizations and events. We will not publish lists of businesses, or lists of individual names. CORRECTIONS The Gazette-Tribune regrets any errors. If you see an error, please call 476-3602. We will publish a correction on page 2 in the next issue. NEWS TIPS Have an idea for a story? Call us at 476-3602 SERVICES Back issues are available for up to one year after publication for a small fee. Photo reprints are available for most photos taken by the staff. Ask about photos we may not have had room to print. PRINTED Printed in Penticton, B.C., Canada on recycled newsprint with soy ink. Please Recycle

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THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF OROVILLE & TONASKET

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Real concern is over cost of Enloe Dam project Dear Editor, Responding to your article about the poll conducted by the Chronicle, we did not have any role in the Chronicle’s decision to run that poll. We were informed by email from a friend that the poll was in the paper. We then contacted people to tell them about the poll and that they could vote on Enloe. The real issue of concern is the estimated $40 million of debt the PUD will have to take on to power up Enloe Dam. Okanogan County ratepayers will be responsible for this debt for decades, for a project with very marginal returns. At the PUD’s Enloe Dam Budget Meeting, Tuesday evening Nov 5, we brought up the fact that authorizing legislation for the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation Project (US Congress, 1976), the cost to provide fish passage over Enloe Dam, or remove the dam, was a cost that is a regional responsibility, because it is mitigation for Grand Coulee Dam. I believe that when the PUD is done with their investigation of alternatives to building the Enloe power house, they will find that the funds to remove Enloe Dam will come from whoever needs the habitat above Enloe.

THE MOLSON LEADER

90 YEARS AGO: November 21 - 28, 1923: Happenings in the near future at the Molson P.T.A. include a monstrous basket social with a dance in conjunction in which the musical rhythm will be received and transmitted through the courtesy of Mr. Abbott with his master radio outfit. Fred Walker, of Spokane, who was recently arrested near Havillah by Customs Officer Floyd Loomis of Molson and Deputy Sheriff M. McCoy and Glen Warren, when he was found driving an Oakland car loaded with 24 cases of Canadian liquor, was fined $500 and costs when taken before Judge C. H. Neal. Upon complaint of Nick Conklin, D. H. Greer was tried before Justice G. W McKee Tuesday on a charge of cruelty to one of horses and was fined $10 and costs. Mr. Greer has given notice of appeal. A party of alleged booze runners in eight cars was held up near Riverside by Sheriff E. J. Wilson and Deputy B. T. McCauley and eight men and five cars captured Tuesday morning. One man was shot and killed in the mix-up by Sheriff Wilson. It is known that five cars have been hiding near Molson for several days, waiting an opportunity to get down the river. They made the attempt but turned back when ambushed by offices. Bring your fat dressed turkeys to Oscar Mattson’s store at Oroville on Nov. 22. We are paying highest market price for birds this year. Our cash buyer will give you his courteous attention, fair grading and honest weight. Mr. autoist, have you tried the latest thing out for auto radiators for anti-freeze solution made from honey? Honey raises the boiling point of water to 215 degrees F. and lowers the freezing point. It is not injurious to metal or rubber and is a rust preventative. Fifteen pounds is sufficient for a Ford radiator. H. C. Pollock, chief electrician of the Norris Safe & Lock Co., Seattle, has been in Molson the past few days installing all the latest improvements to the burglar alarm system in the Molson State Bank. The Underwriters Association insists that banks keep their alarm systems up-todate in every particular.

THE OROVILLE GAZETTE

50 YEARS AGO: November 21 - 28, 1963: Oroville received its first snow flurries of the sea-

When we discussed dam removal at the budget meeting, Commissioner Bolz asked what would happen if the dam were removed and fish swam into Canada, where they are not wanted. We had to think for a minute about that question, but, obviously, if the Similkameen becomes an open and free river, fish might swim up it. It’s really in God’s hands what fish do in the river if and when the dam comes down. It’s God’s river. No one really knows if the athletic steelhead can jump Similkameen Falls, but a lot of fishing folks think they can and would. The Upper Columbia River Steelhead are on the endangered list, and there is 40 miles of U.S. habitat above Enloe, that the fish might use. If they did, it would form the basis of a greatly expanded fishing recreation economy for north Okanogan County. A wonderful compensation for losing the dam, and I agree with you Gary that Enloe Dam is a powerful place to visit and it will be missed. But, its a manmade structure, and what goes up must eventually come down.. Finally, Gary, I’d like to say that we have not “demanded” that Enloe be breached. We’ve suggested it, as an alternative to $40 million of debt. The Okanogan ratepayer simply cannot be held responsible for paying for an expensive, unneeded power plant, just to keep fish from swimming up the river. Jere’ Gillespie Chesaw

ITEMS FROM THE PAST son Tuesday, Nov. 19, when it snowed and rained the biggest part of the day. Wednesday morning dawned bright and clear and cold with the snow covering each side of the valley. Temperatures were reported to have been around 17 above early Wednesday morning. This is not un-seasonable but it is uncomfortable. A concentrated air and ground search was launched Wednesday morning, in an effort to locate the missing Air National Guard Pilot, Lt. Robert J. Boucher, of S2702 Assembly Road in Spokane. Boucher was believed to have parachuted from his jet airplane when it developed trouble last Thursday and crashed into Windy Peak Mountain. The wreckage has been found and Boucher’s navigator, Rolin J. Descham, also of Spokane, was rescued last Friday, a few feet from the plane. Oroville Apple Judging Team placed second in state competition at Chelan recently. Members of the team showed off their banner and were Jim Cockle, George Gage, Richard Morris and Jack Greene and their instructor, Ken Kirkwood. On Friday, Nov. 15, a new business was started in Loomis. Ernie Hanson will operate a barber shop from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays in a shop adjacent to his home. Thanksgiving bargains at the local stores: six 303 size cans Yams, $1.00; Snowdrift shortening, 3 lb. tin $.49; large grade “A” eggs, $.55 per doz.; Hen Turkeys, 10 to 16 lbs. $.43; 2 16 oz. tins Cranberry Sauce, $.39; Baking potatoes, $.06 lb; U & I Sugar, 10 lbs. $95. NOTHING HAS SO SHOCKED THE COMMUNITY OF OROVILLE as the sudden announcement that the United States President, John F. Kennedy has bee felled by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas, Texas last Friday. All activities were cancelled for the rest of Friday and the three days following. It wasn’t until Tuesday that the activities resumed to resemble those more accustomed days. Tonasket Ranger, Les Wahrgren, announced this week that a charge of $1.00 per tree will be made this year for Christmas trees cut on the Tonasket District for personal use. Weather Wise, by Marge Frazier: Nov. 20, 31 degrees maximum and 20 degrees minimum; Nov. 21, 30 and 10; Nov. 22, 35 and 27; Nov. 23, 37 and

Fuss will become a historical footnote Dear Editor, “Obamacare is an Obamanation.” “Obamacare is a nightmare.” “Obamacare is a train wreck.” After these letter headlines it only gets worse with lies and innuendo and partisan outrage. Why does media publish this prejudiced opinion from Obama-haters and Tea Party Republicans? Yes, the Obama administration deserves to be on the hot seat, but Republican and Tea Party politicians are incredible hypocrites for whining about Obamacares’ failed introduction, since they did everything possible to sabotage it. Most Republican governors have refused to set up state exchanges, forcing millions out in the cold in regards to healthcare. Republicans in Congress, in a concerted effort, blocked funding for website contractors and refused to let Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius move money around to make up for Republican obstructions. But there is good news; all this fuss about broken websites will become a historical footnote in no time as Obamacare is up and running smoothly. Ron Lowe Nevada City, California

32; Nov. 24, 41 and 32; Nov. 25, 46 and 36 and Nov. 26, 52 and 45. Total precipitation for the period, .81 in. rain.

THE GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

25 Years Ago: November 17 -24, 1988: Fire broke out at a large barn just south of Oroville and although units of the Oroville Fire Department were quick to respond, the barn was lost along with the hay inside. Fortunately the livestock inside were set free and a nearby residence and another barn were saved. The Tonasket City Council is following Oroville’s lead and asking the Okanogan County Treasurer to credit their property tax collected by the county with the interest that their share of the funds accrues before they are disbursed. Walter Womack, County Treasurer, has said that he will start crediting those taxing entities with interest funds as soon as he gets a letter from the entity asking for it. Members of the American Legion and the public were at hand to watch the raising of new American and Washington State flags at the Oroville Welcome Gates last Friday. The new flags were raised in celebration of Washington State’s birthday and Veteran’s Day. The new flags were acquired by the Oroville Chamber of Commerce for the celebration. Christmas tree permits for home use only are now being sold, said Bill McLaughlin. They cost $2.00 and are required to be able to cut on National Forest Lands. Sitzmark Ski Hill waits patiently for opening day when the quiet will be broken by area skiers enjoying runs down the slopes. Official opening is planned tentatively for the day after Christmas. There is hope for weekend skiing prior to Christmas if the weather cooperates and snow pack builds. A fairly common sight in Oroville is the Curtis famil’s Morgan horses and carts warming up for the show seasons. This year, it paid of for D-D Maxamillion and Chopka Tea Rose. At the 1988 Washington State Horsemen’s Convention in the Tricities, D-D Maxamillion was awarded High Point Pleasure Driving-Limit for the state. Real Estate: Plenty of room in this warm, friendly home with 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, enormous family room, deck overlooking the lake with 240 ft. choice frontage and even has its own boathouse. 1.3 acres and all for $115,000; Tonasket 2 bedroom home on large lot, close to schools, ready to move into. $23,800 with contract terms.


NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A5

Okanogan Valley Life

Happy Thanksgiving How nice that Eva’s Diner is continuing the tradition of free Thanksgiving dinner so those that were alone or couldn’t afford to have some of the special items that we take for granted will be on our table for the day. Linda Darrow (and others) provided many dinners over the years and they are to be commended for getting the tradition started and thanks to the gracious folks that make cash donations to help the tradition going. Holiday dinners were usually at our house and when our parents were alive, we had about 30 present. It was no problem

because everyone helped by doing special dishes and it was great fun. Don’t think I could do that these days. The Oroville Senior Bazaar is Dec. 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. We will be having lunch, which will be a nice hot bowl of stew and accompaniments, with dessert. Walt Hart has graciously agreed to prepare this meal. So, get out of the cold and come see if you can find a few Christmas gifts and enjoy lunch and visit with a few friends and make a ho-hum Saturday a little more fun. And of course there will be other vendors offering handmade items.

And of course we need items for the baked good table. Have you gone to Edna’s barbershop lately, expecting to see Corine Curtis? She wasn’t there, was she? Her new venture has moved to the location that formerly housed Mary Lou’s gifts, on Central, by the Back to Basic’s eatery, and of course Mary Lou is in the old Engstrom building. Sorry to report that Juanita Waggy has returned to the hospital, in Tonasket. Juanita just can’t seem to get strong enough to be out and about. And John Peterson, one of the faithful Bingo players at the senior center has been

CELEBRATING A CENTURY

taken to Spokane for tests (and wide selection of fresh vegetables or treatments) for throat disor- that there is in summer but craft ders. And our good friend Bob items etc. should be available. Hirst is still pretty much house Still don’t know just what is bound, due to health issues, but happening at the Weyerhaeuser is doing therapy, trying to get chip plant, but it appears to be in some strength back. Ron Finley the process of being dismantled. has been added to our “sick list” Some changes with “Sandra’s with serious health on Main” nail and foot problems, and Jim care. Temporarily she Finley has some will be located next to good days and some Corine Curtis barber bad. shop, on Central, due Vivian Emry had to the sale of the buildsuccessful cataing she was in on Main. ract surgery, last Another announceWednesday. ment at the Senior Did you know of Center is that there will the indoor Farmer’s no longer be Weight Market (the Winter Watcher’s meetings in Market), being held THIS & THAT 2014, at the Center. in the social room Joyce Emry Do you remember at the library? I what you were doing just heard about it, when the announcebut will have to check it out. ment of the assassination of Obviously, there won’t be the President Kennedy came, 50

years ago? I do. Some while back I mentioned that a van had been parked on the senior citizen’s parking lot and the owner had never came back for it. It seems he died, over a year ago, leaving few or no relatives. It was identified as belonging to a Canadian. If you want to hear a story told, as only Betty Roberts can tell one, ask her about the recent, uninvited caller she had. I could never do justice to the incident. The size of green table grapes is almost unbelievable…and so is the price, but they are so tasty, and better for a body than candy. Yum! The vendors that come to the Oroville Senior Center bazaar won’t have much choice (if any) by the time of this reading. Dec. 7 is the date and the price is very reasonable.

Annual Christmas Party is Tuesday, Dec. 3

all are welcome to attend Please bring a gift and a snack. Our Aerie meetings are the first and third Tuesdays of the month and the Auxiliary meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays. Happy hour is 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day and Seahawks games are always Happy Hour. We have free pool every Sunday. Monday is Taco Night, during Pool League we have burgers on Wednesdays, Thursdays we play Bingo and eat Burgers and More. Friday is Steak Night, Karaoke and Meat Draw. Watch this column for Saturday special events. Come join your brothers and sisters at your Eagles and bring your friends. Find out what’s happening at your club and join in. As always, We Are People Helping People.

EAGLEDOM AT WORK

By Jan Hansen Oroville Eagles

The benefit dinner and auction for Josh Janczyk went well on Saturday. Thanks to all who showed up and all who helped pull this off. We are still recovering from a devastating burglary at our beloved Eagles. The physical damage, emotional damage and financial damage to our club is beyond description. Please support your Eagles in this time of recovery. We will be closed Thursday,

Bazaar will be Saturday, Dec. 7

Aurora Lodge Oroville/ Tonasket No. 201 Free & Accepted Masons of Washington is celebrating their Centenial Year and held their 100th Annual Installation of Officers Last Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m.. Frank Grunert (above and right) was installed as the Worshipful Master by John McDonald to lead the lodge forward into their next 100 years. Also installed as officers were Brick Wall, Dan Lepley, WB Gary Bull, Chuck Gallup, Andy Baskin, Rocky DeVon, Scott Thomas, Preston Ray, Garland Smith and Blain Sullivan.

By Marianne Knight Highlands Correspondent

A couple of weeks ago I wrote that we thought that winter was here, as we had a covering of snow and it was getting cold. Well... guess what? The snow has gone (maybe not in shaded areas). It has become very cold. Some reports have been down to single digit numbers. Later in

Just two classes left, Fall Quarter coming to end

By Dolly Engelbretson

Happy Thanksgiving to you all! The Thanksgiving Dinner at the Center will be Tuesday, Nov. 26. This will be the only lunch served next week because of the holiday. The next Sunday potluck will be Dec. 8. Following lunch, they will be playing their wild game of pinochle; either join in to play

or learn the rules with a handful of cards. The Bazaar will be held here on Dec. 7. Starts at 10 a.m. and goes to 2 p.m. There will be a lunch of beef stew and homemade biscuits and dessert with tea and coffee that will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. I believe Boots may have a table or two left to sell, but

please give her a call if you are interested. Her number is (509) 476-3353. Many events coming up this month, such as: The Christmas Social sponsored by the Historical Society will be held at the American Legion on Dec. 14. Our bazaar is on Dec. 7, potluck on Dec. 8. Pinochle Scores: The door prize was won by Evelyn Dull; most pinochles by Danny Weitrick; high scoring man was Jim Fry; there was a tie for high scoring woman – Judy Ripley and Wilma.

Local Lions Club invites community to fight hunger “Organizing this project gives us a chance to help families in TONASKET – The Tonasket/ our community who don’t have Okanogan Valley Lions Club is enough to eat or can’t afford to inviting all community residents buy nutritious food,” said Debbie to help kick off their Relieving Johnson, event chair. “We’re trythe Hunger Event on Dec. 6 at 5 ing to build a stronger, healthier p.m. at the Tonasket Winter Fest. community.” This event is part of the In addition to the club’s upcom“Relieving the Hunger” ing “Relieving the Hunger” serCampaign, a Lions global cam- vice event, the club conducts paign taking place during the a variety of projects, including months of December and January collecting children’s books for that focuses on hunger and mal- the Lions Literacy Program and nutrition. There will be donation selling cotton candy at Tonasket drop boxes at several locations in Founder’s Day Parade. Tonasket and Omak. The donated Lions clubs are groups of men food will be delivered to the and women who identify needs Tonasket and Omak Food Banks. within the community and work Lions everywhere share a together to fulfill those needs. common belief, “Community is For more information or to get what we make it.” During the involved with the Tonasket/ “Relieving the Hunger” cam- Okanogan Valley Lions Club, paign, Lions are fighting hun- please contact Kris Bailey at ger in their communities, while (509) 486-9966 or Johnson at raising awareness of this global djohnson@gdimail.net. problem. Nearly one billion peoLions Clubs International is ple do not get enough food to the world’swww.edwardjones.com largest service club be healthy. Recently, financial organization with 1.35 miland economic crises have pushed lion members in approximately more people into hunger, and 46,000 clubs in 206 countries not start a new holiday tradition? Makeareas this the many Why hunger relief organizations and geographical around time of year that you help for a child’s are finding it difficult to keep up save the world. Since college 1917, Lions with demand. education. The Gazette-Tribune

HILLTOP COMMENTS the day the sun has come out and warmed us up a bit. The last Friday of the month is movie night at the Mercantile. Give Sandy or Bill a call at (509) 485 2268 for all the details. What Movie? Potluck? Family oriented? They can answer any and all of your questions. Did you know that the Chesaw Community Bible Church is hosting a free turkey dinner with all of

THE LEARNING TREE

By Jackie VALIQUETTE North Valley Community Schools

Wow! It’s been a quick three months and this will be our last Learning Tree until January. Fall quarter is coming to an end and we are busy building our winter catalog of classes. Just two classes remain this quarter and you are invited to sign up for Make A Pinata on Dec. 2 and Dec. 9 or Draw a Face on Dec. 5. It’s a good time, too, to thank our talented instructors, some of whom drive miles to share their skills. We so appreciate their support. Many of our students drive a good distance to participate in classes, as well. They have a great time. How do we know? We ask each student to complete an evaluation form and to make any comments they wish. We

OROVILLE SENIOR NEWS

Oroville Senior Center

Gary DeVon/staff photos

Snow is gone, but getting very cold in the Highlands

Nov. 28 for Thanksgiving so our members and employees can spend this day with their families. We will not have Steak Night or Meat Draw on Friday, 29 November, but we will have Karaoke. Monday, Dec. 2 and Tuesday, Dec. 3 at 11 a.m. the Auxiliary will be decorating our club for Christmas. All are welcome to join in the fun. All help will be appreciated. On Tuesday, Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. the Auxiliary is having it’s annual Christmas party. There will be a Secret Sister gift exchange and

take these evaluations very seriously. NVCS will offer some new classes this winter and we need more of them. What are you qualified to teach? How about Stun Your Friends With Magic Tricks,

the trimmings on Thanksgiving Day from noon to 3 p.m.? They are, and you and your families, and friends are welcome to come and enjoy a great meal. This is the time of year that we celebrate our thankfulness for what we have and what we can share with others. See you in Chesaw next Thursday, Nov. 28. Last but not least are the Pinochle winners for Nov. 18 with 34 players at the Grange Hall in Molson. High Winners were Alan Moore and Bev Holden. The Low Winners were Darrel Bunch and Judy Ripley. Judy Ripley took the Traveling Award.

Build a Birdhouse, Working with Clay, Candy Making, Self Defense for Women, Picture Framing, Candy Making, Public Speaking, How’s Your Grammar, and the list goes on! These are just a few ideas - give it some thought and don’t be shy! Talent abounds in our community. Come forward with yours. To become an instructor or for any other information call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011 or email her at community. schools@oroville.wednet.edu.

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Happy Thanksgiving

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clubs have aided the blind and visually impaired and made a strong commitment to sight preservation and community service throughout the world. For more information about Lions Clubs International, visit the Web site at www.lionsclubs.org.

At the

MOVIES Oliver Theatre

Oliver, B.C.

Sun.-Mon.-Tues.-Thurs...7:30 P.M. Fri.-Sat.................7:00 & 9:00 P.M.

250-498-2277

THOR THE DARK WORLD SAT. SUN-MON. TUES, THURS-FRI NOV. 30, DEC 1,-2-3,5-6. SHOWTIIMES FRI & SAT: 7&9:15

CATCHING FIRE

SUN. - MON. - TUES. OLIVER THEATRE          Regular  Showtimes   DEC. 7-8-9-10, 12-13-14 2013  Programme   ONEDecember,   SHOWING NIGHTLY 7:30PM

Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.  –  Thurs…7:30  p.m.   Fri.  –  Sat………….……….7:00  &  9:00  p.m.                          (unless  otherwise  stated)  

Enjoy your  evening  out,  taking   In  a  movie  at  the  Oliver  Theatre!  

Phone 250-­‐498-­‐2277        Oliver,  BC  

Sun. –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.     Dec.  15  –  16  –  17,  19    

                             Visit  Our  Website  

www.olivertheatre.ca

LAST VEGAS Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.       Nov.  30,  Dec.  1  –  2  –  3,  5  -­  6     Showtimes  on  Fri.  &  Sat.  @  7:00  &  9:15  p.m.  

SUN.-MON.-TUES, THURS DEC, 15-16,17,19

OMAK THEATER OMAK AND MIRAGE THEATERS ARE NOW DIGITAL Coarse and  sexual  language.  

Fri. –  Sat.  –  Thurs.        Dec.  20  –  21,  26  

509-826-0860 | www.omaktheater.com

THE HUNGER GAMES Violence, frightening  scenes.  

Sat. –  Sun.  –  Mon.  –  Tues.,  Thurs.  –  Fri.  –  Sat.   Dec.  7  –  8  –  9  -­  10,  12  –  13  -­  14     One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  p.m.  

 

Catching Fire

PG13

146 min

There will  also  be  a  matinee  of  this  show  on  the     Sat.  at  2:00  p.m.    All  seats  $6.00  for  the  matinee.  

Fri. –  Sat.  –  Sun.  –  Mon.,  Wed.  –  Thurs.  –  Fri.   Dec.  27  –  28  –  29  -­  30,  Jan.  1  –  2  -­  3     One  Showing  Nightly  @  7:30  p.m.  

 

Action/Adventure/Sci-Fi Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Phillip Seymour Hoffman,Woody Harrelson Fri. 6:30,9:45 Sat.*3:00,6:30,9:45 Sun. *3:30,7:00 Wkdys: 7:00

The

MIRAGE THEATER

101 S. Main St. - 2 blocks from Omak Theater

FROZEN Violence.

108min

Subject to  Classification  

Programme Subject  To  Unavoidable  change  without  notice  

PG

Starts Wed.(11/27). Animation/Comedy/Family Starring Kristen Bell, Indina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad. Fri.6:45 & 9:15. Sat.*3:15,6:45 &9:15 Sun.*3:15,6:45. Wkdys 6:45.

DELIVERY MAN

PG13

Starts Friday. Comedy Starring 103min Vince Vaughn, Chris Pratt, Cobie Smulders Fri . 6:45, 9:30. Sat *4:15, 6:45, 9:30 Sun *4:15, 6:45 Wkdays 6:45

HOMEFRONT

R

100min

Starts Wed.(11/27).Action/Crime/Thriller

Starring Jason Statham, James Franco, Winona Ryder, Kate Bosworth

Fri.7:00, 9:30 Sat. *3:45,7:00,9:30. Sun. *3:45,7:00. Wkdys 7:00. Adult $8.50

Matinee $6.00

Child $6.00

No children under age 4 admitted unless film is G rated. No one under 17 admitted to R rated films without their own parent. Photo ID required.


Page A6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Okanogan Valley Life Free Thanksgiving dinner Thursday

FILLING THE GYM

TONASKET EAGLES

by Susan Wisener Tonasket Eagles #3002

We would like to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving and a safe trip to wherever you may be going. Our annual Thanksgiving dinner is Thursday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. It’s free or by donation. The bar will be closing at 6 p.m. The Benefit Buffet and Silent

Auction for Barb Millner was outstanding and raised close to $4,000. Barb would like to thank everyone for coming and all the people that put the whole thing together. (Hats Off!) There will be no Bingo on Friday, Nov. 29, see you Dec. 6. We are saddened by the passing of brother Jeff Wilson. He was a member of the Tonasket

Brew Crew, Shop & Nice Rack at top

POOL LEAGUE

By Gai Wisdom North Valley Pool League Brent Baker/staff photo

The Tonasket High School boys and girls basketball programs are investing in their future with a series of Junior Tiger Basketball Camps for kindergarten through eighth grade students. Organized by varsity basketball coaches Agustin Pedregon and Stephanie Schertenleib, the Saturday, Nov. 23, camp drew nearly 120 kid. Jared Schand, a volunteer skills coach for the Wenatchee Valley College men’s basketball team, provided instruction, with THS coaches and high school players assisting with coaching duties. Pedregon said he had originally anticipated about 35 “campers” to participate. Above, participants in the late morning session get a little practice with teamwork in.

Week three brings us no big surprises. The weather is holding nicely and the players seem to be having a good time. Your

top three teams are The Brew Crew out of the Shop, Nice Rack, shooting for the Pastime and Oroville Eagles’ Aiming Fluid. Like I said no big surprise there.

Eagles since 1984 and will be dearly missed. On Friday, Nov. 29, there will be a memorial for him at 3 p.m. at the Eagles. Pinochle scores from last Sunday are as follows: First place: Kevin Hovland and Dave Russell; second place: Ken Cook and Jo Porter; Low Score: Ron and Sue Wisener; Last Pinochle: Ken Hovland and Dave Russell. We will all of those that may be ill a speedy recovery to good health. God bless all. The Biggest Little Eagles in the State. It’s the next three teams that will be most interesting to watch. The Plaza’s Guereros, the Shop’s Pool Fools, and the Eagles’ Half-ast are in the real battle right now. The stats were out Saturday afternoon this week. That means Jan is getting all the score sheets by Friday. Go teams! Go Jan! Have a Happy Turkey Day, and Play Pool.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR CHESAW - The Chesaw Community Bible Church is hosting a free Turkey Dinner with all the trimmings on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 28 from 12 p.m.- 3 p.m. Bring the family and your friends for a great meal. For more information or answers to your questions please call Carol Mills at (509) 485-2083

Thanksgiving Dinner in Oroville OROVILLE - Carrying on the tradition of Linda’s Bakery, Eva’s Diner in the same location at 712 14th Ave. in Oroville, is offering a free Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. The dinner, prepared by Eva’s will include all the traditional Thanksgiving itemsThis is a free dinner, but donations are gratefully accepted.

Spiritual Movie Night OROVILLE - The HUMUH Clear Mind Buddhist Meditation Center at 1314 Main Street in Oroville is hosting a Spiritual Movie Night on Saturday, Nov. 30 at 6:30 p.m. Snacks are provided. Bring a donation and help keep the lights on at the Center. Everyone is welcome. For more info call (509) 476-0200.

Hand Bell Choir at Loomis LOOMIS - The public is invited to come and enjoy the Touch of Grace Hand Bell Choir in concert at the Loomis Community Church on Sunday, Dec. 1 at 11 a.m.

TES Scholastic Book Fair Tonasket Elementary School is hosting a Scholastic Book Fair, Dec. 2 through 7. Times will be Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., as well as Friday evening from 5-8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. for family shopping. This is a great time to get some book for Christmas reading. We are also collecting donations to buy books for ECAP/Head Start. Look for our boxes around town or drop by the fair to donate. For more information contact

the school at (509) 486-4933 or check out the link on the school web page.

Candy Benefits Ambulance/EMTs OROVILLE - The Royal Neighbors will be selling See’s Candies as part of their annual fundraiser. The candy be available on the following locations and dates: at Frontier Foods Monday, Dec. 2, 9, 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; at Akins Harvest Foods - Thursday, Dec. 5, 12, 19 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; at the PTO Christmas Bazaar - Oroville Elementary School, Friday, Dec. 6 and Saturday, Dec. 7 and at Oroville Senior Center Bazaar on Saturday, Dec. 7 at 1521 Golden Street, Oroville Don’t miss out on this Holiday Favorite. Quantities are limited. Sponsored by Oroville Royal Neighbors of America 2014 matching fund program to benefit Oroville Ambulance/ EMTs.

Draw a Face at NVCS OROVILLE – Have you tried to draw a face only to be unhappy and frustrated with how it turns out? In this class, Learn to Draw a Face, on Thursday, Dec. 5, you will learn no-fail steps to create a face with symmetry and expression. Yes, you can learn to do it with our artist instructor leading the way. Call Ellen Barttels at (509) 476-2011, email her at community.schools@oroville. wednet.edu, or register online at www.northvalleycommunityschools.com.

Elementary Christmas Bazaar OROVILLE - Oroville Elementary School PTO will host the annual Christmas

Bazaar in the gym, Friday, Dec. 6 between 5 p.m. and 9 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration forms are available at Oroville Elementary, Oroville High School, Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville Public Library and Oroville City Hall. Vendor space is available and your booth fee will benefit local students! Call Susan at (509) 476-2427 for more information.

Tree Lighting & Tractor Parade OROVILLE - This year the annual Tree Lighting Ceremony for Oroville will be on Saturday, Dec. 7 at Centennial Park. The ceremony will be preceded by a Christmas Tractor Parade down Main Street. More details will be sent out next week. But we wanted potential participants to start getting their tractors decorated (especially with lights.) The Parade will start at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7 and will conclude at the park (next to Sun Lakes Realty) on Main Street. If you would like your tractor in the parade, please contact Sandy Andrews at the Camaray Motel (509) 476-3684. The Tree Lighting Ceremony will include nearly 30 singers from the Okanagan International Chorus. And, of course, the event concludes with a visit from Santa as well as free Hot Dogs and Hot Cocoa.

OVOC Christmas Concert OMAK - Get in the holiday spirit with Okanogan Valley Orchestra and Chorus as we bring you our annual Christmas Concert on Sunday, Dec. 8 at 3 p.m. at the Omak Performing Arts Center. Cost is $12 for adults, $10 seniors, $8 youth (13 and up), and free to kids 12 and under.

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OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Office Hours: Tues. - Wed., 8 - 5 Tel: 509-476-2151

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OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Office Hours: Thursdays, 8:30 - 5:30 Tel: 509-826-1930

New Patients and Insurance Plans Welcome. Care Credit

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202 S. Whitcomb Ave. Mon. - Tue. 8:30 - 5 p.m. 509-486-2902

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Start your newspaper subscription today and get all the latest business, entertainment, sports, local news and more. 1420 Main St., P.O. Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844 509-476-3602 or 1-888-838-3000


NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page A7

cops & courts Compiled by Zachary Van Brunt

Superior Court

Shanie Rae Marchand, 34, pleaded guilty Nov. 19 to vehicular homicide and vehicular assault. Marchand was sentenced to 8.5 years in prison and fined $1,110.50 for the Nov. 4, 2011 crimes. Carolyn Lee Lozano, 35, Oroville, pleaded guilty Nov. 19 to seconddegree burglary and seconddegree retail theft (extenuating circumstances). Lozano was sentenced to 12 months in prison and fined $600 for the May 1 crimes. In a separate case, Lozano pleaded guilty Nov. 19 to seconddegree introduction of contraband, POCS (heroin) and use of drug paraphernalia. Lozano was sentenced to 12 months in prison to run concurrent with the above sentence. Those crimes occurred in early May 2013. Alejandro Cesar Hernandez, 24, Omak, pleaded guilty Nov. 20 to delivery of a controlled substance (oxycodone). Hernandez was sentenced to nine months in jail and fined $3,310.50 for the March 2012 crime. An additional charge of delivery of a controlled substance (oxycodone) was dismissed. Morgan L. Roloff, 22, Bellingham, pleaded guilty Nov. 21 to two counts of residential burglary, third-degree theft, and second-degree theft. Roloff was sentenced to six months in jail and fined $1,110.50. The crimes occurred Sept. 16 near Riverside. The court found probable cause to charge George Joshua Gilmer, 34, Omak, with second-degree assault of a child. The court found probable cause to charge Theodore Kurtis Storm, 26, Omak, with second-degree theft.

District Court

Freda Victoria Riehart, 37, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Riehart was fined $500. Richard Scott Robbins, 46, Tonasket, guilty on four counts of third-degree theft. Robbins was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended and fined $3,232. Robbins also had a second-degree trespass charge dismissed. Bernardino Saldana Rodriguez, 45, Oroville, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Shanyce Rachel Rodriguez, 19, Oroville, guilty on two counts of third-degree theft. Rodriguez was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,576. Charles Daniel Ross Jr., 47, Tonasket, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Ross was sentenced to 180 days in jail with 174 days suspended, and fined $1,058. Kevin Charles Rounds, 24, Oroville, guilty on three counts of thirddegree DWLS. Rounds received a 90-day suspended sentence and fined $2,454. Rounds also had an additional third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Amy Joann Ruiz Contreras, 26, Omak, had a second-degree recreational fishing charge dismissed. Michel Louis Savoie, 58, Riverside, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Savoie was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 334 days suspended, and fined $1,018.

Joseph Kenneth Shawl, 43, Okanogan, guilty of fourth-degree assault. Shawl was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 354 days suspended, and fined $1,033. Shawl also had a harassment charge dismissed. Larry Edward Siltman, 58, Omak, had five charges dismissed: resisting arrest and four for violation of a no-contact or protection order. Johnny Thomas Snell Jr., 39, Omak, had a charge dismissed: violation of a no-contact or protection order. Stephen Andrew Steciw, 33, Omak, had a charge dismissed: hit and run (unattended vehicle). Amanda Christine Stokoe, 22, Okanogan, had a charge dismissed: minor operating a vehicle after consuming alcohol. Stokoe was fined $500. Walton Scott Tegarden III, 56, Riverside, had a third-degree DWLS charge dismissed. Tashina Lee Thomas, 22, Omak, had two charges dismissed: thirddegree malicious mischief and third-degree theft. Thomas was fined $585. John Fitzgerald Timentwa Jr., 26, Omak, guilty of second-degree DWLS. Timentwa was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 359 days suspended, and fined $1,018. Fernando R. Torres Rodriguez, 28, Omak, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Terry Mattew Vranjes, 34, Omak, guilty of third-degree theft and first-degree criminal trespass. Vranjes was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 304 days suspended, and fined $1,366. Natasha Renee West, 19, Oroville, had a fourth-degree assault charge dismissed. Shelley Lynn Williams, 45, Omak, guilty on two counts of thirddegree theft and making false statements to a public servant. Williams was sentenced to 364 days in jail with 319 days suspended, and fined $1,866. Jacob N. Wilson, 33, Okanogan, guilty of third-degree DWLS. Wilson was sentenced to 90 days in jail with 89 days suspended, and fined $858. Wesley Paul Wirth, 36, Tonasket, had a third-degree malicious mischief charge dismissed.

911 Calls and Jail Bookings

Monday, Nov. 18, 2013 Fraud on Sawtell Rd. near Oroville. Trespassing on Main St. in Oroville. DWLS on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Domestic dispute on S. Tonasket Ave. in Tonasket. Kathryn Hermoine Chavez, 30, booked for welfare fraud and false verification. Shelby Lorissa Gorr, 20, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for third-degree theft. Jess Martin Shadle, 29, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for no valid operator’s license without ID. Theodore Kurtis Storm, 26, booked for second-degree theft and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant for POCS. Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013 Fraud on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Hwy. 97 near Oroville. Theft on Keystone Rd. near Riverside. Scrap metal reported missing. Fraud on Hwy. 7 near Oroville.

Joseph William Peterson, 52, court commitment for DUI. Brian Lee Mathis Jr., 27, court commitment for DUI. John Watkins Jenkins, 58, booked on two FTA bench warrants for first-degree criminal trespass and third-degree malicious mischief. Franklin John Raschka, 34, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Wenona Rachel Webster, 18, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV). Ray Joseph Leroy Tachell, 50, booked on an OCSO FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV). John Wayne Jennings, 57, booked for first-degree premeditated murder and delivery of a firearm to an ineligible person. Adam Shaun Jennings, 27, booked for first-degree premeditated murder and first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm.

Helen Leona Farley, age 68 of Oroville died November 20, 2013 in Wenatchee. She was born in Fairpoint, Ohio on October 11, 1945. As one of nine children, she learned at an early age how to take care of herself and to care for others. She moved to California in 1964 and married Patrick Farley, the love of her life. They would have had their 49th anniversary this Wednesday. Helen’s two children credit her with their love of cooking, their desire to help the community, their take-charge attitude, and their love of humor. Helen moved to Oroville with Pat about six years ago after living in Roy, Wash. for more than 30 years. Though the transition took some time, Helen grew to love this place and the people here as much as she did Roy. Helen was known around town for her baked goods, her excellent cooking and canning, and her love of friendly banter. We love her dearly and she will be deeply missed. A private service Has Already Been Held In Helen’s Honor. Bergh Funeral Service of Oroville/Tonasket in care of arrangements.

Robert (Bob) Arthur Grover

Robert Arthur Grover, better known to his friends and family as “Bob,” was born to Charles and Bessie Grover on October 4, 1929 in Albany, New York. Bob went to heaven on November 6, 2013.

Bob Grover Bob started his career off as a chauffeur in New York. He later became a short-haul truck driver which became his passion. During this time he married the love of his life, Adeline Vera Roy, in 1954 on Valentine’s Day. Shortly thereafter, they decided to take a venture to California to be closer to Adeline’s family. They settled in a cozy home in Santa Ana, Calif. Bob continued driving truck, delivering asphalt until he retired. Bob and Adeline enjoyed the simple life and fishing and gardening. They did not have children during their married life, however, they loved all the children in the neighborhood. Several of them, Aurora (Aurie) Magallanes and Bethany Hernandez were still in touch with Bob until his passing. They wrote him many letters and sent lots of pictures. Bob talked very highly of this family and loved Aurie and Bethany so much. Bob’s sweet Adeline who he adored passed away in 1988. Bob continued to enjoy family in California. At Thanksgiving

Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013 Fraud on Salmon Creek Rd. near Okanogan. DWLS on Hwy. 20 near Tonasket. Dacia Lee Mackarness, 40, booked for residential burglary, violation of a protection order and violation of an anti-harassment order. Myron Robert John, 23, booked on two Superior Court FTA warrants: POCS with intent to deliver and second-degree assault (DV). Kyle Allyn Snyder, 22, booked for POCS with intent to deliver, thirddegree DWLS and POCS (legend

drug). David John Donovan, 57, booked for third-degree DWLS. Dylan Thomas James Counts, 19, booked for third-degree malicious mischief (DV). Jack Edward Cole, 53, booked for harassment.

Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013 Hit-and-run vehicle crash on Engh Rd. in Omak. Trespassing on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. ATV crash on Cayuse Mountain Rd. near Tonasket. Injuries reported. Trespassing on Balmes Rd. near Oroville. Fraud on Quince St. in Omak. Hit-and-run vehicle crash on W. Apple Ave. in Omak. One-vehicle crash on Omache Dr. in Omak. Fraud on Riverside Dr. in Omak. Warrant arrest on 16th Ave. in Oroville. Burglary on 11th Ave. in Oroville. Warrant arrest on Kay St. in Oroville. Robert Ellis Allen, 30, booked on a Department of Corrections detainer. Justin Kiel Smith, 29, booked on third-degree malicious mischief (DV), fourth-degree assault (DV), residential burglary, second-degree theft, and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Korey Douglas Bevel, 25, booked for failure to register as a sex offender. James Everett Davis, 56, booked on a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant. Friday, Nov. 22, 2013 Fraud on North Slope Rd. near Tonasket. Fraud on Trail Ridge Rd. near Omak. Domestic dispute on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Assault on Hwy. 20 in Tonasket. Violation of no-contact order on E. Division St. in Tonasket. Xavier Lewis Smith, 22, booked on three Superior Court FTA warrants: residential burglary, seconddegree burglary and third-degree theft. Manuel Arevalo Hernandez, 22, booked on a warrant for no valid license without ID. Lewis Patrick Marchand, 53, booked on a State Patrol FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS and an OCSO FTA warrant for third-degree DWLS.

he would always bring flowers to the cook, his niece Lea, in appreciation of the great dinner. Bob loved his cars, trucks and was especially interested in small engines. He graduated from Foley-Belsaw Institute in 1999 with a diploma in small engine service and repair. This became his hobby and he gladly fixed all the neighbors’ lawn mowers. Bob soon had a new chapter in his life in 2002- Oroville, Washington. His many friends in Oroville became a family to him. Bob continued tinkering with small engines and during the winter he would attach a snow blade to his riding lawn mower. He went all over the neighborhood plowing driveways showing his kindness to many. What a nice surprise after a long day’s work to come home to a cleared off driveway. Hmmmm... Bob must have been here. Bob was always helping neighbors and friends. He was the kind of man that would /(give you the shirt off his back.” Bob became close friends with his neighbor Mae Hill and her nephew Earl Hill. What a great friendship they shared! Many years later, Bob took care of Mae so she could be at home during her illness. After a year or so of care giving, Mae passed away. Bob remained close friends with Earl and continued on with life, always making jokes and putting a smile on our faces. He will be missed by many! Bob was preceded in death by his parents Charles and Bessie Grover, his brother Charles Grover and wife Adeline Grover. He is survived by his nieces Lea Walker and Maureen Halverson; nephews Doug Walker and Jack Walker all of California; his brother Leslie Grover and niece Crystal Roberts of Washington.

Teresa Ann Moomaw, 36, booked for POCS (legend drug) and on three Omak Police Department FTA warrants: DUI, second-degree DWLS and third-degree theft. Joseph Alex Martinez, 35, booked for obstruction, two counts of POCS (legend drug) and a Department of Corrections secretary’s warrant for POCS. Cannon Lee Kuneki, 32, booked on an Omak Police Department Warrant for fourth-degree assault and two tribal warrants: FTA for malicious mischief and FTC for physical control of a vehicle. Delecia Juiliann McCraigie, 23, booked on an Omak Police Department FTA warrant for thirddegree DWLS.

Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013 Theft on Hwy. 7 near Tonasket. Warrant arrest on Dayton St. in Omak. Malicious mischief on Fir St. in Oroville. Burglary on E. Fifth St. in Tonasket. Alfonso Cardenas, no middle name listed, 56, booked on a Tribal FTA warrant for fourth-degree assault (DV).

Okanogan Valley

Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013 Fraud on Conconully Rd. near Okanogan. Violation of no-contact order on Cartwright Dr. near Tonasket. Theft on Loomis-Oroville Rd. near Loomis. Buoys reported missing. Fraud on Nealey Rd. near Oroville. Threats on Applejack Rd. near Tonasket. Jeanie Kay Todd, 32, booked for violation of a no-contact order.

Obituaries

Helen Leona Farley

Ronni Lynn Sandoval, 45, booked for third-degree theft. Saul Gonzalez-Villaraldo, 27, booked for fourth-degree assault (DV).

CHURCH GUIDE Your Mark ar d Calen

2013 Christmas Concert Luke 2:10-11

“Joy to the World” Friday, Dec. 6th at 7 p.m.

Tonasket Bible Church (6th & Whitcomb)

For more information call 509-486-8888

OROVILLE NEW Hope Bible Fellowship

(Formerly Oroville Community Bible Fellowship)

Service Time: Sun., 5:30 p.m.  Wed., 6:30 p.m. 923 Main St. • ocbf@ymail.com Mark Fast, Pastor www.BrotherOfTheSon.com

Faith Lutheran Church

11th & Ironwood, Oroville • 476-2426 Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m. “O taste and see that the Lord is good!” Pastor Dan Kunkel • Deacon Dave Wildermuth

Immaculate Conception Parish

1715 Main Street Oroville 8:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 10:30 a.m. 1:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Sunday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

PC of G Bible Faith Family Church

476-3063 • 1012 Fir Street, Oroville SUNDAY: 7 am Men’s Meeting • 9:45 Sunday School 10:45 Worship Service • Children’s Church (3-8 yrs) WEDNESDAY: 7 p.m. Pastor Claude Roberts Come Worship with Project 3:16

Oroville United Methodist

908 Fir, Oroville • 476-2681 Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Rev. Leon Alden

Valley Christian Fellowship

Pastor Randy McAllister 142 East Oroville Rd. • 476-2028 • Sunday School (Adult & Teens) 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship 11 a.m.• Sun. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Sunday School & Children’s Church K-6 9:45 to 1:00 p.m. Open to Community! Located at Kid City 142 East Oroville • Wednesday Evening Worship 7 p.m.

Trinity Episcopal

602 Central Ave., Oroville Sunday School & Services 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist: 1st, 3rd, & 5th • Morning Prayer: 2nd & 4th Healing Service: 1st Sunday The Reverend Marilyn Wilder 476-3629 Warden • 476-2022

Church of Christ

Ironwood & 12th, Oroville • 476-3926 Sunday School 10 a.m. • Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study: 7 p.m.

CHESAW

Chesaw Community Bible Church

Nondenominational • Everyone Welcome Every Sunday 10:30 a.m. to Noon Pastor Duane Scheidemantle • 485-3826

MOLSON Community Christian Fellowship

Molson Grange, Molson Sunday 10 a.m., Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday 6:30pm, Bible Study “For by grace are ye saved through faith...” Eph. 2:8-9 “...lovest thou me...Feed my lambs...John 21:1-17

RIVERSIDE Riverside Lighthouse - Assembly of God

102 Tower Street Sunday Bible Study 10:00am Sunday Worship 11:00am & 6:30pm Wednesday- family Night 6:30pm Pastor Vern & Anita Weaver Ph. 509-826-4082

TONASKET Holy Rosary Parish

1st & Whitcomb Ave., Tonasket 10:30 a.m. English Mass 1st Sunday of the Month Other Sundays at 8:30 a.m. 7:00 p.m. Spanish Mass every Saturday Father Jose Maldonado • 476-2110

Immanuel Lutheran Church

1608 Havillah Rd., Tonasket • 509-485-3342 Sun. Worship 9 a.m. • Bible Study & Sun. School 10:15

“For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith--and this not from yourselves, it is the gift of God--not by works, so that no one can boast.” -Eph. 2:8-9

“To every generation.” Celebrating 100 years 1905-2005

Crossroads Meeting Place Tonasket Foursquare Church

415-A S. Whitcomb Ave. • Pastor George Conkle Sunday: 10 a.m. (509) 486-2000 • cell: (509) 429-1663

Tonasket Community UCC

24 E. 4th, Tonasket • 486-2181

“A biblically based, thoughtful group of Christian People”

Sunday Worship at 11 a.m. Call for program/activity information Leon L. Alden, Pastor

Seventh-Day Adventist

10th & Main, Oroville - 509-476-2552 Bible Study: Sat. 9:30 a.m. • Worship: Sat. 11 a.m. Skip Johnson • 509-826-0266

Oroville Free Methodist

1516 Fir Street • Pastor Rod Brown • 476.2311 Sun. School 9:15 am • Worship Service 10:15am Youth Activity Center • 607 Central Ave. Monday 7:00 pm • After School M-W-F 3-5pm office@orovillefmc.org

Whitestone Church of the Brethren

577 Loomis-Oroville Rd., Tonasket. 846-4278 9:15am Praise Singing. 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday school for all ages

Ellisforde Church of the Brethren

32116 Hwy. 97, Tonasket. 846-4278 10am Sunday School. 11am Worship Service

“Continuing the work of Jesus...simply, peacefully, together”

Pastor Jim Yaussy Albright. jim.ya@hotmail.com

LOOMIS Loomis Community Church

Main Street in Loomis 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Worship Service Pastor Bob Haskell Information: 509-223-3542

To place information in the Church Guide call Charlene 476-3602


Page A8

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 28, 2013

 26

Shopping Days  4 Saturdays  4 Weekends

SHOP LOCAL

Holiday Open house

Don’ett! Forg

Sat. Nov. 30th 10am - 4pm Door Prizes! Hot apple cider, Food tastings, Cookies and whole lot of Holiday Cheer!

off 

Sat. Dec. 7!

Blossom & Briar

¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97 Ph. 509-486-4496

www.blossomandbriar.com Just two miles North of Oroville. 33436 US Hwy 97. , Oroville, WA 98844

Stuff your Stocking!

Starting Dec. Open 7 Days a Week!

Leah Cathryn Day Spa

TONASKET CHAMBER

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Invites you to participate in Winter Fest Friday Dec. 6 from 5:30pm to 8:00pm. Look for other Winter Fest weekend events!

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Lightweight saw for wood-cutting tasks around the home

A Land For All Seasons!

Tanning ALL MONTH

Offer good through 12/31/13 at participating dealers while supplies last.

Please bring food items for... Fundraiser For Tonasket Food Bank. Bring food for a food drive to help support families in need during this holiday season!

Enter to win a CoachTM PURSE!

Floyd and Charlotte

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We service everything we sell!

560 E. Riverside Dr., OMAK 509-826-2321

809 14th Ave., Oroville 509-476-9000

Animate Object Circus Cabaret Friday, Dec. 6 • 7 p.m.

Loadin’ Up

Omak PAC

20 S. Cedar Street,Omak

$15 adults • $10 students

HOLIDAY DREAMS

Craftsman Craftsman Tool Box & Tools Tool Bench

omakpac.org “omakPAC” Tickets online at: Ticket Outlets: Tonasket Interiors, Tonasket; Oroville Pharmacy, Oroville; Rawson’s Dept. Store,Okanogan; The Corner Shelf, Omak; or at the door.

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Mail Letters to: Santa Claus North Pole c/o Gazette-Tribune 1422 Main / PO Box 250 Oroville, WA 98844

Letters must be received no later than Dec. 6, 2013 to be eligible for the drawing. All letters will be forwarded to Santa and all names will be placed in drawing and included in our Special Dec. 19th Christmas issue!

Breyer Classic Horses

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune

Page B1

Schools ¡La Chispa! provides spark for area bi-lingual students By Brent Baker bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

TONASKET - When Paola Rivera asked the middle school students in the group she mentored what they wanted to be, she says one girl told her she didn’t think she could ever amount to anything. “I said I thought any kid can become anything,” Rivera recalled later. “If you like to sing, you can be a singer. If you like to act, you could be an actor. If you’re good at lying, well, you could become a lawBrent Baker/staff photo yer. Ray Coronado (far right) of the ¡La Chispa! program moderates as a “You can do anything if you number of middle school students share positive character traits that actually try. We all have our were discussed in a small group setting at Thursday’s workshop in own purpose. And if we actual- Tonasket. ly try we can change the world.” ing them out, makes a middle schooler feel That kind of desire to help younger students, combined with a high school- good.” Victor Flores said that a lot of his effort went er’s honesty and wry humor, has been one of the into encouraging the younger kids to take advandriving forces behind the ¡La Chispa! (Spanish for “The Spark) program. ¡La Chispa!, series of tage of opportunities that are available to them. “Yesterday we had the opportunity to be leadone-day workshops statewide designed to teach leadership skills primarily to bi-lingual Latino ers and show the middle schoolers what they can do if they take the correct road,” students, held a regional session Flores said. “You don’t have to in Tonasket on Thursday, Nov. hide - you can take the sec21, with more than 130 staff and middle school students from “What we’re trying to ond step to move ahead. There so many opportunities. But about a half-dozen Okanogan teach them is to be are if you don’t take that step, it’s County schools. The day was pro-active about their tough to make it.” conducted in both Spanish and Several of the mentors noted English. education. Be proacthat teaching and learning conAs the host school, Tonasket tive about you. Your fidence was a big factor in learnprovided about 20 high school success will be deter- ing to heed Flores’ advice. students (including Rivera) “As I worked more with the that volunteered and prepared mined by how much kids more they started talkto serve as mentors for middle work you put into it. ” ing more with me,” said Hilda school students. Celestino, who said that at first “The program is put on by Ray Corona , ¡La Chispa! many of the younger kids didn’t the Washington Principals’ want to talk. “It showed you Association,” said Ray Corona, an admissions counselor at the University of need to be confident in who you are. It’s just the Washington’s Bothell campus and one of two way you are that helps people to open up. It’s visiting hosts of the program. “The intent of really hard, but it’s something you need to do.” “I asked (one boy) if he wanted to go to the program is to have students think about who they are from a cultural aspect of things, college,” Rivera said. “He looked around at and have them think about how they belong on his friends and said, well, you know, maybe. I school and how their culture and language are asked him why, did he want to work someone assets to the school setting. We want the kids to for his whole life in an orchard? He said no. be able to focus on achieving higher education, I asked him if he’d rather work someplace in post-secondary options, anything along those an office with an air conditioner? He was like, yeah. “So I guess peer pressure is a problem with their friends, and cane be a bad influence.” Corona said that the high school mentors’ willingness to share their own stories was key to earning the younger students’ trust. “What we’re trying to teach them is to be pro-active about their education,” he said. “Be proactive about you. Your success will be determined by how much work you put into it. Getting students to be accountable for their own actions, to step outside of their own boxes and their own Brent Baker/staff photo boundaries.” Paola Rivera and Esgar Mendez were among about 20 Tonasket High “For the most part, they are School students that served as mentors for middle school kids from at a point in their lives where around the county during Thursday’s seven-hour ¡La Chispa! workshop. they’re realizing they are leaders and role models whether they like it or not, or know it or not,” Graves said lines.” Tonasket ESL (English as a Second Language) of his high school group. “(They) have people instructor Tyler Graves said he’d been keeping his looking up to them; it’s on them to be that and eye on the program for awhile, and liked what it continue to be role models and leaders.” Of course, the high school mentors have those offered for both the middle school kids and the they look up to, themselves. high school mentors. “You did an awesome job of pushing us and “What they are doing is spectacular,” Graves said. “I thought it was a great opportunity for giving us a good example of what should be (the high school students) to take charge. These done,” Christian Garcia said to Graves as the guys have been so responsible from day one when I asked if they wanted to do it. I needed the buy-in from them to be responsible and see this through. Each one of these guys has followed through and upheld their end of the deal.” In an interview on Friday with about half of the high school mentors, the all agreed that being viewed as role models carried a responsibility with it, whether they saw themselves that way or not. “I’m an example to my younger siblings,” said Rosemary Luna. “I’m the oldest one, so they look up Brent Baker/staff photo to me. To have 130 middle High school mentors during Thursday’s ¡La Chispa! workshop had to schoolers looking up to each step out in public amongst their peers and more than 120 middle school one of us... I was a leader to students those people. Instead of just our siblings, it’s 130 strangers, basically. It makes a person feel good interview wrapped up. “I wasn’t someone who about themselves, knowing that they have saw myself as a leader, but you convinced me to. someone to look up to. And the high school- You’re someone who knows me really well. You ers, wanting to do that for them and help- got to know who I am.”

Submitted photo

Oroville High School’s FBLA chapter recently attended the North Central Region Fall Leadership Conference in Wenatchee. Pictured are (l-r) Tori Kindred, Luke Kindred, Nathan Rise, Shelby Scott, Dakota Haney, Lena Fuchs, Bailey Griffin, Pie Todd, Phoebe Poynter, Ellamae Burnell, Faith Martin, Kylee Davis, Kali Peters, Yessica Yemecio, Ashley Marcolin and Bethany Roley.

Region VP Kindred presides over Wenatchee FBLA conference The Gazette-Tribune

OROVILLE - North Central Region Fall Leadership Conference was recently held in Wenatchee, Washington at Wenatchee Valley College. Luke Kindred presided over the leadership conference as the current Washington State Future Business Leaders of America Vice President over the North Central Region. Kindred, the Oroville High School Chapter President, is a senior and second year Running Start student. He worked extensively with local businessman Braden Dragoo and adviser/Dad Tony Kindred and regional advisor Royce Turner to arrange this conference. Over 400 students and their advisers attended the conference which included such High profile speakers Sandy Wheeler, the inventor of BowFlex; Dragoo, of New York Life and Dr. Greg Grillo of Grillo Family Dentistry. Other Oroville students attending included Vice President Ashley Marcolin, Secretary Pie Todd, Treasurer Yessica Nemecio, Parliamentarian Kali Peters, Nathan Rise, Shelby Scott, Dakota Haney, Lena Fuchs, Bailey Griffin, Pie Todd, Phoebe Poynter, Bethany Roley, Ashley Marcolin, Faith Martin, Ellamae Burnell and Kylee Davis. The fall leadership conference brings students together from all

Submitted photo

Luke Kindred, Washington State Future Business Leaders of America North Central Region Vice President, and Oroville High School President of Future Business Leaders of America is shown with sister Tori Kindred, President of the Oroville Junior High chapter of FBLA. over North Central Washington. Students listen to business professionals who present on topics of motivation, goal setting, entrepreneurship and the importance of professionalism and education. “Leadership is a passion of mine,” Kindred said. “My goal for this conference was to provide amazing speakers that have done amazing things. It is so important for our future to learn from those individuals who have worked so hard to be successful and who care about the success of others. It is with sincere thanks to Braden Dragoo who also has local roots (Omak) that I was

able to work with so many important businessmen. “Future Business Leaders of America is a great association that provides leadership opportunities at both the high school and collegiate levels (Phi Beta Lambda). It has been my pleasure to be a part of a leadership association that promotes leadership to our youth.” Kindred will remain vice president until after state competition held in Seattle next April. Kindred’s sister Tori is the president of Oroville’s Junior High FBLA Chapter.

TONASKET HIGH SCHOOL FIRST QUARTER HONOR ROLL Seniors Honor (3.5-4.0) Kathryn Cleman (4.0), Savannah Clinedinst (4.0), Lupita Maria Ornelas (4.0), Norma Ramos (4.0), Cassandra Spear (4.0), Jamie Wilson (4.0), Leslie Iniguez, Brisa Leep, Christa McCormick, Levi Schell, Phillip (Collin) Aitcheson, Amber Monroe, Marcelino Ruiz-Martell, Elizabeth Jackson, Sara Holan, Madaline Coffelt-Richardson, Sarah Green, Diante Haney Williamson, Kjeld Williams, Norma Ornelas, Chance Stucker, Michaela Rampley, Caio Baumstein, Daniel Hernandez, Eric Chavez, Madison Villalva, Carrisa Frazier-Leslie, Abigail Schiel, Selena Cosino, Makalapua Goodness. Merit (3.0-3.499) Clayton Fry, Jair Chavez, Mahter Warren, Amanda Johnson, Walker Marks, Lainey Olveira, Kaitlyn GildroyMacGregor, Tyler Farver, Michael Goudeau, Parker Kenyon, Christopher Elliott, Kenneth Freese, Vanessa Medina Sanchez, Sarah Moore, Jenna Davisson, Dyllan Walton, Timothy Jackson, Dyllan Gage, Trevor Terris, Anna Chavez, Martine Bjerke, Daniela Capote, Tanner Good, Pete Valentine, Kylie Dellinger, Janysis Bello, Elias Abrego, Larry Burton, Derek Sund.

Juniors Honor (3.5-4.0) Alexander Mershon

(4.0),

Abraham Podkranic (4.0), Aspen Verhasselt (4.0), Abran Alvarez, Johannes Weber, Lea Berger, Antonio Sanchez Jimenez, Dalton Smith, Jesse Manring, David Curtis, Aiza Dahman, Ulukbek Beishekeev, Travis Deggeller, Sydney Nielsen, Charlie Sanchez, Colton Leep, Brooke Nelson, Anna St. Martin, Hilda Celestino, Mary Naylor, Tiffany Ferdon, James Coleman, Darbee Sapp, Deoha Braggs, Frank Holfeltz, Lucas Vugteveen. Merit (3.0-3.499) Amber Burton, Cesar Reynoso, Allison Glanzer, Alissa Young, Jose Ortega, Devyn Catone, Colt Hatch, Rosemary Luna, Daniela Bravo, Rebeccah Holberg, Rochelle Glaspie, Smith Condon, Brock Henneman, Austin Knowlton, Timothy FrazierLeslie, Jensen Sackman, Diego Goudeau, Elvira Alvarez, Ethan Bensing, Bailey Steinfort, Chad Edwards.

Sophomores Honor (3.5-4.0) Omar Calderon (4.0), Pablo Chavez (4.0), Madeleine Graham (4.0), Baillie Hirst (4.0), Trevor Peterson (4.0), Jaden Vugteveen, Rade Pilkinton, Kasey Nelson, Rachel Silverthorn, Leighanne Barnes, Ashley Tobel, Jenna Valentine, Kendra Davisson, Treven Nielsen, Jordan Hughes, Bryden Hires, Janelle Catone,

Hugo Sanchez Jimenez, Kyra Whiting. Merit (3.0-3.499) Jevonti Haney Williamson, Nicholas Crandall, Micala Arnesen, Dimas Ayala Alas, Esmeralda Flores, Vanessa Pershing, Daisy Alcauter, Jonathan Freese, Alexee Howell, Shyane Lewis, Melanie Gronlund, Adrian McCarthy, Blake Anderson.

Freshmen Honor (3.5-4.0) Elijah Antonelli, Brenden Asmussen, Samuel Nelson, Thomas Kennedy, Bonnie Siegfried, Jacob Villalva, Hunter Swanson, Brenda Perez, Johnna Terris, Timothy Freese, Zion Butler, Bradley Keener, Benjamin Mills, Lucas Scott. Merit (3.0-3.499) Wyatt Pershing, Ally Mershon, Serenity Poletti-Brereton, Seth Smith, Katlen Wagner, Amanda Padilla Castro, Lexie Wahl, Beau Cork, Taundra Chaska-Webber, Victor Flores, Jerie Olynyk, Abraham Sixtos, Paola Rivera Covarrubias, Chelsea Vazquez, Brianna Hollister, Cheyan Kinkade, Chase Reid, Vance Frazier-Leslie, David Ornelas, Lalayna Danforth, Lorena Sanchez, Breann Nolan, Devin Walton, Alexia Gavin, Eleanor Burse.


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OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE | NOVEMBER 28, 2013

SPORTS Cross Country - Sierra Speiker, State Champion Football - State Qualifier Volleyball - Bi-District Qualifier Girls Soccer - District Qualifier

Oroville and Tonasket

Luke Kindred, Oroville - CWL Football MVP (Offense)

Sierra Speiker, Oroville - 3-time State Cross Country Champion

Daniela Capote - Tonasket Soccer

Faith Martin - Oroville Soccer

Rachelle Nutt - Oroville Volleyball

Blake Rise & Logan Mills - Oroville Football

These fine Businesses Wish to Say Congratulations! Lee Frank Mercantile SCHOLZ

Sporting Goods

509-486-2105

316 South Whitcomb, Tonasket

Wash & Wax Your Car...

2 BAY SELF SERVER WAND SYSTEM

Community

CAR WASH

723 Appleway, Oroville

Supporting Tiger Athletes!

Paul’s Service

Your one stop for complete auto repairs!

Hwy. 97, South, Oroville Phone: 476-2241

83 B Eastlake Rd., Oroville

476-2051

Great Hamburgers, Milkshakes & More

1 Block off Main St. (next to the Eagles) Oroville Tire Center 476-3902

Tonasket

Athletic Booster Club

Sheila’s Shoppe

HORNET’S NEST BURGERS

476-3893 • Friendly Service • One Stop Grocery Shopping • Cold Pop & Beer • Chips & Snacks OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 • Groceries, Meats & Produce TONASKET: 323 S. Whitcomb, 486-2917

1102 Main St., Oroville • 476-4545

OMAK:th 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 18BREWSTER: W. 4 , Tonasket 538 W. Main,486-2127 689-0904

Oroville Pharmacy

OROVILLE Quick

2306 N. Hwy 97, Oroville

Stop

2208 Juniper St., Oroville (Across from Prince’s)

A family warehouse for our growers! Appleway & Ironwood Oroville, WA. 98844 OROVILLE: 814 Central, 476-3023 TONASKET: 323 S. ce:476-3646 Whitcomb, 486-2917 General Offi

Oroville Auto Parts Center 476-3679 Hwy. 97, Oroville

OMAK: 2 N. Main Street, 826-1156 www.golddiggerapples.com BREWSTER: 538 W. Main, 689-0904

Oroville Dental Center Dr. Joey Chen, D.M.D. Family Dentistry

OROVILLE: 1600 N. Main St. Tel: 509-476-2151 OMAK: 23 S. Ash St., Omak Tel: 509-826-1930

509-476-9999

509-476-3411

1416 Main St., Oroville for all your prescription needs!

Roy’s Pharmacy

RX Billing for Numerous Insurances 318 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

(509) 486-2149 Fax: 486-2196

Quik - Mart

1501 Main St., Oroville 509-476-2161

Oroville

BOOSTER CLUB

Supporting Hornet Athletes!

Independent Franchise of Pacific Pride

615 11th Ave., Oroville www.rominefuel.com

509-476-3610

Oroville GOLF CLUB "Come visit our World Famous Groundhogs"

Phone: 509-476-2390

2 mi. W. of Oroville on Nighthawk Rd.


NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE

PAGE B3

SPORTS

Post-season and Honors

Girls Soccer - Bi-District Qualifier

Baylie Tyus - Tonasket Soccer

Bridget Clark - Oroville Volleyball

Brittany Jewett - Oroville Volleyball

Christa McCormick and Rose Walts Tonasket Soccer

Kali Peters - Oroville Soccer

Kathryn Cleman - Tonasket Soccer

Oroville Volleyball - Breast Cancer Awareness Night

Brent Baker/staff photos

Oroville Soccer - ready for a free kick

Oroville Football - taking the field

These fine Businesses Wish to Say Congratulations! 212 N. Hwy. 97, Tonasket 486-2183 7 Days A Week: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.

COMMUNITY

AUTO REPAIR 4D 723 Appleway, Oroville 509-476-2874 509-560-1011

DOUBLE “A” LOGGING

476-2907 Family Medicine 1617 N. Main, Oroville 476-3631 17 S. Western Ave., Tonasket 486-2174

P.O. Box 2207 Oroville, WA.

DISCOUNT FIREWORKS

Pizza, Subs, Salad Bar, Calzones, Lasagna, Wraps & More!

TONASKET PIZZA COMPANY 15 West 4th St., Tonasket 509-486-4808

ALLEN’S Good Luck Tiger Athletes! 308 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket 509-486-2921

512 S. Whitcomb, Tonasket

509-486-8400

Something for Everyone

 Books  Children’s Gifts  Western & Garden Decor  Wedding Registry

 Antiques & Collectibles ¼ mi. N. of Tonasket on Hwy 97

Ph. 509-486-4496

Good Luck To all The Athletes!

P.T. WORKS

INC.

PHYSICAL THERAPY Diane MacFarland, P.T. 39 Clarkson Mill Rd., Tonasket

509-486-1616


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Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 28, 2013 OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE • November 28, 2013

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O K A N O G A N VA L L E Y

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Classifieds

Tonasket residents can drop off information for the Gazette-Tribune at Highlandia Jewelry on 312 S. Whitcomb

Houses For Sale

For Rent

OROVILLE: QUIET AREA featuring 2 BR, 2 BA ground floor apt. Level entry home with walk-in closet. Relax & view your nice green yard from your covered back patio. Accepting applications. No smoking. No pets. $525/ month + $400 dep. Call 509223-3064 or 509-560-9043.

TONASKET - 1 Bedroom $495. 2 Bedroom $595. Close to town. All appliances. Tonasket Water/Sewer paid. 509-4863200 Square foot, custom re- 1682 or 509-429-0873. modeled home. 4 Bedroom, 3 bath, finished basement. Custom tile work throughout, By Owner. $243,900 obo. 253-380-6030

Announcements

Statewides

Say it in the classifieds! *Special deal* *HAPPY BIRTHDAY *HAPPY ANNIVERSARY *CONGRATULATIONS!! *WILL YOU MARRY ME? MUST BE PREPAID $6.00 for the first 15 words additional words $1.00 each. Bold words, special font or borders extra. Add a picture for only $1.50 more. Call to place ad Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune 509-476-3602

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS WEEK OF NOV. 25, 2013

Found DID YOU FIND AN ITEM AND WANT TO FIND THE OWNER? Found items can be placed in the newspaper for one week for FREE. Limit 15 words, or prepay for words over the 15 word limit. Call 509-476-3602 before noon on Tuesdays.

Help Wanted

For Rent

WorkSource

Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 6+ acres, $910. 2 Bedroom House, In Town, $650. 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Lakefront Apartment, $725. Darling 1 Bedroom, $495. Deluxe Lakefront Home, Furnished, 3 Baths, $1595. OTHERS. Call Sun Lakes Realty 509-476-2121

Hillside Park Senior Apartments

Okanogan County 126 S. Main St., Omak 509-826-7310

Updated list of employment at

www.go2worksource.com

Announcements

WorkSource Okanogan County is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Space donated by the Gazette-Tribune.

Health General

515 Tonasket Ave Tonasket, WA TAKING APPLICATIONS 62 Years of Age or Older or Disabled RENTAL ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE Income Limits Apply Call Geneva 509-486-4966 TDD# 711 Oroville 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, 1 bath, garage, nice yard, 1 mile from border, 33548 Hwy 97. $700 month, $350 deposit. (509)486-2685 OROVILLE GARDEN APARTMENTS. Senior or Disable Housing 1 bedroom upstairs Subsidized Unit if eligible. Located downtown. Applications available at 617 Fir St., Oroville. Call: 509-476-3059

COUPLE SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeking to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of opportunity, humor, adventure and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at direct at 206-920-1376, toll-free at 877-290-0543 or email AndrewCorley@outlook.com You can also contact our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

On Call CMA Oroville & Tonasket Is seeking a caring, compassionate, patient oriented applicant. Must be a team player, comfortable with computers and able to multitask. Current Washington State License required. Must successfully pass a background check and urine drug screen.

kADOPTION:k Adventurous, Financially Secure, Travel, Sports, LOVE, Laughter, Stay-Home-Mom yearns for 1st baby. Expenses paid 1-888-664-2648. kVanessa & Chadk

Across 1. Wedding pledges 5. Detective, at times 9. “___ on a Hot Tin Roof,� Williams play 12. Correct, as text 14. #1 spot 15. Cornstarch brand 16. Inhabitant of “The First State� 18. Engine sound 19. Fergie’s ex

Visit our website, wvmedical.com for more information and to apply online

20. Shops that forge metal 22. Book part 24. “___ Calloways� (Disney film) 25. Crash site? 28. Bent 30. Auld lang syne 31. Halo, e.g. 33. Arduous journey 35. Stage item 38. Agenda 39. Curtain fabric 41. One of the two main branches of orthodox Islam 42. Allow entrance 44. 100 cents 45. Missile with several warheads 46. Andy’s radio partner 48. Alpine sight 50. ___ Dee River 51. Come to 52. Container for nitroglycerin 54. Substances that chemically corrode 57. Carve 61. Arch type 62. Large in size or quantity 64. Brews 65. Flightless flock 66. Paperlike cloth made from bark 67. Big ___ Conference 68. Eastern music 69. Back Down 1. Sacred Hindu writings 2. Black cat, maybe 3. Fuse

4. Tangle 5. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby� 6. Air force heroes 7. Mosque V.I.P. 8. Mercifulness 9. Carnival boat (2 wds) 10. Acquiesce 11. High spots 13. Dork 15. Maxim 17. Looks for 21. God with a hammer 23. Madcap comedy 25. Perry Como’s “___ Loves Mambo� 26. “___ Lang Syne� 27. Person who reacts to situations in an exaggerated manner (2 wds) 29. Emergency supply 32. Ill will arousing active hostility (pl.) 34. Bolshoi rival 36. Cork’s country 37. 1990s party 40. Theory that reality consists of a single element 43. Exactly (3 wds) 47. Chip off the old block 49. Implied 51. American symbol 53. Kind of cycle 54. Checked item 55. Deep sleep 56. Wallop 58. Bound 59. Insect stage 60. Boris Godunov, for one 63. ___ Today, newspaper

Statewides 5 ACRE REPO -- 5 acres w/tons of trees; year ‘round access and close to great trout lake & Nat’l Forest. Only $500 down on seller contract. Call TLC 1-888-440-9824 REF: TC5

Public Notices 2014 BUDGET NOTICE Notice is hereby given that a 2014 budget for Okanogan Fire District #16 was presented and adopted by the Commissioners at a public hearing on November 11th, 2013 at 6 Main Road in Aeneas Valley. Revenue 2014 Beginning Fund Balance - $45,000 General Property Taxes - $47,000 Grants - $95,000 State Entitlements-$1,000 Intergovernmental Service Revenues $23,000 Interest and Other Earnings -$1,000 Contributions & Donations Private $12,000 Interfund Loan Receipts - $500 Other Non-Revenues - $1,000 Total Revenue - $225,500

ADOPTION

Expenditures 2014

WARM, FUN Professional Couple Eager to Provide Your Child Love and Happiness Forever. Expenses paid. Ann and Peter. Call 1-800-593-1730 annpeter102@gmail.com or go to www.annandpeter.info

Ending balance - $26,000 Administration and other services $24,000 Salaries and other wages - $0 Personnel benefits - $3,500 Supplies - $40,000 Other services and charges -$18,000 Capital outlays -$114,000 Total Expenditures - $225,500

ADOPTION -- Adventurous, Financially Secure, Travel, Sports, Love, Laughter, Stay-Home-Mom yearns for 1st baby. Expenses paid 1-888-664-2648 Vanessa&Chad EVENTS-FESTIVALS ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. FINANCIAL LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com HELP WANTED -- DRIVERS DRIVERS --It’s a great time to change! Haney Truck Line seeks top-quality professional truck drivers for regional work! Earn up to .375 cents/mile. CDL-A required. 1-888-414-4467. Apply online: www.gohaney.com

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Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on Nov. 21 and 28, 2013. #528005 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF OKANOGAN Estate of PATRICK DAVID MYRICK, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00106-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed Kevin J. Myrick as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: November 14, 2013 /s/ Dale L. Crandall WSBA #32168 Attorney for Kevin J. Myrick P.O. Box 173 Loomis, WA 98827 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 14, 21, 28, 2013. #526727 Notice of Application, Determination of Non-significance under SEPA and Public Hearings on the Matter Mill Drive Long Plat TON SD 13-2 Official Date of Notice: November 28, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Michael Buchert who is the owner of the below described property has filed applications for a rural residential subdivision of a 2.88 acre three parcel group into six (6) 15,083 to 31,149 sq ft individual lots with internal roadways, drives, drainage controls and open space. In order to facilitate the development concurrent approvals are sought: 1) Preliminary Plat Approval 2) Deviation from the full street and sidewalk standards given the scope, intensity and location of the subdivision. 3) Additional right of way width dedications to Mill Drive. 4) Extensions of municipal utilities authorization and other related construction permits. 5) Relaxation of the zoning setback (variance) to the Highway 20 right-ofway due to unusual topography. 6) Parcel Consolidation Approval The subject property is located at the East end of Mill Drive(new addressing will be assigned), also known as Tax 140, Tax 201 and Tax 202 all part of Section 16, Township 37 N., Range 27 E. WM., Tonasket, Washington. The City of Tonasket Planning Commission will conduct an open record public hearing on the application during their regularly scheduled December 17, 2013 meeting. This meeting is to begin at 3:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber Room, City Hall, 209 Whitcomb Avenue, South, Tonasket, Washington please consult the agen-

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Public Notices da as to what order of business the hearing is. The purpose of this hearing is to take testimony relative to the Planning Commission making a recommendation to the City Council to approve, modify or reject the applications. The City Council will make the final decision on the applications after conducting a closed record hearing to consider the Planning Commission’s recommendation during their first regularly meeting after the Planning Commission renders its recommendation. The City of Tonasket Building & Permits Department who is the lead agency for this proposal, has determined that it does not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. An environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required under RCW 43.21C.030(2)(c). This decision was made after review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the lead agency. This information is available to the public on request. This DNS is issued under 197-11-340(2); the lead agency will not act on this proposal until after December 17, 2013. The complete application, related drawings and documentation is available for inspection and/or copies may be obtained by purchase or electronically by request at the City of Tonasket Clerk’s Office during normal business hours or by visiting the City’s website at www.tonasketcity.org and following the links on the Public Notice tab. Any person desiring to express their views on this proposal or attain party of record status and be notified of any subsequent record decisions on this application must notify in writing Christian Johnson, Permit Administrator, Box 487, Tonasket WA 98855 or cjohnson.oroville@nvinet.com Written comments on the application must be filed no later than 3:00 p.m. December 17, 2013. Issued this date: November 20, 2013 Christian D. Johnson, Permit Administrator This notice is given pursuant to Sections 16.20.060, 17.30.030 & 18.04.180 of the Tonasket Municipal Code. Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 28, 2013. #529236 TS No: 12-03196-3 Loan No: 7141034269 APN: 0810960001 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON CHAPTER 61.24 ET. SEQ. I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on 12/6/2013, at 10:00 AM, at the main entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 149 Third North, Okanogan, WA, Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or state chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of Okanogan, State of Washington, to wit: LOTS 96 TO 106, BOTH INCLUSIVE, IN GOVERNMENT TOWNSITE OF LOOMIS, WASHINGTON, ACCORDING TO PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN VOLUME “C� OF PLATS, PAGE 17, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF OKANOGAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON, LYING SOUTHERLY OF THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT A POINT 530 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 96; THENCE WEST TO A PRIVATE ROAD IN THE NORTHERLY PART OF SAID LOT 98; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID ROAD TO A POINT 465 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 105; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY IN A STRAIGHT LINE TO A POINT ON A LINE WHICH INTERSECTS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 107 AND THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 108 OF SAID ADDITION AND EQUAL DISTANCE FROM SAID CORNER. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 3/9/2006, recorded on 3/17/2006, as Instrument No. 3100922 of Official Records in the Office of the County Recorder of Okanogan County, WA, from ELIZABETH A ROTHROCK, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as original Grantor(s) to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as the original Beneficiary, The current Beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Soundview Home Loan Trust 2006-OPT3, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-OPT3, (the “Beneficiary�). More commonly known as: 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD LOOMIS, WA II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrow-

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Puzzle 39 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.41)

Licensed & Bonded

Phone: 509.826.3200 Fax: 509.826.1620

509-486-2692

Email: GunnLaw@hotmail.com

P.O. Box 1758 Tonasket, WA 98855

7 North Main Street, Omak, WA 98841

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Concrete

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Puzzle 42 (Easy, difficulty rating 0.44)

Custom built home on 3.7 acres, 3 bed 3 bath, garage and huge work shop. Overlooks the Okanogan River, an Entertainers delight. $

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l Refrigeration l Heating l Heat Pumps l Commercial l Air Conditioning l Residential

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er’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust./Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; The total amount of payments due is: $23,625.64; the total amount of late charges due is $1,257.69; the total amount of advances made is/are $7,413.03 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $157,102.20, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 3/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on 12/6/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 11/25/2013, (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 11/25/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default(s) as set forth in Paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11/25/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. Puzzle 48 (Easy, rating 0.43) 1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each The object is todifficulty place the numbers column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.

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We b s i t e : w w w. d f i . wa . g ov / c o n s u m e r s / h o m e o w n e r ship/foreclosure_help.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: 888-995-HOPE (4673) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hcs.cfm?webListAction=search&seachstate=WA The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 Website: www.ocla.wa.gov/ SALE INFORAMTION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-573-1965 Dated: 7/15/2013 FIDELITY NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee 135 Main Street, Suite 1900 San Francisco, CA 94105 Phone No: 415-247-2450 Megan Curtis, Authorized Signature ADDRES FOR PROCESS SERVICE: Fidelity National Title Insurance Company clo Chicago Title Ins. Attn: Trustee Services Dept 701 Fifth Ave, Suite 2300 Seattle, WA 98104 Local Phone: 206-628-5666 Reference: FNTIC CA TS#: 12-03196-3 Further Contact (GAL): Megan Curtis 415-247-2450 P1053361 11/7, 11/28/2013 Published in the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune on November 7, 28, 2013. #523834

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61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under the Unlawful Detainer Act, Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060; THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determing your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by: The Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: 1-877-894-HOME (4663);

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the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrances paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD LOOMIS, WA 98827-9718 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE RD LOOMIS, WA 98827 1112 LOOMIS OROVILLE ROAD TONASKET, WA 98855-9328 15 COLUMBIA DRIVE LOOMIS, WA 98827 PO BOX E LOOMIS, WA 98827 by both first class and certified mail on 3/8/2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW

Sudoku

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NOVEMBER 28, 2013 | Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune November 28, 2013 • OKANOGAN VALLEY GAZETTE-TRIBUNE


Page B6

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune | NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Sports

Speiker takes 5th at BorderClash her level. The BorderClash was something else entirely. The second and third place finBEAVERTON, Ore. - Given the ishers were Oregon runners. Washington 4A champion chance to prove herself against the top runners from two states, Alexa Efraimson continued her Oroville’s Sierra Speiker did just dominant ways, winning the race that Saturday, Nov. 22, at the Nike by 17 seconds in 15:43. Speiker has run the elite-level BorderClash in Beaverton. race twice before, finishing 61st Speiker broke into the out of 80 (17:36) in team scoring as Team 2012 and 34th out of 78 Washington defeated (17:26) in 2010. Team Oregon 23-36. The The 15th annual verClass 1B/2B Washington sion of the high-profile state champion finevent was run at 5 p.m., ished fifth overall (out meaning that the race of 79 athletes) on the was after dark on a lit 4.387-kilometer course course. with a time of 16:17, two Sierra Speiker “Running at night seconds behind state 3A was wonderful,” Speiker said. “It champ Andrea Masterson. “It was great running against was so much fun. At first I was all the top runners in both hesitant when the race started Washington and Oregon,” Speiker because it was kind of scary - 80 said. “It was fun having to work of us all in spikes sprinting into a my way up towards the front of bottle neck area with tight turns the pack and having someone to in several areas. “It was a little hard to get comchase after.” Speiker was so dominant in the fortable with but after the first small school classes this year that 400 meters I decided I needed she often ran alone, well out in to go and show what I had to front of the pack, with occasion- prove and not let the dark hold ally one or two competitors at me back.” By Brent Baker

bbaker@gazette-tribune.com

Nathan Thompson of Oroville, won his first pro MMA fight in 1 minute 13 seconds of the first round with a rear naked choke. The fight took place on Wednesday Nov. 20 at the Northern Quest Casino’s “Conquest of the Cage”. Thompson, a 2008 graduate of Oroville High School, started wrestling as a first grader in the “Killer Bee” program and went on to become a State placer for wrestling coach Chuck Ricevuto. He was also a four year starter in football and baseball. Thompson started training for MMA in 2009, winning several amateur title belts, before deciding to go professional. Nathan, who fights out of the Warrior Camp of Spokane, has several local sponsors as shown on his promotional poster above. Nathan is the son of Jocelyn & Tam Hutchinson and Steve & Cori Thompson. Nathan will be the Main Event in his next fight, Dec. 14, at the Camas Center in Usk, WA.

ALL-LEAGUE TEAMS Football Caribou Trail League

Player of the Year: Casey Ruether, QB, Cashmere Coach of the Year: Erick Judd, Okanogan Team Sportsmanship: Quincy

1st Team Offense

Offensive Line - Adrian Urias, Brewster; Jacob Allison, Cashmere; Derek Crites, Cascade; Asa Schwartz, Chelan; Enrique Vargas, Okanogan. Orozco Quarterback - Justin Rivas, Okanogan. Running Back - Dennis Merritt, Cascade; Rex Pittsinger, Cashmere; Kai Clausen, Chelan. Receiver - Cade Smith, Brewster; Dylan Boyd, Cashmere. Tight End - Luke Gleasman, Chelan.

2nd Team Offense

Offensive Line - Bryan McNair, Cashmere; Tyler Carrillo, Cashmere; Jared Anderson, Chelan; Ryan Gerber, Chelan; Brad Nearents, Okanogan; Steven Gomez, Quincy. Quarterback - Tanner Hendricks, Chelan; Dallas Bassett, Quincy. Running Back - Mason Elliott, Cashmere; T.J. Morris, Okanogan; Michael Orozco, Tonasket. Receiver - Mykey Flowers, Chelan; John Lindquist, Quincy. Tight End - Justin Vanderweide, Okanogan.

Honorable Mention

Offensive Line - Bernardo Maravilla, Cascade; Michael Sorenson, Cascade; Saxton Sykes, Cashmere; Fransisco Arteaga, Chelan; Joe Mintzer, Okanogan; Cody Sumner, Okanogan; Chad Edwards, Tonasket; John Rawley, Tonasket; Anthony Lewis, Omak; Zach Gates, Quincy. Quarterback - Mitch Boesel, Brewster. Running Back - Hayden Bayha, Brewster; Arturo Ramos, Okanogan; Dustin Thorp, Omak. Receiver - Michael Allen, Cascade; Tristin Parton, Cascade; Konnar Stevens, Chelan; Eli Jenkins, Chelan. Tight End - Oscar Cantu, Cashmere.

1st Team Defense

Defensive Line - Elijah Frazier, Cascade; Jacob Allison, Cashmere; Jared Anderson, Chelan; Isias Jimenez, Quincy. Defensive Backs - Dennis Merritt, Cascade; Mason Elliott, Cashmere; Tanner Hendricks, Chelan; Justin Rivas, Okanogan. Linebackers - Rex Pittsinger, Cashmere; Kai Clausen, Chelan; Jim Townsend, Okanogan; Enrique Vargas, Okanogan.

2nd Team Defense

Defensive Line - Hayden Bayha, Brewster; Lucas Schrader, Cashmere; Ian Wood, Cashmere; Arturo Ramos, Okanogan. Defensive Backs - Tristin Parton, Cascade; Dylan Boyd, Cashmere; Mykey Flowers, Chelan; Fabian Rodriguez, Okanogan; John Lindquist, Quincy. Linebackers - Noax Wood, Cascade; Casey Ruether, Cashmere; Luke Gleasman, Chelan; Yurian Gayton, Omak; Jose Chavez, Quincy.

Honorable Mention Defense

Defensive Line - Hunter Kindred Bach, Brewster; Michael Sorensen, Cascade; Kenny Johnson, Okanogan; Dakota Huff, Okanogan; Austin Knowlton, Tonasket; Frank Holfelz, Tonasket; Cody Bidlen, Omak; Kyle McGowen, Omak. Defensive Backs - Michael Allen, Cascade; Nathan Mashburn, Cashmere; Colton Crawford, Cashmere. Linebackers - Raf Varelas, Brewster; Duncan Scott, Cascade; Fransisco Arteaga, Chelan; Konnar Stevens, Chelan; Joe Esquivel, Okanogan; Steven Gomez, Quincy; Collin Aitcheson, Tonasket.

1st Team Special Teams

Kicker - Raual Olvera, Brewster. Punter - Michael Orozco, Tonasket. Kick Return - Casey Ruether, Cashmere.

2nd Team Special Teams

Kicker - Jared Anderson, Chelan. Punter - Enrique Vargas, Okanogan. Kick Return - Justin Rivas, Okanogan.

Honorable Mention Special Teams

Kicker - Oscar Cantu, Cashmere. Punter - Jared Anderson, Chelan; Antonio Melendez, Quincy. Kick Return - Dennis Merritt, Cascade.

Central Washington 2B League MVP (Offense): Luke Kindred, Oroville MVP (Defense): Cesar Dominguez, Liberty Bell. Coach of the Year: Andy Bush, White Swan Team Sportsmanship: Bridgeport

1st Team Offense Offensive Line - Victor Andy, White

Swan; J.J. Naphi, Kittitas; Cesar Dominguez, Liberty Bell; Jake Scott, Oroville; Brennan Watson, White Swan. Quarterback - Chip Jones, Liberty Bell; Joseph Kosik, White Swan; Luke Kindred, Oroville. Running Back - Hector Garcia, Bridgeport; Andre Hannah, Manson; Austin Watson, Liberty Bell; Brian Walker, White Swan; Tanner Smith, Oroville. Wide Receiver - Kobie Lewis, White Swan; Milo Holsten, Liberty Bell; Eli Iler, Kittitas. Kicker - Dustin Nigg, Oroville

2nd Team Offense

Jewett

Offensive Line - Boone McKinney, Oroville; Nain Sanchez, Bridgeport; Colby Smith, Liberty Bell; Mick Fulmer, Oroville; Lane Tietje, Oroville; Michael Sanchez, Manson. Quarterback - Austin Rosenbaum, Lake Roosevelt; Austin Oursland, Kittitas. Running Back - Colton Forman, Kittitas; Sean DeWitte, Oroville; Jonathan Oregon, Bridgeport; Emmett Fink, Liberty Bell; Tony Picard, White Swan. Wide Receiver - Tristian Spencer, White Swan; Chase Kurtz, Liberty Bell; Bridger Machus, Manson. Kicker - Jorge Lara, Liberty Bell.

1st Team Defense

Defensive Line - Tony Picard, White Swan; Jonathan Oregon, Bridgeport; J.J. Naphi, Kittitas; Emmett Fink, Liberty Bell; Jake Scott, Oroville. Linebacker - Cesar Dominguez, Liberty Bell; Jonathan Shields, White Swan; Austin Oursland, Kittitas; Tanner Smith, Oroville. Defensive Back - Tristian Spencer, White Swan; Luke Kindred, Oroville; Colton Forman, Kittitas; Dave Aleck, White Swan. Punter - Jorge Lara, Liberty Bell.

2nd Team Defense

Defensive Line - Logan Mills, Oroville; Sean DeWitte, Oroville; Chase Marceau, White Swan; Robert Garza, White Swan; Andre Hannah, Manson. Linebacker - Milo Holsten, Liberty Bell; Hector Garcia, Bridgeport; Geo Rojas, White Swan; Mike Pittman, Manson. Defensive Back - Christian Lopez, Bridgeport; Chance Garvin, Liberty Bell; Joe Sarmiento, Oroville; Chip Jones, Liberty Bell. Punter - Jonathan Oregon, Bridgeport.

Honorable Mention 1st Team

Kel Jenson, Liberty Bell; Hunter Wallace, Kittitas; Octavio Alejandre, Lake Roosevelt; Joe Toolson, Manson; Trey Nicholson, Lake Roosevelt; Geo Rojas, White Swan; Cody Oliva, White Swan; Ivan Sanchez, Bridgeport.

Honorable Mention 2nd Team

Offense - Josiah Desautel, Lake Roosevelt; Jacob McMillan, Liberty Bell; Mike Pittman, Manson; Dustin Nigg, Oroville; Connelly Quick, Oroville; Dylan Rivera, White Swan; J.J. Nanez, White Swan; Bryce Helgelson, Kittitas; Christian Lopez, Bridgeport; Jorge Juarez, Manson; Brennan Radich, Kittitas; Uriel Medel, Bridgeport. Defense - Colby Smith, Liberty Bell; Garrett Jensen, Liberty Bell; Mick Fulmer, Oroville; Nain Sanchez, Bridgeport; Jake Palmer, Lake Roosevelt; Jack McMillan, Liberty Bell; Victor Macedo, Bridgeport; Cody Oliva, White Swan; Manuel Viveros, White Swan; Wesley Gibb, Kittitas; Connelly Quick, Oroville; Dezmond House, Lake Roosvelt; Josh Harris, Lake Roosvelt; Dustin Nigg, Oroville; Jaymis Hanson, Liberty Bell; Chase Kurtz, Liberty Bell; Jorge Juarez, Manson; Brennan Radick, Jackson Kittitas.

Volleyball Caribou Trail League

Player of the Year: Abby Phelps, Chelan Coach of the Year: Marcy Boesel, Brewster Team Sportsmanship: Brewster

1st Team

Brette Boesel, Brewster; Marquette Miller, Brewster; Eliana Ala’ilima-Daley, Cascade; Johnna Rieke, Cascade; Sydney Coffin, Cascade; Johanna Fuller, Chelan; Kaycee O’Brien (libero), Cascade.

2nd Team

Gabrielle Brulotte, Cascade; Jenny Sundberg, Chelan; Karle Pittsinger, Chelan; Makenzie Harris, Chelan; Lindsey Hughes, Omak; Valerie Tobin, Quincy; Kaitlin Ramsey (libero), Quincy; Jocelyn Reyes (libero), Brewster.

Honorable Mention

Margie Brammer, Brewster; Brenna Barton, Cascade; Samantha Steele, Cashmere; Jordan O’Donnell, Cashmere; Jordyn Boesel, Okanogan; Vanessa VanderWeide, Okanogan; Baelie Meese, Omak; Kellie Foth, Omak; Diane Hilderbrand, Omak; Sam Kleyn, Quincy; Cassie Spear, Tonasket.

Central Washington 2B North Division

1st Team

Goalkeeper - Zelia Zahir, Cashmere Defense - Kendall Loreth, Cascade; Katie Whitten, Cascade; Karly Thies, Cashmere; Aidan O’Connor, Okanogan; Elizabeth Jackson, Tonasket. Midfield - Charlee Odegard-Behla, Cascade; Tianna Helm, Cashmere; Lauren Johnson, Cashmere; Kylie Dellinger, Tonasket. Forward - Maddy Parton, Cascade; Tessa McCormick, Cashmere.

2nd Team

Goalkeeper - Cameron Moses, Okanogan. Defense - Karina Rincon, Brewster; Mikayla Sites, Cashmere; Brooklyn Bauer, Okanogan; Maggie Cervantes, Omak. Midfield - Ivy Ostrom-Spiegel, Cascade; Dani Morseman, Cashmere; Emmy Engle, Okanogan; Karina Guzman, Brewster. Forward - Daisy Franco, Chelan; Kathryn Cleman, Tonasket.

Honorable Mention Goalkeeper - Karina Guz-

man, Brewster; Greta Enloe, Cascade; Shawnee Covington, Omak; Baylie Tyus, Tonasket. Defense - Charlie Williams, Cascade; Tasha Kowatsch, Cashmere; Etta Godwin, Chelan; Alexis Romero, Okanogan. Midfield - Jill Townsend, Okanogan; Trisha Priest, Omak; Selina Cosino, Tonasket; Gabby Torres, Brewster. Forward - Veronica Arrez, Brewster.

Dellinger

1st Team

Goalkeeper - Sarah Rios, Bridgeport Defense - Rubio Portillo, Manson; Haley Post, Liberty Bell; Aisha Herrejon, Bridgeport; Samantha Martinez, Bridgeport. Midfield - Yesenia Ramirez, Entiat; Jenny Salazar, Bridgeport; Mia Kennedy, Liberty Bell; Alba Robles, Bridgeport. Forward - Alexis Swearingen, Entiat; Lauren Fitzmaurice, Liberty Bell.

2nd Team

Defense - Kaitlyn Grunst, Oroville;

Defense - Kali Peters, Oroville; Kathleen ChaveyReynaud, Liberty Bell. Midfield - Karina Perea, Bridgeport. Striker - Meagan Moralez, Oroville; Jocelyn Escobar, Manson; Noemi Montes, Manson.

Johnna Terris, Tonasket; Alejandra Diaz, Quincy; Janette Meneses, Chelan; Kieran Ringel, Cascade; Drew Morris, Chelan; Dezarae Westra, Quincy; Francia Orozco, Quincy.

Central Washington League Boys

Monroe

Cross Country

1st Team

Athlete of the Year: Spencer Elmore, Quincy Coach of the Year: John Durheim, Cashmere (boys and girls) Team Sportsmanship: Cascade (boys and girls)

2nd Team

Miguel Leyva, Manson; Ray Yazzie, Lake Roosevelt; Sam Thomas, Manson; Logan Szafas, Liberty Bell; Marc Martinez, Bridgeport; Carter Dornfeld, Liberty Bell; Robert George, Lake Roosevelt.

1st Team

Spencer Elmore, Quincy; Daniel Olmstead, Cascade; Jonathan Mangas, Cashmere; Ivan Reyes, Chelan; Victor Salgado, Quincy; Morgan O’Dell, Omak; Samuel Goble, Omak.

Honorable Mention

Brandon Desautel, Lake Roosevelt; Diego Santana, Oroville; Jerry Palmer, Lake Roosevelt; Erik Ellis, Liberty Bell; Coby Boyd, Riverside Christian; Javier Castillo, Oroville; Geza Sukovaty, Liberty Bell.

2nd Team

Drew Van Polen, Cashmere; Eli Phillips, Cashmere; Ricardo Naranjo, Cashmere; Jimmy Garcia, Quincy; Oliver Fernandez, Cashmere; Cole Paton, Cashmere; Ian Allen, Chelan.

Central Washington League Girls

Honorable Mention

(based on league meet finish)

Nathan Wells, Cascade; Danile Tveten, Cascade; Dakota McFadden, Cashmere; Gustavo Mendoza, Quincy; Jag Baines, Omak; Mereck Palazzo, Chelan; Neil Flodin, Cascade.

1st Team

Sierra Speiker, Oroville; Ashley Palmer, Lake Roosevelt; Alexia Hanway, Lake Roosevelt; Rhiannon Easter, Pateros; Letty Trejo, Bridgeport; Lilly Schlotzhauer, Liberty Bell; Melissa Gray, Pateros.

Caribou Trail League Girls

Athlete of the Year: Erin Mullins, Cascade

1st Team

(based on league meet finish)

Ben Klemmeck, Liberty Bell; Liam Daily, Liberty Bell; Oren Cox, Bridgeport; Morgan Ott, Liberty Bell; Josiah Klemmeck, Liberty Bell; Willy Duguay, Liberty Bell; Ryan Widhalm, Riverside Christian.

Caribou Trail League Boys

2nd Team

Erin Mullins, Cascade; Jennifer Novikoff, Cascade; Addison Ivory, Chelan; Sarah O’Dell, Omak; Lydia Youkey, Cascade; Breanna Knishka, Cashmere; Amber Monroe, Tonasket.

Elsie Valdovinos, Bridgeport; Clare Castrodale, Lake Roosevelt; Anai Palacios, Bridgeport; Annie Miller, Riverside Christian; Phoebe Poynter, Oroville; Maddy Varrelman, Bridgeport. (No Honorable Mention)

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1st Team

* Wednesday *

Sarina Williams, OH, Liberty Bell; Brittany Jewett, S/OH, Oroville; Diocelina Torres, DS, Bridgeport; Taylor Curtiss, OH, Liberty Bell; Chyenne Kelly, OH, Lake Roosevelt; Brianna Rogers, S, Bridgeport; Cynthia Espinoza, Libero, Manson.

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* Thursday *

Steak Night

2nd Team

Mikel Friedlander, S, Lake Roosevelt; Whitney Fox, MB, Liberty Bell; Bridget Clark, RS, Oroville; Jordan Peart, MB, Bridgeport; Rachelle Nutt, MB, Oroville; Baylee Ward, OH, Manson.

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Honorable Mention

Maddie Ward, Manson; Mikayla Scott, Oroville; Courtney Austin, Bridgeport; Kassadi Boutain, Lake Roosevelt; Ashley Watson, Liberty Bell; Anita Velazquez, Bridgeport.

Girls Soccer Player of the Year: Tianna Helm, Cashmere Coach of the Year: Glen Stefanko, Cascade Team Sportsmanship: Omak

Honorable Mention

Out On The Town

Player of the Year: Sarina Williams, Liberty Bell Coach of the Year; Hanna Coffman, Bridgeport Team Sportsmanship: Manson

Caribou Trail League

Jesica Bauer, Cashmere; Jessica Oules, Chelan; Jasmine Gonzalez, Cashmere; Alexandra O’Dell, Omak; Abigail Early, Omak; Daisy Campos, Chelan; Jessica Galvan, Chelan.

Honorable Mention

Central Washington 2B League

Player of the Year: Sara Rios, Bridgeport Coaching Staff of the Year: Erik Olson, Liberty Bell Sportsmanship: Oroville

2nd Team

Viridiana Santana, Bridgeport; Taylor Southard, Entiat; Alexandra Barker, Entiat. Midfield - Danielle Mott, Liberty Bell; Paula Soto, Bridgeport; Anna Spencer, Entiat; Sandy Hernandez, Entiat. Striker - Ayana Herrejon, Bridgeport; Corrine Dietz, Liberty Bell.

Dining

& Entertainment

EVERY WEEK Call Charlene at 509-476-3602

Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune, November 28, 2013  

November 28, 2013 edition of the Okanogan Valley Gazette-Tribune